27.05.2021 Views

Untold Stories: Poetry at English Heritage

Untold Stories – Poetry at English Heritage took place in the autumn of 2020. Through new commissions, a poetry exchange and a public competition the programme allowed us to experience English Heritage sites in new ways and offered opportunities for everyone to explore our past through poetry. The programme was co-curated by Jacob Sam-La Rose, English Heritage’s Poet in Residence. This digital anthology brings together a collection of works written as part of the programme. It features poems written in Shout Out Loud workshops led by Malika Booker; as part of the Untold Stories Poetry Competition; and by commissioned poets Esme Allman, Nii Ayikwei Parkes, Jay Bernard, Malika Booker, Safiya Kamaria Kinshasa and Jacob Sam-La Rose. english-heritage.org.uk/untold-stories

Untold Stories – Poetry at English Heritage took place in the autumn of 2020. Through new commissions, a poetry exchange and a public competition the programme allowed us to experience English Heritage sites in new ways and offered opportunities for everyone to explore our past through poetry. The programme was co-curated by Jacob Sam-La Rose, English Heritage’s Poet in Residence.

This digital anthology brings together a collection of works written as part of the programme. It features poems written in Shout Out Loud workshops led by Malika Booker; as part of the Untold Stories Poetry Competition; and by commissioned poets Esme Allman, Nii Ayikwei Parkes, Jay Bernard, Malika Booker, Safiya Kamaria Kinshasa and Jacob Sam-La Rose.

english-heritage.org.uk/untold-stories

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS

Create successful ePaper yourself

Turn your PDF publications into a flip-book with our unique Google optimized e-Paper software.

inspired by: Tintagel Castle<br />

Artognou<br />

emily pritchard<br />

We write our small names everywhere –<br />

each piece of paper th<strong>at</strong> I used in school,<br />

marked yours <strong>at</strong> the ends of letters,<br />

auto-filled in online forms, inside book jackets,<br />

under every childhood drawing, and left<br />

on the fl<strong>at</strong> sl<strong>at</strong>e slabs of Welsh beaches.<br />

Like you, Artognou, your name not carved<br />

but scr<strong>at</strong>ched into the surface, just enough<br />

to last these fifteen hundred years<br />

scrawled underside a drain cover <strong>at</strong> Tintagel:<br />

Artognou, descendant of P<strong>at</strong>ernus Colus made [this] –<br />

then, again – Colus made [this]. Your name,<br />

Artognou, something like Known-As-A-Bear<br />

or Known-As-The-Bear, but you’re not known<br />

<strong>at</strong> all, Artognou, your first three letters seized<br />

upon and twisted, your stone becoming Arthur’s<br />

Stone, broken on all sides, its meaning cracked,<br />

your name become a sign, something to hang<br />

our hopes upon, to make the leap from myth to fact<br />

and back again. Reading your name this way<br />

is laying claim, saying here is where it happened<br />

and I do the same, use my name’s root to root<br />

myself, tell how Pritchard means ap Rhisiart, son<br />

of Richard, how my grandf<strong>at</strong>her spoke only Welsh<br />

till he was eight years old and I speak none <strong>at</strong> all,<br />

hold on to my name like it’s a tool, and with it I can<br />

scr<strong>at</strong>ch myself into those rocky cliffs – ask, hand<br />

on stone, to be remembered, to be a part of [this].<br />

27

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!