Future Experiences: Stress Less

student68245

F U T U R E

E X P E R I E N C E S

A RWEN BORRIS


Educating

Technological

Communicating

Cancer

Future

Working

Prevention

&

Detection

Cancer

CI

Personal

Well-being

Future

Living

Care

&

Treatment

Social

Beyond

Cancer

CANCER COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE:

A FUTURE ECOSYSTEM

2


Table of Contents

Brief

Meet the Team

Project Launch

S.T.E.E.E.P.L.E Cards

CI Statements

Unintended Consequences

Manifestations

Future Vision

Mood Board

Proposed Props

Emotional Journey Map

Our Step Back

The Patient Network

Future Vision-Revisited

Manifestations-Revisited

Mood board-Revisited

Metaphor Sketches

Storyboard

Video

Communication

Poster Proposals

Web-page

Reflection Part One

3


Design Brief

“Designing future experiences of

cancer in 2030 enabled by advances in

collective intelligence”

Exploring health and care in the

post Covid world, this project will

investigate what cancer will look like

ten years into the future. With a speculative

and analytical approach, it will discover

future living and future working. Glasgow

School of Art students will work closely with

cancer experts across the world to research,

predict and design for the future of cancer

care. The designers will work in groups of

four for the research phase then proceed to

part 2 of the project individually to produce

a product, service or experience outcome.

4


James Lu Arwen Borris Sian MacKay Ibrahim Afzal

Meet the Team

Our group was assigned Cancer future working within

Care and Treatment: informing Professional judgements

on therapies and care pathways.

5


PROJECT LAUNCH

Upon our first encounter with the experts we discussed various

stakeholders involved in Care and Treatment using Mural and Zoom as a

documenting platform.

Palliative

care staff

Radiotherapists

Survivors

Statisticians

Consultants

Pharmaceutical

Companies

Nurses

Surgeons

Family

Charity

Workers

Oncologist

Patient

NHS Computer

Scientist

Peers

Financial

Support

Having identified these stakeholders, we began our desk research and

explored potential locations they and their patient would be in, time frames

of how long they were involved for and their importance in the system.

6


Exploring our

Domain

Why is it important?

Prepare the

patient to live

with cancer

Support

Network

Educating

Prolong Life

Generating

patient data

Manage side

effects

Recovering

Mental Health

Where does it happen?

Living with

cancer

Oncology

Ward

Radiology

Isolation/

Shielding

alone

During travel

Community

Centres for

help groups

At work

Hospitals

Social

Media

Patients Home

Blogging

Platforms

Hospice

Pharmacies

Charity Shops

When does it occur?

Post Treatment

Beyond

Cancer

During

Diagnosis

Palliative Care

Time waiting

for diagnosis

Post

Diagnosis

Self-Help

Over long

periods of

time

7


S.T.E.E.E.P.L.E

CARDS

8


As done previously in other projects, we formed research

cards from our desk research, these would act as inspiration

and influencers for our project to follow.

9


S.T.E.E.E.P.L.E. Cards Analysis

To understand our strands of thinking we mindmapped and filtered the steeeple cards.

The three main categories derived from this were Humanitarian, Legal and Medical.

This also showed a divide in both the “Care” and “Treatment” aspects of our project.

‘Humanitarian/Care’ had the subsections of the individual patient and the community whilst

‘treatment’ was the practical and legal sectors. Education, Technology, Environmental Impact

and Money also overlapped into all of our clusters too.

10


11


Collective Intelligence

Allows lived cancer

experiences to connect with

current cancer cases through

real-time data collecting to

enhance patient and staff

knowledge

Collective Intelligence

Allows cancer workers to

improve communication

globally and/or locally

thus opening up future

career collaborations across

disciplines

Collective Intelligence

Can allow the patient to

have more control and

freedom in their treatment

by connecting with various

forms of support

12


UNINTENDED

CONSEQUENCES

“An exploratory workshop to uncover the unanticipated effects of change”

"A design futures tool to explore the knock-on effects of change"

We pushed our future thinking

forward in such a short space

of time through Andthen’s

'Unintended Consequences' workshop.

Here, we were able to think divergently,

brainstorming multiple futures and the

ramifications of each in a short period of time.

I felt hurried by the pace of the workshop but

it gave me little time to consider my more

rational thought process allowing me to be

more speculative and not worry about perfect

answers which I have been prone to sticking

with in the past.

Among the consequences we gathered as

a group, some of my favourites were our

hypothesised: “black market medicine due to

the NHS privatisation”, “a cancer retreat” and

“a divide between those who use technology

and those who avoid and fear it due to its

invasion of privacy.”

13


UNINTENDED

CONSEQUENCES

1st

Consequence

2nd

Consequence

New jobs

specific to

handling the

vast amount of

data collected

Connecting

globally allows

one country

to learn from

another

A collective

group is

formed to

regulate and

cater treatment

globally

Family/carers

being more

responsible for their

family members

with cancer

Staff can

see the patient

recovery journeys

to help their

mental health

Public and

private

support will

collaborate

Machines

choosing the

medication

rather than

doctors

Older staff

struggle with

ever changing

technology

updates

More support

for staff wellbeing

Technology

allows the

healthcare team

to be more

connected

Harder to get

employment

in the medical

field

Trained by

technology

walk through

=> more

experienced

Survivor

stories

increase

New

Technology will

allow patient

and doctors to

communicate

remotely

Mental health

workers will

be directly

connected to

medical staff

New jobs

positions are

created

Security

issues with

live data

New

services will

be created to

accommodate

treating cancer

at home

Hospitals will

become more

human and

personalised

Technology

Will be installed

in the home

to help with

Cancer

More

connected in

the medical

world with

each other

Staff work

less hours due

to mental and

physical toll of

a high pressure

job

3rd

Consequence

Mass

unemployment

due to rise of

machines

Mental health

issues become the

new mainstream/

feared illness

Society

becomes more

enlightened

on what causes

cancer

The world

becomes too

tech-driven

14


Manifestations

Bringing our conclusions from the

andthen workshop, we summarised

them into 5 building blocks that would

build the foundations of our future world and

explore its potential within the medical field.

Medical Treatment

Transported

Rise in domestic treatment; medical

services will travel to patients

instead of hospital visits. Mobile

hospitals will become popular as the

Coronavirus continues to spread

through stationary hospitals with

semi-permanent patients that could

be treated at home

Human Centred

Approach To Cancer

Treatment At Home

A human centred approach

will become more prominent

in treating cancer at home

enabling increased freedom

and control to the patient

over their lifestyle.

15


Cancer Retreat

An optional full-time retreat

programme with doctors, fellow

patients and all medical equipment

required will all be in one place.

This centralised expert team in one

sanitary clean facility will increase

the chances of survival and take

pressure off public hospitals.

Technology vs.

Technophobic

Technology privacy and

affordability creates a huge

divide. Technophobic

people will require human

interactions whilst those fully

adapted to technology may

struggle to communicate

socially without it.

No Medical Information

on the Internet

The internet can provide people with useful

information but it can be dangerous too. The

digital search for symptoms will be banned,

preventing false self-diagnosis and ensure

professional medical advice is always used.

16


FUTURE VISION

Our mood board sharpened our focus on what represented our world in ten

years time. Showcasing empathy and humanising technology as key values

essential to 2030, we aimed to fuel our future projects around these key

themes. However, we also intended to challenge them, showing the dystopia

version of technology advancements and human emotions too.

17


MOOD BOARD

As part of our GOODD workshop, we created a mood board

based on our Care and Treatment approach in 2030 we wanted a

welcoming relaxing invitation to the future. Allowing technology

to make your life easier whilst you feel in control of it.

Object

The relationship between

technology and humans

becoming closer than ever

Personality

Teamwork, overcoming

cancer together, its not

a battle to do alone, we

all need support

Activity

The cancer blogger,

controlling your own

care and treatment

Architecture

Mobile hospitals

- medical staff

travel to you

Key Value

Humanising Technologyadvancements

no longer

daunting

Material

self-medicating in your

home with medical

equipment that you trust

Tone of Voice

Knowledge from a reliable

source; the internet cannot

always be trusted

Typeface

delicate yet bold

personality, it has

character to it

Colour

clean, precise,calm,

peaceful, friendly, purity

18


Giving a more grounded context to our

vision we created three proposed items for

our film.

Proposed Props

CHIPPED MEDICATION

Pills programmed to travel to a

specific place in the body, transmit

their location, collect live data

and inform a remote medical staff

member that the medicine has been

consumed.

MEDICINE ON WHEELS

Mobile clinics and

medication dispensers that

deliver healthcare straight to

the patients door

SHARED

RESPONSIBILITY DEVICE

A monitor that suggests sleep pattern,

medication consumption and exercise

appropriate to your treatment. Providing the

most appropriate care to its individual patient

allowing them to make educated decisions

about their health and well-being. Medical

Staff can oversee this progress remotely.

19


USER JOURNEY

The GOODD workshop asked us to create a scenario in 2030 with a selected stakeholder.

We roleplayed as a GP considering duties and human behaviour but alone, we

struggled to map out their journey. Understanding that care and treatment was about

a relationship between staff and patient, we created the scenario with both parties involved.

Showing each moment and their corresponding emotions. The patient is displayed in the light

blue whilst the GP in the dark blue.

Patient

MoMent

Live data

understands

patient life style

Patient starts

having cancer

systems

Patients get

informed and

have a video

meeting with the

doctor

Patient gets

visit/contact

from the doctor

Staff

Searching

patient history

and analysing

data

Identifies cancer

symptoms from

data notifies their

doctor

Doctor interviews

patients with

detailed

questions

Doctor arrived

with hospital on

wheels and does

tests on patients

Patient

At ease, trusts

machines more

with healthcare

Upset and

Confused

eMotions

Staff

Out of their

hands allows

patients to be

identified easier

Uncertainty

Looks over just

to double check

machine findings

- machine bias

Feels

knowledgeable

confirming data,

but with human

empathetic

approach

Human contact =

comfort

Travels to

patients house

daunting

visiting a home

20


atient gets

sit/contact

the doctor

Patients tries

to process the

information

Patient makes

the decision

what treatment

option they want

Patient receives

first cycle of

treatment to

their doorstep

tor arrived

hospital on

ls and does

on patients

Diagnoses

patients and

informs them of

treatments and

side effects

Doctor also

contacts fellow

healthcare staff

to advise too

Doctor talks

through the

process of the

patients chosen

treatment

Doctor syncs

patients home

devices to their

treatment, fit bit,

alarm etc.

Machines

produce the

first cycle of

personalised

medicine

Anxious, scared,

upset, angry?

Assisted by

technology to treat

Feels a sense

of control and

involvement

an contact =

comfort

Anxious, scared,

upset, angry?

Modern and

independent

ravels to

tients house

daunting

ting a home

Sympathetic

role has to

comfort patients

emotionally

and

professionally

Is patient and

supportive whilst

explaining

Less control

and pressure

to make

decision for

patient

Joint

responsibility

and variety of

advice: less

bias

21


SCENARIO

Presenting all the props posed tricky as they covered various aspects of care and treatment.

We settled on explaining the chipped medication, tracking live patient data and remote

monitoring by a staff member as a patient takes control of their treatment at home.

Leaving out medication on wheels and putting it separate on the scenario board.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZHv8wLkgIMA&feature=emb_title

Our video for the andthen workshop integrated our

props. Working in four different houses with four

different styles really showed itself; we weren’t too happy

with the video due to this but it portrayed our future

vision enough to progress from the workshop.

22


OUR STEP

BACKWARD

Care & treatMent

Upon reflection from our expert

input day we decided to change

course slightly, having gone down

a more patient focussed route rather than

staff. We revisited various aspects of our

project responding to the double diamond

process and applying it to a future working

perspective

staFF

Future Working

Patient

Design Opportunities

01 02

Giving patients empathy whilst

remaining professional in the work

place in a world where there are

less human interactions and more

technology in care and treatment

The communication channel to

strengthen between staff but also to

expand to patients to include them

in decision making.

23


PATIENT NETWORK

“At the moment we rely on the patient being the

communicator” - Expert

A zoom call group discussing the network

When looking over the project

as a whole, the project launch

resurfaced itself. We were

able to reapply its importance presenting

the stakeholders as a network. With the

patient being in the centre and showing the

stakeholders responsibilities that overlapped.

For example the patient is given a diagnosis

from the GP, who prescribes a medication and

the pharmacist distributes the prescription to

the patient therefore the GP and Pharmacist

are connected by “Prescription” duties.

This network was a key turning point in our

project, it made us look differently towards

staff communication and their individual

roles.

We found interesting insights in the places

where the connections were vital (Pharmacist

and GP for prescription) likewise found

the connections that were missing just as

intriguing (Admin and therapist etc.).

We spent a lot of time throughout our project

referring back to this diagram and which

places of interest on the network would fuel

our own individual projects as we progressed

into part 2

24


PATIENT

NETWORK

The numbers reflect where our design

opportunities manifest within the patient

network

Fundraising

Genetic Data

01

Home Carer

Give Treatment

Give Treatment

Family

Blood/organ

donation

Forming

Relationships

Family Support

Hope

Provisions

Forming

Relationships

Family Support

Hope

Therapist

Resources

Resources

Charities

Funding

Funding

Community

Re-educating

Re-educating

Survivors

Advice

Empathy

Support

Identity

Learning

Opportunity

Awareness

Check-ups

Advice

Empathy

Awareness

Learning

Opportunity

Check-ups

Phone Calls

Lab staff

Results

Results

GP

Diagnosis

Patient

Network

Primary Contact

Nurse

Paperwork

Paperwork

Receptionist

Digital

Verify diet plan

Health

Prescription

Communication

Channel

Medication

Verify diet plan

Health

Prescription

Medication

Surgery

Communication

Channel

Appointment

Live Data

Medication

Appointment

Live Data

Dietician

Diet plan

Diet plan

Pharmacist

Shared Knowledge

Shared Knowledge

Surgeon

Shared Knowledge

Shared Knowledge

Consultant

Absences/Holidays

Absences/Holidays

Admin

Advise

Drugs Supply

New Drugs

Experimental

Decision maker

Drugs Supply

Experimental

Medical

Companies

Advise

Advertisement

Advertisement

Medical

Researchers

New Drugs

02

New Technology

Statistics

New Technology

Statistics

Maintenance

Computer

Science

Live Data


FUTURE VISION

-REVISITED

“ You used to know your patients, you knew they have a dog, that

it was their daughter that brought them to the hospital etc. Now

its just a phone call and you don’t get to know them” - Expert

Humanising

Technology

Shared Responsibility

Empathy

Communication

We wanted to emphasise shared responsibility and the more holistic aspects to medicine in 2030

as we believed it to be a priority in the future. We adjusted our vision accordingly looking closer

at ‘future working’, staff communication and well-being.

26


Manifestations

Revisited

With more time to reflect on our unintended

consequences results we formed new

manifestation cards that we felt were more

refined to future working

27


MOOD BOARD

REVISITED

New Sensory focussed Mood Board

Our mood board also needed altered from the harsh contrasting utopia

and dystopia images. We explored the senses in this new mood board,

highlighting comforting feelings and relaxing visuals whilst portraying a

technology driven world underneath.

28


Metaphor Sketches

Our future of Care and Treatment would be

built upon the foundations of communication

between the stakeholders involved. But we

needed a way to represent this complex

situation into a clear visual metaphor.

29


STORY BOARDING

Initial Future Vision Video: https://vimeo.com/504547169

Showing that only when every member of

the Patient’s care and treatment network

communicate will the system work; we

chose the bike and cogs metaphor for our video.

The story board is shown above and represents

the following.

Each stakeholder involved in the cancer patient’s

process e.g. dietician, charity worker and

surgeon; are all represented by a cog. These cogs

when working and communicating collectively

allow the bike to turn and therefore the patient

to continue to peddle through life. When a cog

is removed the rest struggle having to work

harder and the patient has to push to keep

cycling.

When too many cogs stop working or are under

stress, the bike falls apart. The patient is no

longer supported and the care and treatment

fails.

30


Video

“A series of little changes can have

a big effect” - Nicol Keith

We were able to meet in

the studio for a day

with our props to film

and edit. It’s ending was a bit

grim (the bike crashed with the

patient on it) but it did bring the

powerful message across effectively.

Our tutors and Nicol felt it was

a strong metaphor that portrayed

the importance of communication

well. However in developing it, they

asked for us to show specifically

these interdisciplinary interactions

rather than simply suggest them. We

took this on board improving these

local and global interactions in our

revisited video.

https://vimeo.com/504537084


COMMUNICATION

“Communication underlines care and treatment I think its the

corner stone of giving good care and treatment. Communication,

I think, is something we don’t do well.” - Expert

Our experts confirmed our predictions about the importance of communication

and the lack of it in our current system. In order to produce better care

and treatment the level of communication and quality of data refined to the

specific stakeholders who needed it would have to be improved. There is either

too much information broadcast everywhere; information being passed to the

wrong people or not enough information communicated to any channel at all.

We created a short video of an interview with a 2030 Oncologist to show what

we had changed for the future working care and treatment staff:

https://vimeo.com/504534222

32


POSTER PROPOSALS

01

We needed

a poster

that

summarised our

research and

conclusions from

part 1 of the

project. Continuing

with our cogs and

bike metaphor we

began sketching.

The ‘Blueprints’ to future cancer care

02

Our first

proposals

stated

our values and an

info-graphic of the

network: a patient

cycling and the

staff represented

as cogs working

below to power

the bike similar to

the video.

The core values of care and treatment

33


Chosen Infographic displaying Care and Treatment Network

03

34


04

FINAL

POSTER

Our final poster (displayed above)

presented our complex patient

network in a more simplified

manner. Having images of the stakeholders

involved helped show that it was about

human interactions and working together that

would all in all change the service of care and

treatment.

35


Product design Work About

Future Experience

Sian, Arwen, Ibrahim, James

The future of Cancer care and treatment is one of transparency and empathy,

technology will become more humanised and will be welcomed for its

collected knowledge and precision in many situations including surgery and

prescription advice. Communication will be at the heart of future working and

there will be a strong focus for staff members health and wellbeing with

sopport for those who need it.

Hospitals and individuals working within departments will be connected both

locally and globally sharing knowledge and responsibility of patients. Post

coronavirus, safety and hygiene will remain a top priority with those who do

not need to be treated at hospital getting the care they require provided to

them at home. The future of care and treatment is built open the foundations of

a patient network, all stakeholders involved with the patient from diagnosis to

beyond cancer will share responsibility for them with a recognition that no

matter how small of role, we must all take part otherwise the eco-system fails.

As represented below our metaphor for the patient network is demonstrated by

a patient riding the bike of care and treatment, each staff member involved is

symbolised as a cog, when all working, the patient can cycle through life

smoothly as one or several fail it puts a strain on the rest of the cogs/staff,

causing the patient to struggle.

Web-page

“The future exhibit with the staff

network was really interesting with all

the connections” - Expert

Our web-page laid out all our work in

an organised form that was easy to

follow. It was something fairly new

to me but as a team it was easy to compile it

all together.

Having experienced the previous issue of

different styles in four different locations we

decided to delegate tasks amongst the group

so as to have a coherent style throughout

various aspects of our project presentations.

We continued to communicate through

zoom calls reporting our progress and

advising each other in order to meet our

deadline.

https://ibrahim2964.wixsite.com/careandtreatment?fbclid=IwAR3Kt1PKKStbh6iqyeD__AnSxFL6iGslHq508L4x8hSN-

9mQliSDYGgYIh_g

Key Research

Preventing Burnouts

"44% of doctors are currently suffering from depression, anxiety,

stress or other mental health issues, related to or caused by work"

Ethics of data sharing

"With social media playing a bigger role in cancer charities,

patients and survivors, there will be issues with research and

development"

Puppy therapy

"More than 5000 therapy dogs exist in the us"

Personalised Medicine

"Precision medicine and personalised medicine are highly related

and genomics play a big role in both"

A taste of home

"While 94% said they felt more relaxed using virtual realities in

hospital treatment, 80% said they felt less pain when wearing

headset"


REFLECTION

“It’s hard to tell patients they have cancer when you can't

hold their hand, pass them a tissue or even hug them whilst

being head to toe in PPE” - Expert

So far, I had really enjoyed the

project, I felt it was such an

important topic to work on

that the whole class appeared fully

invested and gave it 100%.

Despite feeling a little unprepared

having little to no knowledge on

the workings of a cancer ward I

felt respected by our experts and

discovered just how effective and

adaptable our design skills were.

We were very rapidly understanding

issues that our experts faced, they

opened up to us as we questioned

them sharing thoughts and

opinions to current and potential

problems that would arise in the

future. Using the "Yes, and...." and

"What if brainstorming" ideation

techniques whilst in conversation

with them allowed us to explore

multiple avenues for the future with

them whilst they were able to make

us aware of the rational medical

boundaries and issues we would

face; this in turn directed our desk

research throughout the project

Although often struggling to be

happy with the quality of our work

produced in the early weeks of this

project due to very tight schedules; it

did force us to come to conclusions

becoming less rational, allowing

our creative work to be more

speculative suiting the 2030 theme.

As we returned to our previous

work we redone various aspects:

tidying up loose sketches; adding

more focus and specific imagery

into our mood boards. Having done

the groundwork on short deadlines

allowed us to produce the framework

for our projects without wasting

time.

Through part 1 our direction

changed quite dramatically; perhaps

fuelled by the experts always

discussing and wanting the best for

their patients we had realised around

halfway through that our projects

still had a strong patient focus.

Our understanding had been that

the future of care and treatment

would be a shared responsibility

between both staff and patient. But

we were a future working group

so remaining with our ‘shared

responsibility’ logic we turned

to look towards this within the

relationship between staff. Had it

not been for this reflection I think

our outcome would have lost it's

value for our intended user.

37


F U T U R E

E X P E R I E N C E S

P ART T WO


Table of Contents

Continued Research

Unintended Consequences

Concepts

Detailed Patient Journey

Stakeholders Research

Chosen Persona

The Eco-System

Current User Journey

Video Planning

Future 2030 User Journey

2030 Mood Board

Speculative Making

Artefacts

Anna’s Empathy Map

Further Development

Colour Psychology

Further Development

Micro Expressions

Poster

Video

Reflection Part 2

39


CONTINUED RESEARCH

STEEEPLE CARDS

Dedicating research time to develop

my knowledge on the current

field of Care and Treatment,

allowed me to explore in more detail the

roles of various stakeholders and the process

patients go through from diagnosis to

beyond cancer.

In my desk research I also brought some

more creative inspiration to my project

in the form of more steeeple cards.

Taking an interest into the humanitarian,

holistic and care aspect of future working,

many of these were social themed.

40


“I think the Staff Burnout is a really good topic.

There are huge challenges around burnout. We’ve

got hundreds of nurses off due to a combination of

stress and illness and a lot of that is tied to burnout”

- Expert

41


UNINTENDED

CONSEQUENCES

The Healthcare

system becomes

more emotionally

understanding

Lack of

medical staff

Hygiene and

safety will remain

a top priority in

hospitals postcovid

19

Rise of brand

transparency

New

roles in

healthcare

Sympathetic

qualities are

desired in medical

staff for patients

emotional support

Focus on

staff’s mental

health

Emotional and

physical strain

on healthcare

staff as there is

an increase in

cancer patients

Smart

homes and

workplaces

Rise in staff

burnout

Carefully selected as the ones I found most interesting,

I returned to our unintended consequences and

expanded slightly upon them

42


In preparation for the next Studio Andthen workshop I

generated 5 concepts each questioning the 5 W's. I felt

rushed and didn’t think I developed enough, finding

that I was repeating things I had discussed before.

Concepts

WHO IS INVOLVED? - A new communicator job role

WHAT ARE THEY DOING? - Taking responsibility to pass information between

relevant stakeholders

WHY ARE THEY DOING IT? - To be the link in the chain for interdisciplinary working

WHEN WHEN WILL IT OCCUR? - An opportunity for this role will be recognised and

developed with technology assistance

WHERE WILL IT BE LOCATED? - Assigned to only a few patients each there will be an

office for each department

WHO IS INVOLVED? - All stakeholders in care and treatment.

WHAT ARE THEY DOING? - Joining a retreat that has cancer specialities in one place

WHY ARE THEY DOING IT? - To learn and join in “cancer camp” with fun carefully

selected activities

WHEN WILL IT OCCUR? - 2030 for month long periods at a time - perhaps longer

for patients

WHERE WILL IT BE LOCATED? - In the countryside separate from public hospitals

WHO IS INVOLVED? - New medically qualified supervising job and Patients

WHAT ARE THEY DOING? - Monitoring patients health remotely through wearable’s

WHY ARE THEY DOING IT? - allows the patient more freedom, not bound to the

hospital

WHEN WILL IT OCCUR? - Everyday 24/7 monitoring

WHERE WILL IT BE LOCATED? - Within the patient home and office for this job role

WHO IS INVOLVED? - Nurses

WHAT ARE THEY DOING? - Taking a VR break after a distressing moment

WHY ARE THEY DOING IT? - To improve health and well-being in turn producing

better work

WHEN WILL IT OCCUR? - On staff ’s shift when they are noticeably stressed WHERE

WILL IT BE LOCATED? - A small room within the department

WHO IS INVOLVED? - Doctors, Nurses and Patients

WHAT ARE THEY DOING? - Working in smaller hospitals

WHY ARE THEY DOING IT? - To improve accessibility for patients

WHEN WILL IT OCCUR? - Gradually over several years leading up to mid 2030

WHERE WILL IT BE LOCATED? - Evenly spaced amongst cities

43


DETAILED PATIENT

JOURNEY

Lucy makes an

appointment

with her GP

The GP

contacts a

specialist

Receptionist

Lucy has

concerns a lump

has developed in

her breast

She is

seen by

the GP

Lucy is

seen by an

oncologist in

a clinic

The tests are

analysed in

the labs by the

haematologists and

others

They take her

blood and

conduct other

tests

She gets sent home

as an outpatient

and gets told she’ll

be informed

The

Radiographer takes

the scans

She goes to

the radiology

department and

gets scans

The radiologist

and oncologist

reads the scans

The oncologist

does a physical

exam and takes

tests

The

Receptionist

arranges an

appointment

She gets called

back in and is

diagnosed with

cancer

The room has a

nurse specialist,

oncologist,

consultant and

trainee oncologist

students

After a lot of researching and discussion

with experts I put myself in the shoes

of a patient (Lucy), role-playing her

experience to form a patient’s journey through

breast cancer (light blue storyboard) plotting on

the journey where I predicted the specific stakeholders

interacted with the patient (shown in

dark blue). This, although not entirely accurate

gave me a far better understanding into the care

and treatment process.

44


The radiologist

and oncologist

reads the scans

She gets called

back in and is

diagnosed with

cancer

The room has a

nurse specialist,

oncologist,

consultant and

trainee oncologist

students

As it is breast

cancer, a

gynaecologist is

involved

She is

comforted by the

staff in the room

and her family

member

She gets advice

on treatment

plans and

options

The doctors

excuse themselves

but the specialist

nurse stays with

them

The specialist nurse

comforts them

leaving later than

the rest

Lucy gets sent

home with

leaflets and

people to contact

for help

Charity

organises

meetings with

survivors and

patients

She meets with

survivors and

fellow patients

in charity

meetings

A charity worker

is contacted and

is added to the

case they visit the

patient

She meets with a

charity worker.

They suggest

meetings she can

join for support

A plastic

surgeon is

consulted for

surgery scars

A plastic surgeon

also talks to her

about a remodel

option

A dietician

reviews her

medical history

and treatment

plan

She meets with

her dietician to

create a diet

plan suited to

her treatment

She goes back

to the hospital to

discuss surgery and

its risks

A consultant

and surgeon

meet to talk

about surgery

options

The specialist

nurse knows

her case more

personally

talking to family

etc.

The oncologist

and specialist

nurse talk

through her

first dose

Lucy picks

up her

prescription

at her local

pharmacy

The pharmacist

checks her

prescription and

provides her

with the correct

medication

45


Stakeholders Research

“The places where things fall down is when we can’t communicate.” - Expert

46


Knowing I was future working I ‘went wide’ in my

research exploring further into the various stakeholders

‘Lucy’ would encounter trying to understand their responsibilities

and human behaviours in order to decide

which stakeholder I wanted my focus to be on.

Clinical Nurse Specialist

Dedicated to a particular area of nursing;

caring for patients suffering from

long-term conditions and diseases

such as cancer. CNS’s work with other

professionals to provide and improve

cancer care for patients.

Junior Doctor

Any medical graduate who is in

further training and not yet qualified

to practice independently without

supervision. You could see a ‘junior

doctor’ in A&E, have them diagnose

you or put you under anesthetic.

Nurse

A profession within the health care

sector focused on the care of individuals,

families and communities so

they may attain, maintain or recover

optimal health and quality of life.

Surgeon

In modern medicine a surgeon is

a physician who performs surgery.

There are also surgeons in podiatry,

dentistry, orthodontics and veterinary

medicine.

General Practitioner

Treat all common medical conditions

and refer patients to hospitals and

other medical services for urgent and

specialist treatment.

47


Chosen User

Research

“CNSs treat and manage the health concerns of patients and work

to promote health and well-being in the patients they care for. They

use their skills and expertise in cancer care to provide physical and

emotional support, coordinate care services and to inform and advise

patients on clinical as well as practical issues, leading to positive patient

outcomes.

CNSs also reduce treatment costs, increase efficiency, drive innovation

and provide valuable information for service redesign as well as enable

multidisciplinary care and communication between different teams.

The number of people living with cancer is expected to increase from 2

million to 4 million by 2030. Therefore, the number of people requiring

specialist care and support will increase throughout the cancer pathway.

Cancer CNSs possess a wide variety of skills and expertise and use this

knowledge to ensure that cancer patients experience the best possible

care and support.

Cancer CNSs can help to improve quality of life for people with cancer

through assisting with decision making, symptom management and

emotional support. Cancer CNSs also help empower patients to selfmanage

their conditions leading to reduced costs for healthcare providers

through hospital appointments, emergency admissions and consultant

time. They take a holistic approach to treatment and they can also link up

different health and social care services together.”

https://www.macmillan.org.uk/documents/aboutus/commissioners/clinicalnursespecialistsanevidencereview2012.pdf

Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist

Anna - Specialist Nurse

48


P ERS ONA

“The clinical nurse specialist is the

glue that holds everything together. I

think they are the right person to pick

when talking about networks and

connections.” - Expert


The Eco-System

A

simple diagram showing the impact

across the whole network when a

single role is affected: spreading like

a cancer itself and ultimately impacting the

patients care and treatment.

Lab staff

Therapist

Dietician

GP

Medical

Companies

Charities

Pharmacist

Computer

Science

Home Carer

Patient

Network

Medical

Researchers

Family

Community

Survivors

Anna

CNS

Surgeon

Consultant

Receptionist

Lab staff

Therapist

Dietician

Admin

GP

Medical

Companies

Charities

Pharmacist

Computer

Science

Patient

Network

Medical

Researchers

Community

Anna

CNS

Surgeon

Survivors

Consultant

Lab staff

Receptionist

Therapist

Dietician

Admin

GP

Medical

Companies

Charities

Pharmacist

Computer

Science

Home Carer

Patient

Network

Medical

Researchers

Patient

Family

Community

Survivors

Anna

CNS

Surgeon

Consultant

Receptionist

Admin

50


Current User Journey

Stress Level represented by the size of hexagon: the

largest the most stressful

Anna gets

handover

from nurses on

previous shift

Anna starts

her shift on the

ward

She meets in the

room with the

oncologist and

students

The patient comes in

and the oncologist

diagnoses them

with breast cancer

A family

member is with

them to comfort

them but they are

upset too

All the staff

try to comfort

them and

answer their

questions

Every staff

member but

Anna leaves

to go to other

patients

From my patient journey storyboard I

selected the areas that involved Anna (A

specialist-nurse) and tried to predict Anna’s

daily work routine from there. I assumed

Anna would have a similar cycle in work:

meeting a patient as they are diagnosed

answering questions, comforting them and

then moving onto another patient

She also has more

patients to go see

so has to decide

when its right to

leave

She stays with

them another

while longer as

they raise more

questions they

forgot

She then moves

onto her next room

with the oncologist

and student

She gives them

leaflets and

contacts other

people they will

need to see

The patient

comes in and

the oncologist

diagnoses then

with breast cancer

I did not have experience

in this career but I

assumed it would take

a lot of empathy and

emotion for this role.

I decided there was an

opportunity to help this

particular stakeholder in

this area.

51


VIDEO

Inspired by the works of Eleonora Stella Hariyono Oei in Side effects, I wanted to visually

represent my character being drained from her working day

For the next Andthen workshop we were to create a short video using household items

available to us to communicate the moment we wanted to enhance/alter in some way for

our chosen stakeholder.

I thought about Anna going into work everyday, having to put her feelings aside and

treat her patients supplying them not only with information and advice but emotional

support too. I thought this continuous requirement to sympathise for every patient seen

that day and struggle with the pressures of work may very easily put strain on Anna.

Through the use of colour and liquid I demonstrated the CNS being literally drained

gradually over her shift.

https://vimeo.com/501788794

52


Anna Drained

Returning to the video with more

time, I added extra scenes. It showed

that if the staff members work

collectively and share their emotions

(coloured liquid) they can rely on each

other openly. In doing so will prevent

staff burnout and produce better care

and treatment.

Sharing The Load

In sharing the workload fairly with

open communication welcomed, none

would get drained having had the

others ‘top them up.’

Staff Workforce

This new workforce system powered by

communication and empathy needed

to physically function. With my

interest returning to my ‘smart clothes’

steeple card my creative exploration

had it’s starting point.

53


Anna arrives at

work and puts all

her belongings

(keys and purse)

A machine

in her locker

uses the live

data it has to do

the handover

to her from the

last shift

She puts on her

PPE and gets

scanned for

bacteria upon

entering the

ward

She meets in

the room with

the oncologist

and students.

Having had the experts confirm the accuracy of the

CNS current user journey, I felt comfortable to use it as

a basis to adapt for my 2030 user journey.

The patient

comes in and

the oncologist

diagnoses them

with breast cancer

All the staff try

to comfort them

and answer their

questions

Every staff

member but Anna

leaves to go to

other patients

She stays with them

another while longer

as they raise more

questions they forgot

Every staff

member but

Anna leaves

to go to other

patients

All the staff try

to comfort them

and answer their

questions, they’re alone

which makes

it harder

The patient comes in

and the oncologist

diagnoses then with

breast cancer

She then moves onto

her next room with

the oncologist and

student

She gives them

leaflets and

contacts other

people they will

need to see

She also has more

patients to go see so

has to decide when its

right to leave

She stays with them

another while longer

as they raise more

questions they forgot

She has another patient

to see before her break

so has to choose when

the right time is to leave.

The patient is distressed so

she stays longer but now

worries she will not have

time for her next patient

and her break

She eventually manages

to leave the room, it was

quite an upsetting situation

to be in. Anna feels a bit

down. She passes her

colleague Martin in the

hallway but he just smiles

as he cannot see behind

her PPE that she is upset

She then joins the

room a little later where

the next patient is being

diagnosed. This patient takes

the news a little better but

Anna’s mental health has

now affected her work and

is close to tears as they ask

how they might tell their son

and daughter

She is so upset that

she’s forgotten to call the

haematologist about the

blood results she was

meant to pass on to the

consultant for a patient in

the afternoon

Future 2030 User Journey

Stress level represented by size of hexagon: the

largest the most stressful

“The Journey you described of the CNS is very very

realistic and this idea of burnout and how we can

make it worse the more technology we have, I think

it often just gives doctors more work” -Expert

She sits at her break in

silence, although this may

have worked for some,

Anna felt she needed to

talk to someone about her

morning. But no one asked

as no one noticed. So she

moves onto her afternoon

shift not feeling any better.

54


“The CNS journey was very accurate

and the stress points and the triggers I

was very impressed with” - Expert

In 2030, Anna’s Oncology Specialist Nurse

role is more stressful than ever, she has

even more patients which makes it hard

to juggle her time between them.

She is the main communicator between

staff and has a more empathetic and holistic

approach to patient care. She works in a

very clean minimal and paperless hospital

with technology all around her doing all

the technical and surgical side to care and

treatment.

Due to PPE her fellow staff members are

unable to identify how stressed she is and

therefore don’t step in and support her when

the job gets too much.

On her user journey I have pin pointed the

two moments in her job where I feel there

are opportunities to improve her day to day

life and by extension her role in Care and

Treatment.

55


2030 MOOD BOARD

Using found objects available to me I

translated my sketches into a physical mood

board of the medical services in the future.

Neutral colours, new high-tech devices that

just blend into the background but complete a

lot of the groundwork. Comfort and empathy

at the forefront and a transparency in

healthcare to appear trustworthy to the public.

56


Speculative

Making

“An inspiring new experience design

practice” - Kaitlin Debiasse

Having watched Kaitlin Debiasse’s

speculative making videos I decided to

attempt my own Vignette and Future

Artefact’s. For my vignette, I created a layout

of Anna’s bag contents over a period of time

showing it messy and excessive in 2020 to

paperless and only essentials by 2030. This

showed more of Anna’s character but did not

help me in my development.

My artefact’s were more insightful, in

retrospect I should have explored more

channels rather than remaining with the

smart uniform. But my research had lead me

into a very minimal hospital environment

and for the sake of accessibility and

efficiency I wanted to design something on

Anna’s person.


Digital Self-Care Gloves

Artefact’s

After exploring the PPE and being

in the middle of my dissertation on

single use plastics I decided to try and

eradicate the disposable aspects of medical PPE

equipment. With my research into self cleaning

smart clothes and biodegradable materials I

couldn’t see it being an unreasonable leap that

there are no longer single use PPE in 2030.

Personal Discreet Recorder

58


ANNA’S EMPATHY MAP

Says?

• “I’m fine”

• “I understand how you feel”

• “If there’s anything I can do to help

don’t hesitate”

• “We’ll get this sorted for you”

• “How are you feeling today?”

Thinks?

• People don’t listen to her

• She doesn’t communicate feelings

well

• She is trying to juggle too many

patients to give her 100% care to

each of them

Does?

• Checks up on patients at home

• Empathises for others

• Understands others

• Gets to know patients well

• Communicates across disciplines

• Follows a patient through their full

cancer journey

• Contacts charities/ support groups

for individual patients

Feels?

• Tired

• Stressed

• Over worked

• Stretched

• Misunderstood

• Alone

• Loves her job

• Proud to help others

• Drained

• Close to her patients

Goals

• Prevent Anna from feeling burnout

• Help Anna communicate and connect better with her colleagues and potentially

patients

• Protect Anna’s mental health

• Ensure Anna is producing the best care and treatment she can

59


Digital Glasses that inform you of staff stress levels

Digital Mask insert that determines your emotions

Development

Micro expression tracking had been

an important STEEEPLE card in

my research.

Lasting between 0.5-4.0 seconds on the

face micro expressions cannot be faked. I

thought about what this would mean for the

medical world if these were put in place. It

would be a very honest transparent workplace

that arguably breached private thoughts

too much. How might patients react if they

could physically see their doctor was nervous

about surgery? However putting this aside,

it removed a communication barrier that

PPE had inflicted. Visual cues once lost

by PPE and lack of social skills would be

eradicated. An opportunity for staff members

to help each other having seen stress in their

colleague. Less human errors on the ward may

also result from this, having predicted when

someone’s mind state was not prepared for

their job at a specific time.

I had drawn this as a component that would

sit inside a mask. Having used one of these

face brackets myself during the pandemic I

knew they weren’t comfortable so I decided to

try integrating this design into the mask itself.

60


Unsure how to display these emotions I

researched various options but turned

back to my own project, reflecting

back to the start of my part 2 with my staff

burn out metaphor video I recalled the impact

of colours and how effective they had been to

demonstrate emotions. Using this I drew up

various staff members in different colours seen

through the glasses.

The demand for company transparency has

reached the medical services. In light of

this and to help identify and prevent staff

burnout, the NHS have integrated a smart

clothes uniform into their workplace.

These clothes monitor health and read

micro-expressions of their staff to visually

produce their emotions as a universal medical

colour language on their uniform. Staff with

AI glasses can then visually see staff that are

under stress and in need of assistance without

alerting patients.

61


Colour Psychology

Some emotions I felt could be left

unspoken for the sake of privacy and

were not necessary to prevent staff

burnout for example: love, envy, anger etc.

Colour association varied not only dependant

on profession: advertising, psychology,

philosophy but culturally too.

http://atlasofemotions.org/?fbclid=IwAR2-

mWMrLJx8knO130TtdD6MRxVQVfexqnRJ_

NkKKMfbXEcVy4-Wmx1h2po#triggers/

Stressed

Sad

Admiration

Happy

Confident

Tired

As I was designing in collaboration with

the Digital Health and Care Institute

(DHI) NHS Greater Glasgow and

Clyde and NHS education for Scotland and

Edinburgh; I decided to design my colour

association based on the western world’s culture.

The new universal colour language would be part

of staff training so even if some did not relate an

emotion to a specific colour they still understood

what it meant. My chosen colours to emotions

are shown above.

62


FURTHER DEVELOPMENT

2D sketching various forms, I

looked for something that was

going to be comfortable for

its user with a very clean/slick and

minimal appearance. The organic

shape would be easy to wipe for

hygienic purposes. It would not

obstruct vision with its curved screen

and would look less intimidating,

coinciding with my mood board.

63


FURTHER

DEVELOPMENT

An adjustable sliding visor. The visor is

a digital screen that enables its user to

see other staff members in the specific

colours that represent the emotion their mask

is transmitting.

I researched the technical aspects of how it

could work. A double sided camera is situated

in the centre of the mask extruded from

the face, one side analyses the users facial

expressions whilst the other searches for other

visors. At either side of the mask are skin

worn flexible patches that monitor your blood

pressure, heart rate, and cortisol levels to get a

more accurate conclusion to your emotions.

64


Micro Expressions

Wide Lens Camera

I wanted to show how the

camera tracked the users facial

expressions. Viewing the full

face it projected an invisible

digital grid and analysed the

movements made by the user in

relation to the grid transmitting

the Universal Micro

Expressions they had made.

Live data Camera

As the camera would be

embedded into the mask it would

be close to the face but have a

wide enough lens to take in the

full features

65


66


2030’s mask is worn by all medical care and

treatment staff. In the centre of the mask is

a camera extruded from the face, it captures

the users micro expressions as they work, the

sides of the mask monitor health through skin

patches.

The mask transmits this collected data to a

database that translates these emotions and feeds

it back to the mask network. Staff on the ward

view this users emotion through a universal

colour language as they see them through their

visor. They can then react accordingly around

them with this higher form of communication in

the workforce.

Eyelids Heavy = Tired

Lip Corner

lowered = Tired

Lip Parted = Tired

2030 Standard Personal

Protective Equipment

ta’s dentes the eotons o ther ser trang

roessng and translatng ther roeressons oten

ssed the han ee and nseen nder ther nor

t then onates the eotons to ther olleages

allong the a ne leel o onaton here the

an sort eah other to reent sta rnot and

rode the est are and treatent as a tea

Final Poster for Mask Outcome

67


EYEBROW CREASE - STRESS

CROWS FEET - HAPPY

LOW CORTISOL - HAPPY

LIP STRETCHED - STRESS

LIPS PARTED - HAPPY

68


POSTER AND VIDEO

https://vimeo.com/501788865

I was proud of my user journey shown above I felt the drawings

were clean and the text was precise and easy to follow.

Working at home with no model, nor scene that could resemble

a hospitals cancer ward in 2030, I decided to make a series of

sketches to show how the product would prevent staff burnout.

I added an audio explanation which made it much clearer

although I did feel it lacked a human aspect to it and therefore

didn’t emphasise the value of my design.

69


REFLECTION

PART 2

“Communication underlines care and treatment I think its the corner

stone of giving good care and treatment, communication I think is

something we don’t do well.” - Expert

The coronavirus pandemic

challenged me to improve

my digital drawing,

communicating and presenting skills.

I didn’t use my physical sketchbook

as much as I felt I should have but

these were replaced with digital

drawings as they were far easier to

send and communicate with at a

click of a button which I felt was

essential for this fast paced project.

I also felt my project lacked a

human aspect to it. Having worked

predominantly at home this year

I was unable to access a model to

wear my mask and felt for such

a humanitarian, emotions -based

project it lacked the presence of

physical human interaction.

I was proud of my research for this

project and ability to understand

and communicate well with my

client. I spent a great deal of time

trying to research the various roles

of stakeholders involved in care

and treatment and took the time

to carefully decide which one was

best suited to design for in my

project. In response to this I was

complimented for my contribution

to the part 1 patient network and

the user journeys produced around

my specialist nurse persona. I had

understood her daily life enough

that my insights were relateable

and agreed upon by the experts. It

allowed me to build my folio up

based on a strong understanding

of what went on within Care

and Treatment physically and

emotionally.

I found modelling a bit of a

challenge, anything I created was

made of either household objects or

cardboard. The most difficult part

of this semester was the loss of the

studio. With all students remaining

at home I felt it difficult to bounce

ideas off each other; creative

influences and opinions had been

something I always found useful

when working on projects. Despite

making time for individual or small

group zoom calls to attempt this I

felt it wasn’t as beneficial.

70


F U T U R E

E X P E R I E N C E S

P ART T WO : P O S T MID Y EAR


Table of Contents

Post Mid Year

What If ’s

Desk Research

GPS Vests

New Role in Care and Treatment

Substitutions

Traffic Light Analysis Workshop

User Journey Map

Substitutions Coordinator

Interface Thumbnails

George’s Interface

Video Planning

Video

Poster

Reflection

72


Post Mid Year

“Whilst the sharing of data can help

promote and sustain healthy behaviors

and interactions and give greater

access to health information for the

self- management of symptoms, our

participation, public or private raises

issues around data ethics, personal

privacy, surveillance and security.” -

Kirsty Ross

WIP Show and World Cancer Day Event

Having examined my

design proposal for part

two in retrospect, I felt

my outcome had been rushed

and unresolved. It didn't answer

sufficiently to my insights and strong

design opportunity. I decided to strip

away part two's outcome back to its

foundations; designing a product/

service for Anna to communicate her

emotions to staff and/or patients in a

paperless, digital era with less social

skills in order to prevent burnout.

73


Wifi/Power down is a

frequent occurrence

Brainstorming and drawing ‘What If ’

scenarios allowed me to expand my

thinking again and branch out from my

direction that I had previously landed on

too fast.

We preserve energy in

a much stricter fashion

We can connect to

each other instantly

across the globe

Mental Health is

carefully monitored

and prioritised

What if?

We could see each

others emotions

Every medical

decision is

democratic

Your wealth is

viewed as your

health status

We can visually

see each others

health status

74


Desk Research

With my distinct area of interest in smart

uniform, wearables and the ability of

communcating stress through these vessels; I

returned to my desk research for refining my

knowledge on such technologies.

Vision

Enhancement

Sun Exposure

Monitor

Sound Animated Clothing

Heated Clothing

Self cleaning

clothes

Light Reactive

Clothing

Gesture

Control

Band

Smart

Uniform

Activity

Tracker

Band

GPS Tracking

Virtual

Coaching

Sensor

Insoles

Lifestyle

Tracker Band

Mood

Responsive

Clothing

Micro

Expression

Tracking

(Previous

Direction)

From collating all these technology advancements

in a mind-map I realised many were ‘owned’ in

predominantly one sector, I felt for example that “Mood

and Light responsive clothing” had remained within

Glamour with unexplored potential elsewhere; whilst

Live Data was dominant in Security and Business and

considered less in communication. I was most intrigued

in integrating Sport and Fitness industries technologies

into the Medical Services.

75


GPS Vest

Found previously in my sketchbook but

overlooked was my discovery of the GPS vest:

"These black 'half-vests' or sports bras are made

of neoprene and are fitted with a small GPS

tracking device in a pouch in the back. This can

then gather crucial performance data such as the

player's heart rate, distance covered and speed."

https://sqaf.club/why-do-footballers-wear-bras/

StatSports

Recording retrospectively, these small

vests are able to report on many

aspects of their user including heart

rate, body temperature, energy expenditure

and location on the pitch (in other words data

that could be used to produce a reading on

stress level).

This data once collected, is summarised

and used by players themselves for self

improvement as well as performance analysts

and team managers.

From this knowledge I hypothesised that

by 2030 this technology wouldnt have to

record retrospectively but report live and

would become far more affordable due to

technological progress.

I therefore asked myself why these vests were

not in the medical industry monitoring staffs

wellbeing and performance.

76


NEW ROLE IN CARE

AND TREATMENT

This collectied data could be game-changing for the medical services but

useless if nothing came of it. An analytical role would be required to assess

this data. Despite them monitoring performance however, I didn't want

them to use this intelligence negatively but for the staff's benefit. I recalled

experts talking about various situations that caused them stress and

mindmapped how this new role might help.

Stressed in making

an important

decision alone?

Send someone to give a

second opinion

“The most stressful

thing for me is having

to make important

decisions on my own

without collective

responsibility” Expert

Have support

from another staff

member

What action would

they take in seeing Anna

Stressed?

Stressed by an

emotional patient?

Given time and

space to vent

“I’d just like a safe

space to talk and

reflect about my

day” Expert

“Educators are

spread so thin”

Expert

Stressed by lack

of training?

Organise training

experience

Stressed with too

many jobs to do?

Delegate some

work load

“Everyone’s roles

are just spread a bit

too thin sometimes”

Expert

77


Substitutions

My considered actions of witnessing

stress seemed appropriate but would

require the input of more staff members.

I worried about the afford-ability

and credibility of this actually being

applied to the medical system

Illustration of Medical "subs"

I know this is a

lot to take in, just take

all the time you need

we’re hear for anything

you need

Stephen, It’s looking like

Anna’s gonna need a

break after this patient.

I’m scheduling you in now

to cover her next patient

instead at 10:15

Okay no

problem

Stephen can you

check in on Simon, it’s

looking like he’s a bit

stressed with something

in room 4.

I just can’t

believe it..

Hi Simon,

you doing okay?

George sent me

over to check on

you?

I can’t

remember how to

do this properly but

I need to go see

my next patient.

Hey George, can

you send someone to

cover Simon’s patient

while I train him on the

radiology equipment?

Yeah sure, Jess are

you free?.

Sure, on

my way

Yes, I’m on my way

to the patient now

George

I returned to my sports and fitness research and began considering the use of

substitutes in football. Purposely having a number of medical staff on “your

bench” and being able to have them switch with those feeling stressed, tired,

sick etc whilst on shift would not only prevent their burnout but improve the

standard of care and treatment in doing so too.

78


TRAFFIC LIGHT

ANALYSIS WORKSHOP

Testing my new concept through my co-design workshop

Sticky notes captured from workshop in progress

Presenting vocally with minimal visual

sketches from my sketchbook as it was

still very open and in need of refinement

I set my workshop up with multiple participants.

Then I asked them to consider advantages

(noted in green), questions (noted in yellow) and

disadvantages (noted in pink) encouraging them

to discuss and vocalise their thoughts to spark

more considerations in each other.

The workshop took a little over an hour but

for the next week I still had my participants

contacting myself about new thoughts they

had about the idea. I was able to address these

positives and negatives in my development of

the role and was able to diverge and converge

my thinking in answers to questions I may not

have considered myself.

Glad to have done this workshop early in my

process of this concept I felt it began to piece

together and the value of this new role was

becoming very clear.

I needed to then illustrate this new role, their

communication with their substitues and how

this all effected Anna, my intended user.

79


User Journey Map

USERS AND CONVERSATIONS

Anna

Specialist

Nurse

I want the best most

stress free day for our

care and treatment

team today

Hi there, I’m Anna, I’m going

to be with you though every

step of your cancer journey

George

Substitutions

Coordinator

George, If you don’t

need me right now

shall I go for my break

while it is quiet?

Stephen

Staff Substitute

ACTIONS

Anna -

George -

Stephen -

Handover

Logging on

Sits in on Handover

meeting

Meets patient

Checking live data and

overseeing team

Does training exercises

whilst on ‘stand by’

Giving patient

empathy

Checking live data

Has a break having

cleared it with George

Meetin

Oversee

checkin

Returns

training

hospital

80


Thank you so much that

was really distressing I’ll

go to the staff room now

Stephen I think I’m going to

need you to take Anna’s next

patient, she’s running late

and looking a bit stressed

That’s me back George

just give me a shout if

you need me

Meeting next patient

Overseeing team

checking live data

Returns to online

training in a paperless

hospital

Running late, very

stressed

Sees Anna’s distress,

analyses situation,

contacts Stephen

and asks him to take

Anna’s next patient

Contacted by George.

Silently notified of

change of plans

Notifies Anna change

of plans. Tells her to

take a break

Travels to patient

Goes on break instead

of going to next

patient

Overseeing team

Meets with Anna’s

next patient in her

stead.

81


SUBSTITUTIONS

COORDINATOR

My new role for care and treatment, someone who oversees the stress

levels of staff and acts accordingly substituting staff in where needed.

George McIntyre

Substitutions Coordinator

Daily Routine

Goals and Aspirations

Understands how difficult it is to work in the medical

services and wants to help alleviate some of that stressful

burden on staff.

Likes and Dislikes

“Let’s make the best most

stress free day for our care and

treatment team today”

Has a strong desire to help people

Does not like over-confidence

Admires honesty and loyalty

Likes to get to know people

My New Stakeholder Persona

82


Extracts of Sketchbook thumbnails

George’s Interface

The coordinator's interface

neeeded to display many things

whilst being clear and precise:

• Substitutions on shift

• Their competency in various training

• Ward related notifications

• Date and Time: Live Data

• Doctors and Nurses on Shift

• Daily Schedule

• Individuals heart rate

• Individuals energy levels

• Individuals temperature

• Individuals location

83


INTERFACE

My mock up of this interface was

then created on XD, a platform I

wasn’t as confident on but built my

skills up in doing this project. All

staff data collected from the vests to

produce the interface information

is protected by similar firewalls for

patient data to prevent data leakage.

84


85


VIDEO PLANNING

AND VIDEO

Video planned storyboard prior to filming George's role

https://vimeo.com/535006513

Originally I had planned to portray a

day in the life of George in its busy,

yet organised manner. I filmed him

making several cups of coffee and edited a

sequence of fast paced clips where he got

ready for work (similar to the work of Edgar

Wrights Hot Fuzz) before I realised that I

hadn't really shown his job and what that

entailed.

So I went back to the drawing board and

sketched out actual moments of him in his

workplace. His job involved: signing in for

the day; logging on to his software; taking

note of his substitute staff; communicating to

them via a headset; analysing the ward floor

and its staff on his interface; interpreting

when one of them feels stressed through

the data from their vests and taking actions

accordingly.

From this storyboard I then went straight to

filming. With a more refined plan I was able

to capture George's day opening a gateway

for the viewer to understand his role within

care and treatment.

86


POSTER

I wanted to capture a People, product, place scene where George was

analyzing his digital screen whilst being able to physically see his staff on

the floor as I had wanted his job to be predominantly at a desk but with

the ability and option to be mobile and walk around the ward floor should

he feel it necessary to communicate face to face or understand a situation

closer before making an important managerial decision.

Previously I had created some paper mock ups of the interface before designing it

on adobe XD. I was able to use my mock up in the poster to represent his digital

tablet in the foreground whilst showing a more simplistic model of a ward and

its staff in the background. I felt this perspective showed his power but also his

distinct separation from the medical ward; he isn’t there for the hospital in it’s

workings, he was there to look after the staff ’s health and well-being. My final

poster is on the next spread, I felt it set the scene in a more futuristic technology

surrounded world. George is in the moment, using his interface and problem

solving to help a stressed team member.

87


88


89


Desk Research

STEEEPLE Cards

Unintended Consequences

Emotional Journey Map

5 W’s Brainstorming

Selecting a Persona

Speculative Making

Paper Prototyping

Empathy Mapping

‘What if?’ Mind-mapping

Amongst my continuous

research, analysis and

development throughout

I have bullet pointed the

following gateways my

project passed through

to reach my final

delivered proposal

Traffic Light Analysis

User Journey


Reflection

Having taken the time to step backward to reflect my work

both in part one of the project and post mid-year really

deemed essential to my final design response. In both

situations I was able to review my existing work and compare it to

what was being asked of me. I was then able to return to it altering my

design path to ensure my project remained on task and would deliver

an appropriate resolution to my brief.

Marrying up the academic and healthcare experts feedback and advice

that I had recieved throughout the duration of 'Future Experiences'

allowed me to consider my project from various perspectives. Enabling

myself to see my design in a medical and designer lens in turn led to a

stronger, refined end submission.

From my work post mid year, I felt this was a much more appropriate

and resolved response to my design opportunities I had previously

identified. I had researched and understood the technology involved

as well as looked at my devlopment from a more human perspective

becoming more senstive to the human centred issues that my part two

had also faced. I was then able to address the personal privacy, hospital

security and data ethics issues that would have come from this design

raised in my traffic light analysis workshop and find solutions for

them.

I felt my new Substitutions Coordinator role was a credible solution

to the complex problem of preventing staff burnout set in the future

context of ten years time within cancer care and treatment.

Arwen Borris

2020-2021

91

More magazines by this user