World 042821

coolvt

The World
World Publications
Barre-Montpelier, VT

MAY 9 * SHOP LOCAL GIFT IDEAS * PAGES 16 & 17

T VT’ VT

Vol. 49, No. 51 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916 April 28, 2021

www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com

Barre Area Development

Celebrates 60th Birthday

page 3

It’s an Excellent

Time to Use a

Worm and Relax

Get Outside,

Have Fun and

Catch Dinner

page 5

“April Showers Bring May

Flowers”

page 8

The Family Dog May Need

More Walks–

April Awareness for

Canine Health

page 18

It’s Tool Time!

page 28

Thunder Road Announces

Ticketing Information for

Early-Season Events

page 30

Professional Carpet/Upholstery

Cleaning & Maintenance

407 BARRE STREET • MONTPELIER • 223-6577

We’ve been creating Raving Fans since 1974

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed or your money back

www.MontpelierCarpetCleaning.com

Let SR Services

Help With Your

SPRING

CLEANING


WE’RE GOOD AT WHAT WE DO

We are a full-service, fully insured and bonded, privately owned small

business serving Vermonters. With over 80 years of experience in the

construction industry, E.E. Packard Excavating has a solid reputation

among customers and colleagues of honest, efficient, reliable and uality

service. For both residential and commercial excavating projects, we

are used and recommended by many municipalities and local inspectors.

here’s a reason that the maority of our business is referral-based.

Good people like you recommend good companies. We have really high

standards and we do things the right way, the first time. And we hope you

will be satisfi ed and refer us to your friends and neighbors.

OUR SERVICES

We have the dozers, excavators, skid steers, dump trucks, and the

experience to get the job done right from planning and design to

completion and site dressing.

EXCAVATION

We offer hassle free service with no obligation. Packard Excavation is

a locally-owned company you can trust, and we are here to help! We

do foundation testing, site preparation, design build services, road work,

drainage & ditching, septic systems, ponds and more.

E.E. PACKARD ENTERPRISES

Celebrating 35 Years Of Serving Vermonters

Residential / Commercial

Top Soil / Land Clearing / Grading

Building & Site Prep / Water & Septic

Ponds & Driveways

Hauling

290 Packard Rd. East Montpelier, VT 05651

eepackardexcavating@gmail.com Call us: (1)802-229-5741


Shop Where You Live

Supporting Local Businesses Has Never Been More Important

Supporting Local Businesses Has Never Been More Important

The environmental impact of shopping local

Shopping at locally owned businesses

benefits everone rom local business own

ers to the people they employ to the communities

where the operate. As beneficial

as shopping local can be for small business

owners and the communities where they

operate, the planet is perhaps the biggest

beneficiar o consumers supporting locall

owned small businesses.

The environmental impact o purchasing

locally manufactured and sold products is

significant. Consumers who choose to use

their purchasing power to support local

businesses may not realize just how much

they’re helping the planet in so doing.

• Shopping local reduces your “food

miles.” Large grocery stores get much of

their inventor rom producers in other

countries. ven stores that rel heavil on

domestic producers may not limit their domestic

partners to local farms. That means

products ma be traveling thousands o

miles beore the end up on the shelves in

local grocery stores. This is often referred

to as “food miles,” and the more consumers

can reduce their food miles, the more they

help the planet. The Center for Climate and

Energy Solutions notes that transportation

is the largest source of carbon emissions in

the United States, so anything consumers

can do to reduce the amount of fuel needed

to get food from farm to table can greatly

benefit the planet. hopping local grocers

who source their foods from local farms is a

simple and eective wa to help the planet.

hopping local conserves uel. uch

like shopping local reduces reliance on

producers who must travel thousands o

miles to get their products on shelves in

your community, it also reduces the time

consumers spend in their vehicles. That

conserves uel and helps to reduce air pollu

tion. Thats an easil overlooed benefit o

shopping local, but one that should not be

taken for granted. According to the Union

of Concerned Scientists, an estimated 150

million Americans are living in areas that

do not meet federal air quality standards.

Emissions from automobiles are a major

source of the pollution that’s behind poor

air quality, so anything consumers can do

to reduce their fuel consumption, including

shopping locall, can greatl benefit the

planet.

• Shopping local protects land from

developers. Another wa shopping local

benefits the planet is its lin to preserving

local farms. When local grocers get their

foods from local farms, that increases the

long-term sustainability of those farms. If

farms are sustainable, they’re more likely

to remain in operation. Farms don’t just

grow oods, the also provide habitats or

local wildlife that helps maintain local

ecosystems. That domino effect begins with

consumers who support local businesses by

shopping local.

hopping local pas numerous dividends,

not the least of which are the many ways

supporting local businesses benefits the

environment.

BUSINESS OF THE WEEK

Tucker Machine Company

TUCKER MACHINE COMPANY Inc. is a family owned business,

serving Central Vermont with Outdoor Power Equipment Sales

& Service since 1984.

Our main brands include Husqvarna, Toro, Ariens/Gravely,

Simplicity/Snapper, Ferris, SCAG, and Shindaiwa. But if that’s

not enough, we also have Billy Goat, Troy Bilt, BCS, and Mantis/

Little Wonder.

We stock a large selection of equipment for all seasons:

• Walk-Behind & Self Propelled Mowers

• Lawn/Garden Tractors & Riding Mowers

• Compact 4x4 Tractors w/Bucket Loaders

• Residential Zero-Turns

• Commercial Zero-Turns & Walk-Behinds

• Grass/Weed Trimmers and Brushcutters

• Chainsaws,Hedge Trimmers, Pole Saws, PowerBrooms

• Generators, Pressure Washers, Water Pumps

• Rototillers, Cultivators, Leaf Blowers/Vacs, Chipper/Shredders

• Snowblowers, Garden Tractors with Snowblower Attachments

Call for Pick Up & Delivery Availability

267 So. Main St., Barre • 479-9841

New Nursery Stock

Arriving Daily!

Also Lawn & Garden Supplies

Pet Supplies, Too!

MONTPELIER

229-9187

190 E. Montpelier Rd.

Montpelier

www.montpelieragway.com

World’s Best

Maple & Chocolate

Creemees,

Shakes &

Sundaes

We Ship

Anywhere

“A

Quality

Family

Farm

Shop”

802-223-5757

NOW OPEN

EVERY DAY

8:30AM to

6:00PM

Served Everyday

8:30AM to 6:00PM

Just gotta

have one!

Vermont

Handcrafts

Gifts

Vermont

Cheese

Maple Farm

Tour

Maple

Products

1 mile north of E. Montpelier Village on Rt. 14N

(follow signs) 802-223-5757

Supporting local businesses benefits your entire community

Campaigns to “shop local” are often rooted in encouraging locals to support the small

businesses in their communities. Consumers no doubt recognize that such support

is vital to the survival of small businesses, but they may not realize just how much

thriving local businesses benefit their communities. According to the Small Business

Economic Impact Study from American Express, an average of two-thirds of every dollar

spent at small businesses in the United States stays in the local community. That

support can be especially valuable as the world tries to work its way out of a global recession

brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Unemployment rates rose significantly

within a month of the World Health Organization declaring a pandemic as the COVID-19

virus rapidly spread across the globe. While large international corporations were in

better position to avoid layoffs, small, locally owned businesses faced an uphill battle

as they tried to remain in operation and retain their staffs. That’s another way shopping

local can benefit local communities. The Business Alliance for Local Living Economies

reports that, for every $10 million spent locally, 57 new jobs are created at local businesses.

That’s an important factor to remember as the world tries to recover from the

economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Our Prices Will Simply Floor You!”

RT. 2, EAST MONTPELIER

802-223-7171

oorintco

MARINE • ATV

MOTORCYCLES

SNOWMOBILES

Official Vermont Inspection Station

for Motorcycles and Trailers

795 VT RTE 14 SOUTH

EAST MONTPELIER

802-476-3101

gillesmarine.com

Vermont Travelers’

Service Center

STORE • DELI

INFORMATION

BEER CAVE

CLEAN

FACILITIES

Vermont

Liquor

Stores

Conveniently located off

Exit 7 of I-89 - Berlin, VT

Other locations throughout

Central Vermont

RECLINERS

PRICES

STARTING

AT

$

499

OVER 30 ON DISPLAY

Many Options In Stock For Quick Delivery

Barreontelier d

Berlin

WWW.MATTRESSLANDVERMONT.COM

Your

Hometown

Hardware Store

& More!

NelsonAceHardware.com

(802) 476-5700

188 No. Main St., Barre

“HOME OF THE LIFETIME

OIL CHANGE &

STATE INSPECTION”

51 GALLISON HILL RD.

MONTPELIER, VT

MON.-FRI. 7-5; SAT. 8-Noon

802-262-2030

prestonskia.com

FULL SERVICE

GROCERY STORE

Fresh Meat & Deli

Groceries - Produce

Walk-in Beer Cooler

Rt. 14, Williamstown, VT

802-433-1038

M-Th 5:00am-9:00pm

Friday 5:00am-10:00pm

Saturday 6:00am- 10:00pm

Sunday 6:00am-9:00pm

Mon.-Sat. 9-5 • Sundays 9-3

Houseplants, Mulch,

Seasonal Flowers &

Vegetable Plants,

Landscaping, Etc.

PROPANE REFILLS

AVAILABLE

535 US Rt. 302-Berlin, Barre

802-622-8466

thomasgroupusa.com

267 S. Main St. Barre

802-479-9841

tuckermachine.com

Local owned & Operated

Tires,wheels,Service

repair Since 1982

Quality Gifts For Every Occasion

QUALITY GIFTS FOR

EVERY OCCASION

124 NORTH MAIN ST.

BARRE, VT 05641

(802) 476-4031

www.richardjwobbyjewelers.com

page 2 The WORLD April 28, 2021


Barre Area Development Celebrates 60th Birthday

Barre Area Development, Inc. (BADC)

turned 60 years old this month. Since its

founding in 1961, BADC has been involved

in many activities that have improved civic

pride and the economic, social, and cultural

quality of life in Barre Town and Barre City.

Made up of a volunteer board of directors

and, since 2008, a full-time Executive

Director, BADC has collaborated with local

stakeholders to be a successful economic

development force for the Barre area. Since

their creation, they have focused on industrial,

commercial, and retail development by

providing information and support to potential

new and existing businesses in Barre

Town and Barre City. Overall, the goal is to

help grow the local economy.

Whether you are going to the downtown

bakery for a pastry or work for a local manufacturer,

their impact in the community can

be seen every day in Barre. BADC is responsible

for the development of the Wilson

Industrial Park, the current Highland

Sugarworks building in the Wilson Industrial

Park, and the Malden Mills building in Barre

Town. They also assisted in the creation of

the Barre Town Forest. Additionally, BADC

participated in the development of City Place,

the Blanchard Block, and Enterprise Aly in

downtown Barre and helped established the

Barre Revolving Loan Fund to assist local

businesses. With the support of the City and

Governor Phil Scott Introduces Plan for Economic

Recovery and Revitalization

Governor Phil Scott and his Administration

presented a plan to strategically invest $1 billion

in one-time federal money provided to

states to jumpstart recovery from the Coronavirus

pandemic and support long-term economic

growth.

Adhering to the principles set in his Fiscal

Year 2022 budget, presented in January, the

package makes historic investments in projects

and initiatives to address long-standing

challenges and unaddressed needs, putting

communities across the state on a path for

recovery and setting course for a stronger

economic future in every region. Additionally,

the Administration’s proposals ensure

the one-time federal money – which is not

permanent, ongoing funding – is dedicated

to one-time transformations rather than programs

the state would have to continue to support

with other sources of funding once this

federal money is gone.

“This federal money provides an incredible

opportunity to tackle some of our biggest

problems that we haven’t been able to fully

address in the past decade and put ourselves

on a path to greater prosperity in the future,”

said Governor Scott. “By investing in infrastructure,

broadband and housing we can increase

economic equity from region to region,

helping communities across the state attract

Joint Public Hearing to Hear Vermont’s

Unemployment Insurance Issues for Employees and

Employers During the Covid Pandemic

n Tuesda, a , rom p.m.

to p.m. the ouse Committee on

Commerce and Economic Development and

the House Committee on Government

Operations will hold a joint public hearing to

listen to employees and employers in Vermont

about the issues faced with unemployment

insurance during the COVID pandemic. The

public is invited to register to speak at the

hearing or submit written testimony.

To register as a speaker at the hearing, please

sign up here httpslegislature.vermont.gov

• • •

• • •

Town, BADC recently established a brand,

Barre Rock Solid, and a marketing website to

extensively market the Barre area as a special

place to visit, live, and work. Barre’s story is

now being told in statewide and national business

publications, newspapers throughout

Vermont, on social media, and on the Barre

area’s official marketing website www.barrevt.com.

BADC collaborates with the Barre

Partnership, the City’s Main Street Program,

and many other organizations in Barre.

Recently, with the launch of the Barre Rock

Solid marketing program, BADC has begun

to build strategic partnerships with state-level

and regional business groups such as the

Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce,

Vermont Chamber of Commerce, Associated

General Contractors of Vermont, and Vermont

Association of Realtors to help grow Barre

and tell the community’s story.

BADC is available to provide technical

assistance to businesses in Barre and those

who are looking to relocate. Information is

available for those seeking business finance

solutions, grants, commercial real estate,

business coaching, networking, or have questions

on regulatory requirements. BADC can

be reached by phone at (802) 476-0660, by

email at info@badc.com, on Facebook at @

BarreAreaDevelopment, or on their website

www.barrevt.com.

more jobs, families and private investment.

With these initiatives, along with funds to

ensure good jobs remain in Vermont, we can

help create more opportunities for our kids,

workers and families in every region.”

Through the American Recovery Plan Act

(ARPA), Vermont received $1,029,500,000,

which it has until December 2024 to allocate.

The Administration’s plan recommends using

the unds in five strategic categories

• $250.5 million for broadband and wireless

connectivity

• $249 million for housing

• $200 million for climate change mitigation

measures

• $170 million for water and sewer infrastructure

• $143 million for further economic development

and recovery

The proposal also includes $17 million to

cover administration and successful deployment

of funds.

“We are pleased to offer the legislature this

starting point, which sets priorities that will

help make sure we see the maximum value

from every dollar of this one-time federal

funding, and put ourselves in a position to

grow the economy, make Vermont more affordable

and protect the most vulnerable,”

added Governor Scott.

linspublichearingunemploment.

Registrations will be accepted on a first-come,

first-served basis, and testimony time will be

limited to two minutes per person.

To submit written testimony, please email an

MS Word or PDF file to testimony@leg.state.

vt.us.

The hearing will be live streamed on the

Legislature’s Joint Committees YouTube channel

here httpslegislature.vermont.govcom

mitteestreamingsharedjointcommittees.

Mon.-Sat. 9-5 • Sundays 9-3

In Stock Now:

Lilies

Pansies

Violas

More Arriving

Each Week

Gorgeous

Houseplants

Also In Stock

Propane

Refills

Available

We Also Now Have

MULCH

TOP SOIL

(Bags & Bulk)

COMPOST

Check Out Our

VERMONT

WINES

(Including Fresh Tracks Farm)

CRAFT BEERS

Gizmo’s Pickles

Uncle Nectar’s Honey

Ackerman’s Maple Syrup

Forest Road Grass-Fed Beef

Lots Of Local Products

535 US Rt. 302-Berlin (formerly Legares), Barre

802-622-8466 thomasgroupusa.com

Wed. & Thurs. 11-6

Friday & Saturday 11-7

Auto Service

Servicing All Makes & Models

State Inspections

$50 Pass or Fail

System Diagnosis

VT STATE

INSPECTION

Preventative Maintenance

Brake Repair, Pads & Rotors

Shocks Struts Replacement

Tires & Wheel Balancing

FOOD

MENU

We Also Sell New Tires - Call For Prices

SPRING

HAS SPRUNG

SALE

UP TO

SPRING

25%

HAS SPRUNGSALE

OFF

POWER LAWN

& GARDEN

AND

SELECT

APPLIANCES 1

(1) Advertised savings range from 5%-25%. Exclusions apply. See The Details section.

See store for additional exclusions. Offers good thru 5/1/21

510 Elm St, Montpelier, VT

802-229-1839 thomasgroupusa.com

HOMETOWN

STORES

150cc Briggs

& Stratton

625EXi engine

• Ready Start

• Side discharge,

mulch and bag

• High Rear Wheels

ITEM # 07137462

Additional discounts and

offers do not apply.

SAVE $110

BUY HOT

$289 99 27% OFF

ITEM # 02646122/

MHW5630HW

4

DUE SOON

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MOWERS

OR

10 58 /WK.

LEASE PER WEEK

4.5

cu. ft.

Optional pedestals

sold separately.

4.5 cu. ft. capacity 7.3 cu. ft. capacity SAVE $180

washer with electric dryer with ON THE PAIR

Quick Wash, Quick Dry cycle,

Steam and 12 Hour advanced moisture $809 99

EACH

REG. 899.99 EACH

OR

35 21

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Wrinkle Guard® option

ITEM # 02686122/MED5630HW

Gas dryer priced higher.

SEARSHOMETOWNSTORES.COM

PRICES VALID

SUNDAY, APRIL 18TH

THRU SATURDAY,

MAY 1ST, 2021

/WK.

LEASE PER WEEK

~ Tamales

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& More!

Giffords

Ice Cream

ICE CREAM

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82 50

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• 42-in. deck

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• High back seat

• 3 year manufacturer warranty

ITEM # 07122081

Additional discounts and offers do not apply.

YOURCHOICE

20 volt cordless

line trimmer

ITEM # 07177580

20 volt cordless

blower

ITEM # 07177586

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EACH

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85 89

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(1) Advertised savings range from 5

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Advertised savings range from 5%-25%. Exclusions apply. See The Details section. See store for additional exclusions. Offers good thru 5/1/21. ∆As Rated by Engine Manufactures Subject to lease approval, total cost to lease for a 5-mo. lease agreement is $60 due at lease signing plus taxes, followed by 19 weekly payments of the per week

amount shown by the item. For your options at the end of the 5-mo. agreement, see the “LEASING DETAILS” below. Lease prices shown are valid on the sale prices shown for the duration of this advertisement. On all appliances: Colors, connectors, ice maker hook-up and installation extra.

APPLIANCE OFFERS: (1) Bosch®, Whirlpool®, KitchenAid®, Maytag®, Amana®, LG®, Samsung®, Frigidaire and Electrolux appliances limited to 10% off. Offers exclude Hot Buys, Super Hot Buys, Special Purchases GE®, GE Profile, GE Café, clearance, closeouts, Home appliance & Floor Care Accessories, Gift Card and Everyday Great Price items. See

store for additional exclusions. Offers good thru 5/1/21.LEASING DETAILS: This is a lease transaction. The lease has a 5-month minimum term [“Initial Term”]. Must be at least 18 years old and income requirements apply. Qualifying merchandise of at least $199 is required to enter into a lease at Sears Authorized Hometown Stores, LLC. Excludes non-durable goods. No

security deposit required. Lease requires consumer to make first payment at lease signing, plus 19 weekly (offered online only) lease payments, 9 biweekly lease payments or 4 monthly lease payments. After fulfilling the Initial Term, you may: (1) continue to lease by making periodic payments in accordance with the terms of the lease agreement; (2) exercise a purchase option

per the terms of the lease agreement (not available in NJ, VT, WI, or WV); or (3) return the leased items to WhyNotLeaseIt. For example, leased item(s) with lease amount of $600 with a weekly lease payment schedule (offered online only) would require $60 first lease payment followed by 19 weekly payments of approximately $25.26 plus tax, or a biweekly lease payment

schedule would require $60 first lease payment followed by 9 biweekly payments of approximately $53.33 plus tax, or a monthly lease payment schedule would require $120 first lease payment followed by 4 monthly payments of approximately $105.00 plus tax, with total cost to lease the item(s) for the Initial Term of $540.00 plus tax. TEMPOE, LLC dba WhyNotLeaseIt® is

an independent service provider of the LEASE IT program and not an affiliate or licensee of Sears Authorized Hometown Stores, LLC or its affiliates.

Sears Hometown Stores may be independently operated by authorized dealers of Sears Authorized Hometown Stores, LLC or by authorized franchisees of Sears Home Appliance Showrooms, LLC. The SEARS mark is a service mark of Sears Brands, LLC.

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YES! WE OFFER SMALL Barre

here.

ENGINE REPAIR

1598 US Route 302 Berlin

for Your Mower, Snow Barre, Vermont Blowers, 05641Lawn Tractors, Etc.

802 479 2541

EQUIPMENT MAY BE DROPPED OFF AT OUR STORE

Sales

7 Days A Week. Call 479-2541 for More Details

Husqvarna, Craftsman, PoulanPro, MTD Yard Machines and most other brands

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1598 US Route 302 Berlin, Barre, VT

802-479-2541

Owned & Operated by Dave & Lu Thomas

UP TO35% OFF

APPLIANCES 1

April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 3

EXTRA

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$599† or more with qualifying Shop Your Way or Sears credit card. **

OR

HTS 041821 FLYER NS


Kristian Page, Body Shop Manager

Sky Elderkin, Assistant Manager

COLLISION CENTER

AWARDED

WE REPAIR

ALL MAKES

AND MODELS

page 4 The WORLD April 28, 2021

CODY COLLISION CENTER received a

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and 100% of respondents said they

would return and would recommend

the facility to others!

Collision Repair

Business

The Collision Repair Industry

Standards for Training

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CALL KRISTIAN AT THE COLLISION CENTER 802-613-3017

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Successful VT Hunters Can Report Their Turkey

Online or at a Reporting Station

A successful hunter in Vermont’s April

24-25 youth and novice turkey weekend and

the May 1-31 spring turkey season must, by

law, report their turkey within 48 hours to the

Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department. The

department says hunters can report their turkey

online through its website www.vtfishandwildlife.com

or at local big game reporting

stations.

“Online reporting was used successfully

last year,” said turkey biologist Chris Bernier.

“It is convenient for the hunter, and the information

collected has proven to be just as

valuable for monitoring and managing wild

turkey populations.”

The information needed to report turkeys

online is the same as what has been traditionally

collected at big game reporting stations

including license, tag and contact information,

harvest details, and biological measurements.

There are a few things hunters can do in

advance to make submitting a report easier

such as having their Conservation ID Number

handy (located on their license), knowing

what town and Wildlife Management Unit the

bird was harvested in, and completing all the

necessary measurements such as beard and

spur lengths, and weight.

Although not required, the department also

requests that hunters use the online reporting

tool to upload a digital photo showing the

bird’s beard and properly tagged leg. Hunters

who provide a valid email address will receive

GMP Named a 2021 Environmental Champion

Utility on Earth Day

Customer reviews earned Green Mountain zones, which will keep the lights on for customers

in the community center, if the larger

Power (GMP) top spots on the 2021 Environmental

Champion Utility List, joining 30 other

utilities from around the country as ‘best-

GMP’s programs are designed to help

grid has an outage.

in-class’ for dedication to the environment. lower costs for all customers, and a customer

GMP earned the No. 1 spot among utilities in in Woodstock recently wrote in about his experience

with GMP and our energy storage

the east region and the No. 6 spot overall. The

study of customers was conducted by Escalent,

a behavior and analtics firm, which re-

“I’m happy to be a part of the Powerwall

program.

leased the list in conjunction with Earth Day. Program. Such a great thing for GMP to offer

“We are pleased to designate Green Mountain

Power a 2021 Environmental Champion. in the future. We need progressive utilities

and promote. Hope you are allowed to expand

Their customers rated them highest among

like GMP to lead the way for others to follow

electric utilities in the east on commitment to

and to protect our environment,” he wrote.

environmentally friendly energy, supporting

“Feedback from our customers inspires us

local green initiatives and overall environmental

dedication,” said Chris Oberle, senior

to move even faster toward an energy system

vice president at Escalent.

that is carbon-free, resilient against intensifying

weather and powered by energy generated

GMP’s energy supply is 95% carbon free

and 64% renewable, and GMP is committed

to being 100% carbon free by 2025 and honored to receive this distinction because

closer to where it is used. We are especially

100% renewable by 2030. GMP empowers it comes from the customers we serve,” said

customers with programs to help them reduce Mari McClure, GMP president and CEO.

their carbon emissions and costs, including More than 74,000 residential customers of

electric vehicle (EV) incentives, EV charging the 140 largest utilities were surveyed about

infrastructure programs, energy storage and dedication to the environment. Among the

incentives to switch to clean home heating findings, customers cite significant improvements

on utility support for environmental

and cooling. is also launching the first

in-the-nation microgrid in Panton, Vt. in June, causes and dedication to clean energy, and

and GMP will partner with a few more communities

each year to create similar resiliency • • duce • climate impact.

they favor investments in technology to re-

• • •

Proposed Renewable & Climate Resiliency Investments

to Spur Economic Recovery & Lower Energy Costs

• • •

Vermont hunters who take a turkey this spring

can reort it online at eront is and ildlies

website or at a big game reporting station.

VTF&W photo by John Hall.

a confirmation email when they successfully

submit a turkey harvest report using this new

online reporting tool.

The department reminds hunters to wear a

face covering and practice social distancing if

they bring their turkey to a reporting station.

Vermont’s big game reporting stations are

listed under “Hunt” on the left side of Vermont

Fish and Wildlife’s website home page.

Governor Phil Scott proposed more than

$200 million in state-federal climate change

mitigation investments that will lower energy

burdens and climate pollution while supporting

Vermont’s economy.

The Governor’s climate economy proposals

include $25 million to expand Vermont’s

electric vehicle charging infrastructure; $21

million or weatherization and energ eficiency;

$29 million to support investments in

community resilience and make it possible for

more Vermonters to replace fossil-fuel based

heating and cooling systems with all electric

or modern wood systems over the next four

years. An additional $100 million will support

implementation of the climate action plan under

development by Vermont’s Climate Council.

In the following statement, Olivia Campbell

Andersen, Renewable Energy Vermont’s

Executive Director expressed support, citing

the benefits the plan oers to all Vermonters.

“Every Vermonter and every Vermont

community, particularly those with the highest

energy burdens, should be empowered to

generate and store their own power. The Governor’s

proposal to accelerate renewable heating,

electric vehicles, resilient energy storage,

weatherization, and broadband access will

save Vermonters money, make their homes

healthier and more comfortable, and cut climate

pollution.

State energy investments should leverage

both private capital and federal funds to

lower energy burdens and help grow existing

and new businesses to maximize the number

of Vermonters served. More than 18,900

hardworking Vermonters are employed in renewable

energy, clean transportation, and efficienc

jobs, representing . o Vermonts

workforce. The Governor’s proposed energy

infrastructure investments will provide longlasting

economic benefits to communities rebuilding

from the devastation of COVID-19.

By expanding access to electric vehicle

infrastructure, the Governor’s proposal will

help more Vermonters access clean transportation,

saving millions of dollars in transportation

costs and reducing climate pollution.

We look forward to working with the Governor

and legislators to advance necessary

climate economy budget and policy proposals

that expand Vermonters’ ability to make

choices about their energy.”

About Renewable Energy Vermont

Renewable Energy Vermont (REV)’s businesses,

nonprofit, utilit, and individual

members are creating resilient, local economies

powered by renewable energy and employ

a 21st century workforce committed to

improving the lives of their neighbors and

communities. Together, we will achieve

100% total renewable energy (electric, thermal,

transportation) and meaningful climate

action. Join us at www.revermont.org.


Vermont Outdoors People for Better Representation

By Mike Stannard, Fair Haven

For a few weeks, this winter, I would end my day by checking

the Vermont Legislature’s page to see if H. 172 had made

it out of committee. On the evening of ‘crossover’, it seemed

like this piece of proposed legislation must have been too

extreme for the committee to have taken up as part of their

2021 agenda and was pigeonholed.

Like most Vermont outdoors people, I am not a bear

houndsmen or a trapper and do not aspire to either. I do

respect the history of trapping in Vermont and can see the

merits of bear hunting. Both of them fit into our management

plan quite well, as is. More importantly, I realize that what

befalls these two categories of the outdoors community is a

harbinger of the fate of other less controversial outdoor

sports, from waterfowling to bass fishing. There are multiple

pieces of Fish and Wildlife-related legislation in the House

Natural resources Committee that should be of grave concern

to anyone in the outdoor community, not just bear hunters and

trappers. Bill H.172 includes language that would ban the

hunting of bears with hounds, and is only one word away

(bears) from the banning of hunting any game animal or

waterfowl in Vermont with dogs; a serious concern for the

future of waterfowl, grouse, and rabbit hunting. The bill also

includes language to remove the bear tag from a youth hunting

license and end trapping as we know it in Vermont. This

is an obvious 1st stab at ending the “generational transfer” of

our hunting culture to the next generation.

I was relieved that this was the final time I would need to

check the progress of these bills, as though I were checking

my lottery numbers, to see if we would get to keep our heritage

for another year. But, a few days later, many of us in the

Vermont hunting world started picking up chatter from online

communities that these bills were still being discussed in

committee and that testimony was being stacked 6/1 in favor

of some of the very organizations that pushed the drafting of

the bill in the 1st place.

I have watched portions of the House Natural Resources

meeting streams and heard testimony from a very select group

of anti-hunting and anti-trapping interests. There have been

no trappers or bear hunters as witnesses. Nor, has there been

any testimony from anyone on the F&W board or from anyone

focused on the wildlife management model used in

Vermont (and all of North America) or the Science behind

trapping and its guidelines. I am perplexed why there seems

to be a real front-loading of “anti” testimony (i.e. Protect Our

Wildlife). Even if there is a strong push amongst the majority

to get this bill to the house floor, it has long been the Vermont

way to provide ample opportunity for those whose vested

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department says as temperatures

warm, songbirds return and the ice recedes, a shift

in fish behavior also occurs. Many fish species found in lakes

and ponds throughout Vermont become more active, feed

more regularly and provide a great fishing opportunity.

“While some anglers focus on the challenge of catching

trout during early spring, there are other ways to enjoy fishing

without having to wade through ice cold water,” said State

Fisheries Biologist Bret Ladago. “Species such as bluegill,

pumpkinseed, crappie, rock bass, and yellow perch are common

in many of our waters and become more active at this

time of year as they prepare for spawning. These fish can be

easily accessed from shore, making them ideal for a variety

of anglers looking to enjoy spring fishing in Vermont. Using

only a hook, worm and bobber, you can catch fish, have fun

and relax.”

Rig your bobber at least one to two feet above the hook.

Most fish will not be right at the surface, so the deeper you

can get your bait the better. If the bobber is too far from the

hook, it will be difficult to cast and may become tangled.

Bait the hook with a worm, or any other tasty fish treats.

If you do not want to venture to a store, bait like worms

and grubs can be found in gardens, compost piles and under

logs and rocks. Cast your bait out at least 10 feet and wait.

Sit back and enjoy being surrounded by nature but keep an

eye on your bobber. Once you see the bobber move, wait a

few more seconds, set the hook and then reel in your catch!

Try to match the size of your hook to the fish you are catching.

If the hook is too small, it will be easier for a larger fish

to swallow. If it’s too large, they may not be able to get it in

their mouth. Consider pinching the barb on the hook if you

do not intend to keep your catch.

Agency of Transportation Takes Action to Protect the

Monarch Butterfly

In recognition of Earth Day, the Vermont Agency of

Transportation (AOT) announced that it has joined the effort

to protect the Monarch butterfly by enrolling highway rightof-way

lands throughout the state in a voluntary nationwide

conversation program. The eastern Monarch population has

declined by approximately 77% since 1995.

“AOT’s participation in this national program exemplifies

the commitment by the Agency and the State of Vermont to

protect wildlife and approach all transportation-related work

as stewards of our beautiful Green Mountain State,” said

AOT Senior Biologist Glenn Gingras.

The nationwide conservation agreement is called the

Nationwide Monarch Candidate Conservation Agreement

with Assurances (CCAA) for Energy and Transportation

Lands. AOT enrolled 42,534 acres of land into the agreement.

This includes 3,403 (8%) “adopted” acres where specific

conservation practices will be implemented: conservation

mowing, idle lands set aside during rotational mowing, brush

removal to create open lands, native seeding, plantings to

interest lay in the balance, to get their opportunity to speak

their position. It has become obvious that there is a strategy in

effect by the Committee Chair Rep. Amy Sheldon (bill

cosponsor) and Vise-Chair Rep. James McCullough (bill cosponsor)

to shelter their fellow committee members and viewers

of the zoom meetings (archived on youtube). Testimony

from an articulate and informed Vermonter just could make

them question the legitimacy of the bill.

During the zoom committee meeting that followed, Rep.

Kari Dolan (bill co-sponsor) added that she had cross-referenced

hundreds of emails coming in against the bill, through

the Secretary of State’s Office, and that “A share of” the

emails were from out-of-staters, and that she “found that

interesting”. I found it “interesting” that mostly anti-hunting

and anti-trapping, out-of-state influenced special interest

groups were the lion’s share of a very small showing of witnesses

for legislation that would end 300 years of Vermont

tradition and outdoor heritage. Like Rep. Dolan, I find the

influence of out-of-staters on this legislation “interesting”

also. I also found her pointing this out to be quite hypocritical,

since no Vermont Trapper, Bear Houndsmen, Scientist or Fish

and Wildlife official was given the opportunity to provide

testimony in committee. I’m quite sure that if this bill

involved banning habitat fragmentation from mountain bike

trail building or creating a reservation-only system for hiking

popular trailheads, we would be hearing from those with a

vested interest.

I am calling on all hunters, fishers, and trappers to get

involved with this legislation, as soon as possible, this session.

We need to act as the biggest lobby group in Vermont

and get the word out to our own Representatives, the Speaker

of the House, the House Natural Resources Committee, and

the Governor that we demand better representation from witnesses,

and that those with a contrarian take on this legislation

should be heard. It could be our most valued outdoor pastime

that is next on the chopping block. We must see to it that no

parts of Vermont’s outdoor culture we value are stripped from

us and future generations, without so much as a chance to

defend their merits.

Postscript, I am a lifelong Vermonter, outdoorsman, high

school science teacher, fly fishing instructor, and father of

three Vermont youth hunters & fishers. I hold a B.A. in

Environmental Science and an A.A. in Environmental Studies.

I am an Independent who considers myself a radical moderate.

I write today, as an informed citizen with no lobbying

affiliations.

• • •

It’s an Excellent Time to Use a Worm and Relax Get Outside,

Have Fun and Catch Dinner

• • •

Species such as this pumpkinseed, as well as bluegill, crappie,

rock bass, and yellow perch are common in many Vermont waters

and become more active this time of year. They can be caught from

shore, making them ideal for a variety of anglers looking to enjoy

spring fishing in Vermont. VTF&W photo by Jud Kratzer.

“For folks who want to eat their catch, there’s nothing better

than a fresh meal of perch, crappie or bluegill caught in our

local waters,” added Ladago. “They make for an excellent,

healthy, locally-sourced meal for your family.”

For more information, see the fishing regulations and

Fishing Basics on Vermont Fish and Wildlife’s website (vtfishandwildlife/fish).

restore habitat, and conducting pollinator habitat monitoring.

Entering into this agreement provides multiple benefits to

participants if the species is listed as endangered. The agreement

provides assurances that minimize project and other

work delays so that daily operations and construction activities

can continue seamlessly. Conservation measures will also

enhance habitat for other pollinator species as well.

Since 2017, the University of Chicago has partnered with

more than 45 energy and transportation organizations to

develop the first nationwide CCAA for Energy and

Transportation Lands. The Monarch CCAA is a historic and

transformational voluntary agreement between the U.S. Fish

and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and non-federal transportation

and utility organizations to protect the Monarch Butterfly

from extinction. In December 2020, the USFWS announced

that listing the monarch as endangered or threatened under

the Endangered Species Act is warranted but precluded by

higher priority listing actions.

After 44 Years Serving Central Vermont

WE ARE CLOSING

Thank you for your patronage

Records must be picked up between

April 20 - May 7

Vermont Black Bears and How to

Effectively Manage Conflicts

Bears are exiting their winter dens, so it’s the perfect time

for Protect Our Wildlife to share their new bear report,

“Vermont Black Bears and How to Effectively Manage

Conflict.” The report is the product of a five-month-long

project launched by an Environmental Sciences student at the

University of Vermont and was overseen by Protect Our

Wildlife. Contributors to the report also include a Stowe, VT

resident with a Ph.D. in microbiology and molecular genetics

with post-doctoral research experience from Harvard Medical

School, as well as an ecologist, and other experts with varied

backgrounds.

Jennifer Lovett, POW Board member who has a Masters in

conservation biology from Antioch University, shared,

“Vermont cannot hunt its way out of black bear conflicts.” The

2020 bear hunt produced a record 921 bears killed, with half

being female. “We have an obligation to learn how to coexist,”

she added. Bears are also hunted with hounds, which is one of

the more contentious methods of hunting. The report impresses

the following on Vermonters, “Before we choose lethal

methods of bear management, we also need to consider the

ethics and impact to bear families. Bears form tight family

units with the cubs staying with their mother for about a year

and a half. When we implement lethal control, this disrupts the

bear’s natural lifecycle, potentially leaving a cub to grow up

without a mother.”

The report touches on a number of matters from possible

reasons why there was such a dramatic increase in bear complaints

reported to VT Fish & Wildlife in 2020 to simple

things we can each do to prevent bear conflicts from happening

in the first place. “I really hope that this report helps

Vermonters learn how to be better bear neighbors,” shared

Will Spitter, the UVM environmental sciences student who

began the bear project back in the fall of 2020. For more information

on Vermont’s bears, please visit Protect Our Wildlife’s

website.

Protect Our Wildlife Vermont is an all-volunteer, nonprofit

501(c)3 wildlife advocacy organization. Our team of

volunteers is composed of biologists, wildlife rehabilitators,

educators, and other professionals who seek better protections

for wildlife. We collaborate with nonprofits, both local and

national, to ensure we are all working together to offer the best

outcomes for wildlife.

• • •

Please contact:

Louis Cassani

321 N. Main St.

Barre, VT 05641

802-476-7932

Vermont Walleye Fishing

Season Opens Saturday, May 1

The Vermont walleye fishing season opens on Saturday,

May 1, marking the return of some of the best walleye fishing

in New England.

Excellent spring walleye fishing can be found in several

Vermont lakes and rivers, including Lake Champlain and its

tributaries – the Missisquoi, Lamoille and Winooski rivers and

Otter Creek. In the Northeast Kingdom, Salem Lake and

Island Pond also have walleye populations that are on the

rebound thanks to stocking by the Vermont Fish and Wildlife

Department.

A trio of additional waters – Lake Carmi, Chittenden

Reservoir and the Connecticut River, also offer quality walleye

fishing.

Veteran walleye anglers use a variety of techniques, but one

of the simplest and most effective is to slowly troll a nightcrawler

harness near the bottom. Most nightcrawler harnesses

include a rotating blade ahead of two hooks, where the worm

is secured. The blade produces a fish-attracting flash and

vibration. Shore-based anglers can catch walleyes on nightcrawlers

or live minnows or by casting crankbaits or hard jerk

baits. Walleyes are generally more active at night, so fishing

in the dark is often more effective.

As a reminder to anglers, there is no open season on sauger,

a close cousin to the walleye. Once abundant in southern

Lake Champlain, sauger still appear there rarely. If caught

while fishing for other fish, sauger must be immediately

released.

Anglers can read about current fishing regulations in the

2021 Vermont Fishing Guide & Regulations available free

from Vermont license agents. To purchase a fishing license or

learn more about fishing in Vermont, visit www.vtfishandwildlife.com.

Vermonters are encouraged to get outside to enjoy fishing,

provided they follow COVID-19 guidelines available from the

Vermont Department of Health at this link: https://www.

healthvermont.gov/response/infectious-disease/2019-novelcoronavirus.

April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 5


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Free radio show at www.musementors.com

Jim Blair, retired staff photographer at National

Geographic-radio show on life, love, and legacy

Vermont photographer

James Pease Blair began

his 32 year career at the

ational eographic ociety

as staff photographer on

board Jacques Cousteau’s

Calypso in 1962. As a photograph

student in the fities

at the Institute of Design

in Chicago, he studied

with Harry Callahan and

Aaron Siskind, but it was

his years as a summer intern

with Roy E. Stryker, at

the Pittsburgh Photographic

Library that made the

biggest impression on Jim.

These experiences set him on a path to become

one of America’s legendary photographers.

Jim Blair’s artistry and empathy brought a

new ind o humanit to ational eographic

which went from being a travel and culture

magazine to a journal which included social

and environmental images that revealed the

soul o the planet and its inhabitants. ow in

this late chapter of his life, Jim is contending

Vermont International Film Festival and Vermont PBS

Announce Launch of the Made Here Film Festival

The Vermont International Film Festival

[VTIFF] is pleased to announce the inaugural

launch of the Made Here Film Festival, the

onl film estival dedicated eclusivel to

films and filmmaers rom the orthern ew

ngland states o Vermont, ew ampshire,

aine, and assachusetts orthern ew

York; and their neighbors in Québec. The

Festival is a partnership with Vermont PBS.

“We are very pleased to continue our support

o regional filmmaers in the hope that b

introducing them and their films to each other,

new partnerships may emerge,” said VTIFF

Executive Director Orly Yadin. “MHFF is

a natural progression from what used to be

the Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase, which

in 2019 expanded to become the Made Here

Showcase. We are also looking forward to

representing the films at the inperson Vermont

International Film Festival in the Fall of

this year.”

The Festival will be held virtually and

run or five das rom ednesda, a

through Sunday, May 9 on VTIFF’s robust

online platform on Cinesend, with a “Pay as

You Can” policy. A portion of the donations

The Front Calls for New Members

The Front is seeking artists of all backgrounds

interested in provoking curiosity,

exchanging ideas, and promoting community

engagement with the visual arts.

The Front is a cooperative gallery space

located in downtown Montpelier, Vermont.

It includes two large street facing windows,

plent o walin trafic, and is alwas bus

during Montpelier Art Walks. Members donate

their time, energ, and financial support

to keep the gallery running. We feature members’

work in about six group exhibitions alternating

with six solo shows annually. Members

also use the gallery for events including

artist talks, performances, movie nights, and

critiques.

The Front is dedicated to equity and inclusivity,

and because of that we want to encourage

all applicants, regardless of ability to pay;

for those who are able, we are deeply grateful

for additional contributions that help us meet

expenses.

The Front is an artist-run cooperative gallery,

structured as an L3C. That means members

contribute the time, energy, and funds it

takes to run everything.

Being a member of the gallery means you

are a part-owner of The Front.

Artists Are Invited to Submit Original Artworks

for The Upcoming Summer Exhibition: Made In Vermont

Bryan Gallery invites all artists working

in two-dimensional art in any media format

to submit their works in the upcoming juried

Made in Vermont exhibition running June 24

– September 6, 2021. The jury will be looking

for works in which the subject showcases the

ingenuity and resourcefulness of Vermonters.

This may include works where the working

landscape of Vermont is the predominant

theme, and how it appears today including

Vermont’s urban landscape, working farms,

sugaring houses, breweries, covered bridges,

woodlots; etc.

To view the complete list of guidelines and

Harry Callahan (left), Jim Blair (right) Chicago 1953

• • •

• • •

• • •

with a lung condition that has reduced him

to 35 percent breathing capacity, and yet he

continues to live life with eyes and heart wide

open. Listen to this powerfully moving radio

show on demand at https://www.buzzsprout.

com/1278755/8313308-national-geographicphotographer-james-pease-blair-making-pictures-life-love-and-legacy.

will be shared with the filmmaers. the

films submitted, were selected b the judging

panel. The Made Here Festival winners

who will be awarded four $500 cash prizes

include:

• Vermont PBS Award for Best Documentar

film goes to atasha aers an Un-Still

Life directed b Anita Clearfield eore

Leighton, of Maine

VTI Award or est iction film will be

shared between Roseline Like in the Movies

directed by Sara Bourdeau of Québec

and Stay for Tea directed by Paul Bronislaw

Kmiec of Massachusetts.

• James Goldstone Award for Most Promising

ewcomer, sponsored b .. tetson III,

goes to Yellow Cards for Equal Pay, directed

by Maia Vota of Vermont.

“Vermont PBS is proud to see our program

Made Here and our partnership with VTIFF

grow to include the Made Here Film Festival,”

said Steve Ferreira, CEO of Vermont

. This new estival will allow the filmmakers

from our community to display their

talents to a wider audience.”

Members typically:

• Staff the gallery during open hours, usually

one 3-hour shift per month

• Contribute member dues to keep things running

– $50 a month is standard; $60 a month

helps us offer memberships to those paying at

a lower rate. We do not consider ability to pay

as criteria for membership.

• Show work in group shows every other

month, and in a solo show to be scheduled

in collaboration with other members. (During

covid, show schedules have been variable

and eible, but generall alternate between

group and solo shows).

• Attend monthly (zoom) group meetings and

serve on committees to handle tasks ranging

from hanging art to planning events to publicity.

• Take part in occasional critiques, movie

nights, artist talks, and general camaraderie

as part of a group of fun and creative people!

I ou would lie to appl, please fill out the

online application, which includes an artist’s

statement, bio, and six images of your work,

at https://thefrontvt.com/application/. You can

reach The Front at info@thefrontvt.com, and at

(802) 552-0877. Deadline is April 30.

information regarding the upcoming exhibition,

please visit: http://bryangallery.org/calltoartists.php

. Online entry to submit artwork

went live: April 23, 2021.

Deadline: To have your artwork considered

for Made in Vermont, please submit your

work(s) by May 16, 2021 at www.bryangallery.org/artistartistsadmin/.

Bryan Memorial Gallery is at 180 Main

Street, Jeffersonville, VT., 802-644-5100.

For more information, contact Stephen Gothard

at 644-5100 or info@bryangallery.org,

www.bryangallery.org.


Vermont Native Mark Treanor Wins Colby Award for

Book about Service In Vietnam War and Its Aftermath

Mark Treanor has won the 2021 William E.

Colby Award for his book, “A Quiet Cadence.”

Norwich University in Northfield, Vermont,

presents the award, now in its 22nd year,

annually to a first solo work of fiction or nonfiction

that has made a major contribution to

the understanding of military history, intelligence

operations, or international affairs.

“A Quiet Cadence,” (Naval Institute Press,

2020) is the story of a young U.S. Marine in

combat and dealing with its aftermath over

the years since his war.

Treanor grew up in Rutland, Vermont, and

splits his time between Quechee, Vermont,

and Edgewater, Maryland. He graduated from

the U.S. Naval Academy and commissioned

into the U.S. Marines as a 2nd lieutenant in

1968. He was a rifle platoon leader in

Vietnam, an artillery battery commander and

leadership instructor and later served on the

boards of the National Defense University

and the Naval Academy.

Treanor is a University of Maryland School

of Law graduate, where he was a member of

the school’s Law Review and Order of the

Coif. He has been a lawyer, corporate executive,

and leadership coach who has participated

in national security fact-finding missions

in Iraq, Yemen, Africa and the Caucasus.

He also studied in the Vermont College of

Fine Arts MFA program.

Treanor recently retired as chairman of the

board (nonexecutive) of Virtus Investment

Partners Inc. (NASDAQ: VRTS), and as an

executive leadership coach with Cambria

Consulting Inc. Previously, Treanor was the

senior executive vice president and general

counsel of Wachovia Corp. (1999-2008).

During his tenure, he was named one of the

five best general counsel in the United States

by Corporate Board Member magazine.

Before joining Wachovia, he was senior partner

of Treanor Pope & Hughes, a Maryland

law firm he founded, focusing on complex

corporate litigation and serving as lead trial

lawyer in cases in 17 states.

Treanor is a member of the Council on

Foreign Relations and a senior fellow of the

American Leadership Forum. He is former

chairman of the Advisory Committee to the

Export-Import Bank of the United States,

Morrisville Cult Awareness Educator Publishes

Enlightening Memoir

“Buglion delivers a clear warning about the

destructive power of charismatic, authoritarian

leaders and what it takes to regain one’s

own inner-strength and self-awareness. A

timely book.” —Susan Ritz, award-winning

author

Rootstock Publishing, a Montpelier-based

publisher and imprint of Multicultural Media,

Inc., announces the release of An Everyday

Cult, a personal memoir and wake-up call to

recognizing cultic membership, by Gerette

Buglion, of Morrisville, Vermont.

An Everyday Cult is an essential read for

understanding how people fall prey to mind

control and cultic manipulation. Buglion’s

true-life story follows her through eighteen

years under a trusted teacher’s unethical tutelage.

The memoir shows how her innocent

quest for meaning was answered by a man

who ultimately eroded her capacity for critical

thinking. Through a treacherous narrative,

she lays bare the hallmarks of cultic manipulationmind

control that ies under the radar

of human awareness—and implores society to

wake up to its ever-present abuses of power.

It is a redemptive book of self-awareness and

self-discovery.

“One of my goals in writing this book was

Series Teaches Students about Dairying In Vermont

Curious about what a cow eats? Or how

farmers use technology on the farm?

Students, ages 12-18, will have an opportunity

to delve into these and other questions

about dairy farming through Exploring

Vermont Dairy. This free, five-part series will

be offered via Zoom on consecutive

Wednesdays from 3:30-4:30 p.m., beginning

May 5.

The University of Vermont (UVM)

Extension 4-H program developed the series

in cooperation with the Vermont Agency of

Agriculture, Food and Markets. Each session

will include a pre-lesson assignment. Students

are encouraged to share their thoughts and

ask questions to gain a better understanding

of dairy farming in the state.

Registration is required at https://go.uvm.

edu/xploringermontairy. Topics include:

May 5–Introduction and Technology on

the Farm. The focus will be on drones, precision

planting, robotic milkers, robotic feeding

systems for calves and self-drive tractors,

among other technological advances on

Vermont dairy farms.

• • •

• • •

vice chairman of the Board of Visitors of the

U.S. Naval Academy, chairman of the

National Defense University Foundation, and

a former member of the boards of the National

Defense University, the University of

Maryland School of Law, the U.S. Chamber

of Commerce Institute for Legal Reform, the

University of North Carolina Center for

Banking and Finance and the Financial

Services Roundtable.

Treanor is at work on his second novel. He

and his wife, Claire, a retired attorney and

school counselor, have four children and five

grandchildren.

“I’m thrilled to have been chosen as the

recipient of the 2021 Colby Award; it is a

great honor to join the company of the distinguished

writers who have been prior recipients,”

Treanor said. “And, it is truly gratifying

that the judges chose a novel which explores

the realities of combat and its postwar impact

on our troops.”

Colby Award winners receive a $5,000

author honorarium provided through the generosity

of the Chicago-based Pritzker Military

Foundation, on behalf of the Pritzker Military

Museum & Library. Treanor will receive the

award and honorarium during the Norwich

University Military Writers’ Symposium,

Nov. 3 through Nov. 4, 2021, on Norwich

University’s Northfield, Vermont campus.

Finalists for the 2021 Colby Award included

“Feeding Victory,” by Jobie Turner and

“Inside the Hot Zone,” by Mark G. Kortepeter.

“A Quiet Cadence was a joy to read, a true

page-turner with timeless themes about trauma

and redemption, and with one hell of a

powerful ending,” Colby Award selection

committee chairman, historian and bestselling

author Alex Kershaw ‘H19 said.

“Hopefully the book will now find a wider,

well deserved audience.”

The Colby Award, named for the late

ambassador and former CIA director William

E. Colby, began at Norwich University in

1999. Previous Colby Award recipients

include Paul Scharre, Nisid Hajari, Thomas

McKenna, James Bradley, Nathaniel Fick,

Jack Jacobs, Dexter Filkins, Marcus Luttrell,

John Glusman, Karl Marlantes, Adam

Higginbotham and Steven Sodergren.

to nudge readers toward a compassionate

understanding of the more nuanced realities

surrounding cultic involvement,” says author

Buglion. “Yes: smart, compassionate people

get drawn into destructive groups. Yes: mind

control is real. Yes: there are positive traits in

most if not all controlling groups/cults. Yes:

people can heal and lead productive lives after

cultic involvement,” she says.

A collaborating founder of #iGotOut

(igotout.org), a social media movement to

help cult survivors share their stories, Gerette

Buglion is a cult awareness educator in Morrisville,

Vermont.

An Everyday Cult is available for pre-order

at local bookstores and on Amazon, IndieBound,

Bookshop, Barnes & Noble, and

Rootstock Publishing (www.rootstockpublishing.com),

and is available for the book

trade with Ingram. Libraries receive a 20%

discount when ordered through Rootstock

Publishing (they must contact info@rootstockpublishing.com).

Release Date: May 25, 2021 / 226 pages /

6 x 9 / ISBN: 978-1-57869-055-8 / $16.95

/ Memoir/Cults / Distributed Worldwide by

Ingram

May 12–Animal Health and Nutrition.

Participants will learn about a cow’s daily

diet and how animal nutritionists balance feed

rations for optimal nutrition and good herd

health.

May 19–Added Value and Diversification.

To survive, many dairy farms have increased

their revenue streams with cheese, maple,

farm stands, corn mazes, farm tours and onfarm

stays. The discussion will cover these

and other options for diversification.

May 26–Farm Business and Decision

Making. This presentation will explore the

tools a farmer can use to make management

decisions on the farm, such as which cows to

keep or cull, or when to plant crops.

June 2–Soils and Conservation. The session

will focus on conservation practices

farmers follow to be good stewards of the

land, including measures to improve water

quality.

For more information or to request a disability-related

accommodation to participate,

contact UVM Extension 4-H educator Martha

Manning at martha.mannng@uvm.edu.

PLANT-BASED PICKS

plant-based patties with egg & cheese

Nabisco Ritz Crackers

13.7 oz. 2/ $ 5

Chobani

Greek Yogurt

5.3 oz. 5/ $ 5

SPECIALS GOOD THROUGH

SUNDAY, MAY 2

Not responsible for typographical errors.

PROUD TO SELL

VP RACING

FUELS

PRODUCTS!

Rt. 14, Williamstown • 433-1038

Hood Cottage Cheese

16 oz.2/ $ 5

Coffee Mate Florida Natural Juices

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Great Selection of fresh, local baked goods from Graham Farms

Maple, Hannahʻs Gluten Free, Mariaʻs Bagels and Northern Sugarz!

Check Out Our New & Expanded International Foods Section!

Great Asian, Indian & Mexican Items to spice up your meal!

Kayem

Natural Casing Franks

Applewood or Hickory

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$

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THANK YOU FOR SAYING

I SAW IT IN

Friendly’s

Ice Cream

48 oz. $ 3 49

Sugardale Bacon

Regular or Thick Cut

$

12 oz. pkg. 5 99 $ 1 lb. pkg. 4 99

Fresh Ground Chuck

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$

4 99 /lb

$ 2.5 lb. box 9 99 BIG BACON SALE

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6 oz. pkg. $ 3 99

Check out our new and expanded

Dairy & Frozen Selections!

Premium 91 octane Non-ethanol Gasoline at the pumps

Great for your small engine lawn tools, motorcycles, classic cars, &

more! We stock many high performance fuels in 5 gallon cans!

Need fuel for the track? Ask about ordering by the 54 gallon drum.

Remember VP Racing Fuel is the Official Fuel of Barre’s Thunder Road!”

Monday-Thursday 5:00am-9:00pm Friday 5:00am-10:00pm

Saturday 6:00am- 10:00pm Sunday 6:00am-9:00pm

Rt. 14, Williamstown • 802-433-1038

DEBIT EBT/SNAP Cards Welcome

April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 7


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page 8 The WORLD April 28, 2021

“April Showers Bring May Flowers”

By Debra Paul

April is coming to an end we still have our boots, umbrellas,

and rain ponchos out for the rainy or even snowy days.

The age-old saying “April Showers Bring May Flowers”

still holds true today. But where did this saying originate? The

saying originated from a poem that dates back to the year

1157 that was written by Thomas Tusser. The line in the poem

is: “Sweet April showers do spring May flowers”.

If we travel back in time a bit further to the end of the 14th

Century, the poet, Geoffrey Chaucer, had this to say about the

month of April, in his famous collection of stories entitled,

“The Canterbury Tales.”

Chaucer’s version in translation is: “When in April the

sweet showers fall, That pierce March’s drought to the root

and all, And bathed every vein in liquor that has power, To

generate therein and sire the flower”.

Although it may be said Thomas Tusser is the father of this

saying, Geoffrey Chaucer is certainly the creator.

The idea was likely posed to urge us out of the depression

that looms during the long hard winter and dreary, rainy

months of early spring. We are encouraged to look forward to

the month of May and the sunny and much more pleasant

weather ahead.

Thinking about other sayings like: “weeping endures for a

night, but joy comes in the morning”; “there is a silver lining

Parent Child Centers: Invest in Families, Invest in

Children, Invest in Vermont

Claire Kendall, Co Director, Family Center of Washington

County Margot Holmes, Director, Springfield Area Parent

Child Center

This last year the pandemic has upended our families, our

communities and our world. Parent Child Centers across

Vermont have offered a constant safety net of support for

families through it all. Parent Child Centers have provided

essential basic needs such as access to food, diapers, technology

tools needed to ensure education and service access, and

concrete financial supports to ensure or attain housing security.

PCCs have served as a lifeline to parents with young

children who are isolated and at risk both through virtual

parent support and connection as well as in-person supports,

often delivering to families many of the vital resources and

goods families need but often could not safely obtain to get

through the pandemic.

One of the most remarkable things about Parent Child

Centers is their potential involvement in every aspect of a

family’s life because we create communities of support where

families are not afraid to ask for help. Our staff pick up food

at the foodbank for the family without transportation and

bring it directly to them. The child that doesn’t enter the foster

care system as a result of parent education and support groups

provided by Parent Child Centers saves the state of Vermont

thousands of dollars. The single mom that makes connections

with other parents at a Parent Child Center playgroup creates

a social safety net that provides the peer support to make it

through the rough patches. The new father that gets a visit

from a Parent Child Center home visitor can help access the

tools he needs to be the best father he can be.

Research has shown time and again that investing in prevention

and young children and families saves thousands of

dollars down the road. We know that adult-child relationships

and other early experiences influence child well-being. Parent

after each dark cloud”; and “this too shall pass”.

The reality of death producing new life parallels with

spring the thought of sunshine following a season of gloom

and sadness.

The idea of this saying “April showers brings May flowers”

shadows what we are all experiencing right now.

It is a reminder that even the most unpleasant of things, in

this case the virus of 2020, will pass and we can hope and

expect enjoyable times in the near future. “Light at the end of

the tunnel” and “a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow” all

apply.

Looking forward to “May flowers” and happier days ahead

is on all of our minds.

“April showers bring May flowers” is also a lesson in

patience, and one that remains valid today. Many of life’s

greatest things come only to those who wait, patiently.

Take in the sights and smells of May and the rebirth of life.

After all, if you have an optimistic outlook positive thing are

sure to happen.

Remember these things: “there has never been a wind that

did not change directions, clouds do not hang forever and

April showers bring May flowers.

The point here is that after all this we will come out better

prepared and stronger. Sometimes you have to go though

something hard to truly understand what is most important.

Child Centers provide evidence-informed and research-based

interventions that build resilience in both children and their

caregivers through extensive family support programming.

This leads to better health outcomes. As the Center for the

Developing Child at Harvard University states “.....supporting

families with young children and strengthening responsive

relationships not only builds a foundation for social-emotional

development, school readiness, and future learning; it also

strengthens the building blocks for a lifetime of physical and

mental health.”

Parent Child Centers do this work in many important ways:

supporting parent/child bonding/attachment; prenatal/postpartum

support; family systems work; child screenings; referrals

and access to supports and services across the state; support

accessing state systems and funding; access for families

to concrete supports; supporting parenting women in getting

back into the workforce. Parent Child Centers are codified in

Vermont statute and provide consistent services across the

state as well as being responsive to local community and family

needs, our flexibility in this way sets our services apart

from others.

When we invest in families getting the support they need

they are able to give back to healthy and strong communities.

“Policies and programs that reduce stress, prevent toxic exposures,

and provide support for pregnant mothers and families

with infants and toddlers will result in better health outcomes

across the lifespan and save billions in health care costs”

(Center for the Developing Child, Harvard University). Now

is the time to strengthen Parent Child Centers and make a

policy investment in our network of services for children and

families. We are asking our leaders to be brave. It’s critical to

ask -can we afford not to spend more on children and families?

This is the opportunity of a lifetime. Invest in families,

invest in children, invest in Vermont.

Why Black History Month is Failing Our Students

• • •

• • •

By Chris Dodge

In February, thousands of dedicated and well-meaning educators

just like myself scour their classrooms and school

libraries for books on Martin Luther King, Jr., Harriet,

Tubman, Rosa Parks, and other famous Black Americans. It’s

Black History Month, and the concept is failing our students.

I fell into the trap, too, big time this year, as I visited many

classrooms in my school carrying books on famous Black

Americans and reading and discussing them with children as

young as age three. I even went so far as to buy four books on

famous Black Americans for every student in my school to

send home after I presented them in their classes. I entered

classrooms armed and ready to have courageous conversations

about racism in a different way this year, more deeply

than before, not just read the books and call it a day. I was

pleased with myself for stepping out of my comfort zone and

diving into this work school-wide, and I felt prepared by a

barrage of professional learning aimed specifically at how to

talk about race.

Late on a Thursday afternoon, I finished reading the fourth

book in a National Geographic series for children on famous

Black Americans to a third and fourth grade class of engaged

and attentive students. As with each of the previous books, I

read the story with gusto, paused to discuss new vocabulary

and the main ideas, to garner students’ thoughts on the subject

and help them think critically about the material, and to check

their understanding. I had written a letter to families about

each book, encouraging discussion at home, and I sent that

letter home with every story. I was pleased with myself, to say

the least. Sounds great, right? And then, it all came crashing

down.

“I sure am glad that we don’t have racism anymore,” one of

our brightest fourth graders proclaimed.

I was stunned, and it was in that very moment that I realized

a fundamental flaw in how we teach students about racism.

Not only do we teach the concepts in isolation – often

only in February when the calendar suggests – but we all too

often teach about racism and discrmination uniquely as a

historical problem. My students could tell me exactly what I

wanted to hear about Dr. King’s dream speech, Rosa Parks’s

bravery on that bus 1955, or how Harriet Tubman led slaves

to freedom. And, that’s where their knowledge ended. With

slavery abolished, Black Americans sitting freely on busses,

and women being able to vote, my students celebrated the fact

that equality reigns supreme, and that there would be no reason

to even consider the lasting effects of our history, or that

discrimination and racism might still plague our nation and

our schools.

My heart sunk as I polled the class, asking them to raise

their hands if they thought that racism still existed. There was

not a single hand in the air. With ten minutes to spare, I tried

desperately to give examples and convince the group that racism

did not end with the events we had studied, and that we

each need to play a part in the continued battle against modern

day discrimination. And they looked at me like I had three

heads.

I was deflated. While I knew that sharing books and having

discussions with students about historical racism wasn’t in

and of itself bad, it wasn’t enough. I had fallen short of my

obligation to help them connect the historical context to the

present day, and that had potentially done harm, not only to

them, but to any marginalized population that still struggles

with discrmination. Passively and unintentionally, by only

presenting the material in the past tense, I had led my students

to believe that racism no longer exists. I also risked some of

my students not seeing themselves, and their struggles with

race-related issues, in our learning.

In the coming days I worked feverishly to mend the error

of my ways with individual and group conversations. I tried

desperately to help students understand that the work is not

complete, that each of us needs to examine our own beliefs

and how they impact others, and that racism very much still

exists. I hope they understood. I believe they did, no matter

how abstract it may have seemed.

I will teach differently next time. I will discuss racism

regularly, not just in February. And, I will start with a modern

day context and work my way back in time to help my students

understand how we got to where we are. Without question,

it is important to celebrate the progress our country has

made, and the brave individuals that led that work, and especially

to recognize the continued work ahead. In order to

repair the damage of our history, we must first acknowledge

the racism of our present. This learning is a necessary gift to

all of our students, both as the future policy makers who will

work to end modern day inequities, and as compassionate

citizens who will lead the way in creating a world that is fair

and just.

Chris Dodge is principal at Fletcher Elementary School in

Fletcher, Vermont.


Ainsworth

Public Library

Williamstown

Look for us on Facebook: Ainsworth Public Library

802-433-5887

library@williamstownvt.org

www.ainsworthpubliclibrary.org

2338 VT RTE 14 Williamstown, VT

Curbside: M: 10-5:30pm, T: 2:30-6:30pm, W: 11-5:30,

FR: 2:30-6:30 SA: 10:30-1:30

Opened for Appointments

We are excited to begin our phase 2 opening. Appointments

are on Tuesdays 3-6pm and Fridays from 3-6pm. You can

email us: Library@williamstownvt.org, phone us: 802 433-

5887, Facebook PM us: Facebook Ainsworth Public Library

to set up an appointment in one of our slots. Appointments

will be 15 minutes each. You can browse and check out materials,

copy/fax/scan or use a computer. One person per

appointment. You must wear a mask and your temperature

will be taken at the door. Please do not visit us if you have

Covid symptoms until you are feeling better. After each

appointment, we will clean. You can sign up in advance.

Montpelier Senior

Activity Center

58 Barre Street, Montpelier • 802-223-2518

A Pro-Active, Insightful Approach to Estate Planning

4-session Class Series starts April 27

Claudia Pringles | 4 Tuesdays, starts 4/27 | 6:30—8:00 pm

| via Zoom video/phone. Local Attorney, Claudia Pringles,

will focus on the important items/tasks/roles involved in planning

for the future. Topics will include matching skills and

temperament to task; how transparency in the Estate Planning

process can keep the peace in your family; safeguarding assets

of family members unable to do so on their own; protection in

the event of disability or incapacitation; and making sure that

your wishes are carried out as desired, in the least stressful

way possible. Get full details and register at: https://www.

montpelier-vt.org/751/Classes, or call (802) 223-2518.

Zoom Training 201

Thursday, April 29 | 10—11 am | Free | Online | Registration

Required. Have you been on Zoom enough to know the basics

but want to learn more? This training will discuss how to

schedule your own Zoom meeting, how to use the screen

share function, save the chat notes, and more. Contact Andrew

at 262-6287 or email msacamericorps@montpelier-vt.org to

register for this new training designed to enhance your understanding

of Zoom beyond the basics. More trainings to come!

Cooking with Willing Hands

Thursday, April 29 | 11:00 am | online. Join FEAST and the

Southern VT organization, Willing Hands, for an online cooking

demo this month. This is part of the series of nutrition

Spring News from the Jaquith Public Library

We are now open Tuesday through Friday 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

and 3 to 6 p.m. In addition we offer curbside service Saturdays

and Mondays 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. or anytime we are open.

Red Clover Picture Book Celebration – Live on Zoom

Join Deborah on Saturday, April 24th at 10am for a live

reading of Hummingbird by Nicola Davies. We will also

revisit the nine other wonderful books nominated for the Red

Clover Picture Book Award. And learn about how YOU can

vote for which one wins the Red Clover Award! To join the

Zoom reading: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88924941430 For

more information on the books visit: https://www.jaquithpubliclibrary.org/red-clover-award.html

Spring Wildflower Walk

Sunday, May 2 (rain or shine) from 1- 3:30 p.m.

With naturalists Brett Engstrom and Annie Reed. Sponsored

by the Marshfield Conservation Commission, the Stranahan

Stewardship Committee, and the Jaquith Library. We will

meet at the Stranahan Forest parking lot at the beginning of

Thompson Road (right off of Hollister Hill Road). Masks

required. 20 person maximum, please preregister by contacting

Brett Engstrom: engstrombrett@gmail.com or call the

library at 426-3581.

Spring Bird Walk

Saturday, May 15 f(rain date May 16) from 7:30 to 10 a.m.

Led by Taber Allison and his son Alexander. Sponsored by

the Marshfield Conservation Commission and the Jaquith

Library. We will meet at the Stranahan Forest parking lot at

the beginning of Thompson Road (right off of Hollister Hill

Road). ). Masks required. 10 person maximum, please preregister

by contacting Taber: taberallison@hotmail.com or call

the library: 426-3581.

Green Mountain Book Award

There are 15 amazing teen picks for the Green Mountain

Book Award - and voting is ongoing from now until spring.

Vote for your favorite 2020/2021 nominees, as you read them.

The voting deadline is May 28, 2021 at 5pm.

For a list of the 15 nominees and for voting go here: https://

www.jaquithpubliclibrary.org/green-mountain-book-award.

html

Send an Original Poem by May 28th!

April is National Poetry Month, so let’s write poetry!

The Jaquith Public Library invites you to submit your

original poems to our Community Poetry-Sharing Project.

Kids! Teens! Adults! Nobody is too young or too old to write

poetry. This summer we will create a Poetry Storywalk, fea-

• • •

Curbside Services Continue

Even though we are offering appointments, we will still

offer curbside services M 10:30-5:30pm, T 2:30-6:30pm, W

10:30-5:30, FR 2:30-6:30pm and SAT 10:30-2:30pm. Call us,

email us, FB Message or reserve items on your account.

Youth Giveaway

The library has teamed up with CVOEC and the VT

Department of Libraries to offer a free art kit giveaway for

youth. Canvas, paint, and a paint brush are provided in the art

kit. Contact the library to pick one up. FREE While supplies

last.

Mother’s Day Youth Giveaway

May3-8 th the Library will be giving out free take home

kits for youth to make a special flower pot for Mother’s Day.

Contact the library to reserve yours and to let us know when

you can pick it up. While supplies last.

Storywalk

April is Fair Housing Month. The Ainsworth Public Library

have joined up with the Vermont Dept. of Libraries and

CVOEO to offer a Storywalk on the ramp at the library. Visit

the Storywalk anytime! The Storywalk will be at the library

until the end of the first week of May.

Board of Trustees Meeting

The Trustees are meeting at 10 am on May14.Our meetings

are open to the public. Check website for details and the

agenda.

education events brought to you by the Central Vermont

Council on Aging. Email vista@willinghands.org for more

information.

FEAST Curbside TO-GO: Tuesdays and Fridays, 12-12:30

pm, served at 58 Barre St.

Seniors 60+, drive up to the side door of MSAC every

Tuesday and Friday to receive your delicious, hot FEAST

To-Go takeout meal. We have shifted to Curbside Pickup for

your safety and ease. We’ll have signs to remind you where to

go. You can see our menu on our website. Please call to make

your reservation: 262-6288 or email us at: feast@montpeliervt.org.

To View FEAST To Go Menu, visit https://www.montpeliervt.org/DocumentCenter/View/3228/FEAST-Meals-Menu.

FEAST at Home (Meals on Wheels): Do you have an older

adult in your life who needs more access to delicious, healthy

food? Is there someone in your life who is struggling to eat

more nutritionally? Let us know because we can help! Have

them call the office to be connected to our robust (and

yummy!) program. Call 262-6288 or email feast@montpeliervt.org.

Volunteer for FEAST

FEAST has begun the planning process for congregate

meals to begin in July, as well as returning to daily hot meal

delivery, and we need help to do so! If you or someone you

know is interested in helping bring nutritious, delicious meals

to seniors who need them, please let us know by calling or

emailing us: 802-262-6288, feast@montpelier-vt.org.

We are seeking the following:

• Meals on Wheels Drivers

• FEAST Together Volunteers in the kitchen and as servers

• FEAST Special Events Volunteers

• • •

turing poems written by you! Poems can be about anything

you wish and in any format or style. For more information,

inspiration, and resources visit: www.jaquithpubliclibrary.

org/youth-programs.html . To submit, please include your

name, age (optional), town of residence, and contact information.

Only original, unpublished poems, please! Mail to:

Jaquith Public Library 122 School St. Marshfield, VT 05658

Email submissions to: jaquithyouth@gmail.com or drop off

at the library!

Stranahan Town Forest Ladybug Walk

June 12 (raindate June 13) from 11AM to 1PM

Julia Pupko of VCE and the VT Entomological Society

will conduct a ladybug information session and walk. Meet at

the Hollister Hill parking at the beginning of Thompson Road

(right off of Hollister Hill Road).

Laptop Lending now available!

Jaquith Public Library has laptops to lend to members 18

and older for two weeks to meet the educational, cultural,

technological, and recreational needs of the community. Use

anywhere outside the building with our new extended WIFI,

or anywhere at your convenience. Ask at the circulation desk

for more details!

New Equipment to Borrow—For Tweens, Teens and

Everyone!

Marshfield Story Project makes it fun and easy to interview

your grandparents, siblings, neighbor or a local hero! The kit

includes a Zoom voice recorder, instructions, two decks of

Our Moments topic cards and two books to get the conversation

started. When it is safe to gather outdoors or at a distance,

borrow our new Marshfield Story Project Home Interview

Kit. Contact the library for details!

We just added 200 DVDS to our collection!

They were donated to the Jaquith Library by Joe Bookmyer,

film Aficionado from Yonkers, NY. For new adult books and

movies: https://www.jaquithpubliclibrary.org/new-additions.

html

For new youth books: jaquithpubliclibrary.org/new-andfeatured-kids.html

Email submissions to: jaquithyouth@gmail.com

New Youth Book Bundle Request Form!

We know it can be tricky to pick out a book when you can’t

browse our shelves. Want a few picture books about spring?

Or sharing? Looking for your next great fantasy adventure?

Or historical fiction? Want a nonfiction book about the

ocean? Or the civil rights movement? Enter your preferences

in our Youth Book Bundle Request form and Deborah will

make selections for you! Click here to fill out the form:

https://forms.gle/QFXLzVp7LktHoTbN7 . Responses sent

Tuesdays through Monday mornings by 10am will be ready

to pick up the following Tuesday. You will be contacted to

arrange the pickup.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs

Gen. Mark Milley to give

Norwich University’s 2021

Commencement Address

Norwich University

is honored to announce

that Joint Chiefs of Staff

Chairman Gen. Mark A.

Milley will give the commencement

address to the

Class of 2021 in recorded

remarks on Saturday, May

1.

Milley was born June

20, 1958, in Winchester,

Massachusetts. In 1980,

he graduated from Princeton

University and received

his commission

rom the eserve ficers

Training Corps (ROTC). During his more than 40 years in uniform,

Milley commanded and served in units at every echelon,

from platoon leader to U.S. Army chief of staff.

In 2019, he was appointed the 20th Chairman of the Joint

Chiefs of Staff. As the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,

Milley is the senior most ranking member of the military and

serves as principal advisor to the President, Secretary of Defense,

and National Security Council.

Besides a bachelor’s degree in political science from Princeton

University, Milley has master’s degrees in international

relations from Columbia University and national security and

strategic studies from the U.S. Naval War College. He is also

an alumnus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Seminar

XXI National Security Studies Program.

In accordance with state of Vermont pandemic guidelines

and with the health and safety of the Norwich community

as our highest priority, Norwich University’s 2021 Commencement

ceremonies will be a hybrid of virtual streamed

and in-person events. There will be four separate commencement

ceremonies, two each running simultaneously in Shapiro

Fieldhouse and Kreitzberg Arena at 9 a.m. and 12 p.m.

on Saturday, May 1. Milley will receive an honorary Doctor

of Military Science before addressing an anticipated 490 students

graduating from 32 undergraduate programs and one

master’s program: 477 Bachelor’s Degrees and 13 Masters

of Architecture. The ceremony, which is free and open to the

public via livestream, will be held in person for the graduating

seniors and two ticketed, fully COVID-19 vaccinated guests

observing Vermont and federal Centers for Disease Control

and Prevention COVID-19 safety protocols. Learn more here:

norwich.edu/commencement.

Story Time at Home!

We have 10 themed Story Time at Home bags you can

check out and bring home. Each bag contains a collection of

picture books (both fiction and non-fiction titles) and a related

craft - with all the supplies and instructions you need to

complete it. Themes available are Snow, Owls, Transportation,

Butterflies, Friendship, Music & Dance, Moon, Gratitude,

Pumpkins, and Bedtime. Take a little of the magic of story

time home with you! Have a theme you’d like to see? We

would love to hear about it!

Monthly Book Group for Adults: Fourth Mondays at 7

p.m.

Join us for the Jaquith book group. For copies of the book,

please stop by the library. New members are always welcome,

and it’s only one hour a month! We are currently using

Zoom for our meetings. April 26- Cringeworthy: A Theory of

Awkwardness by Melissa Dahl … May 24- French Exit by

Patrick deWitt

Borrow a Game or a Puzzle!

We have a pretty hefty collection of games and puzzles that

you can take home and enjoy. We are working on getting

them all in our online catalog, but in the meantime, you can

still borrow them! For a list of games available, click here.

Checkout our Makerspace Kits!

Did you know we have STEAM-focused Maker kits catalogued

and ready for checkout? Learn about coding and

robotics, explore how electricity and circuitry works, design

and build a marble run, try your hand at calligraphy, build

geometric shapes with play dough – and more! For a full list

and description of our Maker kits, click the link and scroll

down: https://www.jaquithpubliclibrary.org/new-and-featured-kids.html

Supported in part by the Vermont Humanities

Council.

Chapters in History Seven; Deeper into the Middle East

Second Saturday afternoons at 2:00 p.m. through May

A free public program series co-sponsored by The

Marshfield Historical Society and the Jaquith Public Library.

May 8: Leadership in Turbulent Times by Doris Kearns

Goodwin. Books are available for loan from the library. For

more information, please call 454-1680. “The past changes a

little every time we retell it.” ---Hilary Mantel

Our Online Services:

Online access to eBooks and audiobooks is still available

through Green Mountain Overdrive/Listen-up Vermont and

Libby and they can be accessed through the library’s website.

Both of these services allow users to either stream or download

audiobooks and eBooks and are free to library patrons.

There are also digital resources available from the library,

such as VT Online Library, Universal Class and Consumer

Reports. You can find links to all of these from our website:

www.jaquithpubliclibrary.org/digital.html.

April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 9


Dolores Helen DeForge

Dolores Helen DeForge, 90, of North

Ferrisburgh, VT, passed away on April

11, 2021, at the McClure Miller Respite

House due to natural causes.

Dolores was born on July 23, 1930,

(her mother’s birthday), and was the

daughter of L. Ribelle Crozzoli and

Vasta (Dwire) Crozzoli.

In 1948, Dolores graduated from

Montpelier High School.

Just two years later, she would marry Clyde L. DeForge on

July 26, 1950. Together they had three children, Barbara

DeWitt, David DeForge, and Steven DeForge. She worked as

an administrative assistant in the budget and management

department for the state of Vermont until retiring.

Dolores loved traveling with her husband. Her favorite

places to go were Hawaii, Florida, as well as Montana,

where she could take in all of the beautiful sights and scenery.

Dolores was predeceased by her parents, her child David,

and her husband Clyde.

Survivors include her daughter Barbara (Gary), Steven, and

David’s wife Charlene Phlypo, her sister Barbara Conner

(Ted), as well as several nieces, nephews, and cousins.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to

the McClure Miller Respite House (3113 Roosevelt Hwy,

Colchester, VT 05446).

A memorial service will be held on July 31, 2021, at 11:00

a.m. at Guare & Sons Funeral Home.

Online condolences may be left at www.guareandsons.com.

Bruce D. Marshall

Bruce D. Marshall – 77 of

East Montpelier passed away

peacefully after a long battle with cancer

on Sunday morning, April 18, 2021. Born

in Burlington on September 4, 1943, he

was the son of the late Dwayne C.

Marshall and Shirley M. (Keith)

Marshall.

Bruce was married to his wife of 52

years, Pauline “Polly” (Roy) Marshall on

June 22, 1968 in Barre VT.

Bruce graduated from Waterbury Highschool (1962) and

then enlisted to serve his country as a member of the U.S

Airforce. Bruce was active-duty form June 1962 to June 1966

when he entered the VTANG and served for many years.

Bruce worked numerous years at Merriam Graves, Zayers,

Grand Union, and finished up his working years as a salesman

for Kenco Janitorial in East Barre Vt.

Bruce’s favorite pastimes were fishing in the local rivers

and lakes and going on long road trips on his motorcycle with

his wife and son. He enjoyed the outdoors and appreciated

nature’s beauty and all living creatures (especially his squirrel

Charlie). Bruce lived a life of positivity and humor. He was

quick to tell a corny joke, sing a silly tune or make a goofy

face to bring us joy and hear us laugh. He loved the simple

things that life had to offer; a quiet evening at home with family

and friends, playing with his grandchildren and greatgrandson

and relaxing in front of his computer playing video

games or watching funny videos. His passion was building

RC model airplanes (his favorite being the P-51) and flying

them at the airfield in Berlin. Some of Bruce’s happiest

memories were camping on Lake Carmi with his wife and

kids with the Coghlan family every summer.

Bruce is survived by his wife, Pauline “Polly” (Roy)

Marshall of East Montpelier; his son Shawn Marshall and his

wife Lara of Palm Bay, FL; his daughter Tammy Marshall

and her partner Andreas Atkinson of Wilder, VT; his beloved

grandkids Michael LaClair and Christina Baril of Pratt, KS;

Tyler Marshall and Bree Rome of Wilder, VT; Brandon

Marshall of Barre, VT; Alysha Marshall of Palm Bay, FL;

Shaylyn Dearborn of Harrisburg, PA; Cody Marshall of

Northfield, VT; Joel Marshall of Barre, VT; Cassandra

Marshall of Wilder, VT; Richard Beach of Northfield, VT;

and a great-grandson Tyson Marshall of Wilder, VT; a sister

Phyllis Marshall of Williston, VT; a brother Steven Marshall

and his wife Bonnie of Waterbury Center, VT; a brother-inlaw

Douglas Couture of Duxbury, VT as well as extended

family.

Bruce was predeceased by a sister Joyce Couture and a

brother Neil Marshall.

A special thank you from the family to Angie Atkinson for

caring for Bruce during his battle with cancer.

A private burial service will be held at The Vermont

Veteran’s Memorial Cemetery in Randolph VT.

For those who wish, memorial gifts would be appreciated

as donations to: The American Cancer Society.

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page 10 The WORLD April 28, 2021

KATHERINE B. BISSON peacefully passed

away at Woodridge Nursing and Rehabilitation

Center on Saturday, April 17, 2021, at the age of

98. Katherine was born in Montpelier on Sept. 2,

1922, to Charles and Bernice (Pembroke) Harpan.

She graduated from St. Michael’s High

School in Montpelier. After graduating, she

worked as a switchboard operator. On Sept. 7, 1946, she married

her high school sweetheart, Raymond Bisson. She will be

remembered for the all-telling twinkle in her Irish eyes. Katherine

is survived by her six children and their spouses, sister,

grandchildren and extended family. There will be no calling

hours. A Mass of Christian burial to honor and celebrate her

life was held on Thursday, April 22, 2021, at 10 a.m. in St.

Monica Catholic Church in Barre. Burial followed in St. Sylvesters

Cemeter in ower ebsterville. In lieu o owers,

consider a donation to St. Monica or St. Michael schools or to

Woodridge Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Berlin. Arrangements

are in the care of the Pruneau-Polli Funeral Home,

58 Summer St. in Barre.

LENA PASQUALINA FELICETA (AUGUS-

TONI) CANAS died peacefully on Sunday,

April 11, 2021, at the Miller McClure Respite

House in Colchester, just two months shy of her

96th birthday. Lena leaves her nephews, niece,

grandson and extended family. She graduated

from Montpelier High School in 1943. She married,

Emilio Canas, on April 25, 1981. She loved her weekly

card games at the Montpelier Senior Center. Her kitchen was a

dispensar o lasagna, blueberr mufins, apple pies and an

assortment of wonderful Italian dishes. A private burial will

take place in May. A celebration of Lena’s life will be held this

summer with a date to be determined. In lieu o owers, dona

tions to Montpelier Food Pantry, 137 Main St., www.justbasicvt.org,

or Montpelier Senior Center, 58 Barre St., both in

Montpelier, VT 05602, would be appreciated as these organizations

were meaningful to Lena.

LEE E. FLANDERS, 92, a longtime

resident, passed away on Sunday,

April 11, 2021, at his home. Born on Jan. 26,

1929, on the family farm in Washington Village,

he was the son of Archie and Florence (Cutler)

Flanders. Lee attended Spaulding High School,

most days walking the 12 miles each way. In

1955, he enlisted in the U.S. Army serving one tour of duty at

Fort Bliss in Texas. On Dec. 18, 1970, he married Colleen

“Sally” McKnight. Survivors include his wife, and her children,

and his beloved cat, “Jenny.” A graveside service to

honor and celebrate his life will be held at the convenience of

his family in July in the Maple Hill Cemetery in Washington.

There are no calling hours. Arrangements are by Hooker Whitcomb

Funeral Home, 7 Academy St., Barre. For a memorial

guestbook, please visit www.hookerwhitcomb.com.

THÉRÈSE HIGGINS passed away unexpectedly

at her home in Montpelier on April 9, 2021.

Born in Québec City on Nov. 4, 1928, to Charles-

Eugène and Amarilda Malenfant, she was the 11th

of 14 children. She attended schools in Québec

and learned enough English to work as a telephone

operator for Bell Canada. She is survived

by her three children and their spouses, siblings, grandchildren

and extended family. Services will be held in Montpelier once

the Canadian border reopens. Contributions in Thérèse’s memory

may be made to the Montpelier Food Pantry.

KARL EINO HUOPPI, 59, of Barre

Town passed away unexpectedly at

his home. He was born in Concord, Massachusetts,

on Oct. 3, 1961, the son of Paul and Jean

(Pierce) Huoppi. Karl graduated from Hazen

Union High in 1980. Karl worked most of his

career as a firefighter at urlington International

Airport. Survivors include his siblings, and many nieces and

nephews. Interment will be held in Vermont Veterans Memorial

Cemetery at a later date. Those wishing to express online

condolences may do so at www.guareandsons.com.

SYLVIA ANN (HOOD) LEBOURVEAU, 76,

formerly of Middlesex, Vermont, passed away

peacefully Tuesday, April 13, 2021, in Sarasota,

Florida. She was born May 15, 1944, in Montpelier,

Vermont, the daughter of James Sr. and M.

Eva (Cassavaw) Hood. Sylvia attended St. Michael’s

elementary, middle and high schools in

Montpelier, Vermont, and St. Elizabeth College of Nursing in

Utica, New York. Soon after graduating nursing school and

becoming an RN, Sylvia met Ron LeBourveau and they were

married in Montpelier on Aug. 2, 1969. Her loving spirit and

joyful heart touched the hearts and lives of many. Sylvia is

survived by her children, grandchildren, siblings and extended

family. A celebration of Sylvia’s life will take place this summer

in Middlesex, Vermont. Contributions in Sylvia’s memory

may be made to the Family Center of Washington County Vermont.

Online tribute gifts can be made at https://fcwcvt.org/

donate/ or by mail to 383 Sherwood Drive, Montpelier, VT

05602. Arrangements entrusted to Robert Toale and Sons Funeral

Home at Palms Memorial Park, 170 Honore Ave., Sarasota,

FL 34232. (941) 371-4962.

JOHN MATTSON, 95, of Cedar

Drive passed away on Monday, April

19, 2021, at his home, with his family at his bedside.

Born on Sept. 11, 1925, in Barre, he was the

son of Carl and Elsa (Armfelt) Mattson. John attended

local elementary schools and graduated

from Montpelier High School on June 11, 1943.

On May 17, 1944, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy and served as

an Electricians Mate 3rd Class until his honorable discharge

on April 5, 1946. On Dec. 9, 1944, he married Marjorie Eastman.

They made their home in Barre. Marjorie passed away in

2013. Survivors include his daughters-in-law, grandchildren,

and extended family. The graveside service to honor and celebrate

his life was held on Saturday, April 24, 2021, at 1 p.m. in

Hope Cemetery in Barre. Services provided by the Hooker

Whitcomb Funeral Home, 7 Academy St., Barre. For a memorial

guestbook, please visit www.hookerwhitcomb.com.

JEAN GORDON (ROBB) SHANNON, age

83, of North Billerica, Massachusetts, passed

away on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. She was the

wife to the late Richard Shannon and the daughter

to the late Cornelius and Barbara (Sandison)

Robb. Jean was born on Dec. 24, 1937, in Barre,

Vermont. She was educated in Barre and graduated

from Spalding High School. Jean met her husband, Richard,

at the wedding of his brother, Donald and her best friend,

Kathy. They were married on March 7, 1970. Jean is survived

by her three daughters, grandchildren and extended family.

There will be no services for Jean. A burial will be held in

Hope Cemetery in Barre, Vermont, on a later date. Arrangements

have been entrusted to the care of Blake Chelmsford

Funeral Home, 24 Worthen St., Chelmsford. For online guestbook,

visit chelmsfordfuneralhome.com.

LINDA MARIE DINDO-ST. JOHN, a lifetime

resident of Barre, Vermont, passed from this life

into eternal life unexpectedly on April 14, 2021.

Linda was born to Howard and Pauline Dindo on

April 16, 1946. She was the oldest of four brothers

and three sisters. She was employed at Grand

Union Grocery for 35 years. On Aug. 29, 1992,

she married Ron St. John and resided with him in Barre. She is

survived by her daughters, siblings, grandchildren and extended

family. A Mass of Christian burial was celebrated at St.

Monica Church on Summer Street in Barre, Monday, April 19,

at 11 a.m., followed by a celebration of life at the VFW, 527

ast arre oad, arre, Vermont. It is reuested that owers

be sent to St. Monica, donations to the VFW Post 790. A family

service will be held in the Berlin Corners Cemetery at a

later date. There will be no calling hours. Arrangements are in

the care of the Pruneau-Polli Funeral Home, 58 Summer St. in

Barre. Those wishing to send online condolences may do so at:

www.pruneaupollifuneralhome.com.

MARILYN T. TURNER, 83, formerly of Barre Town, died

Wednesday, April 14, 2021, at her home in Winter Haven,

Florida. A full obituary will be published at a later date. Arrangements

are by Hooker Whitcomb Funeral Home in Barre.

MARY WELCH, 82, lost her battle with cancer

and passed away. Mary was born on July 23,

1938, at Gifford Hospital in Randolph, Vermont,

to John and Leona (Gratton) Hackett. She was a

graduate of Braintree Randolph Union High

School (class ‘56) and O’Brien’s School of Cosmetology

in Burlington. Mary is survived by her

sister, Nancy Hutchins and extended family. There are no calling

hours. A graveside service at the cemetery on Route 14 in

East Randolph will be held at a future date. Memorial contributions

are encouraged to benefit Central Vermont ome

Health & Hospice in Berlin, Vermont or to Mary’s favorite

charity, Central Vermont Humane Society, P.O. Box 687,

Montpelier, VT 05601. Arrangements are in the care of the

Pruneau-Polli Funeral Home, 58 Summer St. in Barre. Those

wishing to send online condolences may do so at: www.pruneaupollifuneralhome.com.


2

Lt. Governor Gray Joins Second Gentleman Emhoff for

Roundtable on Vaccines and Calls for Investments in

Telehealth, Economic Wellbeing of Women

Lt. Governor Gray joined state leaders in welcoming

Second Gentleman Doug Emhoff to Vermont and joined Mr.

Emhoff for a roundtable with Governor Scott, Congressman

Welch, Burlington Mayor Weinberger and frontline workers.

The Community Health Centers of Burlington hosted the

roundtable with Grand Isle Fire Chief Bill Baron speaking to

vaccination efforts in rural communities and Dr. Heather Stein

and Alicia Schwarz speaking to the Community Health

Centers’ services to meet the public health needs of marginalized

groups, including members of Vermont’s BIPOC community

and former refugees.

Lt. Governor Gray spoke of Vermont’s effort as an aging,

rural state, particularly as one of the oldest states in the nation,

to get vaccines to older Vermonters in rural communities. Lt.

Governor Gray praised the work of health centers across the

state and applauded support for Vermont’s community health

centers in the American Rescue Plan.

“Our community health centers continue to meet Vermonters

where they’re at,” Lt. Governor Gray said. “The $33 million

in the American Rescue Plan for the Community Health

Centers of Burlington and the 10 community health centers

serving our rural communities remains critical to our ongoing

response as well as meeting community public health needs.”

Lt. Governor Gray also shared some of Vermont’s efforts to

address systemic inequities in vaccine access and overall

inequities in Vermont’s public health system. Lt. Governor

Gray noted that Vermont remains one of the least diverse

states in the nation and that fewer than 6% of Vermonters

identify as people of color. “This is not something we’re

proud of,” Lt. Governor Gray said, “This pandemic exposed

deep and persistent inequities in our public health system.”

Lt. Governor Gray discussed her volunteer efforts at

BIPOC vaccination clinics in Rutland and applauded the

Vermont Medical Organizations and Health Care Leaders

Call on Governor Scott and Vermont General Assembly to

Denounce Proposals to Restrict Access to Gender Care

The American Academy of Pediatrics Vermont Chapter and

University of Vermont Children’s Hospital, joined by the

Vermont Medical Society, Vermont Academy of Family

Physicians, Vermont Psychiatric Association, Vermont

American Academy of Emergency Physicians and the Physician

Assistant Academy of Vermont denounce the large number of

legislative proposals throughout the nation that will harm transgender

and gender diverse youth. Every individual is entitled to

high quality evidence-based medical care regardless of gender

or sexual orientation. These proposals drive discrimination,

reinforce stigma and create barriers to care.

We are thankful to provide care in a state that has routinely

recognized the rights of young people, the rights of LGBTQ

identified persons and the autonomy of medical providers, but

we know we are not immune to attacks on access to care for

transgender and gender diverse Vermonters. We call on

Governor Scott and the Vermont General Assembly to support

full access to gender care and oppose any proposals that would:

• Limit access to evidence-based medical and psychological

care

• Prevent youth from playing sports alongside their peers.

“The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that

youth who identify as transgender have access to comprehensive,

gender-affirming, and developmentally appropriate health

care that is provided in a safe and inclusive clinical space. We

also recommend that playing on sports teams helps youth

develop self-esteem, correlates positively with overall mental

health, and appears to have a protective effect against suicide.”

(AAP Speaks Out Against Bills Harming Transgender Youth)

Every major medical association in the United States recognizes

the medical necessity of transition-related care for

improving the physical and mental health of transgender people.

We stand with our national colleagues in the American

Academy of Pediatrics, the American Association of Child and

Adolescent Psychiatry, the National Education Association,

and numerous other major health, education and child welfare

organizations that signed on to a statement drafted by the

Human Rights Campaign opposing these bills.

Transgender youth face many obstacles and barriers to their

mental health and well-being. A statement published by the

American Medical Association states, “Transgender minors

also face a significantly heightened risk of suicide. But research

has demonstrated that improved body satisfaction and selfesteem

following the receipt of gender-affirming care is protective

against poorer mental health and supports healthy relationships

with parents and peers. Studies also demonstrate dramatic

reductions in suicide attempts, as well as decreased rates

of depression and anxiety.”

A Vermont parent of a transgender youth speaks with intimate

experience – “Being 13 is difficult enough, you don’t feel

comfortable in your own skin either physically or metaphorically.

Gender affirming care means that my son sees his health

care providers as allies and valuable resources. It means that he

is empowered to feel comfortable taking good care of the body

• • •

Administration’s launch of the Vermont Multilingual

Coronavirus Task Force to support the dissemination of

COVID-19 vaccination information in Swahili, Arabic,

Somali, Nepali and many other languages spoken in Vermont

communities. The Lt. Governor noted the importance of giving

marginalized groups a voice in Vermont’s recovery and

discussed her “Seat at the Table” series where she recently

hosted members of Vermont’s former refugee community to

highlight how Vermont can build a more equitable and culturally

competent public health system. Lt. Governor Gray also

called for investments in broadband as critical to full public

health access.

“Vermonters will not have full equity in access to public

health until Vermonters have full equity in access to affordable

broadband,” Gray said.

In response to a final question from Mr. Emhoff to the

frontline workers, the majority of whom were women, could

be better supported, Gray highlighted how women, particularly

Vermont women, had endured on the frontlines of this

pandemic as healthcare workers, childcare providers and

long-term care providers.

“Women have been disproportionately impacted by this

pandemic and especially here in Vermont,” Gray said, noting

that “74% of unemployment claims filed in Vermont in the

fall were filed by women, the highest percentage in the

nation.”

Gray thanked Mr. Emhoff, Vice President Harris and the

Biden Administration for their national leadership on addressing

the economic well-being of women and stated, “One of

the best things we can do for Vermont women, particularly

those who have been on the frontlines of this pandemic, is to

make affordable, quality, childcare as well as paid family and

medical leave, a reality.”

he has while looking forward joyfully to the body he wants;

knowing that his health care providers are fully invested in

helping him get there. It means that he has the space and

resources to attend to his mental health with absolutely no

shame. It means that his family does not live in fear that our

beloved boy will become part of the statistics of trans kids who

attempt suicide. Gender affirming health care is a human right.

Everyone deserves to walk through this world comfortable in

their own skin.”

As physicians and health care leaders in Vermont, we believe

that medical decisions belong to transgender and gender

diverse youth, their parents and their health care practitioners.

We oppose any efforts for legislative interference in this decision

making, and we call on legislators across the country to

reject these harmful measures.

We vow to continue to support gender diverse young people,

their families, their communities and their care teams and invite

others to join us in this commitment.

Sincerely,

Rebecca Bell, M.D., FAAP

President, AAP Vermont Chapter

Lewis First, M.D., FAAP

Chief of Pediatrics, UVM Children’s Hospital

Erica Gibson, M.D., FAAP

Medical Director, Transgender Youth Program

UVM Children’s Hospital

Simha Ravven, M.D.

President, Vermont Medical Society

Katie Marvin, M.D.

President, VT Academy of Family Physicians

Joe Lasek, M.D.

President, Vermont Psychiatric Association

Ryan Sexton, M.D.

President, VT Emergency Physicians

Sarah Bushweller, PA-C

President, Physician Assistant Academy of VT

If you or someone you know is contemplating suicide, there

is help available.

• Trevor Project: 866-488-7386

• Trans Life Line: 877-565-8860

• Vermont Crisis Text Line: 741741

• Vermont Crisis Lines

Other Resources:

• Legislative Tracker: Anti-Transgender Medical Care Bans

• Legislative Tracker: Anti-Transgender Student Athletics

• AAP: Ensuring Comprehensive Care Support for Transgender

and Gender Diverse Children and Adolescents

• AAP Healthy Children: Support Resources for Families of

Gender Diverse Youth

• UVM Children’s Hospital: Timna’s Story - Raising a transgender

child

• UVM Children’s Hospital Transgender Resources

• Outright Vermont

• • •

Scammers Try New Ways to Trick You

How many phone calls did you

receive today? Of those, how many

were scam calls? So far today I’ve

received eight.

This is nothing new, but the tricks that scammers use are

changing, and we need to be up on all of their tactics to steal

our identities and money.

The latest scammer craze is something called tele-transformer.

This is step one in the scammer bag of tricks before

handing you off to the closers who will pull you into a deal.

Sometimes the message will leave a call-back number. Or

they’ll claim they’re returning your call, or calling because you

recently bought one of their products.

If you answer, a typical message will say, “This is Kristen

with benefits advisers calling on a recorded line. How are you

today?” No matter what you say, they launch into their spiel,

sometimes about Medicare, sometimes about Social Security,

or your mortgage or your student loan, or car insurance, your

disability or senior-living home improvement. The range of

topics is long.

Just hang up.

With other types of calls, however, what they’re looking for

is “yes.” With that simple word, they can steal your identity

and your money.

Here’s how it works: The first question they usually ask is

“Can you hear me?” What they want is for you to say “yes.”

Sometimes the question is “Are you having a good day?” or “Is

this X?” if they have your real name.

Do not say “Yes”!

Once they have a recording of that one word from you,

they’re free to do all kinds of things. They can sign you up for

a service or send items to you in the mail. They have proof,

they claim, that you agreed to those ... because they have your

“yes” recorded in your own voice! Just hang up.

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CONSTRUCTION UPDATE

I-89 Bridges 37S and 38S Berlin

TRAFFIC IMPACT: Motorists will encounter a lane reduction in the

Northbound and Southbound lanes of the interstate. Travel will be

reduced to one lane of travel within the construction zone.

Traffi c has been switched to the crossovers on the interstate. This

pattern will remain in place throughout the construction season, into

the Fall.

Width restrictions will be in place on both the Northbound and

Southbound lanes of travel. Northbound will be restricted to 18 feet,

and Southbound will be restricted to 13 feet.

A speed reduction of 55 mph is in place, and fi nes are doubled for

speeding within the construction zone.

CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES:

Concrete barrier installation on the interstate has been completed.

Bridge rail on Bridge 38S has been removed. Removal of bridge rail on

Bridge 37S began today.

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38S. Demolition of this bridge is scheduled to begin on Tuesday,

4/27/21. During saw cutting and demolition of Bridge 38S, the Route

62 roadway width under the bridge will be reduced to further prevent

vehicles from driving under the work zone on Bridge 38S

On Tuesday, 04/27 crews will be saw cutting Bridge 37S. During saw

cutting of Bridge 37S, alternating one-way traffi c will be in affect on

Crosstown Road to prevent vehicles from driving under the work zone

on Bridge 37S.

Crews are fi nishing up the public protection on the underside of Bridge

38S, and should complete this work by the end of the week. Motorists

may see a slowing of traffi c on Route 62, with the presence of a fl agger

to assist with slowing traffi c speed.

LOCATION: The town of Berlin on Interstate 89. Bridge 37S spans

Crosstown Road. Bridge 38S spans Vermont Route 62.

PROJECTED COMPLETION: Fall 2021

CONTACT INFORMATION: Natalie Boyle

Phone - 802-855-3893 Email - nboyle@eivtech.

entral Vermont’s esaer

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page 12 The WORLD April 28, 2021

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• • •

Why Are We Not Supporting Our Military Retirees?

“Expungement Bill Is a Jobs Bill – and the Right Thing to Do”

On Getting and/or Staying Healthy

By G. E. Shuman

First of all, concerning the title of this

column, I’m not sure that you can get

or stay healthy. At least, I’m not sure

that I can. Still, I’m not as young and handsome

as I used to be, well, not as young

anyway, and it seems that the goal of maintaining health is an

exercise, (pun intended) in taking one step forward and two

steps back, for me.

I think I’ve tried everything. There are more diet plans than

you can shake a stick at. You should eat only meat and no veggies.

You should avoid all meat and only eat veggies. You

should avoid all dairy products or eat more dairy products. I

think more dairy is right; that’s why I put powdered artificial

creamer in my coffee. That should count. It’s the same color

as dairy. Anyway, I can’t drink black coffee. Also, how can

you eat a supreme pizza without cheese? By the way, if we

really ‘are what we eat,’ I’m sticking with spaghetti. Have you

ever seen a skinnier food than that?

Several years ago my doctor told me that the first thing to

do to avoid high blood pressure is to take the salt shaker off

the table. That was good advice and I followed it. Now, whenever

I eat a meal I have to go and find the salt shaker because

it’s not on the table. I think my doctor wanted me to get that

little bit of exercise, you know, playing hide and seek with the

salt shaker. What a sneaky guy he is.

That same doctor once came right out and suggested ‘exercise’

to me. For a long time after that, I thought he had said

‘extra fries.’ When I finally figured out what he meant, I did

give running a try, but I spilled my coffee.

• • •

• • •

By Rep. Rob LaClair and Rep. Brian Savage

For the past 5+ years, Vermont House Republicans have

been working to exempt military retirement pay from state

income taxes. Governor Scott has included this commonsense

measure in every single budget he has proposed to the

Legislature. In fact, Vermont is one of only three states that

fully taxes military retirement income. Yet each and every

year, the majority in Montpelier refuses to let this bill even be

debated by the full House of Representatives. It simply dies

slowly in committee.

But this April, things changed. The Vermont Democrats

were eager to get a revenue-raising bill out of their committee,

Senate Bill 53. This bill raises mutual fund fees by $6 million,

the highest levels in the nation, and creates a new “cloud tax”

on prewritten software. Bear in mind that these tax and fee

increases are being proposed in a year when Vermont is

receiving billions in unanticipated revenue windfalls and federal

COVID-19 support. Let us be clear: there is absolutely no

rhyme or reason to raise Vermonters’ taxes at a time when

they need economic relief more than ever.

In order to maintain the illusion of affordability, the majority

party attached an exemption of the first $10,000 in military

retirement pay from state income taxes to this bill. This is an

insulting half-measure. It would create one of the weakest

military retirement relief schemes in the nation, and by far the

weakest in the New England states.

A bipartisan group of legislators tried to raise this exemption

to the first $30,000 of military retirement pay; a more

reasonable step in the right direction. This modest amendment

failed. Even though more than 90 percent of Republicans supported

the measure, it died on the House floor because more

than 75 percent of Democrats voted against it.

This is not about money. The cost of a $30,000 exemption

would have been less than $2 million per year, while the cost

of a full repeal would have been less than $3 million per year.

This is a microscopic portion of Vermont’s $7 billion budget,

which will be boosted by even more federal aid dollars this

year.

Now more than ever is the right time to give our military

retirees a break. Refusing to do so not only sends a poor signal

to military retirees already living in Vermont, it also discourages

military retirees from around the country from looking to

Vermont as a place to settle down.

In the midst of our efforts to reboot our economy and, in

light of billions in extra revenue, we should not be raising

taxes. We should be finding ways to provide relief. That starts

with giving our military retirees a long overdue break, just

like nearly every state in the country has already done.

Representative Rob LaClair (R-Barre Town) is the Vermont

House Co-Assistant Minority Leader. He serves on the House

Committee on Government Operations

Representative Brian Savage (R-Swanton) is the Vermont

House Co-Assistant Minority Leader. He serves on the House

Transportation Committee

By Attorney General T.J. Donovan

As Vermont and our nation continue to work toward a more

fair and equitable criminal justice system, the Vermont

Legislature is considering an important bill that can provide a

fresh start for thousands of Vermonters, promote public

safety, and reduce incarceration. S.7 expands Vermonters’

ability to expunge old criminal records. Clearing old criminal

records for Vermonters who have served their penalty and

remained trouble-free for years is pro-jobs, pro-opportunity,

pro-fairness, and plain common sense. With the passage of

this one bill, we can provide thousands of Vermonters with

economic opportunity that has been long denied because of

the “scarlet letter” of an old record that, often times, has no

bearing on our public safety but carries tremendous, longterm

unintended consequences for the individual. I’ve always

believed the best form of public safety is a good job. One way

to make Vermont more affordable is to give Vermonters the

opportunity to achieve their dreams by unleashing their entrepreneurial

spirit and trusting them to make their own decisions

about their future.

S.7 will greatly increase access to sealing and expungement—the

legal terms for clearing old criminal records—for

those who have remained out of trouble for at least five years

after the completion of their sentence. For more serious

offenses the waiting period is longer, and the most serious

offenses will not be eligible for expungement at all. Judges

make the final decision on whether to grant an expungement

or sealing.

Greater access to expungements and sealing will increase

economic opportunity for low-income Vermonters and effectively

increase Vermont’s workforce. A criminal record is

often a barrier to employment or an obstacle to getting a

better-paying job. Studies show that people who obtain

expungements see their wages increase and are more easily

able to find employment.

This bill also protects the public. Studies show that providing

people with access to steadier- and higher-paying work

will lower the risk of re-offense and criminal behavior. In

addition, data shows that for people who successfully receive

an expungement, their risk of re-arrest is below that of the

general population.

The notion that old records help to accurately assess risk

and ensure public safety is simply not backed by the data.

After years with no further offenses, a person’s risk of committing

a new crime drops to that of the average person in the

general population. Moreover, contact with the criminal justice

system has had a disparate impact on people of color and

the poor in our state. S.7 is a small step towards leveling the

playing field by providing a clean slate for so many of our

neighbors.

Access to expungements and sealing is also a matter of

basic fairness. No judge or prosecutor ever intends to take

away economic opportunity long after a sentence has been

served – but that’s exactly what records do. A criminal record

can have a devastating impact on economic prospects for the

rest of a person’s life. It impacts their ability to engage in their

community, to secure stable housing, accompany their children

on a school trip, coach their kids in a youth sports

league, and jeopardizes their access higher education.

I extend my gratitude to leaders in the Legislature, notably

Sen. Richard Sears and Rep. Maxine Grad, for their leadership

on this critical issue. I am also grateful to the many

advocates in Vermont who have advanced the cause of fairness

and opportunity through the expansion of expungements.

S.7 is in the legislative process and still being refined

to address any stakeholder concerns.

Passage of this law will increase job opportunities, fortify

public safety, and prevent further marginalization of

Vermonters, often the poor and people of color, in the name

of public safety. I urge the Legislature to pass S.7, and I urge

the Governor to sign it into law.

Honestly, back to the subject of food, I have come to realize

that the best all-around (They are vaguely round, like me.) diet

food must be potato chips. Think about it. They’re full of

important vitamins and minerals. (That salt is a mineral.)

They’re boiled in genuine vegetable oil or animal fat, so if

you’re a just-meat or just-veggie person, just check the bag.

They’re sliced thin for portion control, or you can eat that

whole bag so you don’t have to count any calories. Also, they’re

already in shape. Round IS a shape. (Like me, as I said.)

For months I was sure that the covid epidemic, through

keeping me at home, would likely help me lose weight. For

many months my wife and I went to no restaurants. (Driving

through the Burger King drive-through is NOT the same as

actually going to the restaurant.)

Also, being retired now, I’ve been getting a lot of exercise

right here in the house. I can’t tell you how many trips I have

made all the way from the living room to the kitchen fridge

and that doesn’t even count putting the recliner in its upright

position and standing up.

Lastly, in my futile but ongoing efforts to get and stay

healthy, about five years ago I bought myself a new bike. I

used it often for the first three summers. The past two it has

hung in the cellar, collecting dust. I am now determined that

this coming summer I’m going to go down there and at least

wipe the dust off that poor thing. I’ve learned that bicycles are

a lot like all those aforementioned diets. They don’t help

much unless you stay on them.

Please don’t judge me too harshly on the content of this column.

This stuff is what happens when I’m left unsupervised.


Letter to editor,

Bears are exiting their winter dens, so it’s the perfect time

for Protect Our Wildlife’s new bear report titled, “Vermont

Black Bears and How to Effectively Manage Conflict” that

can be found on their website. The report is the product of a

five-month-long project launched by an Environmental

Sciences student at the University of Vermont and was overseen

by Protect Our Wildlife. Contributors to the report also

include a Stowe, VT resident with a Ph.D. in microbiology

and molecular genetics with post-doctoral research experience

from Harvard Medical School, as well as an ecologist, and

other experts with varied backgrounds.

The report touches on a number of matters from possible

reasons why there was such a dramatic increase in bear complaints

reported to VT Fish & Wildlife in 2020 to simple

things we can each do to prevent bear conflicts from happening

in the first place. One easy thing we can do right now is

bring in our bird feeders for the season. Taking bird feeders in

at night isn’t sufficient, since spilled seed on the ground will

The Battle of Algiers (1965)

The Algerians fought a notoriously brutal war of liberation

from 1954 to 1962.

Leftists Westerners at the time romanticized the

Algerians, wanting to believe that they were fighting for liberty,

equality, or even Marxism. They weren’t. The primary

inspiration for the war was well-deserved hatred of their

French colonial oppressors.

Early in “The Battle of Algiers,” young Arab Ali La Pointe

gets tripped by a French jerk while running away from the

cops. Another French jerk laughs in his face. Ali La Pointe

shocks us and the Frenchmen by punching the laughing man

right in the jaw.

To director Gillo Pontecorvo, this is the unvarnished truth

behind the Algerian Revolution. It was essentially a vile bully

being punched in the face by a vicious kid who could no longer

take the abuse. No good guys, no idealism, and no mercy.

The 130 years of French colonial rule in Algeria was awful.

The French mined Algeria bare and kept the loot. White plantation

owners grabbed the best farmland and grew grapes to

import to Europe. The Algerians were left with the worst land

and the worst jobs.

Colonial Algeria was not profitable for the French, by the

way. The average Frenchman had to pay for the soldiers and

police that kept the colony in line.

In French Algeria, the French people lost, the Algerian

people lost big time, and a handful of juiced-in businessmen

got super rich. That is globalization in a nutshell.

Gillo Pontecorvo shows us how the revolutionary violence

escalated with unflinching realism.

First, the National Liberation Front (FLN) guerillas assassinated

French police and stole their guns.

The French responded by putting checkpoints all over

Algiers and frisking all the men who wanted to pass into the

white part of town. The FLN worked around this by enlisting

women and children and using terrorist time bombs to

attract hungry bears who possess a superior sense of smell.

The 2020 bear hunt produced a record 921 bears killed,

with half being female. Vermont’s bear hunt is one of the

longest in the country, including the contentious practice of

using radio-collared hounds. The bear report includes research

that reveals that the hunting season is not an effective tool to

reduce bear conflicts. The report impresses the following on

Vermonters, “Before we choose lethal methods of bear management,

we also need to consider the ethics and impact to

bear families. Bears form tight family units with the cubs

staying with their mother for about a year and a half. When we

implement lethal control, this disrupts the bear’s natural lifecycle,

potentially leaving a cub to grow up without a mother.”

We cannot hunt our way out of bear conflicts. It is on us to

be good bear neighbors.

Brenna Galdenzi, President & Co-founder, Protect Our

Wildlife

Stowe, Vermont

Secretary of State Jim Condos, Lieutenant Governor Molly Gray

and Attorney General T.J. Donovan Sign Letter Calling Upon

Corporate Leadership to Speak Out Against Voter Suppression

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos, Lieutenant Governor

Molly Gray and Attorney General T.J. Donovan joined

a bipartisan coalition of over 50 current or former statewide

elected leaders in signing a letter calling upon corporate leadership

to speak out against voter suppression, following the

passage of Georgia’s controversial voting rights restriction

law. According to the non-partisan Brennan Center for Justice

361 bills aimed at restricting the rights of eligible voters have

been introduced in 47 states.

The letter states, in part “we are asking the business leaders

in our states, and throughout the country, to add their voices

to the growing chorus of corporations standing on the right

side of history. When the foundation of our democracy— the

freedom of citizens in our states to cast their ballots— is under

attack, it is powerful and important when Americans speak up,

especially those in leadership positions.”

“The true voter fraud in this country is to deny any eligible

American from registering to vote and casting their ballot,”

said Secretary Condos, who is Vermont’s chief election official.

ow, more than ever, on the heels o record voter par

ticipation in the 2020 election, we need to come together as a

countr to firml reject these undemocratic attempts to turn

• • •

• • •

back the clock on voting rights.”

“I’m proud of our state’s leadership in removing barriers to

the ballot box. In the last election, we saw record turnout not

only in Vermont but across the nation. We must oppose efforts

to rollback voter participation,” said Lieutenant Governor

Gray. “We’ve witnessed the power of Vermont businesses and

businesses nationally in protecting human

rights, promoting

social responsibility, and upholding the foundations of our democracy.

This moment is no different. I applaud and support

business leaders in speaking out against

voter suppression.”

“While Vermont experienced record

turnout in the 2020

election, we must acknowledge that efforts to suppress and

disenfranchise voters continue to plague

our country,” said Attorney

General Donovan. “I will continue to defend the constitutional

right to vote, and I hope business

leaders from across

the nation join in support of protecting voting rights.”

Conversely, in Vermont, legislation is being considered to

expand the voting franchise, by making the universal mailing

o ballots to all voters a permanent fiture o the Vermont

General Election.

The full letter can be found on the Secretary of State’s website.

• • •

PUBLIC

NOTICES

Tina

VOTE

LUNT

BARRE TOWN CLERK

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

Washington Unit

PROBATE DIVISION

Docket No.: 630-10-20 Wnpr

In re ESTATE of:

Salvatore Francis Balzanelli, Jr.

Notice To Creditors

To the Creditors of:

SALVATORE FRANCIS

BALZANELLI, JR.

late of Barre Town, Vermont

I have been appointed to administer

this estate. All creditors having

claims against the decedent or the

estate must present their claims in

writing within four (4) months of the

first publication o this notice. The

claim must be presented to me at

the address listed below with a copy

sent to the Court. The claim may be

barred forever if it is not presented

within the four (4) month period.

Dated: April 16, 2021

Signed: Sandra L. Balzanelli

Executor/Administrator:

Sandra L. Balzanelli

Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 186

East Barre, VT 05649-0186

Phone: 802-793-0337

Name of Publication: The WORLD

Publication Date:

April 28, 2021 & May 5, 2021

Name of Probate Court:

Vermont Superior Court

Probate Division

Washington Unit

Address of Probate Court:

65 State Street

Montpelier, VT 05602

blow up civilians.

Then Paris stopped fooling around. The French government

sent legendary Resistance hero and notorious tough guy

Colonel Mathieu (Jean Martin) to annihilate the FLN. Prepare for unexpected

Colonel Mathieu recognized the challenge of destroying an power outages with a

enemy that blends in with the civilian population. His new war

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plan was to capture all the Arab men in the city and torture

them to get information.

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people are supportive of their country’s occupation of Algeria.

“We are here for that reason alone. We are neither

madmen nor

sadists …Therefore to be precise, it is my turn

to ask you a

question. Should France stay in Algeria? If your

answer is yes,

then you must accept all consequences.”

Exactly, sir. We must reject imperialism, colonialism, militarism,

internationalism, and globalization in all

its forms. Until

then, exploitation, terrorism, and torture are our fault, too.

Williamstown Elementary School

Preschool

Registration

& Screening

for children who live in

Williamstown and will turn

3 or 4 years old by

September 1st, 2021.

June 9th & 16th

Call Williamstown Elementary

School to register and make an

appointment

433-6653

April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 13


- Card Shower -

Lorraine Watker

is going to be

90!

May 5, 2021

Send Cards to:

92 Seminary Street

Barre, VT 05641

May 10, 2021

Let’s shower her

with cards!

Mary Perreault

Is Turning 90!

Send to:

17 Wildersburg

Common

Barre, VT 05641

Happy Birthday

Darlene

Callahan

April 30

Lots of Love,

From Family

& Friends

Central Vermont Medical Center

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS

The following birth announcements were submitted by Central Vermont Medical Center

on April 16, 2021. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to CVMC.

A daughter, Inara Opal Bador, was born on 4/12/2021

to Krystle (Frantz) Frantz-Bador and Justin Bador of

Worcester.

We want to thank

everyone who

sent wonderful

cards and notes,

flowers and phone

calls for our 65th

Anniversary on

March 31.

It Was Great!!!

Alfred

& Cynthia

Saldi

P

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Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts and The WORLD would like to help you wish

a special couple a Happy Anniversary. Just send their name, address & wedding

anniversary date. Each week we publish the names, plus we’ll have a

monthly winner for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses at Forget Me Not Flowers

& Gifts, 214 N. Main Street, Barre. No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send

anniversary names two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to: The WORLD,

c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please

provide name, address & phone number for prize notification.

Forget Me Not

Flowers & Gifts

214 N. Main St., Barre • 476-6700

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And Be Automatically Registered To Win A 1/2 Dozen Wrapped,

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Congratulations April Winner

John & Tanya King, Middlesex

Married 31 Years

APRIL 26

Vic & Anne Dumas, 62 years, Waitsfield

MAY 1

Tom & Crystal Isabelle, 22 years, So. Barre

MAY 4

Clayton & Lois Butterfield, 64 years, Randolph

FORGET ME NOT FLOWERS & GIFTS

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Mail this coupon to: The WORLD

c/o Happy Anniversary

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week.

Plus, we will draw one (1) couple each month for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses

from Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts, 214 N. Main St., Barre. No obligation, nothing

to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date. Telephone

calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

ANNIVERSARY

DATE_______________________# YEARS______

NAMES___________________________________

ADDRESS_________________________________

_________________________________________

PHONE___________________________________

page 14 The WORLD April 28, 2021

Gifford Medical Center

BIRTH

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The following birth announcements were submitted by Gifford Medical Center

on April 18, 2021. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to Gifford.

A boy, Thomas, was born April 9, 2021 to Sarah

(Drohan) Goodrich and Matthew Goodrich of Barre

Happy Birthday!

FROM

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone

special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the

names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a

FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to

buy. Just send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o

BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302—Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your

name, address & phone number for prize notification.

APRIL 28

Art Bombardier, 78, Barre

APRIL 29

Tim Morgan, 36, Montpelier

APRIL 30

Darlene Callahan, Berlin

Lillian Kasulka, E. Montpelier

MAY 1

Jayden Cane, E.Montpelier

Linda Senecal, 54, Barre Town

MAY 3

Karen Lafreniere, 56, Montpelier

This Week’s Cake Winner:

Art Bombardier, 78, Barre

CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT)

at 479-9078 and ask for the Bakery Department

by Thursday, April 29 to arrange for cake pick-up.

PRICE CHOPPER

“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake

403 U.S. Rt. 302—Berlin

Barre, VT 05641

Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will

publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week

for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin,

VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks

prior to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

BIRTHDATE ___________________________________________

NAME ________________________________________________

AGE (this birthday) ______________________________________

ADDRESS ________________________________________________

PHONE__________________________________ _____________

97 Barre-Montpelier Road

Berlin, VT

802-479-0671

WWW.MATTRESSLANDVERMONT.COM

ARIES (March 21 to April

19) Impatience is still

somewhat of a problem.

But a sign of progress

should soothe the anxious

Aries heart. Meanwhile,

invest some of that waiting time in preparing for the

change ahead.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Bovines tend to excel at

solving problems, not creating them. But you risk doing

just that if you’re slow to respond to a timely situation. If

necessary, seek advice from someone you trust.

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) The Gemini Twin might

need to do more than a routine check of both a job-linked

and home-based situation. Dig deeper for more data on

both fronts to avoid unwanted surprises later.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Moon Children facing an

important workplace decision are encouraged to use their

perceptiveness to see through any attempt to win them

over with a supercharge o awning and atter.

LEO (July 23 to August 22) Good news catapults Leos and

Leonas into reconsidering a deferred decision. But time

has moved on, and it’s a good idea to recheck your plans

and make adjustments where necessary.

VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) The week favors relationships,

both personal and professional. Take the time

to look for and immediately repair any vulnerable areas

caused by unresolved misunderstandings.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A friend’s problems

bring out your protective instincts. Be careful to keep a

balance between meeting the obligations of friendship

without being overwhelmed by them.

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) The temptation

to take an extreme position on an issue is strong, but moderation

is favored both in personal and professional dealings.

ove toward finding areas o agreement.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Getting

another boss or teacher? Try to see the person behind the

image. It will help you adjust more easily to the changes

that new authorit figures inevitabl bring.

CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Much as you

might dislike the idea, keep an open mind about using the

assistance of a third party to help resolve problems that

threaten to unravel an important agreement.

AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Career choices

that seem too confusing to deal with at this point probably

are. More information would help uncomplicate them. On

the personal side, a friend might need your advice.

PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A challenge that seems

eas enough at first could tae an unepected turn that

might test your resolve. Decide if you feel you should stay

with it, or if it’s better to move in another direction.

BORN THIS WEEK: You can be strong when standing up

for justice, both for yourself and for others.

(c) 2021 King Features Synd., Inc.


APRIL BRIDAL DIRECTORY | THE WORLD

A guide to hosting a daytime wedding

Weddings dot the social calendars of millions of people

across the globe. The Association for Wedding Professionals

International says every year an average of 2.4 million weddings

are performed in the United States and approximately

150,000 per year are performed in Canada. Evenings are the

most common time of the day to host a wedding, but that

does not mean a daytime wedding cannot be a beautiful event

and make for a party to remember.

Couples are increasingly customizing their weddings to be

a reection o their personal stles. ne o the was couples

are customizing their festivities is by moving the wedding to

various hours of the day that meet the couple’s needs. A wedding

that takes place in the late morning or afternoon may be

the perect fit or some couples. eres how to navigate the

specifics o a datime wedding.

• Secure accommodations. An early wedding means guests

may have to travel from afar the evening before to be able to

attend the festivities. Daytime weddings can be complemented

by working with a hotel or bed and breakfast to ensure

guests will have a place to stay and get ready to arrive at the

early wedding in time.

• Don’t be afraid to negotiate prices. The wedding resource

Bridal Guide says that vendors are typically more amenable

to price discounts or offering greater value for daytime weddings.

That’s because demand for their services is reduced

during the day. Similarly, venues may have more availability

during the day than at night, and, as a result, they’re more

eible on prices, especiall since brunch oods generall

cost less than dinner entrees.

ire the right photographer. e sure to contract with a

photographer who is a pro at handling photos in daylight and

natural light. While many photographers are skilled in any

light, many are used to shooting in churches and venues with

low lighting. Be sure to see picture samples taken during the

daytime to gauge a photographer’s daytime experience and

skill level.

• Employ color to add dimension. During evening weddings,

lighting or candles help set the mood. Those same elements

will be ineffective in daylight. Choose bright colors for your

decor and owers to brighten up spaces.

• Choose alternative entertainment. Chances are guests are

not going to feel as comfortable dancing during daylight

hours. Consider other entertainment, such as lawn games,

karaoke, or a comedian. A guitarist or pianist may be a nice

musical touch.

• Plan food accordingly. Just because the wedding is early

does not mean the food should be. Guests still will need to

eat. If you are only opting for light appetizers and cocktails,

be sure to mention this on the invitation so guests can plan

ahead and won’t go hungry.

Daytime weddings can be successful with a little tweaking

of traditional evening wedding planning.

Features to look for in an outdoor wedding venue

Couples will remember their wedding day for the rest of

their lives. The day a couple says “I do” is often the culmination

of months of planning, and much of those efforts

are dedicated to creating a special ceremony that will create

cherished memories.

The choice o venue is a significant decision, and todas

couples have more options regarding where to tie the knot

than ever before. Many couples on the cusp of getting

hitched are looking to do so in the great outdoors.

Nature took center stage at weddings in 2020, as many

couples moved their ceremonies outdoors to adhere to

government guidelines issued in response to the CVI

pandemic. Couples considering outdoor venues for their

weddings can look for certain features that can make the big

day as special as it is safe.

• Backdrop: An awe-inspiring backdrop, whether it’s the

natural beauty of a mountaintop or a beach with the sound of

• • •

ocean waves crashing into the shoreline, can make for great

photos and a ceremony couples and their guests will never

forget.

• Plan B: Couples may work hard to ensure everything

goes off without a hitch, but ultimately the elements are in

control during outdoor wedding ceremonies. So couples

hoping to host an outdoor ceremony may want to look for

sites that have a readily accessible indoor option just in case

Mother Nature is not cooperating. Many reception venues

are capable of hosting indoor and outdoor ceremonies as

well as dinners, so this might be the best option for couples

who want to have outdoor weddings during times of the year

when weather is typically inclement or unpredictable, such

as winter, early spring or late fall.

• Lighting: What’s awe-inspiring in person may be hard

to capture on film. Couples ma want to bring their wedding

photographers along as they search for outdoor ceremony

sites. Professional photographers can help couples determine

which sites will make for great photos and which ones might

make it hard to capture the beauty of the site’s surroundings.

• Accessibility: Couples will want to make sure all of their

guests can be there to witness the ceremony. Before choosing

an outdoor ceremony site, consider those guests who

may have mobility issues, such as grandparents. A midday

hike up a mountain might be doable for most guests, but it

may exclude others from witnessing the ceremony. Try to

find an outdoor ceremon site thats readil accessible to

everyone. In addition, keep in mind that the more accessible

a site is the easier it is to get away and get indoors if the

weather takes a sudden, unexpected turn for the worse.

utdoor weddings are wildl popular. Couples who find

outdoor ceremony sites with certain features may rest easier

knowing they and their guests are safe and sound no matter

what Mother Nature has in store come the big day.

Enjoy the months leading up to your wedding, while we plan the day you’ve always

imagined. We offer a wide variety of wedding services, consultations and assistance.

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April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 15


MOTHER’S DAY | MAY 9, 2021

Mother’s Day Ideas For Moms From All Walks Of Life

Mother’s Day is a celebration of women

who devote so much of their effort and

energy to their families. Celebrating Mom

on Mother’s Day lets her know all of her

efforts haven’t gone unnoticed.

Mothers may perform similar tasks, but no two moms are

the same. Finding ways to celebrate Mom’s uniqueness can

make the day that much more meaningful and memorable.

THE CRAFTER

Mothers who are avid crafters may enjoy a craft-themed

Mother’s Day. A family crafting project can make for a fun

afternoon and produce mementos that Mom will cherish for

years to come. Dads and kids can plan the project in advance

without Mom’s knowledge, arranging all of the materials ahead

of time and setting up the crafting station the night before or

while Mom is relaxing on Mother’s Day morning. Kids can even

get a head start on the day by making their own craft for Mom

and giving it to her as a Mother’s Day present. Dads can keep

the craft theme going at dinner and get a laugh out of Mom by

pouring her a craft beer when dinner is served.

THE READER

A 2017 survey from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

found that women read more than men. Women read an

average of 19.8 minutes per day, which can make a Mother’s

Day focused on Mom’s love of books an ideal and unique way

to spend the day. Kids can write Mom their own books, and

Dad can help put them together. Dads can visit rare bookstores

and look for original copies of Mom’s favorite books

that she might not find elsewhere.

THE NATURE LOVER

Fishing and other outdoor activities might have a reputation

as predominantly male hobbies, but studies show that’s

not really the case. A 2016 report from the Outdoor Foundation

found that 46 percent of people who participated in outdoor

activities were women. If Mom is a nature enthusiast,

families can plan a Mother’s Day enjoying the great outdoors,

even giving Mom a new fishing pole, hiking gear or other

items that align with her favorite nature activity.

THE RELAXATION SPECIALIST

Of course, some mothers may want to simply unwind

with a relaxing morning at the spa on Mother’s Day. In fact,

the 2018 U.S. Spa Industry Study found that the spa industry

has enjoyed seven consecutive years of consistent growth,

with more than 187 billion spa visits in 2017 alone. A relaxing

morning at the spa can be the perfect way for moms to begin

Mother’s Day before they enjoy a brunch of dinner out with

their families.

Mother’s Day celebrations can be as unique as the women

being celebrated.

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Thoughtful Handmade Gifts

Sometimes, the best gifts aren’t the most expensive ones but the

ones that come with the most thought behind them.

Enter the handmade gifts,

which are especially meaningful

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remember to pick up the

mess so that mom doesn’t

have to.

CARDS

This project starts with

things you probably have

around the house, but can

get as fancy as you’d like

them to be. Printer paper,

construction paper or even

plain old notebook paper

all make great foundations

for cards, though you could

also opt for thicker, tougher

card stock from the craft or

art store.

You’ll also need some basic art supplies, like crayons,

pencils, pens, markers or paints. Up the ante with gel pens,

glitter pens and more. You can also add fun stickers, pom

poms, cutouts, origami pieces. Your imagination is the limit.

Lastly, you’ll need some sentimental thoughts. Draw a

picture of Mom, maybe doing something she loves, then

write how much she means to you. It doesn’t have to be

perfect or spelled right; she’ll know exactly what you mean.

BAKED GOODS

Hit the kitchen and whip up some sweet treats for Mom’s

special day. Maybe breakfast in bed with a scrumptious

blueberr mufin. r a pile o cooies or brownies or a

sweet treat. Choose something she’ll think is delicious and

for the love, make sure you clean the kitchen.

Go Beyond the Bathrobe

This past holiday season, sketch comedy show “Saturday Night Live” had a viral

hit with a sketch about everyone opening their presents under the tree and

Mom getting … a bathrobe.

Don’t give a bathrobe on Mother’s Day. Try some of these gifts instead.

A SPA DAY

Busy moms may have trouble taking enough time for

themselves. Do it for her instead. Book a full day of spa

treatments at a local day spa. Choose from an array of services

to pamper her or ask one of the experts there to make a

package that’ll make her day. Many spas also offer specials

for Mothers Day, so you can take advantage of savings on a

full day of beauty.

SUPPLIES FOR HER HOBBY

If Mom has a hobby she enjoys, like hiking, painting or

crafting, recruit some help from a local specialty shop and

get her some quality supplies she may not splurge on herself.

You could also opt for a gift card and a day away from the

kids and other responsibilities so she can shop and enjoy

her hobby at her leisure. Also look at giving her a dedicated

space for her hobby in the home if she doesn’t already have

one.

TECH GEAR

Are games and gadgets more Mom’s speed? Gather up a

new tech toy and accessories for the perfect Mothers Day

gift. Think the latest phone with a case, screen protectors and

earbuds. Or a set of video games from her favorite franchise.

ne thing to avoid nless shes specificall ased or it,

avoid gadgets having to do with cooking or housework. A

• • •

PICTURE COLLAGE

This is a great idea that can become a tradition in your

family. Pick out your best photos from the past year and

make a picture collage. That’ll give her a year of memories

every Mother’s Day. You can put them in a collage frame or

even in tumblers. Look at your local craft stores for blank

tumblers that come with instructions on how to print pictures

for the cups.

POTTED FLOWERS

If mom has a green thumb, pot up some of her favorite

kind of plants to adorn her favorite spaces and bring her

some cheer. For an extra touch, paint your sentiments on

terracotta pots and coat them with a waterproof clear coat to

protect them for all time.

vacuum cleaner is still a vacuum cleaner, even if it has voice

controls.

TRIPS

Some Moms enjoy experiences instead. Plan a day trip

— make sure she won’t have to make any decisions — to

somewhere fun. Make sure you map out neat places to shop

(if shopping is her thing) and places to eat and relax. Whatever

you choose, make sure it’s all about her. Bonus points:

Set her up with a night in a weekend in a hotel, even if it’s

local, especiall i this has been a long, dificult pandemic

for mom.

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April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 17


PET CARE CORNER | THE WORLD

The Family Dog May Need More Walks–

April Awareness for Canine Health

Melissa Ruiz

Though the Vernal Equinox occurs in March, most people

in the Northern Hemisphere consider April to be the unofficial

beginning of spring.

With its rain showers, birdsongs, and warmer temperatures,

April is the month that truly draws former winter homebodies

into the outside world once again.

Springtime is also when most people either take or begin

their fitness efforts outdoors. As enjoyable as a stroll alone

might be, those with canine family members might want to

consider letting FiFi or Sparky tag along. It could be the very

thing that makes all the difference in his or her quality of life.

April is Canine Fitness Month, a time dedicated to focusing

on keeping man’s best friend healthy and active.

According to the most recent data available from the North

American Veterinary Community (NAVC), in association

with the Banfield Pet Hospital Network, a Veterinary

Emerging Topics (VET) Report revealed that more than half

of all adult dogs seen at over 1,000 Banfield hospitals alone

were considered overweight or obese in 2019.

Researchers found that 51 percent of the almost 2 million

adult dogs seen at Banfield practices were classified as overweight.

The report also showed that less than ten percent of

these pets successfully went on to lose weight following their

diagnoses, and of those, roughly 40 percent ended up gaining

weight back within a year.

Excess weight in pets is associated with a number of

adverse health conditions, says the American Animal Hospital

Association (AAHA). These conditions include

Endocrinopathies, metabolic abnormalities, cardiovascular

disease, decreased immune functions, and joint problems, and

more.

Like their human counterparts, there are a number of different

factors that can lead to canine obesity, according to Doctor

of Veterinary Medicine, Christopher G. Byers.

Perhaps the biggest factor in weight gain is the ratio of

exercise or activity to the amount of food a dog eats. The

amount of food per meal, number of snacks and treats, and

food quality can adversely affect a dog’s weight.

“Indiscriminate feeding habits including feeding table

scraps, poor diet, and constant access to food are significant

contributing factors to this most prevalent issue in canine

population.” Dr. Byers wrote in his conclusion to the article:

Obesity in dogs ... exploring the causes and consequences of

canine obesity.

Should bad feeding habits develop, coupled with a decrease

in energy output, there are several other internal factors that

could further exacerbate a dog’s weight gain.

As it turns out, there are several dog breeds that have a

biological predisposition to obesity, wrote Dr. Byers. These

Electric Fencing Offers Protection Against Chicken Predation

Keeping a small flock of chickens at home to provide eggs

and meat has become increasingly popular, but many firsttime

small-scale poultry farmers are discovering that several

species of wildlife like the taste of chicken as much as we do.

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department urges poultry

owners to use electric fencing and follow other precautions to

protect their birds from predation.

“We are already getting reports of bears hitting bird feeders

and expect to be receiving additional reports soon about

bears, foxes, raccoons, fisher, coyotes, skunks, and bobcats

preying on chickens,” said Forrest Hammond, Vermont’s bear

biologist. “Many of the calls will be coming from people who

are new at keeping chickens and who do not provide sufficient

protection for their birds.”

“In 2020, we received a record 167 reports of bears getting

after chickens. This number has been increasing in recent

years with an average of 31 reports per year from 2011 to

2017 and an average of 122 reports per year from 2018 to

2020.”

Hammond urges people to keep their chickens contained

inside electric net fencing and to make sure any wire fencing

is secure. Use of one-quarter-inch hardware cloth, especially

along the bottom of an enclosure will block most small

predators. Weasels can get through a one-inch opening. The

• • •

breeds include Cairn Terriers, West Highland White Terriers,

Scottish Terriers, Shetland Sheepdogs, Basset Hounds,

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Dachshunds, Beagles, Cocker

Spaniels, and Labrador Retrievers.

Interestingly, Dr. Byers noted that certain dog breeds, particularly

sight hounds (dogs such as Greyhounds, Whippets,

etc), appear to be resistant to the development of obesity. This

is due largely in part to their aerodynamic body structure and

unique metabolisms which allow these breeds to move at

great bursts of speed to chase down fast-footed game, says the

American Kennel Club.

Age is also a factor in animal weight gain, continued Dr.

Byer, as lean body mass declines as dogs get older. This loss

is often exacerbated if voluntary activity is also decreased

along with age. Furthermore, if food intake does not decrease

proportionately with decreasing energy needs, this results in

Fluffy gaining weight.

Dogs can also gain weight after being spayed or neutered.

As a net loss of circulating sex hormones occurs, the dog’s

metabolism also seems to slow. Changes in these hormones

directly affect the satiety (feeling of fullness) center of the

brain, causing spayed and neutered dogs to eat more food than

is required for their energy levels, resulting in weight gain.

There are also certain medications that contribute to animal

weight gain, including Phenobarbital and Glucocorticoids,

particularly if taken over a long period of time.

For owners who suspect their furry family member may

need to shed a few pounds, the first step shouldn’t be diving

head-first into a new diet and exercise regimen. At least not

without consulting with Spot’s doctor first.

Says Blue Cross for Pets, “It is best to start with a trip to

the vet ... your pet will need a check-up for medical conditions

that could interfere (with weight loss).

From there, the Veterinarian can help owner and pet begin

a weight-loss journey best suited for the dog’s unique needs.

Most practices also offer calorie-controlled foods and weight

control clinics to aid in getting pets back to their optimal

health.

Of course, prevention is the best way to control a dog’s

weight. Ensuring pets get plenty of exercise and activity, eat

the right foods in the right amounts, and getting annual wellness

screenings can help keep dogs at their healthy weight.

The Veterinarian can also help advise the owner what food

and how much of it is best for his or her canine friend.

As days grow longer, there is more daylight after working

hours to get the family, Fido included, out for some muchneeded

fresh air and exercise. The family that gets healthy

together stays together, and its most loyal members deserve

the proper care to ensure they can stay together as long as

possible.

electric netting, however, is good extra protection even outside

the wire netting – especially against black bears which

are strong enough to break into most unprotected chicken

coops. Several types of electric net fencing are available.

The netting is portable and can easily be used with moveable

chicken pens.

Here are additional tips to help keep your chickens safe:

• Apply bacon grease or peanut butter to a spot on the electric

fencing as an added deterrent.

• Cover the tops of pens with wire or plastic netting to guard

against attacks from avian and climbing predators.

• Bury galvanized hardware cloth or netting 12 inches deep

around the perimeter of the pen to prevent access by digging

predators.

• A motion-activated light to illuminate the coop after dark

will discourage some predators. Motion-activated alarms

also can help deter them.

• Store poultry feed in a secure indoor location in tight containers,

and only feed poultry the amount that can be consumed

in one feeding.

Vermont Fish and Wildlife has more helpful information

about living with bears on their website www.vtfishandwildlife.com.

VTF&W photo by John Hall

Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease

May Threaten Vermont’s

Rabbits and Hares

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department says a disease

affecting rabbits and hares previously found in western states

may be moving eastward. Rabbit hemorrhagic disease

(RHDV2) is a virus known to be extremely lethal to wild and

domestic rabbits, including cottontail rabbits and snowshoe

hares.

RHDV2 was first found in New Mexico in 2010, but it has

spread rapidly to other western states (https://www.aphis.usda.

gov/aphis/maps/animal-health/rhd), and a case involving a

domestic rabbit was reported in Florida in late 2020.

Infection with the virus usually results in the quick death of

a rabbit, often in only a few days. The virus is transmitted

through direct contact between wild rabbits, domestic rabbits,

or between wild and domestic rabbits. It is also easily spread

indirectly through contact with dead infected rabbits, infected

food and water supplies, personal clothing, and domestic rabbit

cages.

The virus withstands environmental stresses such as heat,

cold, wet, or drought conditions and it can live in the environment

for months. Rabbits infected with the virus may have

blood from body openings, appear listless or lethargic, and

they usually die within a few days. The disease does not affect

other wildlife, dogs, cats, or humans.

The likely path of this virus coming to Vermont is through

importation of a domestic rabbit, imported rabbit products, or

by people coming back to Vermont from states that have the

RHDV2 virus.

“We are cooperating with the Vermont Agency of

Agriculture, which regulates the domestic rabbit trade in the

state, to raise awareness of this disease and minimize the likelihood

of introduction of the virus into Vermont’s rabbit populations,”

said Vermont Fish and Wildlife Commissioner Louis

Porter.

Here is what you can do to prevent the virus from getting to

Vermont:

1. If you own pet rabbits, do not let their food or droppings be

exposed to wild rabbits. Keep their quarters clean and use

approved disinfectants for the RHDV2 virus or a 10 percent

bleach solution regularly. Do not release domestic rabbits into

the wild.

2. Wildlife rehabilitators should not let wild rabbits in their

care come into contact with domestic rabbits or their cages,

food dishes, or any other domestic rabbit items. All rabbit

equipment including cages, food and water dishes, and other

materials should be cleaned with a disinfectant approved by

the EPA for RHDV2 virus (https://www.epa.gov/pesticideregistration/list-o-disinfectants-use-against-rabbit-hemorrhagic-disease-virus-rhdv2).

3. If you find a dead rabbit in the wild, do not touch it. If you

see more than one dead rabbit report it to the Vermont Fish

and Wildlife Department.

4. Hunters should not handle wild rabbits after harvesting

without wearing nitrile gloves. Dispose of the gloves, carcass

remains and entrails in plastic bags using appropriate sanitation

methods or by burying in the ground at least two feet

deep. Wash hands, hunting equipment and clothing thoroughly

after cleaning game. If hunters are hunting rabbits in

other states do not bring those harvested rabbits into Vermont.

5. Report unusual wild rabbit mortalities or unusual rabbit

behavior to Vermont Fish and Wildlife.

PET CARE CORNER

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Mon. - Fri. 8-6 229-0567

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Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-5, Sun. 10-2

VISIT US ONLINE AT www.guysfarmandyard.com

PET STORE

379 So. Barre Rd., Barre, VT

in the So. Barre Post Office Plaza

(802) 498-7124

(802) 622-8040

Open Tues.-Sun.

9:30-6:00 Closed Monday

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VETERINARIAN

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Colleen Bloom, VMD Hannah Flynn, VMD

Karen Bradley, DVM Lauren Quinn, DVM

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2386 Airport Rd.

Berlin, VT

802-223-7765

page 18 The WORLD April 28, 2021


All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.

com or mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S.

Route 302, Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00 p.m.,

Thursday preceding publication. The Ongoing section is for

free/low cost/non-profit community events.

Ongoing Events

ONLINE IN VERMONT- Shepherd of the Hills Welcomes

Zoom Worshipers Please join us on Sunday mornings at 9:30.

Visit us on the web at montpelierlutheran.org for the link to our

Zoom service and the bulletin for worship. There’s always room

for folks to come and worship.

Divorce and Separated Support Group This group meets the

first and third Monday of each month from 7:00 - 8:00 on Zoom.

For more information and to get the Zoom link, email DSGvtnh@

gmail.com.

Connection Peer Support Group This group will occur on the

1st and 3rd Tuesday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM on

Zoom. This new peer support group will complement the Monday

night and Thursday afternoon support groups. People can visit

https://namivt.org/support/peer-support-groups/ for more information.

Healthy Youth Connections Monthly Meet Ups is a virtual

question and answer session about youth and substance use, open

to anyone with a young person in their life. Meet Ups are hosted

by Bert Klavens LADC of the Washington County Youth Service

Bureau. Bert will be available to answer your questions every

fourth Wednesday of the month starting March 24, from 7 – 8pm.

Email HYP@wcysb.org to get a Zoom link for the discussion.

This program will run through September 22, 2021.

Nurturing Skills for Families in Recovery Meets weekly online

on Mondays from 1:00 –2:30 PM. For information and to join a

group contact Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Circle of Parents in Recovery Meets weekly online on Thursdays

from 3:00-4:30 PM. For information and to join a group contact

Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Circle of Parents for Grandparents Meets weekly online on

Thursdays from 4:00-5:00 PM beginning. For information and to

join a group contact Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Seven Stars Arts Center All-Comers Virtually Slow Jam will

be starting back up monthly on second Thursday evenings 6:30-

8PM! Traditional dance tunes at relaxed, accessible pace.

BYOBeverages and snacks! Free, with a recommended donation

of $10-15. All ages, levels and instruments welcome! The Zoom

link will be sent out to folks that RSVP “maybe” or “yes” by

email: resonance.vermont@gmail.com.

Mood Disorders Support Group: Now online via Zoom. Peer &

professionally led support for people coping with mood disorders

such as depression, bipolar disorder, seasonal affective disorder,

postpartum depression, dysthymia, etc. We share our experience,

strength and hope to support each other on our mental health

journey. Wed. 4 - 5 PM. There is no fee. For more information and

meeting code, contact Rosanne at 802-917-1959 or rosanne@

rosanne.info.

Weekly Business Networking in Central Vermont, The Garage

Cultural Center, 58 State St. 8AM-9:30AM. Fri. Free. Online during

COVID pandemic. Info: kristin.dearborn@edwardjones.com.

Weatherization Wednesdays at noon. We’ll answer your questions

via Zoom and Facebook Live every Wednesday at noon,

when we present a new topic in weatherization. Get a chance to

win smart thermostats and other prizes. More info and to register:

https://buttonupvermont.org/event.

The Montpelier First Church of Christ, Scientist, is conducting

its Sunday (10:30am) and Wednesday (7:30pm) services on Zoom

for the foreseeable future. You are invited to join us using this

URL: https://zoom.us/j/306295907 or calling 1-646-876-9923

and then keying the meeting ID code: 306 295 907#

The Heart of Vermont BNI Chapter meets weekly via Zoom for

Central Vermont business networking. Meetings are held each

Friday from 8am to 9:30am, and visitors are welcome. For information

or a reservation to attend, please contact Kristin Dearborn

at 802-223-3425. Kristin.dearborn@edwardjones.com.

The Washington County Democrats (Vermont) invite you to

‘like’ or ‘follow’ us on Facebook, and/or send an email to County

Chair, Linda Gravell (washcountydemsvt@gmail.com) to receive

monthly announcements and meeting reminders. We meet on

Zoom on the Third Monday of each month at 5:30 p.m. All

Democrats living in Washington County, Vermont are welcome to

participate.

The Unitarian Church of Montpelier welcomes all to visit

http://www.ucmvt.org and to join weekly Sunday Worship

Services online at 10:00 a.m. on Zoom or Facebook. We welcome

all as we build a loving community to nurture each person’s

spiritual journey, serve human need, and protect the Earth, our

home. Services led by Rev. Joan Javier-Duval, Minister, or Verdis

L. Robinson, Ministerial Intern.

BARRE- Weekly Business Networking in Central Vermont,

Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, 33 Stewart Ln.

8AM-9:30AM. Thurs. Free. Info: mike@eternitymarketing.com.

Church of God of Prophecy Sunday Service at 10:30 am. All

are welcome. Pastor Jeffrey Kelley. (814) 428-2696. Also daily

Facebook devotionals.

Sons of the American Legion Squadron #10 Meetings, Barre

Legion Post #10, 320 N. Main St. 3rd Thurs. of each month. 6PM.

The American Legion Barre Post 10, Regular Post Membership

Meetings. Barre Post 10, 320 Main St., third Thurs. of each

month, 6PM.

OPENING

FOR

THE

SEASON APR. 29

THURSDAYS & SUNDAYS 11AM-7PM

FRIDAY & SATURDAYS 11AM-8PM

2678 River Street, Bethel (2.6 mi. on VT Rt. 107)

802-234-9400 www.toziersrestaurant.com

Central VT Adult Basic Education, Free classes. Pre-GED and

high school diploma prep classes at Barre Learning Center, 46

Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588.

Central Vermont Woodcarving Group, Free instruction projects

for all abilities. Barre Congregational Church, Mon. 1-4pm.

479-9563.

Heart of Vermont Quilt Guild, meets 3rd Tues. of the month at

First Presbyterian Church, Seminary St. 5:30-7:30PM.

Additional Recycling Collection Center, Open for collection

Mon., Wed., Fri. 11:30-5:30PM, 3rd Sat. 9AM-1PM. 540 N.

Main St., Barre. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable

items.

Medicare & You, Have questions? We have answers. Central

Vermont Council on Aging, 59 N. Main St., Suite 200, 2nd & 4th

Tues. of the month. Call 479-0531 to register.

Central Vermont Business Builders, Community National

Bank, 1st & 3rd Tues., 8-9AM. Info: 777-5419.

Weekly Storytime, Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main St.,

Sat., 10:30AM. Info. 476-3114.

Vermont Modelers Club, Building and flying model airplanes

year-round. Info: 485-7144.

Community Breakfast, First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer

St., 3rd Sun. FREE, 7:30-9AM. 476-3966.

Circle of Parents, Confidential support group for parents and

caregivers. Tues. evenings. Info: 229-5724.

Mothers of Preschoolers, Monthly get-togethers for crafts,

refreshments, etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.

Alcoholics Anonymous, Meetings in Barre, daily; call 802-229-

5100 for latest times & locations; www.aavt.org.

Al-Anon Family Groups, Turning Point, 489 South Main St.

Use back door of parking lot. Older children friendly. Sat. 5-6PM.

Info: vermontalanonalateen.org. Barre ‘Courage to Change’ currently,

meeting online – click: https://zoom.us/j/555034004 (or

via phone at 929-205-6099). Meeting ID: 821 0426 9518.

Passcode: 873665.

Hedding United Methodist Activities & Meetings, 40

Washington St., 476-8156. Choir: Thurs. 7PM; Community

Service & Food Shelf Hours: Weds & Thurs. 3-5PM.

Turning Point Recovery Center, 489 N. Main St. Safe and supportive

place for individuals/families in or seeking substance

abuse recovery. Open Mon/Tue/Thur: 10AM-5PM; Wed/Fri:

10AM-9PM; Sat: 6PM-9PM. For info and programs, call 479-

7373.

Green Mountain Spirit Chapter, National women bikers club.

2nd Wed. Info: grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.

Grief & Bereavement Support Group, Central Vermont Home

Health and Hospice office, 600 Granger Road. This group is open

to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one.

Mondays 4-5:30 Wed. 10-11:30AM, Meeting via Zoom. 6 consecutive

sessions. Free. Info: 223-1878.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Barre City Police, 15

Fourth St., 476-6613. Get rid of old or unused meds.

Granite City Grocery Volunteers, every 3rd Wed./month at

6PM at The Quarry Kitchen & Spirits, second floor. Info: gaylepoinsette@gmail.com.

continued on next page

CANADIAN CLUB

ROUTE 14 • 479-9090

Thursday Take-Out Dinners for May

Thurs., May 6: Chicken Parmesan

& Spaghetti

Thurs., May 13: Turkey & Fixings

Thurs., May 20: Chicken Cordon Bleu

Thurs., May 27:Roast Beef

Served at 5PM

$10 Per Person

Dinners Include

Vegetable, Salad & Roll

Drive under carport

to pickup your dinner

ALL ARE WELCOME

RESERVATIONS 479-9090 or CAROL 272-8330

EAST BARRE ANTIQUE MALL

OPEN FOR

THE SEASON

MAY 1 ST OUR 29 TH YEAR!

LOOK FOR FREE ITEMS

STOREWIDE

SALE

133 MILL ST., EAST BARRE, VT 05649

479-5190 ebamstore@yahoo.com

Tuesday - Sunday 10-5, Closed Mondays

www.eastbarreantiquemallvt.com

Gregoire’s Violin Shop

Making & Restoring Fine Violins

Rentals • Service • Sales

Violin • Viola • Cello • Bass

LESSONS FOR ALL AGES

FREE VIOLIN RENTAL

WITH WEEKLY LESSONS

up to 6 months

Monthly

Rentals: Violin $ 16 Cello $ 30

10 Hutchins Circle, Barre 476-7798

www.vermontviolinmaker.com

Host Families Needed

for the Upcoming

2021 Season!

If you are interested or have questions, please

give us a call at 279-5921 or send us an email at

HostFamilies@TheVermontMountaineers.com

MAY 2021

Last quarter 3-May-21 12:51:43 PM 236,242 miles

New moon 11-May-21 12:01:33 PM 251,964 miles

First quarter 19-May-21 12:13:13 PM 236,868 miles

Full moon 26-May-21 4:14:51 AM 225,959 miles

Full Flower Moon - Flowers spring forth in abundance

this month. Some Algonquin tribes knew this full Moon

as the Corn Planting Moon or the Milk Moon.

May 1 Kentucky Derby Day

May 2 Brothers and Sisters Day

May 3 World Press Freedom Day

May 4 Star Wars Day

May 5 Cinco de Mayo

May 6 National Nurses Day

May 7 National Day of Prayer

May 8 Military Spouses Day

World Red Cross Day

a oters Da

May 10 Clean up Your Room Day

May 11 Twilight Zone Day

May 12 National Receptionist Day

May 13 International Hummus Day

May 14 Dance Like a Chicken Day

May 15 Armed Forces Day

May 16 National Sea Monkey Day

May 17 Pack Rat Day

May 18 No Dirty Dishes Day

a Bos l Da

May 20 Pick Strawberries Day

May 21 National Waiters and Waitresses Day

May 22 National Maritime Day

May 23 Lucky Penny Day

May 24 International Tiara Day

a ational issin ildrens Da

May 26 Sally Ride Day

May 27 Sun Screen Day

May 28 Amnesty International Day

May 29 International Jazz Day

May 30 Mint Julep Day

May 31 Memorial Day

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April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 19


BARRE- Health Through Our Eyes Art Show Project supports

wellbeing for Vermonters with intellectual disabilities.

Exhibition is open to the public at the Barre Local Health

Office at the McFarland Office Building, 5 Perry Street.

CALAIS- Art at the Kent Starting September 11, visitors

can safely view works on the grounds of the Kents’ Corner

State Historic Site at 7 Old West Church Road. We invite you

to enjoy original sculpture, installations, assemblages and the

written word by a group of contemporary Vermont artists who

explore historic trades and technology in new and surprising

ways. Check kentscorner.org for updated information or contact

thekentmuseum@gmail.com.

HARDWICK- 1111 Copper Nails: Bread & Puppet

Calendar Prints – A 36-Year Retrospective Dual Location

Exhibition in Hardwick, Vermont. When: April – summer

2021. Where: exhibition in 2 fully accessible & covid-safe

mask-required locations (also by appointment). (1) The

Hardwick Inn, 4 S Main Street, exhibit on all 3 Floors, 8-6,

Mon-Sat. (2) Front Seat Coffee, 101 S Main Street, B&P

Calendars & Art for Sale, 8-2, Mon-Fri.

MANCHESTER- What Remains | Scattered Memories

German-born, Shushan NY-based artist Katrin Waite is the

next artist to be featured in a solo show at Ellenbogen Gallery.

Presenting paintings created over six years, from 2014 to

present, will open to the public on Saturday, July 25th at

11:00 AM. On Friday, July 24th at 4:00 PM, “Eg. Live:

Virtual Vernissage” on Facebook will feature host Elizabeth

Spadea in discussion with the artist and doscent-tour of the

exhibition. Info: email at ellenbogengallery@gmail.com or

by calling (802) 768-8498.

MONTPELIER- The State of Sculpture 2019 an overview

of Vermont Sculptors at the Vermont Arts Council Sculpture

Garden, 136 State Street. On display through August 2021.

The Front presents Daryl Burtnett: Respite a solo show of

recent work by the Front member artist. Burtnett’s mixed

media works on paper and canvas draw inspiration from the

marks, textures and imprints time leaves on things and on us.

Respite brings together work from the past several months,

sharing works that have brought solace in these fraught times.

Daryl Burtnett: Respite runs March 5th through November

29th. The Front is open Saturdays and Sundays 11-2, and

Daryl welcomes showings by appointment. Join us for

Daryl’s artist talk via zoom on March 18th at 7:00pm; email

info@thefrontvt.com to rsvp.

NORTHFIELD- Pandemic Art ART, etc. presents Art From

the Shutdown, featuring paintings of Katie O’Rourke and

Mark Rosalbo and the effects the pandemic shutdown had on

them; on view for the months of April and May. For more

information please e-mail artetcvt@gmail.com, visit www.

artetcvt.com, or FB/IG @artetcvt. Store hours: Tuesday –

Sunday 10-2 and by appointment. 32 Depot Square.

WAITSFIELD- Art Forms: An Exploration highlights the

multiple approaches artists have adopted to convey their

ideas, bringing together both fine arts and quality crafts.

Paintings in oil, pastel, and watercolor complement works in

glass and ceramics; metal sculpture plays nicely against the

warm tones of pyrography. Each artist brings a unique

approach to the medium of their choice in this eclectic show.

The show is open to the public Wednesday, Thursday and

Friday from 1PM to 5PM. Opening reception is Sunday April

11 from 5pm to 6pm.

Granite City Grocery’s Board Meeting, every 2nd Tuesday at

6PM. Open to public.

Small Group Bible Studies sponsored by VT Christian Radio

WJPL-LP 92.1 FM. In the Aldrich Public Library upstairs conference

room, 6 Washington St. Thursdays at 6PM. All are welcome.

Savvy Speakers Toastmasters International is an educational

club where people learn and practice how to speak with confidence

in a fun and supportive environment. Meetings held 1st and

3rd Tuesday of the month 6-7:30 p.m. at Capstone Community

Action, 20 Gable Place, Barre, VT 05641 Please call Margaret

Ferguson 802-476-0908 or MLFerguson2002@yahoo.com

Memorable Times Cafe Third Wednesday of each month from

1:30 to 3 p.m. at the VT History Center, 60 Washington St. A

relaxed social time for people living with mild to moderate

memory loss and their care partners. Come enjoy stories, memories,

music and community. Free, refreshments provided.

Sponsored by Central VT Council on Aging and the ABLE

Library. 802-476-2681 for more information.

BERLIN- Contra Dance *Dances are canceled for now. Check

www.capitalcitygrange.org/dancing/contradancing or email cdu.

tim@gmail.com for updates* No experience and no partner

needed. All dances are taught plus an introductory session at 7:45.

Everyone welcome! The dance takes place at the Capital City

Grange Hall, 6612 Rt 12, 1 mile south of Montpelier. Please bring

clean, soft-soled shoes. Admission is $10 adults, $5 kids and low

income, $15 dance supporters. Questions? Call Tim Swartz at

802-225-8921, visit: http://capitalcitygrange.org/dancing/contradancing.

Every 1st, 3rd, and 5th Saturday year round.

Family Support Groups empower and educate family members

and close friends of individuals with persistent mental health

challenges. All groups are led by trained individuals who have a

family member living with a mental health condition and understand

the same challenges you are experiencing. Central Vermont

Medical Center. Group meets 4th Monday each month.

BETHEL- YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program, United

Church of Bethel, Church St. Thurs., 11AM-12PM. Free. Info:

728-7714.

BROOKFIELD- Mothers of Preschoolers, Meal and childcare

provided. New Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fri., 6PM.

Info: 276-3022.

CABOT- Fiddle Lessons with Katie Trautz: Mon., Info: 279-

2236; Dungeons & Dragons, Fri., 3-5:30PM. All at Cabot

Library, 563-2721.

CALAIS- Men’s & Women’s Bible Study Groups, County

Road, Wed., 7PM. Info: 485-7577.

CHELSEA- Chronic Conditions Support Group, Chelsea

Senior Center, in the United Church of Chelsea, 13 North

Common. Free. Fri. 8:30-11AM. Info:728-7714.

DUXBURY- Sunday Service at the Green Mountain Community

Alliance Church, 9:30 - 10:45. Children’s classes, coffee fellowship

after service and mid-week bible studies. 316-9502. 274

Stuart Lane.

E. HARDWICK- Bible Study, Touch of Grace Assembly of

God Church, Tues. 10AM; Bible study; Wed. Youth Group, 5PM

dinner, 6PM activity. Info: 472-5550.

EAST MONTPELIER- FREE Zumba-like Fitness Dance for

Women 18+, East Montpelier Elementary, Sundays, 4-5PM.

Info: zabundancejoy@gmail.com.

Men’s Ministry, Crossroads Christian Church. Mon. 7-9PM.

Men’s Breakfast: 2nd Sat., 8AM. Sun. Service: 9:30-11AM. Info:

476-8536.

Twin Valley Senior Center, 4583 U.S. Rte 2. Open Mon., Weds.,

Fri., 9AM-2PM. For class listing & info: 223-3322.

Walk-Through Wednesday Open House at Orchard Valley

Waldorf School, Grace Farm Campus 2290 VT Rt. 14N, 8:30-

9:30am. Join us on the first Wednesday of each month for an

introductory visit to the OVWS grades school from 8:30-10:30

a.m. Campus tour and Q&A. Contact enrollment@ovws.org or

call 456-7400 with questions. Please register by noon the day

prior to the Walk-Through.

GROTON- YA Book Club, 3rd Mon., 6:30PM; Book Discussion

Group: 4th Mon., 7PM; Crafts & Conversation, Wed., 1-3PM.

Round Robin Storytime for kids age 0-5: Tues., 10AM. All at

Groton Public Library. Info: 584-3358.

HARDWICK- Caregiver Support Group, Agency on Aging,

rear entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs. 229-0308 x306.

Peace & Justice Coalition, G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg (old firehouse),

Tues., 7PM. Info: 533-2296.

Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs.,

6-8:30PM. Registration/info: 472-5229.

MARSHFIELD- Playgroup, Twinfield Preschool, Mon., 8:15-

9:45AM (except when school is not in session).

MIDDLESEX- Food Shelf, United Methodist Church, Sat.,

9-10:30AM.

MONTPELIER- First Church of Christ, Scientist Sunday

School welcomes children for Sunday school to learn how to feel

close to God everyday. 10:30AM. 223-2477.

Free Coffee House Potluck, 1st Fri. at the Trinity Methodist

Church. 7PM-9PM.

Vermont College of Fine Arts Friday Night Reading Series,

Cafe Anna, 1st floor of College Hall, 36 College St. 5:30-

7:30PM. Free snacks.

Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup, North Branch Nature Center.

Mon. 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 229-6206.

Montpelier Kiwanis Club, Tues., 6PM. at The Steak House. All

are welcome. Info: 229-6973.

Onion River Exchange Tool Library, 46 Barre St. Over 85

tools. Wed., 10AM-2PM, Thurs., 10AM-2PM.

Friday Night Group, Open to all LGBTQ youth ages 13-22.

Pizza and social time, facilitated by adults from Outright VT.

Unitarian Church, 2nd & 4th Fri., 6:30-8PM. Info: 223-7035.

continued on next page

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL TOMORROW

WHAT YOU CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753 ~ Central Vermont’s Newspaper

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, VT 05641

ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA

• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedules subject to change without notice.

ORCA Media Channel 1075

Public Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, Apr 28

6:00a Vermont Land Trust

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Senator Bernie Sanders: American

Rescue Plan

10:00a Moccasin Tracks

11:00a Bill Doyle on VT Issues

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Vermont Humanities Council

3:00p Racism in America Series

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:30p Celluloid Mirror

7:00p League of Women Voters

9:00p Ideas For The Future Of Vermont

11:00p Bear Pond Books Events

Thursday, Apr 29

6:00a Vermont Humanities Council

7:30a Octagon St. Laveau

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Vermont Economic Conference 2021

10:30a Vermont Chamber of Commerce

Virtual Policy Series

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Bear Pond Books Events

2:30p Kellogg-Hubbard Library

4:30p The Music Zone with Pitz Quattrone

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p David Pakman Show

7:00p Diversity and Inclusion An Economic

Perspective

8:30p Celluloid Mirror

9:00p Dr. John Campbell

10:00p Senior Moments

Friday, Apr 30

6:00a Senior Moments

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Abled and on Air

10:00a All Things LGBTQ

11:00a Talking About Movies

11:30a Celluloid Mirror

12:00p Brunch with Bernie

1:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

2:00p Sustainable Woodstock Green Drinks

Series

4:00p Energy Week

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Virtual Town Hall with Congressman

Peter Welch

7:00p Moccasin Tracks

8:00p Gay USA

9:00p Vermont Chamber of Commerce Virtual

Policy Series

10:30p St. Laveau's World Cinema

11:00p Vermont Humanities Council

Saturday, May 1

6:00a Virtual Town Hall with Congressman

Peter Welch

7:00a The Music Zone with Pitz Quattrone

8:00a Racism in America Series

10:00a Vermont Institute of Community and

International Involvement

12:00p Senior Moments

2:00p Diversity and Inclusion An Economic

Perspective

3:30p Octagon St. Laveau

4:00p St. Laveau's World Cinema

4:30p Roman Catholic Mass

5:00p Washington Baptist Church

7:00p FOCUS

8:00p All Things LGBTQ

9:00p Vote for Vermont

10:30p Betty St. Laveau's House of Horror

Sunday, May 2

6:00a Diversity and Inclusion An Economic

Perspective

7:30a St. Laveau's World Cinema

8:00a Bear Pond Books Events

9:30a Washington Baptist Church

10:30a Roman Catholic Mass

11:00a FOCUS

12:00p Vermont Institute of Community and

International Involvement

2:00p Vermont Economic Conference 2021

3:30p Vermont Chamber of Commerce Virtual

Policy Series

5:00p Vote for Vermont

6:00p Dr. John Campbell

7:00p Senator Bernie Sanders: American

Rescue Plan

8:00p The Music Zone with Pitz Quattrone

page 20 The WORLD April 28, 2021

8:30p Abled and on Air

9:30p Octagon St. Laveau

10:00p Kellogg-Hubbard Library

Monday, May 3

6:00a Kellogg-Hubbard Library

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Vote for Vermont

10:30a Sustainable Woodstock Green

Drinks Series

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p League of Women Voters

3:00p Ideas For The Future Of Vermont

4:00p Senator Bernie Sanders: American

Rescue Plan

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Moccasin Tracks

7:00p Vermont Institute of Community and

International Involvement

9:00p Vermont Land Trust

11:00p FOCUS

Tuesday, May 4

6:00a League of Women Voters

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a The Peoples Law School

11:00a Dr. John Campbell

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p All Things LGBTQ

2:00p Vermont Land Trust

4:00p FOCUS

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Abled and on Air

7:00p Vermont Economic Conference 2021

9:00p Racism in America Series

11:00p Sustainable Woodstock Green

Drinks Series

ORCA Media Channel 1095

Education Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, Apr 28

12:00p North Branch Nature Center

2:30p First Wednesdays

6:30p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

Thursday, Apr 29

12:00p Harwood Unified

4:00p North Branch Nature Center

www.pointfm.com

6:00p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

8:00p Washington Central Union School

Board

Friday, Apr 30

12:00p Washington Central Union School

Board

4:00p Vermont State Colleges Board of

Trustees

10:30p Game of the Week

Saturday, May 1

12:00p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

3:00p North Branch Nature Center

5:00p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

District

9:00p Vermont State Colleges Board of

Trustees

Sunday, May 2

12:00p Orange Southwest School District

4:00p Randolph TCC School Board

7:00p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

Monday, May 3

12:00p White River Valley Supervisory

Union

2:30p White River Unified District Board

5:30p Randolph TCC School Board

6:00p VT State Board of Education

Tuesday, May 4

12:00p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

District

4:00p Orange Southwest School District

8:30p White River Valley Supervisory

Union

10:30p White River Unified District Board

ORCA Media Channel 1085

Government Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wed, Apr 28

6:00a Bethel Selectboard

9:30a Rochester Selectboard

11:00a Press Conference

1:30p Green Mountain Care Board

6:30p Montpelier City Council LIVE

Thu, Apr 29

6:00a Middlesex Selectboard

8:30a Montpelier Social and Economic

Justice Advisory Committee

10:00a Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

12:00p Vermont State House

4:00p Central Vermont Fiber

6:30p Waterbury Selectboard

10:00p Press Conference

Fri, Apr 30

6:30a Berlin Selectboard

8:0a Berlin Development Review Board

11:00a Press Conference

1:00p Moretown Selectboard

3:30p Central Vermont Fiber

6:30p Rochester Selectboard

9:00p Montpelier Planning Commission

Sat, May 1

7:00a Vermont State House

11:00a Press Conference

1:00p Randolph Selectboard

6:30p Calais Selectboard

9:30p Green Mountain Care Board

Sun, May 2

6:30a Waterbury Selectboard

10:00a Berlin Selectboard

11:30a Berlin Development Review Board

1:00p Vermont State House

3:30p Montpelier Development Review

Board

7:00p Montpelier Design Review

Committee

9:30p Montpelier City Council

Mon, May 3

6:00a Moretown Selectboard

8:30a Middlesex Selectboard

11:00a Press Conference

1:00p Bethel Selectboard

5:30p Montpelier Design Review Committee

LIVE

7:00p Montpelier Development Review

Board LIVE

Tue, May 4

7:00a Calais Selectboard

11:00a Press Conference

1:00p Vermont State House

3:30p Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

5:30p Montpelier Planning Commission

9:30p Randolph Selectboard

Community Media (802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net/schedules

CVTV CHANNEL 194

Wednesday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00AM - Community Bulletin

7:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

9:00AM - Barre City Council

12:00PM - Barre City Council

3:00PM - Barre City Council

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Williamstown Select

10:00PM - Williamstown Select

Thursday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Williamstown Select

9:00AM - Williamstown Select

12:00PM - Williamstown Select

2:00PM - Community Bulletin

3:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

10:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

Friday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Barre Unified Union School

9:00AM - Barre Unified Union School

12:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

3:00PM - Barre Town Select

5:30PM - Community Bulletin

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre Town Select

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Saturday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Barre Town Select

9:00AM - Barre Town Select

12:00PM - Barre Town Select

3:00PM - Community Bulletin

4:00PM - 7:00PM - State House

Programming

7:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Sunday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also

be viewed online at cvtv723.org

6:00AM - 7:00PM - Church Services

Monday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00AM - State House Programming

9:00AM - State House Programming

12:00PM - State House Programming

3:00PM - Plainfield Select

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Plainfield Select

10:00PM - Plainfield Select

Tuesday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Plainfield Select

9:00AM - Plainfield Select

12:00PM - Plainfield Select

3:00PM to 5:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre City Council “Live”

10:00PM - Barre City Council

CHARTER COMMUNICATIONS OF BARRE

ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

CVTV Channel 192 • BARRE, VT

Wednesday - Art and Music

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - Art and Music Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - Art and Music Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - Art and Music Programs

Thursday - International and Multicultural

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - International and Multicultural

Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - International and Multicultural

Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - International and Multicultural

Programs

Friday - Local Vermont and Conversation

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

“All schedules are subject to

change, please call us

with questions - 479-1075.”

Saturday - Education and Nature

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Barre Congregational Church

8:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

9:00AM - 6:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 10:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

10:00PM - Local Sports

11:00PM - 12:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

Sunday - Church Services and Spirituality

6:00AM - 2:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

2:00PM - New England Cooks

3:00PM - 7:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

7:00PM - 12:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

Monday - Science

6:00AM - 3:00PM - Science Programs

3:00PM - Local Sports

4:00AM - 6:00PM - Science Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00AM - 12:00PM - Science Programs

Tuesday - History

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - History Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent

Global News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - History Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest

8:00PM - 12:00PM - History Programs

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org


Meditation, Mon. 1PM.; Intro to Yoga, Tues.

4PM; Consults, Fri. 11AM. Free classes, limits

apply. Fusion Studio, 56 East State St. Info:

272-8923.

Capital City Farmers Market Capital City

Farmers Winter Market 11AM-1PM every 2nd

and 4th Saturday through April at 133 State

Street. Dozens of local vendors with delicious

and wholesome wares. EBT, SNAP and Crop

Cash accepted.

Celiac Support Group, Tulsi Tea Room, 34

Elm St., 2nd Wed., 4-5PM. Info: 598-9206.

A Course in Miracles, at Christ Episcopal

Church, 64 State St., each Tues., 7-8PM. Info:

622-4516.

Parent’s Group & Meet-Up, Connect with

local parents to share advice and info. Kellogg-

Hubbard Library, Hayes Rm., 1st Mon.,

10-11:30AM. Info: mamasayszine@gmail.com.

Families Anonymous For families or friends

who have issues with addiction, alcohol and/or

mental illness. Bethany Church, 2nd floor youth

room, Mon., 7-8PM. Info: 229-6219.

Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights, Need

help w/a bike repair? Come to the volunteer-run

community bike shop. 89 Barre St., Wed. 4-6PM

and Fri. 12-4PM. Info: freeridemontpelier.org.

Free Community Meals, Mon: Unitarian

Church, 11AM-1PM; Tues: Bethany Church,

11:30AM-1PM; Wed: Christ Church,

11AM-12:30PM; Thurs: Trinity Church,

11:30AM-1PM; Fri: St. Augustine Church,

11AM-12:30PM; Last Sun., Bethany Church,

4:30-6:30PM.

Calico County Quilters, All skill levels welcome.

2nd Sat. Sept. through June, 1-3PM.

Location info: 244-7001.

Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA), Bethany

Church basement, Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 229-

9036.

CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group,

Childcare not available. Woodbury College, 2nd

Tues., 5:30-7:30PM. Info: 498-5928.

Resurrection Baptist Church Weekly Events,

144 Elm St. Sun., 9:45AM. Bible Study; 11AM.

Worship Service; Wed., 7PM. Prayer Meeting.

Good Beginnings of Central VT, 174 River St.

Drop-In hours at the Nest. 1st floor Weds/Thurs/

Fri., 9AM-3PM. Babywearers of Central

Vermont meet upstairs, 4th Mon., 5:45-7:45PM

& 2nd Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 595-7953.

Breastfeeding support: 3rd Thurs., 9:30-

11:30AM; Nursing Beyond a Year: 3rd Fri.,

9:30-11:30AM (802-879-3000).

Al-Anon, Trinity Methodist Church, Main St.,

Sun., 6:15-7:30PM. Info:1-866-972-5266.

Al-Anon, Bethany Church basement, 115 Main

St., Tues. & Thurs. 12-1PM, Wed. 7-8PM. Info:

1-866-972-5266.

SL AA, 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship

problems. Bethany Church, Wed., 5PM.

Info: 249-6825.

Survivors of Incest Anonymous, Bethany

Church parlor, 115 Main St., Mon., 5PM. Please

call first: 229-9036 or 454-8402.

Brain Injury Support Group, Unitarian

Church, 3rd Thurs., 1:30-2:30PM. Info: 1-877-

856-1772.

Playgroups: Dads & Kids, Thurs., 6-7:30PM

& Sat., 9:30-11AM, at Family Center of

Washington County. Held during school year

only.

Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer

Support, for patients and caregivers. Info:

1-800-652-5064.

Christian Meditation, Christ Church, Mon.,

12-1PM.

Mood Disorders Support Group, 149 State

St., last entryway, first floor. Peer and professionally

led support for people coping with

mental illness. Wed. 4-5PM. Free. Info: 917-

1959.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs,

Montpelier Police, 1 Pitkin Court, 223-3445 at

Washington County Sheriff, 10 Elm St., 223-

3001. Get rid of old or unused meds at these

local permanent safe disposal sites.

Community Song Circle, Center for Arts and

Learning, 46 Barre St. 1st Sun. except July/

Aug., 6-8PM. Info: vtcommunitysing@gmail.

com.

Suicide Grief Support Group - for anyone

who has lost a loved one to suicide. Meets the

second Monday of each month, 6:00-7:30.

Please contact Michele Delaney at 802-223-

4752 for intake screening and location.

Flat Track Roller Derby, Montpelier Rec

Center, 55 Barre St. Sunday afternoons - email

for practice times. 18+, all genders welcome, no

experience necessary, please bring a mouthguard

- all other gear provided. First practice

free then $30/month. Will resume after COVID

pandemic. Info:vtderbytcr@gmail.com.

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance

Abuse Recovery Mondays at 4:00. Contact

Cindy Wells, Family Support Programs

Coordinator, at 802-498-0611 or cwells@pcavt.

org.

Nurturing Skills for Families Tuesdays and

Thursdays at 10:00. Contact Cindy Wells,

Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-

498-0611 or cwells@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Skills for Families Mondays at

10:00 Contact Heather Niquette, Family Support

Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance

Abuse Recovery Tuesdays at 11:00. Contact

Amber Menard, Family Support Programs

Coordinator at 802-552-4274 or amenard@

pcavt.org)

Nurturing Skills for Families Thursdays at

5:30. Contact Cindy Atkins, Family Support

Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608 or catkins@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Fathers Program Mondays at 5:30.

Contact Amber Menard, Family Support

Programs Coordinator at 802-552-4274 or amenard@pcavt.org.

Circle for Foster & Adoptive Families

Thursdays at 5:00. Contact Heather Niquette,

Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-

498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org).

Circle for Kinship & Guardianship Families

Thursdays at 8:00 PM. Contact Heather

Niquette, Family Support Programs Coordinator,

at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org.

Circle of Parents open to all. Thursdays at

10:00; Contact Cindy Atkins, Family Support

Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608 or catkins@pcavt.org.

Circle of Parents in Recovery Tuesdays at

5:30; Contact Cindy Atkins, Family Support

Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608 or catkins@pcavt.org.

Contact the program manager

or call 1-800-CHILDREN

MORETOWN- Mad River Chorale.

Rehearsals at Harwood Union H.S., Mon.,

7-9PM. Info: 496-2048.

MORRISVILLE- “The Role of Power,

Authority & Control in Groups” Monthly

Meeting, Morristown Centennial Library, 20

Lower Main St. 1st Tues. 5:30PM-7PM. Info:

gerette@dreamhavenvt.com.

Overeaters Anonymous, 12-step program for

people who identify as overeaters, compulsive

eaters, food addicts, anorexics, bulimics, etc. All

welcome; no dues or fees. Info re: place & time:

863-2655.

River Arts Events, Photo Co-op Drop-in 3rd

Thurs., 6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

Poetry Clinic Drop-in 1st & 3rd Tues.,

6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

NORTHFIELD- Bingo, Northfield Senior

Center. Mon., 4PM.

Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program, Ages 12-18.

Edward F Knapp State Airport Passenger

Terminal, Tues, 6-8:30PM. Info: info.vt033@

vtcap.org.

Clogging & Irish Step Lessons, w/Green

Mountain Cloggers, ages 8-78. Sun., 5-8PM.

Info: 522-2935.

Playgroup, United Church of Northfield. Wed.,

9:30-11AM. Held only when school in session.

Info: 262-3292 x113.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs,

Northfield Police, 110 Wall St., 485-9181. Get

rid of old or unused.

PLAINFIELD- Community Supper Support

Group, Grace United Methodist Church. 4th

Tues., 6PM-7PM. Info: michaelbix@gmail.

com.

Cardio Funk Class. At the Community Center.

Fri., 5-6PM. Info: email shannonkellymovement@gmail.com.

Cutler Memorial Library Activities, Classic

Book Club: 1st Mon., 6PM; Tuesday Night

Knitters (except 1st Tues.). Info: 454-8504.

Diabetes Discussion & Support Group,

Everyone welcome. The Health Center conf.

room, 3rd Thurs., 1:30PM. Info:322-6600.

RANDOLPH- Health Support Groups,

Maple Leaf Room at Gifford Medical Center.

Tobacco Cessation Program regularly offers

four-week “Quit in Person” group sessions.

Info: 728-7714.

Caregiver Support Group, Gifford Medical

Center. 2-3PM. Meets 2nd Wed. of the month.

Info: 728-7781.

Diabetes Management Program, Kingwood

Health Center (lower level conf. room), 1422

VT Route 66. Thurs., 10-12:30PM. Six week

program for people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes.

Info/register: 728-7714.

New Business Forum, Vermont Tech Enterprise

Center, 1540 VT Rte 66, 2nd Weds.,

11:30AM-1PM. Info: 728-9101.

Cancer Support Group, Gifford Conference

Ctr, 2nd Tues., 9:30-11AM. Info:728-2270.

Storytime. Kimball Library. Wed., 11AM, ages

2-5; Toddler-time, Fri., 10:30AM; Gathering for

handwork, 2nd & 4th Mon., 6PM.

WAITSFIELD- Community Acupuncture

Night, Free assessment and treatment. Donations

welcome. Three Moons Wellness, 859 Old

County Rd., 2nd fl., last Weds., 4-7PM. RSVP:

272-3690.

WARREN- Knit & Play, Warren Public

Library. Bring your kids and your projects. All

levels. Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM.

WASHINGTON- Central VT ATV Club,

Washington Fire Station, 3rd Tues., 6:30PM.

Info: 224-6889.

Calef Mem. Library Activities, Art and

Adventure w/ April: 3rd Sat., 1PM; Storytime:

Mon., 11AM; Tech Help Drop-In: Sat.,

10AM-2PM. Info: 883-2343.

continued on next page

Borrowed Time

Books

A Thoughtful

Selection of Used

& Collectible

Editions for All

Visit us at GRAKLES

162 N. Main St., Suite 103

Barre, VT

Tues.-Fri. 10am-5pm; Sat. 9am-3pm

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

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With 45 Years Experience

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SAMBEL’S Mother’s Day Eve

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April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 21


VSHOF Virtual

Induction Celebration set

for Thursday April 29

The eighth class of inductees for the Vermont Sports Hall

of Fame will be inducted in a virtual celebration on Thursday

April 29, 2021.

The link to the 7 p.m. online event will be posted on www.

vermontsportshall.com -- the Vermont Sports Hall of Fame

website.

The broadcast will be available later for replay online and

the plan is to make it available to air on community access

channels on cable television systems throughout Vermont.

Regional Educational Television Network in Burlington is

producing the event. The ceremony is presented by Myers

Waste.

The 2020-21 inductees are: standout cross country and

track star Tara Chaplin of Middlesex; Legendary ice hockey

coach Jim Cross of the University of Vermont; All-Star

hockey player and coach Toby Ducolon of St. Albans;

Renowned gymnastics champion Debbie Dunkley of South

Burlington; Olympic ski jumper Jeff Hastings of Norwich;

Basketball legends Ed Hockenbury of Northfield and Sarah

Schreib of East Fairfield; Fabled golf pro and basketball

player Libby Smith of Essex; Women’s ice hockey pioneer

Carol Weston of Bristol. Record-setting golfer Thomas ‘Tom’

Pierce of Rutland, was selected as this year’s historic inductee

along with Mickey and Ginny Cochran, as the David Hakins

inductees, for exceptional promotion of sports, athletics and

recreation in the state.

The annual in-person induction banquet has been postponed

due to COVID-19, but the 11 inductees will be honored

with the next class during the ensuing in-person dinner and

celebration in 2022.

The guest host for the online event will be Mike McCune,

sports director of WCAX-TV in South Burlington.

WATERBURY- Waterbury Public Library Activities,

Preschool Story Time: Thurs., 10AM. Baby and Toddler Story

Time: Mon., 10AM. Crafts: Tues., 3-4PM. Info: 244-7036.

WATERBURY CTR- Bible Study Group, Waterbury Ctr.

Grange. Sun., 5-6PM. Bring bible, coffee provided. Info: 498-

4565.

WEBSTERVILLE- Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs,

Barretown Police, 149 Websterville Rd., 479-0508. Get rid of old

or unused meds.

WEST TOPSHAM- Bible Study, New Hope Methodist Church,

2 Gendron Rd. Wed., 6:30PM.

WORCESTER- Knitting Night, The Wool Shed, Tues., 6:30-

8:30PM.

Friday, April 30

ONLINE- Live and In with Katie Trautz, presented by Chandler

Center for the Arts. Streamed via Facebook Live and at www.

chandler-arts.org/live-and-up. Admission by donation. 7PM.

Saturday, May 1

BARRE- Sip and Shop Mother’s Day Event 10:30AM- 3PM at

the VFW Post 790 on East Barre Road, Barre. Drinks, food, shopping,

something for everyone!

PLAINFIELD- Green Up Day! 10AM-Noon at the Recreation

Field: pick up bags and register where you want to pick up.

10AM-4PM at the Town Garage: take your filled bags and roadside

debris to the Green Up trailer. Call Becky at 479-4326 for

more information.

RANDOLPH- Chicken Pie Supper. Drive-thru Take-Outs.

Limited seating at 5pm – Reservations required 802-728-5251.

Our Lady Of The Angels Church. Corner of Route 66 and Hebard

Hill Road. Adults $12, Kids $5.

Monday, May 3

ONLINE- The How, Why Wonder of Spiritual Healing

Speaker: Featuring Beth Packer, CS, Christian Science

Practitioner & Member of the Christian Science, Board of

Lectureship. Register: FCCSMontVTBethPacker. Attend by

phone day of 1-312-626- 6799 ID 895-0086-8425 Sponsored by:

First Church of Christ, Scientist Montpelier, Vermont For more

information visit www.csmontpelier.org or call 1-802-793-3737.

7:30PM.

The CreateVT Action Plan Join your fellow leaders and do-ers

in government, business, and the creative sector together for the

unveiling of CreateVT -- a vision and roadmap for a thriving,

creative Vermont. 2-3:30PM. Register at EventBrite: https://

www.eventbrite.com/e/createvt-action-plan-launch-tickets-151557728245.

Saturday, May 8

BROOKFIELD- Take Out Pancake Breakfast 7-11AM at the

First Congregational Church of Brookfield (Pond Village

Church). At the corner of Ridge Rd. and Rt 65. Plain or blueberry

pancackes, bacon, home fries, coffee and tea. Adults $8, kids $5.

A bake sale will be available.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Invites Public to

Zoom Talk on May 3, 2021

• • •

Would you like to explore the phenomena of spiritual healing

as recorded throughout the Bible, healing that for centuries

has allowed people to live their lives with dominion and

wellness and not be victims to their circumstances? I invite

you to attend an online talk given by guest lecturer, Beth Packer,

CS of New South Wales, Australia. She will be speaking

at 7:30 PM EDT on Monday May 3, 2021. Her talk is titled,

“The How, Why and Wonder of Spiritual Healing.” This talk

is sponsored by the Christian Science Church in Montpelier,

VT. You can register for this free talk by going to our website

and finding the lin to the lecture www.csmontpelier.org.

In this talk you’ll hear how practical, effective prayer can

help us all experience divine power and protection in our lives.

You’ll hear how a knowledge of our inseparable relationship

to God brings practical healing solutions. The talk also includes

multiple healing experiences including protection from

danger, healing of illness and contagion. The ideas used come

from the original source book on Christian healing, the Bible,

along with Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by

Mary Baker Eddy.

The speaker, Beth Packer, is an experienced healer, being

listed in the world-wide Journal of Christian Science Practitioners.

She is also a member of the Christian Science Board

of Lectureship and has spent years lecturing across Australia

as well as in Asia, Africa, Europe and the US.

This talk is meant for folks who are not Christian Scientists

so that you may understand better what makes us tick, or

rather think! It is a small investment in time to know a little

more about options out there in the world of spirituality.

GO FIGURE

The idea of Go Figure is to arrive at the figure given at

the bottom and right-hand columns of the diagram by

following the arithmetic signs in the order they are given

(that is, from left to right and top to bottom). Use only the

numbers below the diagram to complete its blank

squares and use each of the nine numbers only once.

page 22 The WORLD April 28, 2021


The Look of Silence

By Kimberly Madura

Sometimes the look is hard, sometimes rough,

sometimes anxious, sometimes aloof, sometimes

cold, and sometimes polished. Always controlled.

All to be seen in a certain way, to throw a certain

light. It is the way she hides things. Things like

shame, guilt, horror, messiness. Things she doesn’t

want you to see. Because she knows how to hide

her pain (it has made her so strong) because she

thinks if you saw through and perceived her as

ugly, as damaged, as dirty, as less, that just maybe

she couldn’t bear that.

So now if you look too close, too long, too deep, if

you get too close, she may freeze, or run, hide, avoid,

throw up daggers, fight, lie. Because she knows that

the look you give her back could shatter her. Because

in your eyes, in your expressions, she will see in you

what she could not face in herself – her own feelings –

pain, sadness, horror, outrage, grief, sympathy,

empathy, understanding, acceptance, compassion,

and worst of all LOVE.

Because she knows in the looking, in the seeing, in the

listening, in the silence lies the only key that will unlock

the secret. And the last secret is that she desperately

wants out.

Haiku

By Wayne F. Burke

the treadmill is taking me

somewhere

I want to go to

Misty Mountain

wears a shroud--

the ridge line weeps

the applause of pigeons

rising from the lawn--

I did nothing to deserve

Do you, pen

take this pencil

to be

your longly-lived

life?

new day

By Wayne F. Burke

cloudy and overcast–

lush green grass,

looks good enough to eat:

nut-sized green buds on

trees, and green sweep of

the woods on

mountainsides under

chalk-white sky,

a blank slate

to write the story

of the day

upon.

sunset #5

By Wayne F. Burke

Pigeons lined-up on

a wire

below a flaming sun sinking

slow as cold molasses

down behind Pine Tree Ridge--

a passing seagull

noisily objects to

something, maybe

to the presence of the

crow on top the telephone pole

(cawing an unlisted number).

The sun takes its sweet time

reaching the ridge line;

the crow swoops and

disappears in shadow;

the yellow sun sets the

ridge on fire

and dusk comes on

mellow.

5 PM

By Wayne F. Burke

Friday afternoon, and

the crush of traffic through

downtown streets,

cars and buses, roar of

trucks Bang

Boom

the gurgle of a motorsuckle--

everyone headed home

or who knows where (I don’t)

I wish everyone would tone it down

but, fat chance

of that, I know;

a seagull overhead, and

white as ever, does not

seem to mind the noise

but I do.

sunset #6

By Wayne F. Burke

Gold horizon

7 PM sunset,

viewed from a curbstone of

the JIFFY MART parking lot,

cars rolling in, rolling out

a sudden chill

in the air

as last rays of the sun,

it’s bald head sunk within ridgeline pines,

reflects off the face of the

overhang above gasoline pumps–

another day of life

in the world

nears an end.

Concepts Kakuro

Best described as a number

crossword, the task in

Kakuro is to fill all of the

empty square, using numbers

1 to 9, so the sum of

each horizontal lock equals

the number to its left, and

the sum of each vertical

block equals the number

on its top. No number may

be used in the same block

more than once.

April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 23


GREAT SUMMER JOB

Excellent Starter Job

for Students.

Fast Paced

Dynamic Place To Work.

Apply at Left Side of

Pump & Pantry

Williamstown

12 to 8 pm or call

802-595-4320

(Leave a Message)

LegenDairy Maple & Ice Cream, LLC

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

BELLAVANCE TRUCKING is

NOW HIRING for our warehouse

team in Barre. Competitive

pay, family-owned

culture, and full benefi ts. Call

802-661-5572

or email recruiting@

bellavancetrucking.com

to apply

GENERAL SALVAGE YARD

HELP, Immediate Openings

Part or Full Time. $12-17 802-

685-7799

JANITORIAL / HOUSEKEEP-

ER (Overnight) Vermont College

of Fine Arts is seeking

a Janitorial / Housekeeping

candidate who will be responsible

for the daily cleaning of

a 4.5 story buildings as well

as locking / unlocking certain

buildings, answering calls for

assistance as needed and

maintaining logs. The individual

in this position works with

limited supervision, but will report

to the Housekeeping Supervisor

and / or Assistant Director.

The position is Monday

through Friday with shift hours

of 11 p.m. to 7:30 a.m. Please

forward your resume to tanya.

patterson@vcfa.edu.

NEED NIGHT SHIFT Quality

Parts Checker, Hours 3:30-

2:30, Mon — Thrus, Call Bonnie

at HEB mfg Co. 802-685-

4821

CLASSIFIEDS

DEADLINE: MONDAY 10:00AM

DISPLAY ADS THURSDAY AT 5:00PM

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • Fax 802-479-7916

Email: sales@vt-world.com

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

RESPITE CARE WORKER

WANTED Looking for someone

to care for two developmentally

delayed adults in

our home. Must be able to lift

to transfer from chair to chair.

Some medical knowledge is

preferred to address their individual

needs, but willing to

train. You would be attending

to their daily needs including

washing / showering, assisting

with dressing, cooking and

light housework. Also caring

for our animals. It is three

days a week including overnights,

Preferred days are Friday

through Sunday but is negotiable.

Call Kevin for more

information. 802-479-9765

WORK AT HOME AND EARN

BIG BUCKS!

Earn up to $1,000 a week

at your leisure in your own

home? The probability of gaining

big profi ts from this and

many similar at home jobs is

slim. Promoters of these jobs

usually require a fee to teach

you useless, and unprofi table

trades, or to provide you with

futile information. TIP: If a

work-at-home program is legitimate,

your sponsor should

tell you, for free and in writing,

what is involved. If you question

a program’s legitimacy,

call the ATTORNEY GEN-

A’ C A-

TANCE PROGRAM at 1-800-

649-2424.

BUSINESS

OPPORTUNITIES

LOOKING TO EARN A MIL-

LION$? Watch out for business

opportunities that make

outrageous claims about

potential earnings. on’t

get fooled into get rich quick

scams. There are legitimate

business opportunities, but

be cautious of any business

that can’t refl ect in writing

the typical earnings of previous

employees. TIP: Investigate

earning potential claims

of businesses by requesting

written information from them

before you send any money,

or by calling the A’

GENERAL CONSUMER AS-

SISTANCE PROGRAM, at

1-800-649-2424.

BUSINESS ITEMS

TABLE-TOP Speakers Podium,

24” wide / 18” Tall, solid

hardwood, Very Nice, $50

obo. 802-249-0748 Gary

CLASSES &

WORKSHOPS

Train online to do medical

billing! Become a Medical Offi

ce rofessional at C et

trained certifi ed to wor in

months! 888-572-6790. (M-F

8-6 ET)

FREE ITEMS

$ A1-CASH PAID

Pending the Market

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

FOR INFO, 802-522-4279.

FREE “BEWARE OF THE

VERMONT LAND TRUST”

Bumper Stickers, Call

802-454-8561

FREE HOUSE PLANTS

CALL 802-225-6733

TOP PRICE PAID for Your

Complete Junk Cars and

Trucks, FREE metal pickup

839-6812

HEALTH CARE

Attention oxygen therapy users!

Inogen One G4 is capable

of full 24/7 oxygen delivery.

Only 2.8 pounds. Free info.

kit. Call 877-929-9587.

DO YOU HAVE CHRONIC

KNEE OR BACK PAIN? If

you have insurance, you may

qualify for the perfect brace at

little to no cost. Get yours today!

Call 1-800-217-0504

OXYGEN-Anytime. Anywhere.

o tans to refi ll. o

deliveries. Only 2.8 pounds.!

FAA approved. FREE info kit:

Call 1-855-917-4693

continued on next page

Summer Employment

Lifeguard/Swim Instructor

City of Barre

Municipal Swimming Pool

Looking for a part time summer job while you are in

school? How does spending the day by the pool sound?

The City of Barre is currently looking for Lifeguards/

Swim Instructors for the summer of 2021. We are looking

for hard working, responsible energetic individuals

with great interpersonal skills and the desire to teach

swimming, to join our team. Lifeguards are responsible

for the general supervision and safety of all patrons by

preventing and responding to emergencies. In addition

to the lifeguarding duties the Lifeguards will be

teaching swim lessons to participants. The successful

candidates are superior swimmers with First Aid and

C certification, preerred candidates will also hold a

current ieguarding Certification. The Cit is willing to

pay the fees and assist the right candidates to obtain their

ieguarding Certification. A bacground chec will be

required prior to hiring.

The City of Barre is an equal opportunity workplace and is

an afirmative action emploer. All aspects o emploment

including the decision to hire, promote, discipline,

or discharge, will be based on merit, competence,

performance, and business needs. We do not discriminate

on the basis of race, color, religion, marital status, age,

national origin, ancestry, physical or mental disability,

medical condition, pregnancy, genetic information, gender,

sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, veteran

status, or any other status protected under federal, state, or

local law.

Applications:

City of Barre

Rikk Taft, Human Resources

6 North Main Street

Barre, Vermont 05641

Questions

476-0257 / squaranta@barrecity.org

page 24 The WORLD April 28, 2021

DINING SERVICES AIDE

Part-Time & Full-Time

We are looking for an organized, energetic,

customer service oriented individual to work in

our dining services department. Duties include

some basic food preparation, serving residents,

and cleaning dining areas. Every other weekend

and one or more holidays per year required.

Mayo is an equal opportunity employer who

respects and encourages diversity in the

workforce.

REQUIREMENTS

• Must be at least 16 years of age

BENEFITS

• Holiday Pay

• Employee Assistance Program (EAP)

• FREE Delta Dental Insurance

• FREE Life Insurance

• BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD Medical Insurance

• And More!

CONTACT

Mark Lester

Dining Services Manager

Mayo Healthcare

71 Richardson Street

Northfield, VT 05663

802-485-3161

HOUSEKEEPING POSITION

Our small non-profit healthcare organization

is looking for a dedicated Housekeeper to join

our team at Mayo Healthcare in Northfield, VT.

This is a full-time position, including every other

weekend. Responsibilities include vacuuming,

dusting, disinfecting, shampooing of carpets,

cleaning residents’ rooms and bathrooms. Mayo

is an equal opportunity employer who respects

and encourages diversity in the workforce.

REQUIREMENTS:

• Must be 16 years of age or older

• Must be able to follow written and oral

instructions

• Must be friendly, dependable and

punctual

• Must be in good mental and physical

health.

BENEFITS:

• Holiday Pay

• Employee Assistance Program (EAP)

• 403(b) Retirement Plan

• FREE Delta Dental Insurance

• FREE Life Insurance

• BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD Medical

Insurance

• And More!

CONTACT:

Danielle Nickerson, LNHA

Assistant Administrator

Mayo Healthcare

71 Richardson Street, Northfield, VT 05663

802-485-3161


HEALTH CARE

LOOKING FOR A MIRACLE /

Lose 20 pounds in one week?

This is almost impossible!

eight loss ads must refl ect

the typical eperiences of

the diet users. Beware of

programs that claim you

can lose weight effortlessly.

Clues to fraudulent

ads include words lie

breathrough,effortless,

and new discoery. hen

you see words like these be

septical. Before you inest

your time and money call the

A A’

C AAC

PROGRAM, at 1-800-649-

2424. WANT A CURE-

ALL?

ealth fraud is a business

that sells false hope. Beware

of unsubstantiated claims for

health products and serices.

here are no uic Cures

— no matter what the ad is

claiming. rely

on promises of a money bac

guarantee atch out for

ey words such as eclusie

secret,amaing results, or

scientifi c breathrough. or

more information on health related

products or serices, call

the A A’

C AAC

PROGRAM at 1-800-649-

2424, or consult a health care

proider.

WANTED

CA A

Jorgensen Lane, Barre

802-355-2404

COIN COLLECTOR will Pay

Cash for re-195 Coins and

Coin Collections. Call oe

Blakely 802-498-3692

ants to purchase minerals

and other oil and gas interests.

end details to .. Bo

13557 ener, C 0201

CLASSIFIEDS

ANTIQUES/

COLLECTIBLES/

RESTORATION

A CCB,

Old, New and in between

Call 802-272-1820/802-461-

6441

A B iuidation

utlet. e buy contents

or downsied personal property

lots. 20 years sering

central B-ie ndustries

141 ier t. ontpelier 02-

522-6283

ast ime Around Antiues

114 o. ain t. Barre.

802-476-8830

GARAGE SALES

FLEA MARKETS

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FAIRLEE FLEA MARKET

A

this weekend, May 1st

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aturday, 730 A-3

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on ain t airlee,

or nformation 02-333-409

or email:

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AA A

aturday 51 unday 52

9:00 — 3:00

141 ais Aenue

orthfi eld alls, ermont

CA

Old, New and In-Between

omething for eryone

MISCELLANEOUS

A A

B, , A,

tc. 1930’s to 190’s.

A A. CA

FREE 1-866-433-8277.

MISCELLANEOUS

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Pending the Market

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ow Aailable et ot3

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amilies o learn more,

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ae money on diabetic supplies

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more o learn more, call now

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BA A

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rames, 40 0. ae my

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rucing Aailable

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40 mo 5 Channels. tream

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liminate gutter cleaning

foreer eafilter, most ad-

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protection. chedule free estimate.

15 off urchase. 10

enior ilitary iscounts.

Call 1-855-995-2490

A

CA eafilter,

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chedule a eaf-

liter estimate today. 15 off

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ilitary iscounts. Call

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A A Colonial-style

child’s playhouse.

Needs TLC. Mounted on trailer.

$750 obo

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continued on next page

802-505-3859

Seeking

Flaggers

Will Certify

Willing to train.

Please call Kristen Hood:

802-505-3859

or email: lpdtrafficcontrol@gmail.com

Seeking Paint Truck Gunner

Please call: 802-798-2885

or email: freshcoatsales@gmail.com

Seeking Class “A” CDL Driver

Please call: 802-798-2885

or email: freshcoatsales@gmail.com

Central Vermont Supervisory Union

Custodian Needed

Northfield Schools

Full time, competitive pay and benefits

Send resume to:

CVSU

Attn: Chris Locarno

111B Brush Hill Rd

Williamstown, Vt. 05679

If you enjoy the little things in life, and could help

individuals maintain a balanced, healthy, fun, and

relaxing life, you’re who we are looking for.

Upper Valley Services of Bradford

Direct Support Specialists, to provide support

to individuals with intellectual/developmental

disabilities in their community, work place, and

home. Qualified candidates will be dependable,

creative, demonstrate skills to support life-long

learning and develop meaningful relationships.

Background checks, valid driver’s license with a

reliable vehicle and valid insurance required. Full

time. Part-time positions available, and additional

per diem substitute hours available. Why you should

apply:

On- site training (No experience necessary)

Health, Dental & Vision benefits

Retirement plan

Paid time off

Join our team, and positively impact your community

today!

Please call Kelley at (802) 222-9235 to complete

an application. Additionally, email can be sent to

kwright@uvs-vt.org, to submit resume or request

an application. EOE

Manufacturing Team Member

Super Thin Saws, of Waterbury, VT manufactures

precision circular sawblades and similar tooling,

primarily for the woodworking industry. We are

seeking highly motivated individuals to work and

grow in our manufacturing operation.

Candidates must be mechanically inclined, and

have previous experience with measuring tools

such as micrometers, calipers, and dial indicators.

We will provide training to successful candidates.

Super Thin Saws provides excellent benefits, pay,

and flexible work hours.

To apply: please send your resume to

bookkeeping@superthinsaws.com

or call 802-244-8101.

Upper Valley Services

is seeking a

Professional Roommate

The Professional Roommate is a supported

living arrangement, where an individual with

an intellectual disability shares their home and

life experiences with you. As a Professional

Roommate you’ll provide a safe and comfortable

home environment and enable a person to

become more independent and stay connected

within their community. You will be responsible

for Recruitment, training, and mentoring staff

to assure all supports are provided with the

designated funding hours. Develop and manage

staff schedules, shift responsibilities and weekly

activities that assure the consistency in support

strategies, achievement of goals and team

cohesion. Provide a four-overnight coverage,

on-call crisis, and vacancy coverage as needed.

This position will come with a generous tax-free

stipend. For more information and application

please email Kelley at kwright@uvs-vt.org E.O.E

CUSTODIAN 2ND SHIFT

Barre Unified Union School District seeking 2

custodians - one for BTMES and one for BCEMS.

Second shift starts 3:00 pm 11:30 PM during the

school year and 7:00 am until 3:30 during summer.

Candidates must:

- Be able to perform physical labor/activities, lifting,

unassisted, bending, standing, climbing and walking

- Work effectively and respectfully with public

- Understand and carry out oral and written

directions

- Maintain cooperative working relationships

- Demonstrate sensitivity to, and respect for, a

diverse population

- Pass a background and fingerprint check.

- Background in commercial cleaning preferred.

Starting wage $17.14/hr plus differential shift

pay. Benefits include health and dental insurance,

retirement, paid sick, vacation and personal leave.

Interested candidates should attach a cover letter,

resume and three letters of reference to:

Jamie Evans – Facilities Director

120 Ayers Street

Barre, VT 05641

E.O.E.

The Salvation Army of Barre, VT

NOW HIRING

District Business Manager

Of Thrift Store &

Warehouse Operations

®

OF BARRE

• Full Time With

Benefits

• Previous

Management

Experience

• Driver’s License

Required

Please Send Resume To:

heather.west@use.salvationarmy.org

Accounting Clerk – Duties include generating

customer invoices, posting customer payments and

creating bank deposits, paying vendor invoices,

reviewing weekly time cards for submission to payroll

company, taking customer phone orders, fi ling various

documents and other duties as assigned. Knowledge

of general accounting and Microsoft Offi ce required and

experience with Quickbooks a plus. Competitive salary

and benefi ts.

Shipper – Duties include packing and shipping

Company products using various shippers such as

FedEx and UPS, loading and unloading boxes, other

duties as assigned. Must be able to lift 75 pounds.

Forklift and crane experience a must. Competitive

salary and benefi ts.

Warehouse Package Handler – Duties include

palletizing customer orders and delivering to local

trucking companies, other duties as assigned. Must be

able to lift 75 pounds. Forklift and crane experience a

must. Competitive salary and benefi ts.

Send resumé to: ASW c/o The WORLD

403 US Rte. 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 25


The Future Is Bright!

Anticipating A Very Busy Summer And Beyond!

GET A

$25 WAYSIDE

GIFT CARD

AT INTERVIEW

Now through May 15

Part-Time & Full-Time Jobs

Kitchen & Dining Room Staff

Graduated Benefit Highlights

* Safest Work Environment

* Family Friendly Hours

* 7 Major Holidays Off

* Generous Meal Discount

* Paid Sick-Time

* Employee Assistance Program

* Individual Retirement Account

* Employee Retention Bonus

* Health Access Account

* Paid Vacation

Compensation Range $12.50-$25.00

Stop By For An Application Or Apply On Our Website

https://waysiderestaurant.com/jobs/

Apply Yourself Or Tell A Friend!

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL

TOMORROW WHAT YOU

CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753

Central Vermont’s Newspaper

CLASSIFIEDS

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, Vermont 05641

CLASSIFIEDS

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

Fax:

(802)479-7916

403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

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WE CAN remove bankruptcies,

judgments, liens, and

bad loans from your credit fi le

forever! The Federal Trade

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that promise to scrub your

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HOME

APPLIANCES

BRAND NEW never used portable

washing machine, 40lbs,

on rollers. 350 fi rm.Call 02-

793-1045

BOATING &

FISHING

LIVE BAIT

Perch bait, Shiners, Crawlers,

Tackle.

OPEN EARLY — OPEN LATE

call anytime.

Route 12, Putnamville.

802-229-4246

BICYCLES

EXPEDITION new cables and

brake pads, $200. 802-272-

0862

STORAGE

A STORAGE PLACE

Williamstown

Route 64.

802-505-1921

SPORTING

EQUIPMENT

BASKETBALL BACKBOARD

& HOOP. PLUS (1) Basketball.

$35 for all. Call Gary 802-

249-0748

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

FIREWOOD

Let Stephen keep you warm

this winter.

802-498-3159

continued on next page

Environmental Services

Technicians Needed

Join our highly-valued team of EVS technicians,

dedicated to preventing the spread of infection and

helping keep everybody healthy at CVMC.

Flexible Hours Available

We offer on-the-job training and flexible hours to

support childcare and school schedules.

Starting pay: $15.51 for evenings, $17.51 for nights

No experience required • Higher pay offered for experienced candidates

Full-time and per diem positions available with:

EXCELLENT

BENEFITS

GENEROUS

PAID TIME OFF

Learn more and apply online today:

UVMHealth.org/CVMC/Jobs

or call our Talent Acquisition team at

(802) 821-8465

Now Hiring for

Food Service Positions

Supervisory and entry-level roles available.

We offer on-the-job training and flexible hours

to support childcare and school schedules.

Full-time positions include excellent benefits

and generous paid time off.

Learn more and apply online today:

UVMHealth.org/CVMC/Jobs

or call our Talent Acquisition team at

(802) 821-8185

Equal Opportunity Employer

Equal Opportunity Employer

page 26 The WORLD April 28, 2021


CLASSIFIEDS

SALES & SERVICE

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

BEWARE OF The Vermont

Land Trust. You shake hands

with them be sure to count

your fi ngers when you are

done. 802-454-8561.

A’

reen easoned

802-454-1062

All ardwood

cut, split and deliered in

ontpelier and Barre. reen

$240 / cord. 802-485-8525 or

1-800-707-8427

A ermont and

rust, ell’s Coming and

Charley’s Coming with hem.

. CX ellet

toe, ower Auger cost

2000 ew, Asing 400.00.

802-461-6441

C

220 C,

plit eliered

aul oulin

802-883-5563

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

5 A A Coers

$1.00 each.

he Barrel an

802-439-5519

A

C

e hae the answer.

12 colors of landscape stone

for your yard proects.

e elier

andscape tones of

Vermont

Blac oc Coal

ast ontpelier

802-223-4385

1-800-639-3197

landscapestonesofermont.

com

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

A Barrels totes,

e hae oer 700 in stoc

from 2 12al 275 al totes.

Call for nfo Bicnell Barrels

he Barrel an

802-439-5519.

A

A

egetable Annual lower

tarts.

Competitie prices,

Certifi ed rganic

pening ay th

Weekends 9am-2pm

lainfi eld t

littlewoodfarm.org

B A

ood A C t

rom eal Cows o rugs,

o rowth ormones, ust

ld arm anure 3ards

deliered 145, Also ld Cow

mi 5050 with op oil 3

ards 1 45. parrow arm

can also delier crushed slate,

stone, sand and grael also

washed eastone. 02-229-

2347

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

- C

and, grael hauling,

Compost, ulch ay

802-498-3159

A1-CA A

ending the aret

CA, C

or ore nfo, 02-522-4279

AAB A -

C CC, Commercial

esidential. Also metal

recycling, brush remoal.

Contact tee 02595-3445

or trashsr4uhotmail.com or

www.trashser4u.com

Ask about cash discount.

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

ALWAYS

LANDSCAPING

Lawn Mowing,

Rototilling,

Painting &

Repairs

CALL THE BEST

802-223-6363

CA

C

Free Estimates

802-477-3899

DmFURNACE

MAN

•Oil Furnace Tune-Ups

•Cleanings •Repairs

•Installations

Fully Licensed & Insured

Reasonable Rates

Call Daryl

802-249-2814

DOE home need a

good eterior cleaning igh

ressure, ressure ashing.

A Call 02-

461-8422 / 802-461-6441.

XC C

luid ilm ndercoating

ire ount Balance

pray-in Bedliners

Braes uspension

Exhausts

Routine Maintenance

nteriorterior etailing

A A

ully nsured

02-355-2404 X

A

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

A

erices C

802-279-3680

A

C

emoal ull ree erices,

tump rinding, edge

and hrubs trimming, for free

estimates call andy 02-

479-3403/802-249-7164 35+

years eperience, ully nsured.

X ainting,

taining, allpaper remoal

sheet roc repairs

sim coating. ec cleaning

ealing. lass and glaing.

nsured. call . 02-793-

1017

BA

top the water before it

comes in. Free estimates

gien for installing a under

drain system. Call unrise

Construction Company C

802-461-6441 or 802-917-

3693.

A A mowing starting

at 75 up to one acre

within 15 miles of Barre, ther

conditions apply, ree stimates.

ering Central ermont

since 2005.

Bob Morin

802-522-9753

A

ACA,

Bar ulch

free estimates

30 yrs eperience. Call ae

249-0480 Or Mike 229-8739

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

A oer 3 acres

within 20 miles of Barre free

estimates sering central

since 2005. Bob Morin 802-

522-9753

- ainting-taining

nterior-terior

etal oof ainting

ressure washing

Free Estimates

ully nsured

802-229-0694

802-793-2363

A’ A

. 93’

ull erice rie thru rash

rop aturday’s

esidential Commercial

crap etal

Construction ebris

auling erices railer

rop-off’s 7 days a wee.

Best ost competitie rates

in the area ocated in .

ontpelier.

our trash is our business

Call et aul

802-595-4383

CA

A

AAC

CA-

A

ACA

AA CA

ree stimates- ully nsured

802-229-0694

802-793-2363

A

CA

done in Barre ontpelier

area. ree stimates. Call oe

802-229-6527

PET OF THE WEEK

Beatty is a bashful guy who was

originally a stray that came in with his

friend Gigi. He loves a good napping spot,

especially if there’s sunlight to bathe in. Do

you have a relaxing, quiet home that Beatty

could call his own? Beatty wouldn't mind

a home with another feline who has a

similar personality but is not sure about

canines or kiddos who are not cat-savvy.

TILLERS

FG110

$

369

Trimmer

FS56

SALE

$

199

2 Year

Warranty

LAWN MOWERS

HRN Series

STARTING AT

$

429

3-Year

Warranty

5-Year

Warranty

HRX Series

•Lifetime Warranty

On The Deck

STARTING AT

$

629

All adoptions are done by a phone

appointment only (no one is allowed

in the building). Contact an adoption

counselor to set up an appointment

at 802-476-3811 or emailing

info@centralvermonthumane.org

85 SOUTH MAIN ST. • BARRE, VT

802-476-5400

freedom

Central Vermont

Home Health & Hospice

April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 27


Public Invited to Join Free Online

Composting Summit May 3-7

Next month, the Composting Association

of Vermont and the Agency of Natural Resources

will be hosting the Vermont Organics

Recycling Summit (VORS). This event

will bring together leaders and learners from

across the state to discuss creative ways to

keep organics out of the trash and transform

organics into valuable products. The free online

Summit is a great opportunity for anyone

interested in how Vermont communities and

organizations manage their food scraps successfully

and overcome challenges. It is also

a great way to learn more about compost, anaerobic

digestion, and building healthy soil.

The event runs from May 3-7 during International

Compost Awareness Week.

“The Summit aims to help Vermonters and

regional partners meet the state’s organics diversion,

food rescue, and food scrap recycling

goals,” said Natasha Duarte, the Director of

the Composting Association of Vermont. “We

have more than 15 events scheduled, including

virtual tours of organics management sites

around the state, that celebrate the value of

compost and the many ways it supports the

health of the environment, the people, and the

economy. We’re especially excited to hear Dr.

David Montgomery’s keynote presentation

Bringing Our Soil Back to Life.”

“When communities keep organics out of

the trash, they support green businesses and

jobs, reduce dependence on landfilling waste,

cut greenhouse gas emissions, and produce

LAWN MOWING

& LANDSCAPING

Flower Beds

Mulch Deliveries

Free Estimates

R&R Property Care

Call Randy

802-917-3422

compost, which has restorative soil properties,”

said Josh Kelly, the Materials Management

Section Manager in the Agency of

Natural Resources. “Efforts to keep food out

of the garbage can also put more food on the

tables of Vermonters. For example, many

grocery stores now partner with the Vermont

Foodbank to send excess quality food to people,

instead of throwing it away.”

Learn more about VORS or register online

at www.compostingvermont.org/vors-2021

or contact Natasha Duarte at info@compostingvermont.org

or 802-373-6499.

The Composting Association of Vermont

(CAV) is a nonprofit organization. It

promotes organics recycling that protects

and benefits the environment. The Vermont

Agency of Natural Resources, Department

of Environmental Conservation (ANR/DEC)

works to protect Vermont’s people and places

by caring for the state’s land, air, and water.

E-mail

us!

Now Placing

Your Classified

Or Display Ad Is

Even Easier!

sales@vt-world.com

Please include contact

person

& payment info

Only

By Suzanne Freitas

Extension Master Gardener, University of

Vermont

Warm days may tempt you to work in the

garden and remove winter mulch, but wait a

bit longer. We still could have snow and some

very cold nights. Plants still need protection.

The freeze and thaw cycles of early spring

can damage plants that have survived a cold

winter. While waiting for warmer weather,

this is an excellent time to clean your gardening

implements and make sure your tools are

in good working order.

First, inspect your pots and growing containers

and clean them. It’s important to disinfect

plant containers that were used in the

previous gardening season. Disease-harboring

debris can build-up inside containers.

To disinfect pots, soak them in a solution of

one part bleach to nine parts water for ten

minutes. Use a scrub brush to clear away

stubborn debris. Finish by rinsing pots with

clear water. Your pots are now ready.

Second, get out your weeders, cultivators

and other gardening tools and inspect them.

If you discover some rust, here’s what to do

to get them back in working order:

• Soak in a 1:1 mixture of vinegar and water

overnight.

• Then scrub in a circular motion with steel

wool.

• Rinse in soapy water and then plain water.

• Let dry thoroughly, then rub lightly with

linseed or mineral oil.

Make sure tools are dried thoroughly

before storing. Treating tools with linseed or

mineral oil on a regular basis is the best way

to keep them from getting rusty.

Third, inspect your pruners, loppers or

shears. Pruners should be taken apart and

deep cleaned at least once each season.

• Unscrew the nut that holds them together,

and wash all parts separately in soapy water.

• Soak in vinegar and water, and scrub with

steel wool to remove any rust.

• Rinse and dry.

• Then soak in bleach and water to sanitize,

then rinse and dry.

• Rub with boiled linseed oil and reassemble.

In addition, check the sharpness of your

tools. Cutting or pruning with dull blades

often results in damaged branches, so it’s

important always to keep your tools sharp.

Branches that have been ripped or torn

apart are more susceptible to disease. Keep

your pruners and other cutting tools sharp

with a specialized pruner-sharpening tool or a

sharpening stone. Other tools such as hoes,

It’s Tool Time!

shovels and knives can be kept sharp with

quick touch-ups from a sharpening file, followed

by a sharpening stone.

Lastly, do not forget to take care of the

handles of your tools. Minor cracks can be

reinforced with heavy-duty duct tape. Or you

just might decide that now is the time to

replace that old tool.

A highly effective tool is a spear-headed

spade. The narrow, pointed head lets you dig

in beds without disturbing nearby plants.

Another handy tool is a drain spade. This is

a sturdy shovel, which can slice through compacted

soil, roots and sod because it has sharp

teeth that provide extra cutting power.

A regular maintenance routine will keep

your garden tools in good working order and

will help them last longer. Tools need to be

sharp but also clean and sterile.

Tools that are exposed to plants or soil with

bacterial, fungal or insect infestations can

spread problems throughout the garden. It

only takes a few minutes after each gardening

session to take care of your tools and protect

your garden the next time they are used.

Suzanne Freitas is a UVM Extension

Master Gardener from Jericho.

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Grant’s Trash Removal

Call/Text: Heather: 802-279-3469

Visit us on Facebook

SPRING CLEAN-OUTS

~Residential & Small Commercial

Clean Outs & Trailer Rentals

~Junk, Metal & Debris Removal~

Weekly Trash & Recycling Drop

SATURDAYS 8AM-NOON

At Black Bear Bio Diesel in Plainfield

Local, Friendly & Family Owned/Operated for Over 25 Years!

TRUCK FOR HIRE!

In Need Of A

Pickup Truck And

Helping Hand?

• Hauling

• Dump Run

• Landlords,

Residential

Clean-outs

Call Us!

Tom Moore

T&T Truck For Hire

Montpelier

802-224-1360

page 28 The WORLD April 28, 2021

GREG’S

PAINTING & STAINING

CARPENTRY

• Handpaint or Spray

• Metal Roof Painting

• Interior/Exterior

• Guarantee

Since 1974

SERVICES

802-223-6577

407 BARRE ST. MONTPELIER

Professional

Carpet/Upholstery

Cleaning & Maintenance

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

or your money back.

www.MontpelierCarpetCleaning.com

• Free Estimates

• Reasonable Low Rates

• Neat, Quality Work

• References • Insured

Call 802-479-2733

gpdpainting@aol.com EPA, RRP, EMP Certified

Business Technology & Cyber-Security Services

Located in the historic Hangar Building

1970 Vermont Rt. 14 South 802.223.4448

East Montpelier, VT 05651

rbtechvt.com

Bob’s Creative Landscaping

*Trees, Shrubs,

Evergreens

*Patios, Walls,

Walkways, Decking

*General

Maintenance,

Planting

*Designing

& Consulting!

Specializing

in

Concrete

Pavers

Bob Richardson, Owner

Tel: 802 472-8877

Cell: 802 249-8448

BUILDING GARAGES

FROM FLOOR TO ROOF

Starting At $ 13,000

24 x 24 garage, 6” concrete floors with steel

rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.

Garages to your specifications, any size.

House Framing & Addition Work

Call 802-296-1522 • Ask for Ray

Full Service Plumbing, Heating, Air & Electric

FULLY LICENSED AND INSURED

24-HOUR

EMERGENCY

SERVICE

LLOYD

HOME SERVICE

Your Residential Service Experts

(802) 426-2092

www.lloydplumbingandheating.com


CAMPERS &

MOTORHOMES

2012 AVALANCHE

5TH WHEEL

39 Foot by KEYSTONE

Four Slide Outs, One Awning,

One A/C Unit, Outside Shower

& Kitchen. Excellent Condition,

Asking $24,000

Call 802-279-8740

or 802-279-9168

TRUCKS/VANS/

JEEPS/ACCESS.

2011 NISSAN JUKE $8,995

East Barre Auto Sales 802-

476-5370 or 866-928-9370 or

TEXT 0WOJ TO 27414

2016 CHEVROLET EQUI-

NOX $13,500 East Barre

Auto Sales 802-476-5370 or

866-928-9370 or Text 1LKK to

27414

2016 GMC TERRAIN $13,995

East Barre Auto Sales 802-

476-5370 OR 866-928-9370

For more details TEXT 1LHH

to 27414

Buying All Power Sports and

Open & Enclosed Trailers

Trucking Available

Servicing Central Vermont

802-477-2249

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

$ A1-CASH PAID

Pending the Market

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

802-522-4279.

2009 FORD FOCUS $5,995

East Barre Auto Sales (866)

928-9370 / 802-476-5370 For

more details TEXT 1VPP TO

27414

AUTOMOTIVE

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

ERASE BAD CREDIT

FOREVER!

Credit repair companies make

false claims and promises to

erase a trail of unpaid bills or

late payments from your credit

report. However, only time can

erase negative, but accurate

credit information. n addition,

federal law forbids credit repair

companies from collecting

money before they proide

their serice. f you hae

questions about your credit

history or you want to know

how to get a free copy of your

credit report call the ATTOR-

A’ C-

ER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

at 1-00-49-2424. on’t

send any money to a credit repair

company until you check

it out.

NEW & USED TIRES ALL

SIZES, Used Rims,

Call week days.

802-883-5506

TIRE SALE

$100.00 A Set

245/75/16 (4)

225/55/17 (4)

205/55/16 (4)

CALL 802-622-8138

Hunter Heavy Duty

ALIGNMENTS

McLEODS

SPRING & CHASSIS

“Your Truck

Chassis

Specialists”

32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641 • 1-802-476-4971

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL

TOMORROW WHAT YOU

CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753

Central Vermont’s Newspaper

2016 TOYOTA RAV4 SE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,995 ($389/MONTH)

2016 HONDA CRV EX-L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,795 ($399/MONTH)

2015 SUBARU OUTBACK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,995 ($299/MONTH)

2013 TOYOTA RAV4 LIMITED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,995 ($349/month)

2014 CHRYSLER T&C TOURING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,995 ($349/month)

2008 JEEP WRANGLER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,995 ($378/month)

2014 VOLKSWAGEN TIGUAN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,995 ($339/month)

For 2012 All HONDA CR-V EX-L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,495 ($252/month)

Sizes 2015 VOLKSWAGEN GOLF TSI S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,495 ($237/month)

2014 SUBARU LEGACY PREM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,995 ($266/month)

of RVs

2014 TOYOTA CAMRY L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,995

Trucks, IS BACK!

($260/month)

Trailers 2014 TOYOTA & CAMRY SE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,995 ($238/month)

Buses 2016 FORD FOCUS SE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,995 ($219/month)

2012 SUBARU FORESTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,495 ($266/month)

2013 NISSAN SENTRA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,995 ($219/month)

2011 DODGE RAM DAKOTA

$229

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,995 ($224/month)

2011 TOYOTA RAV4 PER . . . . . . MONTH

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,995 ($224/month)

2011 FORD TAURUS SEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,995 ($199/month)

2013 NISSAN ROGUE S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,495 ($214/month)

2012 NISSAN ROGUE SV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,950 ($196/month)

2012 HYUNDAI SANTA FE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,695 ($198/month)

2010 HONDA CIVIC SDLX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,495 ($198/month)

2006 GMC CANYON SLE1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,995 ($197/month)

2012 SUBARU LEGACY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,995 ($189/month) $99

2010 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,995 ($169/month)

2014 MITSBUSHI MIRAGE ES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,995 ($159/month)

2013 FORD FOCUS SE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,995 ($129/month)

2013 KIA SOUL BASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,495 ($149/month)

“JAKE”

USED CAR LEASING

PER MONTH

CALL DEALER FOR DETAILS!*

709 VERMONT 222 VT. ROUTE RT. 15 15, WEST, HARDWICK, HARDWICK, VT 05843 VT 05843

802.472.7510 | LVImportsVT.com 800-649-5967 | XXXXXXXXXX

DISCLAIMER: ALL PAYMENTS ARE DISCLAIMER: ESTIMATED, BASED ALL ON CREDIT PAYMENTS APPROVAL WITH ARE 10% ESTIMATED, DOWN @6% APR, NOT BASED INCLUDING ON TAX, CREDIT TITLE REG APPROVAL

AND

FEES. LENGTH OF PAYMENTS BASED WITH ON YEAR 10% OF DOWN VEHICLE(2009 @6% AND OLDER=48 APR, NOT MONTHS, INCLUDING 2010-11= 66 MONTHS, TAX, TITLE 2012 NEWER= REG 72 AND MONTHS) FEES.

CLASSIFIEDS

LENGTH OF PAYMENTS BASED ON YEAR OF VEHICLE(2009 AND OLDER=48

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, Vermont 05641

MONTHS, 2010-11= 66 MONTHS, 2012 NEWER= 72 MONTHS)

2009 TOYOTA COROLLA

4DR, $2000 AS IS.

802-505-1765

2011 TOYOTA COROLLA

4DR, $2000 AS IS.

802-505-1765

2013 FORD FOCUS $7,500

East Barre Auto Sales (866)

928-9370 / 802-476-5370 For

more details TEXT 1L6X TO

27414

2013 KIA SPORTAGE $11,995

East Barre Auto Sales 802-

476-5370 or 866-928-9370 or

Text 0WPX TO 27414

2013 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA

$7,500 East Barre Auto Sales

802-476-5370 or 866-928-

9370 Text 1FKC TO 27414

2014 NISSAN SENTRA

$7,995 East Barre Auto Sales

802-476-5370 or 866-928-

9370 or TEXT 0WSD to 27414

2015 CHRYSLER 200

$12,995 East Barre Auto

Sales 802-476-5370 or 866-

928-9370 or Text 1V0W to

27414

2017 SUBARU IMPREZA

$14,995 East Barre Auto

Sales 802-479-5370 OR 866-

928-9370 For more details

TEXT 1T7Y TO 27414

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all

cars! Junk, high-end, totaledit

doesn’t matter et free

towing and same day cash!

NEWER MODELS too! Call

844-813-0213

Donate your car to kids!

our donation helps fund the

search for missing children.

Accepting trucks, motorcycles

’s too ast free picuprunning

or not — 24 hour response.

Maximum tax donation.

Call (888) 515-3813

EXPERIENCE COUNTS!

Fluid Film Undercoating

Tire Mount & Balance

Spray-in Bedliners

Brakes • Suspension

Exhausts

Routine Maintenance

Interior/Exterior Detailing

ALL MAKES & MODELS

Fully Insured

802-355-2404

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

JUST GOOD

AUTOS

296 East Montpelier Rd • Rt. 14 North - Barre

802-479-0140

2014 DODGE RAM

2500 REG. CAB

Auto., 4x4, 6.4 Liter HEMI, PW,

PL, AC, 9.2 ft. Boss V-Plow

$27,995

2011 MAZDA 3

WAGON S SPORT

5 Dr., Auto., 4 Cyl., PW, PL, AC

$5,995

2011 FORD FOCUS SE

Auto., PW, PL, AC,

low miles, 75K

$5,995

2011 CHEV. CRUZE LT

Auto., PW, PL, AC, 4 cyl.

$5,495

2009 FORD RANGER

XLT XCAB 4X4

5 spd., PW, PL, AC, with Cap

$8,995

2006 FORD FOCUS SE

Auto., PW, PL, AC, Low Miles

$3,495

2002 BUICK PARK

AVENUE

Auto., PW, PL, AC, Leather

$3,995

EXTENDED WARRANTIES AVAILABLE

JUST GOOD

AUTOS

Trades Welcome

Prices Negotiable

Just a Sample of Many

Just Good Autos!

April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 29


YOKOHAMA GOODYEAR MICHELIN PIRELLI

FIRESTONE GENERAL UNIROYAL NOKIAN

PLEASE

WEAR A MASK

STAY IN YOUR CAR WHILE WORK IS BEING DONE

& Lt. Truck

TIRE CHANGEOVERS Mounted & Computer Balanced

YOUR TIRES OR OURS

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

Mon. - Fri. 8:30-4:30 • Saturday 8:30-1:00

Closed Sunday

FRED BUDZYN

TIRE

Corner No. Main &

Seminary Sts., Barre

479-1819

CALL FOR PRICES

WRANGLER HANKOOK COOPER

PRESTON’S

SPRING SAVINGS

15 %

- May not be

LUBE, OIL &

FILTER CHANGE

• Up to 5 qts.Standard Motor Oil

• Genuine Factory OIl Filter

• Multi-Point Inspection

• Top off All Fluids

New & Good

Used Tires

Passenger, Performance

TIRE CHANGEOVER

SPECIAL

- Adjust tire pressure to vehicle specs

- Mount and high speed computer

balance all tires

- Most vehicles.

- May not be combined with any other offer

ONLY AT PRESTON’S KIA

AVAILABLE AT PRESTON’S KIA

combined

with any

other offer

WE DO

FLAT

REPAIR

WE

ACCEPT

Eligible Tires Only • May not be

combined with any other offer.

See Service Advisor for Details

Please present coupon at vehicle write-up.

Offer good thru 4/30/21.

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES & MODELS

You Don’t Have To Purchase Your Vehicle Here To Take Advantage Of Our Quality Service!

page 30 The WORLD April 28, 2021

BUY 3 TIRES $ 1

GET THE 4TH FOR

VEHICLES

ONLY

DISCOUNT TO

$34 95

EBT

Please present coupon at vehicle write-up.

YOUR

CHOICE

Plus

Tax

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON ONLY AT PRESTON’S KIA

Please present coupon at vehicle write-up. Offer good thru 4/30/21

FREE

CAR

WASH

WITH ANY

SERVICE

ALL SIZES BF GOODRICH GENERAL

AUTOMOTIVE

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

VERMONT STATE

INSPECTION

• Most cars & light trucks

• Inspection only, repairs extra

• May not be combined

with any other offer VERMONT

INSPECTION

$

54 95

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON AT PRESTON’S KIA

Please present coupon at vehicle write-up.

Offer good thru 4/30/21.

51 GALLISON HILL RD.

MONTPELIER, VT

403 Route

302-Berlin

Barre, VT 05641

Fax:

(802)479-7916

www.facebook.

com/vtworld.

news

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

DUE

MONDAY-FRIDAY 7-5

SATURDAY 8-Noon

Service & Parts

802-262-2030

4

Plus Tax

& Shop

Charges

Thunder Road Announces Ticketing

Information for Early-Season Events

Barre’s Thunder Road has announced ticketing,

fan attendance, and health and safety

information for the early-season events on its

2021 schedule. The 62nd Thunder Road season

begins with the Community Bank N.A.

150 on Sunday, May 2, which can be seen at

the top of Quarry Hill or live worldwide on

FloRacing.

For the Community Bank N.A. 150, a limited

number of tickets will be available for

fans who have not been fully vaccinated

against the COVID-19 virus. The exact number

is subject to change based on the State of

Vermont’s reopening plan, which currently

goes through early July. This limitation

applies to all ages.

There is currently no limit on the number

of fully vaccinated fans who can attend

Thunder Road events. As such, separate “vaccinated”

and “unvaccinated” tickets will be

sold to Thunder Road events for as long as

these restrictions are in place. Fans who are

fully vaccinated are asked to please not buy

“unvaccinated” tickets since there are limited

quantities.

Advance tickets to Thunder Road events

will be sold at https://happsnow.com/event/

Thunder-Road-Speedbowl. Tickets for the

Community Bank N.A. 150 are now available.

General admission to the Community

Bank N.A. 150 is $25 for adults, $10 for kids

ages 6-12, and free for ages 5 and under.

Pricing has also been set for the 58th

Mekkelsen RV Memorial Day Classic on

Sunday, May 30. Admission for the event’s

return is $20 for adults, $5 for kids ages 6-12,

and free for kids ages 5 and under. Thunder

Road hopes to resume offering family pricing

once attendance restrictions are lifted.

Camping will be available for both the

Community Bank N.A. 150 and Mekkelsen

RV Memorial Day Classic. The grounds will

be open from 12:00pm the Friday before the

event until 12:00pm the following Monday.

Site fees are $35 for self-contained units only.

The face mask requirement that began last

August will also remain in effect to begin the

season. Fans must wear a face mask or facial

covering except when they are in their seat

and socially distanced from other households/

groups. Drivers and crew members must wear

a face mask when they are not in their individual

pit area. These policies are in accordance

with the Vermont state mandate requiring

the use of face masks in public spaces.

If fans are unable to attend Thunder Road

events or do not yet feel comfortable doing

so, they can watch live on FloRacing. The

live streaming network has a new multi-year

agreement to broadcast every lap of action on

their website, mobile app, and most smart TV

platforms. An annual subscription is $150,

JUST EAST OF MONTPELIER ON RTE 2 • BERLIN, VT

OIL & FILTER CHANGE

$

34.95Plus

Tax

• Up to 5 qts. 5W30

Heavy duty trucks, diesels & synthetic higher

Offer Good With This Coupon Through 4/30/21.

Spring

Tire Rebates

UP

TO $ 100

MAIL IN REBATE ON

SELECT TIRES

WITH THE

PURCHASE OF ANY

SET OF 4 TIRES

• Free multi point

inspection

• Free alignment

check

Call for details • Offer good thru 4/30/2021

Thunder Road has set its fan attendance guidelines

for the Community Bank N.A. 150 on

Sunday, May 2 along with other early-season

events. (Alan Ward photo)

which includes access to all Thunder Road

events plus racing from dozens of other tracks

across North America. Visit www.FloRacing.

com or www.FloSports.tv to sign up.

“We’re happy to be taking one more step

towards normal as the 2021 racing season

begins,” Thunder Road managing partner

Cris Michaud said. “We’re very thankful to

all the fans and teams who stuck with us

through the challenges the COVID-19 pandemic

presented throughout the 2020 season.

A lot of progress has been made, and as long

as people continue to be smart and considerate

of each other, it looks like things could be

back close to the way they were by early July.

We’re looking forward to getting the Thunder

Road season started and hope everyone continues

to be patient, smart, and safe.”

Thunder Road opens its 2021 season on

Sunday, May 2 at 1:30pm with the 23rd

Community Bank N.A. 150. The stars of the

ACT Late Model Tour and Maplewood/Irving

Oil Late Models will go at it for 150 greenflag

laps. The Lenny’s Shoe & Apparel Flying

Tigers, RK Miles Street Stocks, and Burnett

Scrap Metals Road Warriors also have a full

card of racing.

Admission is $25 for adults, $10 for kids

ages 6-12, and free for kids ages 5 and under.

The event will also be live streamed worldwide

on FloRacing via their website, mobile

app, and most smart TV platforms.

The weekend begins with the annual Car

Show at Thunder Road on Saturday, May 1

from 9:00am to 12:00pm. An open practice is

slated for Saturday afternoon followed by the

2020 ACT/Thunder Road Banquet of

Champions.

For more information, contact the Thunder

Road offices at (802) 244-6963, media@

thunderroadvt.com, or visit www.thunderroadvt.com.

You can also follow us on

Facebook and Twitter at @ThunderRoadVT.

For more information about FloRacing, visit

www.FloRacing.com or www.FloSports.tv.

We Sell TIRES

• We Service All

Makes & Models

• Fleet & Commercial

Accounts Welcome

• We Honor All

Extended Warranties

#4, YOU ARE DUE!

Vermont State

Inspection

$

24 95

PLUS TAX

• Most Cars & Light Trucks • Pass or Fail

Offer Good With This Coupon Through 4/30/21.

4 TIRE

CHANGEOVER

- Adjust tire pressure to

vehicle specs

- Mount and high speed

computer balance all tires

-PLUS-

- Most vehicles.

- May not be combined with

any other offer

$

69 95

Plus

Tax

Please present this coupon at time of write-up

Offer Good With This Coupon Through 5/30/21

OFFERS VALID AT THIS DEALERSHIP ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH OTHER OFFERS. TAX & SUPPLIES EXTRA.

Call Toll Free 866-764-7509

MONDAY - FRIDAY 7 - 5 • SATURDAY 7 - 12. OFFERS GOOD WITH AD TIL 4/30/21


REAL ESTATE

PUBLISHER’S

NOTICE

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this

newspaper is subject to the fair housing

act which makes it illegal to advertise

“any preference, limitation or discrimination

based on race, color, religion,

sex, handicap, familial status or

national origin, or an intention, to make

any such preference, limitation or discrimination.”

Additionally, Vermont’s Fair Housing

and Public Accomodations Act prohibits

advertising that indicates any preference,

limitation or discrimination based

on age, marital status, sexual orientation

or receipt of public assistance.

This newspaper will not knowingly

accept any advertising for real estate

which is in violation of the law. Our

readers are hereby informed that all

dwellings advertised in this newspaper

are available on an equal opportunity

basis.

To file a complaint of discrimination,

call the Vermont Human Rights

Commisson toll-free at 1-800-416-2010

(voice & TTY) or call HUD toll

free at 1-800-669-9777 (voice)

or 1-800-927-9275 (TTY).

MOBILE HOMES/

RENT/SALE

FOR SALE

1985 MOBILE HOME,

14’X70’, 3 Bedroom

2 Full baths,

Metal roof.

Fixer-Upper, Best offer.

You move it.

802-456-7092

leave a message.

COMMERCIAL

RENTALS/SALES

COMMERCIAL SPACE

AVAILABLE Approx 1200 sf

of commercial space available

in Barre. Great location at 260

North Main Street $975.00 /

month Call 802-899-3400 for

more information / application.

APARTMENTS

ROOMS/HOUSES

FOR RENT

HOMES

WORRIED ABOUT FORE-

CLOSURE?

Having trouble paying your

mortgage? The Federal Trade

Commission says don’t pay

any fees in advance to people

who promise to protect

your home from foreclosure.

Report them to the FTC, the

nation’s consumer protection

agency. For more information,

call 1-877-FTC-HELP or click

on ftc.gov. A message from

The World and the FTC.

2710 SQ. FT. (Excluding Bonus Room)

CRAFTSMAN TWO STORY

FIRST FLOOR MASTER SUITE and large

living area. Three Oversized Bedrooms

plus BONUS ROOM on Second Floor

Contact Builder for Plan Details!

Limited Building Slots Available!

Building Contractors Since 1979

Green Mountain

Custom Homes

802-431-7344 OR

802-296-1500

greenmountaincustomhomes1@gmail.com

CONTACT US

editortorldco

salestorldco

torldco

Fax:

(802)479-7916

403 Route

302-Berlin

Barre

eleone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

Updated Weekly

Home Mortgage Rates

LAST

DOWN

LENDER UPDATE RATE APR TERM PTS PAYMENT

Community National 04/23/21 3.000% 3.017% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Bank 1-800-340-3460 2.375% 2.406% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

New England Federal 04/23/21 2.875% 2.898% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Credit Union 866-805-6267 2.250% 2.291% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

Northfield Savings 04/23/21 3.000% 3.037% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Bank (NSB) 2.500% 2.566% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

802-485-5871

VT State Employees 04/23/21 3.250% 3.288% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Credit Union (VSECU) 2.500% 2.568% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

1-800-371-5162 X5345

Rates can change without notice.

***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some products are available with as little as

5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not

included in the APR calculations.

3BR/3BA Home on 2.5± Acres

Tuesday, May 18 @ 11AM

Register & Inspect @ 10AM

222 Campbell Rd., Morrisville, VT

Open House: Fri., April 30 from 3-5PM

2,328± SF home built in 1976, detached garage, full

walkout basement, backup generator, views of Mt.

Mansfield. Located between Morrisville and Stowe.

THCAuction.com • 802-888-4662

WINDY WOOD – BARRE TOWN

WINDY WOOD – BARRE TOWN

“A common interest community”

VIEW “A HOMES common BEING interest BUILT SUNDAYS community”

1 PM – 3 PM

SHOWN BY BY APPOINTMENT

ANYTIME

CALL CALL 802-249-8251 OR 802-734-1920

One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, full basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

Single family homes priced from $267,000 and Duplex homes priced from $229,000

One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, full

basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile on Hill Street, left onto

Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into Windy Wood.

Single family homes priced from $298,000

and Duplex homes priced from $258,000

Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile

on Hill Street, left onto Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into

Windy Wood.

EMAILED ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISING INSERTION ORDER

Thomas Hirchak Company

FROM: Lisa Rowell

Phone: 800-634-7653

advertising@THCAuction.com

INVEST-igate THIS!

3-unit mixed-use investment opportunity in the

heart COMPANY: of Worcester The World Village. Great visibility on

a main paved corridor, only 9 miles north of the

Capital City. Level parking lot for 8+/-. Distant

views. TODAY’S Anchor DATE: tenants 04/22/2021 are S ost fice and

a well-established NAME OF FILE: 180588_TW

cafe. Upstairs 2-BR apt has

hardwood DATE(S) TO oorin, RUN: 04/28/2021

open layout and syliht.

seul, unfinished concrete basement. etal roo.

Electrical, SIZE OF AD: plumbing, 2x4 windows, weatherization,

cosmetic updates completed, and more! $315,000.

EMAILED TO: sales@vt-world.com

1C=1.48; 2C=3.1; 3C=4.68; 4C=6.3

Lori P. Holt, Broker

SECTION: Class Auctions

ie teet ontpelie, V

oiHoltVoup.com

cell a

PO# 180588

HH filiates, . n independentl owned and opeated anchisee o

HH filiates, . eshie Hathawa Homeeices and the eshie Hathawa

Homeeices smbol ae eisteed seice mas o Homeeices o meica,

nc. ual Housin ppotunit.

RULE OF THUMB......

Describe your property,

not the “appropriate” buyer or

renter, not the landlord,

not the neighbors.

Just describe the property

and you’ll almost always obey

the law.

WILLIAMSTOWN SMALL 1

Bedroom, 1st fl oor, includes

heat, hot water, rubbish, coinop

laundry, Non-smoking, no

dogs, $700 / monthly plus deposit.

802-433-5832.

WILLIAMSTOWN, 2nd Floor

effi ciency, includes heat, hot

water, rubbish coin-op laundry,

non smoking no dogs,

$550 / monthly plus deposit.

802-433-5832

VACATION

RENTALS/SALES

WANTING TO RENT, Camp

on the water, sleeps 8, bath

and a half, need for 2 weeks,

looking for last week of July or

fi rst of August. 239-495-1153

Warm Weather is Year Round

in Aruba. The Water is safe,

and the dining is fantastic.

Walk out to the beach. 3-bedroom

weeks available. Sleeps

8. Email: carolaction@aol.

com for more information.

LAND FOR SALE

15 ACRE BUILDING LOT

WINDSOR, VT

315-528-0172

Gerry Tallman, Esq.

Serving Central Vermont

for 25+ years

Blanchard Block, 5th Floor, Barre | 2 Summer St., Randolph

802.461.4444 or 802.728.9103

oficeallanaco

LAND

FOR SALE

WILLIAMSTOWN, VERMONT

3.1+/- Acre Lot

Septic Design for 3-Bedroom Home

Convenient to Town

Amenities and Schools

$48,000.

Call 802-433-1433

April 28, 2021 The WORLD page 31


COME JOIN

OUR TEAM

MACHINE

OPERATOR

1st shift

$

18 50

/HR

2ND SHIFT

POSITIONS

starting at

$

22 50

/HR

Receive a $25 gift card at

time of your interview!

Now through

April 2021

We are here and continuing to grow! There are many positions available on 1st and 2nd shift.

If you are ready for the challenge, and want to be rewarded for your hard work, apply today!

3 weeks paid time off 10 paid holidays Comprehensive benefits 401(k) match. All starting day 1!

PASSION. PRIDE. CRAFTSMANSHIP.

Among the vibrant hills and silver waters of the Green Mountain State is one

constant: the promise of American craftsmanship. This is where day after day,

year after year, the proud people of Vermont Castings craft each stove with

hand and heart. No detail is too small, no element insignificant. This is true

craftsmanship. we are here and continuing to grow. Come join our team!

TEAMWORK. GROWTH. RESPECT.

Family, future, profit sharing, strong pay and benefits. Our manufacturing

professionals benefit from a quarterly profit sharing program, access to a

401(k), member stock purchase plans, tuition reimbursement options as well

as medical, dental and life insurance plans.

It’s more than a career, it’s the future you’ve been looking for.

Apply today at hearthnhome.com/careers

or stop by 1131 Beanville Road, Randolph

page 32 The WORLD April 28, 2021

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