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WEEKLY NEWS

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MAY 13, 2021 • VOL. 66, NO. 20 SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1957 16 PAGES • ONE DOLLAR

Luring families back to fishing

By Anne Marie Tobin

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Professional bass angler Gene Ellison gifts a Bass Pro Shops hat to Peabody Mayor

Edward A. Bettencourt Jr. at Crystal Lake last Friday.

PEABODY — The city

unveiled a new initiative designed

to introduce families

to an old-fashioned pastime

— fishing.

“Let’s Go Fishing at Crystal

Lake” will be held Saturday,

May 15 in recognition of the

National Park Trust’s 11th

Annual Kids to Parks Day,

which celebrates outdoor play.

“Kids to Parks asks communities

to develop creative ways

to get kids into the outdoors to

promote discovery of the many

fun things you can do outdoors,”

the city’s Recreation,

Parks and Forestry Director

Jennifer Davis said at a press

conference held last Friday at

the lake.

Power plant plan put on hold

By Anne Marie Tobin

PEABODY — The

Massachusetts Municipal

Wholesale Electric

Company (MMWEC) has

temporarily pulled the plug

on MMWEC’s Project

2015A plans to build a

peaking plant in Peabody.

MMWEC’s Board of

Directors authorized a 30-

day minimum pause in a

vote on Monday and is

also considering available

options to fulfill its participants’

required capacity

obligations under ISO New

England rules.

“It’s not any one group in

particular, but certainly the

noise the opposition has created

has reached all levels of

government,” said Peabody

Municipal Light Plant

(PMLP) Manager Charles

Orphanos. “The opposition

did a good job getting their

message out, which is basically

false claims of lack of

transparency. We did not get

the facts out there, which are

that at the time the project

was voted in January 2017,

we held multiple public

hearings to explain why this

project is necessary.

“It’s a shame that these

groups that have no connection

to Peabody are

spreading misinformation.”

MMWEC CEO Ron

DeCurzio noted that much

has changed in technology

since the project was first

proposed more than five

years ago making the need

for reassessment even more

necessary.

“We are thankful for the

significant input we have

FISHING, PAGE 3

received from interested

stakeholders, including the

elected and appointed leaders

of the Commonwealth and

from municipal officials,”

DeCurzio continued. “We

share the zeal expressed by

many members of the public

for embracing new technologies.

Driving toward the

best carbon-free technology,

while making sure it meets

reliability and affordability

standards for our communities

– that is in our DNA.”

POWER, PAGE 3

THOR JOURGENSEN

COMMENTARY

Mike Schulze’s

love for politics

a lasting legacy

I take pride in the political button collection

my wife and I (mostly her) have assembled.

We have a “Colin Powell for president

1996” button; a “King — Re-elect the governor”

button, a “McGovern/Shriver” and a

“Nixon/Agnew.”

Not bad, but our collection couldn’t hold

a candle to the one the late Mike Schulze

amassed. In 1990, Schulze estimated he

owned more than 5,000 political buttons

and a ton of other political memorabilia.

The Peabody resident, who died on

April 28 at the age of 76, was a political

junkie through and through who loved the

rough-and-tumble pace of politics in a democracy.

It’s easy to imagine Schulze at

the Constitutional Convention of 1787 or

making his way through the cigar smoke

and forests of signs that defined early 20th

century political conventions.

He was a veteran campaigner for former

U.S. Sen. John F. Kerry. He campaigned for

Democrat Gary Hart in 1984 and worked the

crowd at Democratic National Conventions.

Politics was in Schulze’s blood: His mother,

Priscilla, loved campaigning, and joined

him on the rollercoaster ride that defined

Hart’s ill-fated bid for the presidency.

SCHULZE, PAGE 2

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2

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

Mike Schulze’s love for politics is a lasting legacy

SCHULZE

FROM PAGE 1

Peabody politics is not for

the meek and mild, and Mike

Schulze knew how to play the

game. He also knew, as the

late Thomas P. “Tip” O’Neill,

former Speaker of the U.S.

House of Representatives, said,

that all politics is local.

For all the time he spent on

the national campaign trail in

the 1980s, he also dug into

local issues in Peabody, where

he was co-founder of the Save

Brooksby Farm Committee.

A 1965 Lynn English High

School graduate and Navy veteran,

Schulze won the Peabody

Democratic City Committee

chairmanship in 1990. He

mixed it up a year later with

Republican City Committee

Chairman Nick Nikitas who

committed the cardinal sin of

criticizing top local Democrats,

including the late state Sen.

Frederick Berry.

A Daily Evening Item story

quoted Nikitas as saying Berry

has “long ridden the coattails”

of former state Senate President

William Bulger.

Schulze doubled down

and compared Nikitas’ criticism

to former Massachusetts

Republican Party Executive

Director Alexander “Sandy”

Tennant’s brawling style.

His love for national politics

also made Schulze, like

Sam and Rick Vitali of Lynn,

an early supporter of President

Joseph R. Biden. In 1987, when

then-U.S. senator Biden ended

his presidential campaign,

Schulze took a dim view of the

media uproar over claims that

a speech Biden delivered contained

phrases used by British

politician Neil Kinnock without

attribution.

Once again, Schulze took a

shot at Republicans by pointing

out former President Ronald

Reagan’s penchant for quoting

Democrats.

“The average person couldn’t

care less about this stuff,” he

opined to a Daily Evening Item

reporter.

Schulze didn’t just campaign

for candidates — he became

one. He ran for the Ward 3 City

Council seat and for library

trustee, and he threw his hat

in the ring in 1994 for the 12th

Essex seat in the Massachusetts

House.

Like Lincoln, Schulze regarded

losing an election not

as an end point, but as a beginning

of his next adventure into

politics. He embraced political

campaigns for their proverbial

explosions and smoke, and he

talked issues when he ran for

office. He said, “I know what it

takes to get the job done,” and

he had the political knowledge

to back up those words.

In the true spirit of democracy,

Schulze opposed term limits for

politicians — a favorite campaign

theme for people making

their first, usually unsuccessful,

bid for public office.

“You get somebody in there

who does a good job, and then

take him out?” he said in his

trademark direct fashion.

Schulze simply loved politics.

He understood that it is

the process, not the personalities,

that count. The person

who stood up and publicly and

passionately made a case for

change counted for something

in Mike Schulze’s book.

We side with Peabody Ward

5 City Councilor Joel Saslaw’s

request to allow residents in

Huntingwood and other neighborhoods

to comment on

Northeast Arms’ plan to operate

a mobile gun range.

Northeast won city Zoning

Board of Appeals approval last

month to operate the range —

a trailer that can be towed to

police departments to use for

target practice — with conditions

including 50-foot and 100-

foot buffer zones around the

trailer when it is on Northeast’s

property.

Neighbors’ concerns, ranging

from traffic to noise to property

value depreciation, were not

reviewed during the Northeast

hearing because, as board Chair

Fran Gallugi pointed out, board

members were only responsible

Pre-Schoolers

Love

Opinion

A hair-trigger decision

for reviewing Northeast’s request

for a variance from buffer

zone dimension requirements.

That narrow jurisdictional

focus left neighbors and Saslaw

frustrated and wondering why

they weren’t told well before

the hearing that noise and other

concerns about the Northeast

proposal were not the board’s

responsibility.

Saslaw pointed out that

Northeast’s proposal has been

before the board for months,

adding that “people asked for information

a while ago.”

Saslaw told board members

there was no reason they could

not delay their vote until neighbors

had the opportunity to voice

their complaints to other city

officials, which would ensure

that concerns beyond the zoning

board’s jurisdiction received

review.

“There should be no rush

here,” Saslaw told the board.

But Gallugi and board

member Barry Osborne made

it clear during the hearing that

their support for Northeast’s

proposal went beyond buffer

zone compliance. Gallugi called

the mobile range “...something

we could benefit from in the

long run,” and Osborne warned

that not approving the proposal

was tantamount to discouraging

business on Route 1.

Peabody neighbors deserve

better than a one-and-done

hearing where their concerns are

not taken into consideration. We

urge the board to reconsider its

vote and delay it until residents’

concerns are addressed and

questions answered.

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PEABODY — The Peabody

Area Chamber of Commerce

and the city’s Health

Department teamed up for a

webinar last Wednesday to update

local businesses on issues

they are facing as the state continues

to relax its COVID-19

guidelines.

“Throughout the pandemic,

the Peabody Health Department

has worked closely with businesses

to help them implement

the statewide COVID protocols

necessary for them to operate

safely,” said Health Director

Sharon Cameron. “As the public

health data improves, many of

the restrictions are being modified.

We appreciate the opportunity

to partner with the PACC

and its members to answer any

questions businesses owners

have about the upcoming

phases of reopening.”

The event was free of charge.

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Cameron and Public Health

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MPH, provided updates on the

COVID vaccine, recently-announced

modifications to the

state’s COVID guidelines and

provided information about the

vaccination options available

for businesses to help get their

employees vaccinated.

Health Department partners

Christian Hassel and

Dan Hoffenberg of Atlantic

Ambulance also spoke about

vaccination and testing efforts.

In addition, Citizens Inn/

Haven from Hunger Executive

Director Corey Jackson spoke

about the increase in food insecurity

during the pandemic.

Other topics discussed during

the webinar included the “who,

what, and where” of vaccination

opportunities, how local

businesses can help their employees

navigate through the

vaccination process, the vaccination

ambassador program,

and side effects associated with

COVID-19, including compromised

mental health and food

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The program featured a question-and-answer

session.

For questions on future webinars

or additional information,

contact PACC Programs

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WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

City wants to lure families back to fishing

FISHING

FROM PAGE 1

“Years ago, our adventure

series included fishing, but it

was discontinued for unknown

reasons.”

Davis credited Bob Langley,

the city’s director of engineering

and an avid fisherman,

for coordinating the dredging of

Crystal Lake and restoration of

the area. She also acknowledged

the Recreation Department’s

outdoor education oordinator,

Maureen Sammon, for coming

up with the idea.

“Bob came to Maureen and

together they floated the idea,

and we all thought, ‘why not

bring that back to Peabody?’”

Davis said. “Fishing is a great

activity for not only kids, but

families, so we are excited to

bring it back.”

Instruction will be provided

by Langley’s son, Andrew

Langley, MassWildlife’s 2020

Freshwater Catch-and-Release

Angler of the Year and professional

bass angler Gene Ellison,

who has been dubbed “The

Fishing Machine.”

“Kids love to catch big fish,

but the reality is fishing is an

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Professional bass angler Gene “The Fishing Machine” Ellison of Lynnfield will co-teach “Let’s

Go Fishing at Crystal Lake” in Peabody on Saturday, which aims to introduce families to the

basics of fishing in the area.

activity for everyone in all

walks of life,” Ellison said. “It’s

not expensive so lower-income

families, single-mom families,

(and) men and women of all

ages can fish. With these programs,

not only do people learn

how to fish, it looks to connect

people with their kids. It’s

quality time for families even if

it’s only 20 to 30 minutes.”

Langley, a sophomore

studying biomedical engineering

at Tufts University,

agreed.

“My father taught me how to

fish when I was really young

and we go fishing together all

the time, at least twice a week,

and we also go to tournaments

together,” said Langley. “It’s an

activity that’s perfect for families

and gets kids away from

their computer screens.”

The Massachusetts Division

of Fisheries and Wildlife

(MassWildlife) will provide 50

rods and reels on loan for the

day, while Danvers-based Big

Daddy’s Bait ‘N’ Tackle will

donate bait. Bass Pro Shops,

Mercury Engines and the

Berkley Company will donate

hats, lures and fishing rods.

Jim Lagacy, an aquatic biologist

at MassWildlife, said adult

involvement is critical when it

comes to kids and fishing.

“We do about 100 of these

(events) a year and have learned

that you need a parent or adult

to help make fishing a lifelong

activity,” he said. “Kids don’t

become hockey players or anglers

on their own as an individual.

You need a parent.”

“This is such an exciting

program,” said Mayor Edward

A. Bettencourt Jr. “It’s great

knowing that we may be developing

a whole new group

of people who (will) discover

how much fun it is to come out

as a family and do some fishing

right in their own backyard.”

The program is limited to 25

residents. Parents are asked to

limit their child’s registration to

one session. The recommended

age is 9 to 14.

To register, or for additional

information about the program

or other events, go to

https://peabodyma.myrec.com/.

Session 1 will be held from

9-10:15 a.m., while Session 2

follows at 10:30-11:45 a.m.

Peaking power plant plan put on hold

POWER

FROM PAGE 1

The project has been under

development and public review

for more than three years

and has secured state permits.

Its proposed location is on the

site of PMLP’s Waters River

Station on Pulaski Street.

As proposed, Project 2015A

is a 55-megawatt capacity

plant to provide necessary capacity

for 14 nearby cities and

towns - including Peabody,

parts of Lynnfield and

Marblehead, during periods

of peak electricity demand.

Because it will be among the

newest and most efficient resources,

it will produce fewer

emissions than 94 percent of

the fossil fuel plants in New

England. Without this resource,

local utilities that are

required to have capacity

will continue to rely on older,

less efficient energy power

plants through the ISO-New

England markets. It will displace

carbon that would otherwise

be produced by higher-polluting

plants, resulting

in a net reduction in carbon

emissions.

“MMWEC is a proven leader

in carbon-free technology, and

we are proud that our members’

power portfolios have

some of the highest percentages

of renewable energy and

the lowest carbon emissions

in the Commonwealth,” said

DeCurzio, “In fact, most of the

Project 2015A participating

municipal light plants have

already exceeded the Baker

Administration’s 2030 carbon

reduction targets. We plan

to continue that leadership

in the next phase of energy

development.

“Can we find a way to develop

a needed capacity resource

that isn’t fossil fuel-fired

but still reliable in

times of need? It is worth

taking another look at whether

advancements in technology

make a different approach possible

today.”

Orphanos said PMLP has

already exceeded the state’s

2030 Roadmap goals and currently

is working on meeting

2040 goals. Since 2008, PMLP

has added only carbon-free

resources to its energy portfolio.

Within the last eight

months alone, PMLP, through

MMWEC, joined Hydro

Québec, a large public utility

using hydropower. PMLP is

also one of six municipal light

plants (MLPs) to participate in

Project 2020, a seven megawatt

(MW) solar photovoltaic

project to be built on the

MMWEC campus in Ludlow.

“We are continuing to build

our energy portfolio to meet

state goals and are constantly

looking for projects with zero

net emissions and the fact that

we’ve added these last two

speaks to that,” Orphanos said.

Over the course of the next

30 days, MMWEC will meet

with and seek input from stakeholders,

including regulators,

other Commonwealth officials,

the participating communities

and the larger community to

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consider alternatives and assess

their feasibility. The board

will regroup to discuss findings

at the end of the review period.

DeCurzio said that that while

MMWEC has fulfilled all the

required public notices and

applications for the project

and followed the same procedure

it did for advancing

other developments, including

Project 2020A - a proposed

seven-megawatt solar farm to

be built on MMWEC’s site in

Ludlow - the board determined

it would be prudent to evaluate

all of the concerns recently expressed

about the project.

Orphanos said the temporary

halt will allow PMLP and

the other communities committed

to Project 2015A to

create opportunities to educate

the public about the project

and dismiss mistruths that are

being spread by opponents.

“The opponents’ voice needs

to be truthful, so now it’s our

turn to set the facts and the

record straight so the public

knows this project is necessary,”

Orphanos said. “We

have always been above board

and will continue to be.”

Information about Project

2015A can be found at www.

project2015A.org.

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WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

Police Log

Monday, May 3

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 2:59 p.m. Monday on Summit

Street; at 7:01 a.m. Tuesday at 96

Washington St. and 2 Clement Ave.;

at 7:29 a.m. at 119 Tremont St. and

50 Mt Vernon St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle

breaking and entering at 11:15 a.m.

Monday at Mass Bay Movers at 58R

Pulaski St. A caller reported catalytic

converters were taken from several

trucks.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 1:23

p.m. Monday at Extended Stay

America at 200 Jubilee Drive. One

person was taken to Salem Hospital.

Theft

A cell phone was reported stolen

at 7:28 p.m. Monday at Stop & Shop

at 19 Howley St.

Tuesday, May 4

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 11:56 a.m. Tuesday at Walgreens

at 229 Andover St.; at 1:28 p.m.

Tuesday at 60 Andover St.

A report of a hit-and-run motor

vehicle crash at 4:52 p.m. Tuesday

at The Cheesecake Factory at 210C

PEABODY

WEEKLY NEWS

(USPS #66)

Telephone: (978) 532-5880 • Fax: (978) 532-4250

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903

News and Advertising Offices: 110 Munroe St., Lynn, MA 01901

Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

www.weeklynews.net

Editor: Thor Jourgensen tjourgensen@essexmediagroup.com

Reporter: Anne Marie Tobin atobin@essexmediagroup.com

Sports Editor: Mike Alongi malongi@essexmediagroup.com

Advertising Reps: Ralph Mitchell rmitchell@essexmediagroup.com

Patricia Whalen pwhalen@essexmediagroup.com

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Local Subscription Rate: $20 per year (52 issues) • Single Copy: $1.00

Deadlines: News: Monday, noon; Display Ads: Monday, noon;

Classified Ads: Monday, noon;

No cancellations accepted after deadline.

The Peabody Weekly News is published 52 times per year on Thursday by Essex

Media Group, Inc. No issue is printed during the week of Christmas. The Peabody

Weekly News is delivered via US Mail to homes in Peabody. It is also available

in several locations throughout Peabody. The Peabody Weekly News will not be

responsible for typographical or other errors in advertisements, but will reprint that

part of an advertisement in which a typographical error occurs if notified immediately.

Advertisers must notify the Peabody Weekly News of any errors in advertisements

on the FIRST day of insertion. The publisher reserves the right to reject,

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Andover St.

One person was taken to Beverly

Hospital after a motor vehicle

crash was reported at 8:46 a.m.

Wednesday at Outback Steakhouse,

300 Andover St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 5:28

p.m. Tuesday at 119 Foster St. An

officer reported the disturbance

was from kids playing and running

around.

Wednesday, May 5

Theft

A report of a larceny at 9:10 a.m.

Wednesday at 14 North Apts/7200

Building on Crane Brook Way. A

contractor reported about 400 feet

of copper was stolen. The material

was worth about $1,400.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 9:08 a.m.

Wednesday at Symphony Park on

Symphony Road. An employee from

the Park Department reported the

field was damaged. Police reported

an unknown person drove on the

grass and left tire marks.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 2:42 p.m. Wednesday at

16 Tanners Court; at 6:10 p.m.

Wednesday at Gaeta’s Shell &

Citgo at 14 Newbury St.; at 9:31

p.m. Wednesday at Peabody Shell

at 85 Lynnfield St.; A report of a

hit-and-run motor vehicle crash at

Holiday Inn at 1 Newbury St.

Complaints

A caller reported a large sinkhole

was forming and causing a traffic

hazard at 4:16 p.m. Wednesday at 4

Gardner St.

Thursday, May 6

Arrests

Shawnakay Tamika Young, 24, of

138 Euclid Ave., Apt. 138, Lynn, was

arrested and charged with shoplifting

by concealing merchandise

and disorderly conduct at 6:17 p.m.

Thursday.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 4:24 p.m.

Thursday at La Siesta at 3 Main St. A

caller reported a customer skipped

out on their bar tab.

Complaint

A report of a disturbance at 2:27

a.m. Thursday at 10 May St. A caller

reported there were people in his

home and that they were starting

a fire. Police reported the couch

was extinguished after a person

left burning marijuana on it before

going to sleep.

A report of a suspicious motor vehicle

at 12:35 p.m. Thursday at the

Police Department at 6 Allens Lane.

An officer reported an unknown

person was in the back lot. The officer

spoke with the man, who was

following a fishing app and trying

to fish in the pond behind the police

station. He left without incident.

Complaints

A report of gunshots at 5:04

p.m. Thursday at Emerson Park on

Perkins Street. A caller reported

hearing a single gunshot near the

park. An officer reported a baseball

game was taking place in the park.

At 5:20 p.m. Thursday, a caller

reported witnessing a man exhibiting

lewd behavior outside of North

Shore Childcare at 17 Washington

St.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 1:26 p.m. Thursday at Town

Variety at 116 Central St.; at 1:57

p.m. Thursday at Lahey Medical

Center at 1 Essex Center Drive; at

4:37 p.m. Thursday at Route 128

North and 208 Andover St.; at 5:35

p.m. Thursday at 145 Summit St. at

4:15 a.m. Thursday at 294 Forest

St.; at 1:26 p.m. Thursday at Town

Variety at 116 Central St. A car reportedly

crashed into a tree at 1:34

p.m. Thursday at 2 Goodale St. and

567 Lowell St.

A vehicle was reported to be on

fire after a motor vehicle crash at

4:15 p.m. Thursday at Forest Street

and Route 128 North. State Police

handled the crash and both vehicles

were towed.

Friday, May 7

Arrest

Amos F. Cutter III, 49, of 1

Mooney Ave., Salem, was arrested

and charged with OUI-liquor, failure

to stop/yield, and failure to stop for

police at 9:01 p.m. Friday.

Accidents

At 7:41 a.m. Friday at 107 Lowell

St.; at 9:02 a.m. Friday at Sugar

Cane Restaurant at 106 Main St.

A caller reported a pedestrian was

hit by a motor vehicle at 2:56 p.m.

Friday at Brown School, 150 Lynn

St. The person declined medical

attention.

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 3:23 p.m. Friday at 47 Lake

Shore Road; at 6:53 p.m. Friday at

Santander Bank at 300 Andover St.

A report of a crash between two

police cruisers at 5:04 p.m. Friday at

Beth El Cemetery at 506 Lowell St.

Both vehicles had minor scratches.

A report of a hit-and-run motor

vehicle crash at 9:35 p.m. Friday

at Manziel, Inc. at 96 Foster St. An

officer spoke with the owner of the

suspect vehicle, who reported she

had run home to grab a pen and

was returning to the scene to leave

a note. Police confirmed a note was

left.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 12

a.m. Friday at Lahey Medical Center

at 1 Essex Center Drive. Lahey

Security reported a man in the north

parking lot was laying on the horn

inside a silver Jeep and exhibiting

erratic behavior. Police reported

all was in order; the man was just

leaving work and was excited.

A report of suspicious activity at

3:36 a.m. Friday at 20 Harris St. A

caller thought she saw people on

her trampoline. Police didn’t find

anyone in the yard.

A report of a neighborhood dispute

at 7:02 p.m. Friday at Mobile

Estates at 286 Newbury St. A caller

reported his neighbor was banging

on his door and challenging him to a

fight. Vincent Serrentino, 59, of 286

Newbury St., Apt. 161, was summoned

for threatening to commit a

crime and assault.

A report of suspicious activity at

11:51 p.m. Friday at 38 Keys Drive.

A caller reported two males, in their

teens or 20s, were using flashlights

to look into vehicles in the back of

the complex. An officer reported a

group of kids was playing manhunt.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 10:34

a.m. Friday at 8 Oak St. A caller

reported the front door was damaged.

Police reported the door was

smashed.

Assaults

A report of an assault at 6:49 p.m.

Friday at 9 Roycroft Road. A caller

reported her 8-year-old neighbor

threw a piece of wood at her on

Thursday. She said there have

been past incidents with the same

neighbor.

Saturday, May 8

Arrests

Zachary David Ramos, 26, of 286

Newbury St., Apt. 151, was arrested

and charged with domestic assault

and battery, assault and battery with

a dangerous weapon, strangulation

or suffocation, malicious destruction

of property, and larceny under

$1,200 at 12:52 p.m. Saturday.

Jefrey M. Abreu-Nunez, 25, of 50

Hollingsworth St., Apt. 2, Lynn, was

arrested and charged with speeding,

failure to stop/yield, and on a warrant

at 2:12 a.m. Monday.

Accidents

At 9:58 a.m. Saturday on Church

Street; at 12:59 p.m. Saturday at

163 Washington St. and 124 Foster

St.; at 3:45 p.m. Saturday at Bagel

World Bakery & Deli at 10 Sylvan

St.; at 10:29 p.m. Saturday at 3

Violet Road. A hit-and-run motor

vehicle crash was reported at 6:08

p.m. Saturday at Stop & Shop at 19

Howley St.

Adolfo Mendez, 34, of 20 N

Franklin St., Lynn, was issued a

summons after a minor motor

vehicle crash at Gaeta’s Shell &

Citgo, 14 Newbury St., at 6:16 p.m.

Saturday.

A car into a building was reported

at 6:44 p.m. Saturday at The

Container Store at 210C Andover St.

The store was closed after the crash,

but the building inspector deemed

there was no structural damage.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle

breaking and entering at 8:38 a.m.

Saturday at 24 Tracey St. A caller

reported his car was broken into

overnight.

Complaint

A report of a disturbance at 9:22

a.m. Saturday at 96 Washington St.

and 2 Clement Ave. A caller reported

he saw a man throwing rocks at his

girlfriend’s car. An officer reported

the person was frustrated over car

troubles.

Sunday, May 9

Accidents

At 9:25 a.m. Sunday at 137

Lowell St. and 91 Endicott St.; at

4:51 p.m. Sunday at Nordstrom at

210N Andover St.;

Monday, May 11

Accidents

At 6:53 a.m. Monday at Peabody

Housing Authority at 75 Central St.;

at 12:33 a.m. Monday at the Cabaret

Lounge at 96 Newbury St.

A report of a hit-and-run motor

vehicle crash at 8:34 a.m. Monday

at 36 Paleologos St. A caller reported

she saw a vehicle strike

her neighbor’s car. She confronted

the woman, who said she did not

care and drove away. Jacquelin

Hernandez-Degenao, of 11 Harrison

Ave., Salem, was issued a summons

for leaving the scene of a motor vehicle

crash with property damage.


MAY 13, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 5

Religious News

All Saints Episcopal Church of

the North Shore

Good morning and thank you!

All Saints Episcopal Church of the

North Shore in Danvers has in-person

worship, as well as Zoom opportunities

on Sunday mornings

and throughout the week. Our

webpage is https://allsaintsepiscopalnorthshore.org/,

and we are

also on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

In-person Worship

Join us for our modified service

of the Holy Eucharist at 8:30 Sunday

mornings, with COVID-19

safety protocols in place. Advanced

registration is required (call

the church at 978-774-1150).

Outreach

Join us on the 3rd Sunday of

each month as we prepare 40-50

bagged lunches for the food insecure

in Peabody. Contact the

church office (978-774-1150) if

you would like to donate food or

help prepare the lunches.

We also have the following

Zoom services and fellowship opportunities:

Worship on Sundays at 10 a.m.

https://zoom.us/j/134596872

Meeting ID: 134 596 872

Phone: 929-205-6099

Coffee hour on Tuesdays at 10

a.m.

https://zoom.us/j/201985541

Meeting ID: 201 985 541

Phone: + 1 929 205 6099

Carol McMahon

For the Weekly News

PEABODY — In tough times,

communities find strength in people

— and people find strength

in their communities. In the

past year, we’ve seen this time

and again in Peabody as friends,

neighbors, and businesses have

found new ways to support each

other.

In our community, older adults

are a key source of this strength.

Through their experiences, successes,

and difficulties, they have

built resilience that helps them to

face new challenges.

When communities tap into

this, they become stronger too.

Each May, the Administration

for Community Living leads the

celebration of Older Americans

Month (OAM). This year’s theme

is Communities of Strength, recognizing

the important role older

Frank Time Discussion on the

second Wednesdays of each month

at 5:15 pm

https://us02web.zoom.

us/j/85499949543

Meeting ID: 854 9994 9543

Phone: +1 929 205 6099

Morning Prayer on Fridays at

8:30 a.m.

https://zoom.us/j/96760775904

Meeting ID: 967 6077 5904

Phone: +1 929 205 6099 US

Perfect Paws Pet Ministry, the

third Sunday of each month at 5

p.m.

https://zoom.us/

j/990855545?pwd=YVN4bzFhO-

EpLZkY3Y1dxQkt2OTJMdz09

Meeting ID: 990 855 545

Password: Saintfranc

Parish office: Call 978-774-

1150 or email allstoffice@gmail.

com

Peace,

Michelle Behling, Parish Administrator

--

Michelle Behling, Parish Administrator

All Saints Episcopal Church of

the North Shore

46 Cherry Street

Danvers, MA 01923

978-774-1150 / allstoffice@

gmail.com

adults play in fostering the connection

and engagement that build

strong, resilient communities.

Strength is built and shown not

only by bold acts, but also small

ones of day-to-day life — a conversation

shared with a friend,

working in the garden, trying a

new recipe, or taking time for

a cup of tea on a busy day. And

when we share these activities

with others — even virtually or

by telling about the experience

later — we help them build resilience

too.

This year, the Peabody Senior

Center will celebrate Older

Americans Month by encouraging

community members to share

their experiences. Together, we

can find strength — and create a

stronger future.

Here are some ways to share

and connect:

Look for joy in the everyday:

Celebrate small moments and ordinary

pleasures by taking time to

Carmelite Chapel

Carmelite Chapel in the Northshore

Mall

Holy Mass:

Monday through Friday: Noon

and 3 p.m.

Saturday: Noon, 4 and 5:30

p.m.

Sunday: Noon

Confession:

Monday through Friday

11-11:45 a.m. and 2-2:45 p.m.

Saturday

11-11:45 a.m. and 2:45-3:45

p.m.

Gift Shop

Open Monday through Saturday:

11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Phone: 978-531-8340

Congregation Tifereth Israel

Due to Covid-19 restrictions,

we are currently holding our Shabbat

services monthly on Zoom.

The next service is scheduled for

Friday, May 14, and the link is sent

out via email to our members and

by request to info@ctipeabody.

org. Updated information can also

be found at our website: www.ctipeabody.org

or by calling 978-531-

8135. President, Elliot Hershoff/

Soloist, Joanne Pressman.

North Shore Baptist Church

706 Lowell St., W. Peabody

Sharing God’s Truth for Life’s

Transitions

Small Group Worship & Bible

Study (in-person) - 10:30 a.m.

Sundays. For info, prayer or help,

recognize them. Start a gratitude

journal and share it with others

via social media, or call a friend or

family member to share a happy

moment or to say thank you.

Reach out to neighbors: Even

if you can’t get together in person

right now, you can still connect

with your neighbors. Leave a

small gift on their doorstep, offer

to help with outdoor chores, or deliver

a home-cooked meal.

Build new skills: Learning

something new allows us to practice

overcoming challenges. Take

an art course online or try a socially

distanced outdoor movement

class to enjoy learning with others

in your community. Have a skill

to share? Find an opportunity to

teach someone, even casually.

Share your story: There’s a reason

storytelling is a time-honored

activity. Hearing how others experience

the world helps us grow.

Interviewing family, friends, and

neighbors can open up new conversations

and strengthen our connections.

When people of different ages,

backgrounds, abilities, and talents

share experiences — through action,

story, or service — we help

build strong communities. And

that’s something to celebrate!

The Peabody Council on Aging

recently purchased a tent and

is awaiting its arrival. We plan to

schedule outdoor classes such as

line dancing, Zumba and some

chair yoga under the new tent.

We are also planning to have

some classes meet on-site as well.

We will gradually work toward

opening up some areas of

the senior center and eventually

will offer lunch here again. Until

then, we have decided to continue

our frozen meals program. At

the present time, our large dining

room and stage area is being used

as a vaccination site, which will

continue over the next several

months.

contact us at 978-535-6186

or office@northshorebaptistchurch.org.

St. Clare of Assisi

(non-Roman)

Our Parish family welcomes

everyone. We are not here to condemn,

criticize, or judge you. Rather,

we want to offer our love, our

support, and our prayers for you.

Your presence is an important part

of our celebration of the Mass and

when you are not here, you are

missed!

The Rev. Fr. Mike Otero-Otero,

O.S.F.

978-804-2250

www.stclarepeabody.org

Holy Mass: Saturdays at 3 p.m.

St. Clare Mission (feeding the

hungry)

Saturdays at 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Mission Outreach Services

(Homelessness Outreach)

Call Jill at 267-481-5725.

Al-Anon Meetings

Find us at:

https://alanonma.org/.

St. John Lutheran Church

Worship: 9:30 a.m., Sunday,

in-person and on Zoom

Bible Study: 11 a.m.

22 Ellsworth, Peabody

Website: https://stjohnpeabody.

org

Church phone: 978-531-1731

Pastor: The Rev. Charles N.

Stevenson

Email: stjohnpastor@earthlink.net

For the Zoom link, please email

the pastor.

Temple Ner Tamid

Service Times

Sunday to Thursday: 7 p.m.

Friday: 8 p.m.

Saturday: 9:30 a.m.

Holidays as published.

Join Us Online.

Services and all other programs

are being held virtually

using Zoom, Facebook and

YouTube

Rabbi Richard Perlman

Associate Rabbi Bernie

Horowitz

Visit our website

www.templenertamid.org

Contact office

978-532-1293

office@templenertamid.org

368 Lowell St.

Peabody, MA

Temple Tiferet Shalom

Services and all other programs

are being held virtually via Zoom

and StreamSpot.

Services Friday evenings at

7:30 p.m. and Saturday mornings

at 9:30 a.m.

Rabbi David Kudan

Music Director Bryna Toder

Tabasky

Prayer Leader Gary Gillette

489 Lowell St.

Peabody, MA

978-535-2100

www.templetiferetshalom.org

Seniors

There’s plenty to do in May at the Senior Center

Staff members will be in contact

with the teachers and participants

of many of our classes in

the next few weeks. Per Centers

for Disease Control and Prevention

guidelines, we will require

participants to fill out paperwork

with their contact information in

case there is a need for our Health

Department to do contact tracing.

Classes will be limited and registration

will be required. Unfortunately

we will be unable to accommodate

drop-in visitors at this

time. You will need to be given an

appointment in order to attend.

We know this has been a very

difficult time for so many and we

will be adding programs and services

as quickly, but most importantly,

as safely as possible. Please

feel free to call us at any time at

978-531-2254 for more information.

Carol McMahon is the Peabody

Council on Aging administrative

assistant.


6

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past issues?

Find them on

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than 300 words.

PEABODY, FORMERLY OF LYNN

- Robert E. Douglas 98, beloved

husband of over sixty-nine years to

the late Priscilla M. (LeCain) Douglas,

died Sunday, May 9, 2021 at

home surrounded by his family.

Born in Dundalk, MD, he was the

son of the late Hazen and Helen

Brown (Halse) Douglas. He graduated

from Peabody High School,

class of 1940. After completing

his service in the Army as a Sergeant

in WWII he continued his education

earning a Master of Education

from Salem State Teachers

College, class of 1954.

Mr. Douglas had been employed

for thirty-five years in the

Business Department at

Lynn English High School

as a bookkeeping and

accounting teacher where

he was loved and admired

by all of his students, until

the time of his retirement

in 1990.

A long-time resident of South

Peabody, he faithfully attended

Austin Square Baptist Church in

Lynn for the past seventeen years

and he was a former member of

the Second Congregational Church

in Peabody. He was a loving father,

grandfather, great-grandfather,

friend and neighbor who will be

missed by all who knew him. He

found great joy in celebrating holidays,

especially Christmas with his

family, summers around his pool

and sitting on the front porch with

his wife visiting with his wonderful

neighbors.

Surviving him are two daughters,

Jean Trueira and her husband,

Brian and Leslie Grayton and her

husband, Rob all of Peabody, four

grandchildren, Michael and Cory

Fletcher and Leigh Anne and Philip

Trueira, six great grandchildren,

a sister-in-law, Evalyn Douglas of

Peabody and many nieces and

Thank you

for your compassion.

Your teamwork. Your dedication.

As we mark National Skilled Nursing Care Week®, we thank you – our team. The past

year has been unlike any other, and through it all, you’ve been there, and continue to

be there, when our residents need you most.

We’re Perfecting the Art of Superior Care.

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

Obituaries

Robert E. Douglas, 98

1923 - 2021

nephews. He was also the

father of the late Barbara

Douglas Tsoukalas and

brother of the late Malcolm

and Bruce Douglas.

Service Information:

His funeral service will

be held at the Austin Square

Baptist Church, 10 Keslar Ave.,

Lynn on Thursday, May 13, 2021

at 10:00 a.m. Relatives and

friends are invited to attend.

Visiting hours at the Conway

Cahill-Brodeur Funeral Home,

82 Lynn St., Peabody, Wedensday

from 5 to 7 p.m. Burial in

the Cedar Grove Cemetery, Peabody.

All attendees are required

to wear a mask and adhere to

social distancing guidelines. In

lieu of flowers, contributions

may be made in his memory to

Austin Square Baptist Church

or to My Brother’s Table, 98 Willow

St, Lynn, MA 01901 For directions

and online guestbook,

please visit www.ccbfuneral.

com.

96 Forest Street • Peabody, MA 01960

978-532-0303

www.pilgrimrehab.org

Betty L. Bratt, 95

1926 - 2021

CHARLOTTESVILLE - Betty L.

Bratt passed away peacefully on

May 5, 2021 at 95 years young.

Betty had been living with her

daughter, Donna, and son-in-law,

Dan Sawyer, in Scottsville, Va.

for the last seven years since the

passing of her husband, Albert V.

Bratt, Jr.

Originally from Lafayette, Ind.,

she also resided in Lynnfield,

Mass. for several years while raising

her family. Upon retirement,

she and Al wintered in Cannon

Creek Airpark in Lake City, Fla., and

summered in Center Harbor, N.H.

Betty is survived by her two

sisters, Linda Colby and Patricia

Hann, both of Lafayette, Ind., and

is predeceased by her two brothers,

Marion L. Smith and Russell

F. Smith. She also leaves her five

children, Paula Prucknicki, Steven

Bratt, Donna Sawyer, Carol Crowley,

and Teresa Stapleton.

Betty was grandmother to 12

grandchildren: Clinton, Blake (deceased),

Clifford, Michael, Danny,

Chris, Kaitlin, Keith, Taylor, Emily,

Olivia, and Katherine. She also

had 8 great -grandchildren.

Betty was a devoted and caring

mother and wonderful with

her grandchildren and greatgrandchildren

alike. She was the

“Nanny B” that all children should

have. She will be deeply missed by

her family, extended family, and all

that knew her.

There will be a memorial service

held this summer in Center Harbor,

N.H., where she will be laid to rest

with her husband, Al. A date has

not yet been set.

In lieu of flowers, donations may

be made to the Breast Cancer Research

Foundation, the American

Heart Association, or the National

Library Service for the Blind and

Vision Impaired.

Condolences may be left for the

family at www.hillandwood.com.

Barbara (Butler) Stone, 87

1934 - 2021

LYNNFIELD - Barbara (Butler)

Stone, formerly of Lynnfield

passed away surrounded by her

loving family after a long battle

with Alzheimer’s Disease. She was

87.

Beloved wife of the late Robert

J.W. Stone with whom she shared

25 years of marriage. Devoted

mother of Karen Stone Talwar

of New York, NY, Jacqueline Comeau

and her husband David of

Lynnfield, and Meredith Stone of

Middleton. Loving sister of the

late Rosemary Rudolph. Cherished

grandmother of Mackenzie

and Cameron Comeau. She felt

strongly about the importance of

volunteering. Giving of her time to

the League of Women Voters and

The Home for Little Wanderers.

She was also an avid golfer.

She was a loving mother, mother-in-law,

grandmother, and loyal

friend. Family was always her

first priority. She especially loved

traveling the world with family and

friends. She had a warm smile, a

big heart and kind word for everyone

she met. Barbara always saw

the good in people; and everyone

loved her.

Relatives and friends are invited

to visiting hours at Robinson

Funeral Home, 809 Main St.,

Melrose on Tuesday, May 11 from

4-7pm and again on Wednesday

at First United Methodist

Church, 645 Main St, Melrose for

her Funeral Service celebrated at

10am. All attendees are required

to wear masks, maintain social

distancing, pay their respects, and

exit the Funeral Home promptly to

allow other guests to enter. A limited

number of guests will be allowed

in the building at one time.

Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery,

Lynnfield. Gifts in Barbara’s memory

may be made to the Alzheimer’s

Association MA/NH Chapter,

309 Waverley Oaks Rd, Waltham,

MA. 02452. For online tribute and

directions, visit RobinsonFuneral-

Home.com.


MAY 13, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 7

HOW THEY DO IT

Rent Control Board a little bored

By Steve Krause

PEABODY — The Rent

Control Board is scheduled to

have a meeting next Wednesday,

May 19. That's provided there's

anything to discuss. If there's

not, there won't be one.

That's life on the board these

days. There just isn't much to

talk about. Their jurisdiction extends

only to mobile home parks

and, even with those, there are

further exclusions. The board

does not have jurisdiction over

co-ops, for example, which

are lots where the tenants have

banded together to buy the property

outright.

Still, says Chairman Ted

Neary, there are six parks in the

city that operate the old-fashioned

way. And the board has

control over those.

"Usually, you buy the mobile

home," says Neary, who is

a computer technician, "and you

rent the space the home is on —

the pad — from the owner of the

park."

There are some residents,

Neary says, who have been in

the regular units for more than

40 years. Some of them are

elderly, and they see mobile

homes as being more affordable,

even if they have to pay rent on

the land.

Still, there are times that the

COURTESY PHOTO | TED NEARY

Rent Control Board Chair Ted Neary said the board’s jurisdiction covers six local mobile home parks.

board has to spring into action.

Just not many.

"I wouldn't say we're the busiest

group around," Neary says.

There are actually only two

areas where the board gets involved,

but they are both significant,

Neary said. The first is

evictions. And even then, all the

board can do is approve a park

owner's petition to take the case

to land court.

"There could be several reasons

for eviction," he said, "one

of obviously non-payment of

rent. Also, if you are a nuisance,

make a lot of noise, or put other

people in danger."

The second issue the board

judges can be a little trickier,

Neary says. It involves adjustments

on rent. These adjustments

can be based on a number

of factors, from repairs to the

property to inflation.

"If there's a water main break,

for example, and fixing it runs

the property owner into a lot of

Keeping the faith, virtually

By Steve Krause

PEABODY — Five years into

the merger of synagogues in Peabody

and Malden, Temple Tiferet

Shalom of the North Shore is

dealing with constraints placed on

institutions of worship due to the

COVID-19 virus — as a result, it

has gone virtual.

The synagogue, located on 489

Lowell St., Peabody, is offering

services and all other programs,

both on Friday evenings (7:30)

and Saturday mornings (9:30) via

Zoom and StreamSpot, until further

notice. Those who wish can

follow along with song and prayer

by using the Mishkan T'Filah for

Shabbat prayer book.

Temple Tiferet Shalom may

be located in Peabody, but its

reach extends much further. Six

and a half years ago, on Oct. 20,

2015, meetings between the Temple

Beth Shalom in Peabody and

Temple Tifereth Israel in Malden

resulted in the consolidation of the

two congregations.​

A second vote, this one taken

in Malden, authorized the sale of

the building, with the proceeds

from this sale going toward the

"Temple Tifereth Israel Building

Fund for Temple Tiferet Shalom."

The temple offers several

programs, including preschool

for toddlers, Pre-K, kindergarten

readiness, toddler playgroup and

summer camp.

It offers extensive religious education,

where students learn Hebrew

reading, lessons from the Torah,

the history of Israel, Judaism

appreciation and Jewish values.

"Our goal is to prepare our students

to be knowledgeable, charitable,

and proud members of our

faith," said Tracy Cranson, via the

temple's website.

In addition, the temple offers

several areas of Torah study and

several different adult education

programs from speaker series to

social action programming, and

even a movie series.

Rabbi David B. Kudan, a graduate

of Hampshire College, holds

graduate degrees from Hebrew

Union College and Harvard University.

He was ordained in 1987.

He served congregations in the

New York, Boston and Chicago

areas prior to coming to Peabody.

He was also Rabbi-in-Residence

at the Memorial Church at Harvard.

Rabbi Kudan is a member of

the outreach faculty of the Union

of Reform Judaism, and in this capacity

holds “introduction to Judaism”

courses in local synagogues.

He is frequently invited to local

synagogues and churches to

lecture and teach on scholarly topics

within his fields of specialization,

including the ancient Jewish

lore of angels and the Dead Sea

Scrolls.

Rabbi Kudan has pursued

graduate work in Aramaic, Ethiopic,

and Hebrew Bible at New

York University and at Harvard,

and is completing his Ph.D. at

Harvard University in the Department

of Near Eastern Languages

and Literatures in the field of Second

Temple Judaism.

He recently presented aspects

of his dissertation research on the

liturgical patterns in the Book of I

Enoch, at the Society of Biblical

Literature Conference in Washington,

D.C.

Financial planning is

more important than ever…

• Detailed Life Planning

• Education Plans

• Longevity Planning

• Legacy & Estate Planning

• Investment Management

money, the owner has the right

to petition the board to adjust

the maximum rent so he can

spread the cost among the tenants

there."

But, says Neary, it's not always

that cut and dried.

"If there's a post that has electrical

meters on it, and that post

is not properly maintained, then

it can be tricky," he said, adding

that the onus is not always on the

tenant in these situations.

"Then, there is a hearings officer

who will take the evidence

from the owners, and he'll either

come up with a price or deny the

request, based on whatever the

evidence is."

Neary stressed that even

though the rent on mobile home

property isn't anywhere near as

exorbitant as that of prime real

estate, it's all relative.

"A lot of the people who

live there are retirees on fixed

incomes," he said. "It may not

seem like a lot, but to them it is."

• Retirement Planning

• Long Term Care Planning

• Life Insurance

• Sustainable investing

• Charitable Giving

ANTONIO SORDILLO, CFP®, CRPC®, CPFA

Vice President, Investments

antonio.sordillo@raymondjames.com

20 Burlington Mall Road, Suite 130 // Burlington, MA 01803

781.313.8403 // evergreenfinpartners.com

© 2021 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC. 21-BRNAO-0003 TA 1/21

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net


8

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

Taking the lead for a safe summer

By Anne Marie Tobin

PEABODY — The city has

taken a lead position on a regional

campaign to rally residents

and businesses toward widespread

vaccination, ensuring a

responsible reopening of local

economies this summer.

“Getting vaccinated against

COVID is the fastest way to

end this pandemic once and for

all,” said Mayor Edward A. Bettencourt

Jr. of Peabody, the lead

municipality of the Safe Summer

campaign.

“Balanced with smart public

health guidance and policy, we

can have a summer on the North

Shore that we missed out on last

year — coming back together

at our restaurants for live music

and the in-person activities that

bring us joy."

The coalition includes 10

North Shore communities:

Beverly, Danvers, Gloucester,

Hamilton, Marblehead, Nahant,

Newburyport, Peabody, Salem

and Swampscott. It aims to provide

consistent and clear public

health guidance regarding vaccination

and COVID-safe behaviors

throughout the region.

Swampscott Town Administrator

Sean Fitzgerald said

that well over 50 percent of

Swampscott residents are fully

vaccinated, but his concern is

reaching those "pockets of risk"

in areas where vaccination has

been slow.

"We all want to get back to

community and be able to enjoy

summer on the North Shore," he

said. "This is one of the greatest

spots in the world in summer,

but if you can't get a chop suey

sandwich at Salem Willows or

walk down Lynn (Shore) Drive,

that's not summer. By broadening

the scope of vaccinations, we

can get back to normal so much

sooner."

Marblehead Public Health

Director Andrew Petty said a regional

approach is the best way

to get everyone vaccinated.

"We've been working with

other communities all along to

get people vaccinated," he said.

"It's not a one-community issue.

What's good for us is good for

everyone."

Petty said approximately

10,000 of Marblehead's 19,306

residents are fully vaccinated

with another 3,492 partially vaccinated.

Salem Mayor Kimberley

Driscoll, who chairs the coalition,

agreed.

"We need a regional approach

to public health education and

community building, to ensure

that every resident who wants

a vaccine can get one, and that

those who are unsure about vaccination

are provided with accurate

information to make the

best possible decision for themselves,

their families, and their

community," she said.

The Safe Summer 10-week

campaign includes partnerships

with local businesses to encourage

responsible reopening

through vaccination. The coalition

plans to implement an aggressive

social media, print and

public space marketing campaign

to motivate residents to

get vaccinated so they can safely

return to their favorite summer

activities.

A partnership with Mass

General Brigham’s Community

Messenger program has been established

to provide multilingual

vaccination information. Materials

will be distributed to local

healthcare providers, houses of

worship, nonprofit organizations

and other service providers.

New ambassador programs

in Peabody and Salem will pay

residents to conduct vaccination

outreach in neighborhoods that

have been disproportionately

impacted by the virus.

As of May 6, 46 percent of

residents in the coalition's 10

communities have been fully

vaccinated, while 60 percent

have received one dose. The

coalition will track community

vaccination progress weekly to

identify and respond to areas

with the greatest need.

Peabody Health Director

Sharon Cameron said the coalition

will also be looking for

important input from businesses,

adding that "we will be speaking

to businesses about ways they

can help us promote the benefits

of vaccination to our residents."

Coalition spokesperson

Emilee Regan said the program

is being funded through a repurposed

grant that was received

prior to the pandemic.

"Grant funding for the campaign

was originally provided

to the 10 communities by the

Department of Public Health in

2020 to support a shared visiting-nurses

program for new

mothers," Regan said. "The pandemic

prevented that program

from moving forward, and the

local boards of health chose to

reallocate the funding to ensure

more robust outreach and communications

that will encourage

vaccine uptake and COVID-safe

behaviors in the spring of 2021."

"Sharon (Cameron) is a rock

star," said Fitzgerald, who was

the chief of staff for former Peabody

Mayor Michael Bonfati. "I

remember interviewing her with

the mayor when she was hired.

She was a star then.

"There are a lot of bright

lights on the North Shore and

she likes to fly under the radar,

but her ability to lead — at a

time when the position has never

been this important — has been

brilliant."

Cipoletta rejoins

J Barrett & Company

BEVERLY — J Barrett &

Company is pleased to announce

that Realtor Joseph Cipoletta has

re-joined the agency in the Cummings

Center office.

A real estate industry veteran

for more than 10 years, Cipoletta

is a well-respected real estate

professional with an enviable

track record of helping clients

buy and sell property throughout

the North Shore.

“The bottom line — no pun

intended — is that successful

real estate transactions are a collaborative

effort among buyers,

sellers and agents,” he said. “By

working together, we can ensure

that everyone feels good about

the outcome.”

A Boston native who grew up

in the North End, Cipoletta has

lived in Salem since 2009 and

is also the music director for St.

Paul’s Parish in Hamilton-Wenham.

His wife, Jessica, a research

project manager at Boston Children’s

Hospital, is also on the

faculty at Mass. College of Pharmacy

and Health Sciences. Their

son, Sebastian, a recent addition

to the family, makes sure that

life is hectic.

“Change is the norm in real

estate and that also applies to

agents who want to explore

other opportunities,” says Jon

Gray, J Barrett president. “As a

company, we recognize and value

ability, knowledge and dedication,

so when an agent with

Joe’s abilities decides that we

are the best option, we are happy

to have him on our team again.”

Established in January 2007,

J Barrett & Company is a service-oriented

company that has

quickly become the premier

privately-owned real estate firm

on the North Shore. The company

serves the North Shore and

Cape Ann areas from offices in

Beverly, Gloucester, Ipswich,

Manchester, Marblehead, and in

Prides Crossing.

COURTESY PHOTO | J BARRETT

Realtor Joseph Cipoletta, who has lived in Salem since 2009, is

rejoining the team at J Barrett and Company.

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Looking for past issues?

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MAY 13, 2021

Fenwick student

loves change

PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

Bishop Fenwick senior Elani Gikas is the Student of the Week.

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 9

BY ALLYSHA DUNNIGAN

PEABODY — Elani Gikas, a

senior at Bishop Fenwick High

School, said she did her best to

make the most of her final year

in high school, given it took

place during a pandemic.

Gikas was the captain of her

soccer team, where she played

defense, but said she wanted to

try some new things her senior

year.

With the pandemic altering

the normal high school sports

schedule, Gikas maintained

her fall soccer schedule, but

decided to try cheerleading in

the “fall two” season. (This

past year in high school, sports

consisted of a “fall one” season,

followed by the usual winter

sports, then a “fall two” season

where football and cheerleading

took place.)

“I’ve never had the opportunity

before to even try cheerleading,”

she said. “But I like

trying new things.”

After the “fall two” season,

Gikas decided to spend the end

of her senior year trying lacrosse.

She said her co-captains

for soccer joked that she should

play lacrosse with them so she

decided to go for it.

After trying two sports that

she had never played before,

Gikas said she loved cheerleading

and lacrosse and wished

she had tried them sooner.

In addition to sports, Gikas

stays active as the student

council president, where she

focuses on planning school

events. This year, Gikas said

they are allowed to host a prom

outside under a tent — with

masks required — so, although

her classes are over, she is still

going to school every Thursday

to plan the senior prom.

Gikas has also spent time as a

peer mentor where she worked

with four to five freshmen

providing tours and support

as they transition into a new

school. At the beginning of the

school year, Gikas said the peer

mentors would host meetings

with their assigned freshmen,

and were encouraged to stay

involved with them through

group chats and check-ins.

Next year, Gikas will be

STUDENT OF

THE WEEK

continuing her soccer career

at Saint Michael’s College in

Vermont. She is planning on

majoring in business and said

that, as of now, she would like

to work in business development

like her father.

Saint Michael’s is about a

three-hour drive from her home

in Peabody, but Gikas said she

is not worried about the distance;

she’s looking forward

to college and to meeting new

people who she hopes will become

some of her best friends.

“I embrace change and try to

look on the bright side of it,”

she said. “That’s why I’m really

excited for college.”

St. John’s Prep

third quarter

honor roll

DANVERS — St. John’s

Prep recently announced the

names of students who earned

academic honors for the third

quarter of the 2020–2021

school year. Students who qualified

for the Headmaster’s List

earned grades of A- or above in

all courses, students who qualified

for the Principal’s List

earned grades of B+ or above

in all courses, and students who

qualified for the Honor Roll

earned grades of B or above in

all courses.

The following Peabody students

were named to the academic

honors list for the third

quarter listed with the names

and graduation year.

Headmaster’s List

Tirenioluwa Asenuga ‘24

Travis Broadbent ‘23

Carson Browne ‘23

Thomas Desmond ‘24

Nicholas Fursey ‘21

Tyler Gomes ‘25

Nicholas Gregory ‘24

Carmen Ilardi ‘22

Nico Ilardi ‘24

Joseph Isidro ‘24

Christian Kaminski ‘24

Patrick Kaminski ‘26

Terence Lee ‘24

Eugene Mantilla ‘21

Robert Shea ‘22

Christopher Shea ‘24

Christopher Tsaparlis ‘21

Dimitrios Vamvouklis ‘22

Yianni Vamvouklis ‘24

Principal’s List

Jack Castrichini ‘23

Ryan Dacy ‘21

Stephen Ditchfield ‘22

Shane Isaac ‘22

Neil Isaac ‘21

Thomas Ligh ‘21

Seth Mootafian ‘25

Mark Patturelli ‘22

Christopher Winters ‘21

Honor Roll

Colby Broadbent ‘25

John Droggitis ‘24

Patrick Hosman ‘21

Aaron Kelly ‘21

Steven Lafferty ‘21

Cullen Pasterick ‘27

Aaron Saporito ‘21

Zachary Saporito ‘24

Ryan Saslaw ‘23

Justin Saslaw ‘21

St. Mary’s High School

Term 3 honor roll

LYNN — St. Mary’s High

School announces its honor

roll and principal’s list for the

third quarter of the 2020-21 academic

year.

Honor roll students must

achieve an 85 or above in all of

their classes. Students earning

principal’s list status must

achieve 90 or above in all of

their classes.

The following students from

Peabody, listed along with their

graduation class year, have

achieved these honors:

Honor Roll

Ryan Gil ’27

Christopher Grossmann Jr.

’27

Gianna Korsianos ’23

Kelly Lovett ’23

Kellyn Preira ’23

Maddox Romero ’23

Krystana Manthorne ’22

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Kevin Espino ’21

Shannon Lovett ’21

Principal’s List

Brianna Porras ’27

Kylie Kennison ’24

John Kolokithas ’24

Haylie Grossman ’23

Tara Powers ’23

Elizabeth Fitch ’22

Meghan Lovett ’22

Brianna Skory ’22


10

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

Sports

FILE PHOTO | OWEN O’ROURKE

Peabody’s Jordyn Collins played a strong defensive game in a

win over Beverly Monday afternoon.

Tanners girls lacrosse

opens season with

big win over Beverly

GIRLS LACROSSE

By Mike Alongi

The Peabody girls lacrosse

team opened up its 2021

season in style Monday afternoon,

rolling to a 16-2 victory

over Beverly in a Northeastern

Conference matchup on the

road at Memorial Field in

Beverly.

Hailee Lomasney led the

way with 11 points in the

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win while Amber Kiricoples

was not far behind with eight

points. McKayla Fisher added

five points and Hailey Baker

had three.

Jordyn Collins, Sophie Izzo,

Emily McDonough and Elise

Staunton all played well defensively.

Olivia Lavalle had 10

saves in net.

Peabody (1-0) has a big

matchup against a strong

team in NEC foe Swampscott

Thursday afternoon (4).

FILE PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Abby Bettencourt went 2-for-3 with a double, two RBI and two runs scored in a win over

Gloucester Saturday afternoon.

Bettencourts pace Peabody

in win over NEC foe Danvers

SOFTBALL

By Mike Alongi

The Peabody softball team

continued its strong start to

the season over the weekend,

notching a 6-1 victory over

Northeastern Conference foe

Danvers in a battle at Kiley

Brothers School Saturday.

The Bettencourts were key

contributors to the victory,

with Abby Bettencourt going

2-for-3 with a double, two RBI

and two runs scored and Isabel

Bettencourt going 1-for-3 with

one RBI.

Gina Terrazzano and Penny

Spack (2-for-3) each added an

RBI in the win, while Emma

Bloom went 2-for-3 with a

double and two runs scored and

Logan Lomasney went 2-for-3

with one stolen base and one

run scored.

Avery Greico had a big day

on both sides of the field,

earning the win in the pitcher’s

circle and going 1-for-3

at the plate. Greico shined in

the circle, tossing a complete

game and allowing one run on

four hits with three walks and

11 strikeouts.

Peabody (2-0) hosts NEC foe

Beverly Friday afternoon (4).

FRIDAY

The Peabody softball team

got a solid pitching performance

from Abby Bettencourt

and came through with some

timely hitting to earn a 4-0 win

over Northeastern Conference

foe Gloucester on the road at

Gloucester High School Friday

afternoon.

Bettencourt, a freshman,

shined in her Tanners debut on

the mound. She tossed a complete-game

shutout, allowing

just three hits with two walks

and nine strikeouts.

On the offensive side of

things, Isabel Bettencourt went

1-for-3 with an RBI triple and

Abby Bettencourt added an

RBI on a sacrifice fly. Kiley

Doolin went 2-for-3 in the

win, while Avery Greico went

1-for-2 with a stolen base and

two runs scored. Emma Bloom

went 1-for-4.

The Tanners didn’t waste

any time getting on the board,

putting a runner on base in the

top of the first before Isabel

Bettencourt smashed a RBI

triple with two outs to make it

1-0.

After cruising through the

first two innings on the mound,

Abby Bettencourt helped her

own cause in the top of the

third when she knocked in

Greico with an RBI sacrifice

fly to make it 2-0 Tanners.

Peabody was able to add two

more runs in the fifth inning

thanks to some solid baserunning,

and Abby Bettencourt

took over on the mound from

there to earn the Tanners their

first win of the year.


MAY 13, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 11

Fenwick can’t shake off the

rust in loss to St. Mary’s

BASEBALL

By Mike Alongi

LYNN — The last time the

St. Mary’s baseball team was

on the field — an astounding

682 days ago — the Spartans

were hoisting the Division 2

state championship trophy.

On Thursday afternoon, the

Spartans were celebrating

again after notching a 9-0 win

over rival Bishop Fenwick in a

Catholic Central League bout

at Fraser Field.

“We really just wanted to

get started again, and it was a

great day to get it going,” said

St. Mary’s coach Derek Dana.

“The guys were excited, they

came out and played well and

they were ready to go.”

Junior pitcher Aiven Cabral

was the star of the day for

the Spartans, allowing only

two hits in six innings of

work while walking none and

striking out 10.

“Aiven picked up right

where he left off his freshman

year, except now he’s two years

older and stronger,” said Dana.

“He’s a kid who just works at it

relentlessly, and he’s a baseball

player through and through.

His hard work is really paying

off.”

Tommy Falasca came in to

pitch the final inning, allowing

no runs on one hit with one

walk.

Cabral also contributed to

the win on the offensive end,

going 2-for-3 with two RBI.

Deniel Ortiz (0-for-4) also

had two RBI in the win, while

Colby Magliozzi (2-for-2) and

John Nowicki (0-for-2) each

had one RBI.

But the Spartans also took

advantage of their opportunities

to score without hits,

employing heady baserunning

to take extra bases and push

across a few extra runs.

“The guys were where they

were supposed to be and they

hustled all game long,” said

Dana. “We work on things like

sacrifice flies and taking extra

bases in practice, so to see us

capitalize like that in the first

game is a positive.”

For Fenwick, the problem

was pitching and poor defense.

The Crusaders hit five batters

and walked five more in

the loss, and errors across the

board turned into seven unearned

runs.

“I guess you’ve just got to

chalk it up to not having been

out on the field in two years,”

said Fenwick coach Russell

Steeves. “There’s no excuse

for all the hit batters and the

walks, we just have to pitch

better. You’re not going to win

many games when you give up

seven unearned runs.”

The Spartans didn’t waste

any time in this one, jumping

ahead with three runs in the

bottom of the first thanks to a

RBI single from Cabral, a RBI

sacrifice fly from Ortiz and a

RBI walk from Nowicki. That

lead was extended to 7-0 in

the second inning, with Ortiz

knocking in his second run

of the game and St. Mary’s

scoring three runs via baserunning.

An RBI single from

Magliozzi in the bottom of the

third and an RBI single from

Cabral in the bottom of the

fifth rounded out the scoring

for the Spartans.

“We’ve just got to move on

from this one and find a way

to pitch better,” said Steeves.

“Only two of our kids have

seen a varsity pitch in the past

two years, so we’re going to try

to build on this and be better.”

SATURDAY

Bishop Fenwick 10,

Matignon 0

The Crusaders notched their

first win of the season behind

a strong offensive performance

and a combined effort on the

mound.

Alex Gonzalez and Mike

Faragi each went 2-for-3 with

two RBI in the win, while

Tucker Destino went 1-for-3

with two RBI and two stolen

bases. Scott Emerson, Chrisitan

Loescher, Dan Reddick and

Anthony Marino each had one

RBI.

It was a team effort on the

mound for the Crusaders, as

Brandon Bloom earned the

win on the mound after just

two innings pitched. Loescher,

Emerson and Marino each

pitched one inning of scoreless

relief to help seal the shutout

win.

MONDAY

Austin Prep 4,

Bishop Fenwick 1

Despite Brandon Bloom

tossing five no-hit innings

on Monday, the Crusaders

couldn’t hold on against their

CCL rival.

Scott Emerson and Tucker

Destino were the only two

Crusaders to register hits,

while Anthony Marino took the

loss on the mound.

Fenwick (1-2) travels to

Danvers Saturday (1).

Fenwick track sweeps rival St. Mary’s

By Mike Alongi

The Bishop Fenwick track

team earned a pair of solid victories

on its home track Saturday

afternoon, taking down rival St.

Mary’s at Donaldson Stadium.

The boys team won 85-46,

while the girls team won 90-30.

On the boys side, Fenwick

got two wins from Matt Juneau,

who took first in the discus

(99-10) and the shot put (36-9).

Other winners for the Crusaders

were Aidan Dwyer in the triple

jump (35-5 1/2), Angel Martinez

in the 100 (12.3), Ethan Tran in

the 200 (23.6), Colby Browne in

the 400 (54.8), Matt Gerdenich

in the 800 (2:11.2) and Wyatt

Burr in the two-mile (11:22.5).

Fenwick (1-0) runs against

St. Joseph’s Prep Saturday (10).

For the girls, the Crusaders

had three double-winners in

the victory, with Julia Loescher

winning the discus (98-8) and

the javelin (88-8), Breanna

Benoit winning the 100 (13.7)

and the 200 (28.6) and Eliza

Powers winning the 100 hurdles

(18.6) and the high jump (4-6).

Other winners for Fenwick

were Kailey Silva in the 400

hurdles (1:26), Zoe Elwell in

the shot put (23-2), Catherine

Carter in the 400 (1:07.7) and

Keiry Paniagua in the long

jump (13-7).

Fenwick (1-0) runs against

St. Joseph’s Prep Saturday (10).

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULE

THURSDAY

Baseball

Lynnfield at Rockport (6:30)

Lynnfield at Triton (3:45)

Boys Lacrosse

Swampscott at Peabody (4)

Triton at Lynnfield (3:45)

Girls Lacrosse

Peabody at Swampscott (4)

FRIDAY

Baseball

Swampscott at Peabody (7)

Softball

Lynnfield at Hamilton-Wenham (3:45)

Beverly at Peabody (4)

Boys Tennis

Rockport at Lynnfield (3:30)

Girls Tennis

Lynnfield at Rockport (3:30)

Cardinal Spellman at Bishop Fenwick (3:30)

Peabody at Winthrop (4)

SATURDAY

Baseball

Hamilton-Wenham at Lynnfield (10)

Bishop Fenwick at Danvers (1)

Boys Lacrosse

Bishop Fenwick at Peabody (7)

Track

Arlington Catholic, St. Joseph’s Prep at Bishop

Fenwick (10)

SUNDAY

Baseball

Bishop Fenwick at Swampscott (12)

MONDAY

Baseball

Bishop Fenwick at Matignon (4)

Softball

Newburyport at Lynnfield (3:45)

Matignon at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Matignon at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Masconomet at Peabody (4)

Girls Lacrosse

Bishop Fenwick at Matignon (4)

Peabody at Masconomet (4)

Boys Tennis

Lynnfield at Hamilton-Wenham (3:30)

St. Joseph’s Prep at Bishop Fenwick (3:30)

Girls Tennis

Hamilton-Wenham at Lynnfield (3:30)

Bishop Fenwick at St. Joseph’s Prep (3:30)

Salem at Peabody (4)

TUESDAY

Baseball

Lynnfield at Newburyport (3:45)

Boys Lacrosse

Hamilton-Wenham at Lynnfield (3:45)

Girls Lacrosse

Lynnfield at Hamilton-Wenham (4)

Track

Bishop Fenwick at Austin Prep (TBD)

WEDNESDAY

Baseball

Cardinal Spellman at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Peabody at Winthrop (4)

Softball

Lynnfield at Pentucket (3:45)

Peabody at Marblehead (4)

Bishop Fenwick at Cardinal Spellman (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Bishop Fenwick at Cardinal Spellman (4)

Girls Lacrosse

Cardinal Spellman at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Boys Tennis

Newburyport at Lynnfield (3:30)

Bishop Fenwick at Matignon (3:30)

Girls Tennis

Lynnfield at Newburyport (3:30)

Matignon at Bishop Fenwick (3:30)

Masconomet at Peabody (4)

Track

Marblehead at Peabody (4)

FILE PHOTO | OWEN O’ROURKE

Jenna Durkin scored one goal in Bishop Fenwick’s win over

Matignon Friday.

Bishop Fenwick opens

with win over Matignon

GIRLS LACROSSE

By Mike Alongi

The Bishop Fenwick girls

lacrosse team kicked off its

season with a big win on Friday,

taking down Matignon by a

score of 17-4.

Karina Gyllenhaal led the offensive

outburst with six goals

and two assists, while Brynn

Bertucci had two goals and

two assists. Mia Tsaparlis had

two goals and one assist, while

Jenna Durkin scored one goal.


12

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

Bishop Fenwick opens season against St. Mary’s

PHOTOS | Julia Hopkins

Bishop Fenwick’s Alex Gonzalez pitches during last Thursday’s season opener that ended with a St. Mary’s win.

St. Mary’s Lucas Fritz reaches out to catch the ball to get

Bishop Fenwick’s Christian Loescher out.

Bishop Fenwick catcher Chris Faraca throws during last Thurday’s St. Mary’s win over Fenwick.

St. Mary’s Andrew Luciano slides home to score.


MAY 13, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 13

A look back at Peabody history

PHOTOS | Julia Hopkins

An old article from the Daily Evening Item that dates to 1944 depicts the “greatest crowd in the history of schoolboy football” for a matchup between Peabody

and Salem at Manning Bowl. The article is included in the “Play Ball: A History of Sports in Peabody” exhibit in the Osborn-Slanta House of Peabody

Historical Society.

A variety of schedules, tags, and other memorabilia related to

Peabody High School baseball team is part of the “Play Ball: A

History of Sports in Peabody” exhibit.

A historic drawing that depicts Peabody Town Hall is part of

the archive at the Peabody Historical Society.

Coach Joe Pechinsky, long-time leader and mentor of the Tanner City Fencers Club at Peabody

High School, is celebrated in the “Play Ball: A History of Sports in Peabody” exhibit.


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PEABODY CITY COUNCIL

LEGAL AD

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Peabody, will conduct a

public hearing on THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 27, 2021, at 7:30 P.M., in the

Frank L. Wiggin Auditorium, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA, and remotely via

Zoom, on the application from LSF PEABODY, LLC D/B/A LEGAL SEA FOODS,

210 Andover Street, Peabody, MA requesting a transfer of an ENTERTAINMENT

LICENSE FOR NON-LIVE ENTERTAINMENT at said 210 ANDOVER STREET,

Peabody, MA. Non-live entertainment will consist of televisions and and

background music.

For remote participation using the Zoom platform, please visit

www.peabody-ma.gov under "City Calendar" on the home page or contact the City

Clerk's office. Zoom information will not be available until the Friday before the

meeting.

Weekly News: May 13, 2021

PEABODY CITY COUNCIL

COUNCILLOR MARK J. O'NEILL

CITY COUNCIL PRESIDENT

Allyson M. Danforth

City Clerk

Notice is hereby given by Four Star

Service Inc. 134 Newbury St. Rear Unit

R.U.B. Peabody, Ma 01960 that on

Friday May 28, 2021 at 11a.m., a sale

will be conducted for the following

vehicles to satisfy the garage lien,

thereon for the storage, towing

charges, care and expenses of notice

& sale of said vehicle:

2014 Chrysler 200

VIN: 1C3CCBBG3EN113871

Reg: N/A

Owner: Richard Ferrier

78 Central Ave Unit 308

Lynn MA 01901

2009 Nissan Altima

VIN: 1N4BL21E09N530125

Reg: 4022564 NH

Owner: Debra Farmer

10 Circlefield Dr

Nashua NH 03062

2009 Cadillac Escalade

VIN: 1GYFK43519R218941

Reg: 4387076 NH

Owner: Kevonte Evans

19 Washington Way

Durham NH 03824

2008 Buick Lucerne

VIN: 1G4HE57Y270189214

Reg: 4676674 NH

Owner: Karen Plante

10 Chapel St #4

Newmarket NH 03857

Weekly News: May 13, 20 and 27,

2021

Have an

announcement

to share?

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts

City of Peabody

The owner or occupants of the following described parcels of land situated in the

City of Peabody, in the County of Essex and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts,

and the public, are hereby notified that the taxes, thereon, severally assessed for

the years(s) hereinafter specified, according to the list committed to me as the

Collector of Taxes for the City of Peabody by the Board of Assessors of said city,

remain unpaid, and that said parcels of land will be taken for the City of Peabody

on May 28, 2021, at 10 a.m. for the principal and interest, if any, with all legal

costs and charges thereon unless the same shall be previously discharged, all

plans referred to are on file in the Assessor's Office.

Christopher Morfis, City Collector

Fiscal 2020

CURRERI FRANKLYN L

18,552 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 51 BIRCH ST Parcel 008-158

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-34741 Page-417 2020 000698-00

Tax assessed $4,218.67, Balance due $5,072.35

PALOMO FERNANDO

20,181 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 78 RUSSELL ST Parcel 009-096

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-6187 Page-132 2020 000832-00

Tax assessed $4,419.34, Balance due $2,684.92

ORLANDO MICHAEL J & JUDY

15,002 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 18 MADISON AVE Parcel 015-082

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-7734 Page-302 2020 001411-00

Tax assessed $6,992.34, Balance due $4,988.00

ARRUDA JANICE L

20,652 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 62 PERLEY AVE Parcel 021-004

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-36852 Page-321 2020 002012-00

Tax assessed $9,259.08, Balance due $3,630.47

KARAVOLAS LOUIS J TR

ELM HIGH REALTY TRUST

6,116 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 29 ABINGTON AVE Parcel 053-010

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-6430 Page-149 2020 005399-00

Tax assessed $6,267.45, Balance due $6,692.58

PINTO FABIO & BERTA TRS

PINTO-BOWDITCH REALTY TRUST

Subsequent Owner PINTO MARIA TRUSTEE

4,979 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 18 BOWDITCH ST Parcel 064-224

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-39126 Page-563 2020 007141-00

Tax assessed $10,697.67, Balance due $3,238.92

KARAVOLAS ANGELA TRUSTEE

ELIAS REALTY TRUST

13,482 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 90 CENTRAL ST Parcel 075-091

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-17596 Page-107 2020 009096-00

Tax assessed $4,976.72, Balance due $766.08

KARAVOLAS ANGELA TRUSTEE

ELM HIGH II REALTY TRUST

3,463 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 92 CENTRAL ST Parcel 075-092

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-17596 Page-127 2020 009097-00

Tax assessed $5,439.64, Balance due $2,209.11

MCDONALD HAROLD & HELEN

3,642 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 2 DAVIS TER Parcel 076-304

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-4301 Page-127 2020 009753-00

Tax assessed $4,810.93, Balance due $1,330.54

SULESKI JOAN DOROTHY

Subsequent Owner MORRISSEY JOAN

of improvements situated

at 7 PARK ST 8 Parcel 085-507

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-34550 Page-440 2020 010632-00

Tax assessed $1,894.06, Balance due $2,367.80

KARAVOLAS ANGELA TRUSTEE

FOUR-K REALTY TRUST

5,001 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 2 DANE ST Parcel 094-103

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-17596 Page-117 2020 011268-00

Tax assessed $5,213.97, Balance due $1,137.54

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Contact

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FLORAMO STEFANIE

4,500 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 14 JOHNSON AVE Parcel 102-134

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-35732 Page-171 2020 013334-00

Tax assessed $4,161.17, Balance due $3,056.71

MCCARTHY KERI L & KRISTEN M

MCCARTHY COLLEEN E

5,101 Sq.Ft. of land with improvements situated

at 7 EMERSON AVE Parcel 109-378

Registry of Deeds Deed Book-36608 Page-447 2020 015158-00

Tax assessed $4,828.25, Balance due $5,790.83

Weekly News: may 13, 2021

Phone us: 781-593-7700

Email us: classified@itemlive.com

Find us online:


MAY 13, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 15

Shop like a Queen at Black Box Theater

PHOTOS | Julia Hopkins

Lily Reed, age 6, points out the cake-pop she wants to her grandmother Kristen Reed at Bella &

Harvey, one of many businesses featuring their wares.

Karisma Geneva Jackson-Tae is the star of the day at the “Shop

like a Queen” event at Peabody Black Box Theater.

Painter Susan Dodge offers a variety of paintings, prints, mugs, and even beach towels with her

artwork during a showcase of local businesses and artists.

Artist and craft leader Pasquale Minichillo Jr. decorates Mason

jars at the craft tables at the “Shop Like a Queen” event at

Peabody Black Box Theater.

Kerri Hodgdon and Dee Sabelli, right, choose gifts from April Reed’s One Crafty Motha at the

“Shop like a Queen” event at Peabody Black Box Theater.


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WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 13, 2021

*ON MARKET*

COMING SOON

COMING IN JUNE

COMING THIS MONTH

26 EDGEMERE ROAD, LYNNFIELD 32 HERITAGE LANE, LYNNFIELD 37 BENEVENTO CIRCLE, W. PEABODY 36 EAST STREET, MIDDLETON

COMING SOON

COMING THIS SUMMER

COMING NEXT WEEK

COMING IN JUNE

405 MAIN STREET, LYNNFIELD 7 HOMESTEAD ROAD, LYNNFIELD 4 GERRY ROAD, LYNNFIELD

56 JORDAN AVENUE, WAKEFIELD

Stephanie

Macfarland

Marjorie

Youngren

Ellen

Crawford

Rachelle

DaSilva

UNDER AGREEMENT OVER ASKING

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UNDER AGREEMENT OVER ASKING

UNDER AGREEMENT OVER ASKING

19 CRESSY STREET, BEVERLY 4 RAVENWOOD ROAD, PEABODY 8 WASELCHUK DRIVE, PEABODY 27 NORTH STREET, WILMINGTON

UNDER AGREEMENT OVER ASKING

UNDER AGREEMENT

OVER ASKING

CONTINGENT

UNDER AGREEMENT

55 PILLINGS POND ROAD, LYNNFIELD 9 PARK STREET, U2, DANVERS 45 WILDEWOOD DRIVE, LYNNFIELD 527 SALEM STREET U12, LYNNFIELD

UNDER AGREEMENT UNDER AGREEMENT UNDER AGREEMENT UNDER AGREEMENT

69 FOUNDRY STREET, U509, WAKEFIELD 6 LAWRENCE ROAD, BOXFORD 10 WEDGEWOOD AVENUE, BILLERICA 114 DAVIS ROAD, BEDFORD

UNDER AGREEMENT UNDER AGREEMENT UNDER AGREEMENT

UNDER AGREEMENT

17 ROBERT DRIVE, ANDOVER 101-103 KING STREET, U103, READING 10 POMEWORTH STREET, UB, STONEHAM

1629 COMMONWEALTH AVE, U9, BOSTON

Marjorie.Youngren@raveis.com 781-580-9357

www.MarjorieSells.com

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