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WEEKLY NEWS

MAY 13, 2021 • VOL. 65, NO. 19 SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1957 16 PAGES • ONE DOLLAR

Residents approve MWRA hookup

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By Anne Marie Tobin

\

LYNNFIELD — Center

Water District (LCWD) ratepayers

approved a proposal for

a $9.8 million capital improvement

project at the district’s

82nd annual meeting Monday

night at the high school.

The project, which was one

of the final items on the night’s

warrant, asked ratepayers to

authorize the district to appropriate

$9.8 million for a comprehensive

capital project. It

includes a $6.3 million greensand

filter plant at the Glen

Drive station, as well as establishing

a connection with the

Massachusetts Water Resources

Authority (MWRA) for supplemental

water.

WATER, PAGE 3

PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

Residents gather for the annual Lynnfield Center Water District meeting held outside

at the high cchool on Monday.

Planning Board talking trees

By Anne Marie Tobin

LYNNFIELD — The

Planning Board is moving

forward with an aggressive

marketing campaign

to tout the benefits of a new

tree preservation bylaw.

“We got Town Counsel’s

(Thomas Mullen) blessing

so the bylaw has been submitted

for inclusion on

the warrant for the June

12 Town Meeting,” Board

Chair Brian Charville said.

“Our focus now is to make

sure that we get the word

out. This topic has been

discussed at every one of

our meetings since last fall

and we need to make sure

people know that the bylaw

is much narrower than the

one proposed last year.”

The vote on last year’s

proposed bylaw was postponed

indefinitely after

Charville told attendees that

additional time was needed

to quell the spread of misinformation

and address

residents’ concerns about

the bylaw. Charville said

the board plans to bring the

bylaw to the next meeting

of the Select Board, which

is May 24.

“We had not seen the

bylaw until Monday when

we received it from Town

Hall,” said Select Board

member Phil Crawford.

“Until I read it, I know absolutely

nothing about this,

and it’s not like it’s one or

two pages — it’s 17. All I’ve

heard — which has not been

from the Planning Board -

was it was supposed to be

downsized, but I don’t know

as their board has yet to come

to us. Last year, they came

before us twice before it was

submitted. Regardless, they

are supposed to come before

us and present it so we can

have input, but they have

not. That’s not the way the

process works.”

Marketing promotions

include a brief question-and-answer

Vimeo session

that will be videotaped

and shown on Lynnfield

public access television and

posted on the town’s website

and on the board’s Facebook

page.

Department staff has created

an informational flyer.

TREES, PAGE 3

Another

virtual

Memorial

Day

By Anne Marie Tobin

LYNNFIELD — For a second straight

year, there will be no formal, in-person

Memorial Day observation on the Town

Common.

Instead, the celebration will once again

be held virtually.

“Although the pandemic is showing

some strong and positive signs of improvement,

we decided that having our

customary celebration would still be

risky,” said Veterans Service Officer

Bruce Siegel. “We cannot march in a parade,

and we should not have a cookout.

But that doesn’t mean we will not honor

the brave men and women who made the

ultimate sacrifice in defense of our nation

to keep us free.”

Select Board member Phil Crawford

said the decision to forgo holding a live

event is the right thing to do.

“Obviously we are not out of this pandemic

yet and it doesn’t make any sense

at all to put people in harm’s way,” he

said.

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2

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

These sisters continue

to pave their own way

By Daniel Kane

COURTESY PHOTOS

Bishop Fenwick seniors Isabella (top) and Natalia (bottom)

Scolaro are the Lynnfield Students of the Week.

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sisters have gone to school

together as long as they can

remember, so it’s fitting the

two Lynnfield natives are this

week’s Students of the Week.

Isabella and Natalia are both

seniors at Bishop Fenwick high

school and both have been

plenty busy in the classroom.

For Isabella, who boasts a 4.59

grade point average (GPA), her

studies over the past year have

had her interested in several different

areas.

“Some of my favorite classes

are Advanced Placement (AP)

Literature and Composition,”

Isabella said. “I also really love

Anatomy. It’s a really fun thing

to learn about, it’s been ool to

see how the body works. And

AP European History is filled

with a lot of things you usually

don’t learn about so that’s been

interesting as well.”

“I also love to read,” she said.

“I read a lot of books, especially

fiction. That’s something I really

love. I really enjoy the class

discussions.”

Both sisters share that love

for reading, but for as much as

they have in common they’ve

also left their own individual

marks on the school as well.

Isabella has served as a captain

on both the basketball and

football cheerleading teams.

And if you’ve attended any of

those games over the years,

you’ve definitely heard her

voice — she sings the national

anthem before all the Crusaders’

home games.

“I love doing that,” Isabella

said. “I have a passion for

singing and actually have two

songs out.”

Those songs are titled “Dirty

Sneakers” and “Tip of My

Tongue” and were released

under her artist name Belz.

Natalia has plenty of talent

herself and that’s clear on the

volleyball court. She served as a

senior captain for the Crusaders

this past fall but there was

plenty of work put in by her

and her teammates before that

during the pandemic.

“I think the hardest challenge

of the season was in

the summer,” Natalia said.

“Captains practices are usually

held in the gym but we couldn’t

practice inside because of

guidelines. So we practiced outside

on the tennis courts with a

beach volleyball net. It wasn’t

ideal but we did temperature

checks and had masks on.

“It was good to finally move

inside,” Natalia said. “The fall

season was similar to a normal

one. There was some getting

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used to playing with masks but

after a while it was normal. It

was a really fun season.”

In the classroom, Natalia,

who has a 4.12 GPA, has had

her interest peaked in her AP

government class.

During the college search the

two sisters had a few places in

mind. Natalia applied to Baylor

University in Waco, Texas.

Isabella was interested in attending

the Berklee College

of Music. But in the end both

sisters will tackle college together

as well, being accepted

into New York University, early

decision.

“I would love to pursue music

in the future but I decided to

pursue a different route in college,”

Isabella said. I’m really

excited to study physiological

anthropology. I would love to

be a forensic anthropologist

someday.”

“I applied to Baylor and

New York University,” Natalia

said. “I loved both of them. But

they’re very different. Between

which one I belonged to more, I

just knew NYU was the school

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WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

Residents gather for Lynnfield center water meeting

WATER

FROM PAGE 1

The project will aim to improve

flow, water pressure and

the town’s water quality, which

has long drawn the ire of district

residents who have lodged

complaints about discoloration.

“This is a critical situation,

in that issues of quality are

expanding and the demand

is increasing,” said LCWD

Superintendent John Scenna.

“Even without building new

homes, similar to the schools,

people want to live in Lynnfield

and have larger families, so

this was a critical vote, not just

for the district, but for the town

as well.”

Townsend Road resident

Michael Walsh said the capital

project addressed only “shortterm

problems when we need

long-term solutions.

“Nine million dollars is a lot

of money and I don’t think they

studied all of the options. It’s

an awfully big bill.”

Some attendees expressed

concern over the way the article

was written, saying the

article should be limited only

to the Glen Drive filter plant.

Alan Dresios proposed an

amendment to the article,

which would have limited the

project to the Glen Drive plant,

but the motion failed by a vote

of 66-48.

On a subsequent vote, the

article as presented in the

warrant (which needed a twothirds

vote), passed by an overwhelming

margin (96-17).

The night’s other major article,

which sought authorization

for the district to enter

into a 20-year agreement with

neighboring Wakefield to

supply supplemental water,

passed by a majority vote.

The Glen Drive project will

improve the consistency in

water quality for certain areas

where there has been a natural

accumulation of excess

iron and manganese in the

groundwater, resulting in discoloration.

The project will

also help to improve water

pressure, thereby enhancing

the fire department’s ability to

contain fires.

The MWRA water distribution

system will be established

with Wakefield through an interconnection

on Main Street at

Bay State Road.

The connection will add up

to 250 gallons per minute of

MWRA water to the district’s

capacity, improving flow and

water pressure. This would

supplement existing supply by

nearly 25 percent.

The project includes all costs

associated with MWRA membership,

including a membership

charge of $1.5 to 1.6 million

and another $250,000 to

$300,000 for permitting.

Fire Chief Glenn Davis has

been a strong supporter of the

capital program.

“The project will help sustain

pressures throughout our entire

fire-suppression system in periods

of high demand,” he said

in a letter to the district. “This

project best serves the safety of

all of these residents and buildings

in this manner. It is wellthought-out,

efficient and will

create a system that can be relied

upon for decades to come.”

Board of Water

Commissioners Chair Joseph T.

PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

Residents gather for the annual Lynnfield Center Water

District meeting, hoping to resolve the ongoing water quality

issues in the town.

Maney was elected to a second

three-year term, defeating Ryan

Collard by a 102-37 margin

while Timothy Doyle, who was

running unopposed, was reelected

as board clerk.

Challenger Shannon

Gilmartin Cuddy defeated incumbent

James Alexander by

a margin of 94-46 and was

elected to a one-year term as

treasurer. Alexander had served

as treasurer since 2000.

Ratepayers also approved

several other projects, including

upgraded water meter infrastructure,

purchase of equipment

including a truck signboard

and Bobcat attachment,

tank upgrades at Knoll Road

and Wing Road, and upgrades

at the Station 3 water treatment

plant on Phillips Road.

The capital project is expected

to be completed in 2023.

LCWD serves approximately

2,600 households, which represents

two-thirds of the town.

Planning Board talks tree preservation

TREES

FROM PAGE 1

“It will be in people’s mailboxes

on June 10 and 11,”

said board member Susan

Lambe. The flyer will also be

published on the board’s website.

Charville said the board

may consider holding a public

hearing at its next regular

monthly meeting on May 26.

“That could be the date, but

right now we don’t envision any

major changes,” Charville said,

adding that the revised bylaw

was submitted to the town about

a month ago.

According to Charville, the

aim of the bylaw is to encourage

protection of trees at least

six inches in diameter during

“building activity” in existing

zoning setbacks where building

activity is already restricted.

MEMORIAL

FROM PAGE 1

“With the age of our seniors

and many of the veterans who

attend the observance, we just

don’t want anyone to be compromised,”

Crawford said.

“What they did last year was

very good with the video presentation

put together by Bruce,

so I fully expect this year’s will

be similar to that, if not better.”

This is the “tree border” where

if such protected trees are removed

in the course of building

activity, they would need to be

replaced with saplings of minimum

size or mitigated by payment

into the Town’s existing

tree fund to support the Town’s

overall tree-planting and maintenance

efforts.

“It applies to every parcel in

town, but only applies to much

narrower set of activities,”

Charville said. “The Planning

Board cannot prevent people

from clearing trees, but the

bylaw requires that the trees be

replicated or, in the alternative,

pay a fee to the tree fund. It is

not unlike tree bylaws in most

communities.”

Specifically, the bylaw would

apply to exterior building activity

for new home construction

or for any existing home

expansion of 50 percent or

Siegel said that every veteran

buried in the town’s five cemeteries

has been honored with

the placement of an American

flag in recognition of his or her

service.

Further information will be

posted when available on the

town’s website at https://www.

town.lynnfield.ma.us/veterans-services/pages

and on social

media.

“Let’s also get the children

involved by decorating the front

greater and new subdivisions

projects requiring special permits

or variances; and site plan

approvals.

Protected trees that are removed

would have to be

replaced on a one-inch forone-inch

diameter basis. For

example, if a tree with a six

inch diameter were removed

from within a tree border area,

it could be replaced with three

two-inch diameter trees.

Alternatively, property

owners could pay a fee into the

Lynnfield Tree Replacement

Fund. The fee would be based

upon the DPW’s current tree

purchase and planting costs.

Charville said the bylaw does

not affect existing protections

afforded for wetlands and street

trees.The Planning Board began

researching tree preservation

bylaws in similar communities

in 2018.

Another virtual Memorial Day

doors of your homes in a patriotic

theme to honor our fallen

heroes,” Siegel said.

Spring Cleanups

and

Tree Removal

and

Dog Waste

Removal

In 2019, Planning &

Conservation Director Emilie

Cademartori applied for and

was awarded a grant from the

state’s Executive Office of

Environmental Affairs (EEA) to

develop a Bylaw for Lynnfield.

With planning assistance from

the Metropolitan Area Planning

Council (MAPC), multiple

Planning Board public meetings

were held to review best

practices of working bylaws in

Wellesley, Concord, Newton,

and Lexington, while considering

the unique opportunities

and challenges of Lynnfield.

The board has identified numerous

benefits that trees provide

to people and the community,

beginning with enhanced

property values. The Arbor Day

Foundation reports that having

large trees in yards along streets

can increase a home’s value

anywhere from three to 15

percent.

Other benefits include reduced

energy use and costs,

cleaner air, improved water

quality, and preservation of

wildlife habitats.

The revised tree-preservation

Bylaw, along with a onepage

summary can be viewed

at https://www.town.lynnfield.

ma.us/planning-board/pages/

treepreservation-bylaw-proposed.

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LYNNFIELD

WEEKLY NEWS

(USPS Permit #168)

Telephone: 781-593-7700 • Fax: 781-581-3178

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903

News and Advertising Offices: 110 Munroe St., Lynn, MA 01901

Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

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Editor: Thor Jourgensen tjourgensen@essexmediagroup.com

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Retail Price: $1.00

Deadlines: News: Monday, noon; Display Ads: Monday, noon;

Classified Ads: Monday, noon;

No cancellations accepted after deadline.

The Lynnfield Weekly News is published 52 times per year on Thursday by Essex

Media Group, Inc. No issue is printed during the week of Christmas. The Lynnfield

Weekly News is delivered via US Mail to all homes in Lynnfield. It is also

available in several locations throughout Lynnfield. The Lynnfield Weekly News

will not be responsible for typographical or other errors in advertisements, but will

reprint that part of an advertisement in which a typographical error occurs if notified

immediately. Advertisers must notify the Lynnfield Weekly News of any errors in

advertisements on the FIRST day of insertion. The publisher reserves the right to

reject, omit or edit any copy offered for publication. POSTMASTER: Send address

changes to Lynnfield Weekly News, P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903. © 2016 Essex

Media Group, Inc.

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WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

Monday, May 3

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 11:11 a.m. Monday at

425 Market St. and 425 Walnut

St.

A report of a hit-and-run

motor vehicle crash at 6:16 p.m.

Monday on Market Street.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 10:59

a.m. Monday at 7 Country Club

Drive.

Wednesday, May 5

Accident

A report of a motor vehicle

crash with personal injury at

2:31 p.m. Wednesday at 326

S Broadway and 65 Brook

Drive. One person was taken to

Melrose-Wakefield Hospital.

Thursday, May 6

Complaint

At 3:18 p.m. Thursday, a Pine

Street caller reported he got a

text from “Cartel” that stated if

he didn’t send them money, they

would kill more people. He said

the person also sent graphic

images of people the group had

allegedly killed. Police reported

the exchange appeared to be a

scam.

Friday, May 7

Enforcement

Police conducted motor vehicle

traffic rules enforcement

on Walnut Street and Salem

Street on Friday morning.

Police Log

Complaint

Police gave a verbal warning

about fireworks use to a Locust

Street resident on Friday at

6:32 p.m. following a neighbor

complaint.

Medical

Police assisted with medical

transport from Salem Street to

Salem Hospital on Friday at 8:44

p.m.

Saturday, May 8

Medical

Police assisted with medical

transport from Lynnfield Street

to Salem Hospital on Saturday at

12:17 a.m.; from Ashdale Road

to Lahey Burlington on Saturday

at 3:55 a.m.

Complaint

Police enforced motor vehicle

traffic rules on Walnut Street on

Saturday at 6:38 p.m.

Sunday, May 9

Alarms

Police responded to faulty

alarms on Salem Street on

Sunday 4:44 a.m. and 9:38 a.m.

Enforcement

Police conducted motor vehicle

traffic rules enforcement

on Essex Street on Sunday at

11:18 p.m.

Medical

Police assisted with medical

transport from Greenmeadow

Drive to Melrose-Wakefield

Hospital on Sunday at 1:23 p.m.

Complaint

Police responded to the high

school parking lot on Sunday at

4:02 p.m. on a report of youths

destroying a bicycle. The bicycle

was left for Public Works employees

to pick up.

Larceny

Police responding to a defective

alarm on South Broadway

located a vehicle stolen out of

Taunton on Sunday at 8:35 p.m.

Complaint

Police responded on Sunday

at 9:44 p.m. to a complaint about

dirt bike riders making noise behind

East Boston Savings Bank

on South Broadway.

Cipoletta rejoins J Barrett

& Company

BEVERLY — J Barrett &

Company is pleased to announce

that Realtor Joseph

Cipoletta has re-joined the

agency in the Cummings Center

office.

A real estate industry veteran

for more than 10 years,

Cipoletta is a well-respected

real estate professional with an

enviable track record of helping

clients buy and sell property

throughout the North Shore.

“The bottom line — no pun

intended — is that successful

real estate transactions are a

collaborative effort among

buyers, sellers and agents,” he

said. “By working together, we

can ensure that everyone feels

good about the outcome.”

A Boston native who grew

up in the North End, Cipoletta

has lived in Salem since

2009 and is also the music director

for St. Paul’s Parish in

Hamilton-Wenham.

His wife, Jessica, a research

project manager at Boston

Children’s Hospital, is also on

the faculty at Mass. College of

Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

Their son, Sebastian, a recent

addition to the family, makes

sure that life is hectic.

“Change is the norm in real

estate and that also applies to

agents who want to explore

other opportunities,” says Jon

Gray, J Barrett president. “As

a company, we recognize and

value ability, knowledge and

dedication, so when an agent

with Joe’s abilities decides that

we are the best option, we are

happy to have him on our team

again.”

Established in January 2007,

J Barrett & Company is a service-oriented

company that has

quickly become the premier privately-owned

real estate firm on

the North Shore. The company

serves the North Shore and

Cape Ann areas from offices in

Beverly, Gloucester, Ipswich,

Manchester, Marblehead, and

in Prides Crossing.

COURTESY PHOTO | J BARRETT

Realtor Joseph Cipoletta,

who has lived in Salem since

2009, is rejoining the team at

J Barrett and Company.


MAY 13, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 5

Religious News

Centre Congregational

Church

5 Summer St., Lynnfield

781-334-3050

www.centre-church.org

Facebook.com/Centre-

ChurchUCC

office@centre-church.org

YouTube.com/c/centrecongregationalchurch/

In the Centre since 1720,

Centre Church is an open and

affirming congregation of the

United Church of Christ. No

matter who you are or where

you are on your life’s journey,

you are welcome at Centre

Church.

Messiah Lutheran Church

708 Lowell St., Lynnfield

(corner of Lowell and Chestnut),

is currently open for

in-person worship, following

state COVID-19 guidelines,

safety protocols and capacity

limitations. In-person worship

is on Sunday morning at 10:30

am by reservation. Masks are

required.

To reserve seats for worship,

please call 781-334-4111 and

leave your name, the number in

your group, and a contact number.

Worship services are also

currently being streamed live

on Facebook.

Like us on Facebook at:

Seniors

facebook.com/Messiah-Lutheran-Church.

Sunday mornings at 10:30

a.m., Sunday evening devotion

at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday evening

prayer time at 7:01 p.m.

Messiah Lutheran Church

is served by the Rev. Dr. Jeremy

Pekari, and the Rev. David

Brezina.

Temple Emmanuel/Wakefield

For more information about

Temple Emmanuel, a member

of the Jewish Reconstructionist

Communities, call 781-245-

1886 or see our Facebook page

or website at www.Wakefield-

Temple.org.

Request service links to the

Senior Center offers

plenty to do in May

LYNNFIELD — The Lynnfield

Senior Center has been

busy offering more than 200

programs/classes virtually including

live Zoom exercise

classes, a book club, discussion

groups and even a Zoom lunch

bunch!

The Center offers Grab and

Go lunches three days each

week in our parking lot — advance

sign-up is required. The

Center's SHINE representative

is available to offer insurance

assistance by appointment, and

we hope you will enjoy all of the

staff cooking and craft videos

that we post each week, along

with our Virtual Travel Monday

Trips.

For more info, please call the

senior center at 781-598-1078.

Don't know how to Zoom?

It's easy. Call us and we will get

you started. Then see all you

can do from the comfort of your

home. Contact us if you would

like the links to our exercise

classes, or to see the variety of

programs offered.

Exercise with Alice - Zumba

and Pilates classes

Zumba: Monday, Tuesday,

Thursday, and Friday, 10:30 – 11

a.m.

Pilates: Monday, Tuesday,

Thursday, and Friday, 9:30 –

10:30 a.m.

Contact Alice at aodachowski@msn.com

for more information

and to get the Zoom links.

Chair Yoga and Meditation

classes with Sam

Chair Yoga: Tuesdays from

10 – 10:45 a.m.

Meditation: Thursdays from

10:00 – 10:20 a.m.

Sit and Tone video with Joie

Chair Yoga video with Michelle

Enhanced Fitness videos with

Frank

Enhanced Cardio

Enhanced Strength and

Stretch

Join Elaine every Monday at

1:30 p.m. for Trivia. Test your

knowledge and have lots of

laughs. Sign up with Elaine at

emoorman_coa@hotmail.com.

Join Elaine for Zoom Bingo

every Tuesday at 9 a.m.

We will send you the bingo

cards. Grab your beans and have

some fun. Sign up with Elaine at

emoorman_coa@hotmail.com.

Free.

Our Virtual Book Club with

Sue started Monday, April 12 at

10 a.m. We will be reading "The

Map Thief" by Heather Terrell.

Contact Sue at slagorio@town.

lynnfield.ma.us to register and

for more information. Free.

Join our Accountability

Group every Wednesday at 10

a.m. on Zoom as we cheer each

other on in accomplishing our

goals. Have you been meaning

to call a friend, sort through

pictures or write your memoir?

Join us for some laughs and support

as we accomplish our goals

and set an intention for the next

week.

Sign up with Elaine at emoorman_coa@hotmail.com.

Our van service will pick up

and drop off your library books.

Call the Lynnfield library, 781-

334-541, to make arrangements.

Zoom streaming: info@WakefieldTemple.org

Shabbat services: Friday

7:30 p.m.: May 21, June 1 and

June 25.

Saturday mornings at 9:30

am: May 22, June 5 and 19,

July 17

SPECIAL SHAVUOT holiday

celebrations/services: May

17, 7:30 p.m., May 18, 9:30

a.m.

Wakefield-Lynnfield United

Methodist Church

Peace, Hope & Virtual Hugs

Deb Willis Bry, cell:

781-521-9726

Office Assistant, Wakefield-Lynnfield

United Methodist

Church

Assistant Coordinator,

Greater Boston Project Linus

Wakefield-Lynnfield United

Methodist Church, 273 Vernon

St., Wakefield, Mass., 01880

Church Office: 781-245-

1359, Parsonage: 781-245-0338

Email: WLUMC272@gmail.

com

www.facebook.com/methodistchurchwakefield

www.instagram.com/methodistchurchwakefield

*A Project Linus Blanket

Drop-Off Location*

www.bostonprojectlinus.com

Crighton and Jones

support new

war memorial

By Allysha Dunnigan

LYNNFIELD — House Minority

Leader Bradley H. Jones,

Jr. (R-North Reading) secured

$50,000 in state funding to put

toward the construction of a

new war memorial in Lynnfield.

State Sen. Brendan Crighton

(D-Lynn) said he will work with

Jones to see what else is needed

in the town and to support

the budget for this project in the

state Senate.

The funding was given preliminary

approval as part of a

consolidated amendment to the

House of Representatives’ proposed

fiscal year 2022 state budget.

The earmark still needs approval

from the Senate as well

as Gov. Charlie Baker’s signature

before the money can be

released to the town.

Crighton said he will be filing

an amendment for $50,000

as well.

Jones said the planned war

memorial will provide a tribute

that will honor all of Lynnfield’s

residents who have served the

United States.

“We must never forget the

service and sacrifices that have

been made by our veterans and

their families,” Jones said. “I’m

pleased to be able to assist the

town with the funding of this important

project, and will continue

to advocate for its inclusion

in the final budget.”

A War Memorial Committee

proposed constructing a new

monument on the green space

adjacent to South Common

Street, across from the Town

Common and near the town’s

existing veterans memorial.

As a part of the proposal, a

“Memorial Maintenance Endowment

Fund” will be established

to help maintain and preserve

the memorial.

The committee said it envisions

building a teaching memorial,

which will help educate

residents and visitors about Lynnfield’s

history and the sacrifices

residents have gone through

during their years in the service.

The memorial will include

the country’s major wars from

the Revolutionary War to present

day and will consist of the

names of local men and women

who served.

The memorial will also be

designed to allow for additional

service members’ names to be

added in the future.

The FY22 budget now moves

to the Senate and the spending

proposal is expected to be debated

the week of May 24.

Have a story to share?

Need a question answered?

contactus@essexmedia.group


6

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past issues?

Find them on

weeklynews.net

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from you!

Send us a letter at

editor@weeklynews.net.

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than 300 words.

PEABODY, FORMERLY OF LYNN

- Robert E. Douglas 98, beloved

husband of over sixty-nine years to

the late Priscilla M. (LeCain) Douglas,

died Sunday, May 9, 2021 at

home surrounded by his family.

Born in Dundalk, MD, he was the

son of the late Hazen and Helen

Brown (Halse) Douglas. He graduated

from Peabody High School,

class of 1940. After completing

his service in the Army as a Sergeant

in WWII he continued his education

earning a Master of Education

from Salem State Teachers

College, class of 1954.

Mr. Douglas had been employed

for thirty-five years in the

Business Department at

Lynn English High School

as a bookkeeping and

accounting teacher where

he was loved and admired

by all of his students, until

the time of his retirement

in 1990.

A long-time resident of South

Peabody, he faithfully attended

Austin Square Baptist Church in

Lynn for the past seventeen years

and he was a former member of

the Second Congregational Church

in Peabody. He was a loving father,

grandfather, great-grandfather,

friend and neighbor who will be

missed by all who knew him. He

found great joy in celebrating holidays,

especially Christmas with his

family, summers around his pool

and sitting on the front porch with

his wife visiting with his wonderful

neighbors.

Surviving him are two daughters,

Jean Trueira and her husband,

Brian and Leslie Grayton and her

husband, Rob all of Peabody, four

grandchildren, Michael and Cory

Fletcher and Leigh Anne and Philip

Trueira, six great grandchildren,

a sister-in-law, Evalyn Douglas of

Peabody and many nieces and

Thank you

for your compassion.

Your teamwork. Your dedication.

As we mark National Skilled Nursing Care Week®, we thank you – our team. The past

year has been unlike any other, and through it all, you’ve been there, and continue to

be there, when our residents need you most.

We’re Perfecting the Art of Superior Care.

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

Obituaries

Robert E. Douglas, 98

1923 - 2021

nephews. He was also the

father of the late Barbara

Douglas Tsoukalas and

brother of the late Malcolm

and Bruce Douglas.

Service Information:

His funeral service will

be held at the Austin Square

Baptist Church, 10 Keslar Ave.,

Lynn on Thursday, May 13, 2021

at 10:00 a.m. Relatives and

friends are invited to attend.

Visiting hours at the Conway

Cahill-Brodeur Funeral Home,

82 Lynn St., Peabody, Wedensday

from 5 to 7 p.m. Burial in

the Cedar Grove Cemetery, Peabody.

All attendees are required

to wear a mask and adhere to

social distancing guidelines. In

lieu of flowers, contributions

may be made in his memory to

Austin Square Baptist Church

or to My Brother’s Table, 98 Willow

St, Lynn, MA 01901 For directions

and online guestbook,

please visit www.ccbfuneral.

com.

96 Forest Street • Peabody, MA 01960

978-532-0303

www.pilgrimrehab.org

Betty L. Bratt, 95

1926 - 2021

CHARLOTTESVILLE - Betty L.

Bratt passed away peacefully on

May 5, 2021 at 95 years young.

Betty had been living with her

daughter, Donna, and son-in-law,

Dan Sawyer, in Scottsville, Va.

for the last seven years since the

passing of her husband, Albert V.

Bratt, Jr.

Originally from Lafayette, Ind.,

she also resided in Lynnfield,

Mass. for several years while raising

her family. Upon retirement,

she and Al wintered in Cannon

Creek Airpark in Lake City, Fla., and

summered in Center Harbor, N.H.

Betty is survived by her two

sisters, Linda Colby and Patricia

Hann, both of Lafayette, Ind., and

is predeceased by her two brothers,

Marion L. Smith and Russell

F. Smith. She also leaves her five

children, Paula Prucknicki, Steven

Bratt, Donna Sawyer, Carol Crowley,

and Teresa Stapleton.

Betty was grandmother to 12

grandchildren: Clinton, Blake (deceased),

Clifford, Michael, Danny,

Chris, Kaitlin, Keith, Taylor, Emily,

Olivia, and Katherine. She also

had 8 great -grandchildren.

Betty was a devoted and caring

mother and wonderful with

her grandchildren and greatgrandchildren

alike. She was the

“Nanny B” that all children should

have. She will be deeply missed by

her family, extended family, and all

that knew her.

There will be a memorial service

held this summer in Center Harbor,

N.H., where she will be laid to rest

with her husband, Al. A date has

not yet been set.

In lieu of flowers, donations may

be made to the Breast Cancer Research

Foundation, the American

Heart Association, or the National

Library Service for the Blind and

Vision Impaired.

Condolences may be left for the

family at www.hillandwood.com.

Barbara (Butler) Stone, 87

1934 - 2021

LYNNFIELD - Barbara (Butler)

Stone, formerly of Lynnfield

passed away surrounded by her

loving family after a long battle

with Alzheimer’s Disease. She was

87.

Beloved wife of the late Robert

J.W. Stone with whom she shared

25 years of marriage. Devoted

mother of Karen Stone Talwar

of New York, NY, Jacqueline Comeau

and her husband David of

Lynnfield, and Meredith Stone of

Middleton. Loving sister of the

late Rosemary Rudolph. Cherished

grandmother of Mackenzie

and Cameron Comeau. She felt

strongly about the importance of

volunteering. Giving of her time to

the League of Women Voters and

The Home for Little Wanderers.

She was also an avid golfer.

She was a loving mother, mother-in-law,

grandmother, and loyal

friend. Family was always her

first priority. She especially loved

traveling the world with family and

friends. She had a warm smile, a

big heart and kind word for everyone

she met. Barbara always saw

the good in people; and everyone

loved her.

Relatives and friends are invited

to visiting hours at Robinson

Funeral Home, 809 Main St.,

Melrose on Tuesday, May 11 from

4-7pm and again on Wednesday

at First United Methodist

Church, 645 Main St, Melrose for

her Funeral Service celebrated at

10am. All attendees are required

to wear masks, maintain social

distancing, pay their respects, and

exit the Funeral Home promptly to

allow other guests to enter. A limited

number of guests will be allowed

in the building at one time.

Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery,

Lynnfield. Gifts in Barbara’s memory

may be made to the Alzheimer’s

Association MA/NH Chapter,

309 Waverley Oaks Rd, Waltham,

MA. 02452. For online tribute and

directions, visit RobinsonFuneral-

Home.com.


MAY 13, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 7

Wakefield Co-operative to undergo renovations

By Elyse Carmosino

LYNNFIELD — Wakefield

Co-operative Bank’s second location

is set to undergo renovations

later this year.

“We’re going to try to keep

the theme of the Colonial building,

but we’re going to hugely

improve the inside,” Bank President

Jeffrey Worth said.

The renovation is several

years in the making, with the

chain having already upgraded

its main branch in Wakefield in

2019. “We poured a lot of money

into modernizing our main

office in Wakefield with a very

open look and feel. As we went

through the 2019 remodel, we

had a fair amount of Lynnfield

customers who stopped by the

Wakefield branch who remarked

on how beautiful the remodel

was,” Worth said. “They all

asked ‘when are you going to do

Lynnfield?’”

Although the chain still has

yet to finalize pricing, construction

is intended to begin some

time in the next few months.

“The building will be far

more open. The glass will come

down and people will be able to

mingle — to the extent that we

can with COVID-19 — and talk

Wakefield Co-operative

tugs on its jeans

For the Weekly News

LYNNFIELD — Wakefield

Co-operative Bank employees

recently wore jeans to work to

benefit Raw Art Works in Lynn,

a youth arts organization rooted

in art therapy.

Bank President and CEO Jeff

Worth doubled employee contributions,

resulting in a donation

of nearly $300.

Every month, bank employees

are encouraged to wear

denim to work on designated

"Jeans Days" in exchange for a

donation to a community organization.

Raw Art Works was chosen

by employees as a Jeans Day recipient

for its mission to provide

free programming, from painting

to filmmaking, for kids ages

8-19. RAW uses art to ask kids

“what’s really going on” in their

lives, giving them the tools to

ITEM PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

Wakefield Co-operative Bank Vice President Mohammed

Bezzat, right, and Assistant Vice President Bob Clattenburg

welcome clients to the Lynnfield branch.

create in unexpected ways and

envision new possibilities for

their future.

“Here at Raw Art Works, we

believe that all kids should be

seen and heard and that everyone

has a story to tell,” said Valerie

Rafferty, development associate

at RAW. “We are so grateful to

the bank for this thoughtful gift

to support our operation and

mission.”

Since its inception in 2018,

Wakefield Co-operative Bank’s

Jeans Day program has resulted

in more than $18,000 in community

donations to local organizations

such as A Healthy Lynnfield,

Communitas, The Food

Drive in Melrose, Habitat for

Humanity, Lynnfield for Love,

MelroseWakefield Hospital,

Mission of Deeds, Reid’s Ride

and many more.

To learn more about Raw Art

Works, visit https://www.rawartworks.org/.

To learn more about Wakefield

Co-operative Bank, visit

wakefieldcoop.com.

Wakefield Co-operative Bank

(WCB) is a 130-plus-year-old

mutual institution headquartered

in Wakefield, operating under a

co-operative bank structure.

Being a mutual means that it

has no stockholders and issues

no public offerings. Wakefield

Co-operative Bank’s main office

is located at 342 Main St. in

Wakefield and it has two other

branch locations: 596 Main St.

in Lynnfield and 526 Main St. in

Melrose.

It is the bank’s mission to

provide exceptional service and

innovative products, with the

vision of seeing every one of its

customers achieve their personal

financial goals and success.

Learn more at wakefieldcoop.

com.

Arbor Day the Scout way

to each other,” Worth said. “That

will give all three of our branches

a consistent but unique look

and feel.”

With the chain’s Lynnfield

branch having served as a fixture

of the community for well

over half a century, Worth said

he understands that a sense of

community is the heart and soul

of local banking.

“We’re not a newcomer to

the market, and we are a true

community bank, so we’re not

owned by any stockholders or

shareholders,” he said. “We represent

the interests of the community.

In Lynnfield, we have a

whole bunch of customers who

have come to love that branch.”

Wakefield Co-operative

Bank's services encompass assisting

customers with checking

accounts, savings accounts,

students accounts, and also providing

customers with mortgage

Financial planning is

more important than ever…

• Detailed Life Planning

• Education Plans

• Longevity Planning

• Legacy & Estate Planning

• Investment Management

and personal loans.

In the last decade, Worth

said the bank has also become

involved with commercial and

construction loans throughout

the entire Greater Boston area.

“Community banks are pretty

unique to the Northeast. It’s

where banking really started,”

Worth said. “Most banks were

commercial banks. The idea,

years and years and years ago,

back in the 1800s when we were

founded, was the ability to take

deposits and lend money to the

average, everyday person.

“The fabric of that small business

community is what’s kept

us in business for those 130-plus

years. It would be nice to say

‘we do a lot for that community,’

and I’m not saying that’s not true

— it is true — but what’s particularly

important is the fact that

they’ve done so much for us. We

stand on their shoulders.”

• Retirement Planning

• Long Term Care Planning

• Life Insurance

• Sustainable investing

• Charitable Giving

ANTONIO SORDILLO, CFP®, CRPC®, CPFA

Vice President, Investments

antonio.sordillo@raymondjames.com

20 Burlington Mall Road, Suite 130 // Burlington, MA 01803

781.313.8403 // evergreenfinpartners.com

© 2021 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC. 21-BRNAO-0003 TA 1/21

We want to hear

from you!

Send us a letter at

editor@weeklynews.net.

Letters should be no more

than 300 words.

COURTESY PHOTO

The Lorax looked on as a new tree was planted and Girl Scout Troop 82559 proclaimed Arbor

Day in Lynnfield on Saturday, May 1 at Town Hall. Left to right: Alana Doroquez, Victoria

Clancy, Sophie Kennison, Shealyn Moore, Sonia Kumar, Annabelle Eckhardt, Chloe Cieslewicz

(in back), Lorelei Eckhardt (in front).


8

For the Weekly News

LYNNFIELD — Market-

Street continues its impressive

growth with an exciting new

wave of retail, fashion, beauty

and wellness offerings, including

the recently opened and locally-owned

women’s boutique

shops Cattivo and Pretty Posh,

and three new stores opening

this summer.

The news comes on the

heels of the property’s recent

announcement of four new

restaurants set to debut beginning

this spring. Joining MarketStreet

Lynnfield’s dynamic

mix of locally-owned shops and

national brands this summer are

leading female apparel brand

Aerie, revolutionary hair coloring

experts Madison Reed, and

beloved Boston-based juice bar

Squeeze Juice Co.

With these new offerings,

the leading open-air lifestyle

destination adds to its diverse

collection of retail and restaurants,

further showcasing an

exemplary shopping experience

for the North Shore community

and beyond.

“As part of our continued

commitment to offering our

guests a unique mix of mustshop

destinations and fresh

brands, our latest store openings

at MarketStreet Lynnfield

represent some of the most

sought-after retail brands alongside

local small businesses.

We’re thrilled to have them join

our community here at the property,”

said Charlotte Woods,

general manager of Market-

Street Lynnfield.

Cattivo is a Nantucket-based

women’s contemporary fashion

retailer featuring emerging designers

as well as established

brands, with styles that are both

trendy and timeless at a wide

range of prices.

Curated with an impeccable

eye for style, owner Mary

Marathas and her three daughters

fill the store with airy,

floral dresses, cozy, feminine

sweaters, and statement-making

accessories from brands

like LoveShackFancy, For Love

& Lemons, Maia Bergman, We-

WoreWhat, Astr the Label, Lost

+ Wander, PatBo, Charo Ruiz

Ibiza, and many more.

Whether it’s a night out or a

little something for the beach,

women will be sure to find a

style at Cattivo that will make

them stand out in a crowd. It’s a

little bit bohemian glam, a little

bit rock & roll, and a whole lot

of fun. www.shopatcattivo.com

| @shopcattivo

Voted as “Massachusetts Online

Boutique of the Year” in the

national 2020 Boutique Awards,

the local- and woman-owned

Pretty Posh Boutique is excited

about its debut at MarketStreet

Lynnfield this season.

Founded by Lynnfield native,

Lex McCormick, Pretty Posh is

a shop for the fashion-forward

woman and showcases a collection

of beautifully-made,

affordable clothing perfect for

any occasion — from a night

out on the town with friends to

a weekend getaway.

Now open, Pretty Posh features

its new spring and summer

collection of effortless, everyday

ready-to-wear clothing

as well as jewelry, handbags,

and shoes, with more to come

during the season.

In an effort to help end child

hunger, Pretty Posh’s fundraising

initiative, Giving Tuesday,

is currently making donations

to Friends of Canaan — Mission

for Haiti. For every nine

dollars donated, a child is fed

for an entire month.

Through this special fundraiser,

Pretty Posh and its shoppers

are already helping to feed

more than 500 children. www.

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

MarketStreet debuting five new stores

A TRADITION OF TRUST, CARING & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1952

Service to all faiths

Complete Pre-Need Planning

Medicaid Approved Trust &

Insurance Plans

19 YALE AVE.,

WAKEFIELD, MASS.

Conveniently Located off Exit 39 (North Ave.) Rt. 128

COURTESY PHOTO | CHRIS LANGLEY

MarketStreet is rolling out five new stores just in time for summer with a focus on retail, fashion and beauty.

Spacious Modern Facilities

Ample Private Parking

Handicapped Accessible

Area Code 781

245-3550 • 334-9966

prettyposhboutique.com | @

prettyposhboutique_

Aerie is one of the country’s

fastest-growing brands in the

apparel industry. Committed to

creating exceptional collections

while positively influencing the

way women see themselves and

treat others, Aerie offers intimates,

apparel, activewear, and

swimwear with every piece designed

for comfort.

The Aerie brand promotes

body positivity, empowerment,

and confidence. With its pledge

to forgo all retouching of campaign

imagery in 2014, the

brand’s powerful #AerieREAL

platform continues to inspire

women around the world to not

only love themselves, but to

help empower other women.

Leading the charge behind

the self-love movement, Aerie

was one of the first brands to

stop using models in its campaigns,

rather highlighting real

women who support its mission,

and continues to do so today.

www.Aerie.com | @Aerie

Madison Reed Hair Color

Bar is a beauty company revolutionizing

the way women

color their hair with its luxurious

hair-color, with a Smart

8-free formula (free of PPD,

ammonia, parabens, resorcinol,

phthalates, gluten, SLS and titanium

dioxide).

This summer's opening of

the Madison Reed Hair Color

Bar at MarketStreet Lynnfield

expands upon the company's

exciting growth in New England

and the hugely successful

Madison Reed Hair Color Bars

that have recently opened in and

around major cities including

New York, San Francisco, Dallas,

Atlanta, and Washington,

D.C.

The Madison Reed Hair

Color Bar features a team of

in-person professional colorists

to help women choose the

perfect shade of hair color and

assist with application on-site.

Also offered are the brand’s full

product lineup such as Radiant

Hair Color Kits, Color Reviving

Glosses, Color Therapy,

and Color Depositing Masks,

as well as hair care products,

accessories, and complimentary

color consultations for athome

application. www.madison-reed.com

@MadisonReedLLB on Instagram

and Facebook.

Armed with over a decade’s

worth of operation in the hospitality

industry, Squeeze Juice

Co. offers great-tasting, nutritious

juices, smoothies, superfood

bowls and other quick eats

from premium ingredients.

The popular, Boston-based

juice and smoothie concept developed

its menu with integrity,

passion, and purpose for the

lives everyone is living. Soon

to be located in its bright new

space just off MarketStreet Lynnfield's

green, Squeeze Juice

Co. features premium-yet-familiar

products such as madeto-order

and cold-pressed bottled

raw juice, smoothies, and

various bowls featuring acai

and other superfoods.

Additionally, Squeeze Juice

Co. offers cold brew, nitro

cold brew on draft, specialty

coffee and espresso drinks,

and other made-in-house,

creative, grab-and-go items.

www.drinksqueeze.com | @

drinksqueeze

These exciting store openings

will join MarketStreet Lynnfield’s

lineup of more than 80

shops and restaurants, including

four new restaurants set to open

this spring and summer.

The OkiPoké, the successful

local poké concept will debut at

MarketStreet Lynnfield in the

spring and the North Shore’s

acclaimed Serenitee Restaurant

Group will open its exciting

New American concept, Alchemy,

this summer. Joining them

are Chipotle, the eponymous

Mexican grill and fast-casual

innovator, scheduled to open

this summer, and GFG Café,

an authentic Greek bakery and

café out of New York City and

New Jersey, slated to open later

this year.

With guest and staff safety

at the forefront of its priorities,

MarketStreet Lynnfield continues

to abide by all government

safety regulations and to uphold

all sanitization practices.

To promote social distancing,

visitors and employees are encouraged

and reminded to abide

by current distancing guidelines

by way of helpful signage.

MarketStreet Lynnfield has

also adjusted communal spaces

and furniture configuration

throughout the property. For

up-to-date details on hours, offerings,

and events, visit www.

marketstreetlynnfield.com, sign

up for weekly newsletters, or

follow @marketstreetlynnfield

on Facebook and Instagram.

Since its 2013 opening, MarketStreet

has become essential

to the North Shore community,

both for its diverse shopping,

dining, and entertainment options,

and for its dedication to

family-friendly events, seasonal

festivities, and charitable fundraisers.

For more information and

the most recent updates, please

visit www.marketstreetlynnfield.com

and follow @marketstreetlynnfield

on Facebook

and Instagram.


MAY 13, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 9

LAG artists busy with spring paintings

COURTESY PHOTOS | Lynnfield Art Guild

“Tea Time,” Sheila Falco of Stoneham

“Taking Notes,” Hedy Sanni of Lynnfield

“Seawolf in Harbor,” Hedy Sanni

“Reflection Boston,” Dan Abenaim of Lynnfield

“Reflections at Reedy Meadows,” Shaila Desai of

Lynnfield

“It’s Winter Again,” Joyce Fukasawa of Lynnfield

“Me Too,” Sheila Falco

“Love Birds,” Beth Aaronson of Lynnfield

DON'T LET THE CONSTRUCTION FOOL YOU, WE ARE STILL

OPEN FOR BUSINESS WITH NEW SUMMER HOURS

Monday – Friday 9 am – 3 pm

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY CLOSED

60 Bennett Street

Lynn, MA 01905

781-598-1613

TIRES • AUTO GLASS • ALIGNMENTS

BENNETTSTREETTIREGLASS.COM

Hope to see you soon.

“Irises,” Joyce Fukasawa


10

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

Sports

Pioneers drop a

heartbreaker to

North Reading

BASEBALL

By Mike Alongi

LYNNFIELD — It was

a long time coming when

the Lynnfield baseball team

got back out onto the field

Saturday afternoon, and the

Pioneers didn’t waste any time

in getting the drama going. In

a nine-inning thriller against

Cape Ann League rival North

Reading, Lynnfield was the

victim of one too many mistakes

in a 2-1 loss on its home

field.

“I thought we had two good

weeks of practice and a few

scrimmages, but you’ll always

get some hot-and-cold

play when you have a lot of

kids who haven’t played at

the varsity level before,” said

Lynnfield coach John O’Brien.

“I think our pitchers definitely

threw well enough for us to win

or at least keep us in the game,

but you can’t make those errors

and mistakes at critical times

like that.”

The lone RBI of the day for

Lynnfield came from Aidan

Burke, who went 0-for-3 with a

sacrifice fly. Evan Balian went

2-for-4 in the loss, while Henry

Caulfield (1-for-4, run scored),

Jack Bird (1-for-3) and Luke

Martinho (1-for-4) added hits

for the Pioneers.

On the mound, Blake Peters

pitched a solid game in his first

start of the season. Peters went

four-plus innings, allowing no

runs on just two hits with five

walks and three strikeouts.

Accuracy issues led to a high

pitch count for Peters, and

Trent Balian was brought in

as a relief pitcher in the fifth

inning. He went on to toss the

final five innings of the game,

allowing two runs on four

hits with two walks and two

strikeouts.

After North Reading moved

runners into scoring position in

each of the first two innings but

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and delivery

came up empty, Lynnfield finally

struck first in the bottom

of the third. Caulfield opened

the inning with a single before

Bird dropped down a sacrifice

bunt, and the delayed throw allowed

Caulfield to scamper all

the way to third base in the process.

Next up was Burke, who

launched a fly ball into left

field that was just deep enough

to score Caulfield on a sacrifice

fly, making it 1-0 Pioneers.

“That’s the kind of baseball

we like to play,” said O’Brien.

“The guys came through and

played some good situational

baseball there, but we’ve got

to be able to sustain that a little

more.”

The score remained there

until the top of the seventh

inning. A one-out single and

a balk put a North Reading

runner on second base before

the Hornets knocked a single

into centerfield. The runner

on second made an attempt to

score, but Martinho made an

incredible one-hop throw from

deep center to gun down the

runner and keep the Pioneers’

1-0 lead. But the other runner

advanced to second on the

play, and on the next pitch he

made a move to steal third.

The Lynnfield throw got away

and into left field, allowing the

tying run to score and the momentum

to shift all the way to

North Reading.

The two sides went back and

forth through two extra innings

from there, with North Reading

eventually getting the go-ahead

run on a Lynnfield error.

Lynnfield (0-1) travels to

Rockport Thursday afternoon

(4).

“It was a tough first game,

but hopefully we can learn

from this one and be better the

next time out,” said O’Brien.

“We’re going to need to hit

better and clean up the issues

in the field, and hopefully we

can do that starting Tuesday.”

PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

Lynnfield’s Chloe Shapleigh went 3-for-4 with a home run and one RBI in a win over Triton

Monday afternoon.

Lynnfield guts out win over Triton

SOFTBALL

By Daniel Kane

LYNNFIELD — The

Lynnfield softball team went

back and forth with visiting

Triton Monday, but in the

end the Pioneers gutted out a

8-6 win over their Cape Ann

League rivals.

It was the first win of the

year for a young Lynnfield

team that didn’t falter despite

facing a 5-3 hole in the fourth

inning.

“We didn’t quit the whole

game,” Lynnfield coach Peter

Marinelli said. “And that’s the

important thing. I just love that.

When you’ve got young kids,

it all depends on if mistakes

bother them and they carry

it or they let it go. (Monday),

they let it go. And we obviously

played better than we

did the last game against North

Reading (an 8-1 loss).I was

very happy with what the team

did (Monday).”

The Pioneers got contributions

up and down the roster

on the offensive side. Chloe

Shapleigh brought the big

bat for the Pioneers, going

3-for-4 with a solo home run

in the third inning and three

runs scored. Ava Marotta (1-

for-3 with one walk) had two

RBI and one run scored, while

Reilly Ganter also drove in a

pair of runs.

Ava Gamache and Celia

Carbone each had one RBI.

Catie Kampersal ran for Ganter

— who also pitched all seven

innings — and scored two runs.

Lauren Amico also scored a

pair of runs.

“We’ll take it,” Marinelli

said. “Reilly Ganter got her

first hit and it was a shot up the

middle. If Chloe and Reilly get

it going, then you have a few of

the younger kids around them

chipping in here and there it

will be a good season for us.”

Ganter had a solid outing on

the mound, with six strikeouts

while allowing one walk, five

hits and five earned runs.

She helped her own cause

right from the start, knocking

in Marotta on a fielder’s choice

to get Lynnfield on the board

in the first inning. A Triton

error also allowed Shapleigh to

score and the Pioneers went up

2-0 early.

But a Lynnfield error also

got Triton started in the third,

and the Vikings added a pair

of runs of their own to even

things at 2-2.

Shapleigh broke the tie in a

big way next inning with her

solo homer to right-center, but

Lynnfield stranded two runners

later in the inning. Triton

followed with a big two-run

double and a wild pitch to go

ahead 5-3 in the fourth before

Ganter struckout back-to-back

batters to get out of the inning.

Lynnfield chipped away

from there. Marotta knocked

in Amico in the fourth and

Kampersal scored on a fielder’s

choice off the bat of Gamache

in the fifth to tie things up at

5-5.

The Pioneers finally took

control in the sixth when

Marotta drove in another run,

followed by an RBI single

from Ganter. Kampersal scored

again later in the inning to

stretch the lead to 8-5.

Triton scored on a sacrifice

fly after a nice grab from

Gamache in left field but backto-back

putouts by Shapleigh

at shortstop put the game away

for Lynnfield.

“I thought Reilly pitched

well (Monday),” Marinelli

said. “Six strikeouts and one

walk is obviously good. She

pitched very well. You need

pitching. We’ve got pitching

this year. We have a good

shortstop. We have two good

senior leaders. Now it’s just a

matter of bringing it along with

the younger kids. I like what I

see. It’s just a matter of giving

them all as much playing time

as we can.”

Lynnfield (1-1) travels to

Hamilton-Wenham (3:45).

FRIDAY

North Reading 8,

Lynnfield 1

A young Lynnfield team had

some bright spots in its 2021

debut, but couldn’t put it together

against its Cape Ann

League rivals.

Reilly Ganter was on the

mound for the Pioneers and

had seven strikeouts despite

the loss. Chloe Shapleigh had

two of Lynnfield’s four hits

and the lone RBI of the game.

Lauren Amico went 1-for-3

and scored one run. Ganter also

went 1-for-3 at the plate.

“We have a young team,”

Lynnfield coach Peter

Marinelli said. “We only have

two seniors and one junior then

all sophomores and freshmen.

But there were some good

things. Ava Damache played

really well defensively.”


MAY 13, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 11

COURTESY PHOTO | JOHN BRAGGS

Lynnfield’s John Braggs has made his future plans known, as the senior has committed to attend

school and play lacrossse at Norwich University next season.

Lynnfield senior John Braggs

commits to Norwich lacrosse

By Daniel Kane

LYNNFIELD — Lynnfield

senior John Braggs has had to

pivot on his future decisions,

but he hasn’t let that slow him

down.

“I had always wanted to join

the military and go that route

after I graduated,” Braggs

said. “But I’m a Type 1 diabetic,

so I had to switch gears

and put my focus towards law

enforcement.”

That refocus led Braggs towards

Norwich University.

Braggs signed his letter of intent

Tuesday to not only attend

Norwich — which is located in

Northfield, Vt. and is the oldest

private and senior military college

in the United States —

but also continue his lacrosse

career on the field with the

Cadets next year.

“It’s a private military college,

so it has that structure and

that lifestyle that I’m looking

for,” Braggs said. “No matter

where I was going, I wanted to

play lacrosse. So I reached out

to the coach at Norwich right

away.”

That not only checked off

another important box for

Braggs, but also exceeded his

expectations for any program

he thought he would join at the

next level.

“I didn’t really care if I was

playing for a good program

or not, I just wanted to keep

playing,” Braggs said. “But

it turns out Norwich has a

good program. I had a virtual

meeting with some coaches

and met some players and it

fit pretty well. I’ll be playing

on their fall team this year and

hopefully can find a spot.”

Braggs and the Pioneers

are currently in the middle

of a season that just got underway

Monday. The senior

captain and midfielder already

has one goal under his belt

during Lynnfield’s 10-5 win

over North Reading. It was

the first game for Braggs and

company in two years after last

season was canceled due to the

COVID-19 pandemic.

“We were super excited,”

Braggs said. “It was a let down

last year and I was definitely

bummed out not being able to

play. Now I can play in college

so it makes it seem not as bad,

but we’re still excited to be out

there one last time.”

Pat Lamusta is in his

first year as head coach of

Lynnfield, but Braggs has become

plenty familiar with him

already through the years.

“Obviously this is his first

year as head coach but he’s

been an assistant and JV coach

where I played under him before,”

Braggs said. “He made

those games fun but also taught

more of the structure and

fundamentals.”

“John is an important leader

on the team and also an important

scorer,” Lamusta said.

“He’s been playing lacrosse

since he was playing lacrosse

in sixth grade. I remember

working with him on the JV

team years ago. He’s very

committed to the program

and we’re excited to see what

he’ll accomplish at Norwich

too. He’ll be joining another

Lynnfield graduate, Mitchell

McKay there.”

For now, Braggs and the

Pioneers are hoping to make a

big step forward this season in

their return to the field.

“Our biggest goal is just

to be playing good lacrosse,”

Braggs said. “We haven’t had

the best seasons in the past.

Now, making the tournament

is a big goal for us and we’re

optimistic about it.”

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULE

THURSDAY

Baseball

Lynnfield at Rockport (6:30)

Boys Lacrosse

Lynnfield at Triton (3:45)

Swampscott at Peabody (4)

Girls Lacrosse

Triton at Lynnfield (3:45)

Peabody at Swampscott (4)

FRIDAY

Baseball

Swampscott at Peabody (7)

Softball

Lynnfield at Hamilton-Wenham (3:45)

Beverly at Peabody (4)

Boys Tennis

Rockport at Lynnfield (3:30)

Girls Tennis

Lynnfield at Rockport (3:30)

Cardinal Spellman at Bishop Fenwick (3:30)

Peabody at Winthrop (4)

SATURDAY

Baseball

Hamilton-Wenham at Lynnfield (10)

Bishop Fenwick at Danvers (1)

Boys Lacrosse

Bishop Fenwick at Peabody (7)

Track

Arlington Catholic, St. Joseph’s Prep at Bishop

Fenwick (10)

SUNDAY

Baseball

Bishop Fenwick at Swampscott (12)

MONDAY

Baseball

Bishop Fenwick at Matignon (4)

Softball

Newburyport at Lynnfield (3:45)

Matignon at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Matignon at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Masconomet at Peabody (4)

Girls Lacrosse

Bishop Fenwick at Matignon (4)

Peabody at Masconomet (4)

Boys Tennis

Lynnfield at Hamilton-Wenham (3:30)

St. Joseph’s Prep at Bishop Fenwick (3:30)

Girls Tennis

Hamilton-Wenham at Lynnfield (3:30)

Bishop Fenwick at St. Joseph’s Prep (3:30)

Salem at Peabody (4)

TUESDAY

Baseball

Lynnfield at Newburyport (3:45)

Boys Lacrosse

Hamilton-Wenham at Lynnfield (3:45)

Girls Lacrosse

Lynnfield at Hamilton-Wenham (4)

Track

Bishop Fenwick at Austin Prep (TBD)

WEDNESDAY

Baseball

Cardinal Spellman at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Peabody at Winthrop (4)

Softball

Lynnfield at Pentucket (3:45)

Peabody at Marblehead (4)

Bishop Fenwick at Cardinal Spellman (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Bishop Fenwick at Cardinal Spellman (4)

Girls Lacrosse

Cardinal Spellman at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Boys Tennis

Newburyport at Lynnfield (3:30)

Bishop Fenwick at Matignon (3:30)

Girls Tennis

Lynnfield at Newburyport (3:30)

Matignon at Bishop Fenwick (3:30)

Masconomet at Peabody (4)

Track

Marblehead at Peabody (4)

COURTESY PHOTO | SEAN POWERS

Lynnfield eighth grader Sarah Powers had three goals and

three assists to help lead her Assabet Valley U13 girls youth

hockey team to a national championship last week.

Lynnfielder helps Assabet

Valley win 2A national

hockey championship

The Assabet Valley U13 girls

youth hockey team capped off

a dream season last Monday,

with the team taking home

the U14 2A USA National

Championship trophy in

Littleton, Colo. The Assabet

U13 girls team plays out of

Concord and placed No. 1 in

the country for their age group

after finishing the season

34-7-4.

Helping to lead the way in

Assabet Valley’s title run was

Lynnfield eighth grader Sarah

Powers, who had a very successful

tournament with three

goals and three assists, including

a goal in the championship

game.


12

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

Lynnfield softball grabs first win

PHOTOS | Julia Hopkins

Lynnfield pitcher Reilly Ganter had six strikeouts in the Pioneers’ 8-6 win over Triton Monday.

Lynnfield’s Chloe Shapleigh rounds third base and heads home.

Shortstop Chloe Shapleigh makes a throw to first base.

First baseman Abi Travers reaches out to catch a ball.

Signs and balloons decorate the fence for Lynnfield Varsity Softball’s opening day.


MAY 13, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 13

Lynnfield baseball open season

PHOTOS | Spenser Hasak

Lynnfield catcher Evan Balian, right, returns the ball to his brother, pitcher Trent Balian, and

shares a quick word before returning to the plate during Saturday’s matchup against North

Reading on Saturday.

Lynnfield’s Jack Bird catches an infield fly ball against North

Reading on Saturday.

Lynnfield’s Evan Balian is called out as North Reading’s Michael Vittozzi slides into the bag.

Lynnfield’s Henry Caulfield makes contact with the ball as the Pioneers take on North Reading

on Saturday.

Blake Peters pitches for Lynnfield High School during their

matchup against North Reading on Saturday.


14

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

May is Older Americans Month

Carol McMahon

For the Weekly News

PEABODY — In tough times,

communities find strength in people

— and people find strength in their

communities. In the past year, we’ve

seen this time and again in Peabody as

friends, neighbors, and businesses have

found new ways to support each other.

In our community, older adults are

a key source of this strength. Through

their experiences, successes, and difficulties,

they have built resilience that

helps them to face new challenges.

When communities tap into this,

they become stronger too. Each May,

the Administration for Community

Living leads the celebration of Older

Americans Month (OAM). This

year’s theme is Communities of

Strength, recognizing the important

role older adults play in fostering the

connection and engagement that build

strong, resilient communities.

Strength is built and shown not

only by bold acts, but also small ones

of day-to-day life — a conversation

shared with a friend, working in the

garden, trying a new recipe, or taking

time for a cup of tea on a busy day.

And when we share these activities

with others — even virtually or by

telling about the experience later —

we help them build resilience too.

This year, the Peabody Senior

Center will celebrate Older Americans

Month by encouraging community

members to share their experiences.

Together, we can find strength — and

create a stronger future.

Here are some ways to share and

connect:

Look for joy in the everyday:

Celebrate small moments and ordinary

pleasures by taking time to

recognize them. Start a gratitude

journal and share it with others via

social media, or call a friend or family

member to share a happy moment or

to say thank you.

Reach out to neighbors: Even if you

can’t get together in person right now,

you can still connect with your neighbors.

Leave a small gift on their doorstep,

offer to help with outdoor chores,

or deliver a home-cooked meal.

Build new skills: Learning something

new allows us to practice overcoming

challenges. Take an art course

online or try a socially distanced outdoor

movement class to enjoy learning

with others in your community. Have

a skill to share? Find an opportunity to

teach someone, even casually.

Share your story: There’s a reason

storytelling is a time-honored activity.

Hearing how others experience the

world helps us grow. Interviewing

family, friends, and neighbors can

open up new conversations and

strengthen our connections.

When people of different ages,

backgrounds, abilities, and talents

share experiences — through action,

story, or service — we help build

strong communities. And that’s something

to celebrate!

The Peabody Council on Aging recently

purchased a tent and is awaiting

its arrival. We plan to schedule outdoor

classes such as line dancing,

Zumba and some chair yoga under the

new tent.

We are also planning to have some

classes meet on-site as well.

We will gradually work toward

opening up some areas of the senior

center and eventually will offer lunch

here again. Until then, we have decided

to continue our frozen meals

program. At the present time, our large

dining room and stage area is being

used as a vaccination site, which will

continue over the next several months.

Staff members will be in contact

with the teachers and participants of

many of our classes in the next few

weeks. Per Centers for Disease Control

and Prevention guidelines, we will

require participants to fill out paperwork

with their contact information

in case there is a need for our Health

Department to do contact tracing.

Classes will be limited and registration

will be required. Unfortunately

we will be unable to accommodate

drop-in visitors at this time. You will

need to be given an appointment in

order to attend.

We know this has been a very difficult

time for so many and we will

be adding programs and services

as quickly, but most importantly, as

safely as possible. Please feel free to

call us at any time at 978-531-2254 for

more information.

Carol McMahon is the Peabody

Council on Aging administrative

assistant.

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GENERAL

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Superintendent of Schools

Weekly News: May 13, 20, 2021

MEETING NOTICE

TOWN OF LYNNFIELD

Lynnfield School Committee

SCHOOL CHOICE HEARING

Tuesday, May 25, 2021

6:00 PM

The Al Merritt Media and Cultural Center

600 Market Street

Citizens of the community

are invited to attend this

Public Hearing.

Catch up with your

favorite team

in Item Sports!

“Helpful tips”

for a S-M-O-O-T-H

trouble-free move!

Designate a drawer for

essentials such as

sheets and towels for

quick access the first

night you move into

your new home.

Plan a garage/yard

sale before you move.

Fresh coffee, baking

soda, or charcoal in a

sock, placed inside

your refrigerator will

keep the inside smelling

fresh and clean.

Pack your current

phone book — it’s a

quick easy reference to

the folks back home.

Place pictures in

boxes between sheets

or blankets to give

them extra protection.


MAY 13, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 15

Cavalry Church pitches in to help

PHOTOS | Spenser Hasak

Veronica Lewis of Wakefield prepares sweet potatoes to be passed out to waiting motorists.

Tom Salvi of Lynn bags up food as he volunteers during the

Good Hope, Inc., food distribution at Calvary Christian

Church in Lynnfield.

The multi-purpose room at Calvary Christian Church was filled with supplies of food to distribute to people in need.

Victoria Lewis, left, and her mother, Veronica, both of Wakefield, gather fresh

produce to give out on distribution day.

Volunteers with Good Hope, Inc., hand out close to 12,000 pounds of food to

roughly 200 people during their weekly food assistance program.


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WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

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