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MAY 27, 2021 • VOL. 60, NO. 21

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Hopes and promises on parade

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By Anne MArie ToBin

LYNNFIELD — The

COVID-19 pandemic presented

unprecedented challenges to

students, but the recent Parade

of Destinations offered a chance

to celebrate bright futures for

high-school graduates.

“It’s great to see everyone

here today to show their support

for the graduating seniors,”

Assistant Principal Brian Bates

said. “These kids have really

never complained throughout

the last year and a half. We’ve

always stressed kindness, which

has been so important in getting

to where we are today.”

Principal Bob Cleary gave

credit to students, families and

the community for helping to

make the best of a bad situation.

PARADE, PAGE 3

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Lynnfield High School seniors take part in the Parade of Destinations on Saturday,

celebrating where they are attending school next year.

Middle School hosting

student vaccination clinic

By Anne MArie ToBin

LYNNFIELD — The town,

in partnership with Walthambased

Pelmeds Community

Pharmacy, is hosting a

COVID-19 vaccination clinic

for Lynnfield students ages 12

and up on Thursday, May 27

at the middle school.

“There will be enough

doses for everyone who

needs one or wants one,”

said Emergency Management

Team (EMT) School Liaison

Toni Rebelo, RN, MSN.

“This is all just recommended

and is not required. We just

want to make it available to

those people who want it.”

The news was revealed

during an EMT video update

addressing Gov. Charlie

Baker’s May 17 announcement

that Massachusetts

would end most COVID-19

restrictions by May 29 and

lift the state of emergency on

June 15. The new advisory

ends the mandatory mask and

social-distancing mandates

for vaccinated individuals in

most settings. Some industries

— including health care,

schools and transportation

— must continue to require

individuals to wear masks regardless

of vaccination status.

Rebelo said an email with

a link containing information

about the clinic has been sent

to school families and staff.

The clinic is open to all residents

regardless of where they

attend school.

Town Administrator Rob

Dolan said that, while vaccinations

are not mandatory, it

is extremely important that

residents get vaccinated.

“We are encouraging all

to get vaccinated and cannot

stress how important that is,”

he said. “There are sites available

everywhere if you want

to get a dose very quickly. We

say this as it’s an issue as to

how we protect each other.”

Mattingly

wins music

scholarship

For The Weekly neWs

NEWBURYPORT — The Newburyport

Choral Society (NCS) is proud to award

the 2021 Betty Gillette Scholarship to

Finnian (Finn) Mattingly of Lynnfield.

Named for founding NCS member

Betty Gillette, who sang with the chorus

from 1934 to 2009, the $1,000 scholarship

is presented each year to a local high

school senior who plans to major in music

at the collegiate level.

“Thank you to NCS and the scholarship

committee,” said Mattingly, upon hearing

the news. “I am honored and grateful to

pursue music at the collegiate level and

eventually as a career.”

NCS Music Director Ryan Turner was

quick to remark on this year’s scholarship

winner: “Finnian possesses an impressive

combination of scholarship, humanity and

passion that is inspiring and brings hope

to the future of classical music, and I look

forward to watching his work unfold.”

Currently a senior at Lynnfield High

School, Mattingly performs in a number

of vocal groups, including the Concert

Choir and Men’s Chorus, as well as the

advanced Chamber Singers group.

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2

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

St. John’s Prep graduates 258

By Anne MArie ToBin

DANVERS — St. John’s

Preparatory School held its

111th Commencement exercises

last Saturday morning.

Headmaster Edward P.

Hardiman, Ph.D. conferred

diplomas upon 258 graduates

during an outdoor, socially-distanced

ceremony held on

Cronin Memorial Stadium’s

Glatz Field.

“There are no appropriate

words that could aptly capture

what each person in this stadium

has experienced since 2:45 pm

on March 12 of 2020 (due to

the Commonwealth’s state of

emergency declaration),” said

Dr. Hardiman, adding that the

class was the first since 1948 to

include students who started as

seventh graders.

“It would be foolhardy to attempt

to summarize this experience

given that each of you has

endured this public health crisis

in different ways, with different

challenges and different outcomes,”

Dr. Hardiman said.

“While you each have different

gifts, talents and experiences,

you have made connections,

built bridges and overcome obstacles,

and you’ve done it beyond

just the last 435 days.

CLINIC

FROM PAGE 1

Dolan added that the town’s

60-and-up population is almost

fully vaccinated. He also

pointed out the impact that

the relaxation of capacity restrictions

will have on local

businesses.

“No more capacity limits on

outdoor gatherings and being

MATTINGLY

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“It’s been an honor and a

privilege to learn with you

and from you throughout your

time here. Keep building, keep

dreaming, keep adapting, keep

learning and always remember

that you never walk alone. We

are always with you.”

Michael Maddison of

Lynnfield was the class

valedictorian.

In his address, Maddison

urged his classmates “to have

the courage to be yourself.”

He reflected on his belief that

all new graduates need to open

their hearts and their minds.

“Who we all are is a mysterious

mixture of the passions we

choose and the identities we are

born with,” said Maddison, who

graduated St. John’s with a 4.73

GPA and will attend Dartmouth

College.

“In my experience, many passions

… are generally accepted.

Identities are a bit trickier, since

some identities are less accepted

than others. We are multifaceted,

but we are also completely in

love with the things that make

up our personalities. I leave you

all with this: Make use of (life’s)

moments — big and small —

with everyone. Our diversity is a

gift. Inclusivity is how we celebrate

it.”

able to have 100 percent capacity

for business is big,” he

said. “With no more limits on

seating capacity, that will certainly

help our MarketStreet

and other restaurants through

the summer.”

For a second straight year,

the town’s Memorial Day observance

will be virtual, but

Dolan expressed optimism on

the prospect of the community

being able to celebrate Veterans

Equally as significant, he has

demonstrated a passion for musical

composition that quickly

caught the attention of his high

school choral director.

“I could instantly see his

knowledge of music was more

advanced than any of my students

in the areas of music

theory and composition,” said

Douglas Hodgkins, director of

choral activities at Lynnfield

High School. “It was not until

our first coffee house, a night

of small ensemble and solo performances,

that everyone saw

where his true passion lies.”

“He performed an original

composition with a violinist that

showed his ability and vision

and left the audience wanting

more.”

Since 2019, Mattingly

has also been attending the

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Fifty-two percent of the graduates

were members of the

National Honor Society, while

nine earned commendation as

National Merit Scholars. A remarkable

37 Eagles student

athletes signed national letters

of intent to continue their sports

careers in college.

This year’s seniors represented

44 cities and towns

across the Commonwealth, including

as far south as Brighton,

as far west as Westford, and

as far north as Newburyport.

There were seven international

students.

Family was a prominent

theme, as there were 28 legacy

graduates and many others with

familial connections.

“My son, Jack, graduated

here in 2017, my son, Thomas,

received his diploma today,

and my nephew will graduate

next year,” said Brenda Ligh

of Peabody. “This has been a

tremendously difficult time for

so many more people than just

those in this school community,

but having an opportunity

to come together and share in

these graduates’ experience

as they close one chapter and

begin another is something that

I think we all cherish, especially

because there was no guarantee

Middle School hosting student vaccination clinic

Day with a traditional, inperson

program.

“Obviously this year we are

going to have a virtual parade

on Memorial Day, but that

might change for Veterans Day

in the fall,” he said.

Rebelo said she’s excited

about the way the governor’s

announcement will impact the

daily routines of students.

“These are big changes for

our schools. Everything is going

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Lynnfield’s Ethan Diranian receives his diploma during St.

John’s Prep graduation last Saturday.

in such an amazing direction

for the school community now,

to be able to have our students

outdoors without any masks

on during recess and outdoor

learning and otherwise,” she

said. “Students can now share

objects, like gym equipment

and art supplies and other manipulative

objects. Those two

things are huge, and students

can now see their friends and

teachers’ faces again.”

New England Conservatory

Preparatory School, taking

composition lessons and classes

with Composition Faculty

member Rodney Lister.

“I have been impressed by

his innate musical aptitude as

well as the quality of the several

pieces he has written while

studying with me, which are on

the level of the very best students

I have worked with not

only on the pre-college, but

the college level,” said Lister,

who also is senior lecturer in

music, composition and music

theory at Boston University’s

Composition and Theory

Department.

“In fact, Finn is one of the

most impressive of the students

I have ever taught,” Lister

added.

an in-person graduation would

ever happen.”

Marblehead’s Sean Heffernan

and Lynnfield’s Andrew

Vittiglio received Loyalty and

Service awards during a virtual

Senior Awards ceremony

held earlier this month. Salem’s

Noah Thomas received the

Paul “Buster” DiVincenzo ‘50

Athletic Director’s Award.

Peabody’s Nicholas Fursey

received the Sean Lynch ‘85

Scholarship Award, while

Maddison received a Stephen

J. Kiely ’68 Scholarship Award.

The top 5 percent of the senior

class in academic performance

(in addition to

Maddison) included Nolan

Adam of Marblehead and

Mark Zolott of Swampscott. At

Friday’s Baccalaureate Liturgy,

Adam was recognized with a

Campus Ministry Award.

St. John’s Prep will hold a

limited-admission eighth-grade

promotion ceremony for the

Class of 2025 on June 3. The

event will serve to recognize the

class’s 113 students’ resilience,

leadership and focus throughout

this school year as well as

honor individual and collective

achievements.

Dolan said that, while

Lynnfield case numbers are low

(just seven in the last 14 days),

“we are not out of the woods

yet.

“We’d all agree on that, but

this is a day we’ve all been

waiting for,” he said. “We want

people to play and enjoy sports

again and want you to enjoy a

beautiful week and wonderful

summer of 2021.”

Mattingly wins prestigious music scholarship

An exemplary student as

well as an outstanding musician,

Mattingly was accepted

to the Royal College of Music

in London, where he plans to

pursue a Bachelor of Music

with Honors in Composition.

Recognizing the challenges

of pursuing a classical music career

during the time of a worldwide

pandemic, Finn Mattingly

stated: “Now, more than ever,

is the most important time to

study composition. Musicians

are essential; when we emerge

from the pandemic, it will be

necessary to re-knit communities

that were damaged and

learn to celebrate again.”

For more information about

the Betty Gillette Scholarship,

go to the NCS website: www.

newburyportchoralsociety.org.


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

PHOTOS | SPENSER HASAK

Lynnfield High School senior Janssen Sperling is headed for Syracuse University.

Bentley University-bound Lynnfield senior Isabella Toscanini

prepares for the parade.

Seniors Kyara Glinski, left, and Savannah Schuerhoff decorate Glinksi’s car before the start of

the parade.

Hopes and promises on parade

PARADE

FROM PAGE 1

“This has been a community

effort with so many volunteering

to do what they can for

these kids,” Cleary said. “They

all want to know what they can

do to make days like today.”

Last year’s parade was the

school’s solution to replacing

the annual May Day tradition

of students wearing their college

T-shirts and sweatshirts to

school.

Spring Cleanups

and

Tree Removal

and

Dog Waste

Removal

This year’s parade included

approximately 150 vehicles decorated

with college logos, signs

and colors. From Dartmouth

green to Duke blue to Holy

Cross purple, every color of

the rainbow was represented

last Saturday. The accomplishments

of the Class of 2021

were undeniable, with students

heading to some very selective

schools, including Dartmouth,

Duke, Tufts, Boston College,

Villanova, Providence College,

UMass Amherst, Northeastern

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and Syracuse.

“Every class is an accomplished

class,” said Cleary.

“The school you go to isn’t that

important. Yes, this class is impressive,

and the kids did get

into some great schools, but it’s

only great if you match up with

the right one.”

Class Valedictorian Anthony

Zhang said he’s known since

middle school where he was

going to college.

“I’m a big Duke basketball

fan and have known since seventh

grade I wanted to go there,”

said Zhang. “I had looked at

some Ivys and USC, but took

them all off the table to go early

decision, so I was lucky.”

For now, Zhang’s focus is on

tennis, playing doubles for the

undefeated (5-0) Pioneers.

“We’ve already beaten

the best team in the league

(Hamilton-Wenham),” Zhang

said. “So far, things are going

well.”

Chris Dasilva said familiarity

and location were major factors

in his decision to commute to

Merrimack.

“I wanted to stay close to

home and also have a lot of

friends there, so you might say

it will be a reunion of sorts for

me,” he said.

Twins Ashley and Lauren

Mitchell will be attending Holy

Cross.

“We knew we wanted to go

to the same school, but once we

are there, we plan to find our

own way,” said Lauren.

“This is our chance to be

together, but still be independent,”

said Ashley.

April Luders plans on

studying criminology or pre-law

at Villanova. A school record

holder in hurdles, Luders said

her focus will be on academics.

“I think that’s more important,

but who knows? I may

end up running club track,” said

Luders.

Several students are headed to

Worcester Polytechnic Institute,

including Julia Colucci, who

verbally committed last year to

play soccer.

“I want to go into the STEMrelated

field, and WPI was the

best choice as it has an extremely

strong program,” she

said.

Chloe Shapleigh will also be

continuing her athletic career in

college. She committed last fall

to play ice hockey and softball

at Endicott College, one of the

most popular destinations for

Lynnfield graduates in recent

years.

“I always wanted to play

something and knew I didn’t

want to give anything up just

yet,” said Shapleigh, who has

led the Pioneers to a 5-1 start.

Last week, she became only the

second Pioneer to hit a home

run at Pioneer field.

Jack Ross will also attend

Endicott. He was chauffeured

in style, with older sister, Alex,

driving their SUV, which was

decorated with the Gulls’ trademark

blue and green.

“It’s the perfect match for

me,” said Jack, who plans to

major in environmental science.

“It’s close to home, it’s on the

beach and it has a great program,

so I expect Endicott will

be my home for the next four

years.”

Kiran Lampert rode on the

back of a sports car, waving an

oversized Syracuse flag. Her

father, Sean, got in on the fun

wearing a big, clown-like orange

wig.

“I’ve always known that

Syracuse is the place where I

belonged,” said Lampert, who

plans to major in biology.


4

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

LYNNFIELD

WEEKLY NEWS

Police Log

(USPS Permit #168)

Telephone: 781-593-7700 • Fax: 781-581-3178

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903

News and Advertising Offices: 110 Munroe St., Lynn, MA 01901

Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

www.weeklynews.net

Monday, May 17

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 8:17 a.m. Monday on

Condon Circle.

Editor: Thor Jourgensen tjourgensen@essexmediagroup.com

Reporter: Anne Marie Tobin atobin@essexmediagroup.com

Sports Editor: Mike Alongi malongi@essexmediagroup.com

Advertising Reps: Ralph Mitchell rmitchell@essexmediagroup.com

Patricia Whalen pwhalen@essexmediagroup.com

Ernie Carpenter ecarpenter@essexmediagroup.com

Tuesday, May 18

Accident

At 3:34 p.m. Tuesday at N

Broadway and Salem Street; at

4:01 p.m.

Retail Price: $1.00

Deadlines: News: Monday, noon; Display Ads: Monday, noon;

Classified Ads: Monday, noon;

No cancellations accepted after deadline.

The Lynnfield Weekly News is published 52 times per year on Thursday by Essex

Media Group, Inc. No issue is printed during the week of Christmas. The Lynnfield

Weekly News is delivered via US Mail to all homes in Lynnfield. It is also

available in several locations throughout Lynnfield. The Lynnfield Weekly News

will not be responsible for typographical or other errors in advertisements, but will

reprint that part of an advertisement in which a typographical error occurs if notified

immediately. Advertisers must notify the Lynnfield Weekly News of any errors in

advertisements on the FIRST day of insertion. The publisher reserves the right to

reject, omit or edit any copy offered for publication. POSTMASTER: Send address

changes to Lynnfield Weekly News, P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903. © 2016 Essex

Media Group, Inc.

Can’t get to

the store?

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delivery.

Subscribe for half the

newsstand price.

Subscriptions include

full online access.

www.itemlive.com/subscribe

or call 781-593-7700, ext. 1239

Assaults

A report of an assault at 4:13

p.m. Monday at 23 Stillman

Road.

Complaints

At 3:32 p.m. Monday, a caller

reported youths were riding dirt

bikes and all-terrain vehicles in

the roadway on Tapley Road. An

officer checked the area and was

unable to find the group.

A report of a disturbance

at 3:38 p.m. Monday at 174

Bourque Road. A caller reported

a neighbor “came at me in a

threatening manner.”

Wednesday, May 19

Accident

Wednesday at 909 Salem St.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 12:47

p.m. Wednesday at 0 Keniston

Road.

Thursday, May 20

Accident

A report of a motor vehicle

crash with personal injury at

9:39 p.m. Thursday on South

Broadway.

Complaint

A report of a suspicious

person at 9:11 a.m. Thursday

at Chase Bank at 230 Market St.

A bank employee reported two

men were aggressively banging

on the front door. Police reported

two construction workers were

trying to notify the bank about a

crane being used in the area.

Friday, May 21

Summons

Domenic Dibiase, 63, of 59

Lynnbrook Road, was issued a

summons on Friday at 2:58 p.m.

for harassment prevention order

violations.

Enforcement

Police issued a motor vehicle

traffic rules violation citation to a

Medford driver on Salem Street

on Friday at 7:07 a.m. Police

issued citations to Lynnfield

and North Reading drivers on

Chestnut Street on Friday at

3:01 p.m.; issued a citation to a

Lynnfield driver on Pillings Pond

Road on Friday at 5:37 p.m.;

issued a citation to a Lynnfield

driver on Wildewood Drive on

Friday at 9:03 p.m.

Medical

Police assisted with medical

transport from Salem Street on

Friday at 1:34 p.m.; assisted

with transporting a golfer struck

in the head by a ball from Reedy

Meadow Golf Course to Lahey

Burlington on Friday at 4:49 p.m.

Complaint

Police responded to Locust

Street on Friday at 3:28 p.m. for

a report of a man and woman arguing

in a motor vehicle. Wayne

W. Webber Jr., 48 of Manchester,

New Hampshire was issued a

summons for operating under

the influence of drugs and a

woman in the vehicle was transported

to Lynn. A Timberhill

Terrace caller reported hearing

gunshots on Friday at 5:26 p.m.

A search of the area turned up

negative.

Saturday, May 22

Complaint

Police responded to Ashwood

Road for a barking dog on

Saturday at 12:31 a.m. Police responded

to multiple calls about

loud music and people riding offroad

vehicles behind Michael’s

Landing on South Broadway on

Saturday at 2:18 p.m. Police

responded to a report of a dog

left in a motor vehicle at Market

Street on Saturday at 4:49 p.m.

Police responded to Knoll Road

on Saturday at 8:15 p.m. but

could not confirm a report that

fireworks were being set off.

Medical

Police assisted with medical

transport from Salem Street to

Salem Hospital on Saturday at

8:49 a.m.

Enforcement

Police issued a motor vehicle

traffic rule violation citation to a

Peabody driver on Essex Street

on Saturday at 4:35 p.m.

Sunday, May 23

Complaint

Police responded to Kimball

Lane on Sunday at 12:43 a.m.

for a report of several people

who lit a large bonfire straddling

the Saugus line. The group

was told to leave the area and

the Fire Department was called

to extinguish the fire. Ordered

people sleeping in a motor vehicle

in Willow Cemetery on

Summer Street on Sunday at

11:12 a.m. to leave. Received a

report on Sunday about a wallet

lost at the high school at 4:20

p.m. Responded on Sunday at

10:20 p.m. to a report of people

playing music loud in a South

Broadway lot. Group dispersed

when police arrived.

Medical

Police assisted with medical

transport from Salem Street to

MelroseWakefield Hospital on

Sunday at 6:39 a.m.; assisted

with transport from Trog Hawley

Street to Lahey Burlington on

Sunday at 10:38 a.m.; assisted

with transport from Pizzuti

Way to North Shore Children’s

Hospital on Sunday at 1:06 p.m.;

assisted with medical transport

from MarketStreet to Lahey

Burlington on Sunday at 8:01

p.m.

Fire

Advised a Walnut Street resident

about illegal burning on

Sunday at 7:33 p.m.

Accident

Police responded to a motor

vehicle crash reported on Salem

Street at South Broadway on

Sunday at 9:04 p.m.

Monday, May 24

Fire

Aided Fire Department in responding

to a large brush fire off

I-95 near exit 63 on Monday at

1:59 a.m. believed to have been

started by an improperly-disposed

cigarette.

Enforcement

Police issued motor vehicle

traffic rule violation citations to

Peabody drivers on Essex Street

on Monday at 6 a.m.


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 5

Religious News

Centre Congregational

Church

5 Summer St., Lynnfield

781-334-3050

www.centre-church.org

Facebook.com/

CentreChurchUCC

office@centre-church.org

YouTube.com/c/

centrecongregationalchurch/

In the Centre since 1720,

Centre Church is an open and

affirming congregation of the

United Church of Christ. No

matter who you are or where

you are on your life’s journey,

you are welcome at Centre

Church.

Messiah Lutheran Church

708 Lowell St., Lynnfield

(corner of Lowell and

Chestnut), is currently open for

in-person worship, following

state COVID-19 guidelines,

safety protocols and capacity

limitations. In-person worship

is on Sunday morning at 10:30

am by reservation. Masks are

required.

To reserve seats for worship,

please call 781-334-4111 and

leave your name, the number

in your group, and a contact

number. Worship services are

also currently being streamed

live on Facebook.

Like us on Facebook

at: facebook.com/

Messiah-Lutheran-Church.

Sunday mornings at 10:30

a.m., Sunday evening devotion

at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday

evening prayer time at 7:01

p.m.

Messiah Lutheran Church is

served by the Rev. Dr. Jeremy

Pekari, and the Rev. David

Brezina.

Temple Emmanuel/

Wakefield

For more information about

Temple Emmanuel, a member

of the Jewish Reconstructionist

Communities, call 781-245-

1886 or see our Facebook

page or website at www.

WakefieldTemple.org.

Request service links to

the Zoom streaming: info@

WakefieldTemple.org

Shabbat services: Friday,

7:30 p.m.: June 1 and June 25.

Saturday mornings at 9:30

am: June 5 and 19, July 17

Wakefield-Lynnfield

United Methodist Church

Peace, Hope & Virtual Hugs

Deb Willis Bry, cell:

781-521-9726

Office Assistant, Wakefield-

Lynnfield United Methodist

Church

Assistant Coordinator,

Greater Boston Project Linus

Wakefield-Lynnfield United

Methodist Church, 273

Vernon St., Wakefield, Mass.,

01880

Church Office: 781-245-

1359, Parsonage: 781-245-

0338 Email: WLUMC272@

gmail.com

www.facebook.com/

methodistchurchwakefield

www.instagram.com/

methodistchurchwakefield

*A Project Linus Blanket

Drop-Off Location*

www.bostonprojectlinus.

com

Seniors

Senior Center offers plenty to do in May

LYNNFIELD — The

Lynnfield Senior Center

has been busy offering

more than 200 programs/

classes virtually including

live Zoom exercise classes,

a book club, discussion

groups and even a Zoom

lunch bunch!

The Center offers Grab

-and-Go lunches three days

each week in our parking

lot — advance sign-up is required.

The Center’s SHINE

representative is available

to offer insurance assistance

by appointment, and we

hope you will enjoy all of

the staff cooking and craft

videos that we post each

week, along with our Virtual

To the editor:

I’m writing to thank Essex

Media Group/Lynnfield

Weekly News for supporting

the Above the Influence

campaign that A Healthy

Lynnfield ran this spring.

The enthusiastic response

we have received from the

community for the successful

campaign has been

very gratifying. From your

multiple articles on the campaign

to the weekly profiles

of community members who

were honored as Champions

for Youth, the coverage has

been outstanding.

We would also like to

Travel Monday Trips.

For more information,

please call the senior center

at 781-598-1078.

Don’t know how to Zoom?

It’s easy. Call us and we will

get you started. Then see all

you can do from the comfort

of your home. Contact

us if you would like the

links to our exercise classes,

or to see the variety of

programs offered.

Exercise with Alice -

Zumba and Pilates classes

Zumba: Monday, Tuesday,

Thursday, and Friday, 10:30

– 11 a.m.

Pilates: Monday, Tuesday,

Thursday, and Friday, 9:30 –

10:30 a.m.

thank the school administration,

teachers and staff

for their support, as well

as the A Healthy Lynnfield

Youth Leadership Council.

Their creation of the

video, 21 Reasons to Stay

Above the Influence, inspired

many younger students

with positive reasons

not to use alcohol or other

drugs. The video can be

viewed at https://youtu.be/

ESY9BE1IuVg.

It is important to A

Healthy Lynnfield that

we involve community

members in all that we do.

We all learned something

through this campaign, and

Contact Alice at aodachowski@msn.com

for

more information and to get

the Zoom links.

Chair Yoga and

Meditation classes with

Sam

Chair Yoga: Tuesdays

from 10 – 10:45 a.m.

Meditation: Thursdays

from 10 – 10:20 a.m.

Sit and Tone video

with Joie

Chair Yoga video with

Michelle

Enhanced Fitness videos

with Frank

Enhanced Cardio

Enhanced Strength and

Stretch

Join Elaine every Monday

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

at 1:30 p.m. for Trivia. Test

your knowledge and have

lots of laughs. Sign up with

Elaine at emoorman_coa@

hotmail.com.

Join Elaine for Zoom

Bingo every Tuesday at 9

a.m.

We will send you the bingo

cards. Grab your beans and

have some fun. Sign up with

Elaine at emoorman_coa@

hotmail.com. Free.

Our Virtual Book Club

with Sue started Monday,

April 12 at 10 a.m. We will

be reading “The Map Thief”

by Heather Terrell. Contact

Sue at slagorio@town.lynnfield.ma.us

to register and

for more information. Free.

we encourage those of you

who might not be familiar

with it to log onto www.

AHealthyLynnfield.org

and check out A Healthy

Lynnfield on Facebook.

Influences — good and

bad — surround us every

day. It is how we choose to

respond to these influences

that impacts us. This is particularly

important during

impressionable teenage

years.

Modeling positive decisions

and engaging in supportive

conversations with

young people helps pave

the way to a healthy lifestyle

and a healthier community

for all. Please take

the time to talk with the

teenagers in your life and

share how making good

decisions now can benefit

Join our Accountability

Group every Wednesday

at 10 a.m. on Zoom as we

cheer each other on in accomplishing

our goals. Have

you been meaning to call a

friend, sort through pictures

or write your memoir? Join

us for some laughs and support

as we accomplish our

goals and set an intention

for the next week.

Sign up with Elaine at

emoorman_coa@hotmail.

com.

Our van service will pick

up and drop off your library

books. Call the Lynnfield library,

781-334-541, to make

arrangements.

Thanks for supporting Above the Influence

them later in life.

Peg Sallade

Substance Use

Prevention Coordinator

A Healthy Lynnfield

Penny McKenzie-Venuto

Realtor ® , CBR ® , SRES ®

Commonwealth Real Estate

Northrup Associates

26 Main Street

Lynnfield, MA 01940

Cell 781-929-7237

penny.mckenzie@commonmoves.com

A member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates, LLC


6

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

STUDENT OF

THE WEEK

She has her lens on the world

By Elyse Carmosino

LYNNFIELD — When

Julianna Fama was gifted a

camera to take pictures of her

brothers’ sports games during

her freshman year of high

school, she had no idea where

her newfound hobby

would lead.

Three years later,

the St. Mary’s junior

has developed

a lucrative business

venture as a school

sports photographer,

creating a name for

herself locally and

garnering a steady

stream of clients familiar

with her work.

“I used to go to my brothers’

basketball games, and I always

kind of had that eye for a picture,”

Fama said. “I always

wanted to capture a moment.”

A volleyball and basketball

player herself, Fama, who has

two older brothers and a sister,

grew up attending her siblings’

games and said she knew early

on she wanted to pursue sports

photography.

Now, her parents’ home is

filled with the pictures she’s

“It almost makes me feel

like I have a part in someone

else’s life, because those

pictures are something those

players can have for the rest

of their lives.”

— Julianna Fama

taken over the years.

“You can tell that I improve

every single time I take a new

game,” she said. “(My parents)

love the pictures. Literally all

of them are framed around the

house.”

During basketball season,

she generally shoots an average

of two assignments per

week (at the request of players

and coaches who reach out to

her online) and posts her work

on Instagram and SmugMug

under the handle @jfamaphotos.

Otherwise, Fama said

she takes work as it

comes.

“I get comments all

the time from people

who say (the photos)

are really good,” Fama

said. “When I take pictures

of their games, a

lot of the players will

ask me immediately to

send them more.”

In the future, Fama

sees herself as an NBA

photographer.

“It makes me feel amazing,”

she said. “It almost makes

me feel like I have a part in

someone else’s life, because

those pictures are something

those players can have for the

rest of their lives.”

COURTESY PHOTO | JULIANNA FAMA

Julianna Fama loves sports photography.

Kristen Reed

Late spring is the ideal time for easy smoothies

My favorite spa smoothie not

only feels fancy, but is super

easy and refreshing. It will

have you daydreaming about

relaxing at the spa and laying

by the beach with its light, energizing

taste, and will fill you up

thanks to all the fiber, protein

and healthy fats.

Plus, it is packed with greens

(Tip: always keep a bag of

frozen spinach or other greens

in the freezer so you can add

it to your smoothies), tons of

vitamins, nutrients and antioxidants,

will keep your blood

sugar stable and keep hunger at

bay.

This spa smoothie is quick

and portable for when you’re

on the run and need “fast food.”

You’ll feel good about

starting your day nourishing

your body in the best way with

this super smoothie.

Ingredients:

2 cups water or unsweetened

almond or coconut milk

• Office • Skate Room

• Skate Guards •Snack Bar

Part time hours can be arranged

• On the MBTA Bus Route 429

Call Meghan or Jerry

781-233-9507

or

617-620-9201

Open 7 days a week

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2 cups frozen spinach

1/4 avocado

1/2 cup chopped cucumber

Handful of mint leaves

Juice of half a lemon

1 tablespoon chia seeds (or

ground flaxseed)

1 scoop vanilla protein

powder (I love this brand

available at primalkitchen.

com — use code NWW for 10

percent off)

Dash of sea salt (I love this

brand at Redmond Life Store

for unrefined salt — use Code

NWW for 10 percent off)

Optional: splash of pure

vanilla extract

Add all ingredients in a

blender, blend well and enjoy!

Kristen Reed is a Lynnfield

resident and registered nurse

and was featured on the front

page on the Brigham and

Women’s Hospital’s heart and

science publication for her

initiative in creating nursing

staff Wellness Days and Reiki

Resiliency research project for

nurses and patients.

COURTESY PHOTO | KRISTEN REED

Kristen Reed is a Lynnfield resident and registered nurse whose

passion for health translates in her favorite smoothie.


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 7

Library turns the page

PHOTOS | Julia Hopkins

Anthony Ruggiero, 43

1977 - 2021

REVERE - Ruggiero, Anthony of

Revere peacefully passed away

surrounded by his family on May

22, 2021 at the age of 43. Born in

Boston on May 30, 1977, to Egidia

(Preziosi) and the late Nicola Ruggiero.

Anthony was a Union member

of Local 3 Bricklayers & Allied

Craftsmen. He is survived and

was adored by his sisters Maria

Ruggiero-Pace and her husband

Vincent of CT, Nicole Marotta and

her husband Joe of Lynnfield, and

Sabrina Vramis and her husband

Niko of Danvers. Cherished uncle

of Salvatore, Nikolas, Ava and Gia

Marotta, Steven and Alexis Vramis,

and Peter and Nicole Pace. Loving

nephew of Luigi Ruggiero of Revere

and Richard and Anne Marie Ruggiero

of Peabody. All services will

be held privately for the immediate

family. Entombment at Holy Cross

Cemetery. For guest book please

visit www.buonfiglio.com.

Librarian Samantha Totman reshelves books in a new section at Lynnfield Public Library.

Children’s Librarian Lauren

Fox finds origami books for

children returning to the

library.

C.C. Ragalevsky, 10, picks out books she has been hoping to

read in the library children’s room.

Gloria F. Hennessey, 79

1942 - 2021

LYNNFIELD - Gloria F. Hennessey,

nee Hathaway, a nearly 60 year

resident of Lynnfield, MA, passed

away quietly at her home on May

19, 2021. She was 79 years old.

Born in Lynn, MA, the daughter

of Worton B. and Eileen F. Hathaway

and sister to Worton M. Hathaway.

Gloria graduated from

St. Mary’s High School where she

met the love of her life James J.

Hennessey. The couple married in

1965 and resided in Lynnfield following

their Honeymoon; and never

left the community they made

their home.

Gloria was a vibrant and enigmatic

woman with an extraordinary

sense of humor and a rapier

wit. She was a successful business

women, avid gardener and

took great pleasure watching and

listening for the birds outside her

window. She led by example and

to her last breath demonstrated

what it was to love with your whole

heart. She was an advocate of the

underdog and always encouraged

those around her to broaden their

horizons, think before speaking

and engage any endeavor with

passion. She will be sincerely

missed by all those who were fortunate

enough to know her.

She is survived by her loving

children and grandchildren: Krista

L. Hennessey, and her husband

Timothy Miller, of California; Marcia

M. Hennessey of Lynnfield, and

James J. Hennessey II and his wife

Erin of North Carolina. Her grandchildren

Emma k. Hennessey and

James J. Hennessey III, also of

North Carolina.

Service Information: Services

are not immediately being held

and will be conducted at a later

date this summer. In lieu of

flowers, donations may be made

in Gloria’s name to her favorite

charities: MSPCA-Angell Animal

Welfare or Wounded Warrior

Project.

Arrangements in the care of

the McDonald Funeral Home,

Wakefield.

Financial planning is

more important than ever…

• Detailed Life Planning

• Education Plans

• Longevity Planning

• Legacy & Estate Planning

• Investment Management

• Retirement Planning

• Long Term Care Planning

• Life Insurance

• Sustainable investing

• Charitable Giving

ANTONIO SORDILLO, CFP®, CRPC®, CPFA

Vice President, Investments

antonio.sordillo@raymondjames.com

20 Burlington Mall Road, Suite 130 // Burlington, MA 01803

781.313.8403 // evergreenfinpartners.com

Peabody resident Dan Rubin uses one of the library’s computer stations by appointment.

© 2021 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC. 21-BRNAO-0003 TA 1/21


8

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

COURTESY PHOTOS | MARK O’SULLIVAN

Mark and Nancy O’Sullivan spent months in the pandemic creating “Victoria Falls,” which pumps water out at 60 gallons per minute

Waterfall helps couple weather pandemic

By Allysha Dunnigan

LYNNFIELD — Gardening

is a yearly activity for Mark and

Nancy O’Sullivan, but since the

onset of the COVID-19 pandemic,

Mark said the couple

wanted to tackle an extra challenge:

A backyard waterfall.

According to Nancy, she and

her husband started by looking

at water features that birds can

drink out of, but that idea turned

into a pandemic project they

now call “Victoria Falls.”

When the idea of a waterfall

came to mind, Mark said he

looked to buy one already built,

but he and Nancy decided to

customize their own to fit the

image they had for their yard.

After months of planning and

building, the waterfall now consists

of about 12,000 pounds of

stone, and the water flows at a

speed of 60 gallons per minute.

As an engineer, Mark began

the project by creating a blueprint

and then “did everything

from scratch.” He installed a

water pump and ran a 130-foot

power line from his garage to

the waterfall in the back of the

yard. He also built a control

panel inside the shed to turn the

water and lights on and off. The

system also includes a filter to

remove algae and a backwash

feature.

There are two tanks in the

ground: one is a filter for leaves

and debris and the other is the

250-gallon main recirculation

tank. The “pond” at the base of

the waterfall is filled with river

rocks, so Mark said there are no

worries about mosquitos or fish

feeding.

The waterfall is surrounded

by flowers, which the couple

planted, and Nancy said that,

between the garden and waterfall,

“it is a beautiful sight.”

A project like this isn’t cheap,

but Mark said since they could

afford to do it and had the time

to, it was “worth it.”

“As a retired environmental

engineer, I have turned my

attention to creating beautiful

landscapes,” Mark said.

“Armed with horticultural and

architectural skills, I can visualize

how to transform an ordinary

space into joy. Using innovative

perennials, which thrive

in this climate, I try to have

constant color and interest from

spring into fall.”

Mark and Nancy had to put

the pump away during the

winter, but they said they are

planning on turning Victoria

Falls back on in a few weeks.

The couple said their friends

love the waterfall and the

soothing sounds it provides.

“It’s really something,”

Nancy said. “I’m so proud of

him for doing it, and I just want

to share it with everyone.”

The watefall contains about 12,000 pounds of stone.

OUR OPINION

Tree bylaw chopped from Town Meeting

Thinking globally and acting

locally hit a big bump with the

Select Board’s May 12 decision

to keep the proposed tree preservation

bylaw off June’s Town

Meeting warrant.

The idea of everyone starting

in their own backyard to combat

global warming’s negative impacts

ran smack dab into controversy

during Lynnfield’s last

Town Meeting, where residents

loudly protested a tree preservation

proposal widely viewed

as an unnecessary homeowner

property-rights violation.

Town Tree Committee and

Planning Board members

pushed hard this spring to promote

a redrafted preservation

proposal with a much narrower

focus than the one that ran into

a wood chipper at the previous

meeting.

The revamped bylaw affects

trees in areas where building activity

is taking place. Uprooted

trees would have to be replaced

with saplings, or else the builder

removing trees could make a

payment into the Town’s existing

tree fund, which would

support tree-planting and maintenance

efforts.

“It applies to every parcel

in town, but only applies to a

much narrower set of activities,”

Planning Board Chair

Brian Charville said.

Select Board Chair Richard

Dalton and fellow board members

acknowledged, during

their May 12 meeting, the hard

work expended on the revised

bylaw. But they said the revision

needed extensive Select

Board review, meaning its next

appearance at Town Meeting

will be in October at the earliest.

Bylaw advocates insist

Lynnfield owes future generations

a concerted effort to protect

local trees, especially older

ones. They also point to the

important role trees and forests

play as natural filters, which

help to reduce air pollution and

control temperature variations.

Opponents warn that the

bylaw, even with a narrow

focus limited to development

activity, represents a threat to

personal property rights. They

warn against Lynnfield following

Newton and Needham’s

lead in telling property owners

what they can and can’t do with

trees.

At first glance, Lynnfield

looks like a community with a

lot of trees. It’s worth asking

what, if any, protections — beyond

those already available to

the Conservation Commission

— the town needs to place on

local trees. The Select Board is

taking the correct course in deciding

to give the revised tree

protection bylaw a thorough

review.


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 9

Joseph Connell

COMMENTARY

Pausing to remember on Memorial Day

For the second year in a row,

Memorial Day looks a little different

than it has in years past.

In many cases, our backyard

barbecues and get-togethers are

replaced by smaller gatherings,

video chats and other ways of

staying connected while being

safe. We have all attempted to

hold onto some degree of normalcy

through this challenging

time, and I trust that we are

close to getting back to life as

it was. Hopefully this is the last

Memorial Day that we will see

like this.

The memories and emotions

this day brings are always the

same. For countless families

across the nation, Memorial

Day is a stark and often painful

reminder of those who were

never afforded the opportunity

to be honored as veterans for

their service to our country.

Unfortunately, they paid the ultimate

sacrifice. Their sacrifice

is a true expression of selfless

service.

Whether people volunteered

to serve at a time of war, or have

served during peacetime, they

all represent the best America

has to offer. We feel their loss

while roaming the sacred hills of

places like Arlington National

Cemetery, locally or the final

resting places around the world.

Year in and year out, too many

mothers, fathers, siblings and

children feel the immense

weight of seeing an empty chair

at their family table.

This year marks the 20th year

we’ve been at war in the Middle

East, longer than any American

conflict that came before. About

2.7 million Americans have

served in Iraq and Afghanistan,

and over half of them deployed

more than once. Those who

returned are now our community

members, neighbors and

friends. Please take the time to

thank them, and their families,

for their service to this country.

On Memorial Day, we honor

those who served so bravely

and did not return home to their

family and friends. We must always

remember those service

members who fought in the

darkest times for our freedom,

and we honor their legacy by

continuing to carry the torch of

liberty.

Lynnfield has a strong tradition

of honoring its service

McManus joins

J Barrett & Co

members that have served this

great country. Just look at the

magnificent Upper Common

in the middle of the town.

Lynnfield’s Main Common,

dedicated to those who have

paid the ultimate sacrifice for

this country, is a testimony to

this town’s appreciation for

those who have served.

Memorial Day is distinct

— that is, it specifically recognizes

the military personnel

who gave their lives defending

their country. However, it might

help to highlight the differences

in the four recognized military

holidays. So, here they are, and

what they represent:

Armed Forces Day: Honoring

those who are currently serving

in the armed forces (celebrated

on the third Saturday in May).

Memorial Day: Honoring

those who have died in service

to this nation (celebrated on the

last Monday in May).

Gold Star Mother’s Day:

Established in 1936 by the 7th

Congress, it is celebrated on the

last Sunday of September.

Veterans Day: Honoring the

living who once served in the

armed forces (celebrated on

Nov 11).

Has its roots in what was

called Decoration Day, a day

when Union Civil War veterans

honored those who had died

in conflict (roughly 620,000

people died in that war alone).

Memorial Day has been observed

on the last Monday in

May since 1968, when Congress

passed the Uniform Monday

Holiday Act. Memorial Day is

just not an event, it’s a day of

pride and honor for those service

members who died while

serving the nation. More than

1.1 million men and women

have died in wartime throughout

the span of our nation’s history.

Tradition holds that part of

the Memorial Day observance

is the National Moment of

Remembrance. All Americans

are encouraged to pause wherever

they are at 3 p.m. local

time for a moment of silence

to remember and honor those

who have died in service to this

nation.

Lynnfield has so many military

heroes and will continue to

do so.

I would like to ask, at 3 p.m.

on Monday, take just 30 seconds

of your time in a moment of silence

for those who have fallen

in battle. I know you will and

that you will do it with pride.

It’s up to us to not only tell

their stories, but to honor their

service and memory by ensuring

their families and survivors are

cared for and not forgotten.

Joseph R. Connell is a

Lynnfield Select Board member

and a U.S. Army veteran.

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10

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

Sports

FILE PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Lynnfield’s Evan Balian went 1-for-2 with a double and a walk

in a loss to Pentucket Thursday.

Lynnfield’s offensive

woes continue in loss

to Pentucket

BASEBALL

By Daniel Kane

LYNNFIELD — The

Lynnfield baseball team was

right there for most of the day,

but just couldn’t get the bats

going in a 3-1 loss to visiting

Pentucket Thursday.

Lynnfield manufactured their

lone run on a sacrifice fly in the

fifth, but other than that it was

the same old struggles.

“The biggest thing for us is

we’re not hitting with men on

base,” Lynnfield coach John

O’Brien said. “(Thursday) we

made contact. We’re just not

making the big hit when we

need it. And it’s not just one

guy, it’s multiple guys. It’s guys

that we’re counting on.”

To his credit, Pentucket

pitcher Ethan Hunt pitched a

great game. Lynnfield made

plenty of contact off the right

hander but were held to just

three hits.

“At least we were barreling up

the ball (Thursday),” O’Brien

said. “(Hunt) was a pretty good

pitcher. He threw the ball pretty

well, so that’s encouraging.”

Tyler Scoppettuolo had the

game’s lone RBI on the sacrifice

fly that drove in pinch

runner Aidan Burke to tie things

up at 1-1 at the time. Evan

Balian (1-for-2, double, walk),

Spencer Riley (1-for-3, double)

and Luke Martinho (1-for-3,

single) all had hits.

Blake Peters also had a solid

day on the mound for Lynnfield.

The lefthander kept the Pioneers

in the game, throwing 6 1/3 innings

and allowing two earned

runs, seven hits and four walks

with five strikeouts.

“I think there were a few

at bats that went long, a few

walks, but he got out of it,”

O’Brien said. “The kids played

good defense behind him. The

outfield played well. I think he

made some good pitches when

he had to. He kept us right in the

game at 1-0 and we ended up

tying it. But we made the error

in the last inning and that kind

of opened the door for them.

That’s the way the season has

been.”

The first mistake was a

passed ball in the first that allowed

Pentucket to grab an

early 1-0 lead.

Lynnfield didn’t make any

noise until the fifth when Trent

Balian followed Evan Balian’s

double with a walk but the bats

went silent.

Next inning, Riley laced his

double. Burke went in to run

and reach third on a passed ball

before Scoppettuolo’s sacrifice

fly knocked him into even the

game at 1-1.

Things weren’t tied for long

when Peters went back out

for the seventh inning and

Pentucket got to him. A single

and an error put runners on

for Trevor Kamuda and Chase

Dwight, who each knocked in a

run to put Pentucket up 3-1 and

end Peters’ outing.

“(Peters) hit his max (pitch

count) anyway,” O’Brien said.

“He had thrown Saturday in

a late game so he was right

there. That’s probably my fault,

I asked him if he was all right

and he’s a pretty tough kid, a

senior, so of course he’s going

to say yes.”

Tim Pivero finished off the

last two outs for Lynnfield, allowing

one walk and striking

out his last batter, but it was too

late for the Pioneers to rally in

the bottom half of the seventh.

“It’s a little bit of a struggle

at the plate but the kids are

working,” O’Brien said. “That’s

all we can do is keep going. We

have seven seniors so we’ll be

back at it Saturday.”

FILE PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Lynnfield senior Dante Gesamondo has committed to continue his academic and athletic career

at Div. III Medaille College next season.

Lynnfield’s Dante Gesamondo

commits to Medaille College

By Daniel Kane

LYNNFIELD — Over the

past year, Lynnfield’s Dante

Gesamondo has seen his future

on the soccer field thrown for a

loop.

“COVID really ruined my

summer of soccer, which

was a huge recruiting time,”

Gesamondo said. “Between ID

camps getting canceled, there

was a dead period. Schools just

didn’t want to go out.”

And for the Lynnfield senior,

that dead period meant losing

the opportunity to pursue a spot

on a Division I program.

“I had been talking to schools

like Northeastern and Bryant,

but I missed out,” Gesamondo

said.

But if you know anything

about the Pioneers goalkeeper,

you can bet he wasn’t going to

let that stop him from moving

forward for too long. After

some time finding the right fit,

Gesamondo has committed to

Division III Medaille College in

Buffalo, N.Y.

“I committed pretty late,”

Gesamondo said. “I had been following

(Medaille’s) Instagram.

They have a new coach building

a team and there are a lot of incoming

freshmen -- 15 including

myself.”

The difference in background

of those fellow freshmen, along

with the rest of the team, is really

what put Medaille over the top

for Gesamondo.

“I love the diversity,”

Gesamondo said. “In my

freshmen class, only four of

us are from the U.S. There are

players from England, Spain

and Scotland. That’s one of the

big reasons I decided on it. I saw

a lot of really talented players.

Knowing I was going Division

III, I wanted to have that and

also wanted to win.”

That desire to win is something

Gesamondo has had since

finding himself in the net at a

young age.

“Once I put on that crazy colored

jersey as a kid, I loved it,”

Gesamondo said. “When you’re

that young, no one wants to be a

goalie and get hit with the ball.

But I loved diving around.”

That love for the position continued

through high school.

Gesamondo, who also plays

basketball and baseball, had

to overcome a broken foot his

sophomore year before earning

the starting spot in net his junior

season. That year was more than

worth the wait.

After slipping into the state

tournament with a 9-8-1 record,

the Pioneers made quite

the splash in Division 3 North

— and a lot of it was thanks to

Gesamondo.

The pinnacle of the run came

in the North semifinals, where

No. 10 Lynnfield upset No. 3

Watertown behind a 17-save

performance by Gesamondo. A

few days later, the run came to

an end in the North final.

“That Watertown team had a

lot of talent,” Gesamondo said.

“I didn’t get a break all game. It

was a real challenge, but getting

that win was a top moment of

high school for me.”

Without a tournament this

past season, Lynnfield finished

7-1-2, good enough for a share

of the Cape Ann League title.

Gesamondo was named a first

team CAL all-star after allowing

just four goals with six shutouts

on the year.

After so many highs,

Gesamondo — who will study

business at Medaille — is

looking forward to the competitiveness

that comes from

fighting for the starting spot

again with the Mavericks.

“I’m really just ready to compete,”

Gesamondo said. “I haven’t

competed for a starting spot

since early sophomore year. I’ve

been on top and now it’s back to

the bottom again. I want to show

them I deserve to play. I’ve met

the coach and he said there is no

seniority, the best kids play. If

you show up to camp and you’re

better, you’ll start. I like that and

I want to compete there right

away.”


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 11

PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

Lynnfield’s Drew Damiani scored two goals in a loss to Hamilton-Wenham Tuesday afternoon.

Lynnfield falls short to CAL

foe Hamilton-Wenham

BOYS LACROSSE

By Daniel Kane

LYNNFIELD — The

Lynnfield boys lacrosse team

had its bright spots Tuesday, but

couldn’t put it together enough

offensively in a 6-4 home loss

to Hamilton-Wenham.

Despite taking an early

lead, the Pioneers fell behind

5-2 before the fourth quarter.

Lynnfield dominated possession

time in the final frame,

but just didn’t finish on enough

chances to crawl back into

things.

“I think the looks are there,

it’s just finishing,” Lynnfield

coach Pat Lamusta said.

“You’ve got to finish and

seize the scoring opportunities.

But we’ll keep working

on that. We’ll keep working on

shooting and everything.”

Drew Damiani had two

goals for Lynnfield, while John

Briggs and Jack Calichman

each had one. Goalie Niko

Marotta played a great game in

net with six saves.

“We have some great captains

leading us,” Lamusta

said. “Myles McKay, Michael

Dreher and Niko Marotta in

net, who had some great saves.

He’s a communicator. That’s

what makes him a special guy.

He always makes sure the defense

is on top of things.”

The defense started the day

off well and Damiani followed

that with two early goals to put

Lynnfield up 2-1 in the first

quarter. Hamilton-Wenham got

one back before the second to

tie things up at 2-2.

Marotta helped Lynnfield

stay even with a trio of nice

saves before the half, but

Hamilton-Wenham’s defense

held strong as well.

Will Steadman had a few nice

chances, including a shot that

was blocked and settled right

before the goalline before

being controlled, but Lynnfield

just couldn’t extend its lead.

A few minutes later,

Hamilton-Wenham broke

through with two quick goals

before the half to go up 4-2.

Lynnfield once again couldn’t

get on the board in the third

and Hamilton-Wenham added

another to go up 5-2.

Briggs finally got Lynnfield

COURTESY PHOTO | JOHN DIAS

In a battle of two undefeated teams the Essex County Senior

League last week, the Lynnfield Bears beat Hamilton Wenham

Generals 12-0 to take over first place and win their ninth

straight game.

Lulu Dias pitched a no-hitter with 10 strikeouts and one walk

to shut down the Generals. Excellent catching by Caitlin

Buoniconti and great fielding plays by Julie Corrente and Kaila

George highlighted the win.

back on the board in fourth,

ripping a shot after a prolonged

possession that cut the deficit

to 5-3.

Hamilton-Wenham matched

Briggs’ goal two minutes later

to go back up by three. Damiani

had a shot ring off the crossbar

next, but Lynnfield grabbed a

rebound and Calichman capped

off the scoring with his goal to

cut the lead to 6-4 in the final

minutes.

“I think it was a really strong

defensive effort all game,”

Lamusta said. “You look at

the ground ball column and we

also did a good job there. We

just have to make sure we capitalize

on opportunities coming

off the defensive effort. We’re

getting one step closer to our

team gelling and the offense

coming together.”

Lynnfield (1-4) hosts

Newburyport Friday (3:45).

“We’re only a few games

in,” Lamusta said. “The thing

is, it’s a shorter season so we

have to make the most of every

game. Each game, win or lose,

you have to make sure you’re

getting a little better.”

The Lynnfield Bears are (back

row, from left) Kalia George,

Morgan Hubbard, Lulu Dias,

Gia Marotta, Julia Corrente,

Izzy Fiorentino and (front

row, from left) Marianna

Axiiotakis, Gia Gagnon,

Caitlin Buoniconti, Rori

Caprio, Mallory Desilvio and

(not pictured) Sydney Danese.

THURSDAY

Baseball

Lynnfield at Amesbury (3:45)

St. John’s Prep at Malden Catholic (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Peabody at Danvers (4)

Girls Lacrosse

Danvers at Peabody (4)

Track

Pentucket at Lynnfield (3:30)

FRIDAY

Baseball

Peabody at Salem (4)

Softball

Lynnfield at Ipswich (3:45)

Peabody at Danvers (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Newburyport at Lynnfield (3:45)

Girls Lacrosse

Lynnfield at Newburyport (5:15)

Boys Tennis

Lynnfield at Ipswich (4:30)

Girls Tennis

Ipswich at Lynnfield (4:30)

SATURDAY

Baseball

Ipswich at Lynnfield (10)

Bishop Fenwick at Winthrop (10 & 2)

Boys Tennis

Bishop Feehan at Bishop Fenwick (2)

Girls Tennis

Bishop Fenwick at Bishop Feehan (2)

MONDAY

Baseball

Bishop Fenwick at Essex Tech (10)

St. John’s Prep at Xaverian (4)

Peabody at Saugus (4)

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULE

Softball

Lynnfield at Triton (11)

Swampscott at Peabody (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Lynnfield at Amesbury (10)

Bishop Fenwick at Matignon (TBD)

Boys Tennis

Amesbury at Lynnfield (10)

Girls Tennis

Lynnfield at Amesbury (11)

TUESDAY

Baseball

Bishop Fenwick at St. Joseph’s Prep (3:30)

Triton at Lynnfield (3:45)

Softball

St. Joseph’s Prep at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Gloucester at Peabody (4:30)

Boys Lacrosse

Ipswitch at Lynnfield (4)

Bishop Feehan at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Peabody at Beverly (4)

Girls Lacrosse

Bishop Fenwick at St. Joseph’s Prep (4)

Beverly at Peabody (4)

Lynnfield at Ipswich (4:30)

Boys Tennis

Bishop Fenwick at St. Mary’s (3:30)

Girls Tennis

Bishop Fenwick at Austin Prep (3:30)

MONDAY

Baseball

Peabody at Danvers (4)

Boys Tennis

Bishop Fenwick at Austin Prep (3:30)

Girls Tennis

Arlington Catholic at Bishop Fenwick (3:30)

Winthrop at Peabody (4)

Track

Peabody at Swampscott (4)

D’Amico notches

RBI in Prep victory

BASEBALL

By Mike Alongi

DANVERS — The St. John’s

Prep baseball team leaned on

strong pitching and timely

hitting Monday afternoon,

notching its fourth straight win

after taking down St. John’s

(Shrewsbury) by a score of 6-0

at Pete Frates Field.

It was Sam Beliveau who

got the job done on the mound

for the Eagles, tossing a complete-game

shutout. Beliveau

struck out seven batters in the

victory, walking just one.

Despite not registering a hit

on the day, Eric Wing led the

Eagles with two RBI thanks to

the rare two-run sacrifice fly.

Lynnfield native Pat D’Amico

went 2-for-3 with a double

and one RBI, while Payton

Palladino, Christopher Dirks

and Shane Williams each had

one RBI.

The Prep did all its damage

over the course of two innings

— the bottom of the first and

the bottom of the fourth. After

Beliveau struck out the side in

the top of the first, the Eagles

2 Large

Cheese Pizzas

$15.99

Open for take-out

and delivery

came up and got started quickly

with two walks and a double

to load up the bases. After a

popout, Wing stepped up to

the plate and smashed a deep

fly ball to right field. Palladino

scored easily on the fly, then

D’Amico also managed to find

his way home from second

base on the throw to make it

2-0. Next up was Dirks, who

laced an RBI single to right

field to make it 3-0.

The score remained there

until the fourth. A walk and a

hit batter put two runners on

with no outs for the Prep, and

then Williams knocked an RBI

single up the middle to put

the Eagles up by four runs.

Palladino knocked Williams

home on an RBI groundout two

batters later, then D’Amico

rounded out the scoring when

he knocked an RBI single up

the middle to make it 6-0.

Beliveau took it from there,

only allowing two hits and

three baserunners over the

course of the last three innings

to seal the win.

St. John’s Prep is now 6-1 on

the season.


12

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

Pioneers fall short to Hamilton-Wenham

PHOTOS | Julia Hopkins

Lynnfield’s Jack Calichman celebrates after scoring a goal against Hamilton-Wenham.

Lynnfield’s Will Steadman winds up for a shot on net.

Lynnfield’s Drew Damiani looks to the referee for calls on a play.

Lynnfield’s Drew Damiani looks to pass the ball.

Lynnfield’s Myles McKay evades Hamilton-Wenham defenders.


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 13

Kids take the field to keep fun on track

COURTESY PHOTOS | Alexandra Buonfiglio

Left to right: Quinn Panos, Caitlin Buoniconti, Gabriella Bottaro, Chase Carangelo, Cameron Carangelo, William Fuller and Shea McCarthy.

LYNNFIELD — The second Lynnfield Youth Track and Field

meet was held Saturday, May 22 at the middle school.

Eighth-grade girls Chase Carangelo, Gabriella Bottaro, and Caitlin

Buoniconti swept the first-place finishes, each winning two individual

events. Look out for them on the high-school sports scene

next year.

On the boys’ side, fourth-grader Brandon Doherty shocked the

crowd with two first-place finishes against much older competitors.

Fifth graders Claire Halsey and Quinn Panos took home the

Rising Star awards for their impressive performances against older

competitors.

Halsey cleared 3’10” in the high jump and ran 22.65 in the 100m

hurdles. Panos cleared 4’0” in the high jump and ran 16.23 in the

100m dash.

First-place finishes:

100-meter hurdles: Caitlin Buoniconti (20.03) & William Fuller

(17.54)

100-meter dash: Chase Carangelo (14.46) & Brandon Doherty

(13.35)

800-meter run: Gabriella Bottaro (3:03) & Shea McCarthy (3:03)

High Jump: Chase Carangelo (4’6”) & Cameron Carangelo (4’8”)

Long Jump: Caitlin Buoniconti (11’10”) & Brandon Doherty

(12’1”)

Shot put: Gabriella Bottaro (15’0”) & Lucas Westscott (15’10”)

Information and photos provided by Alexandra Buonfiglio.

Gabrielle Bottaro

Quinn Panos

Chase Carangelo

Brandon Doherty

Caitlin Buoniconti


14

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 MAY 27, 2021

Students celebrate return to live theatre

PHOTOS | Julia Hopkins

Billy Crocker, played by Dylan Pool, left, and Hope Harcourt, played by Kim Daniels, perform

“Easy To Love” during the Sunday showing of Anything Goes at Lynnfield High School.

Billy Crocker, played by Dylan Pool, right, and Reno Sweeny, played by Aidan Briggs perform

“You’re The Top” during the Sunday showing of Anything Goes at Lynnfield High School.

Kyle Morais performs as Elisha J. Whitney in the Sunday

showing of Anything Goes at Lynnfield High School.

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Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net


MAY 27, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 15

“Anything Goes” gets students onstage

PHOTOS | Julia Hopkins

Reno Sweeny, played by Aidan Briggs, performs “You’re

The Top” during the Sunday showing of Anything Goes at

Lynnfield High School.

Billy Crocker, played by Dylan Pool, right, dips Hope Harcourt, played by Kim Daniels, perform

during the Sunday showing of Anything Goes at Lynnfield High School.

Elisha J. Whitney, played by Kyle Morais, welcomes Moonface Martin, played by Chris Collins,

left, into the room during the performance of Anything Goes at Lynnfield High School.

Billy Crocker, played by Dylan Pool, right, and Reno Sweeny, played by Aidan Briggs share a

musical number during the Sunday showing of Anything Goes at Lynnfield High School.

Hope Harcourt, played by Kim Daniels, performs “Easy

To Love” during the Sunday showing of Anything Goes at

Lynnfield High School.


16

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