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WEEKLY NEWS

JUNE 3, 2021 • VOL. 60, NO. 22 SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1957 16 PAGES • ONE DOLLAR

Take a spin at MarketStreet

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PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Bellamin Gomez, 3, of Lynn spins on part of the Los Trompos art installation at

MarketStreet Lynnfield on Tuesday.

LYNNFIELD — MarketStreet

is putting a new spin on its commitment

to public art displays.

“Los Trompos”, a wildly creative

and colorful international

art installation that is sure to

make heads spin — literally.

“Los Trompos” — “spinning

tops” in Spanish — consists of

eight larger-than-life, three-dimensional

spinning tops in a

variety of colors and shapes.

The installation was created

by award-winning Mexican

art-and-design team Héctor

Esrawe and Ignacio Cadena.

Owned by DTE Energy Beacon

Park Foundation and The

Downtown Detroit Partnership,

“Los Trompos” will be located

on The Green, MarketStreet’s

outdoor event area, from June

1-27.

Krafts donate $125,000 to Arc

BY STEVE KRAUSE

DANVERS — The family of

New England Patriots-owner

Robert Kraft has donated

$125,000 to support Northeast

Arc’s Campaign for Linking

Lives.

Kraft and his son, Josh Kraft,

president of the Kraft Family

Philanthropies, announced the

challenge grant last Wednesday

in a video message recorded

for Northeast Arc’s virtual

Evening of Changing Lives

Gala.

The money will support

Northeast Arc’s first-ever

capital campaign, a $3 million

fundraising effort for the

Center for Linking Lives at the

Liberty Tree Mall. A challenge

grant means that Northeast Arc

will receive the funding once it

receives a matching amount of

gifts from other donors.

KRAFT, PAGE 2

SPIN, PAGE 2

COURTESY PHOTO

From left, Josh Kraft, president of Kraft Family

Philanthropies, and Robert Kraft, CEO of The

Kraft Group, announce a $125,000 challenge grant

to support Northeast Arc.

Art finds

a home

with faith

BY ELYSE CARMOSINO

LYNNFIELD — When she was laid

off from her 30-year job at a Fortune 500

company last June, Maureen Richard-

Saltman promised herself she would try

something completely different.

A longtime artist and craftswoman,

she began selling her handmade jewelry

and artwork under the name Perfectly

Imperfect Jewelry at local shops and galleries,

but because it was the midst of the

COVID-19 pandemic, she struggled to

find vendors to take her art.

“I started to hear people say they

couldn’t do craft fairs anymore because

there was no place to do their work,” said

Richard-Saltman.

ART, PAGE 2

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ART

FROM PAGE 1

KRAFT

FROM PAGE 1

“Our family has a history of

promoting social equity,” the

Before

“I got to thinking ‘I’m

paying to go into other shops

to sell my work, and I’m

having a harder time finding

places to put my work,’ so

I thought I’d look for a little

(store) of my own to have just

for fun.”

She quickly set out to find

a spot to lease, and it wasn’t

long before she became acquainted

with Jack Marino, the

property deacon for Lynnfield

Community Church.

“He showed me the little

room (in the church’s basement),

and I said ‘that’s perfect,’”

she said. “I invited 12

of my artsy friends to join

me, and we launched our little

shop on November 27, the day

after Thanksgiving.”

Within a week of launch,

Richard-Saltman said she was

inundated with requests from

other local artists and crafters

who wanted to know if there

was space at the shop to display

their own work as well.

“Nobody had any place

to go. Every existing shop

had waiting lists,” she said.

“People had no place to show

anything. As artists, we go

crazy if we don’t know what

to do with our stuff. We have

to create.”

Although the room she

rented was too small to fit

the wave of artists looking

to showcase their work, the

church’s larger basement room

was still available for rent.

“It was a lot more money

than I had planned and a much

bigger commitment than I had

planned, so I went before Jack,

the deacon,” Richard-Saltman

said. “They’re trying to do

a lot more with the church.

They’re very community-focused,

and we wanted our shop

to be community-focused.

“Lynnfield didn’t have a

shop like this, and we wanted

to provide that in a neighborhood-type

setting, in a

building that would evoke

community, and what better

place to do that then a church?”

she added.

The church was open to

Richard-Saltman’s proposal,

and she signed her new lease

that same week.

Perfectly Imperfect Gift

Shoppe is now home to almost

40 local artists, and Richard-

Saltman has since re-acquired

the smaller basement room to

use as a classroom for various

arts and crafts workshops

hosted by her and other showcased

artists.

Since vaccines have become

more widely available, the

shop has hosted two beading

classes and a “Grow Your

Own Herb Garden” class.

As a way to give back to the

church that has hosted them,

all proceeds from the shop’s

upcoming four-night calligraphy

class — which will take

place every Tuesday in June

— will go to benefit Lynnfield

Community Church’s Capital

Campaign fundraiser.

“We’ve partnered with the

church for a lot,” Richard-

Saltman said. “Whatever

we can do to work with the

church, we’re doing, because

they showed a lot of good

faith to get us in here, so we’re

trying to show as much good

faith as we can to give back to

them.”

The Perfectly Imperfect Gift

Shoppe hosts “Artists Chats”

live streams and posts additional

shop information on

its Facebook page at https://

www.facebook.com/theperfectlyimperfectgiftshoppe/.

family said in a recorded statement.

“Working with strong

partners, we seek to provide opportunities

and support to individuals

and families across our

communities.

“It is of the utmost importance

to us that social equity is realized

by people of all abilities,”

the family said. “The Center for

Linking Lives aligns with this

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 3, 2021

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FILE PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Maureen Richard-Saltman has worked with Lynnfield Community Church property deacon

Jack Marino to rent out space for art projects.

The calligraphy class, to be

hosted by Jack Marino, will

take place June 8, 15, and 22

from 7 to 9 p.m.

An outdoor shop event is

also planned for Saturday,

June 5 and Sunday, June 6,

with rain dates of June 12 and

13.

Beginning June 1, the

shop’s hours of operation are

Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2

p.m., Tuesdays from 12 p.m.

to 6 p.m., Wednesdays from

10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursdays

from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m., Fridays

from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and

Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 3

p.m. The shop is closed on

Mondays.

While the shop’s future may

mission, and we hope other donors

will join us in supporting

this innovative and transformational

project, which will help

provide the greatest outcomes

for people with disabilities.”

Opened in late 2020, the

Center for Linking Lives is the

new home for all of Northeast

Arc’s community-facing programs.

The agency revitalized

26,000 square feet of previously

unused retail space to provide

a range of services including

support for families who have

children diagnosed with autism

or other intellectual disabilities,

early intervention, residential

and health services, supported

employment, an assistive technology

lending library and

skills training.

The Center promotes community

redevelopment and environmental

sustainability while

serving as a national model for

other organizations seeking to

enhance inclusion for people

with disabilities in underutilized

community settings, such

as malls.

In order to fund the construction

of the Center for Linking

Lives, Northeast Arc launched

its first-ever capital campaign

last July.

“The traditional capital campaign

model is to raise money

before embarking on a project,

but as an agency we determined

the need for such an inclusive

space was so great that we decided

to begin construction

simultaneously with the campaign,”

said Jo Ann Simons,

president and CEO of Northeast

Arc.

“We are grateful that the Kraft

be unclear, Richard-Saltman

said she has high hopes for

what’s to come.

“Everything has happened

very organically,” she said.

“When I set out to do this, I

thought it was going to be

a fun little gig, but now I’ve

decided to take the year off to

build the business and make

this my full-time gig.”

Krafts donate $125,000 to Northeast Arc

Family recognizes the importance

of the Center for Linking

Lives. Their support, and gifts

from future donors, will help us

as we create a vibrant community

where individuals with disabilities

can reach their full potential

while leading fulfilling

lives alongside their peers,”

Simons added.

The Northeast Arc has raised

more than $2 million toward its

$3 million goal. Those interested

in supporting the project can

give by visiting www.linkingliveschallenge.org.

Northeast

Arc serves more than 15,000

people in 190 Massachusetts

cities and towns each year. It is

the largest Arc in Massachusetts

and the second largest — of 700

— in the country.


JUNE 3, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

A man makes his way past the “Together” mural by artist Mia Cross at MarketStreet Lynnfield

on Tuesday.

PHOTOS | SPENSER HASAK

Jerry Hallinan of Danvers plays with his grandson, Sonny

DelRossi of Lynnfield at the Los Trompos art installation at

MarketStreet Lynnfield.

SPIN

FROM PAGE 1

“We are so thrilled to bring

this joyful art to the North

Shore, and to mark our first

international art installation

at MarketStreet Lynnfield,”

said MarketStreet Marketing

Manager Annie Healy. “We

have admired Esrawe (and)

Cadena from afar, and we were

able to first experience their

creativity this winter with ‘Mi

Casa, Your Casa 2.0,’ which

debuted with great success

at another WS Development

property, Boston Seaport.”

From its spring display of a

flock of 1,100 pink flamingos

to “Together,” local artist Mia

Cross’ large-scale mural encouraging

diversity and inclusion,

to an upcoming “Rainbow

Garden,” MarketStreet has always

welcomed public art.

Esrawe and Cadena found

their inspiration for “Los

Trompos” in the form of a spinning

top, a toy popular with

children around the world.

The colorful material used

to create each structure works

with vibrant fabric woven in

a traditional style by Mexican

artisans, stretching over the

“spinning-top” structures. Each

sculpture acts as a gathering

place for relaxation, social interaction

and entertainment.

Collaborating with friends and

family, visitors can delve into

their inner child, spinning the

tops on their bases. Each top

seats up to four adults, or up to

eight children.

“The concept behind ‘Los

Trompos’ is based on an approach

to traditional toys, their

colorful expression and the

way they are constructed. We

wanted to talk about the traditions

and skills of the craftsmen

in Mexico as an inheritance

of our culture,” Esrawe and

Cadena said in a statement provided

by MarketStreet. “We

like the idea of translating these

techniques into new symbols.

“We firmly believe that

these are the goals of design:

to weave and generate interactions,

human connections and

emotions; to relate to users; and

to enhance and translate our inheritance

and skills into new

expressions. ‘Los Trompos’ is

a place of color and joy.”

Mia Cross’ “Together”

mural, which made its debut

Tuesday, is located next to

Capital One Café. Designed

to communicate a message

People explore the Los Trompos public art display on The Green at MarketStreet Lynnfield on

Tuesday. See more photos on page 15.

MarketStreet hopes shoppers take a spin

of diversity and inclusion, it

serves to reinforce the notion

that MarketStreet is a space

everyone can enjoy and that all

races, sexual orientations, religions,

ethnicities and abilities

are welcome.

MarketStreet Lynnfield is

celebrating the arrival of its

new “Together” mural with

two giveback opportunities.

For every photo snapped in

front of the mural through

June 4 and posted to social

media — tagged with

#TogetheratMarketStreet —

MarketStreet will donate one

dollar to Lynnfield 4 Love, a

local charity whose goal is to

create a more connected community

by fostering an appreciation

and understanding of diversity

and promoting kindness,

equality and justice.

Each visitor who posts a

photo will also be entered to

win $200 to enjoy at their favorite

shops at MarketStreet

Lynnfield. Guests will also have

a chance to register for professional

photo shoots by Halo

Creative Studios in front of the

mural this summer.

In celebration of Pride

Month, MarketStreet Lynnfield

will partner with North Shore

Pride, Lynnfield 4 Love, Boys

& Girls Club of Stoneham

& Wakefield, Lynnfield Art

Guild, Lynnfield Recreation,

A Healthy Lynnfield and more

to plant a “Rainbow Garden,”

filled with colorful arcs handpainted

by local friends and

family.

The garden will be displayed

through June 30.

“We hope that ‘Los Trompos’

will spark joy for our guests,

inspiring them to play no

Spring Cleanups

and

Tree Removal

and

Dog Waste

Removal

matter what age,” Healy said.

“Coupled with ‘Together’ and

‘Rainbow Garden,’ these three

art installations represent not

only our continued commitment

to the arts, but also our desire to

be a destination where people of

all kinds can feel comfortable

and find something to enjoy.”

For more information

on coming attractions at

MarketStreet, go to www. marketstreetlynnfield.com.

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WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 3, 2021

LYNNFIELD

WEEKLY NEWS

Police Log

(USPS Permit #168)

Telephone: 781-593-7700 • Fax: 781-581-3178

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903

News and Advertising Offices: 110 Munroe St., Lynn, MA 01901

Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

www.weeklynews.net

Editor: Thor Jourgensen tjourgensen@essexmediagroup.com

Reporter: Anne Marie Tobin atobin@essexmediagroup.com

Sports Editor: Mike Alongi malongi@essexmediagroup.com

Advertising Reps: Ralph Mitchell rmitchell@essexmediagroup.com

Patricia Whalen pwhalen@essexmediagroup.com

Ernie Carpenter ecarpenter@essexmediagroup.com

Retail Price: $1.00

Deadlines: News: Monday, noon; Display Ads: Monday, noon;

Classified Ads: Monday, noon;

No cancellations accepted after deadline.

The Lynnfield Weekly News is published 52 times per year on Thursday by Essex

Media Group, Inc. No issue is printed during the week of Christmas. The Lynnfield

Weekly News is delivered via US Mail to all homes in Lynnfield. It is also

available in several locations throughout Lynnfield. The Lynnfield Weekly News

will not be responsible for typographical or other errors in advertisements, but will

reprint that part of an advertisement in which a typographical error occurs if notified

immediately. Advertisers must notify the Lynnfield Weekly News of any errors in

advertisements on the FIRST day of insertion. The publisher reserves the right to

reject, omit or edit any copy offered for publication. POSTMASTER: Send address

changes to Lynnfield Weekly News, P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903. © 2016 Essex

Media Group, Inc.

Can’t get to

the store?

Get home

delivery.

Subscribe for half the

newsstand price.

Subscriptions include

full online access.

www.itemlive.com/subscribe

or call 781-593-7700, ext. 1239

Monday, May 24

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 7:26 p.m.

Monday at 178 Walnut St.

A caller reported a motor

vehicle was in his front

yard after possibly rolling

over.

Complaints

At 7:56 p.m. Monday, a

caller from 195 Lowell St.

reported solicitors were

going door to door, and

thought they were scoping

the house. Police spoke

with the resident, but

were unable to locate the

solicitors.

Tuesday, May 25

Complaints

At 10:58 a.m. Tuesday, a

caller from 1027 Main St.

reported a neighbor cut

down several trees on his

mother’s property. Police

reported the incident occurred

several months ago

and advised the caller that

it was a civil matter.

Carianne Machado, 34,

of 4 Dodge Road, Apt. B3,

Rowley, was issued a summons

for shoplifting by

price tampering at Whole

Foods Market, 100 Market

St., at 9:02 p.m. Tuesday.

Wednesday, May 26

Accidents

A report of a motor

vehicle crash with personal

injury at 1:54 p.m.

Wednesday on North

Broadway. One person was

taken to Beverly Hospital.

A motor vehicle crash

with personal injury at 2:15

p.m. Wednesday at 354 S

Broadway. Two people were

taken to MelroseWakefield

Hospital.

A motor vehicle crash

was reported at 4:13 p.m.

Wednesday at 425 Walnut

St. and 425 Market St.

Thursday, May 27

Arrest

Sarah Hijikata, 51, of 9

Daventry Court, was arrested

on a warrant on

Thursday at 2:31 p.m.

Accident

A crash involving a motor

vehicle and tractor trailer

was reported at 6:05 a.m.

Thursday at 425 Walnut

St. and 425 Market St.; on

Brook Drive on Thursday at

11:54 p.m.

Medical

Police assisted with

medical transport

from King Rail Drive to

MelroseWakefield Hospital

on Thursday at 4:19 p.m.

Fire

Police responded with

the fire department to 19

Upton Lane on Thursday at

4:42 p.m. for a report of an

oven fire.

Enforcement

Police issued a traffic

rule enforcement warning

to a North Reading

driver on Essex Street on

Thursday at 9 p.m. Police

on Thursday at 11:19 p.m.

asked people gathered at

a Keniston Road home to

turn down music.

Friday, May 28

Summons

Steven A. Grasso, 60, of

49 Lakeview Avenue, was

issued a summons for

operating a motor vehicle

with a suspended license

on Friday at 6:38 p.m. following

a motor vehicle accident

on Salem Street.

Enforcement

Police issued a traffic rule

enforcement warning to a

Peabody driver on Essex

Street on Friday at 6:05

a.m.; issued a warning to

a Lynn driver on Salem

Street on Friday at 7:11

p.m.; issued a warning to a

Wakefield driver on Salem

Street on Friday at 2:53

p.m.

Medical

Police assisted with

medical transport from

Huntingdon Road to Lahey

Burlington on Friday at

3:27 p.m.

Larceny

Police on Friday at 4:09

p.m. received a report of

a larceny on Salem Street.

Police on Friday at 5:15

p.m. received a report of

fraud on Mansfield Road.

Saturday, May 29

Enforcement

Police issued a motor

vehicle traffic rule enforcement

citation to a Malden

driver on Salem Street on

Saturday at 6:28 a.m.

Medical

Police assisted with

medical transport from

Pocahontas Way to Lahey

Burlington on Saturday at

6:49 a.m.

Sunday, May 30

Medical

Police assisted with

medical transport

from Richards Road to

Massachusetts General

Hospital on Sunday at

9:20 a.m.; assisted with

transport from Market

Street to Beverly Hospital

on Sunday at 11:44 a.m.;

assisted with transport

from North Broadway to

MelroseWakefield Hospital

on Sunday at 9:32 p.m.


JUNE 3, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 5

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COURTESY PHOTOS | INDRA PERSAD MILOWE

Blue Mas dancers in this painting by Indra Persad Milowe act out a Trinidad Tobago tradition evoking the islands’ slave history.

Caribbean meets Summer Street

For the Weekly News

LYNNFIELD —

“Celebrations and Folklore

of Trinidad, West Indies” is a

solo art exhibition by Trinidadborn

visual artist Indra Persad

Milowe, and it is now on display

at the library, 18 Summer

St.

Scheduled to be in place

throughout the summer,

“Celebrations” features 21

paintings of different shapes

and sizes of canvas created with

multi-colored and gold acrylic

paints.

Milowe, according to a description

provided by the library,

drew on childhood

memories, traditional Hindu

Ceremonies and African folklore

to celebrate her heritage’s

diverse culture.

There is a story behind

every painting, including a

Trinidadian tradition of Blue

Mas players going door to door

shouting, “Pay the Devil.”

“They leaped and pranced,

smeared in blue paint and molasses,

wearing wings, horns

and wire tails while carrying

pitchforks. They all had whistles

in their mouths that dramatized

their movements, and

threatened to smear spectators

unless they paid them off. Their

dancing and performance were

accompanied by men beating

empty biscuit and oil cans,” she

recalled.

Blue Mas dancers wear metal

chains around their waists symbolizing

the slave trade that

finally ended in the 19th century.

The combination of molasses

and soot on their faces

and bodies is a reminder of the

arduous toil of the slaves in the

fields, cutting the sugar cane

and heating it over large fires to

extract the molasses.

The Devil Molasses Mas is

played annually at the Trinidad

and Tobago Carnival.

Other Milowe works evoke

Barahe, or Chatti, a very popular

Hindu celebration marking

a child’s birth. She recalled how

the celebration is held on the

twelfth day after birth.

On the evening of this celebration,

women are served

delicious food and drinks.

Afterwards, they sit around

the baby on the floor, rejoicing

while singing songs

and clapping accompanied

by the dholak, a hand drum

and a dhantal — a metal rod

instrument.

“My aunt would stand up as

she struck the manjeera cymbals

faster

and faster, then everyone in

the room got up to dance. The

participation of friends and relatives,

from both parents’ families,

emphasized the importance

of birth in continuing lines

and cementing family bonds,”

Milowe said.

Indra Persad Milowe’s artwork on display at the Summer

Street library is inspired by her West Indian roots.

STUDENT OF

THE WEEK

By Tréa Lavery

LYNNFIELD — Sarah

Breslow wants to make sure

all students have the supplies

they need for school, and she

is encouraging the community

to help.

The Lynnfield High School

junior is organizing a backpack

and school supply drive

to donate filled backpacks to

the Chelsea Collaborative, a

community organization that

seeks to uplift the local, Latinx

Stretching out a helping hand

immigrant population. She

said she had the idea after participating

in another community

service project a couple

years ago with confirmation

candidates at her church, St.

Maria Goretti, collecting diapers,

toys, crib sheets and

other items for the Catholic

Charities.

“I enjoyed it so much, I decided

this summer to do another

project,” Breslow said.

“We just started collecting,

and my goal is to bring as

many backpacks as possible to

Chelsea by July.”

Breslow posted a call for

donations on the Facebook

page Lynnfield Cares, and invited

people to drop off backpacks

and school supplies at

her home. She said that in the

week since, she has already received

lots of donations, and is

optimistic that she will receive

plenty more.

Meanwhile, Breslow is busy

with other activities: she plays

tennis for the high school and

is on the swim team. She was

also recently inducted into the

National Honor Society, and

is a certified lifeguard. While

she wasn’t able to make use of

that certification last summer

because of the pandemic, she

is happy to see opportunities

opening up as COVID-19 restrictions

are lifted.

“Hopefully this summer, I’ll

get back to work,” she said.

ITEM PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Lynnfield High School junior Sarah Breslow is the student

of the week saluting in her impact on the community.


6

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 3, 2021

Religious News

Centre Congregational

Church

5 Summer St., Lynnfield

781-334-3050

www.centre-church.org

Facebook.com/CentreChurch

UCC

office@centre-church.org

YouTube.com/c/centrecongregational

church/

In the Centre since 1720,

Centre Church is an open and

affirming congregation of the

United Church of Christ. No

matter who you are or where

you are on your life’s journey,

you are welcome at Centre

Church.

Messiah Lutheran Church

708 Lowell Street, Lynnfield

(corner of Lowell & Chestnut)

is currently open for in-person

worship Sunday morning

at 10:30 am. Worship services

will also be streamed

live on FaceBook. Like us

on FaceBook: facebook.com/

Messiah-Lutheran-Church

Worship times: Sunday

mornings at 10:30 am, Sunday

evening devotion on Face Book

Live at 6:30 pm, Wednesday

evening Prayer time at 7:01 pm

on Face Book Live.

Messiah Lutheran Church

is served by Rev. Dr. Jeremy

Pekari, and Rev. David Brezina.

Temple Emmanuel/

Wakefield

For more information about

Temple Emmanuel, a member

of the Jewish Reconstructionist

Communities, call 781-245-

1886 or see our Facebook

page or website at www.

WakefieldTemple.org.

Request service links to

the Zoom streaming: info@

WakefieldTemple.org

Shabbat services: Friday,

7:30 p.m.: June 1 and June 25.

Saturday mornings at 9:30

am: June 5 and 19, July 17

Wakefield-Lynnfield

United Methodist Church

Peace, Hope & Virtual Hugs

Deb Willis Bry, cell:

781-521-9726

Office Assistant, Wakefield-

Lynnfield United Methodist

Church

Assistant Coordinator,

Greater Boston Project Linus

Wakefield-Lynnfield United

Methodist Church, 273 Vernon

St., Wakefield, Mass., 01880

Church Office: 781-245-

1359, Parsonage: 781-245-0338

Email: WLUMC272@gmail.

com

www.facebook.com/method

istchurchwakefield

www.instagram.com/meth

odistchurchwakefield

*A Project Linus Blanket

Drop-Off Location*

www.bostonprojectlinus.com

Trees and diversity? It’s a thing

By Daniel Kane

LYNNFIELD — The massive

pine tree has been overlooking

the town common for decades

now. It’s seen better days, but

still stands strong after all this

time — and for that reason, despite

a few local groans, John

Tomasz has always left it be.

Tree Warden is just one of the

town government hats Tomasz

wears. He is also Lynnfield’s

public works (DPW) director,

and his warden duties put him

in charge of maintaining trees on

public ground.

“Some towns, like a city like

Cambridge, will have an arborist

who is their tree warden,” he

said. Tomasz, who worked in the

cities of Cambridge and Salem’s

public works departments before

landing in town five years ago.

“In most towns it kind of falls

upon the DPW director. They’re

assumed to be the tree warden

until otherwise told. This happened

to be the case here.”

That hasn’t always been the

smartest way to do things, but

a six-week class sponsored

by the state’s Department of

Conservation and Recreation

has made the whole job a lot

easier for officials like Tomasz.

“The state recognized a couple

of years ago that you’re essentially

appointing DPW directors

to do a job where they might not

know a whole lot about trees,”

he said. “So they started offering

this course where they teach

people like me how to recognize

defects in trees and types of trees

just to protect the public.”

That course is all about — you

guessed it — trees. More specifically,

it’s about identifying defects

and spotting trees that are

on the way out and could pose

a risk.

“It’s easy to see a tree that’s

rotted,” Tomasz said. “But in

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John Tomasz is Lynnfield’s Tree Warden and the director of Lynnfield Department of Public Works.

a lot of cases you’d say a tree

looks pretty healthy and then,

when it comes down to it, you

don’t realize how bad it really

was. Since I’ve been here, the

interesting part is seeing trees

come down that you can’t believe

they did and others where

you can’t believe they’re still

standing.”

The town common happens

to be one of Tomasz’s proudest

works of his department. Today

on the common you’ll see plenty

of new trees and many that look

different. That’s no accident.

“We recently took down some

(defected) trees in the common

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and planted four more,” Tomasz

said. “Whenever we take down

trees we try to put down new

trees. Of course, what happens

in a lot of these old towns is in

the old days they planted 2,000

of the same trees. Now you have

2,000 trees that are all the same

age and have the same diseases

and go down around the same

time. We try to be more diverse

now.”

That diversity in greenery also

gives areas around town a more

colorful look, too. The DPW

manages five cemeteries, parks

at every school — even turf

fields, playgrounds and other

areas around town. The experience

so far has been a positive

one for Tomasz and his crew.

“I’ve been able to get a lot

done here that I couldn’t have

in other places because the support

has been so good,” Tomasz

said. “From the selectmen to

the town administrator, finance

committee and the residents. It’s

been great.”


JUNE 3, 2021

Lynnfield Art Guild

membership drive

LYNNFIELD — Attention

painters, photographers, sculptors,

crafters and friends.

You support the arts. You want

to show and sell your works. You

want to learn more and improve

your skills. You want to network

and socialize.

Join now and save with a 50

percent membership discount

for new members. Free first-year

membership for students. This

offer is good until June 30, 2021.

Visit www.lynnfieldart.org for

information and application.

John B. Kennedy Jr, 84

1936 - 2021

DANVERS MA - John B. Kennedy,

Jr. age 84, of Danvers,

formerly of Lynnfield, passed

away peacefully on April 27,

2021 at Brightview Senior Living

in Danvers.

John was born in Boston on

November 10, 1936, he was

the son of the late John B. Kennedy

Sr. and Helen (Donahue)

Kennedy.

John was a graduate of

Sharon High School, Class

of 1954. He was the owner

of Northrup Associates real

estate firm in Lynnfield from

1980 until 2000 and helped

many families in town find their

perfect home. In 1985, he was

appointed by Governor Michael

Dukakis to chair the MA board

of Registration of Real Estate

Brokers. John was recognized

throughout the state for his

high ethics and integrity that

he brought to the profession.

He was active in the Lynnfield

Rotary and was named a Paul

Harris fellow in recognition of

his substantial contribution to

its humanitarian and educational

programs. He was very

active in volunteer work such

as lector at St. Maria Goretti

parish, Lynnfield, MA, serving

on Democratic Town Committee

and President of Rotary

Club. In 1982 he initiated the

Rotary Club “Citizen of the

Year” award. He served as the

Greater Salem Board of Realtors

vice president from 1984

through 1985. Over the years

he has been an avid Red Sox

baseball fan and an active

member of the BoSox club.

He was the beloved husband

of the late Rita T. (Ouellette)

Kennedy. John was the father

of Lisa Kennedy Crooke and

her husband William R. Crooke

of Cupertino, CA and of John

Kennedy III and his wife Linda

Kennedy of Beecher Falls, VT.

He was the brother of the late

Reed Kennedy, David Kennedy,

late sister Ellen Kennedy, late

sister Margaret Cruz, and sister

Anne Fisher.

The family would like to

thank the staff of the Brightview

Senior Living in Danvers

for providing John with loving

care and for offering a place for

social activities and friendship.

Memorial donations may be

made to the National MS Society.

A Proud Supporter of a Healthy Lynnfield

The realtor that gives back!

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A percentage of every transaction is donated back to the community.

To the editor:

With high school graduation

upon us, there is much to

celebrate about the talents and

accomplishments of seniors at

Lynnfield High School.

The announcement stating

Massachusetts’ State of

Emergency will end in June,

along with the advent of warm

weather and the excitement of

being able to “return to normal,”

makes it easy to understand how

celebrations may abound.

Graduation is typically a time

for backyard parties, family celebrations

and get-togethers with

friends; young people need this

social connectedness more than

ever this year. But it is important

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Lynnfield needs tree bylaw

To the editor:

I am a resident of Lynnfield

and currently have the privilege of

serving as the chair of the Lynnfield

Conservation Commission. I write

as a resident in response to “Tree

Bylaw Chopped in Lynnfield”

(Item, May 20).

The editorial stated: “It’s worth

asking what, if any, protections —

beyond those already available to

the Conservation Commission —

the town needs to place on local

trees.” The short answer is that almost

no protections exist for trees

in Lynnfield and, if residents believe

that trees are worthy of protection,

they should come together

to agree on a bylaw that provides

for the specific protections they

believe are necessary.

In most instances, the power

of a conservation commission

to protect trees comes entirely

from the Massachusetts Wetlands

Protection Act and it is very

limited.

Under the act, a conservation

commission can usually only review

the removal of trees that are

located within 200 feet of a river

or 100 feet of other wetlands.

Even when a tree is within conservation

commission jurisdiction,

a conservation commission often

does not have the power under the

act to save it if a resident or developer

would like it removed.

Residents should understand

this when they look to the

Commission to prevent the cutting

of trees — its power is limited.

The tree warden, who is our public

works director, also has only limited

power under state law to protect

“public shade trees,” which

are usually only those that line a

public way.

If residents want to preserve

trees in town, or at least have the

chance to speak up and review a

tree-cutting proposal at a public

hearing, it is up to them to support

a bylaw that would go beyond the

Act and the Shade Tree Law and

grant a town board the power to

protect trees.

Importantly, a bylaw could be

as narrow or as broad as the residents

would like. A bylaw could

be written to not affect current

homeowners at all. For example,

the “cluster development” bylaw,

which was indefinitely postponed

by vote at the fall 2020 town

to remember our No. 1 goal as

a community is to protect the

bright futures of our youth.

Members of the Class of 2021

have come so far, grown so fast

and accomplished so much. Why

put a bright future at risk?

A Healthy Lynnfield, the

Lynnfield Public Schools and

Lynnfield Police remind parents

to host substance-free, safe gatherings

for teens. The MA Social

Host Law spells out that it is illegal

to furnish alcohol to minors

and that it is our collective responsibility

to keep kids safe.

As graduation approaches, it

is important for parents to talk to

teens about how important it is to

practice good decision making

and to be creative in the ways you

Financial planning is

more important than ever…

• Detailed Life Planning

• Education Plans

• Longevity Planning

• Legacy & Estate Planning

• Investment Management

meeting, would have given developers

incentives to save large

groups of trees, but would not have

impacted current homeowners. A

more proactive bylaw might apply

to newly-created, single-family

lots, but not existing lots.

If our residents would like to

see even more protection, the

bylaw might provide a review

process when a resident wants to

cut certain trees near the property

line they share with a neighbor

(like the tree bylaw proposed in

fall 2020).

Whatever residents settle on,

protecting even limited trees

through a bylaw that reflects the

true will of residents certainly

seems better than the absence of

protection we have now.

If you are a resident who would

like to see trees saved, it is crucial

that you give the Planning Board

the power to do so. And, in the

meantime, visit lynnfieldtreecommittee.org

and join our amazing

Tree Committee in their effort to

get 1,000 trees planted in town.

celebrate Lynnfield youth.

Your teens will remember the

kindness and the sense of a strong

community caring for them. So

many have worked so hard to

make Graduation 2021 a memorable,

positive and healthy experience

for all seniors.

Let’s work together to make

sure Lynnfield kids stay safe and

let’s wish the Class of 2021 safe

and healthy futures.

Celebrate safely!

Superintendent of

Schools Kristen Vogel

Acting Chief of

Police Nick Secatore

Substance Use Prevention

Coordinator Peg Sallade

• Retirement Planning

• Long Term Care Planning

• Life Insurance

• Sustainable investing

• Charitable Giving

Don Gentile

Lynnfield

Let’s ensure graduation is fun and safe

ANTONIO SORDILLO, CFP®, CRPC®, CPFA

Vice President, Investments

antonio.sordillo@raymondjames.com

WWW.ELLENCRAWFORDSELLS.COM

20 Burlington Mall Road, Suite 130 // Burlington, MA 01803

781.313.8403 // evergreenfinpartners.com

© 2021 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC. 21-BRNAO-0003 TA 1/21


8

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 3, 2021

Seniors

Senior Center offers

plenty to do in June

LYNNFIELD — The Lynnfield

Senior Center has been busy offering

more than 200 programs/

classes virtually including live

Zoom exercise classes, a book

club, discussion groups and even

a Zoom lunch bunch!

The Center offers Grab and

Go lunches three days each week

in our parking lot — advance

sign-up is required. The Center’s

SHINE representative is available

to offer insurance assistance by

appointment, and we hope you

will enjoy all of the staff cooking

and craft videos that we post each

week, along with our Virtual

Travel Monday Trips.

For more information,

please call the senior center at

781-598-1078.

Don’t know how to Zoom? It’s

easy. Call us and we will get you

started. Then see all you can do

from the comfort of your home.

Contact us if you would like the

links to our exercise classes, or

to see the variety of programs

offered.

Exercise with Alice - Zumba

and Pilates classes

Zumba: Monday, Tuesday,

Thursday, and Friday, 10:30 – 11

a.m.

Pilates: Monday, Tuesday,

Thursday, and Friday, 9:30 –

10:30 a.m.

Contact Alice at aodachowski@

msn.com for more information

and to get the Zoom links.

Chair Yoga and Meditation

classes with Sam

Chair Yoga: Tuesdays from 10 –

10:45 a.m.

Meditation: Thursdays from 10 –

10:20 a.m.

Sit and Tone video with Joie

Chair Yoga video with Michelle

Enhanced Fitness

videos with Frank

Enhanced Cardio

Enhanced Strength and Stretch

Join Elaine every Monday at

1:30 p.m. for Trivia. Test your

knowledge and have lots of

laughs. Sign up with Elaine at

emoorman_coa@hotmail.com.

Join Elaine for Zoom Bingo

every Tuesday at 9 a.m.

We will send you the bingo

cards. Grab your beans and have

some fun. Sign up with Elaine at

emoorman_coa@hotmail.com.

Free.

Our Virtual Book Club with

Sue started Monday, April 12 at

10 a.m. We will be reading “The

Map Thief” by Heather Terrell.

Contact Sue at slagorio@town.

lynnfield.ma.us to register and for

more information. Free.

Join our Accountability Group

every Wednesday at 10 a.m. on

Zoom as we cheer each other on

in accomplishing our goals. Have

you been meaning to call a friend,

sort through pictures or write your

memoir? Join us for some laughs

and support as we accomplish our

goals and set an intention for the

next week.

Sign up with Elaine at

emoorman_coa@hotmail.com.

Our van service will pick up

and drop off your library books.

Call the Lynnfield library, 781-

334-541, to make arrangements.

LYNNFIELD — Two of the

town’s busiest boards — the

Board of Health and Planning

Board — oversee critical responsibilities

aimed at ensuring

the town’s wellbeing and orderly

development.

The mission of the Lynnfield

Board of Health is to prevent illness,

promote wellness and protect

the environment, as ascribed

in our logo.

In these endeavors, the Board

of Health will make reasonable

policies and regulations to

protect and promote the public

health and wellbeing of our

citizens.

The Lynnfield Board of

Health office is responsible

for permitting and inspecting

entities to ensure compliance

with local health regulations,

state sanitary code and environmental

code and communicate

with state agencies, including

the Department of Public

Health, Massachusetts Dept. of

Environmental Protection and

Division of Animal Health.

The Lynnfield Board of Health

monitors disease outbreaks and

responds to illness reports.

The Board of Health collaborates

on mosquito control

with the Northeast MA

Mosquito Control and Wetlands

Management District and the

Rooted in

Your Health

Did you know?

Health and Planning

Boards at a glance

MA Department of Public

Health to protect Lynnfield

citizens from mosquito-borne

diseases.

There are many topics under

the umbrella of public health.

Under the purview of the

Lynnfield Board of Health are

the following:

Title V septic systems, well

permitting, food establishments,

tobacco control, semi-public

swimming pools, tanning salons,

recreational camps, animal inspections,

housing and nuisance

complaints, communicable disease

investigations and immunization

clinics.

The board is a member of

the Region 3B Emergency

Preparedness - Greater Lawrence

Coalition, the Health and

Medical Coordinating Coalition

and the Greater River Valley

Medical Reserve Corps. We are

part of the A Healthy Lynnfield

coalition for substance abuse

prevention and wellness.

The Planning Board is an independent

board of five elected

members who each serve for

a five-year term on a rotating

basis. The board acts on behalf

of the townspeople as stewards

of the Lynnfield zoning bylaws

and the rules and regulations

of the Planning Board, governing

the subdivision of land in

Lynnfield. The board strives to

act politely, equitably, fairly and

independently in the conduct of

its business and in the conduct of

its public hearings.

Board members are Brian

R. Charville, chair; Katherine

Flaws, vice chair; Edward P.

Champy III; Amy MacNulty;

and E. Page Wilkins.

Wilkins and her family moved

to Lynnfield in 2017. Soon after

moving to Lynnfield, Wilkins

became involved with several

Planning Board matters, including

the Tuttle Lane development

and the proposed Tree

Protection Bylaw.

Wilkins is a partner at Lurie

Friedman LLP. Her law practice

involves a wide variety of complex

business litigation matters

including business torts, partnership

disputes, contract disputes,

misappropriation of trade secrets

and confidential information and

employment matters. She also

has experience with real estate

and land use matters.

In addition to working in

private practice, Wilkins also

served as a special assistant district

attorney in Suffolk County.

Wilkins received her JD from

Boston College Law School and

her BS from Boston College.

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JUNE 3, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 9

Jonathan Hegedus

Avoiding unnecessary losses

Jonathan Hegedus, CLU,

ChFC, wrote this article for

the Weekly News on behalf of

Lynnfield-based Beacon Life &

Benefits Group, Inc.

As we learned with COVID,

there are times when the unanticipated

happens. That’s when

it’s important that all of our

liquid assets are not tied up.

Many affected people were

fortunate this past year that the

stock market crash was shortlived,

and that the government

came through with stimulus

checks, unemployment extensions

and qualified plan

waivers. For some who didn’t

have a private reserve, this was

still not enough.

You’ve probably heard that

having savings of at least six

months of expenses is important

to weather the unexpected.

But will that be enough, for

example, if a family member

needs long-term care due to a

medical event? It’s difficult for

a family to save that much and

seems wasteful, if it means just

putting money in a savings account

where inflation exceeds

the interest rate.

In a private reserve strategy

your money should have three

features: It should be easily

accessible, it can be used as

collateral, and it must earn uninterrupted

compound interest.

For many, a first thought is

to liquidate their IRA or company

qualified plan. Obviously,

those funds may be accessible,

but features 2 and 3 wouldn’t

be satisfied. You can’t use

your IRA as loan collateral and

money withdrawn won’t keep

growing.

Also, unless you were taking

a loan from your 401(k) plan,

most distributions (except

those paid back within 60

days or qualifying under the

SECURE Act) will be subject

to income taxes and often a

10 percent penalty if you are

under age 59 ½.

So, besides a loan from

Uncle Harry, what other options

are there?

Essentially, there are two.

Setting up a home equity line

of credit (HELOC) while times

are good, and insurance.

With a HELOC in place you

can start tapping the equity

line when you need the money

with no restrictions on its use,

and relatively low interest

rates on the loaned amounts.

Potential problems include the

possibility that the bank could

cancel the HELOC if not used,

and the loan will be called if

you sell your house.

Insurance for auto, home,

liability, business, health, term

life and disability can cover

many unexpected events. For

other financial situations, the

cash value in permanent life

insurance (PLI) can cover all

three of the private reserve

features.

Funds can be borrowed penalty-

and tax-free at low interest

rates, and you determine

the timing of repayment and

money as the policy continues

to grow tax-free. Depending

on the PLI’s structure, it often

takes five to 10 years to build

up substantial cash value.

However, for certain situations

(e.g. critical illness) the death

benefit can be used, and with

a waiver of premium option

for total disability, the policy

could grow without requiring

COURTESY PHOTO | JOHN SCHNOBRICH

An important component for your financial security is having a

private reserve strategy.

any payments.

Bottom line: An important

component for your financial

security is having a private

reserve strategy. For many,

the most complete option is

permanent life insurance. If

you do experience an unanticipated

long-term problem,

before liquidating investments

you should seek advice from

legal- and financial-planning

professionals.

Jordan Hegedus can be

reached at Jordan@gotobeaconlife.com.

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10

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 3, 2021

Sports

Pioneers can’t

slow down

unbeaten

Amesbury

SOFTBALL

By DAniel kAne

LYNNFIELD — The

Lynnfield softball team ran

into the Cape Ann League’s

best in undefeated Amesbury

Wednesday, and despite

hanging around for a few innings,

the Pioneers couldn’t

slow down the Indians in a 12-0

loss.

“You just have to go out and

do what you can do,” Lynnfield

coach Peter Marinelli said.

“That’s all we ever ask of the

kids. Give it 100 percent and

then go from there. I think we

got a little intimidated in the

middle of the game. Amesbury

is a better team, you can recognize

that, we just want (our

team) to go get it.”

At the plate, Ava Gamache,

Ava Marotta, Celia Carbone

and Chloe Shapleigh each had

one of Lynnfield’s four hits in

the loss. Those were the only

blemishes on a dominant performance

by Amesbury’s pitcher

Alana Delisle, who struckout

11 in the win.

“It’s tough when you have

real young kids facing a pitcher

like that,” Marinelli said. “I put

a challenge to every kid to get

up to the plate and take your

swings. In the seventh inning

there, Ava Gamache got up and

I told her, ‘Look, she’s a good

pitcher and this is a good experience

for you. Get up there and

get the ball.’ She got up and got

a base hit. But overall, we just

weren’t aggressive enough.”

PIONEERS, PAGE 11

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Lynnfield’s Spencer Riley laced a pair of hits and scored three runs in the Pioneers 22-12 win

over Cape Ann League rival Ipswich this past weekend.

Lynnfield earns big CAL

win on Senior Day

BASEBALL

By Mike Alongi

LYNNFIELD — The

Lynnfield baseball team has had

some offensive struggles this

season, but all of that went out

the window Saturday afternoon

in a 22-12 victory over Cape

Ann League foe Ipswich on a

soggy Senior Day at Lynnfield

High School.

Prior to the game, Lynnfield

honored its group of seven

seniors — Jack Bird, Blake

Peters, Luke Martinho, Dante

Gesamondo, Trent Balian, Evan

Balian and Jake DeBenedictis

— for their contributions to the

program over the past four years.

While the Pioneers’ bats didn’t

exactly explode in the win (they

only had 10 hits to go with their

22 runs), Lynnfield was able to

put together a number of runs

behind heads-up baserunning

and taking advantage of mistakes

by Ipswich throughout.

The offensive charge was

led by Spencer Riley (2-for-3,

double), Blake Peters (2-for-4)

and Evan Balian (2-for-4), who

each notched two hits and three

runs scored in the win. Martinho

(1-for-3), Gesamondo (1-for-3),

Bird (1-for-2) and DeBenedictis

(1-for-1, three walks) each had

one hit in the win.

Gesamondo earned the win on

the hill for the Pioneers after getting

the start.

Things weren’t looking good

early on, as Lynnfield fell behind

2-0 in the top of the first inning

after a two-run double.

But then the Pioneers came up

to bat.

Lynnfield went through its

lineup a full two times in the

first inning alone, plating 10

runs behind a combination of

eight walks, two hit batters and

a couple of clutch RBI hits from

Peters and Gesamondo.

But even with that 10-2 lead,

the Pioneers weren’t in the clear

yet. Ipswich battled back with

five runs of its own in the top

of the third to make it 10-7. The

Tigers added two more runs in

the top of the fourth, and all of a

sudden it was a ballgame again.

But in the bottom of the

fourth, Lynnfield effectively put

the game away. The Pioneers

remained patient and forced six

more walks in the frame, supplementing

those walks with

hits from Bird, Peters, Martinho

and Evan Balian to push across

10 more runs and blow the game

open at 20-9.

Ipswich scattered a few more

runs in the top of the fifth, but

it wasn’t nearly enough. The

Pioneers scored two more times

in the bottom of the fifth to

stretch the lead to 10 runs and

end the game early.

Lynnfield (4-6) is set to host

Triton Monday morning (10)

back at Lynnfield High.

FILE PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

Chloe Shapleigh had one of the four hits the Lynnfield softball

team was able to muster up against Amesbury pitcher Alana

Delisle last week.


JUNE 3, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 11

HIGH SCHOOL SCHEDULE

FILE PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

Reilly Ganter pitched all seven innings despite Lynnfield’s loss to Amesbury.

Pioneers can’t slow down

unbeaten Amesbury

PIONEERS

FROM PAGE 10

Reilly Ganter pitched all

seven innings for the Pioneers,

walking a pair of batters and

striking out four while giving

up 16 hits and 12 runs.

Amesbury jumped right out

to a 2-0 lead thanks to a first-inning

triple from Olivia DeLong.

Lynnfield put the bat on the

ball early, with Marotta lacing

a leadoff single. Shapleigh also

made some nice contact on a

line drive to center, but Ella

Bezanson played it perfectly on

a run and doubled up Marotta at

first.

Ganter got out of a jam in

the second inning thanks to a

pair of strikeouts and a putout

from Shapleigh at shortstop, but

things started to go downhill for

Lynnfield on both sides of the

game from there.

The Pioneers couldn’t touch

Delisle, and after going ahead

5-0, Amesbury finally broke it

open in the fifth. A three-run

inside the park home run from

Ella Delisle and another solo

homer from Bezanson helped

Amesbury cruise to a comfortable

10-0 lead.

Gamache and Shapleigh

started off the seventh with hits

for Lynnfield but Alana Delisle

shut the door with three strikeouts

to end the game.

Lynnfield (7-2) will hope to

get back to its winning ways at

Ipswich Friday (3:45).

FILE PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Lynnfield’s Trent Balian, right, == notched the game-winning single for the Pioneers last week.

Balian walks it off

before Ipswich win

BASEBALL ROUNDUP

By Mike Alongi

Trent Balian was the hero for

the Lynnfield baseball team,

pitching all seven innings,

lacing a key two-run home

run and knocking home Blake

Peters on a walk-off single to

lift the Pioneers to a 5-4 win

over Newburyport last Tuesday.

Balian allowed just two

earned runs and six hits with

three strikeouts but Lynnfield

still fell behind 4-0. From there

it was an uphill battle but the

Pioneers were up for it. An RBI

triple from Alex Gentile and

another RBI from Aidan Burke

got Lynnfield started.

From there, Evan Balian

walked and Trent followed his

brother with a two-run homer

to tie things up, setting up his

eventual game-winning single

in the seventh which plated

Peters.

THURSDAY

Baseball

Lynnfield at North Reading (4)

BC High at St. John’s Prep (4)

Cardinal Spellman at St. Mary’s

(4)

Archbishop Williams at Bishop

Fenwick (4)

Softball

North Reading at Lynnfield (4)

Bishop Fenwick at Archbishop

Williams (4)

Peabody at Beverly (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Triton at Lynnfield (3:45)

Bishop Fenwick at Archbishop

Williams (4)

Winthrop at Peabody (4)

Girls Lacrosse

Lynnfield at Triton (3:45)

Archbishop Williams at Bishop

Fenwick (4)

Peabody at Winthrop (4)

St. Mary’s at Cardinal Spellman

(5:15)

Boys Tennis

St. John’s Prep at BC High (4)

Girls Tennis

Triton at Lynnfield (3:30)

Bishop Fenwick at Lowell

Catholic (3:30)

FRIDAY

Baseball

Peabody at Swampscott (4)

Softball

St. Mary’s at Cardinal Spellman

(3:30)

Boys Lacrosse

St. John’s Prep at BC High

(5:30)

Boys Volleyball

BC High at St. John’s Prep

(5:30)

Girls Tennis

Swampscott at Peabody (4)

SATURDAY

Baseball

Arlington Catholic at St. Mary’s

(11)

Lynnfield at Manchester-Essex

(3:30)

Softball

St. Mary’s at Arlington Catholic

(TBD)

Boys Lacrosse

St. Mary’s at Arlington Catholic

(9)

Swampscott at Bishop Fenwick

(2)

Girls Lacrosse

Arlington Catholic at St. Mary’s

(5)

Track

St. Mary’s at CCL Freshman/

Sophomore Meet (10)

Bishop Fenwick at CCL

Freshman/Sophomore Meet

(10)

MONDAY

Baseball

St. Mary’s at Bishop Fenwick

(4)

Softball

Saugus at Peabody (4:30)

Bishop Fenwick at St. Mary’s

(6)

Boys Lacrosse

Bishop Fenwick at St. Mary’s

(5)

Saugus at Peabody (4:30)

Girls Lacrosse

St. Mary’s at Bishop Fenwick

(4)

Boys Tennis

St. Mary’s at Arlington Catholic

(3:30)

Catholic Memorial at St. John’s

Prep (4)

Girls Tennis

St. Mary’s at Lowell Catholic

(3:30)

Track

Lynnfield at Ipswich (3:30)

TUESDAY 6/8

Baseball

Matignon at St. Mary’s (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Lynnfield at North Reading (4)

Catholic Memorial at St. John’s

Prep (5:30)

Austin Prep at St. Mary’s (7)

Girls Lacrosse

North Reading at Lynnfield (4)

Peabody at Saugus (4)

Boys Volleyball

St. John’s Prep at Catholic

Memorial (5:30)

Boys Tennis

Lowell Catholic at St. Mary’s

(3:30)

North Reading at Lynnfield (4)

Girls Tennis

Lynnfield at North Reading (4)

WEDNESDAY

Baseball

Austin Prep at Bishop Fenwick

(4)

Winthrop at Peabody (7)

Softball

Pentucket at Lynnfield (3:45)

Bishop Fenwick at Austin Prep

(4)

Marblehead at Peabody (4)

Boys Lacrosse

Bishop Fenwick at Austin Prep

(4)

St. Mary’s at Matignon (TBD)

Girls Lacrosse

Austin Prep at Bishop Fenwick

(4)

Matignon at St. Mary’s (5)

Boys Tennis

Arlington Catholic at Bishop

Fenwick (3:30)

Manchester-Essex at Lynnfield

(3:45)

Girls Tennis

Austin Prep at St. Mary’s (3:30)

Bishop Fenwick at Arlington

Catholic (3:30)

Lynnfield at Manchester-Essex

(3:45)

Track

North Reading at Lynnfield (4)

Masconomet at Peabody (4)


12

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 3, 2021

Pioneers win big on Senior Day

PHOTOS | Spenser Hasak

Lynnfield’s Dante Gesamondo pitches against Ipswich on

Saturday.

Lynnfield’s Jack Bird swings on a pitch.

DINING GUIDE

DIRECTORY

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TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS:

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JUNE 3, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 13

Pioneers win big on Senior Day

PHOTOS | Spenser Hasak

Lynnfield’s Jack Bird dives to make a stop, but the ball bounces just beyond his reach.

Lynnfield’s Luke Martinho waits for his pitch.

Lynnfield varsity baseball captain Blake Peters races down the

third base line as he heads home to score.

Lynnfield’s Spencer Riley steps into a pitch.

Michael Garabedian

MELKONIAN'S

NORTH READING

SUBARU

Mike Garabedian

welcomes his friends and former customers

to NORTH READING SUBARU

Mike says he will beat any deal from any Subaru dealer!

Lynnfield’s Evan Balian removes his helmet after being called

out at first.

260 Main Street

North Reading MA 01864

Sales: 978 396 6090

Direct: 844 720 9034

mgarabedian@northreadingsubaru.com


14

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 3, 2021

Playing on in

tough times

PHOTO | Spenser Hasak

Lynnfield High School sophomore Adam Ho is a member of the

guitar ensemble at the school.

“Naturally when you play music you want to play music for other

people. It’s just weird to not be able to do that in person anymore,”

said Adam Ho, one of the in-person members of the guitar ensemble

who has played piano since he was five, and recently added the

guitar to his repertoire. “You can’t go out and play in the streets.”

The guitar ensemble, for example, rehearsed with only three kids in

a class, while a larger group tunes in virtually. Because of lag in the

stream, it isn’t realistic for the kids to all practice together, so when

it came time to play music, the two groups must do it separately.

LYNNFIELD

3 DRIFTWOOD LN

$1,130,000

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S: Daly Lorraine L Est & Michael

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B: Jose Cruz Jr & Ashleigh Fitzgerald

S: Suzanne L Jaynes

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Johnson

144 NEWBURY ST

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B: Sunoco Retail LLC

S: Best Petroleum Net Lease

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The Leonard Co.

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JUNE 3, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 15

MarketStreet hopes shoppers take a spin

PHOTOS | Spenser Hasak

A detail from the “Together” mural by artist Mia Cross at MarketStreet Lynnfield.

From left, Joe Sparr, Jariel Pike and Adrien Pike take a selfie

as they spin on part of the Los Trompos art installation at

MarketStreet Lynnfield on Tuesday.

Jaliyah Rosa spins Bellamin Gomez of Lynn on part of the Los

Trompos art installation at MarketStreet Lynnfield on Tuesday.

Another segment from the “Together” mural by artist Mia

Cross at MarketStreet Lynnfield.


16

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 3, 2021

Beverly Farms

Offered at $3,395,000

Newly Listed

Hamilton

Offered at $1,997,750

Beverly

Offered at $1,975,000

Commercial

Rowley

Offered at $1,900,000

Spectacular Shingle-style home on 3 hilltop acres

near Beverly Farms Village, West Beach and train.

6 bedrooms, many baths. Ideal main floor layout

with luxurious master suite. Gunite pool.

Josephine Mehm Baker

Lush plantings on 1.95 acres. Custom 5-bedroom,

3.5 bath gem offers stunning foyer and staircase,

cherry library, solarium with cathedral ceilings and

separate living area over 3-car garage.

Josephine Mehm Baker

Stunning hilltop estate on 4+ acres abuts

conservation land. Exquisite home with 1895

craftsmanship, modern amenities. 6 beds, 5 baths, 4

fireplaces. Beautiful woodwork, wraparound porch.

Andrea Bennett

4.19 Acres. 305’ frontage near Rt 133 on Rt

1 at traffic light opposite entrance to center.

Market Basket is anchor. 2 parcels. 1 has 4,500 sf

manufacturing/warehouse building. Zoned Retail.

e.d. dick group

Newly Listed

Wenham

Offered at $1,880,000

Newly Listed

West Newbury

Offered at $1,525,000

Ipswich

Offered at $1,385,000

Commercial

Hamilton

Offered at $1,050,000

Private estate setting sweeping views across the

lawn to a fenced swimming pool. Expansive,

inviting 7-bedroom home with formal dining and

living rooms. 3 great outbuildings. Abuts reservoir.

Deb Vivian & Binni Hackett

Merrimack River-front 2.78-acre oasis has private

mooring and 335 feet of river frontage. 4-bedroom

Colonial with a chef’s kitchen, fireplaced sunroom.

Family room has deck and own entrance.

Nancy Peterson

Majestic beauty on 2 acres near Crane Beach was

lovingly restored over the last 20 years. Offers 2

legal apartments, wonderful porches, gracious

hallways. New furnaces. House was rewired.

Binni Hackett & Team

Two large units of commercial space with off-street

parking in freestanding, 2-story building adapt to

various uses: medical, law, accounting, education,

offices. Can rent 3rd unit.

Julia Virden

Manchester

Offered at $1,050,000

Newly Listed

Hamilton

Offered at $1,026,000

Wenham

Offered at $995,000

New

Construction

Hamilton

Offered at $969,900

Restored Village Antique near town, train and

Singing Beach. Thoughtful design, original details

and today’s comforts. Custom open eat-in kitchen,

1st floor bedroom suite. Fenced yard, deck.

Tracy Gothie

Serene 5.9 acres offers privacy for 4-bed, 3.5-bath

sunny contemporary. Sweeping lawn to Miles

River marsh area. Cozy office, large great room,

screen porch, open deck, walkout sunroom/gym.

Holly Fabyan & Paula Polo-Filias

Picturesque 1850s farmhouse on 1.99 acres awaits

your vision. Pool is open. 6-bedroom septic and

3.5 baths. Separate home office, pony stall, paddock

area. Upgraded electrical, central air.

e.d. dick group

Single family homes in 55+ condominium

community. 1st floor maintenance free living,

at the same price per square foot as single-family

homes for sale in Hamilton and Wenham.

Wendy McGrath

Boston

Offered at $950,000

New

Construction

Ipswich

$894,900-$1,009,900

Rockport

Offered at $879,000

Manchester

Offered at $819,000

Rare Opportunity! Eagle Hill – Well-maintained

5-bedroom, 2-bath home with an updated 1

bedroom In-law unit with separate entrance.

Newer roof/heating system. Two driveways.

Susan Bridge

New homes in Farm Village. Beautiful architectdesigned

homes range from 2,850-3,550 sf on

private cul-de-sac. Adjacent to 44 acres of open

space. See home designs at FarmVillageIpswich.com.

e.d. dick group

Classic South End home with the ocean across the

street. Updated country kitchen, wood-burning

fireplace, 1st floor den. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, new

septic. Shed has electricity. 4-car parking.

Ann Olivo & Chris Moore & Rick Marshall

Delightful Village antique on a corner lot. Split rail

fence surrounds picturesque front yard and garden.

3 bedrooms, 2 baths and 2 fireplaces plus 2012 roof,

2020 gas boiler. 1-car garage.

Mandy Sheriff

Hamilton

Offered at $799,000

Gloucester

Starting at $589,000

Gloucester

Offered at $579,900

Newly Listed

Middleton

Offered at $579,000

New England Colonial on 1.5 acres. 4 bedrooms,

2.5 baths. Open floor plan, stainless kitchen, family

room. Master suite with gas fireplace. Screen Porch

plus in-ground Gunite pool and barn.

Christine Grammas

Welcome to Maplewood School. A brand new

residential complex with 2- & 3- bedroom homes.

Contemporary open floor plans. Chic kitchens,

office, in-unit laundry and elevator service.

Ann Olivo & Chris Moore

Renovated Queen Ann has historic charm and

modern amenities. Open floor plan, entertainer’s

stainless kitchen, office, 1st floor laundry. Built-in

wardrobes in closets. 2 decks, fenced yard.

Jackeyln Enslow

Cobblestone Park - Townhouse Condo in 55+

complex. Open plan, hardwood floors, gas fireplace,

eat-in maple kitchen, pantry. Loft, laundry, 2 en

suite bedrooms. Full basement, 2-car garage.

Beverly Popielski

North Andover

Offered at $525,000

Saugus

Offered at $489,900

Newly Priced

Brockton

Offered at $349,900

Commercial

Beverly

Offered at $325,000

Picture-perfect, open concept, 3-bedroom Ranch

fully renovated 5 years ago: roof, plumbing, electric,

heat and AC. Gorgeous granite/stainless kitchen

and beautiful family room. Park 4 cars.

Joyce DiLiegro

Beautiful 3-bedroom townhouse feels like a singlefamily

with deck, large yard. Open living-dining

room, finished walkout basement. Solar panels,

central air, 2020 hot water heater & garage.

Debbie Aminzadeh

Spacious Campanelli Ranch. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths,

eat-in kitchen, living room, dining room, and

family room. Updates: roof, windows, heating

system, and insulation. Bring your design ideas.

The Lopes Group

First-floor medical office condos on hospital

campus. Set up/expand practice. 6+ exam rooms,

2 waiting areas/entrances, 3+ offices, 2 bathrooms,

storage. Patient & staff parking.

Paula Polo-Filias

The North Shore’s Premier Real Estate Agency

100 Cummings Center, Suite 101K • Beverly, MA 01915 • 978.922.3683

www.jbarrettrealty.com

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