KNITmuch Issue 12

anptmag

Changing the recommended yarn and colorway of a knitting project can be an adventure that can yield amazing results! In this exciting issue, we do just that with free patterns like the Jay Sweater and the Fresh Berry Tee, see what the thought process is in deciding if the alternate yarns will work out. We also take Cotton Supreme Waves leftover yarn to the loom to make a baby blanket, letting the ‘waves’ do all the color changes! Charles Voth experiments with Lina yarn, a linen-cotton blend, and Whisper Lace, a wool-silk blend, both by Fibra Natura to knit up a fresh summer top. This top also includes an interesting parallelogram patterned stitch as an embellishment, certainly not to be missed! Many more free patterns in this playful issue! Wishing you happy knitting adventures!

KNITmuch

summer tops · cowls · shawls · hat · woven blankets · pullovers

...to K, is to

Issue 12

KNITTING with

Cotton Supreme Waves

Donnina

Merino Mist

Whisper Lace

Lina

* Broken Ribs

Pattern

Stitches

* Alternating

Cable Cast-On

* Simple

Stretchy

Bind-Off

* Choosing

your knitting

needles

wisely

* Block your

knitting to

perfection!

WEAVING A COLOR BLOCK BABY BLANKET WITH COTTON SUPREME WAVES


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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, ART DIRECTOR

Carla A. Canonico

Carla@KNITmuch.com

ADVERTISING SALES

John De Fusco

John@KNITmuch.com

PUBLISHER

A Needle Pulling Thread

PHOTOGRAPHERS

John De Fusco, Carla A. Canonico, Contributors

BLOGGERS/CONTRIBUTORS

Fiona Stevenson

fionastevensondesigns

Cindy O'Malley

cindooknits.blogspot.com

Charles Voth

charlesvothdesigns.ca

Cynthia MacDougall

cgknitters.blogspot.com

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Carla A. Canonico

Carla@KNITmuch.com

Sondra Armas

Sondra@KNITmuch.com

SOCIAL MEDIA and WEB

Sondra Armas

Alejandro Araujo

WEBSITE / BLOG : KNITmuch.com

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WHERE TO GET YOUR COPY

KNITmuch is a quarterly eMagazine published by A

Needle Pulling Thread. It is available free for personal use

online at KNITmuch.com.

A limited number of printed copies of KNITmuch are available for

purchase at select yarn shops and specialty stores. Ask for it at your

local shop. KNITmuch is not available by subscription.

YARN SHOPS

If you are interested in carrying KNITmuch in your store,

please email John@KNITmuch.com.

EDITORIAL

Bloggers, designers and other contributors who would

like to be considered for future issues please email

Carla@KNITmuch.com with a brief description of your

work and your proposed project.

©2021 KNITmuch. All rights reserved. Issue 12.

ISSN 2368-5913.

No part of this publication may be reproduced without

written permission from the publisher.

All designs, patterns, and information in this magazine are

for private, non-commercial use only, and are copyrighted

material owned by their respective creators or owners.

ERRATA KNITmuch Issue 11

We apologize for omitting Fiona Stevenson's name and

Ravelry in the list of contributors and at the end of her

feature on page 13. Fiona Stevenson Designs

www.KNITmuch.com

Visit and download our free ebook:

Cynthia MacDougall's

Knitting Essentials!

2 KNITmuch | issue 12


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Knit Together - Broken Ribs - Pattern Stitches to Try

Doubling up Lina and Whisper Lace yarns for 2X the beauty and function

Giving a shout-out to Whisper Lace yarn

What gives Fibra Natura Lina yarn its beautiful drape?

Making tidy increases/decreases when working with linen yarn, Lina

Try a parallelogram lace panel in your next top-down knit tee

Knitting the perfect spring cowl with Fibra Natura Donnina yarn

Masters in knitting choose their knitting needles wisely!

How to knit super stretchy edges for the Contours Cowl

How to block your knitting to perfection!

Online knitting groups – a knitter is never truly alone

Knitting with Cotton Supreme Waves

Swatches...what does Cotton Supreme Waves look like in 3 needle sizes?

Knitting a summertime tee with waves of color

What to know about knitting an oversized wrap with Cotton Supreme Waves

Weaving a color block baby blanket with Cotton Supreme Waves

Knitting with Merino Mist yarn

3 swatches determine the best knit fabric

Knitting the Jay Sweater in Merino Mist for a perfect fit

Making a simple cowl glamorous using Merino Mist yarn

Soft and cozy arm warmers complete the Merino Mist trio

Standard yarn weights, abbreviations & terms

contents

KNITmuch | issue 12

3


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4 KNITmuch | issue 12


editor's

letter

In my knitting adventures I've often changed up the

yarn recommended in the knitting pattern. It will be

about the color or feel of the yarn that prompts me

to change it. Often the knitted piece will look entirely

different than that in the original

pattern. In this issue, we do

just that with the Jay Sweater,

originally knit up in Fibra Natura

Kingston Tweed, Cindy O'Malley

has knit this colorwork sweater

using Universal Yarn Merino

Mist - soft and airy. See how her

thoughts on the changes. Using

black, gray, and white, the Jay

Sweater looks so very different.

Cindy also changed the color of

the Fresh Berry Tee to a stronger

shade of pink and purple colorway

using Cotton Supreme yarn, giving

it a bolder look. Knitting is about

the joy in experimenting with yarn

and color!

I hope this letter

finds you

in good health.

Cindy has taken her leftover Cotton Supreme Waves

yarn to her loom to see what the 'waves' in the color

would look like in a baby blanket.

The result is beautiful! The yarn

makes the 'waves' do all the

color changes, it's so nice when

projects are simplified while

keeping the wow factor!

Another exciting feature here

is how Charles Voth plays with

Lina yarn, a linen-cotton blend,

and Whisper Lace, a wool-silk

blend, both by Fibra Natura to

knit up a fresh summer top. This

top also includes an interesting

parallelogram patterned stitch

as an embellishment. Just

making things sweeter here!

I hope you have fun reading this

issue and trying out most if not

all of the wonderful suggestions

within it.

Wish you happy knitting

adventures!

Cheerfully,

follow me

KNITmuch | issue 12

5


Knit Together

with Cynthia MacDougall

Photo by Mike Guilbault.

Cynthia MacDougall

Canadian Guild of Knitters

PO Box 562 Stn Main

Orillia, ON L3V 6K2

705.722.6495

1.866.245.5648 (CGK-KNIT)

www.CGKnitters.ca

blog: cgknitters.blogspot.com

ravelry name: theloveofknit

Broken Ribs

Anyone who has had one knows that a

broken rib is no fun at all, but breaking

ribs deliberately in knitting can be fun.

Ribbed stitch patterns, the cause of

boredom in many a knitter, can be made

more interesting by breaking them up.

Knit and purl stitches are the foundation

for all knitting. They are simple

stitches, yet there are literally hundreds

of ways to combine them to create texture

and design. Any stitch treasury has

at least a chapter, if not an entire volume,

dedicated to knit/purl combination

stitches. Ribbing often features prominently

in these chapters or volumes.

Many knitters think of ribbing in a

traditional fashion; even columns of

knit stitches and purl stitches to make

tidy edges on hems, neckbands, and

cuffs of sweaters. Ribbing's potential

goes far beyond this.

What happens when you 'break up' a

ribbed panel? Design options! Seed

stitch (also known as moss stitch in

some areas) is actually a 1x1 rib that is

'broken' every row. Moss stitch (sometimes

referred to as double moss stitch),

is a 1x1 rib that is 'broken' on every

second row. Double seed stitch (sometimes

described as box or dice stitch) is

a 2x2 rib that is broken every two rows.

Beyond these examples, numerous other

options can be explored: a 3x3 rib that

is broken on every third row, or a 4x4

rib broken on every fourth row. It soon

becomes apparent that ribbing alone has

hundreds of possibilities.

What happens when you break a 3x3 rib

by moving the knit and purl stitches one

stitch to the right or left on every fourth

row? The River Rib toque is one answer.

What would happen if the knit and purl

stitches were moved two stitches to

the right or left? What would happen if

the stitches were moved every third, or

every fifth, row?

Another way to break ribs is to use

an 'uneven rib' [even ribs have the

same number of knit and purl stitches.

Uneven ribs have more knit stitches

than purl stitches or more purl stitches

than knit stitches]. Try breaking a 1x3

rib every fourth row, or breaking a 3x5

rib every third row. Break it by 2 stitches,

then try breaking it by 4 stitches.

The possibilities for broken ribs can be expanded

further by working a row or two

of plain knit or purl across the ground of

traditional ribbed columns. Incorporating

twisted stitches is another way of breaking

up the appearance of ribbing.

I like to 'doodle' with yarn. Every so

often, I choose a smooth yarn, appropriate

sized needles, and start to

experiment with stitch patterns. I may

start out with a motif or stitch pattern

by another author, and try branching

out from it, or I may just begin with

a variety of knit and purl stitches and

branch out from there. Take some time

this winter to 'doodle' with broken ribs.

Make note of what transpires on your

needles, and think of ways your doodles

can become your own designs. z

6 KNITmuch | issue 12

Photos courtesy of Cynthia MacDougall.


Pattern Stitches to Try

Seed Stitch:

‘Breaking’ or offsetting a 1 x 1 rib every row creates the Seed Stitch

pattern.

Cast on an even number of stitches.

Row 1: *K1, p1; repeat from * across.

Row 2: *P1, k1; rep from * across.

To centre Seed Stitch work it over an odd number of stitches and

follow Row 1 for every row.

Moss Stitch:

Moss stitch is a 1 x 1 rib ‘broken’ every two rows.

Cast on an even number of stitches.

Rows 1 and 2: *K1, p1; rep from * across.

Rows 3 and 4: *P1, k1; rep from * across.

Double Seed Stitch/ Box Stitch:

Although it is often referred to as double seed stitch, Barbara G.

Walker notes in her Treasury of Knitting Patterns that it more closely

resembles the structure of Moss Stitch, because Double Seed

Stitch pattern has four rows. Double Seed Stitch is actually a 2 x 2

rib that is broken, or offset, every two rows.

Cast on a multiple of 4 plus 2 stitches (e.g., 22)

Rows 1 and 3: *K2, p2; rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Rows 2 and 4: *P2, k2; rep from * to last 2 sts, k4

2 Stitch Rib:

When only row 1 of the Double Seed Stitch pattern is worked on

every row, it results in the 2 Stitch Rib. Because this rib is broken

every row, it is, in effect, a true double seed stitch, because the

‘seeds’ always appear in pairs.

Twisted 1 x 1 Rib, Broken Every 4 Rows:

The instructions below are for back-and-forth knitting, and make a

reversible fabric which is sturdy, but not as elastic as 1 x 1 ribbing.

Cast on an odd number of stitches.

Rows 1 and 3: *K1 tbl, p1 tbl; rep from * to last st, k1tbl.

Rows 2 and 4: *P1 tbl, k1 tbl; rep from * to last st, p1tbl.

Rows 5 and 7: Work as given for rows 2 and 4.

Rows 6 and 8: Work as given for rows 1 and 3

KNITmuch | issue 12

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8 KNITmuch | issue 12


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KNITmuch | issue 12

9


Doubling up Lina and

Whisper Lace yarns for 2X

the beauty and function

Charles Voth

Swatch of two yarns held together, Lina and

Whisper Lace, both by Fibra Natura.

Lina comes in hanks that need to be wound up,

but Whisper Lace is neatly wound into soft balls

that are ready to be knit from.

I swatched with different stitch patterns to see

what I liked.

The last time I held yarn double

to knit something was years ago,

when I had some scrap worsted

weight yarns that I wanted to

use up by making a pet blanket.

I really tried to make the colors

match, but that was trickier than

I thought. I didn’t like how the

colors marled either. I tried to

fight the twisting of the two yarns

first and gave up. Then I tried

to deliberately twist the yarns

evenly, to no avail. I just didn’t

like the look. So what led me to

consider doing this again? Well,

it was mainly being in love with

qualities of certain yarns, but not

finding a yarn that had all the

qualities in one. I chose Lina and

Whisper Lace by Fibra Natura.

What are the qualities I was

looking for?

First, I wanted to have a worsted

weight yarn instead of a DK or

sport yarn because I wanted to

knit a garment more quickly at

a gauge of 18 to 20 sts per 4". I

wanted to use fibers that have

a decent amount of drape, like

linen and silk, but I also wanted

the fiber to have a little bounce

to it, so a little elasticity and

memory, like that in wool. I

wanted the garment to be great

for the in-between seasons…

when many days are cool, but

you don’t want to feel bulky like

a marshmallow and jumping

from pulling layers on or off.

Worsted weight linen is very

heavy and because it has no

elasticity, it really grows with

gravity, so I wanted to blend a

lighter linen or linen blend yarn

with something else. I found out

about Fibra Natura Lina which is

listed as a light-weight yarn, and

it behaves somewhere between a

Sport (2) and DK-weight (3) yarn.

Then I wanted a really fine yarn

that was wool or mohair-based

for the elasticity and looking

through other Fibra Natura yarns

I found Whisper Lace.

Having the really fine lace weight

that is multicolored mixed with the

solid DK-weight is also a whole

different experience than when

I held two strands of worsted

weight together. The marled

or tweedy look from the mix

of Whisper Lace and Lina really

makes a difference. The main

color of the Lina truly shines

through, but the variations in the

Whisper Lace make the fabric

have more depth.

10 KNITmuch | issue 12

Photos by Charles Voth


Giving a shout-out to

Whisper Lace yarn

I want to take a step back

and highlight the strengths of

Whisper Lace yarn.

Whisper Lace comes in 14

luxurious solids and 14 wellcoordinating

multi-colored dye

patterns. Because I was using

a solid of the linen yarn, Lina, I

decided to go with the Fern multi,

which has cream, yellow, greens

and a pale turquoise in the mix.

Check out several projects that

were designed for Fibra Natura

to feature Whisper Lace yarn.

Free PDF of Rime Shawl Pattern

In Whisper Lace.

Free PDF of pattern for Augustine

Scarf in the Stonework colorway

of Whisper Lace.

I like Whisper Lace so much,

that when I'm finished with the

original design, the one where I

blend the two yarns together, I'll

knit something out of this yarn

on its own. It's one of my favorite

lace-weight yarns ever!

Solids and Multis coordinate well, and there is at

least one match for each one.

The lace work and cables on the edge raise this

Rime shawl to a new level of elegance. It only

takes 3 balls at 440 yards each.

I was looking for a lace-weight

yarn that contained at least

50% wool. It didn't have to be

superwash, but I did want a soft

sheep's wool for the elasticity

and 'blockability'. Whisper Lace is

70% superwash wool and 30%

silk. I love this blend because the

silk adds sheen and strength to

the yarn.

This soft wool-silk blend in this pastel colorway is

the perfect blending yarn for my garment project.

One of the design elements

I decided to include in this

garment are lace panels. I

needed to swatch with Whisper

Lace to see how it behaved, so I

chose to work some stockinette

stitch and a small lace panel just

to see how it looked. I decided to

incorporate a lace parallelogram

into the design. Here's what it

looks like close up.

This long, wide, lacy scarf shown in the

Stonework colorway of Whisper Lace is called

Augustine and used 2 balls of this yarn.

This 2-ply S-twist yarn has a nice crimp and a nice

sheen in each strand.

This close up of Whisper Lace in mostly

stockinette stitch is 1½" wide x ¾" tall.

This parallelogram lace motif will make a classic

spring sweater classy.

KNITmuch | issue 12

11


What gives

Fibra Natura Lina yarn

its beautiful drape?

9 of the 12 colors of Lina available shown together

highlight how well-chosen the color-range actually is.

Any color in the collection goes well with the others.

It is characteristic of plant-based fiber yarns to be

comprised of many individual plies.

This yarn is listed as sport weight,

but when I knit with it on size

5US [3.75mm] needles, I got

more of a DK weight stitch count

of 22 or 21 stitches per 4". Each

hank is 100g and has a generous

252yds. I chose the Fern green

color because it was a close

match to the Reeds colorway I

chose in Whisper Lace.

I like to really get to know the

yarns I knit with. At first glance,

Fibra Natura Lina looks a bit

loosely spun. There's a lot of

separation between the larger

plies and this gives the yarn its

lightness of being and helps a

lot with its drape. However, upon

untwisting the plies, I discovered

that there are 3 main plies that

are spun loosely around each

other, but each one of those

strands is comprised of 3 even

more tightly spun plies. The

middle strand in the photo shows

that one of the plies is loosely

spun and has 2 binding plies that

keep the looser fibers contained,

but still relaxed.

The architecture of this yarn

is definitely responsible for its

strength, drape, and depth of color.

I swatched with Lina on its own

first to see what it behaved like

at a tighter gauge. I really found

that the swatch had a lot of

drape and even some elasticity,

which is unusual for a plant-fiber

based yarn.

Lina is a versatile yarn. Change the needles size and you can get a range of

gauges between 24 sts per inch to 20. The fabric has drape in every case.

Row gauge is more accurate after wet-blocking. Read why above

12 KNITmuch | issue 12


All the swatches done, I'm ready to design the sweater

I'll share with you in the next couple of articles.

Fern and Amaranth, these two rich colors of Lina by Fibra

Natura are used together in a lacy long scarfarita called

Strawberry & Kiwi.

Row gauge is a little tricky to measure

prior to blocking because the stitches like

to separate from each other where they

were sitting on the needles. But once wet

blocked and pulled vertically and allowed

to spring back, the stockinette fabric was

more balanced and the gauge more

accurate. I do this when I knit with linen or

cotton because I want to imitate the effect

gravity seems to have on plant-based yarn.

The other stitch patterns at the bottom and

top of the swatch were an attempt at killing

two birds with one stone. I wanted to see

if these textured stitches suited my design

idea. But they didn't. So they just serve as

lovely frames for my stockinette rows.

Here are some free designs that accompany

Fibra Natura Lina and I'd like to introduce

them to you now so that you have more than

one project you can line up in your queue.

PDF of the free pattern for Strawberry & Kiwi Scarfarita

PDF of the free pattern for Ravine Tee-shirt

PDF of free shawlette pattern using Lavendula, Potting Soil for the body

and Crocus for the edging.

This scarf is knit with an all-over lace pattern that

works up on the bias. It's a quick, fun knit for a

classy accessory

You can just see the drape in the photo of this

tee-shirt knit with the Citrus and Mineral colors of

Lina by Fibra Natura.

Using an easy-to-execute Dip Stitch, you can knit

this lovely shawlette that will drape over your

shoulders on a fall evening.

KNITmuch | issue 12

13


Making tidy increases/decreases

when working with linen yarn,

Lina

Stockinette stitch with Lina and Whisper Lace by

Fibra Natura.

Zing interchangeable needles come in a variety

of colors, and make a nice contrast to the yarn.

I'm so excited to share my sweater design where I

held together Lina, a linen-cotton blend, and Whisper

Lace, a wool-silk blend, both by Fibra Natura.

I want to show you how the two yarns look

together. I'll also demonstrate how to keep

this not-so-elastic linen yarn behaving

discreetly when you increase and decrease

to shape the sweater I'm sharing

with you. Let's get to it!

The stockinette is knit in the

round and the gauge on a

US8 [5mm] circular needle is

18 sts and 25 rows across 4".

I'm thrilled with the drape of

this fabric, and it's very light as

well, so I achieved my goal of

knitting at a worsted weight

gauge by blending two lighter

weight yarns, which by their

own merit give a lot of drape

to knit fabric. I really like the

peek-a-boo bits of tweed-like

flecks of color from the Reeds

colorway of Whisper Lace.

This sweater design was done "on

the mannequin" instead of all on

paper first, so there was the need

to remove the stitches from the

circular needle to try it on the

model every once in a while.

14 KNITmuch | issue 12


This sweater starts with a simple crew neck and

is knit top down, making increases a necessary

stitch for shaping.

This could have been a big hassle, but instead, I

used the cool feature of my Zing interchangeable

circular needle by Knitter's Pride. See that little

hole about an inch from my fingers? That's where I

threaded through dental floss as a life-line and knit

one more round. Then I could unscrew the tips off

the cable, slide the cable off the stitches, and voilà!

I'm sure you've heard it before, but when you

swatch for an in-the-round sweater, be sure to

swatch in the round, too! The tension of not

having purl rows can be different for some

knitters.

As I said earlier, this sweater is top-down, and

it begins with a yoke construction.There's one

difference to this particular yoke. You start by

knitting in rows and working a gap opening at the

center back, later to be closed with a button, and

you'll be working short-rows to ensure the back of

the sweater sits higher on the back neck, so that

the front crew is comfortable.

I used German short rows, which I went on and

on about a while ago, and demonstrated in a

video, too, because they're invisible with the

linen yarn...and it's all about invisibility with

plant fiber yarns that don't have elasticity,

because any slight shift in tension is

readily visible, like right there!

Pam is modelling the Parallelogram Tee, knit out

of Lina and Whisper Lace by Fibra Natura.

This also means that increases will show, too. There's

no way to make them totally invisible, but I worked

and worked at making them discreet and figured

out a really useful strategy.

TIP You use the tips of the needles, not their full

circumference to knit the increases, and also the

decreases. Using Knitter's Pride Zing needles makes

this technique really easy because you just have to

keep your loops and yarn-overs on the shiny nickelplated

tips, which are narrower than the colored

body of the needles. Awesome!

I know that you probably have your favorite kind

of increase, and M1 (make 1) may not be it. I tried

lifted increases, knit front-back increases, and yo

and knit into the back loop of the yo on the next

round. None of them were subtle enough for my

taste. So I'm sticking with the M1, and technically

it's a left-twist Make 1. I didn't bother to try a righttwist

M1 because I figured it would stretch the linen

stitches even more and that would make them less

than invisible.

To knit a large version of this sweater (44" bust and

meant to be worn with no positive ease), you'll

need 6 hanks of Lina and 3 balls of Whisper Lace.

KNITmuch | issue 12

15


Try a parallelogram lace panel in

your next top-down knit tee

It's time to share this top-down knit tee pattern

with you so you can try knitting it with Lina and

Whisper Lace held together. The drape of the

resulting fabric is fabulous. I wanted to hold these

two yarns together because I felt that I could finish

a full sweater in 5 weeks if it were knit at a worsted

weight gauge. Alas..I still have 7" to go on the

bottom of the body and both ¾-length sleeves to

add on.

The parallelogram lace panel travels down only one side of the yoke. It

also appears on one side of the back of this tee.

These two yarns held together knit to a worsted weight gauge of 18 sts

and 25 rows to 4" [10cm] in the round.

Pattern Information

bust 44" (meant to be worn with zero positive/

negative ease)

length 25"

sleeves 3/4-length

materials

• 6 hanks Lina by Fibra Natura (pictured in

Fern): 3.5oz [100g] / 252 yds [230m]; 68%

linen, 32% cotton.

• 4 balls Whisper Lace by Fibra Natura

(pictured in Reeds): 1.75oz [50g] / 440 yds

[400m]; 70% superwash wool, 30% silk

• 8US [5mm] Zing circular needle; various

cable lengths to accommodate different

amounts of stitches at neck opening, full

yoke, body, and sleeves.

• 8 stitch markers, 2 additional unique-looking

stitch markers

The diagram for the Lace Panel is below. It's

called CHART A in the pattern. Here are the text

instructions for those who prefer them. Row

numbers for the sweater instructions will not

consistently coincide with the row numbers for the

chart as you need to repeat the 36 rounds over

and over again. Read the chart from right to left

each round.

16 KNITmuch | issue 12


Rnd 1: Ssk, yo, k9.

Rnd 2: K1, p1, k9.

Rnd 3: K1, ssk, yo, k8.

Rnd 4: K2, p1, k8.

Rnd 5: [Ssk, yo] twice, k7.

Rnd 6: [K1, p1] twice, k7.

Rnd 7: K1, [ssk, yo] twice, k6.

Rnd 8: K1, [k1, p1] twice, k6.

Rnd 9: [Ssk, yo] 3 times, k5.

Rnd 10: [K1, p1] 3 times, k5.

Rnd 11: K1, [ssk, yo] 3 times, k4.

Rnd 12: K1, [k1, p1] 3 times, k4.

Rnd 13: [Ssk, yo] 4 times, k3.

Rnd 14: [K1, p1] 4 times, k3.

Rnd 15: K1, [ssk, yo] 4 times, k2.

Rnd 16: K2, [p1, k1] 4 times, k1.

Rnd 17: [Ssk, yo] 5 times, k1.

Rnd 18: K1, [p1, k1] 5 times.

Rnd 19: K1, [ssk, yo] 5 times.

Rnd 20: K1, [k1, p1] 5 times.

Rnd 21: K2, [ssk, yo] 4 times, k1.

Rnd 22: K3, [p1, k1] 4 times.

Rnd 23: K3, [ssk, yo] 4 times.

Rnd 24: K3, [k1, p1] 4 times.

Rnd 25: K4, [ssk, yo] 3 times, k1.

Rnd 26: K5, [p1, k1] 3 times.

Rnd 27: K5, [ssk, yo] 3 times.

Rnd 28: K6, p1, [k1, p1] twice.

Rnd 29: K6, [ssk, yo] twice, k1.

Rnd 30: K7, [p1, k1] twice.

Rnd 31: K7, [ssk, yo] twice.

Rnd 32: K7, [k1, p1] twice.

Rnd 33: K8, ssk, yo, k1.

Rnd 34: K9, p1, k1.

Rnd 35: K9, ssk, yo.

Rnd 36: K10, p1.

Special Stitches

Chart A Stitch

Diagram and

Symbol Legend

for Parallelogram

Lace Panel

Hitch-st on purl side: Yarn should already be at

front of work as this is purl side, slip first st purlwise

[as if to purl], tug on yarn to the right and take

over right-hand needle to the back, bring yarn up

through both needle tips, give it one more tug, [this

is known as the purl hitch-stitch-abbrev: ph-st],

Hitch-st on knit side: Yarn will be at back of work

as this is knit side, bring yarn forward, slip first st

purlwise [as if to purl], tug on yarn to the right and

take over right-hand needle to the back, give it one

more tug, [this is known as the knit hitch-stitchabbrev:

kh-st],

Working hitch-sts off needles: purl or knit into both

strands of next hitch stitch [check the German

Short Rows video below] to maintain pattern of

Seed Stitch.

KNITmuch | issue 12

17


Abbreviations

K = knit; P = purl; SSK = slip next st purlwise, return

to LH needle through front strand, knit 2 sts tog

through back loops; pm = place marker, sm = slip

marker or stitch marker, rm = remove marker, rem

= remaining, st(s) = stitch(es), sl = slip, btwn =

between, LH = left hand, RH = right hand, k2tog =

knit 2 together, tog = together

Hold these two yarns together throughout the pattern.

Using the Old Norwegian Cast-on and size 8US

[5mm] needles, cast on 91 sts.

Set-up Row: Knit.

Row 1: K17, turn, leaving rem sts unworked.

Row 2: Kh-st, k across.

Row 3: K16, work off hitch st by kh-2tog, k10, turn.

Row 4: Ph-st, p across.

Row 5: Knit to hitch st, work off hitch st by kh-2tog,

k10, turn.

Row 6: Ph-st, p across.

Row 7: Knit to hitch st, work off hitch st by kh-2tog,

knit across.

Row 8: K18, turn, leaving rem sts unworked.

Row 9: Kh-st, k across.

Row 10: Purl to hitch st, work off hitch st by ph-

2tog, p10, turn.

Row 11: Kh-st, knit across.

Row 12: Purl to hitch st, work off hitch st by ph-

2tog, p10, turn.

Row 13: Kh-st, knit across to last st, place unique sm

to indicate beginning of round.

Bring other end of circular needle around to join in

the round, being careful not to twist, sl last st to LH

needle, k2tog-90 sts.

Now working in Rounds

Set-up Rnd 1: K5, pm, [k11, pm] 3 times, k12, [pm,

k11] 3 times, pm, k6.

Slip all markers as you come to them.

Rnd 1: K2, M1, k15, [k4, M1, k3, M1, k4], k14, **M1,

k3**, rep btwn ** twice more, k11, rep btwn [ ],

k3, M1, k3–99.

Rnd 2: Knit.

Rnd 3: K18, *k1, [M1, k3] 4 times, work row 1 of

Chart A, k7*, m1, k19, rep btwn * once–108 sts.

Rnd 4: Knit to 3rd marker, sm, work row 2 of Chart

A, [knit to next marker, sm] 3 times, work row

2 of Chart A, knit rem sts.

Rnd 5: K18, *[k3, M1] 4 times, k4, work row 3 of

Chart A*, k8, m1, k19, rep btwn * once, k7–117

sts.

Rnd 6: Knit to 3rd marker, sm, work row 4 of Chart

A, [knit to next marker, sm] 3 times, work row

4 of Chart A, knit rm sts.

Rnd 7: K18, *k1, [M1, k5] 4 times, work next row of

Chart A*, k9, M1, k19, rep btwn * once, k7–126

sts.

Rnd 8: Knit to 3rd marker, sm, work next row of

Chart A, [knit to next marker, sm] 3 times, work

corresponding row of Chart A, knit rem sts.

Rnd 9: K1, M1, k5, M1, k12, *k8, M1, k9, M1, k8, work

next row of Chart A*, k29, rep btwn * once, k1,

M1, k5, M1, k1–134 sts.

Rnd 10: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 11: K3, M1, k17, *k9, M1, k9, M1, k9, work next

row of Chart A*, [k4, M1]x3, k13, rep btwn *

once, k6, M1, k3–143 sts.

Rnd 12: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 13: K5, M1, k16, *k5, M1, k19, M1, K5, work next

row of Chart A*, k1, [M1, k5]x3, k17, rep btwn *

once, k5, M1, k5–152 sts.

18 KNITmuch | issue 12


The back of the sweater is

split at the beginning and

short-rows are worked to

help the neck opening sit

correctly on the shoulders.

Rnd 14: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 15: K22, *k3, [M1, k7]x4, work next row of

Chart A*, k12, M1, k23, rep btwn * once, knit

rem sts–161 sts.

Rnd 16: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 17: K2, M1, k2, M1, k18, *k12, M1, k11, M1, K12,

work next row of Chart A*, k2, M1, k34, rep

btwn * once, k7, M1, k2, M1, k2–170 sts.

Rnd 18: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 19: K12, M1, k12, *k1, M1, k35, M1, k1, work next

row of Chart A*, k11, M1, k4, M1, k22, rep

btwn * once, k1, M1, k12–178 sts.

Rnd 20: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 21: K2, M1, k62, work next row of Chart A, k2,

M1, k24, M1, k52, work corresponding row of

Chart A, k12, M1, k2–182 sts.

Rnd 22: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 23: K4, M1, k41, M1, k20, work next row of

Chart A, k2, M1, k26, M1, k32, M1, k20, work

corresponding row of Chart A, k11, M1, k4–

188 sts.

Rnd 24: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 25: K6, M1, k62, work next row of Chart A, k4,

M1, k24, M1, k55, work corresponding row of

Chart A, k10, M1, k6–192 sts.

Rnd 26: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 27: K8, M1, k60, work next row of Chart A, k6,

M1, 22, M1, k57, work corresponding row of

Chart A, k9, M1, k8–196 sts.

Rnd 28: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 29: K10, M1, k59, work next row of Chart A, k8,

M1, 20, M1, k59, work corresponding row of

Chart A, k8, M1, k10–200 sts.

Rnd 30: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 31: K12, M1, k58, work next row of Chart A, k10,

M1, k18, M1, k61, work corresponding row of

Chart A, k7, M1, k12–204 sts.

Rnd 32: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 33: K14, M1, k6, k11, k40, work next row of

Chart A, k12, M1, k16, M1, k12, k11, k40, work

corresponding row of Chart A, k6, M1, k14–

208 sts.

Rnd 34: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 35: K16, M1, k5, k11, k40, work next row of

Chart A, k14, M1, k14, M1, k14, k11, k40, work

corresponding row of Chart A, k5, M1, k16–

212 sts.

Rnd 36: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 37: K2, M1, k20, k11, k40, work next row of

Chart A, k2, M1, k40, M1, k2, k11, k40, work

corresponding row of Chart A, k20, M1,

k2–216 sts.

Rnd 38: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 39: K5, M1, k18, k11, k20, M1, k20, work next

row of Chart A, k4, M1, k38, M1, k4, k11, k20,

M1, k20, work corresponding row of Chart A,

k18, M1, k5–222 sts.

Rnd 40: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 41: K24, k11, [k10, M1]x3, k11, work next row

of Chart A, k48, k11, [k10, M1]x3, work

corresponding row of Chart A, k24–228 sts.

Rnd 42: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 43: K2, M1, k22, k11, k44, work next row of

Chart A, k2, M1, k44, M1, k2, k11, k44, work

corresponding row of Chart A, k22, M1,

k2–232 sts.

Rnd 44: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 45: K25, k11, [k11, M1]x3, k11, work next row

of Chart A, k50, k11, [k11, M1]x3, k11, work

corresponding row of Chart A, k25–238 sts.

Rnd 46: Rep Rnd 8.

KNITmuch | issue 12

19


Rnd 47: K2, M1, k23, k11, k47, work next row of

Chart A, k2, M1, k46, M1, k2, k11, k47, work

corresponding row of Chart A, k23, M1,

k2–242 sts.

Rnd 48: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 49: K26, k11, k11, [k12, M1]x3, k11, work next row

of Chart A, k52, k11, [k12, M1]x3, k11, work

corresponding row of Chart A, k26–248 sts.

Rnd 50: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 51: K2, M1, k24, k11, k50, work next row of

Chart A, k2, M1, k48, M1, k2, k11, k50, work

corresponding row of Chart A, k24, M1,

k2–252 sts.

Rnd 52: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 53: K27, k11, [k12, M1]x3, k14, work next row

of Chart A, k54, k11, [k12, M1]x3, k14, work

corresponding row of Chart A, k27–258 sts.

Rnd 54: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 55: K2, M1, k62, M1, k27, work next row of

Chart A, k2, M1, k50, M1, k40, M1, k26, work

corresponding row of Chart A, k25, M1,

k2–264 sts.

Rnd 56: Rep Rnd 8.

Rnd 57: K14, M1, k79, work next row of Chart A, k28,

M1, k93, work next row of Chart A, k14, M1,

k14–266 sts.

Rnd 58: Rep Rnd 8, removing the unique marker

at the beginning of the round and removing

the 4 markers that flank 11-st panels that do

NOT have the lace motif worked across them.

Leave the other 4 markers in place.

Split for body.

Set-up Rnd: Knit 41, place new unique marker to

indicate beginning of round, turn work, cable

cast-on 16 sts, turn work, place next 50 sts

on a stitch holder, knit next 83 sts, at the

same time working the next row of Chart A

across the 11 sts between sm, turn work, cable

cast-on 16 sts, turn work, place next 50 sts

on a stitch holder, knit 83 sts, working the

corresponding row of Chart A across the 11

sts between sm–198 sts.

Rnds 1-21: Knit around, working next row of Chart

A across both sets of 11 sts between sm.

Rnd 21: Remove unique beginning-of-round

marker, k8, place unique marker to indicate

new beginning of round, knit in established

pattern (continuing lace panel between both

sets of markers) across 99 sts, place another

marker to indicate center below armhole, knit

in established pattern across.

Rnd 23: *Knit in established pattern across next 23

sts, [ssk, k13]x5, k1*, pm, rep btwn *–188 sts.

Rnds 24-30: Knit in established pattern

Rnd 31: *K2, M1, knit in established pattern to 2 sts

before marker, M1, k2*; rep btwn *–192 sts.

Rnds 32-34: Knit.

Rnd 35: *K1, M1, k2, M1, knit in established pattern

to 1 st before marker, M1, k1*; rep btwn *–198

sts.

Rnds 36-38: Knit in established pattern.

Rnd 39: *K1, M1, k5, M1, knit in establishd pattern to

6 sts before marker, M1, k5, M1, k1*; rep btwn

*–202 sts.

Repeat Rnds 36-39 eight times more–234 sts.

Continue knitting in established pattern until

garment from top of back neck measures approx.

23.5 inches, removing both sets of markers that

flank the 11-st lace panels, but not the other two

markers.

Divide for side splits

Row 1: Knit 117 sts across to next marker, rm, turn.

Row 2: Purl.

Row 3: Knit.

Row 4: Purl.

Knit all rows until length of side split is 1½". Bind off.

Repeat these rows on Back sts.

20 KNITmuch | issue 12


Can't wait to get the sleeves done!

The yoke shaping is done in such a way to keep the parallelogram lace panel

on one side, and should slope gently and contoured.

Sleeves

Set-up Rnd: With RS facing, starting halfway across

16 stitches cast-on for armhole, pick up and knit

8 sts, return 50 sts resting on st holder to needle

and knit around, pick up and knit 8 sts across rem

armhole sts, pm for beginning of round–66 stitches

Knit around until sleeve from armhole measures 3

inches.

Dec Rnd: K2, ssk, knit to 4 sts before marker, k2tog,

k2.

Continue knitting around, repeating dec rnd every

6th round until sleeve measures 7 inches.

Knit straight for 2 more inches.

Next Rnd: Purl.

Next Rnd: Knit.

Rep last 2 rnds once. Bind off.

Lina and Whisper Lace held together, what a

refreshing knitting team!

I hope you really like this sweater and that the

parallelogram lace appeals to you. Instead of miles

and miles of stockinette stitch, which can get rather

boring, you'll have the fun of working two panels of

lace every so often...it's like eating a bag of potato

chips, you can't stop! Please let us know if you're

knitting this or which tutorials have been helpful tips

for your knitting skills inventory.

Charles Voth

charlesvothdesigns.ca

KNITmuch | issue 12

21


Knitting the perfect spring cowl with

Fibra Natura Donnina yarn

Fiona Stevenson

Photo courtesy of Universal Yarn

Fibra Natura Donnina Fine Italian-Style

Merino is the perfect soft and light yarn to

make a spring cowl.

The original Contours Cowl knit with worsted

weight yarn.

Hello everyone! With most of

us at home, we’re all looking

for something to knit to keep

ourselves sane. I’ll share with

you the Contours Cowl that I’m

making with Donnina Merino Yarn.

If you’re looking for your next

project, the Contours Cowl is the

perfect combination of enough

interesting stitch design, but

simple enough to not burn out

the brain while knitting it.

I’m sharing with you the plans for

my Contours Cowl, and how I’ve

adjusted to make it right for my

spring wardrobe.

Later I’ll share the benefits of

choosing the right knitting

needles and notions for your

project. There will be details on

how to do the Alternating Cable

Cast-On and the Simple Stretchy

Bind-Off. I’ll also talk about how

to block your cowl to give it that

professional finish.

My final article in this feature

will be about the growing world

of online knitting groups where

knitters are finding ways to

connected despite the distance

between us.

Anyone who has been following

me on KNITmuch knows that

I almost never knit a project

exactly as written, and the

Contours Cowl is no different.

The original pattern in photo

above called for worsted weight

yarn, but since I was in the

depths of February looking

towards the hope of warmer

weather when I started, I decided

to go with the much lighter

Donnina Merino instead.

The Contours Cowl in Blue Hint Fibra Natura

Donnina Fine Italian-Style Merino yarn is a lovely

addition to my spring wardrobe.

22 KNITmuch | issue 12


I chose the subtle, pretty colorway Blue Hint. My

goal was to make a slightly smaller, definitely

lighter version of the Contours Cowl. Donnina

is the sport weight version of the Dona yarn by

Fibra Natura. Besides being all natural fiber and

really super soft, it’s also a superwash. Bonus!

The recommended needle size is 3 – 5 US [3.25 –

3.75mm] making it a sport weight yarn. Perfect for

my Spring Contours Cowl.

I still wanted the cowl to be large like the original,

so I added 30sts to the total cast on making my

stitch count 360sts. You can increase or decrease

this cowl by any amount as long as you make it a

multiple of 30 stitches since the cable count is 30sts

and the twisted rib border needs to be a multiple

of 3 to fit neatly into the pattern. Who knew when I

grew up I really would need math!

The next adjustment I needed to make was to

change the needles for my project. The original

pattern called for 7 US [4.5mm] needles, but I used a

5US [3.75mm] to suit the sport weight Donnina yarn.

I’ll share more details about how I made my final

needle choice. The smaller needles made the gauge

smaller, but with the added stitches to the cast on the

cowl still remained large enough to be impactful.

I made one other final adjustment to this pattern

by doing only six repeats of the cable chart instead

of seven. The result still makes for a dramatic cowl

while leaving it light enough for spring layering.

To see all of the details on my Spring Contours Cowl

adjustments you can visit my Ravelry Project page.

Learn to make this light and lovely Spring Contours Cowl with Fibra Natura

Donnina Fine Italian-Style Merino yarn.

Photos by Fiona Stevenson

Choosing the right knitting needles comes down to a lot more than simply

the size, and see how I chose the best accessories to create this beautiful cowl.

KNITmuch | issue 12

23


Masters in knitting choose their

knitting needles wisely!

In the battle of wood vs metal, this time metal

won out. My lovely collection of Knitter’s Pride

knitting needles: Nova, Dreamz and Karbons

U-bend Cabling Needles by Clover

In the next set of articles there

are details on how to do an

Alternating Cable Cast On and

the Simply Stretchy Bind Off; how

to block the Contours Cowl; and

how to show of your cowl using

online knitting groups. I’ll be

sharing how to choose the right

knitting needles and notions for

your project.

Many people think that needle

size (US 4, 3mm, etc) and basic

type (straights, circular, or DPN)

are the only factors that need to

be considered when choosing the

needles for a project, but there

are many other things to consider.

Besides the size and type, the

most important decision I make

about knitting needles is its

material composition. By this I

mean metal, plastic, or wood. I

decided to share my process

of needle choice for my Spring

Contours Cowl with you when

I had to switch from wood to

metal after just a few rounds.

In general, I prefer metal needles,

but I had decided to go with

a wooden set of Knitters Pride

Cubics that I had a home. I

love the Knitters Pride Cubics,

because these needles are

square instead of round which

makes them easier to grip.

Since I’ve been experiencing

some repetitive strain in my

left hand, I thought the Knitters

Pride Cubics would be best for

me. Unfortunately, the ones I

had were made of wood, not

of metal. Wool tends to cling to

wood more than metal, and I

soon found knitting with them

very frustrating. The stitches just

weren’t moving smoothly along

the needle, and this slowed me

down. I usually only use wooden

needles when working with

particularly slippery yarns like silk

to stop them from accidentally

slipping off the needles. But

wood was clinging a little too

much to the Donnina Merino, so

I needed to make a change.

At first I wanted to switch to

Knitter’s Pride Zings, but I didn’t

have the right size in my

collection. I settled on a set of

3.75mm, 32” Knitter’s Pride Nova

Platina. What a difference! After

I made the switch my stitches

just flew off the needles…in a

good way.

24 KNITmuch | issue 12


The other notion that turned out to be essential

for this project was a cabling needle. I usually knit

cables without a needle, but this being a larger 8

stitch cable, and a finer weight yarn, I thought it

wise to use a cable needle. Good thing I did! There’s

no way I could have accomplished these cables as

quickly and effortlessly as I did without it.

Because I had used wood before and not liked it

in my knitting needle, I decided to skip my straight

wooden cable needles choosing to use a plastic

u-bend cable needle instead. The U-bend cable

needle is the most secure to keep my cable stitches

from falling off, but a wooden straight cable needle

has a bit of grab that can also work, especially if

they’re notched like the Knit Picks Rainbow cable

needles shown in the photo below.

The benefit of a straight cable needle is you can knit

the cable stitches right off the cable needle instead

of shifting them back to the regular needle tip. If

you aren’t familiar with these two cable needles, I

suggest trying them out, and see which works best

for you.

The last very important accessory for this project

was the row counter. I like the Mini Kacha-Kacha for

two reasons.

Firstly, it has a locking mechanism, so I can throw it

in my knitting bag, or have children run off with it

gleefully trying to click without fear of my row count

getting messed up.

Secondly, I can pull a piece of string (or in my case,

yarn) through a loop on the top, and wear it around

my neck, so I don’t lose it when I get up from my

knitting chair. Any row counter will do, but my Mini

Kacha-Kacha is my favorite chart keeping friend!

Carefully choosing the tools you use in your knitting

will make your overall knitting experience much

more pleasant. Choose your weapons of yarn

unwisely, and you’ll find your favorite past-time has

become your enemy. You decide!

Knitpicks Rainbow wooden straight cabling

needles. Notice the notches to keep stitches safe

from dropping off.

My favorite counter, Mini Kacha-Kacha, will help

you keep track of all your rows.

Keeping the bottom border of the Contours Cowl easy and breezy

with a loose cast-on.

KNITmuch | issue 12

25


How to knit super stretchy edges

for the Contours Cowl

So you now have everything

you need to knit the free pattern

Contours Cowl with super soft

Fibra Natura Donnina Merino yarn.

I’ll teach you a loose cast-on

called the Alternating Cable

Cast-On, and a stretchy bind off

called the Simple Stretchy Bind-

Off. Both of these techniques will

help make nice flexible edges, so

you can block out the Contours

Cowl as much as you like.

How to knit the Alternating

Cable Cast-On

Let’s start with the Alternating

Cable Cast-On. To begin with, you

will make a slipknot and put it

on your left-hand needle. Then

you’ll do a single knitted cable

cast on stitch. To do this go into

the slipknot as if to knit, pull the

loop towards you, and place it

on the tip of the left-hand needle

making sure not to drop the

slip stitch off this needle. There

should be two stitches on the

left-hand needle.

Expand your knitting knowledge with two new stretchy cast-on/bind-off techniques.

26 KNITmuch | issue 12


1. For the next cast on stitch bring the working

yarn to the front as if to purl. Place the tip

of the right-hand needle from back to front

between the two stitches on the left-hand

needle, and do a purl stitch, pull this stitch out

a little and place it on the tip of the left-hand

needle. There should now be three stitches on

the left-hand needle.

2. Bring the yarn to the back. Place the tip of the

right-hand needle from front to back between

the two stitches on the left-hand needle, and

do a knit stitch, pull this stitch out a little and

place it on the tip of the left-hand needle.

There should now be four stitches on the lefthand

needle.

3. Repeat Step 2.

4. Repeat Steps 1-3 until there are the desired

number of stitches on the needle.

This cast on will set you up for the 2×1 rib

pattern for the border and leave your edges

neat and stretchy.

How to knit the Simple Stretchy Bind-Off

When the top border is finished you can use the

Simple Stretchy Bind-Off to make a really loose

edge. Here’s how it goes in the 2×1 rib of the

Contours Cowl.

1. Knit the first stitch.

2. Knit the second stitch.

3. Place the tip of the left handle through the

front of both stitches on the right-hand needle

and knit them together.

4. Purl the next stitch.

5. Place the tip of the left handle through the

back of both stitches on the right-hand needle

and purl them together.

6. Repeat Steps 1-5 until all stitches are bound off

except the last one. Pass the tail of your yarn

through the last stitch and pull tight to secure.

And, like that, you now have beautifully stretchy

edges that will be easy to block.

Make your cast-on edge neat and elastic with the Alternating Cabled Cast-on.

Start your twisted rib border with a 2×1 Alternating Cabled Cast-on.

To ensure the top border edge is as stretchy as the bottom one, use this

Simple Stretchy Bind-off.

KNITmuch | issue 11

27


How to

block your

knitting to

perfection!

Blocking brings the cables in the Contours Cowl

to life!

I’m so surprised how many

knitters know very little about

blocking. Some have NEVER

blocked! What?! It’s one of the

things I just assume every knitter

knows, because blocking a

project brings it to life.

For most of my knitting, it’s an

essential part of the process. I

wanted to share with you how

I blocked my Spring Contours

Cowl. I hope you can see how it

went from nice to extraordinary

through the process of blocking.

The cables opened up, the

borders settled flat and stretched

out really showing off the twisted

rib pattern.

Get ready to block

To properly block your knitting

you need:

• blocking mats

• Knit Blockers or T-pins

• a clean plastic tub

• Soak or similar wool detergent

• a clean, dry bath towel

I put together two of my

blocking mats to make an area

large enough to stretch out my

cowl. Then I filled my plastic tub

with cold water adding just a

single drop of Soak to it. Soak is

designed to open the fibers for

stretching without me needing

to have the added step of

rinsing it out.

Make sure you have everything you need to get

started on blocking your cowl

Gently immerse your cowl in the Soak water.

28

KNITmuch | issue 12


I placed my cowl in the

water, and let it get damp. It

doesn’t need to be utterly

saturated, but all the stitches

should be wet. When you

bring the wet cowl out of the

water, resist the urge to wring

it out. Twisting it too much

will damage the fibers, and

stretch the fabric in ways you

don’t want. Gently squeeze

out the excess water into

your tub. Place your cowl flat

onto the towel, and roll it up.

Again, press it don’t twist it to

take out more of the water.

Place your cowl out onto

your blocking mats, and

gently stretch it to its desired

measurements. Be careful not

to stretch it out too hard. You’ll

find that Donnina yarn grows

generously when dampened,

so there’s very little pulling

needed to get it to the shape

you want. I found the cables

bloomed beautifully with the

lightest stretching.

Using your Knitter’s Pride Knit

Blockers pin the cowl in place.

Then you can leave your cowl

to dry.

Roll up your damp cowl, and gently press out the excess

water. Do NOT wring or twist!

See how the cables have bloomed!

If you’re like me, and you

have cats that love to

snuggle up on damp sheep

wool (WHY!?!) you can place

a dry towel over it. It takes

longer to dry that way, but

at least it doesn’t come out

with cat hair attached to it. It

may take the cowl a day or

two to dry. Be patient. Wait

for it to dry completely then

you can remove the knit

blockers. It’s almost done.

After blocking is the time I

like to sew in my ends.

Et voilá, thanks to Fibra Natura

Donnina yarn, you have a

runway-ready Spring Contours

Cowl to wear and show off to

the world…whenever that’s

possible again.

Et voilá! The blocking has made my Spring Contours

Cowl perfect.

KNITmuch | issue 12

29


Home alone? Find your knitting community online.

Online

knitting groups –

a knitter is never

truly alone

Some of my friends and I have found comfort in

online Zoom video chat knitting groups.

Careful linking into Messenger or Instagram chats

– everyone in your group will be listening!

I shared with you my secrets to making

the beautiful Contours Cowl into a more

spring-like cowl. The original was knit up

using a worsted weight yarn, but I used

the lusciously soft Fibra Natura Donnina

Merino, a sport yarn in a pretty Blue Hint

color. I also made a few changes to the

pattern to lighten it up.

Unfortunately, in this time of COVID-19

many of us find ourselves at home,

and let’s just say the family enthusiasm

for our knitting can be a little

underwhelming. You have a finished

cowl that you’ve diligently worked on,

and no one can appreciate the care that

went into each stitch like fellow knitters.

But, although all the knitting groups are

canceled and your LYS is closed for instore

shopping, don’t despair. We have

the technology to find others of our kind.

Many of the knitters have taken to online

video meeting apps like Zoom to see

each other face to face and bring a

little normal back into our lives. If you

haven’t heard of it Zoom allows groups

of people to video chat in real-time

with each other. It’s simple to download

Zoom onto any device: cell phone, tablet,

or computer. You can choose to have

video and sound, or just sound (if you

have just rolled out of bed, and are precoffee…or

pants.) I’ve been in groups

30

KNITmuch | issue 12


with people from all over the world! If you haven’t

found a video knitting group, I suggest you contact

your LYS, or pop into your favorite Ravelry or

Facebook groups to see if they’ve got one going on.

Maybe you’re not up for a Zoom video chat, but

still want to connect with your tribe. There are

other options out there. Instagram and Messenger

programs have video chat options that you can

use to connect with a select group of your knitting

friends. Create a group on Messenger or Instagram,

and click the video camera icon to open a group

video chat. Be careful though, this will open video

and sound on all the devices linked to that group,

so let people know you’re going to do it before you

click. Especially if you’re going to trash talk Fiona’s

weird novelty hat she knit that looks like it has

eyes and is trying to swallow her head. Fi may be

listening…

If video chat is just a little too overwhelming, and

you would prefer to just post pictures and send

messages; you can join a Ravelry group to share

your projects, find inspiration, ask knitting questions,

and stay connected. Look for a group that’s based

on something that appeals to you (ie Fi Blog

Lovers), has quite a few members, and is active

showing a lot of posts per month. It may take a

little exploration since there are a lot of groups on

Ravelry, but if you can find your perfect group of

knitters it’s worth the effort.

Facebook and Instagram are still great ways to

keep in touch, join in KALs, and share your projects.

Some of your favorite Facebook groups and pages

have created Zoom video chats as well. Both social

media platforms have live videos that are being

made every day by knitters you admire. You can

even add your own live video. Perhaps a video

about the beautiful spring cowl you just made in

this fabulous new yarn you discovered on this ahmaz-ing

blog you read written by this awesome

knitter and knitwear designer, Fiona Stevenson.

Yeah, come to think of it, do that.

Go enjoy the sunshine in your new Spring Contours Cowl!

Fiona Stevenson

Fiona Stevenson Designs

KNITmuch | issue 12

31


Knitting with Cotton

Supreme Waves

Cindy O'Malley

I’m using Heliotrope (pinks and purples), Lagoon (turquoise and teal), and Equator (bright green and blues) for my

projects in this feature.

With winter behind us, it’s time to look forward to the sunny and warm days ahead.

To me, that means working with bright and light weight yarns to make those perfect

summer projects. In this feature, I’m knitting with Universal Yarn Cotton Supreme Waves,

which is 100%, high quality cotton in bright self striping colors.

Cotton Supreme Waves is available in 10 different colors, of which I’ll be using 3

this feature – Heliotrope, Lagoon, and Equator.

As you can see from the next picture, it’s a self-striping yarn with long cheerful

color sets. The available patterns are interchangeable with Cotton Supreme DK

and Cotton Supreme DK Seaspray, and the colors all work together beautifully.

32 KNITmuch | issue 12


Machine washable in warm water, and tumble

dry makes Cotton Supreme Waves an easy-care

summer garment solution. My own personal

preference is to wash my cotton knits in cold water,

tumble dry until damp, and then lay flat to finish

drying. This way, the colors stay bright and cheerful

and depending on the item, I can shape if needed.

Each 3.5oz [100g] cake contains 230yds [210m]. I

was expecting the color gradients to be consistent

in the balls of yarn, meaning each cake would

start and end with the same colors. But not so as

the color runs are very long for each color. What

this means to me is that I want to make sure my

selected projects flow from one to the next when

attaching the next cake.

It’s rated as a Light (DK) weight yarn with a

recommended gauge of 21 sts x 28 rows using

a US 6 [4mm] needle. Quite often, sweaters

designed for cotton tend to have a tight gauge,

which helps maintain the garment’s shape over

time. I find knitting with cotton at a tight gauge

to be uncomfortable on my hands, so in the

next article, I’m showing swatches I knitted to

determine the needle size that’s most comfortable

for me to achieve the pattern gauge.

I know that some people shy away from selfstriping

yarns because they don’t really know

what to do with them. Sometimes, the results

are not desirable depending upon the project.

For example, knitting a sweater flat and seaming

together can result in mismatched stripes. If this is

the look you’re after, great. If not, then you may be

disappointed with the finished project. It’s all about

choosing the right project for the yarn which is

what this feature is all about.

Each cake is unique due to the long color runs.

For my projects, I’ve selected a top-down Tee, an

oversized shawl, and a baby blanket using my

selected colors of Heliotrope (pinks and purples),

Lagoon (turquoises), and Equator (blues and

greens).

Photos by Cindy O'Malley

KNITmuch | issue 12

33


Swatches...what does Cotton Supreme

Waves look like in 3 needle sizes?

I’m knitting some swatches using three different

needle sizes to determine which fabric I like the

best. This impacts how I’ll proceed with my selected

projects as the sweater pattern I chose is based on

a gauge of 20 sts x 26 rows in stocking stitch using

a US 7 [4.5mm] needle.

Sweater patterns designed for cotton will often

have a very tight gauge so that the finished project

holds its shape. There was a time when I would

use the recommended needle size and knit tightly

to achieve gauge. Cotton does not have elasticity

so I found it to be very uncomfortable on my

hands and didn’t enjoy working with it. Over time,

I learned to relax and use the needle size that lets

me knit comfortably and still achieve gauge. That’s

what this article is about.

First Up – I’ll use a US 7 [4.5mm] needle, but I won’t

try to get gauge. Instead, I’ll relax and see what I end

up with for my swatch. I cast on 25 stitches and knit

2 stitches at each end and 2 rows in garter stitch. I

then proceeded to knit 27 rows in stocking stitch and

ended with 2 more rows of garter stitch. My swatch

measured in at 19 sts and 25 rows over 4”.

Secondly – I used a US 6 [4mm] swatch using the

same number of stitches and rows. This resulted in

20 sts and 26 rows over 4”.

Lastly – I used a US 5 [3.75mm] swatch with the

same number of stitches and rows. This swatch

measured in at 21 sts and 27 rows.

When I laundered these swatches, I placed them

in a laundry bag and threw them in the wash with

my other cotton undergarments and sweaters in a

warm wash and medium dryer … in other words,

no special treatment other than the laundry bag,

but that’s because I didn’t want to lose them in the

wash, so to speak. After laundering, I measured

my swatches again and was rather pleased that the

gauge did not significantly change.

In the past, I’ve found that hand-knitted cotton

fabric may change its shape over time. It tends to

expand in width and reduce in length.

This is one of the key reasons why I remove my

cotton knitwear from the dryer while it’s still damp,

reshape it, and lay flat to finish drying.

I must say, this is one of the softest cotton fibers

I’ve knit. My preference was using the US 6 [4mm]

needle and happily, that’s the right size for me to

achieve the Tee sweater gauge that I’ll be working on.

I love the colors of this yarn as well – turquoise and

bright green are two of my favorite summer colors.

Lavender (Heliotrope) US 7 –

4.5mm, Turquoise (Lagoon)

US 6 – 4.0mm, Green

(Equator) US 5 – 3.75mm

34 KNITmuch | issue 12


Knitting a summertime Tee

with waves of color

I’m knitting a top-down Tee

sweater using Heliotrope (purple

and pink). I chose the Fresh Berries

Tee, which is a free downloadable

pattern designed for this lovely

yarn. This exquisite Tee will look

great on those young and perky

20 something’s in the family.

The Fresh Berry Tee knit up in Cotton Supreme Waves.

This pattern is written for a

gauge of 20 sts x 26 rnds = 4”

in St st using US 7 [4.5mm] and

US 6 [4mm] (for the ribbing)

circular needles, but as a result

of swatching before, I’ll be using

US 6 [4mm] and US 5 [3.75mm]

needles. It also calls for using 16”

circulars for the narrow parts,

but since I use the Magic Loop

method, I’ll stick with my 32”

[80cm] needles.

I’ve chosen Heliotrope as my

colorway for this pattern. The

young-uns in my family are crazy

for their purples and pinks, which

makes this the perfect choice.

As I mentioned, the cakes

are not consistent in their

colorways, but the 3 cakes

needed for this project are very

different. One of the cakes has

little to no pink, so I’ll need to do

some careful planning of color

for this project. I decided that

I wanted pink at the neck, so I

drew from the center-left ball to

start my project (you can’t really

see it in the photo, but the center

of this ball has a small amount

of pink). If you notice, the two

balls with the pinkest seem to be

wound in reverse. All three balls

are from the same batch, so it

seems rather strange. This means

that I’ll be drawing from the

center of the 1st ball (left), and

from the outside of the 2nd (top).

Wow, this cotton is very soft

and comfortable to knit with

the right needle size. The

color changes are exciting as it

means progress. I must admit,

I was planning on making the

X-Small, but I got carried away

with increasing and knitting and

couldn’t bring myself to tinK it

(Knit backward). Fortunately,

both the X-Small and Small call

for the same amount of yarn, so

I’m good.

Heliotrope is my color choice for the pattern. Note the

difference in the amount of pink between each cake.

Time to join the 2nd ball after separating the sleeves

from the body.

Paused knitting the body so I could complete the sleeves

in pink.

KNITmuch | issue 12

35


TIP When making top-down sweaters, if you’re

confused about when to M1L vs. M1R, remember this – if

it’s Right of the marker, M1R; if it’s Left of the marker, M1L.

Completed Fresh Berries Tee in Heliotrope

I love making top-down sweaters because you can

try them on as you go to ensure fit (not for me, so

irrelevant); seamless (not that I mind seaming); perfect

for this project as you don’t have to worry about

matching upfronts to backs with the color changes.

But I must say, the absolute best part about top-down

sweaters is that Hallelujah moment — when you get to

separate the sleeves from the body!

Now that the body and sleeves are separated, it’s TV

knitting time. Round and round you go until it’s time

to join the second ball. This above picture was taken

just before I joined the second ball. I know it’s a size

Small, but his yarn has great yardage. As I mentioned

previously, I drew from the outside of the second ball to

maintain the continuity of color sequence – not critical,

just my preference.

When I got down to the pink section, I paused. I

decided that I wanted to finish the sleeves with pink to

ensure that they were consistent. So, I stopped knitting

the body, finished the sleeves, and still had pink to

continue with the body. This is important to note that if

you choose to make a long-sleeved sweater, the stripes

would be very wide on the sleeves because there are

fewer stitches. You may want to plan the sleeves so that

the colors used are consistent for both sleeves. Again,

not critical – just personal preference, and satisfaction

with the finished project.

When it came time to join the 3rd ball, I wound off

some of the outside colors so that my ending color

(purple) continued with the new ball.

Now for the reveal . . .

As you can see from the photo, I didn’t need much

from the 3rd ball, so the lack of pink didn’t detract from

the finished project at all. I’m very pleased with it and

look forward to seeing it on my 20-something niece

with her long blond hair. Unfortunately, that will have to

wait until the lockdown is lifted. Hopefully, there will be

plenty of summers left for her to wear it.

This proves that a top-down sweater project is a perfect

match for Universal Yarn Cotton Supreme Waves, with its long

color runs. If you want to make a long-sleeved sweater,

just remember to plan for the sleeves; otherwise, this is

a very fast and easy project.

36 KNITmuch | issue 12


What to know about knitting an oversized

wrap with Cotton Supreme Waves

Now, I’m making this free

pattern for a triangular wrap in

Lagoon colorway that will show

off the striping effect in a totally

different way.

My inspiration came from the

Flying V Shawl.

The original pattern was knit with

different yarn (Universal Yarn

Unity Beyond) using two colors,

a self-striping and a solid. The

open lacework was done with

the solid, and the garter stitch

sections with the self-striping. I

want more lacework in my wrap,

so I’ll follow the structure from

this pattern to create my own.

Based on my swatching

exercise, I decided to use a US

5 [3.75mm] 32” [80cm] circular

needle. I opted for this needle

size because the weight of the

finished project will elongate the

fabric. As you knit this wrap, it

will get quite large, so you may

choose to use a 40” [100cm]

needle as it progresses in size.

I’m using Lagoon for this project

and I’ve mapped out the order

in which I’ll use them so that the

colors will flow from one ball to

the next.

For this project, you will need:

materials

yarn

• 4 balls of Universal Yarn Cotton

Supreme Waves, in Lagoon

needles

• US 5 [3.75mm] 32” (or 40”)

circular needle or whatever

size you need to achieve

gauge

• 4 stitch markers

• tapestry needle to sew in ends

gauge

• 21 sts over 4” in Stocking Stitch

• 16 sts over 4” in Lattice pattern

• gauge is not that important,

but it will affect the overall

finished size. Use whatever

needle size is comfortable

for you. Note that there was

very little left of the 4th ball

at the end.

finished measurements

84” wide x 32” deep

after blocking

abbreviations

inc’d increased

k knit

k2tog knit 2 together

m marker

p purl

pm place marker

rep repeat

RS Right Side row

sl m slip marker

st(s) stitch(es)

ssk slip, slip, knit – slip 2 stitches

knitwise, then knit them together

WS Wrong Side row

yo yarn over

Flying V Shawl is a free pattern available for

download, that was designed for a different yarn.

KNITmuch | issue 12

37


This oversized shawl can be worn as a wrap (L), Poncho (C), or over the shoulder (R) as a swimsuit cover-up.

Lagoon Wrap

Starting Tab

Cast on 3 sts. Knit 7 rows in

garter st.

Set-up row 1 (RS): K3, rotate

work 90 degrees, pick up

and knit 3 sts from side of

Tab, pick up and knit 3 sts

from cast-on edge – 9 sts.

Set-up row 2 (WS): K3, pm, k1,

pm, p1, pm, k1, pm, k3.

Set-up row 3: K3, sl m, k1, yo, sl

m, k1, sl m, yo, k1, sl m, k3

– 2 sts inc’d, 11 sts.

Set-up row 4: K3, sl m, knit to m,

sl m, p1, sl m, knit to m, sl

m, k3.

Garter Pattern

Row 1: K3, sl m, yo, knit to m,

yo, sl m, k1, sl m, yo, knit

to m, yo, sl m, k3 – 4 sts

inc’d, 15 sts.

Row 2: K3, sl m, knit to m, sl m,

p1, sl m, knit to m, sl m,

k3. Rep Rows 1-2, 6 more

times –24 sts inc’d, 39 sts.

Lattice Pattern

Set Up Row 1 (RS) K3, sl m, yo,

k1, (*yo, ssk); rep from * to

2 sts before m, k1, yo, sl m,

k1, sl m, yo, k1, (*k2tog, yo);

rep from * to 2 sts before

m, yo, k1, yo, sl m, k3. – 6

sts inc’d, 45 sts.

Row 2 (WS) K3, sl m, purl to last

m, sl m, k3

Row 3 (RS): K3, sl m, yo, k1 (*yo,

ssk); rep from * to m, yo, sl

m, k1, sl m, yo, (*k2tog, yo);

rep from * to 1 st before

m, k1, yo, sl m, k3. – 4 sts

inc’d, 49 sts.

Row 4 (WS) K3, purl to last m, sl

m, k3

Repeat Rows 3 & 4 twice more –

8 sts inc’d, 57 sts.

From this point forward, Rows 3

& 4 form the Lattice pattern.

Garter 2 – Repeat Rows 1 & 2 – 2

times – 8 sts inc’d, 65 sts.

Lattice 4 – Repeat Rows 3 & 4 –

4 times – 16 sts inc’d, 81 sts.

Garter 6 – Repeat Rows 1 & 2 – 6

times – 24 sts inc’d, 105 sts.

Now that the pattern is

established, proceed as follows

** Lattice 4 – 16 sts inc’d, 121 sts.

Garter 2– 8 sts inc’d, 129 sts.

Lattice 4 –16 sts inc’d, 145 sts.

Garter 2 – 8 sts inc’d, 153 sts.

Lattice 4 –16 sts inc’d, 169 sts.

Garter 6 – 24 sts inc’d, 193 sts.

Lattice 4 –16 sts inc’d, 209 sts.

Garter 2 – 8 sts inc’d, 217 sts.

Lattice 4 – 16 sts inc’d, 233 sts.

Garter 6 – 24 sts inc’d, 257

sts. **

Repeat from ** once more. (152

sts inc’d, 409 sts.)

38 KNITmuch | issue 12


Border Section

Row 1: K3, sl m, yo, k1 (*yo, k2tog); rep from * to m,

yo, sl m, k1, sl m, yo, (*k2tog, yo); rep from *

to 1 st before m, k1, yo, sl m, k3. – 4 sts inc’d,

413 sts.

Row 2: K3, sl m, knit to m, sl m, p1, sl m, knit to m, sl

m, k3.

Garter 2 – 8 sts inc’d, 421 sts.

Cast off loosely.

Weave in ends and block.

TIP Instead of placing a marker before and after

a single stitch, try using a removable stitch marker.

It will let you know it’s time to do something

differently without having to slip the markers on

each row. Instead, you can easily reposition it every

few rows.

Try using a removable marker in place of two stitch markers.

The colors flowed very well from one ball to the

next with the exception of the 4th ball. I wound off

a few yards so that the color would flow from the

previous ball . . . my personal preference only.

You may have noted that this is a very wide shawl,

but that was intentional so that it could be worn

several different ways . . . as a wrap (Left), as a

poncho closed with a shawl pin (Center), or tied (or

pinned) over one shoulder (Right) which makes a

great swimsuit cover-up.

Although there was a lot of knitting involved in this

project, it was worth it. I love the colors and the

diagonal striping effect of Universal Yarn Cotton Supreme

Waves, in Lagoon. It reminds me of the clear waters

of the Caribbean and will be a perfect wrap on a

breezy evening or as a cover-up over a swimsuit.

And it’s so soft. As promised earlier, here’s a link to

the PDF version of the original Lagoon Wrap pattern.

Are you a Canadian knitter?

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KNITmuch | issue 12

39


Weaving a color block baby blanket with

Cotton Supreme Waves

Originally I had planned on

knitting a blanket that would

show off the long color runs

in a color block or plaid type

effect. But I’ve had a lot of fun

experimenting with different

yarns on my loom, so I thought,

why not try Cotton Supreme

Waves in Equator!

I know several weavers that have

used self-striping yarn as the warp

or the weft, but if you haven’t

tried it as both, at the same time,

then you’re in for a treat.

These colors are fabulous and I

must admit, the acid green and

turquoise are my two favorite

colors for summer, actually any

time. They’re bright and cheerful

and look good with all skin tones,

and genders . . . truly a safe and

universal color, and an extremely

soft texture for baby.

Before I get started with the

details, I’ll just give a couple of

weaving facts for the novices.

If you’re already a weaver, you

know this part, so it’s OK to skip

ahead to the details.

Some basic terminology for the

novice . . .

Warp – the yarn that runs

lengthwise on the loom

Weft – the sideways yarn that is

on the shuttle and run through

the warp to create the fabric

Shuttle – that’s what you wrap

the yarn around to pass it

through the shed

Heddle – each thread of the

warp is run through the heddle

to separate the yarn, also

referred to as Reed.

Rigid Heddle – a fixed panel that

separates and moves the warp

threads. It also acts as the beater

to compress the weft threads

with each pass.

Shed – the separation between

upper and lower warp yarns

through which the weft is woven

dpi – dents per inch – the number

of warp thread slots & eyelets per

inch in the heddle or reed.

OK, enough terminology, let’s get

started.

For this project, I used 3 balls of

Cotton Supreme Waves, Equator

for each blanket. As I mentioned

previously, I like to experiment, so

I used two different heddle sizes …

a 7.5 dpi for one blanket and a 10

dpi for the other. In knitter’s terms,

that means 30 warp threads

over 4” for the first, and 40 warp

threads for the second.

Cotton Supreme Waves in Equator – turquoise

and bright green are two of my favorite colors.

28'' Ashford Knitters Loom warped with Equator on a 10 dpi heddle.

40 KNITmuch | issue 12


This yarn is rated as a Light,

which means DK most of the

time. It’s actually more of a

plump DK, meaning it can act

as a Worsted (20 sts = 4”) or

a DK (22 sts – 4”) in knitters’

terminology.

In weavers’ terminology, it

typically means a 7.5 dpi heddle,

but I wanted to see what would

happen if the warp threads

were denser by also using a 10

dpi. The process is the same,

regardless of heddle size.

I planned to make each blanket

28” wide x 42” long. Woven

fabric will condense once it’s off

the loom and washed, therefore

my finished blanket will be

approximately 10% smaller in

both width and length.

The steps

1. Direct warp the threads onto

the loom – I planned on 45” +

18” waste = 63” warp

2. Thread yarn through the

eyelets of the heddle

3. Tie yarn to the front warp stick

4. Run scrap yarn through the

warp to even out the threads

(the pink yarn)

5. Wind weft yarn on the shuttle

6. Heddle up, pass the shuttle

through the shed (Leave a tail

that’s 2 – 3 times the width

of your woven fabric. This

will be used to hem stitch the

first row.), beat; Heddle down,

shuttle through, beat; repeat

7. Before winding the woven

fabric onto the front roller,

hem stitch the first row. There

are a number of YouTube

videos available to learn this

technique. Here is a link to

Kelly Casanova’s tutorial.

8. Once the Hem Stitch is

complete, wind the fabric on

to the front roller in readiness

to continue.

9. Put on your favorite tunes

and pour a beverage – I find

John Fogerty and a good

Pinot Grigio is a perfect

combination.

10. Heddle up, pass shuttle, beat;

heddle down, pass shuttle,

beat; repeat

11. Continue weaving until the

last row. Repeat Hem Stitch to

secure the last row.

I don’t like to waste any warp

threads, so I continued to pass

the shuttle until there was no

possible room left. Then I took it

off the loom and tied the warp

threads in groups of 3 to create a

small fringe.

TIP Insert a removable stitch marker every 30

rows. This helps to determine how much fabric

has been woven and wound onto the front roller.

The 7.5 dpi blanket (L) has more of a plaid or color block look to it, while the 10 dpi (R) has a subdued

weft with prominent warp stripes.

KNITmuch | issue 12

41


The finished measurements for each blanket, not

including the fringe are:

10 dpi

• 278 Warp Threads, 328 Weft Rows

• 42½” L x 25½” W before laundry

• 39¾” L x 24½” W after laundry

7.5 dpi

• 210 Warp Threads, 376 Weft Rows

• 45¾” L x 25¼” W before laundry

• 43” L x 24½” W after laundry.

The 10 dpi

created a slightly

thicker fabric

than the 7.5

dpi, but the real

difference is in

the overall look

of the two.

The 7.5 dpi

blanket has more

of a plaid or

color block look

to it, while the

10 dpi is more

subdued in the

weft lines with

the warp more

prolific creating

a vertical stripe

look. I’m quite

pleased with

both of them

and they are

incredibly soft. The colors are really gender-neutral

making them perfect gifts for new babies.

I originally purchased my loom to help manage my

plentiful yarn stash. Weaving is so much faster than

knitting that I thought I could burn through some

stash, but you guessed it, I now have a weaving

stash as well. When I look at some yarns, I just can’t

The completed ensemble – Lagoon Wrap with diagonal stripes, Fresh Berries

Tee with horizontal stripes, and two color blocked woven baby blankets in

Equator – all made with Cotton Supreme Waves.

help but wonder, “what would this look like woven”.

I really enjoyed making these three projects and

showing how a self-striping yarn with long color

runs can be used for a variety of projects. By going

with smaller needle size, I was able to knit the Tee

and Wrap without hurting my hands. The yarn is so

soft that it was a pleasure to knit.

My ensemble is complete with the lovely petite

Fresh Berries Tee in Heliotrope, the Lagoon Wrap,

and two adorable baby blankets in Equator, all

made with Universal Yarn Cotton Supreme Waves.

Each project

illustrates how

you can use

this self striping

yarn to creates

some beautiful

garments and

accessories.

With the long

color runs

available in 10

different colors

it’s sure to put

some brightness

in your summer

knitting (or

weaving)

projects.

If you don’t

have any Cotton

Supreme Waves

in you stash,

contact your

Local Yarn Store

(LYS) to see if they stock it, or if they can order it for

you. Many LYS’s are offering curb side pick-up or

mail orders, and the knitted patterns referenced in

this feature are all available online.

Stay safe and knit your isolation away. Soon we’ll all

be back to strutting our knitwear in public.

Cindy O'Malley

cindooknits.blogspot.com

42 KNITmuch | issue 12


don't miss these FREE

projects & tutorials online!

KNITmuch

...to K, is to

READ NOW

Knitting a modular

squares blanket with

Deluxe Stripes

READ NOW

Designing those just-right finishing

touches on the Colorburst vest

The challenge

of combining

7 different

colors on

knitted

sweaters

and

there's

so

much

more!

READ NOW

KNITmuch | issue 12

43


Knitting with

Merino Mist

yarn

Cindy O'Malley

Merino Mist is available in 10 different colors. I’ve chosen to use Rain Cloud

(silver), Thunder (black & silver), and Night (black).

In this feature, I’m knitting with

Rozetti Yarns Merino Mist, which

sports a shimmer that’s sure to

brighten up any dreary day.

Feather-soft and surprisingly

lightweight, this elegant yarn is

made from blown construction;

meaning the fibers are blown

into a mesh tube, which creates

a warm halo and results in a light

and airy yarn that is reflected in

its generous yardage of 167yds

[153m] per 50g ball. Merino Mist

is comprised of 20% Merino,

60% Viscose, and 20% Acrylic.

Viscose is a type of rayon fiber

that is made from natural sources

such as wood and agricultural

products, often bamboo, and is

known as artificial silk.

Merino Mist is available in 10

different colors, of which I’ll be

using 3 this week – Rain Cloud,

Thunder, and Night. Not only

do I like the color assortment, I

love the names. You might think

that I’d select brighter colors to

combat the winter blues, but

the shimmer of Rain Cloud and

Thunder were my inspiration –

they reminded me of New Year’s

Eve celebrations.

The recommended laundry care for

Merino Mist is to hand wash and lay

flat to dry. Let’s take a closer look at

“blown” yarn construction.

Merino Mist is a blown yarn,

meaning the fibers are blown

into the shimmering mesh tube,

giving it a lovely soft haze.

The mesh tube is likely the

viscose component, and is

very similar to an I-cord which

provides the shimmer quality

to the yarn. The Merino and

Acrylic components are blown

into the tube and protrude

slightly to provide a soft halo

around the shimmer. I didn’t

photograph Night (black) as the

shimmer is so subtle, it’s really

only noticeable in bright sunlight.

That’s okay with me as I think it

really complements the other

two colors. Blown yarns do not

typically split while knitting like

some plied yarns can; nor do

they pill easily. They are known

for being light, yet warm.

The recommended gauge on the

label reads 5-6 sts = 1” using a

US 5 – 7 [3.75 – 4.5mm] knitting

needle. That’s interesting as it

means it should range from a

sport to a worsted weight; i.e., 20

– 24 sts per 4” [10cm]. I’ll put this

to the test to determine which

gauge I like the best.

Merino Mist is

a blown yarn,

meaning

the fibers

are blown

into the

shimmering

mesh tube,

giving it a

lovely soft

haze.

44 KNITmuch | issue 12


3

3 swatches determine

the best knit fabric

I’m knitting some swatches using three different

needle sizes to determine which fabric I like the

best. This impacts how I’ll proceed with my selected

projects as the sweater pattern I’ve chosen is based

on a gauge of 23 sts, with two different row counts

of 27 and 30 over two different needle sizes.

I’m using Rain Cloud for my swatches as the silver

will be much easier to count the stitches and rows

than black. So let’s see what I get.

First up – the US 5 [3.75mm] swatch using 24 sts

and 30 rows in stocking stitch. When the swatch

was first completed, it measured in at 22½ sts over

4”. The row count was 31 rows for 4”. After the fabric

relaxed for a while, it actually measured in at 21 sts

over 4”. I’m normally a gauge knitter, but did not

achieve the expected 6 sts per 1”.

Secondly – the US 7 [4.5mm] swatch using the

same number of stitches and rows as the previous

swatch. Initially, this swatch measured in at 19½ sts

over 4”, and 18 sts after relaxing for a while. The row

count resulted in 26 rows over 4”. The knitted fabric

was a lot more relaxed than the previous swatch.

Lastly – the US 6 [4.0mm] swatch with the same

number of stitches and rows. This swatch measured

in at 21 sts over 4” initially, and 20 after relaxing. The

row count was 27 over 4”.

Of the three, my preference is the last swatch. All

three fabrics are lovely, but I like the feel and drape

of the fabric made with the US 6 [4.0mm] needle

the best.

I didn’t launder my swatches, but this is a good

practice to do before measuring. As mentioned,

my stitch count changed from when it was first

made until it had a chance to relax. Laundering can

change this again, so you should always launder

your swatch to get a better feel for what the

finished and blocked garment will be like.

Three swatches (from Left to Right) using US 5 [3.75mm], US 7 [4.5mm], and

US 6 [4.0mm]. All three fabrics are lovely with great stitch definition, but my

preference is the US 6 [4.0mm] version.

You may be wondering why I’m so concerned with

the row count of each swatch. The sweater pattern

I’ve chosen is top-down construction. Row gauge

can be very important to the finished size from the

shoulders to the underarms as pattern increases

(and decreases) are usually based on rows. If you

don’t take this into consideration, you could end

up with a saggy armhole opening or worse yet,

too short.

I’m starting the sweater using a US 6 [4.0mm]

needle, therefore, I’ll need to calculate how my

gauge will impact the pattern. I’ll be using Merino

Mist in Rain Cloud and Night to make a bright and

cheery sweater.

Photos by Cindy O'Malley

KNITmuch | issue 12

45


Knitting the Jay Sweater in

Merino Mist for a perfect fit

I’m knitting a top down yoke

sweater using Merino Mist, Rain

Cloud and Night colorway. The

pattern I chose is the Jay Sweater

which is a free downloadable

pattern. This lovely sweater was

originally designed for Fibra

Natura Kingston Tweed, which is

gauged at 21 sts over 4” using

a US 6 [4.0mm] needle. You’re

likely thinking, like I did initially, that’s great, I can

use Merino Mist on my US 6 [4.0mm] needle!

However, the devil is in the details.

This pattern is written for a gauge of:

23 sts x 30 rnds = 4” in St st using US 7 [4.5mm]

needle, and

23 sts x 27 rnds = 4” in Yoke pattern using US 6

[4.0mm] needle.

That means the stitch count for this pattern is based

on 23 sts over 4” as opposed to the yarn rating of

21 sts. If you forge ahead without taking this into

consideration, you could end up with a sweater

much larger than expected. Another consideration

is the amount of ease. That’s the difference between

your actual bust size and the finished garment bust

size. This pattern is written for 3½” of positive ease,

meaning if you measure 34” in the bust, you would

be looking to make the Small as it has a finished

bust size of 37½”. Ease gives us some leeway in our

finished measurements.

Since I prefer the fabric created using a US 6

[4.0mm] needle, I’ll do some calculations to see

what adjustments I need to make to the pattern.

I want to end up with a finished measurement

around 41”, i.e., Medium. The calculation is 4” gauge

(21) divided by 4, times the finished size — (21 / 4 *

41 = 215.25). Now compare this number to the total

body stitches. The Small calls for 216 stitches, while

the Medium calls for 236 stitches.

If I had forged ahead in making the Medium, I

would have ended up with a sweater that was

44″ – 45” around – way too big. So size Small it

is, however, I still need to check the yoke pattern

details to ensure that I don’t end up with armholes

that are too short for me. Fortunately, this pattern

instructs you to work even in stocking stitch after

the yoke pattern and increases are complete until

the desired measurement for the armholes. No

adjustments needed on my part, but I’ll use the

measurement for the Medium, not the Small.

I’m ready to proceed with Rain Cloud (silver) as

the neckband and pattern, with Night (black) as

the main color. One other important note when

knitting with black yarn; make sure you have really

good lighting. We all love black, but it can be a real

challenge to see.

I really enjoyed knitting this yoke pattern. I had to

keep stopping to admire my work as I went along.

As self serving as that may sound, it’s actually a

really good practice. I was able to catch the odd

error right away, which meant I could fix it easily

without ripping out my work. Rain Cloud has great

stitch definition against Night which made it easy to

spot any errors, and looks fabulous.

I love making top down sweaters because you can

try them on as you go to ensure fit. I definitely tried

it on once the sleeves were separated from the

body because I wanted to make sure the armholes

were in the right place for me … and they were.

Once separated, it’s into the boring (I mean great

TV watching) knitting. Round and round you go

until reaching your desired length (by trying it on of

course). I didn’t want it cropped, so I made it longer.

Now it’s time to pick up the stitches for the sleeves,

and here’s where I deviated from the pattern. The

pattern is designed for ¾ length sleeves, and I

wanted full length sleeves. Also, I’m using the stitch

count from the Small, so the pattern decreases are

based on that size, which may not work for the

Medium length.

46 KNITmuch | issue 12


So I did a little trial and error on the first

sleeve and tried it on as I went. I finally

settled on the following:

• Started decreasing at 2¼” from pickedup

edge (pattern calls for 1¼”)

• Repeated decreases every 8th round 4

more times

• Then every 6th round 6 times (48

stitches remaining as opposed to 56)

• Worked even in St st until 2” before

desired length (tried it on).

I did something when knitting the sleeves

that I don’t normally do – I inserted a stitch

marker on every decrease. Remember, it’s

black yarn and counting black rows is difficult.

I left the markers in the first sleeve so I’d

know what to do for the second sleeve.

I’m not good at writing it down as I go, so

leaving the stitch markers in until I completed

the second sleeve was a godsend.

Then I decided I wanted to tie in the yoke

pattern, so I did the following:

• Work yoke pattern into sleeve as follows

(B=Black, S=Silver):

• B S S S

• S S B S S B

• B S S

• B B S B B S (x 2)

• B S S S B B

• S S B S S B

• B S S S B B

• B B S B B S (x 2)

• S

• Work K1, P1 rib (in Silver) until desired

length (tried it on again), cast off.

And now for the finished product . . .

I really enjoyed making this sweater and

expect to get a lot of wear out of it. One little

snag with black yarn – it’s a dust and hair

magnet. Fortunately, I have a lint remover for

that unsightly lint. Now I’m looking forward

to making some accessories.

The stitch definition on the yoke made it very easy to spot any errors so I could

correct them easily without ripping out my work.

Stitch markers to mark each decrease makes it easier to identify row counts

when working with black yarn.

The completed

Jay Sweater

made with

Rozetti Yarns

Merino Mist

in Night with

Rain Cloud

used on the

yoke pattern

and bottom of

the sleeves.

KNITmuch | issue 12

47


Making a simple cowl glamorous

using Merino Mist yarn

I’m knitting with Rozetti Yarns

Merino Mist, which sports a

shimmer that’s sure to brighten

up a dreary winter’s day. If you

missed it, see how my version

of the free pattern, Jay Sweater,

turned out using Merino Mist in

Rain Cloud and Night.

Hint: Stunning!

I’m making an accessory to wear

with my dazzling Jay Sweater.

Originally, I planned on making

a cowl that doubles as a snood.

48 KNITmuch | issue 12

Sample of One Color Brioche

via: Courtesy of Briochestitch.com

Sample Fisherman's Rib

via: Courtesy of Briochestitch.com

What’s a snood, you say? It’s a

cowl that you can pull up to

cover your head when the wind

blows and you're without a hat.

I really like the look of the

Cozy Snood, which is a free

downloadable pattern. It looks

so warm to wear while walking

on a brisk winter’s day, but

then I thought it may be a little

too warm once indoors, like a

shopping mall or store. It’s knit

flat and seamed, so I thought

I’d close it with buttons instead.

That way I can undo the buttons

without pulling it off over my

head when I stop at the store. I

even bought the buttons that

would go with all three of my

colors (Rain Cloud, Thunder,

Night) beautifully. Then I thought;

do I really want to do and undo

all those buttons? Of course not.

So I decided to look at the

pattern details to see if I could

come up with something else

that was a little easier to pull on

and off, yet keep the quality that

I really like about the pattern –

the open rib. The pattern calls it

a Brioche Rib.

I don’t claim to be a Brioche

expert, but in my experience,

Brioche is accomplished

through yarn over and knit (or

purl) two together. This pattern

calls for knit below, which in

my experience is known better

as a Fisherman’s Rib. Since

I’m not a Brioche expert, I

consulted with a knitting pal of

mine, who is a Brioche expert.

She confirmed my thoughts in

that the resulting fabric is very

similar in appearance, however,

the technique is very different.

Since this is not the first time

I’d come across the “knit below”

technique termed Brioche, I

decided to research it more and

discovered that the two terms

are often used interchangeably.

In my research, I happened upon

a website that's an amazing

resource for both techniques,

briochestitch.com.

As you can see from the images

above, these are two different

techniques that look the same.

It's easy to see why the two terms

are used interchangeably.

I finally decided that I’d make

my favorite winter wearable

accessory, which is a long cowl

(infinity scarf) that I can wrap

around my neck to keep me nice

and warm when outside, and

easily unwrap a layer when inside.

I also wanted to use two colors

so I chose to use a conventional

Brioche stitch, in the round.

If you’re new to Brioche, it’s

easier to learn in the round rather

than flat. In the round, it’s a two

row repeat; four if worked flat.

Fisherman’s Rib is a single row

repeat when worked flat. Both

Brioche and Fisherman’s Rib are

reversible fabrics, meaning both

sides are right sides. Since there’s

no wrong side, I’ll refer to Side

A and Side B. When knitting two

color Brioche flat, you need to


use a circular needle as you need

to knit two rows on Side A before

turning your work to knit two

rows on Side B. When knitting in

the round, the first round works

Side A (i.e., brk), and the second

round works side B (i.e., brp).

For this project, I’m knitting in

the round using Rain Cloud (MC)

and Night (CC) and a two color

Brioche technique. Here are the

pattern details.

abbreviations

k = knit

p = purl

sl = slip stitch purlwise

yo = yarn over

wyif = with yarn in front

brk (brioche knit) knit the stitch

that was slipped in the previous

row together with its yarn over

brp (brioche purl) purl the stitch

that was slipped in the previous

row together with its yarn over

materials

• 1 ball of each

Rozetti Yarns Merino Mist

Rain Cloud and Night

gauge

16 sts = 4” on US 6 [4.0mm]

circular needle, however, gauge

isn't that important but does

affect overall size.

Instructions

Using a US 6 [4.0mm] circular

needle and MC, cast on 240

stitches (to wrap 3 times), 180

(to wrap 2 times), do not turn

your work, slide the stitches to

the other end of the needle and

attach CC.

Set-Up Roundwith CC: wyif,

*sl1yo, p1; rep from *.

Place a marker onto your needle

or hang a marker on the first

stitch. Now join for working in

the round, being careful not to

twist your stitches.

Round 1 MC: (forms MC “knit’’

columns, slips “purl’’ columns) With

MC, *brk1, sl1yo; rep from *.

Round 2 CC: (forms CC “purl’’

columns, slips “knit’’ columns) With

CC, wyif, *sl1yo, brp1; rep from *.

Rep Rounds 1 & 2 until desired

length.

For the longer version, I

recommend working the rounds

until it measures 6" – 6½” in height

(or until to run out of yarn) as it will

wrap around your neck 3 times. If

making the smaller version, you

may choose to continue until your

work measures 8” as it will only

wrap around twice.

Cast off loosely. I used a US 7

[4.5mm] needle for my cast off.

Remember to incorporate the yarn

over with its corresponding slipped

stitch (brk or brp) in your cast off

row.

This very simple, yet elegant

pattern is based on an

instructional tutorial provided

by briochstitch.com, with

amazing results. If you're not

quite convinced about two color

Brioche or working in the round, I

suggest you follow the instructions

for the Cozy Snood using the

Fisherman’s Rib technique. You'll

achieve a very similar look to that

of single color Brioche with only

a single row repeat, and you can

easily size it into a long cowl by

adding more stitches.

This was a fun project and I must

admit, I was caught up in the

brk1,s1yo* motion, so much so,

that I intended to stop at 6” and

ended up with 6½”. I really like how

the two colors of the Merino Mist

complement each other.

Completed Brioche Cowl in Rain Cloud and Night

wrapped 3 times.

When indoors, you can easily unwrap one of

the layers without fear of it falling off.

Or simply loop one end through the other

for a relaxed look.

KNITmuch | issue 12

49


Soft and cozy

arm warmers

complete the

Merino Mist

trio

Rozetti Yarns Merino

Mist in Rain Cloud,

Thunder and Night

colorways. The perfect

combination.

I’m making a pair of forearm

warmers to keep the winter chill

from blowing up the sleeves

of my overcoat. What inspired

this project was the Jay Sweater,

which is designed to have ¾

length sleeves. I don’t wear ¾

length sleeves in the winter

because my arms get cold. I

like wearing plaid shirts over

T-shirts, but seldom do because

again, my arms get cold. Solution

– make forearm warmers to

keep out the chill, yet are easily

removable when indoors.

Also, I’m anxious to use Thunder

which combines the shimmer

of Rain Cloud with the subtly of

Night. Originally, I contemplated

using Rain Cloud and Thunder

together on the Jay Sweater, but

was concerned it would look like

a disco ball. I think my instincts

were right. It would have been

overkill on the shimmer.

50 KNITmuch | issue 12

This is a very easy project that

you whip up while watching TV. I

opted to use one of my favorite

sock patterns – a waffle stitch.

To begin, you’ll need a US 6

[4.0mm] 32” circular needle for

Magic Loop or 4 dpns, and one

ball of Merino Mist Thunder.

Loosely cast on 40 stitches. There

are a number of loose cast on

methods, e.g., Cable Cast On,

Rib Cast On, etc. I tend to use a

long tail cast on but alternate the

yarn around my thumb to create

Knit and Purl stitches for ribbing.

I thought perhaps this was a Rib

Cast on, but have since learned

that it’s a little different, but

accomplishes the same thing.

The sleeves start and end with a

2 x 2 rib, so cast on 2 knit-wise,

then 2 purl-wise. This creates a

stretchy cast on which is great for

socks.

You can adjust the size by casting

on less or more stitches in

multiples of 4.

Merino Mist Thunder combines the sheen of

Rain Cloud with the subtle haze of Night

Illustration of how to alternate the yarn around

your thumb and index finger to make knit and

purl cast on using the Long Tail method.


I like my sleeves to be long to cover the base of my thumb.

Join in the round, being careful not to twist your

stitches.

Rib Rows 1 – 6: *K2, P2, repeat from *.

Pattern Rows

Rows 1 and 2: Knit.

Rows 3 and 4: *K2, p2, repeat from *.

Repeat rows 1 – 4 until desired length and end with

Rows 1 and 2.

Rib Rows 1 – 6: *K2, p2, repeat from *.

Cast off loosely. There are a number of methods to

cast off loosely, but I used a US 7 [4.5mm] needle

to cast off my stitches, which also gives you a loose

cast off.

I like my sleeves to be long; i.e., from just below

my elbow to covering my wrist completely and

the base of my hand, but you can make them any

length you like.

Now I can wear ¾ length sleeves along with my

Forearm Sleeves to ward off winter’s chill. I can still

wear my gloves under them, or scrunch them up.

My ensemble is complete with my dazzling Jay

Sweater, Brioche Cowl, and Forearm Sleeves, all

made with Rozetti Yarns Merino Mist. With the 10

colors available in Merino Mist, you’re sure to put

some dazzle in your razzle.

The completed ensemble of Jay Sweater, Brioche Cowl, and Forearm

Sleeves, all made with Merino Mist.

Cindy O'Malley

cindooknits.blogspot.com

KNITmuch | issue 12

51


Standards & Guidelines For Crochet and Knitting • YarnStandards.com

Standard Yarn Weight System

Yarn Weight

Symbol &

Category

Names

Yarn Weight

Type of

Symbol & Yarns in

Category Category

Names

KNITmuch

Standards & Guidelines For Crochet and Knitting • YarnStandards.com

Standards & Guidelines For Crochet and Knitting • YarnStandards.com

Categories of yarn, gauge ranges, and recommended needle and hook sizes

Standard Yarn Weight System

Standard Yarn Weight System

...to K, is to

Categories of yarn, gauge ranges, and recommended needle Standard abbreviations hook sizes & terms

Categories of yarn, gauge ranges, and recommended needle and hook sizes

alt = alternate

Yarn Weight

approx = approximately

Fingering, Sock,

Symbol & DK,

Worsted, Chunky,

beg = begin(ning)

Sport,

Bulky,

Jumbo,

10 count Fingering, Category

BO= bind off

Light

Afghan,

Craft,

Baby

Roving Roving

CC = contrast color

crochet thread Baby

Names Worsted

Aran

Rug

ch = chain

cm = centimetre(s)

Knit Gauge

Type of

Fingering, Sock,

DK,

Worsted, Chunky,

Sport,

cn = cable Bulky, needle

Type of Range* in Fingering, Sock,

Yarns in DK, 10 count Worsted, Fingering, Chunky,

Jumbo,

6 sts

33–40** 27–32 Sport, 23–26 21–24 16–20 12–15 BabyBulky,

Light

7–11 Jumbo,

Afghan,

Craft, co = cast on

Yarns in Stockinette 10 count Fingering,

Category Light crochet thread Afghan, Baby Craft,

Roving Roving

Worsted and Aran

Rugcont = continue, continuing

sts

sts Baby sts

sts

sts

sts Roving sts Roving

Category Stitch to crochet thread Baby

Worsted

Aran

Rug

fewer

dc = double crochet

4 inches

Knit Gauge

dec = decrease(s), decreasing

Knit Gauge

dpn = double-pointed needle(s)

Range* in

6 sts

Recommended

33–40** 27–32 23–26 21–24 16–20 12–15 foll = following

Range* in

Stockinette

6 sts

7–11

33–40** 27–32 23–26 21–24

12.75 mm

Needle in 1.5–2.25 2.25–3.25 3.25–3.75 3.75–4.5sts

16–20

Stitch to

4.5–5.5sts

12–15

5.5–8 sts 7–11

8–12.75 sts

sts

sts g = gram(s)

and

Stockinette

and

sts

and

hdc = half double crochet fewer

Metric Size

sts

mm

sts

mm

sts

4 mm

sts

inches mm

sts

mm

sts

mm

sts

Stitch to

mm fewer

inc = increase(s), increasing

larger

4 inches Range

in(s) = inch(es)

Recommended

k = knit

Recommended

Needle in 1.5–2.25 2.25–3.25 3.25–3.75 3.75–4.5

17

kf&b or kfb = knit into front 12.75 and mm back of st (increase)

Recommended

4.5–5.5 5.5–8 8–12.75

Needle U.S. 000 to 1 1 to 3

Metric

3 to 5

Size

5 to 7

mm

7 to 9

mm

9 to 11

mm

11 to 17 12.75 mm

mm

and

ktbl = knit through the back and loop

Needle in 1.5–2.25 2.25–3.25 3.25–3.75 3.75–4.5 4.5–5.5 5.5–8 8–12.75

mm

mm

mm

Size Range

and

k2tog = knit 2 sts tog (right-leaning

larger

larger

decrease)

Metric Size

mm

mm

mm Range mm

mm

mm

mm

k3tog = knit 3 sts together (double right-leaning

larger

Range

decrease)

Crochet

Recommended

m = marker

17

Gauge*Ranges 32–42

6 sts

Recommended

21–32 16–20 12–17 11–14

8–11

7–9

in Single

double

Needle U.S. 000 to 1 1 to 3 3 to 5 5 to 7 17

and

7 to 9 9 to 11

m = meter(s)

11 to 17

and

m1 = Make 1 stitch: pick up the horizontal strand

Needle U.S. 000 to 1 1 to 3 sts 3 to 5 sts

sts

sts

sts

sts

Crochet to crochets**

Size Range 5 to 7 7 to 9 9 to 11 11 to 17

and

fewer

between 2 stitches from largerfront to back and knit it

Size Range

larger

4 inch

tbl (lifted increase)

Crochet

MC = main color

Crochet

Steel***

Gauge*Ranges 32–42

mm = millimetre(s) 6 sts

Gauge*Ranges Recommended 32–42

21–32 16–20 12–17 15 mm 11–14

8–11

7–9

1.6–1.4 mm 2.25–3.25 3.5–4.5 in Single 4.5–5.5 double

6.5–9

9–15 6 sts

oz = ounce(s)

and

in Single Hook in Metric

21–32 16–20 12–17 11–14

double

5.5–6.5mmsts

8–11 sts 7–9 sts and sts

sts

sts

Regular hook mm

Crochet mm to mm crochets**

mm

mm and

p = purl

fewer

Crochet to Size Range

sts

sts

sts

sts

sts

sts

crochets**

larger

p2tog = purl 2 sts tog (decrease)

2.25 mm

4 inch

fewer

patt = pattern

4 inch

pfb = purl into front and back of stitch (increase)

Steel***

1.6–1.4 mm

pm = place marker

Steel*** Steel***

Recommended

15 mm

2.25–3.25 3.5–4.5 4.5–5.5

6.5–9 psso = pass 9–15 slipped stitch over

Recommended Recommended 6, 7, 8

Hook in Metric

I–9

15 mm

1.6–1.4 mm 2.25–3.25 3.5–4.5 4.5–5.5 Regular hook mm 6.5–9

Q

K–10

Hook U.S. Size Regular B–1 to E–4 E–4 to 7 7 to I–9

to

1 ⁄2 mm 9–15

5.5–6.5mm

M-13 mm

mmRS = right side

and

Hook in Metric

Size Range

5.5–6.5mm

and

mm

Regular hook mm

mm

mm 2.25 mm

mm

and

to M-13 mm

rem = remain(ing) larger

Size Range

to Q

Range

hook

K–10 1 ⁄2

larger larger

rep = repeat

2.25 mm

B–1

rev = reverse

rnd = round

Steel***

sc = single crochet

Steel***

Recommended 6, 7, 8

I–9

* GUIDELINES ONLY: The above reflect the most commonly used gauges and needle or hook sizes for specific yarn categories.

K–10

sl

Hook U.S. Size Regular B–1 to E–4 E–4 to 7 7 to I–9

to

1 = slip

Q

⁄2

Recommended 6, 7, 8

I–9

Q

M-13

** Lace weight yarns are usually knitted or crocheted on larger needles and hooks to create K–10

and

lacy, openwork patterns. Accordingly, a

Hook U.S. Size Regular B–1 to E–4 E–4 to 7

to M-13

to Q

gauge range is difficult to determine. Always follow Range 7 to I–9

the gauge stated hook to

1 skp = slip one st, knit next st, pass slipped st over knit

⁄2 M-13

and

in your pattern.

K–10 1 ⁄2

st (dec)

to M-13

to Q

larger

Range

hook

B–1K–10 1 ⁄2

larger

ssk = slip, slip, knit: slip 2 sts knitwise, 1 at a time, insert

*** Steel crochet hooks are sized differently from regular hooks--the higher the number, the smaller the hook, which is the reverse

left-hand needle into front of both sts and knit

of regular B–1 hook sizing.

them tog (left-leaning decrease)

sssk = slip next three stitches individually, knitwise.

This Standards & Guidelines booklet and downloadable * GUIDELINES symbol artwork ONLY: The are above available reflect at: YarnStandards.com

the most commonly used gauges and needle or hook sizes for specific yarn categories.

Insert tip of left needle from front to back into

* GUIDELINES ONLY: The above reflect the most commonly ** Lace used weight gauges

11 yarns and needle are usually or hook knitted sizes or for crocheted specific yarn on larger categories. needles and hooks to create lacy, openwork the fronts patterns. of these Accordingly, three stitches a and knit them

** Lace weight yarns are usually knitted or crocheted on larger gauge needles range is and difficult hooks to to determine. create lacy, Always openwork follow patterns. the gauge Accordingly, stated your a pattern.

together (double left-leaning decrease)

gauge range is difficult to determine. Always follow the gauge *** Steel stated crochet in your hooks pattern. are sized differently from regular hooks--the higher the number, the smaller st(s) the = hook, stitch(es) which is the reverse

*** Steel crochet hooks are sized differently from regular of hooks--the regular hook higher sizing. the number, the smaller the hook, which is the reverse

St st = stocking stitch

of regular hook sizing.

tbl = through back loop

This Standards & Guidelines booklet and downloadable symbol artwork are available at: YarnStandards.com

tog = together

This Standards & Guidelines booklet and downloadable symbol artwork are available at: YarnStandards.com

tr = treble crochet

11

WS = wrong side

11

yo = yarn over

52 KNITmuch | issue 12

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