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Memorial Day 2021 Issue

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INFORMING, SERVING AND CELEBRATING THE LAKE REGION

ake Hopatcong News

MEMORIAL DAY 2021 VOL. 13 NO. 2

Building a

Community

Morris Habitat for Humanity finds

a way forward despite the pandemic

STUDENTS PARTNER WITH

SMITHSONIAN AND LHF

GREAT-GRANDSON OF

JOE COOK OFFERS GIFTS

AREA NURSES VOLUNTEER

AT VACCINATION SITES

ONE FAMILY’S

PANDEMIC JOURNEY


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4

From the Editor

The cover story for this issue is an in-depth look at two Morris Habitat for Humanity builds

happening simultaneously in our area. One build is on a property in the Lake Shawnee

area of Jefferson for the Davis family, who will move into their home sometime before the end of

this year. The other build is at Roxbury High School, where students are helping to construct a

modular home that, when completed, will be transported to a property in Landing. That part of

the build will take about two years to complete.

Two very interesting and very newsworthy stories combined into one. The story is long—longer

than any other story published in this magazine in my tenure as editor. But, please, don’t let

the length deter you from reading it. Writer Melissa Summers has crafted a very informative,

thoughtful piece. Maybe, after reading it, you might even be inspired to volunteer at a Habitat

build site.

You might have noticed in the past that stories for this magazine begin and end on one or two

pages. This is intentional, mostly for layout purposes.

When I assign writers a story, I usually let them find the best path to a finished product. The

only parameters I ask is that they meet a deadline date and they write to a word count—sometimes

as little as 800, sometimes as much as 1,200. Comfortable lengths by most accounts. It’s only

recently that I’ve broken my own rule and let the length of the story be determined by the subject.

It started with Mike Daigle’s story about the Lake Hopatcong Commission, the Lake Hopatcong

Foundation and the four lake-town mayors banding together to help secure funds for Lake

Hopatcong. That story, which was published in the 2020 Holiday issue, ran over three pages.

In this year’s Spring issue, Jess Murphy’s well-reported and well-written piece on the Jefferson

Township Municipal Alliance also ran three pages.

Let’s face it, if you let writers write, they will—and rightfully so.

When I started working at the Daily Record back in 1984, newspapers were still thick with

pages and pages of copy. Photographs were big, headlines were bold, stories were long. There were

charts and graphs and pullout quotes scattered throughout.

But it wasn’t long before newsrooms across the country were reacting to the times.

Higher production costs led to less editorial copy. And, Americans, according to a multitude

of focus groups, were too busy to read long stories. So, despite the outcry from writers and

photographers everywhere, shorter stories and smaller photos became the norm.

I remember the battles in the newsroom between writers and editors, between photographers

and editors. In the end, though, those doing the layout always won. There was only so much space

for so much content.

And all this happened before the internet. Now, our collective attention span barely registers.

I often hear from readers how much they enjoy the magazine, that it is read cover to cover.

I certainly appreciate the kind words and hope that these few “longer” stories aren’t a deterrent

to reading an issue from front to back. These stories are more of

an anomaly, rather than the norm. I trust Melissa, Mike and Jess

will understand.

But back to the Habitat story—not the length—the actual story.

It is the second Habitat story in two years (Fall 2019 Vol. 12, No.

6), and it will not be the last. We will be following the progress of

the Roxbury High School students; look to the LHN website for

updates. And, when a family is picked for that house, we will report

about it in the magazine.

So many stories, so little space.

—Karen

STUDENTS PARTNER WITH

SMITHSONIAN AND LHF

GREAT-GRANDSON OF

JOE COOK OFFERS GIFTS

AREA NURSES VOLUNTEER

AT VACCINATION SITES

ONE FAMILY’S

PANDEMIC JOURNEY

ake Hopatcong News

INFORMING, SERVING AND CELEBRATING THE LAKE REGION

Building a

Community

MEMORIAL DAY 2021 VOL. 13 NO. 2

Morris Habitat for Humanity finds

a way forward despite the pandemic

LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021

ON THE COVER

Roxbury High School senior Gavin Yiu helps

install a wall to the floor of the modular

home being built by students for Morris

Habitat for Humanity.

-photo by Karen Fucito

KAREN FUCITO

Editor

editor@lakehopatcongnews.com

973-663-2800

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Michael Stephen Daigle

Melissa Summers

Ellen Wilkowe

COLUMNISTS

Marty Kane

Heather Shirley

Barbara Simmons

EDITING AND LAYOUT

Maria DaSilva-Gordon

Randi Cirelli

ADVERTISING SALES

Lynn Keenan

advertising@lakehopatcongnews.com

973-222-0382

PRINTING

Imperial Printing & Graphics, Inc.

PUBLISHER

Camp Six, Inc.

10 Nolan’s Point Park Road

Lake Hopatcong, NJ 07849

LHN OFFICE LOCATED AT:

37 Nolan’s Point Park Road

Lake Hopatcong, NJ 07849

To sign up for

home delivery of

Lake Hopatcong News

call

973-663-2800

or email

editor@lakehopatcongnews.com

Lake Hopatcong News is published seven times a

year between April and November and is offered

free at more than 200 businesses throughout the

lake region. It is available for home delivery for

a nominal fee. The contents of Lake Hopatcong

News may not be reprinted in any form without

prior written permission from the editor. Lake

Hopatcong News is a registered trademark of

Lake Hopatcong News, LLC. All rights reserved.


ANNUAL

VETERANS' CRUISE

LAKE HOPATCONG CRUISES IS AGAIN PLEASED TO HONOR OUR VETERANS - AMERICA’S HEROES.

Residents can show their support at one of the four public gathering

locations notated with a as Miss Lotta cruises by with our veterans.

Mt. Arlington Municipal Beach

Mt. Arlington Residents Gather Here

JEFFERSON TWP.

JUNE 26, 2021

9 AM - 10:30 AM

JEFFERSON & HOPATCONG

11 AM - 12:30 PM

MT. ARLINGTON & ROXBURY

lakehopatcongnews.com 5


Students Create Videos About

Recent HABS for Smithsonian

Story by ELLEN WILKOWE

Photo by KAREN FUCITO

Matthew Sinchi of Parsippany positioned

his tripod and camera to zoom in on

Roxbury Mayor Bob DeFillippo. Meanwhile,

Kailey Pasquariello of Jefferson reviewed her

questions pertaining to the blue-green algae

bloom that plagued Lake Hopatcong in 2019.

The two 17-years-olds had set up shop at the

Lake Hopatcong Foundation where Sinchi,

Pasquariello and a third member of the team,

18-year-old Veronica Carrion, also of Jefferson,

have been interning during their senior year.

The internships are part of their curriculum

as students at the Morris County Vocational

School District Academy for Environmental

Science at Jefferson Township High School.

Upon completion, the video will become

part of a trilogy that will focus on the

environmental, economic and social impact

of the 2019 Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB).

The videos will be housed on the Smithsonian

Institution’s website as part of their YES! Teen

Internship Program, which provided a grant to

the Lake Hopatcong Foundation to produce

the videos.

The grant provides funding and resources to

assist young people nationwide to discover and

digitally document their communities’ unique

history.

The Lake Hopatcong Foundation qualified

for the grant based on its 2019 traveling

Smithsonian Waterways exhibit, said Donna

Macalle-Holly, grant and program director for

the Lake Hopatcong Foundation.

“This made us eligible to apply for the YES!

stories,” she said. A letter of recommendation

from the New Jersey Council for the

Humanities helped seal the deal she said.

So, how did these three high school seniors

find themselves up close and personal with a

HAB?

As seniors at the Academy for Environmental

Science at Jefferson Township High School,

the trio decided to hone in on HABs for

both environmental and personal reasons.

Pasquariello and Carrion both live in the

vicinity of the lake.

“I’ve been a nature kid since childhood,”

said Carrion, who, because of the pandemic,

has been participating in the intern program

remotely.

“I live and work by the lake and saw how

it [the 2019 HAB] affected everything,” said

Pasquariello.

Carrion, who lives in the Lake Forest section,

also witnessed the effects and immersed herself

in advocacy as a result.

“I was really involved with HAB when it

happened,” she said. “I spent the entire summer

attending town meetings, working with the

Lake Hopatcong Foundation to get flyers out

for public education, and working with the

MUA [Municipal Utilities Authority] and the

beach [at Lake Forest].”

As mayor of Roxbury, DeFillippo knows all

too well the dire effects the HAB had on Lake

Hopatcong and its surrounding towns. When

approached by the interns for the project, he

was more than happy to participate and offer

up some optimism in the future management

of HABs.

“The algae bloom came at a horrible time,”

he said. “Businesses shut down, the lake shut

down and the marinas stopped. This was the

Matthew Sinchi and Kailey Pasquariello conduct

an interview dockside at Lake Hopatcong.

Veronica Carrion edits interviews while

working remotely from her home.

Photo courtesy of Veronica Carrion

worst (bloom) in the 25 years that I’ve lived in

Roxbury.”

DeFillippo referred to the bloom as a “perfect

storm” of contributing factors, including warm

weather, rain and phosphate runoff that made

its way into the lake.

Pasquariello took the interview to the next

level: “How did the towns work together to

resolve it?”

“The Lake Hopatcong Foundation brought

us all together,” DeFillippo said. “It was very

6

LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021


positive to have four towns working together

to find a solution.”

Pasquariello also asked about long-term

preventative measures.

“The four towns agree that there should be

sewers all around the lake, and we are making

headway toward that,” DeFillippo said of the

importance of working with the three mayors

of the other towns surrounding the lake

(Mount Arlington, Hopatcong and Jefferson)

to protect the health of the lake.

“The prevention effort continues with

the mayors’ meetings, working with the

Lake Hopatcong Commission and the Lake

Hopatcong Foundation to come up with

projects to help cease HABs,” he said. “And

finding federal, state and regional groups to

find funds for preventative measures.”

With that, it was a wrap for the video. The

interns also interviewed the other mayors, local

business owners, representatives from lakerelated

clubs and the [DEP’s] communication

person, said Pasquariello.

“I was surprised that I got to interview the

communication person,” she said.

With Sinchi at the helm of filming and

Pasquariello on the interview front, Carrion

oversees the script writing. “It all came down to

what we were good at,” Carrion said, referring

to their respective roles. “I’m a good writer,

Matt knew how to use editing programs and

Kailey’s more social, so she does the interviews.”

In addition to producing the three videos, the

interns also participated in regular Zoom calls

with Macalle-Holly and Pete Bedell, intern

advisor with the Morris County Vocational

School District. This is all in tandem with a full

school workload.

The internship has opened their eyes not only

to HABs but also to the challenges that come

with the task of visual storytelling. “There’s

difficulty with scheduling and getting it just

right,” said Sinchi. “It could be nerve-racking

to see mistakes.”

Upon completion, the interviews were sent

to Carrion, who transcribed them and selected

quotes before writing them into a script.

“Nothing really surprised me, but it’s pretty

hard balancing school and college classes this

year and having to edit videos,” she said.

The experience has been equally as gratifying

for Macalle-Holly.

“I am very fortunate to have very dedicated

students for the project, and it has been an

enlightening experience for them,” she said.

So, what’s next for these interns?

Sinchi has his sights set on an environmental

engineering degree at the University of

Connecticut. “I want to help the environment

anyway that I can,” he said. A recent Eagle Scout

recipient with troop 173 from the Parsippany

area, Sinchi credits scouting with shaping his

future. “Scouts helped solidify that with its

‘leave no trace behind’ concept,” he said.

Carrion, too, plans to pursue the

environmental science field, specifically the

educational aspect, at New College of Florida

in Sarasota. “I want to promote awareness

to the environment,” she said. “There’s this

disconnect between what scientists do and

what the public knows.”

As much as she is impassioned by the

environment, Pasquariello, an EMT with the

Jefferson Township First Aid Squad, envisions

a career in nursing and will attend Ramapo

College in Mahwah this fall. “I have an

attachment to helping people,” she said.

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LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021


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CLINTON HILL

LOCAL

VOICES

A native of Andover, Clinton Hill, 66, has spent the better part of the last three decades in

Mount Arlington. He lives in a nice ranch home on Howard Blvd., a prime location for

his second career, selling fresh cut flowers from a roadside stand. Satisfying his need

to be creative, this year he is also selling homemade vases and candles.

WHAT MAKES LIVING WHERE YOU DO SPECIAL?

It’s a beautiful lake community. The friendly people are very supportive of each other and

its location to three highways, police and fire stations, and a lot of eateries and stores.

WHAT IS YOUR BEST MEMORY ABOUT LIVING IN THIS AREA?

My best memories of living in this area are the Christmas and holiday parties we had

with family and friends when our nieces and nephews were younger.

WHO MAKES UP YOUR FAMILY?

My family consists of Debbie my wife, Kodiak our Malamute, my son Troy

and his wife Tami, my three grandchildren, my sister Bev and my nephew

Justin.

WHO HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST INFLUENCE IN LIFE AND WHY?

My parents were a big influence in my life. They were hardworking,

honest people who everyone liked. They brought me

and my sister up to be honest and hard workers, too.

HOW DO YOU EARN A LIVING?

I worked for 4 or 5 business form printing companies for

about 30 years before they started to go out of business. I

then was a partner in MAC Gardens for two years growing

and selling vegetables and flowers. I now sell bouquets of

flowers outside my house. This year I’ll be cutting wine and

whiskey bottles and turning them into vases and candles.

WHAT’S THE CRAZIEST OR MOST UNUSUAL JOB YOU’VE

EVER HAD?

I guess I’m kind of boring. My most unusual job was watering

flowers and plants in a nursery after I got home from high school

for $1 an hour.

DO YOU VOLUNTEER?

I take pictures of events in Mount Arlington and drop them off

at the town hall or the library. I also take portraits and group

pictures for the Mount Arlington police department.

ANY HOBBIES?

I enjoy gardening. I have three garden areas. One at home,

one at the Mount Arlington Community Garden and one at

Sunset View Farm Community Garden in Andover, where

I grow most of the flowers I sell in front of my house.

I‘ve been a bowler for 55 years. I enjoy fishing.

IS THERE ANYTHING MOST PEOPLE WOULD BE

SURPRISED TO LEARN ABOUT YOU?

I love to grow tomatoes. I sell three types for

sauce, but I hate the taste of a raw tomato.

I AM home-grown I AM creative I AM funny

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LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021


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lakehopatcongnews.com 13


Vaudeville Star’s

Great-Grandson

Donates Items to

Lake Museum

It was built as a cottage, that quaint

term wealthy Americans used to

describe the elaborate homes they built

in resort areas like Lake Hopatcong.

Between 1880 and 1930, fueled by easy

rail access, Lake Hopatcong flourished as

a resort that featured grand hotels and the

cottages of the rich and famous, such as the

Lotta Crabtree home in Mount Arlington

and The Boulders in Hopatcong.

Wait, the what?

The Boulders. Impressive eastward views,

fabulous stone-walled great room, elegant

bedrooms and dining and living areas,

sloping lawn to the boathouse and lake. Built

in 1903, it shared that quiet corner of Davis

Cove with its neighbor, the Rossmore, built

in 1902.

So, when did they put in the golf course

with the ball return that earned the player a

free drink at the bar inside the house? Or

the phone that squirted water when a person

answered it?

And just like that, an elegant, meaningful

home with an equally elegant, meaningful

name became Sleepless Hollow, the gag-filled,

riotous home to comedian and vaudevillian

Joe Cook. It even has a theater where Cook

staged performances, including dressing rooms

and an unseen passageway which allowed “the

butler,” who greeted guests at the front door, to

suddenly appear onstage one level below.

Cook’s librettist, Donald Ogden Stewart,

once said that “Joe lived on a mad gag-infested

estate in New Jersey which bewilderingly

expressed his genius.”

Cook started in show business in 1908 and

became a vaudeville and Broadway superstar in

the 1920s and 1930s. The showbiz press of the

time praised his multi-skilled act that featured

songs and juggling, physical stunts and

inventive storytelling. He also had a successful

radio career.

But Cook is little known today because of

his aversion to Hollywood and the onset of

Parkinson’s disease in 1940, which ended his

career, said Marty Kane, president of the Lake

Hopatcong Historical Museum.

Cook died in 1959 at the age of 69.

14

Story by MICHAEL DAIGLE

Photos by KAREN FUCITO

LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021

Joe Cook with his four children, Josephine,

Doris, Leo and Joe Jr.

His

lack of

recognition today is also due in part to missing

out on the early television era that saw many of

Cook’s contemporaries transfer their vaudeville

and stage acts to the small screen, Kane said.

“Cook is one of the three most important

Lake Hopatcong figures,” Kane said.

The other two are Lotta Crabtree and

inventor and industrialist Hudson Maxim.

Cook often featured Lake Hopatcong in his

routine, Kane said, and was an active supporter

of local organizations.

The lake museum holds the most extensive

collection of Cook memorabilia, including

Photo courtesy of the Lake Hopatcong Historical Museum

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Thomas Helsel visiting

Sleepless Hollow in April.

more than 300 photos that show the wide

scope of Cook’s life, Kane said.

The collection also includes a piano with

signatures from hundreds of Sleepless Hollow

visitors who signed their names with a woodburning

tool.

And now, thanks to Cook’s great-grandson,

Thomas Helsel, the museum is in possession

of another prized instrument—Cook’s goldplated

trumpet.

Before Helsel, 51, of Sicklerville, N.J., a

senior research chef for Campbell Soup Co.,

turned to cooking and food service as a career,

he was an aspiring musician.

“Trumpet was my first instrument,” he said,

during a recent tour of Sleepless Hollow.

“The trumpet was handmade for Joe by

Vega Trumpet of Brooklyn,” Helsel said. That

nugget of information was discovered when

Helsel was in college and seeking a company

to repair the damaged instrument. “I was told

‘this is not a normal trumpet. It is brass covered

with 24-karat gold.’”

The repair was made in 1987, but finding

that the instrument was “beyond” special,

Helsel brought it home. A display case was

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made and the trumpet remained untouched

until Helsel handed it over to Kane at the

museum this past winter.

Along with the trumpet, Helsel also donated

other items, including a guitar, a warming

blanket used by Cook and passengers in his

first car, photos, portraits and a large glass

globe used in one of Cook’s acts.

Helsel has done deep research into the Cook

family, and his attachment to the home is not

just the ingenuity of the tricks Cook built in,

but his connection with their shared family.

Joe Cook married twice and had four

children, all with his first wife, Helen.

Helsel’s mother, Lidih Jo (Lee) Helsel, is

the youngest child of Josephine Georgia Ann

(Cook) Lee and Col. Edwin Clarence Lee, he

said.

Col. Lee, Helsel’s “Pop-Pop,” was a career

Army officer who served on the staff of Gen.

Dwight Eisenhower during World War II. He

was also was a member of the Mount Arlington

Lee family who developed Lee’s Marina, the

popular recreation center opened in the 1920s

that operates today under the ownership of

the Morris County Park Commission. Helsel’s

cousin, Bud Lee, signed the famous piano.

In the end, Helsel and Kane said that Joe

Cook lived a full life that reflected his active

and vivid imagination and approach to his

comedic craft.

Kane said one photo in the museum

collection epitomizes for him the meaning

of Joe Cook’s life. It is one of Cook and his

four children at Sleepless Hollow. For all the

comedic antics, for all the nights on the road,

it came down to his family, Kane said.

Cook lived at Sleepless Hollow for nearly 20

years before leaving to address his declining

health.

Realtor Karen Foley, who handled the recent

sale of the property for Prominent Properties

Sotheby’s International Realty, said in an email,

“Living at the lake for over 16 years, I’ve always

admired the grand historic lakefront estates,

especially Sleepless Hollow. I had heard many

stories during the time Joe Cook resided there.

What had intrigued me the most was the small

theater stage where Joe’s children, servants and

others had performed for their famous celebrity

guests of that era.”

The new owners, Joel and Tracy Beckerman,

are just as intrigued.

“We are both storytellers. I’m a composer

and Tracy’s an author. We fell in love with the

house and the story of Joe Cook. The potential

of owning this house and breathing life back

into it was too good to pass up,” said Joel.

Over time, many of the gimmicks that Cook

built into the house were replaced. The lot is

now 1.5 acres, down from the original 26, but

the theater remains.

Helsel presents

Marty Kane

with Joe Cook’s

trumpet.

As subsequent owners have made

Sleepless Hollow their own home,

one surviving artifact declares the

spirit of the place: Hanging in the

great room is a framed poster for the

1936 film “Arizona Mahoney,” one of

Cook’s two Hollywood starring roles.

Jody Frattini

Sales Associate

908-208-0011

jfrattini@weichert.com

The current market is beneficial to

both buyers, with historically low

mortgage rates, and sellers with

low home inventory.

Helsel is surprised when he

finds his uncle’s name scratched

into Joe Cook’s piano.

92 Woodport Rd, Sparta, NJ 07871 973.729.2700 Sparta.Weichert.com

If your home is currently listed with a real estate broker, this is not intended to be a solicitation of the listing.

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lakehopatcongnews.com 17


Jutta Braun

at one of

the nursing

labs at

County

College of

Morris.

Kathy Prokop

outside the

vaccination

center at

Rockaway

Townsquare.

Bernadette Schicho in class at

County College of Morris.

CCM Nurses are Hands-on at Area COVID-19 Vaccine Clinics

It’s no secret this pandemic has been a “stepup-to-the-plate,”

“all-in” or any other cliché

you can think of kind of experience. And there

is no exception when it comes to our first line of

defense—healthcare professionals, and specifically,

nurses.

At County College of Morris, the education of

a new generation of nurses has continued as they

train amid a real-life crisis. Students have had a

front-row seat not only in their studies but in the

role that the college has taken in the fight against

COVID-19, according to Kathleen Brunet, CCM’s

director of marketing and public relations.

“When COVID-19 first arrived in New Jersey,

nursing faculty and other CCM professors and

students, staff and alumni provided much-needed

assistance by serving on the front lines, making

masks and face shields and offering other help

where needed,” Brunet said.

But it didn’t stop there. Once a vaccine became

available, four members of CCM’s Department of

Nursing began volunteering at vaccine sites.

Bernadette Schicho, 59, of Blairstown, knew she

had to be part of getting that potentially life-saving

dose into as many arms as possible. When the

opportunity came in mid-January from the Warren

County Medical Reserve Corps, she immediately

responded, “Sign me up.”

Schicho, an assistant professor of nursing, is

currently unaffiliated with a hospital but said she

still feels a strong desire to help others. “I can and

so I should,” she said. She found herself at the

firehouse in Belvidere among volunteers ranging

from nursing students to retired doctors and said

the facility is well run and organized, though

demand has slowed.

As a role model to her students, Schicho said

playing her part in fighting the disease reinforces

the idea that nursing isn’t just about caring for

sick patients. “Volunteering is something to aspire

to when they become nurses,” she said. “It gives

them a sense of responsibility of service to your

18

Story by MELISSA SUMMERS

Photos by KAREN FUCITO

LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021

community.”

Nursing Professor Kathy Prokop, 55, of Florham

Park, read about the need for volunteers and

registered with the Morris County Medical Reserve

Corps. “I believe in the vaccine, and I want to help

get it out there,” she said. In February, she began

working in conjunction with Atlantic Health

System to support the pre- and post-vaccination

screening at the Rockaway Mall Regional

Vaccination Center.

Prokop, who has taught at CCM for 28 years,

said it’s been difficult to adjust to primarily virtual

learning. “I’m with my students in the hospitals

when we do clinicals, but I miss being in the

classroom, I miss having interaction, and this is one

way to have that,” she said. “I’m a healthy person,

and I can go ahead and do my part, as small as it is.

It’s still doing something.”

In the first few months of the pandemic, when

Prokop and her students were not allowed to visit

the hospitals, it was hard for her not to be on

the front lines. “I’ve gone to the same unit at St.

Barnabas with my students for the past 20 years,

and I felt like I couldn’t do my part.” Instead, she

visited weekly, even though she wasn’t allowed in,

leaving snacks and other goodies for the staffers she

had partnered with.

One thing Prokop brings from the vaccine site

back to her students is the chance to experience

the public health side of medicine and even the

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misinformation that’s out there. “Being at the clinic,

I can help educate the people coming through to

the best of my ability,” she said. “The more you can

educate them, the less fearful they are.”

Two other CCM nursing professors are

volunteering at another vaccine administration

site at the Sussex County Fairgrounds in Augusta.

Professor Laura Parker, 60, of Sparta is a longtime

volunteer with the Sussex County Medical Reserve

Corps. She had trained with the American

Red Cross but wanted to handle more tasks in

healthcare. One of her first stints was offering

vaccinations during the swine flu pandemic.

When COVID-19 struck, Parker began by

working in a call center, but when the vaccine

became available in New Jersey in January, she was

excited to shift to the vaccine site. And she saw an

opportunity to get her students motivated to serve

their community. “I was able to get my whole class

signed up for the Medical Reserve,” she said. As

students, they won’t be able to administer vaccines

but can assist or handle the paperwork. “I don’t

know that anyone has been called yet, but they are

ready.”

Parker said the prospect of being involved with

such a massive undertaking can’t be duplicated in

a classroom. “They’ll gain knowledge of how the

public health system works and understanding of

how a big vaccination effort happens,” she said.

Parker said she has made her family proud and

takes pride in her role as a volunteer. “I feel really

good about the impact I’ve made,” she said. “It

really is fun, and you feel like you’re making a

difference. It makes me happy.”

Professor Jutta Braun, 65, of Stockholm, is also

volunteering at the Sussex Fairgrounds site. As a

member of the Sussex Medical Reserve Corps for

more than 10 years, she’s been a part of multiple

deployments after natural disasters but said the

pandemic has presented a unique opportunity

to connect her students with the health crisis.

“Everything you do as a nurse, you bring back to

them,” she said.

Prokop is worried about the toll the pandemic

will take on those still working to save lives and

the impact that will have on new nurses. “They

are beyond exhausted,” she said. “I’m afraid there

won’t be as many experienced staff members to help

the new grads, who haven’t had the educational

experience they would have had a few years ago.”

Students are embracing the reality of how

COVID-19 has shaped and will continue to shape

their careers in medicine but are concerned that

they won’t be fully equipped with interpersonal

skills, according to Braun. “They are worried about

not having enough clinical experience,” she said.

It has motivated the students to continue to

work towards their goals, according to Prokop.

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Prokop said COVID-19 has also had an impact

on CCM’s nursing curriculum. “We’ve added

more about infectious disease, emphasizing PPE

[personal protective equipment], as well as student

support groups,” she said. “There are students who

have fears about going into the hospital, and we

have to discuss that and prepare them.”

There is so much to do in nursing, Parker said,

that even students with concerns about different

aspects of the job can find their paths. “If you want

to take care of babies, you take care of babies. If you

want to care for new mothers, that’s who you take

care of. If you want to give vaccines in the public

health realm, you can do that.”

Life will go on thanks to the efforts of our frontline

workers. And educators are making sure the

next generation is well prepared simply by showing

them how it’s done.

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lakehopatcongnews.com 21


The Davis family gathers with friends after breaking

ground at their Lake Shawnee home in October.

Messages

of hope

and good

luck were

painted on

wall studs.

Frank Caccavale with two of his students,

Randy DePalma, left, and Matt Seminara, right.

Photo courtesy of Morris Habitat for Humanity

Volunteers, Families Don’t Let

Pandemic Get in the Way of

Housing Dreams

Roxbury

School s

Mon

Whi

helps buil

first se

of a mo

h

22

Story by MELISSA SUMMERS

Photos by KAREN FUCITO

The coronavirus pandemic has slowed

down many things in the last year, but

it has not stopped the hammers from swinging

as Morris Habitat for Humanity took on two

ambitious projects that will provide homes to

some very deserving families.

Chief Executive Officer Blair Schleicher

Wilson said the organization continues to face

challenges related to COVID-19 and has had

to continually adjust. “The [housing] need isn’t

going away, in fact it’s gotten worse,” she said.

“We lost our volunteer program,” Wilson

said. “Corporate groups have not been there.

We had to take a good hard look at our business

model and how we’ll continue to deliver on our

mission. And we’re doing it.”

That’s where thinking outside the ‘tool’ box

came in.

On World Habitat Day—October 5, 2020—

a truly extraordinary venture kicked off via

virtual meeting. Roxbury High School students

set out to construct a modular home on the

school campus that will be transported and

assembled at a site in Landing.

The build centers around two sections of an

innovative class at Roxbury called Structural

Design and Fabrication (SDF), led by teacher

Frank Caccavale.

LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021

Caccavale, who describes himself as one

of the “Habitat faithful,” has been a frequent

volunteer with the organization and had

brought students over the last few years to one

of Morris Habitat’s previous builds at 119-121

Main Street in Succasunna.

It was during that process, in February 2020,

that Caccavale collaborated with organizers

to design a program for high school students.

“They really believed that Roxbury was the right

school to take this on,” Caccavale said. “Habitat

already had a relationship with the town and

Roxbury schools had a strong commitment to

teaching students to work with their hands and

an education in the skilled trades.”

Roxbury High School’s original auto shop,

which had been used as district storage since the

early 2000s, was converted to a 2,000-squarefoot

classroom space in 2019. SDF had been

focused on smaller district and community

projects, but Caccavale believed his students

were ready for more.

“We had a space that was well-equipped,

and it became a partnership that really made

sense,” he said. “We are the first school that I’ve

heard of that is doing anything like this in New

Jersey.”

According to Wilson, this type of joint

effort has been successful around the country.

“We would love to replicate it,” she said of

the opportunity to make it part of a high school

education. “Because the world needs people who

know about all aspects of building, from the first

shovel in the ground to every level of contractors.”

Plans for the Landing home were drawn up

over several months of discussion and donated

by Babula Architecture of Morris Plains to fit

the unusually shaped plot of land at the corner

of Edith Road and Mansel Drive, Caccavale said.

“We are building it in two halves that are going

to be transported by trailer to the site. We made

one half relatively ‘easy,’ in the sense that it doesn’t

include plumbing, and therefore involves fewer

steps.”

It’s a plan that has suited this already challenging

school year well. “Scaling it back a little made

sense, and we are still hopeful to have the first half

done by the end of the 2020-2021 school year,”

Caccavale said. The second half and final details

will be completed by students enrolled in the

program during the 2021-2022 school year.

The foundation for the home, designed primarily

as a ranch with a garage and basement under the

living space, will be constructed by Morris Habitat,

and Caccavale said the home they build must fit

the footprint exactly. Walls have already begun to

rise from the structure currently situated outside

the SDF lab.

Not only that, but each half of the home must

be able to be successfully transported from the


ht.

Phyllis Chanda pulls a chalk

line across a piece of plywood.

bury High

ool senior

Monique

Whitfield

build the

st section

a modular

home.

Construction Site Supervisor Mike Dakak

works with volunteer Ray Hom at the

Lake Shawnee location.

high school to the site. “The roof is

unique, with trusses that fold flat in order to

clear powerlines,” Caccavale explained. “GAF in

Parsippany, who is donating all the materials for

the project, is bringing in some of their instructors

who will teach us how to do the roofing, once the

home is in place.”

Caccavale also decided to bring on a Master in

Residence. John Martin, who spent seven years

working with Habitat for Humanity, had to

step down to help manage family life during the

pandemic. Caccavale jumped at the chance to

bring Martin to Roxbury part time and approached

him with the idea. “We realized that with the

partnership with Habitat, I was the perfect fit,”

Martin said.

The best part is getting to see students experience

“aha” moments, said Martin. “In construction, we

use certain areas of math quite often,” he said. “If

they see it in the real world, they see where it’s

applicable—where it can be used.”

The project has become the highlight of the

school day for the 15 students enrolled in SDF. For

them, it’s an opportunity for open-air, hands-on,

in-person learning that could lead to a career in

any number of fields.

“I’ve taken classes like woodshop, and I really

love working with my hands,” said 18-year-old

senior Kyle Finnan of Landing. “When I saw

this class—I love construction, planning and

designing—I thought it would be a good fit.”

Senior Alex Harrington, 18, of Ledgewood,

had been planning to take the class since he was

a sophomore. With

hopes of becoming

an architect, he

wanted more than

just a classroom

introduction. “It’s so

much more handson,”

he said. “You

learn more when you

are actually building

something. Every

day I learn something

new.”

As the sole female

currently in the

program, senior

Monique Whitfield,

18, of Landing, said

she wasn’t the least

bit intimidated in

a field dominated

by men. “They don’t treat me differently,” she

said. “In the future that might happen. I’m not

scared of it, because I’m not going to let anyone

hold me back.” Whitfield, who wants to major

in civil engineering and own her own business,

can’t wait to see the final product. “I drove past

the lot already, and I can’t believe we’re doing

this,” she said.

Roxbury High School students attach a wall to

the first floor platform of a modular home.

Congresswoman Mikie Sherrill watches as

Marly Davis drives a screw into a sheet of

plywood at Davis’ Lake Shawnee Habitat house.

BUILDING THEIR HOME IS A FAMILY AFFAIR

Another major undertaking by Morris

Habitat for Humanity broke ground in October

2020. A four-bedroom house in Lake Shawnee

will become home to a family of eight, currently

living in a two-bedroom Newark apartment.

Scott and Marly Davis and their six children

Continued on page 24

lakehopatcongnews.com 23


Habitat (con’t.)

were chosen last August in a random selection of

10 families who had applied and were accepted

into the program, according to Wilson.

The Jefferson Township property was not in

use prior to last year. “It was donated to Habitat

by the estate of a woman who raised her kids in

town,” Wilson said. “They wanted a family to

live there.”

The Davises have been together for 21 years.

Scott Davis, 54, was an Evangelical Christian

campus minister serving several New Jersey

colleges when he met Marly, who in 1996

was transferring from Essex County College

to New Jersey City University, then known as

Jersey City State College. Marly Davis, 50, was

president of the local bible study group, and

Scott was her advisor.

Marly was working as a nanny for a family in

Chatham in between missionary

trips to her homeland

of Haiti, while also

earning her

teacher

Roxbury High School students Kyle Finnan,

Michael Hills and Matt Seminara attach

joist hangers to ledger board.

Got leakys?

certification. “I was praying for a husband,” she

said.

Scott asked Marly to marry him and, shortly

after graduation from NJCU in May 1999, she

did.

They moved into their Newark home, not

knowing they would eventually outgrow the

space. They already had four children when

they temporarily took in five family members

who had escaped the devastation of the 2010

earthquake in Haiti.

That’s when Scott Davis first began his search

for a new home. “We have been looking and

praying for a place for 10 years,” he said. “Even

with good leads and suggestions from friends,

nothing even came close to affordable.” They

were not eligible for New Jersey affordable

housing, because the program can only

accommodate families of up to six people.

“I had worked on Habitat for Humanity

projects in Paterson and Newark for many

years,” he said. “I took my students and had

great experiences. I never thought I’d apply.”

The Davises first applied to Habitat in

Newark, but medical issues kept Scott out of

work. He couldn’t do physical labor for about

a year, which kept him from being able to

commit to the “sweat equity” Habitat requires.

In August 2020, Marly Davis had a revelation.

“God told me I’d have a house this year,” she

said. The couple checked Morris Habitat for

Humanity’s website and saw they were looking

for a family of eight.

They attended an information session and

pulled together a last-minute application in

just 10 days. Scott, who is now the Director

of Programs for Greater Life, a nonprofit

community organization that serves at-risk

youth in Newark, was concerned they wouldn’t

meet the rigorous requirements to be accepted,

but “we fit every guideline,” he said.

The day they got the call, they couldn’t believe

it. “This is our answer to prayer, and we are

really thankful,” Scott said.

The Davises said they had gotten used to the

constant urban noise. “But I always told my

973-398-0875

husband I wanted a place that isn’t in the city,”

Marly, now a full-time stay-at-home mom, said.

Scott already knew through his previous

involvement with Habitat that there was

something special about the mutual partnership

between the organization and recipient

homeowners. The build is a reward in itself,

according to Scott. “This is my home,” he said as

he looked at the structure that rose around him.

“You give part of yourself. I know the beams, I

know this, I know that. There was nothing here

when we first came, and now there is. We’re

putting in that sweat and the hard work. It’s not

just a handout, it’s a lot of hard work, and we

are building memories.”

Marly has homeschooled all four of her sons

and two daughters, who currently range in age

from 6 to 18 years old. She makes do with the

limited space in the Newark apartment but

admits it hasn’t been ideal.

Now, building the new home has become part

of their education. The two oldest boys, Paul,

18, and Peter, 16, have been on-site with their

parents. “They are getting lessons while working

in the house,” Marly said. “They are applying

what they are learning—slope and intersect and

the coordinates and grid. Building a frame is the

same process.”

“It’s a new experience,” Paul said. “I learned

a lot about carpentry, and I’m putting that

knowledge to work.”

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24

LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021


Peter had a hand in laying the roof. “It’s a lot

of math and science,” he said.

The boys look forward to having more

space for themselves and not having to share a

bathroom among all six siblings. The best part,

Peter said, will be having room to grow. “It’s a

safe neighborhood and a better environment for

my brothers and sisters.”

On May 5, Marly Davis helped kick off

Women Build Month at the site of her new home.

She worked alongside Congresswoman Mikie

Sherrill to bring to light the homeownership

challenges women face.

Marly is excited about being able to call

the shots in her own home. “Women identify

themselves with their homes, and I do, too.

Being a homemaker and a homeschooling

mom, it’s a lot for me to have a house,” she said.

“No landlord knocking on the door, just me

inviting people in.”

Sherill was thrilled to pitch in on the Davises’

new home. “To have a small part in this, to grow

our communities, it’s an honor to be here,” she

said. “We have a lot of single moms who have

trouble finding homes. Some women veterans

have children and they are harder to place.

Getting people moved into their own homes,

especially an affordable home, is incredibly

important.”

Groups like Habitat for Humanity work with

people to access the economies and budget

needs of owning a home and support them

through the whole process, according to Sherill.

“It takes a village,” Marly added.

Maryalice Hanzo, 79, of Oak Ridge, works

at Habitat’s ReStore in Randolph once a week

and heard about the Women Build event at

the Lake Shawnee site and asked her daughter,

Pamala Beers, 59, of Bangor, P.A., to join her.

It’s bonding time over nails, just not the ones

on their fingers and toes. “You’d think we’d do

more girlie things, but we always end up at

these,” Beers said.

“It’s so nice to work here, it’s a good feeling,”

Hanzo said of the work she and her fellow

volunteers do. “They are doing it because they

want to do it, and there is a lot to be doing.”

Phyllis Chanda, 63, Roxbury Township, first

started volunteering in 2018 when the Roxbury

Women’s Club was asked by Habitat to help

with a cleanup project on nearly completed

homes. She continued with the home repair

group, even climbing on roofs. A retired human

resources specialist, she still is sometimes in awe

of the work that’s done. “Anybody can do it,

whether it’s once a year or four days a week,

they’ll teach you,” she said. “The family has been

very involved—Peter especially was wanting to

try everything.”

The experience isn’t just meaningful to the

eventual residents, but also to those who are

taking time away from their own lives and

families to put nails into boards. Ray Hom, 59, of

Lake Hopatcong, has been at the Lake Shawnee

site almost every weekend since January. Hom

said his church used to take regular trips with

Habitat to build in Baltimore, Md., but he was

inspired by news coverage of the build closer to

home. “I’ve always been called to serve others

within the community and help it grow,” he

said. “I enjoy helping those who are struggling

to find affordable housing.”

Habitat for Humanity part-time Construction

Site Supervisor Mike Dakak, 71, of Landing, is

at the Lake Shawnee house three days a week.

“The Davis family is very hardworking and

engaged, often coming out in the middle of

winter,” he said.

HAMMERING AWAY AT THE PATH FORWARD

Despite the pandemic, Morris Habitat for

Humanity was able to complete 10 homes in

the last year in a region which includes sections

of Morris, Essex, Union and Warren counties,

Wilson said. And it wasn’t just volunteers who

were hard to find. “Because of factory shutdowns,

all the materials—lumber, windows, doors and

other components—are in short or no supply and

that’s something that’s completely beyond our

control.”

The organization is planning for future needs

and helping where they can because COVID-19

Paul and

Peter Davis

help install

windows at

their Lake

Shawnee

Habitat

home.

has only shone a light on already delicate living

situations. “Family members who are supporting

a loved one, maybe paying their rent and now

have lost their job or even passed away,” Wilson

said.

Morris Habitat’s Neighborhood Revitalization

and Aging in Place programs had to shut down

for almost six months during the pandemic

because they could not enter recipients’ homes.

“Drafty windows, furnaces, plumbing, tons of

roofs. Those things might have been there, and

they were tolerating them because they were out

working most of the time,” Wilson said. “But

now they’re home, and it’s magnified.”

And so, the work continues.

Morris Habitat is breaking ground on two sixplexes,

or structures with six distinct living units,

in Summit and the first phase of a 25-unit project

in Randolph. But they can’t do it without the

help. “People are moved to help, and we can use

it,” said Wilson. “These are good projects that we

would love to be able to push out—it just takes

money.

“I welcome and invite families, individuals,

companies to come out and support your

neighbors in need of a safe and affordable place

to live,” she said. “These are the people we need in

our community.”

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LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021


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LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021


Kristin Hackett, Liz Hackett, Paul Hackett, T.C. Chang, Dorothy Jaworski, Lily

Chang with Bella and Kay Min

Donna Randazzo, Alicia Plinio, Sam Schuchman,

Matt Plinio and Sean Schuchman

Ashley and Alan Powers

For Sale: Hopatcong

Residents Clean Out

Story and photos by KAREN FUCITO

Households throughout Hopatcong participated in the spring

borough-wide garage sale on Saturday, May 1 and Sunday, May 2.

The borough has been hosting the event for 22 years, scheduling one in

May and another in September.

More than 70 households preregistered for the spring two-day event,

selling everything from antiques, books, clothing, knick-knacks and

jewelry to tools and TVs.

Despite a chilly start to the weekend, traffic to the participating

households picked up as Saturday got warmer, said one homeowner, who

added that Saturdays are always the busiest garage sale day.

The next garage sale dates are Saturday, September 4

and Sunday, September 5.

Christina Calabrese with Lula

and Mark Calabrese

Jodie Penn

with Layla

Keith and Nickola Kimble

JoJo, Melissa, Joseph and Mikayla Miranda

Liz Bays and Ashley Bays

Jane Naughton, Joyce Atno, Bette Rizucidlo holding Bella, Carolyn Dierling and Tracey Cobbs

lakehopatcongnews.com 29


Keeping

Our Eyes on

the Post-

Pandemic

Prize

A

Story and photo by MELISSA SUMMERS

“ re we there yet?”

Just like family road trips of our

younger years seemingly dragging on forever,

the COVID-19 pandemic has taken us on a

journey without a destination in sight. And so,

the cliché childhood quandary has taken on a

whole new meaning in 2021.

Heard for decades coming from back seats,

the frequently uttered idiomatic phrase is now

being echoed in our schools, on our athletic

fields and within our small businesses across

the country—and certainly isn’t any less

resounding in my household.

We are more than a year into something

that last April I thought would obviously be

over and done with by the summer. That’s

when busy shopping centers became ghost

towns, schools locked their doors and anything

resembling “life before COVID” disappeared.

Events and commitments were erased from

our calendar and our family postponed an

iconic trip last summer, not just for a few weeks,

but for a whole year. But we are determined it

will happen this summer.

We’ve become used to, yikes, the “new

normal.” The term itself gives me the shivers. I

The author with her family: husband John,

kids Rebecca, Trace and Kylie.

have masks and face covers shoved in my purse,

my glove compartment and coat pockets.

There’s a giant bin of them by the front door.

Even my 3-year-old, Rebecca, carries a spare in

her backpack, and calls out gleefully, “I need

my mask!” whenever we park the car. She

doesn’t have a clue why she has to wear one,

but clearly it’s become part of her normal, and

that just stinks.

Now we watch people in movies and

TV shows made just a few years ago and

automatically wonder why the characters aren’t

standing 6 feet apart or wearing masks. The

pandemic has seeped its way into the plot lines

of prime-time shows and forced game shows to

place on-stage contestants awkwardly far from

the hosts.

We’ve made some progress, like indoor dining

and limited capacity at sports events, but many

have perfected the ways of curbside pickup,

grocery deliveries, socially distant gatherings

and my favorite, “drinks to go.”

The older kids have mastered the art of the

“Google Meet Education,” sitting in front

of their Chromebooks in their pajamas and

raising their hand with the click of a finger

rather than the lifting of limbs. The excitement

of returning to in-person learning in September

was quickly doused by a series of “close contact”

quarantines.

It has become a hassle just to go to school,

amid app-based screening tools and confusing

schedules. Students are not able to use lockers

and must carry with them all personal items,

including their coats. So, yeah, my 12-year-old,

Trace, stands at the bus stop without one.

Rebecca is fortunate to go to preschool three

full days a week, and Trace’s middle school has,

at best, been able to pull off daily half-days

of in-person learning. He’s at an age where

running around with neighborhood kids still

counts as a social life.

Face-to-face contact with friends and peers

is crucial at any age, but it has been most

significantly felt by Kylie, 16, and a junior in

high school. She watched last year as some of

her friends saw their senior year blown to bits

by canceled proms, graduations and senior

trips. And she’s terrified of losing what’s left of

her high school experience.

Kylie shops in stores where clothing comes

with a coordinating face cover and works her

part-time job selling coffee and donuts from

behind a plexiglass shield. And, she’s back to

playing high school field hockey and softball

but has to exercise while wearing a mask and

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LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021


plays in front of sparsely-filled stands.

The journey has made us accustomed to

having our temperature taken everywhere

we go, and the temporal thermometer sits

prominently on the kitchen counter.

Every morning that someone wakes up with

a sniffle or sore throat results in a panicked

rush to check for fever and a rundown of

a memorized symptoms list. “Do you have

shortness of breath? A cough? Chills? Body

aches? Loss of taste or smell?”

Then comes the agony of deciding whether

the results of such an analysis means a doctor

call, doctor appointment, COVID test,

quarantine or any combination of those things.

Or… is it just allergies?

Turns out... some of those symptoms were

because of COVID-19 for Kylie, setting

off a 14-day quarantine for the rest of us,

testing, more cancelled classes and a flurry of

notifications, phone calls and emails. It was

bound to happen sooner or later.

It hasn’t been all bad though. I can count on

one hand the number of times I’ve actually put

on makeup in the last year, I’ve expanded my

legging and yoga pants wardrobe, and wearing

a mask comes in handy for covering up random

zits. My day job in New York started paying for

round-trip Uber rides when most of the transit

services shut down.

Not only that but being in the middle of a

pandemic has legitimized those of us who were

already wiping down bus seats and shopping

cart handles, and opening restroom doors with

paper towels. It’s become acceptable to slither

in and out of a store hidden behind sunglasses

and a mask without having to interact with

anyone.

We have hit all the stops and starts along the

way. Schools have finally gone back to full time.

Proms, graduations and other events are in the

works. Theaters are opening. We’ve rejoined the

local socially distant gym. Even though some

indoor dining has returned, for those of us still

not totally comfortable, the outdoor seating is

popping back up with the warmer weather.

Grandma and Grandpa got their vaccines,

and we are in the process of getting ours, too.

It’s just not clear whether all of the sacrifices

of the last year truly made a difference in the

long run. We still don’t know the long-term

physical effects on those who were infected,

nor do we know the true impact the pandemic

will have on the education and mental health

of our youngest generation. Life may never

completely return to the way it was before, and

we have no choice but to accept that.

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LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021


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HISTORY

High and Dry at Lake Hopatcong

visitor arriving

A at Lake

Hopatcong 100 years ago would have found a

thriving resort with many hotels, restaurants,

dance halls and amusements. One thing they

would not have found was alcoholic beverages for

sale—at least not legally.

The seeds for prohibition in America were

planted in the mid-19th century when supporters

of the national temperance movement began

to decry alcohol as the root of societal evils,

including laziness, promiscuity and poverty.

Leading proponents including the Women’s

Christian Temperance Union, the Anti-Saloon

League and many Protestant denominations,

believed banning alcohol would lead to a happier,

healthier, more prosperous America.

The movement gathered steam around the

turn of the 20th century, driven by growing antiimmigrant

sentiment and women’s groups that

saw temperance as a way to combat domestic

violence. Supporters of prohibition assailed

the impact of alcohol on families and the

inappropriately prominent role they felt saloons

played in immigrant communities. Following a

resolution by Congress calling for a constitutional

amendment to implement prohibition in

December 1917, the 18th Amendment was

ratified in January 1919.

Although a majority of Americans, particularly

those living outside of cities, supported the

implementation of a national prohibition act,

it was also opposed by a substantial number,

including President Woodrow Wilson.

34

by MARTY KANE

Photos courtesy of the

LAKE HOPATCONG

HISTORICAL MUSEUM

ARCHIVES

A winning entry in the Decorated Canoe

Contest held as part of the Aquatic Carnival on

August 12, 1925. Dorothy Cartwright of Chatham

conceived the idea and is the paddler.

LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021

In order to enforce the amendment, Congress

had to enact legislation to enforce the ban. The

National Prohibition Act, commonly known

as the Volstead Act, was passed on October 28,

1919. Although Wilson vetoed the bill on the

basis of moral and constitutional objections, the

House and Senate quickly overrode the veto and

Prohibition took effect on January 17, 1920.

The new amendment had a profound impact

on the country. The allure of the forbidden

gave rise to a glamorous depiction of alcohol

consumption. In many ways Prohibition set in

motion the change of social mores in America

during the Roaring ’20s. The exploits of the

flappers and gents who frequented speakeasies

were widely documented.

Prohibition led to a pervasive disrespect for law,

particularly in larger cities. Out of 7,000 arrests

in New York between 1921 and 1923, only 27

resulted in convictions as jurors had little interest

in jailing bootleggers.

While the possession of alcohol was not

illegal, Prohibition led many otherwise lawabiding

citizens to walk the line of criminal

behavior in order to

purchase it. Criminal

organizations took

the lead in the

production and

distribution of illegal

alcohol. With this

new revenue stream,

Prohibition turned

organized crime into

a major business.

Corruption reached

unprecedented levels

as payoffs to ignore the

law became common.

Instead of reducing

crime, poverty and

violence, Prohibition

Well-known bootlegger John J.

Dunne at his Lake Hopatcong

cottage, which had formerly been

owned by Lotta Crabtree.

led to increased criminal activities such as

bootlegging and widespread alcohol consumption.

Throughout the country, many resorts offered

alcohol and generally had little difficulty

concealing the illegal activity from authorities.

Local officials were often complicit in allowing

the sale of alcohol in their communities. While

Lake Hopatcong was no “Boardwalk Empire,” it

was not difficult to find booze at the lake.

As noted in “Hopatcong Historama,” a 64-page

book published for the Lake Hopatcong Yacht

Club’s 50th anniversary in 1955, visitors to the

lake during Prohibition “never had to go thirsty.”

Several speakeasies provided “cooling draughts of

spirits,” including one River Styx establishment

that provided “a curb service for boaters, shaking

up a quart of gin while the customer waited.”

In his 1976 book, “History of Hopatcong

Borough,” Stuart Murray interviewed former

Hopatcong Mayor Fred Modick, who had been

a borough police officer during Prohibition, and

Borough Councilman James Francomacaro, who

had served as police commissioner during that

era. Modick explained that in recognition of the

importance of tourism, police

had to know “when to keep

fun from turning into trouble,

yet let the fun go on without

interference.”

Confirming the existence of

numerous speakeasies in the

borough, Francomacaro said, “if

people wanted to drink, despite

the laws that said they couldn’t

buy the stuff, they drank

anyway.” Apparently, it was

fairly common for customers to

bring bootleg whiskey purchased

at a local cottage to borough

establishments where they could

then buy soda and ice legally.

Both men indicated that the

Mad House (located where

Townhomes at Lakepointe

now stand) was known for its

homemade gin.

While the Lake Hopatcong

Breeze mostly avoided

discussion of Prohibition and

raids, the lake was mentioned

in other New York and New

Jersey newspapers numerous

times as establishments

were raided, shut down and

quickly reopened.

One such event occurred

on August 30, 1922, when

some 20 agents backed by


state police staged simultaneous midnight raids

on the Monticello House in Landing, Schaefer’s

Hotel and Grill in Mount Arlington, and the

Great Cove House and Espanong Hotels in

Jefferson. Alcohol was reportedly found at each

location, with the Espanong Hotel yielding

brewing equipment, hard liquor and 315 bottles

of beer.

As happened nationwide, local officials were

often either lax in enforcing or openly hostile

to Prohibition. In June 1923, popular Mount

Arlington Mayor Richard J. Chaplin pleaded

guilty and paid a $1,000 fine for the sale of alcohol

at a hotel he owned on Howard Boulevard.

The September 5, 1925 Breeze reported that

Mayor Clarence Lee and members of the Mount

Arlington Council denied charges of failing to

enforce Prohibition laws and refuted allegations

of allowing illegal establishments to run openly,

concluding that “the police department and

the officials of the borough would be glad to be

informed of any places still operating illegally.”

While small raids continued occasionally, a

bigger incident during the summer of 1927

brought publicity to the lake. On August 12, The

New York Times reported that 16 state troopers

and six detectives from the Morris County

Prosecutor’s Office raided Lee’s Pavilion dance

hall at Nolan’s Point (now the location of the

Jefferson House) resulting in six arrests, including

one of the co-owners, a Paterson police detective.

Thirty bottles of liquor were found behind the

soda fountain, according to The Bergen Record,

and a reported 100 people were on the dance

floor at the time of the raid. The orchestra leader,

Frank Dailey, (who would later open the famed

Meadowbrook in Cedar Grove) was held as a

material witness.

The New York Daily News on August 13

reported that “police were also on the watch for

nude moonlight bathing parties which have been

distressing the staider sojourners around Lake

Hopatcong.” Assistant Morris County Prosecutor

Frank Scerbo claimed that with the influence of

illegal alcohol “working girls from New York and

Jersey cities go to Lake Hopatcong and Budd

Lake for their vacations and

throw off every restraint,”

adding that “parents in the

cities would be

horrified at the

conditions under

which daughters

are vacationing in

the country.”

Evidently, he

was not offended

by any male

behavior.

A raid of the

Espanong Hotel the

following afternoon

resulted in more confiscated booze and

the arrest of the owner. On August 14, The New

York Times reported that the Lake Hopatcong

Association, a local business group, claimed the

recent raids had calmed everything down and that

“Lake Hopatcong is perfectly safe for one’s family

at all times.”

While most visits by Prohibition agents did not

make the news, New York newspapers reported

on raids at Kay’s Hotel (which had replaced

Lee’s) and the Yellow Bowl (now the location

of Patrick’s Pub) in 1930 and 1931. One of the

most impressive arrests at Lake Hopatcong came

in May 1931 when agents seized a truck filled

with 40 barrels of beer being operated on behalf

of notorious gangster Waxey Gordon.

Lake Hopatcong had its own well-known

bootlegger, John J. Dunne of West New York,

who started Prohibition as a day-laborer and

retired a beer baron in 1930, worth a reported

$15 million. In 1924, Dunne bought the Lotta

Crabtree house in Mount Arlington. He operated

breweries in plain view, was arrested many times

and somehow always avoided jail. Dunne was

extremely generous to lake causes and hosted

many elected officials at the Crabtree house.

Lake Hopatcong’s own Hudson Maxim, an

inventor and businessman with strong opinions

on most subjects, wrote and spoke out vehemently

against Prohibition. Testifying before the United

Hudson Maxim

in a publicity

photo from

1924 when he

threatened

to sue to add

coffee and tea

to the ban as

intoxicants

under

Prohibition.

States Senate in 1926, Maxim stated that

Prohibition did “more harm than good… and is

actually promoting intemperance and breeding

crime” and that “in the interest of temperance and

humanity, we should do our very best to wipe out

the blot of its black hand upon the Constitution.”

(Maxim received much publicity in 1924 when

he threatened to sue to add coffee and tea to the

ban as intoxicants under Prohibition.)

The 1920s ended, the Great Depression struck

and in November 1932, Franklin D. Roosevelt

was elected president with a pledge to end

Prohibition. In December 1933, the approval

of the 21st Amendment rescinded Prohibition.

Many locals and visitors would later look back

fondly at those “dry” summers of the Roaring ’20s

at Lake Hopatcong.

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lakehopatcongnews.com 35


COOKING

WITH SCRATCH ©

Comfort Food

My

husband,

Aaron, gets

annoyed when he sees

meatloaf or macaroni

and cheese on a restaurant menu.

Irked, he will ask, “Why would you want to

have that when you are going out to eat?”

According to him, these dishes don’t belong

in fancy restaurants. These are foods that

could—and should—be made at home, on the

cheap. Aaron does, however, admit they are

delicious.

The trendiness of comfort food in restaurants

is definitely lost on him. Comfort foods,

however, have been menu bestsellers since the

‘80s. In 1988 the upscale foodie magazine Food

& Wine declared comfort foods to be “hot.”

Not that we need a definition, but just

what exactly are comfort foods? According to

Sciencedirect.com, they are foods that have

nostalgic or sentimental appeal, reminding us

of home and family. They are generally high

in sugar and carbohydrates that the body can

process into temporary stress relief. Comfort

foods are usually associated with childhood

and home cooking. (Could Aaron possibly be

right?)

Now into our second year of quarantine, I

often find myself dreaming of my childhood

and craving the comfort foods my mother,

Gertrude Kertscher, used to make. I recently

had a flashback to a supper she prepared for us

once in a while when I was growing up on the

lake. Velveeta cheesebread with spinach salad

was a treat she didn’t make often, but we all

loved it.

36

by BARBARA SIMMONS

Photos by KAREN FUCITO

LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021

She never made it for company. In fact, it

wasn’t in her usual rotation of supper dishes at

all.

During the week, we had things like goulash

and noodles, pork chops, baked chicken with

Rice-a-Roni, spaghetti and meatballs with

brown gravy, meatloaf and, in the summer,

baked trout. Every meal was accompanied by a

green salad and dessert, even if dessert was just

canned fruit cocktail.

She may have made cheesebread when the

budget was stretched, and we couldn’t afford

to have another dinner featuring some kind of

meat. Good old Velveeta to the rescue!

My German mother, a professionally trained

“Hauswirtschaftsleiterin” (domestic engineer

or professional housekeeper) always kept a box

of Velveeta in the refrigerator. She’d use it in

her excellent macaroni and cheese with Spam

(Vol. 10 No. 5 Labor Day 2018) and every

now and then for cheesebread. And not much

else, really. Maybe grilled cheese sandwiches

for lunch once in a while. It lasted practically

forever. We liked to joke that Velveeta had a

radioactive half-life of 50 years.

Garlic salt was another one of the ingredients

that made this bread so delicious and even a

bit exotic. The unusual fragrance—for German

palates—of garlic wafting through the house

was absolutely intoxicating for us.

In the spring, just after the ice melted off

the lake, but before

it was really warm

enough to play

outside, my brother,

Frank, would have

rather stayed indoors

to build model

airplanes. I would

have preferred to

embroider or draw,

curled up next to

the fireplace in the

living room. But there was always work to be

done outside.

My father, Horst Kertscher, anxious to get

his hands in the dirt and the yard in shape,

would start cleaning off the flower beds while

my brother Frank and I would set about

completing our chore—raking the lawn.

It was a task we both dreaded.

Our fingers would get numb from the cold,

our backs stiff and our arms would be sore

from raking. The wind would be blowing off

the lake, the weather would be damp and gray.

The towering oak trees that surrounded our

yard produced tons and tons of acorns, which

were hard to pry out of the lawn with metal

rakes. It was hard work, and we were miserable.

I’m sure it was a mother’s instinct, but

Gertrude had a knack for knowing the perfect

food to serve to her cold, miserable work crew.

After a day of working in the cold, with blisters

on our fingers, fragrant, crispy, buttery, garlicky

cheesebread was our perfect comfort food.

To compensate for the butter and carbs,

Gertrude served a fresh spinach salad with a

tart vinaigrette. Back in the ‘60s we didn’t have

triple-washed baby spinach in plastic clamshell

boxes—the supermarket spinach was gritty and

sold in a bunch fastened with a thick rubber

band. It needed to be washed a few times and

stemmed before she could add it to the salad.

Be grateful for fresh salad greens in plastic

clamshells!

I scoured the internet in search of a recipe

for Velveeta cheesebread but only found one

photograph on Pinterest. It looked somewhat

similar to Gertrude’s creation.

Here is the recipe for Gertrude’s authentic

version, to the best of my recollection, as it was

never written down. Feel free to jazz up your

version with spiffier cheeses, fresh garlic, herbs

and extra virgin olive oil.


VELVEETA CHEESEBREAD

Ingredients

1 24-ounce semolina baguette

12 ounces Velveeta cheese

1 stick butter

2 teaspoons garlic salt

Procedure

1 Preheat oven to 350°.

2 Slice the baguette into 1-inch slices almost all the way through,

leaving about ¼ inch at the bottom unsliced so it holds together.

Place the sliced baguette on a sheet of aluminum foil about 12

inches longer than the baguette. (I use the 18-inch-wide heavy-duty

foil so that it is wide enough to wrap around the entire baguette.)

3 Slice the Velveeta log into slices and insert them between the slices

of the baguette.

4 With a cheese slicer, slice the stick of butter longways and place

along the top of the baguette with the cheese.

5 Sprinkle the garlic salt over the top of the stuffed cheesebread and

bring up the edges of the aluminum foil, folding it over the

baguette to seal it in.

6 Place the cheesebread covered in foil on a cookie sheet.

7 Bake 30-35 minutes until the cheese is melted.

8 Set the oven to broil, move the oven rack to the top, open the top

of the foil and run the cheesebread under the broiler until the top

is nicely browned and the cheese starts to bubble.

Call Jim to buy or list today!

SPINACH SALAD

Salad

Ingredients

1 5-ounce clamshell baby spinach

¼ cup red onion, thinly sliced into rings

2 hard-boiled eggs, shelled and sliced longways into

quarters

¾ cup cherry tomatoes, sliced in half

1 medium-sized carrot, peeled and grated

6 medium-sized mushrooms, cleaned and sliced

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

Procedure

Add the salad ingredients to a large bowl. Toss with the

kosher salt.

Vinaigrette Dressing

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil

3 tablespoons vinegar

A tiny pinch of sugar

Salt and pepper to taste

Procedure

Whisk the dressing ingredients together and pour over the

spinach salad just before serving.

Gated Marina

James J. Leffler

Real Estate Associate

House Values

James J. Leffler

Real Estate Associate

RE/MAX House Values

101 Landing Road

Landing, NJ 07850

201-919-5414 Cell

973-770-7777 Office

jimleff.rmx@gmail.com

Seasonal Space Rentals

973-663-1192

Sheltered/No Wake Zone

Private Off Street Parking

123 Brady Road ~ Lake Hopatcong

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

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lakehopatcongnews.com 37


WORDS OF

A FEATHER

Although I did

not intend to

write this month’s

column as a sequel, I

am inspired to write about what I observe as I

ramble about in the natural world. Last month,

love was in the air, so I wrote about mating

rituals. This month, rather unsurprisingly, new

life is everywhere.

A resident pair of sandhill cranes strut proudly

behind my home with their two offspring,

which are called colts because of their strong

legs. A mother otter decided to move her babies

from one pond to another, and I watched her

carefully and competently transport each pup

in her mouth, much as a mother cat transports

kittens. My most magical sighting, however,

occurred on my own lanai (what decks or

patios are called in south Florida, where I live).

Right before my eyes, a new butterfly came

into the world.

A friend called in the middle of the day, and

I went outside to my lanai. I sat down on the

edge of the pool to stick my feet in the water

while we chatted and happened to look under

the coping stones. A delicate chrysalis was

hanging there, and it was slightly trembling.

As I watched, the butterfly inside seemed to

unzip a flap in it and wriggled itself out. Its

wings were sort of crimped and hung down

uselessly as it slowly walked about an inch away

and hung, upside down and motionless, for a

few minutes. The air dried its wings, and I saw

them straighten.

Within minutes, the butterfly flapped them a

few times, then took its initial flight. It landed

not too far away, clinging to the screen of the

pool cage. It quickly became a dexterous flyer,

38

Chrsysalis and

new butterfly.

New, Wild and Precious Life

Column and photos by

HEATHER SHIRLEY

LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021

White Peacock

so I opened the door to let it out. It flew out

to my garden and rested on my plants, happily

posing for photos and sipping nectar.

I felt awed by this event, this new life

that I witnessed come into being. OK, I

guess technically it was not a new life but

a transformed one, since it had been alive

in other forms (egg, larva, pupa). Still. The

alignment of universal forces for this event to

occur are incomprehensible to me.

My pool is screened in—how did a caterpillar

get inside? How did it crawl upside down, mere

inches above the water surface, to transform

into its pupa stage? How did my (clearly

ineffective) pool cleaners miss this precise spot,

so as not to disturb the chrysalis? How on earth

did my friend call, motivate me to go sit on

the pool steps to talk to her, so I happened to

glance at an inconspicuous spot—all at the

right moment? The alignment of circumstances

staggers me.

A week or so later, I was swimming and guess

what? There was another chrysalis hanging

from the coping stones! Looking around the

pool cage, I eventually spotted the second

butterfly up at the apex of the screen.

Concerned it wouldn’t find sufficient food, I

vowed to help this new butterfly head outside

into the wild, wondrous world. Eventually,

with perseverance, a large kitchen strainer and

a very gentle touch, I was able to release it. I

have, in subsequent days, enjoyed seeing a pair

of butterflies flying together in my garden.

I am a birder—passionate about observing,

identifying and keeping lists of the birds I

encounter. People do the same for butterflies. I

am not a keen butterfly enthusiast, but because

I enjoy knowing a little bit about a lot of things

in the natural world, I dabble. After researching

my natural history library, I learned that my

new butterfly friends are called white peacocks,

native to south Florida. With a wingspan of

about 2 inches, these butterflies have lovely

coloration of white, orange and purple scales

on their wings.

There are about 725 species of butterflies in

North America. They’re differentiated from

other insects by their scaly wings; in fact, the

scientific name for their order, lepidoptera,

translates from Greek as ‘scaly wings.’

Their four wings (two front and two hinds

on each side) are covered in tiny scales that

overlap like roof shingles, and the way they

overlap makes up the pattern and coloration of

their wings. Some scales are pigmented while

others refract light. I had always heard that if

you touch the wings, you disturb the scales,

and the butterflies won’t be able to fly. Further

investigation disproves this. Scales get damaged

naturally and butterflies can still fly—but of

course, touching and potentially hurting these

fragile creatures are not encouraged.

They are indeed remarkably fragile and

vulnerable. Out of every 100 butterfly eggs

laid, only one grows to adulthood—and even

when one survives those incredible odds, most

species’ lifespan is just two weeks.

It makes me think of a line from my favorite

poet, Mary Oliver: “Tell me, what is it you plan

to do with your one wild and precious life?”

I hope my butterflies have a joyous, safe and

fulfilling time on Earth, however limited. I

hope you do, too. It’s a pretty special place and

time.

All shows are Outside at the

Horseshoe Lake Bandshell

72 Eyland Ave. Succasunna, NJ

JUNE 2 - 7PM

Mostly Motown

with Rhonda Denet

$15 General Adm.

TIX: $10 RAA members

FREE

Summer Concert Series

July 15, 22, 29

August 5

7 PM

at the

Horseshoe Lake Bandshell

www.RoxburyArtsAlliance.org

973-945-0284


15 Commerce Boulevard, Suite 201 • Roxbury Mall (Route 10 East) • Succasunna, NJ 07876

(973) 328-1225 • www.MorrisCountyDentist.com

• Dental Implants

• Cosmetic Dentistry

• Porcelain Veneers

• Family Dentistry

• Invisalign

• Dentures

• Teeth Whitening

• Crowns and Bridges

• Smile Makeovers

• Sedation Dentistry

New Patient Special

$99 Cleaning. Exam & X-Rays

Regularly $190-$344. Up to 6 films.

Cannot be combined - Expires 6/30/21

Refer to Specials on website for details and restrictions.

Dental Implants

Dr. Goldberg is a leading expert on dental implants. He is a Diplomate of the

American Board of Oral Implantology/Implant Dentistry, which is a degree held

by only 1% of dentists worldwide. Whether you require a single implant or

complex full-mouth rehabilitation, a free consultation with Dr. Goldberg should be

considered.

General & Cosmetic Dentistry

Dr. Goldberg treats entire families, from toddlers to seniors. Services include

cleanings, check-ups, fillings, Invisalign, dentures, cosmetics, and more! He and

his staff enjoy the long-term relationships they build with their patients.

FREE Implant, Cosmetic, or

General Dentistry Consultation

Regularly $125

Cannot be combined - Expires 6/30/21

Refer to Specials on website for details and restrictions.

Dr. Goldberg is a general dentist with credentials in multiple organizations. Please visit his website for a complete listing.

Dental Bridges, Dentures, & Implants: What’s The Difference?

Sometimes people need to replace missing teeth or teeth that will be extracted shortly. Bridges, dentures, and implants are common methods, but what are

the differences?

The most common area of confusion lies between dentures and bridges. Dentures are removable: you take them in-and-out of your mouth. Bridges are

permanent.

Dentures can be made from a number of different materials: the most common being acrylic (plastic) or metal. The

advantages of acrylic include cost and simplicity. The disadvantages include thickness and low stability.

Metal dentures are thin, rigid, and fit tightly. The downsides include increased difficulty to repair and cost.

Unlike dentures that are removable, bridges are permanent. This is one reason why bridges are more popular than

dentures. Other advantages include increased biting / chewing power, improved esthetics, and less fuss. Downsides

include the “shaving down” of support teeth, along with possible future cavities and root canals.

Dental implants provide a host of options. Not only can an implant support a single tooth, but multiple implants can

secure a denture or bridge. With respect to dentures, the implant can help to eliminate or decrease the number of clasps,

providing a more esthetic outcome and more stable set of teeth. Bridges benefit from implants by eliminating the risks

Ira Goldberg, DDS, FAGD, DICOI

of developing cavities or needing root canals. You also don’t need to drill on other teeth for support.

A very common substitute for large partial dentures and full dentures is “All-On-Four®.” This revolutionary technology provides the patient with permanent,

non-removable teeth in just a few appointments. Gone is the stigma and disappointment of removable teeth and poor chewing ability. Patients instantly

benefit from a strong bite, excellent smile, and freedom of re-gaining the roof of their mouths if they had a denture that covered it previously. Many

patients who have dentures or require removal of most teeth present to Dr. Goldberg for this procedure specifically: he is a leading authority on this type of

procedure within the community.

More information regarding this, and other topics, is available on our website.

Dr. Goldberg is a general dentist & implant expert located in the Roxbury Mall in Succasunna, NJ. He provides general dentistry for the entire family,

including: cleanings, check-ups, whitening, veneers, crowns, root canals, dentures, periodontal (gum) services, dental implants, and much more. He is a

Diplomate of the American Board of Implantology/Implant Dentistry, holds multiple degrees and is recognized as an expert in dental implants. You can find

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lakehopatcongnews.com 39


directory

s

CONSTRUCTION/

EXCAVATION

Aaron Septic Service

Landing

973-663-6058

www.aaronsepticservice.com

Al Hutchins Excavating

973-663-2142

973-713-8020

Lakeside Construction

151 Sparta-Stanhope Rd.

Hopatcong

973-398-4517

Northwest Explosives

PO Box 806, Hopatcong

973-398-6900

info@northwestexplosives.com

ENTERTAINMENT/

RECREATION

Hopatcong Marketplace

47 Hopatchung Rd.

Lake Hopatcong Adventure

973-663-1944

lhadventureco.com

Lake Hopatcong Cruises

Miss Lotta (Dinner Boat)

37 Nolan’s Pt. Park Rd., LH

973-663-5000

lhcruises.com

Lake Hopatcong Mini Golf Club

37 Nolan's Pt. Park Rd., LH

973-663-0451

lhgolfclub.com

Roxbury Arts Alliance

72 Eyland Ave., Succasunna

973-945-0284

roxburyartsalliance.org

HOME SERVICES

Accurate Pest Control

Landing

973-398-8798

accuratepestmanagement.com

Central Comfort

100 Nolan’s Point Rd., LH

973-361-2146

Window Genie

973-726-6555

windowgenie.com

LAKE SERVICES

AAA Dock & Marine

27 Prospect Point Rd., LH

973-663-4998

docksmarina@hotmail.com

Batten The Hatches

70 Rt. 181, LH

973-663-1910

facebook.com/bthboatcovers

MARINAS, BOAT

SALES & RENTALS

Beebe Marina

123 Brady Rd., LH

973-663-1192

Flash Watersports & Marina

155 Rt. 181 LH

973-663-7990

flashmarina.com

Katz Marina

22 Stonehenge Rd., LH

973-663-0224

katzmarinaatthecove.com

Lake’s End Marina

91 Mt. Arlington Blvd., Landing

973-398-5707

lakesendmarina.net

Lake Hopatcong Boat Rentals

862-254-2514

@lakehopatcongboatrentals

South Shore Marine

862-254-2514

southshoremarine180@gmail.com

NONPROFIT

ORGANIZATIONS

Lake Hopatcong Foundation

973-663-2500

lakehopatcongfoundation.org

Lake Hopatcong Historical

Museum at Hopatcong SP

260 Lakeside Blvd., Landing

973-398-2616

Morris County Dental Assoc.

15 Commerce Blvd., Ste. 201

Succasunna

973-328-1225

MorrisCountyDentist.com

ivyrehab, Physical Therapy

725 NJ Rt 15 Suite 103 LH

973-288-9110

REAL ESTATE

Kathleen Courter

RE/MAX

101 Landing Rd., Roxbury

973-420-0022 Direct

KathySellsNJHomes.com

Robin Dora

Sotheby’s

670 Main St., Towaco

973-570-6633

njlakefront@gmail.com

Christopher J. Edwards

RE/MAX

211 Rt. 10E, Succasunna

973-598-1008

MrLakeHopatcong.com

Karen Foley

Sotheby’s

670 Main St., Towaco

973-906-5021

prominentproperties.com

Jody Frattini

Weichert

92 Woodport Rd., Sparta

908-208-0011

jody-frattini.weichert.com

Donna Geba

Century 21

23 Main St., Sparta

973-726-0333

century21gebarealty.com

Jim Leffler

RE/MAX

101 Landing Rd., Roxbury

201-919-5414

jimleff.rmx@gmail.com

Catherine Pansini

Keller Williams Metropolitan

44 Whippany Rd., Suite 230

Morristown

862-216-7016

soldbycatherine.com

Darla Quaranta

Century21

973-229-0452

century21gebarealty.com

Summer Stock Rentals

973-222-0382

RESTAURANTS & BARS

Alice’s Restaurant

24 Nolan’s Pt. Park Rd, LH

973-663-9600

alicesrestaurantnj.com

Andre’s Lakeside Dining

112 Tomahawk Tr., Sparta

973-726-6000

andreslakeside.com

Lola’s Waterfront Tex-Mex

300 Lakeside Ave., Hopatcong

973-264-4231

eatlolasnow.com

The Windlass Restaurant

45 Nolan’s Point Park Rd., LH

973-663-3190

thewindlass.com

SENIOR CARE

Preferred Care at Home

George & Jill Malanga/Owners

973-512-5131

PreferHome.com/nwjersey

SPECIALTY STORES

AlphaZelle

Toxin-free products

973-288-1971

alphazelle.com

At The Lake Jewelry

atthelakejewelry.com

Hearth & Home

1215 Rt. 46, Ledgewood

973-252-0190

hearthandhome.net

Helrick’s Custom Framing

158 W Clinton St., Dover

973-361-1559

helricks.com

JF Wood Products

973-590-4319

Main Lake Market

234 S. NJ Ave., LH

973-663-0544

mainlakemarket.com

Nature’s Golden Miracle

CBD Products

973-288-1971

NGM-oil.com

Orange Carpet & Wood

Gallery

470 Rt. 10W, Ledgewood

973-584-5300

orange-carpet.com

Sacks Paint & Hardware

52 N. Sussex St., Dover

973-366-0119

sackspaint.net

The Straight Seam

201-410-7349

thestraightseam.com

STORAGE

U-Stor-It/Woodport Storage

20 Tierney Rd./17 Rt. 181

Lake Hopatcong

973-663-4000

YACHT CLUBS

Lake Hopatcong Yacht Club

973-398-4342

73 N Bertrand Rd., MA

lhyc.com

GATES ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, INC

Homestead Lawn Sprinkler

5580 Berkshire Valley Rd.,

Oak Ridge

973-208-0967

Jefferson Recycling

710 Route 15 N Jefferson

973-361-1589

www.jefferson-recycling.com

The Polite Plumber

973-398-0875

thepoliteplumber.com

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

Barbara Anne Dillon,,O.D.,P.A.

180 Howard Blvd., Ste. 18

Mount Arlington

973-770-1380

Fox Architectural Design

546 St. Rt. 10 W, Ledgewood

973-970-9355

foxarch.com

WATERFRONT DESIGNS

RESIDENTIAL

COMMERCIAL

INDUSTRIAL

NEW CONSTRUCTION

ADDITIONS

ALTERATIONS

ELEVATIONS

Wilson Services

973-383-2112

WilsonServices.com

Gates Architectural Design

973-398-4860

gatesarchdesign.com

LAKE HOPATCONG & NORMANDY BEACH AREA

973.398.4860 ~ 732.793.8600

gatesarchdesign.com

FOR A COMPLETE CALENDAR OF EVENTS AND FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT

WWW.LAKEHOPATCONGNEWS.COM

40 LAKE HOPATCONG NEWS Memorial Day 2021


lakehopatcongnews.com 41


Lake Hopatcong...

A fine food and family destination

Nolan’s Point Park Rd., Lake Hopatcong •


• 973-663-2490 • Connect with us! @livethelakenj Live the Lake NJ


Making Home Dreams Come True

SOLD!

SOLD!

SOLD!

2 San Bar Dr., Lake Hopatcong

7 Castle Rock Rd., Lake Hopatcong

530 Howard Bolvd., Lake Hopatcong

SPRING SPECIAL!

Buy or sell with Catherine and she will donate $250

to the charity of your choice at closing.

(When mentioning this ad)

862.236.7016 (CELL)

973.539.1120 (OFFICE)

Soldbycatherine@kw.com

Catherine Pansini

Realtor © - Sale Associate

www.SoldbyCatherine.com

44 Whippany Road Suite 230 Morristown, NJ 07960

Each Office is Independendently Owned & Operated

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