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1921-2021 League Lines - Centennial Edition

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CENTENNIAL

L E A G U E L I N E S A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 0 2 1



is a hallmark of our organization and we provide continual

Voluntarism

for members to give of their time. The Clothes Horse, a thrift store

opportunities

in high-end second-hand clothing items, was operated by our member

specializing

for more than 45 years. The Show House, a Hartford staple since 1979,

volunteers

on our membership to organize our largest event-based fundraiser that

relies

in home design inspiration for local residents and tens of thousands of

results

for our community partners. Since 1986, we have offered Souper

dollars

2

Sustainers, an opportunity for Sustainers to serve food one Friday a month at

Loaves and Fishes. In addition, our Active members participate in Done In A Day

with our partners including The Boys and Girls Club of Hartford,Project

projects

Love 146, and many more. We highlight this work each November through

Linus,

through our mission based fundraiser, Volunteer-A-Thon, a 24 -hour volunteer

our

where we support local initiatives and community partners in one

bonanza

volunteer session.

continuous

the potential of women has always been a part of the Junior League

Developing

has emerged at the forefront of our community over the last decade. Our

and

0

projects which provide small, dedicated groups of intense support for specific

members gain skills that take them well beyond the Junior League to other nonprofit

organizations throughout greater Hartford and beyond. We are servant

strategic thinkers, capacity builders, community advocates, and

leaders,

fiscal managers because of what we learn through the training

responsible

program, Webinar Wednesdays, attendance at association conferences,

certificate

training, and our participation in Leadership Greater Hartford.

league-specific

collective skills allow us to foster a community vision and develop

These

partnerships.

meaningful

League continues to evolve and grow adapting to the needs of our community.

Our

Covid 19 pandemic in 2020 brought many challenges, but it did not stop our

The

2

work. We adapted, as we always do, by offering online programming for youth at

in virtual group trainings. We continue to plan new initiatives for 2021

participating

beyond. With deep appreciation for our past, and gratitude for our present, we

and

forward to what the Junior League of Hartford will accomplish over the next

look

years.

100

Y K I M B E R L Y M C N A L L Y

B

1

the Boys and Girls Club, conducting virtual meetings, and participating in

J U N I O R L E A G U E O F H A R T F O R D 2


3 LEAGUE LINES

L E A G U E L I N E S 3

During its first decade of service, JLH focused on

women and infants. This led them to develop

Hartford’s first maternal milk station, which

provided access to milk for low income families

prior to the invention of baby formula. To support

low- income, working families, members funded

the Mitchell House Day Nursery in Hartford’s

South End by publishing and selling sections of

the Hartford Courant. League members made

healthcare more accessible by working in

community dispensary clinics and learned new

skills in the process.

The Great Depression shifted the League’s focus

to educational enrichment and JLH joined Leagues

across the country in producing educational plays

and puppet shows for children. Through the

creation of children’s theater workshop plays,

including sets, props, and costumes they were

able to raise funds and provide educational

opportunities for children. Members continued to

volunteer in settlement houses and day nurseries

throughout Hartford in support of working class

women.

The advent of WWII brought a central volunteer bureau

association, established by JLH in partnership with the

State Department, to coordinate home-front volunteers.

Members helped to establish a camp for crippled

children, funded by rummage sales which later became

the catalyst for The Clothes Horse, a thrift store for fine

clothes and the League’s signature fundraiser for more

than 70 years. Education continued to be a priority with

the League supporting live radio broadcasts of The Story

Lady on WTIC. Organizationally, the League began the

placement program, where members were trained and

placed according to interest and aptitudes.


JUNIOR LEAGUE OF HARTFORD 4

J U N I O R L E A G U E O F H A R T F O R D 4

Education continued to be a focus for JLH into

the 1950’s. A decade before Sesame Street, JLH

Puppeteers presented educational children’s

entertainment that was broadcast locally on

television and traveled across the country. The

League founded a film bureau and library at the

American School for the Deaf where volunteers

created some of the nation’s first film captioning,

a project that was adopted by the US Department

of Education.

Before the American’s with Disabilities Act was

signed into law in 1990, the Junior League of

Hartford was working to provide access for children

with physical challenges. They built a special

playground for blind and sight impaired students at

Oak Hill School. The League continued to focus on

education by supporting a job training program at

HARC and speech therapy at the Hartford

Rehablitation Center. A teacher shortage paved the

way for the League to develop a successful

recruitment program to identify and train future

educators.

Civil Rights was at the forefront of the 1970’s and

women needed support more than ever. After Civil

Rights riots left Hartford’s North End devastated,

the League partnered with Dr. Evan Daniels to

provide funds and volunteers to found Community

Health Services. JLH established a playroom at the

Women’s Correctional Institute in Niantic for

children of incarcerated women. Women began to

embark on career paths and volunteer work was

recongnized as the excellent training ground that it

is, JLH began to provide training for women in

volunteering and related careers.


With more women in the workforce, some children

spent the afternoons at home alone. According to

studies, these “latch-key” children were more prone

to drug abuse and academic challenges. The Junior

League of Hartford created GATE, a drug awareness

campaign; Phone A Friend, a homework help and

support line for children and teens; and developed

Friends of the Family, a resource and referral

center for teenage parents. These programs were so

successful they were transitioned to their

permanent home at The Village for Families and

Children. In support of those living with HIV and

Aids, the JLH cultivated hope with a therapeutic

gardening program at Peter’s Retreat.

JLH continued to focus on women and children with the

development of Take 5, a program that encouraged new

parents to get timely immunizations for their babies. Take

5 was nationally recognized by the Centers for Disease

Contral and Prevention and by the White House. The

League expanded its reach to support the elderly by

working to bring the non-profit Rebuilding Together to the

Hartford area. This program uses volunteers to repair and

rehabilitate homes of the elderly, low income, and

disabled. In 1986, JLH Souper Sustainers was created to

allow JLH Sustainers to be involved in the community by

serving a healthy mid-day meal to approximately 120

people at Loaves and Fishes. This program continues

today.

The new millennium brought new opportunities for the

League to focus on school-age children. Responding to the

governor’s “Stepping Up to 2000” report on the link between

school truancy and the rich of child abuse, JLH collaborated

on Family School Connection to strengthen families, and

reduce truancy and child abuse. In order to provide

nourishing food to children at risk of hunger, during critical

times of growth and development, JLH instituted a backpack

program to provide weekend meals. Science Saturday

Sampler exposed teen girls to the world of science through a

series of hands-on workshops.

L E A G U E L I N E S 5


The Great Recession of 2009 brought to light

continued food insecurity in our region.

Recognizing that food distribution was not

sufficient to end hunger, JLH collaborated with

Chrysalis Center and FoodShare on Fresh

Place, an innovative food pantry that tackled

the root causes of chronic hunger with wrap

around services.

To complement the mission of developing the

potential of young women, JLH partnered with

Junior Achievement of Southwest New England

on a joint endeavor called Career Connections

for Young Women (CCYW). Annually over the

course of the partnership, JLH and JA

mentored over twenty girls on college and

career preparation in a 10- after school

academy.

Today, the Junior League of Hartford

supports the SMART Girls Initiative at

the Boys and Girls Club of Hartford

through age-specific experiences that

enhance girls’ physical and emotional

health. This small-group program

helps girls build a strong foundation by

equipping them with critical knowledge

and skills in the areas of physical

health and wellness, mental health and

self-esteem, and relationships.

Encompassing the physical, emotional

and social changes a girl who will go

through between the ages of 8 and 18,

this holistic approach supports her

complete experience. League members

lead small group session that focus on

mind, body, and community.

B Y K I M B E R L Y M C N A L L Y

L E A G U E L I N E S 6


J U N I O R L E A G U E O F H A R T F O R D 7

B Y M A G G I E D E V I T O

CELEBRATING

The League kicked off the Centennial Celebration at the

January General Membership Meeting (GMM). The GMM was a

trip down memory lane. We had stories shared about what the

Junior League was like during different time periods in

history. It was great to hear about old traditions and events,

and what the league was like in times gone by. We heard

stories about the Clothes Horse and how Show House came to

be. Pictures were shared, stories told and links to the past

were made. It was a great way for new league members, as

well as long-time members to understand the workings of the

league throughout our 100-year history. We also unveiled our

new centennial logo and slogan that will be used throughout

2021. It was a great way to kick off 2021 and our Centennial

celebrations!

100 YEARS

In January, we held a card making session to reach out to

sustainer members at Duncaster, Seabury, and McAuley

senior homes. League members created beautiful, handmade

cards for members. Many of these members had no visitors

for months due to the pandemic, so it was a nice way of

showing them we care and are always thinking of them. The

league definitely has some artists among us! These cards

were thoughtful, beautiful and creative. The event was

hosted via zoom and was a great time for league members to

meet virtually and share stories and catch up.

In February we teamed up with Seed Bagel in Glastonbury for

OF SERVICE

a sock and hygiene product drive in honor of the Centennial.

The 43 packages of socks and 155 full-size hygiene products

collected benefited Interval House, Loaves & Fishes and

Immaculate Conception, all area programs. The generosity of

league members, as well as the community was

overwhelming. We were able to provide a plethora of toiletry

items, such as toothpaste, soap, shampoo, conditioner and

body lotion. The many pairs of socks donated to the shelters

came in need during the cold winter. Thank you to everyone

who contributed to the centennial drive with Seed Bagel!



In 1921, seventy women organized the Junior League of Hartford under the leadership of our first president, Elinor

Ingersoll. At the end of that first year they wrote “Upon making a thorough survey, we found that not only were there

a sufficient number of organization to take care of the city’s needs, but that in some cases the work overlapped. We

decided, therefore, that our services would be of greater value assisting the organizations already in existence.”

While we have grown from those original seventy woman to an organization of three hundred and seventy (370)

member our ideals and mission have stayed the same to support other local area non-profits in their serving and

betterment of the community. We continue to do that through out countless community partnerships with

organizations like the Boys and Girls Club of Hartford, Journey Home, My Sister’s Place, Interval House, Loaves and

Fishes, Project Linus, and many more.

Over this past year we may not have been able to serve our community partners in the ways we have in the past, but

we got creative and gave back in a big way in a year that was so hard for so many. We volunteered 276.4 hours over

the past league year with 120 hours coming from our annual Volunteer-A-Thon. During this year’s Volunteer-A-Thon

we collected 53 units of blood with the American Red Cross, made 40 blankets for Project Linus, assembled 24

thanksgiving baskets, collected 96 coats, helped deliver furniture to three families with Journey Home, and sorted

hundreds of pounds of food at Foodshare.

Talking about making an impact at Christmas time through the generosity of so many members and supporters the

Junior League of Hartford helped to raise $5,800 in gift cards that were donated to families of the Boys and Girls

Clubs of Hartford. That’s what Women Power is all about!

We have a lot to celebrate over the past 100 years of service and that is our members who are the heart and soul of

the league. Our Centennial Celebration kicked off in January at our GMM where we learned about the history of the

league and heard accounts from our Sustainers. Our Centennial has allowed us to celebrate our members and give

back to the community. During our February Centennial Drive we collected and donated 43 packages of socks and 155

full size hygiene products. We will continue to celebrate our Centennial with a Picnic in Elizabeth Park on June

8thand a Night to Celebrate on Saturday, September 18that Hartford Golf Club!

I am so thankful to have had the opportunity to serve as the President of the Junior League of Hartford this past year!

The league is full of intelligent, strong, supportive, and giving woman that I choose to surround myself with because

you all make me a better person. I look forward to continuing to serve the league and the community in whatever role

the future brings for me.

B Y J E S S I C A P I E R I , P R E S I D E N T

J U N I O R L E A G U E O F H A R T F O R D 9


L E A G U E L I N E S 1 0


2

7

0

100 ACTIVES

170 SUSTAINERS

M

E

M

B

E

R

S

It was decided in the Fall of 2020 to move away from the old credit

structure and instead implement a new Compact Commitment structure.

This allows our members to determine how many hours they would like

to dedicate to the league each year. We understand that our members

are in different seasons of life and one year you may be able to volunteer

50+ hours and the next only 10 hours, and that is okay. Instead of setting

a required number for volunteer hours, we are asking members to fill

out a brief survey with the number of hours they can personally commit

to volunteering for JLH initiatives like Volunteer-A-Thon, Boys & Girls

Clubs of Hartford, and Done in a Day volunteer shifts. This number is

then used in planning to ensure we adequately meet the needs of our

members and make realistic commitments to our community partners.

In addition to the volunteer hour commitment, the member compact

asks the member to actively participate in their assigned committee,

leverage learning opportunities, stay informed of the League's work and

pay membership dues. As we come to a close of our first league year

with this new structure, while it hasn’t been a typical year, the feedback

on the new structure has been positive. Members can fill out their

member compact for the 2021-2022 league year.

B Y A M I E L U G O

J U N I O R L E A G U E O F H A R T F O R D 1 1


FUNDRAISING

ANNUAL FUND

$ 8 , 7 0 9

$ 9 , 3 5 3

ENDOWMENT FUND

$ 6 , 2 7 5

During the 2020-2021 League year, the Junior League of Hartford (JLH) was hard at work

donating virtual volunteer hours and collecting clothing, gift cards and other donations for its

many community partners. League members participated in fundraising events to raise

money to financially support both community partner initiatives and leadership development

of members.

The 5th annual Volunteer-A-Thon in the fall and Bubbly and Bites in the spring brought in

donations of over $8,700 thanks to the fundraising efforts of JLH members. In addition, JLH

Endowment and Annual funds brought in $6,275 from 20 of our generous sponsors.

As a direct result of these efforts and contributions, the JLH was able to donate close to

$16,000 back to community partners and leveraged over $3,700 to benefit members through

trainings, conference attendance and participation in Leadership Greater Hartford’s Quest

Program.

In addition, the League hired a new CPA, Tessa Jordan of Lotus Accounting, LLC. Tessa

brings many years of experience and a fresh perspective. We are very excited for her to join

us!

The League also made the difficult decision to close the office at the end of the League

year. The office closing and the non-profit discount that Tessa is providing will result in over

$16,000 of annual savings that can be used to give back to our community partners as well as

invest in our members.

B Y J E N R I N G , T R E A S U R E R

L E A G U E L I N E S 1 2


Up to $99

$100 to $249

$1000 and Up

Heather Atkins

Anonymous - Network for Good

Ashley Born

Carle Mowell

Andrea Barton Reeves

Laura Cardillo

Jennifer Bell

Susan Chudwick

Michelle Creed

Melinda B. Bloodgood

Jennifer Byrne

Judith Day

Denise Callan

Ashley DePasqale

$500 to $999

Gina Detmar-Pines

Brie Campbell

Alexandra Carlson

Benevity

Ashley Donnelly

Bria Day

Katherine Cassen

Kyra Dorsey

Muriel & Karl Fleishmann

Karen Connal

Eileen Daly

Mary-Jane Foster

Ellen B. Franklin

Emily Deans

Jessica Gagnon

Karen Delaney

$250 to $499

Christiana N. Gianopulos

Shirley DeLong

Barbara Cambria

Patricia K. Hadlow

Ashley DePasquale

Ann F. Hare

Ashley Dubin

Lynne Carey

Elvira Duran

Fanjana Chawla

Paula Healey

Ellen Coco

Alyce F. Hild

Susan Eaccarino

Carolyn VanNewkirk Hoffman

Anna Eisen

Megan Collier*

Kathryn Ferguson

Elizabeth Fierman*

Jennyfer Holmes

Pamela Peaslee Hunter

Laura Hughes

Deirdre Green

Matthew & Valerie Jasinski

Karen Bliss Haberlin

Katie Hughes*

Katherine Ham

Kelly Jarvis

Evelyn Williams Johnson

Allison Schmitz

Lissa Johnson

Carolyn Hoffman

Kathryn Joerg

Dene Keithline

Ann H. Kramer

Jonathan Kaplan

Maura Keating

Nancy Urban La Perla

Julie Livingston

Susan King

Julie Krug

Peggy Lorence

Coreen Majka Sunde

Cindy Lahm

Allison Law

Jane B. Pfaff

Jessica Pieri

Carrie Leigh

Bobbie Lingard

Susan Redfield

Kalyn Redlowsk

Christina Lumbreras

Kelly Macchesney

Rescue Agency - Elle Trout

Sally M. Richter

Arielle Marlette

Mary Martin

Julie Runkle

Mary T. Sargent

Cristina Martinez

Patty McDonald

Kathleen Schuster

Susan Smith Rubin

LaRaine McGrath

Shannon McIntyre

Carol Terry

Ann E. Thomas

David McIntyre

Ellen Meinke

Sarah Thrall

Molly Towne

Kelly Miley

Ann Mittelmann

Jane White

Holly Wilson

Kimberly Moore

Debra Ortega

Julia Zweig

J U N I O R L E A G U E O F H A R T F O R D 1 3


Y O U R G E N E R O S I T Y M A K E S I T P O S S I B L E

Up to $99 cont'd

Rosemarie Papa

Emily Deans

Bethany Pelletier

Elvira Duran

John Pendergraph

Cindy Lahm

Alison Perry

Patty McDonald

Julie Runkle

Wendy Estela Scaringe

John Schuster

Kelley Sellew

Cecilia Sheldon

Julie Simpliciov

Elizabeth Protzman Smith

Stephanie Carlson

Linda Smyth

Kara D'Angelos

Michelle Sok

Judith Day

Tiffany Spinella

Emily Deans

Coreen Sunde

Ashley DePasquale

Mark Wasielewski

Ashley Donnelly

Deborah White

Mary Dunn

Demetria Wright

Anna Eisen

Alexandra Young

Michelle Fucci

Casey Greer

Kelly Iuliano

Steven Joseph

Tali Kest

Anne Z. Malone

Devon Marlette

Arielle Marlette

Laura G. Amenta

Kristin Milano

Beverly Boyle

Carleton Mowell

Francine Christiansen

Morgan Murphy

Shirley B. DeLong

Lisa Preger

Gina L. Detmar-Pines

Timothy W. Protzman

Susan V. Fly

Jennifer Ring

Tiana Gianopulos

Mary M. Romano

Carolyn VanNewkirk Hoffman

Kathleen Schuster

Nina F. Jankowski

Kelly Sellew

Kelly Jarvis

Jason Smith

Kraus Family Foundation

Michele Sok

Peggy Lorence

Samantha J. Squires

Patricia M. Lorenson

Lauren G. Walker

Carle N. Mowell

Amanda Wusterbath

Susan Sappington

Allison Crockett Schmitz

Kathleen Bolduc Schuster

Jan Mason Tracy

Margery Chinn Warren

Maggie Wilard

J U N I O R L E A G U E O F H A R T F O R D 1 4


GIRLS

SMART

themed programming

weekly

B G C H

DRIVE

COAT

coats provided

100

HOLIDAY

raised for BGCH families

$5,800

B o y s & G i r l s C l u b s P a r t n e r s h i p H i g h l i g h t s

Last year we said that the Junior League of Hartford started our signature

partnership with the Boys and Girls Club of Hartford because “there would be

plenty of opportunities to give back to the local community.” In an incredibly

difficult year “giving back locally” seemed more important than ever.

As the world changed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, so did the way we could

support the Boys and Girls Club of Hartford, specifically the SMART Girls weekly

program, which was our signature project with the Club. Due to safety

measures, we were no longer allowed to be in-person at the clubs, which was a

key element to the relationship last year. Like the rest of the world, we had to

pivot.

First, our annual grant made even more of an impact at the clubs. We started

the year with a meeting with Club Directors ensuring the grant use was

extended to cover COVID-19 safety measures, such as masks, gloves, and

sanitizing products. The Clubs continued to be in-person for the kids, one of the

few bouts of normalcy in unprecedented times.

Next our weekly SMART Girls meetings needed to go virtual. We really felt

grateful to the club directors for easily changing direction with us, setting up

Zoom meetings several times a week so that the Junior League could interact

with the SMART Girls. Morgan Ferrarotti led a dance routine to Lizzo, Morgan

Murphy taught yoga virtually, and Nicole Morehart and Laura Capon created

Priyanka Chopra-inspired face and hand masks out of turmeric, yogurt, and

honey.

L E A G U E L I N E S 1 5


to Thanks

families

JLH,

waking

are

enjoying

up

gifts their

having

and

breakfast…

again

thanks

all that for

do! - you

Sophie,

Southwest

Club

Director

The girls squealed as the cold goop landed on their

faces and stuck their orange-painted masked faces into

the Zoom camera. It was super cute! Each activity had a

greater theme in mind such as: healthy body image,

hygiene, self-love, and mindfulness. We created vision

boards to help us vocalize why we’re individually special

and held a career panel with several Junior League

Volunteers. Watch out world, based on the career

questions, there’s a lot of future techies! We ended 2021

with special COVID-compliant mini cake bites baked by

our own Junior League star-baker and President Elect,

Bria Day of Disheveled Diva. We were really proud of

how much interaction we could facilitate despite being

virtual.

What was also equally important was the amount of other support we were able to

provide the clubs. During the Volunteer-A-Thon several Thanksgiving bags were

packed to provide a full Thanksgiving meal. The Clubs reported that the parents had

so much gratitude for the food during what has been a very difficult year. During the

Volunteer-A-Thon, Kelly Iuliano and Ashley DePasquale also organized a coat drive.

Again because of COVID-19 this proved more difficult as we had to dry clean each of

the coats before dropping them off at the Clubs. The girls were so excited when they

saw their new trendy coats for the winter, quickly trying them on in the mirror. We

couldn’t be there, but we got some cute photos!

As 2021 ended, we heard rumors from Club directors that some kids expressed that

they were not going to be celebrating the holidays this year due to parents losing their

jobs and income. We couldn’t stand by to hear this happen so the Junior League

quickly rushed to a grassroots fundraiser, raising over $5,800 in Walmart gift cards

for the parents. Special thanks to Whitney Sweeney who went to multiple Walmart

stores to obtain the physical gift cards, not an easy feat during the holiday rush amidst

a global pandemic. We also asked for wish lists for thirteen Club members who we

knew were not going to receive presents during the holidays. Each of those kids got

exactly what they asked for. What was humbling is a lot of the requests were not for

electronics or games, but rather for books, warm socks, and clothing. We were so

happy to see the videos of those children opening their gifts, receiving exactly what

they asked for. The Southwest Club Director, Sophie, texted us Christmas morning to

say: “Thanks to the JL, families are waking up enjoying their gifts and having

breakfast…thanks again for all that you do!”

The true unsung heroes this year are the Club directors, tirelessly trying to normalize

life for these kids while risking their own lives in the face of the pandemic. They are

primarily young and charismatic leaders, many of whom went through the program

themselves. We couldn’t let them go unnoticed, so we also provided them with Target

gift cards during the holiday season to thank them for their tireless hard work.

Needless to say: there were tears of happiness.

This project has really allowed the League to give back locally, especially during a

time of great need. Thank you to all those who have volunteered so far and we hope to

see many more volunteers as we close out the year.

B Y E S T A A M E D E O & M A G G I E J O H N D R O W

J U N I O R L E A G U E O F H A R T F O R D 1 6


In November, the 5th annual Volunteer-a-thon

COAT DRIVE

was unlike any other! With the world in a

pandemic, creativity, community, and a strong

sense of togetherness as a league were of the

utmost importance. The Junior League of

Hartford was able to pull off a successful event

showing just what these women are made of.

Coming together with a mix of in-person and

virtual volunteer events, we fulfilled our

commitment of 26.2 continuous hours.

BLOOD DRIVE

During our 26.2 hours of Volunteering we:

Made 40 blankets for Project Linus to help

comfort children in local hospitals

Collected 53 units of blood donated to the

American Red Cross

Provided 22 families with Thanksgiving meal

baskets, feeding 100 people from the Boys and

Girls Clubs of Hartford

Collected 100 coats for families of the Boys and

Girls Clubs of Hartford

Delivered donated furniture to 3 families

through Journey Home

Sorted hundred of pounds of food for Foodshare

BGCH BASKETS

Without fundraising, we would not be able to do

the things we do in the Greater Hartford

community. The Volunteer-a-thon raised funds

to help us to continue to provide our annual

grant to support the Smart Girls program for

the Boys and Girls Club of Hartford, as well as

other programs. These programs need us now

more than ever. It was a heart-warming

experience to know that even during a

pandemic, the women of the Junior League of

Hartford stand with their pledge of service to

those in need.

B Y K E L L Y I U L I A N O

J U N I O R L E A G U E O F H A R T F O R D 1 7


L E A G U E L I N E S 1 8

B Y B R I E C A M P B E L L

This year’s Bubbly & Bites Friend-Raiser popped a cork with over 70+ online

participants, $4,500 in net revenue, and friendships reignited through our tiny

computer screen-squares. The generous donations received will benefit the JLH

Annual Fund, which helps provide funding for the programs and projects of the Junior

League of Hartford that address and strive to meet the needs of the Greater Hartford

community.

During the Bubbly & Bites event, attendees heard from JLH President-Elect Bria Day

about the impact JLH has on our greater community through our support of and

projects with other local non-profit organizations, such as the Boys and Girls Club of

Hartford, Love146, and Interval House. In addition to monetary donations, JLH support

included in-kind donations, access to resources, and lots of trained volunteer time

that many of you so generously gave.

The Boys and Girls Club of Hartford shared information about some of their after

school activities during this “new way of life”, as the children attend school virtually,

in-person, or in a hybrid mix. Also showcased was the BGCH SMART Girl of the Year

award recipient, Ma’Layasia Thompson. The presentation emphasized her strength in

overcoming physical challenges, the support system behind her, and her future

dreams to become Dr. Thompson.

The Bubbly & Bites attendees were then invited into the home of Jeanne Barber,

founder and owner of Camden Grace, Interior Designer. As Jeanne toured attendees

through her beautiful home, she shared helpful décor advice, including what size

carpets should be used based on room size and furniture placement, and how to

properly position a wall gallery. Her magnificent kitchen island was a real highlight!

2021 marks the Centennial year of the Junior League of Hartford. Current President,

Jessica Pieri, celebrated our league's history by reviewing some of the

accomplishments of the Junior League of Hartford over its rich, one-hundred-year

history.

Lastly, sustaining members Ann Louise Price, Kathleen Schuster, Allison Schmitz, and

Deb Ortega provided recorded vignettes of what the Junior League has meant to them,

including fond memories of Show Houses past, lifelong friendships made, and the long

standing sustainer community project, Souper Sustainers, which is a monthly

commitment to provide food and the volunteers to serve it at Loaves and Fishes

Ministry in Hartford.

It was an evening filled with laughter, fun prizes, memories, JLH history, bubbles and

drinks with sweet bites, and an abundance of generous donations from you and our

league friends. A special thank you to Cheyney Barrieau who emceed the event, a

gracious thank you to Disheveled Diva for being our Matching-Sponsor, and a huge

thank you to all the companies that donated to the event: Gillette Ridge Wines, Vivid

Hue Home, Max Downtown, Arethusa’s Farm, De Vars-Phillips Florist, Crystal Ridge

Winery, Disheveled Diva and Glastonbury Adult & Continuing Education.


2021 the D&I Task

In

Broadly Shared

Force

Message of the

Its

of

importance

Equity and

Diversity,

Inclusion

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

Despite working in a virtual environment, the

Diversity & Inclusion Task Force had a very

productive league year. The task force focused on

two main goals for the year. One was to create a

D&I Statement for the JLH website and the second

was to host a diversity, equity and inclusion

training session. With the support of the board,

the Communications Committee and the

Membership and Training Committees, the task

force was able to successfully accomplish each of

these goals.

Our D&I Statement was posted on the website in

March 2021 and lets members, prospective

members and supporters know that our league

respects, values and celebrates diversity. The

statement also highlights our goal to be an

inclusive league that reflects all sociodemographic

aspects of our community. In the

statement, we also pledge to commit to working

on strategies and aligning with partners that

reflect our core values. The committee worked

very hard reviewing numerous D&I statements

from other leagues to create a statement that fits

with our strategic priorities.

On April 28, the task force hosted its first training

session on diversity, equity and inclusion. The

title of the training session was Courageous

Conversations: Challenging Our Thinking. In

preparation for the training session, the task force

shared two D&I videos to help guide the

discussion. Participants joined breakout groups

and discussed why the league has faced some

challenges when it comes to creating a more

diverse league. Participants also discussed ways

to proactively work on increasing diversity within

the league. The task force looks forward to

continuing these discussions and encourages each

member to take action to assist with our diversity

initiatives.

BY EVELYN JOHNSON

J U N I O R L E A G U E O F H A R T F O R D 1 9


DEVELOPING

“Developing the potential of women” is a core value of the Junior

League of Hartford, and we were so excited to launch the

Certificate Training Program to help enhance this mission within

the league. The program covers an array of trainings on the six

skill set topics of Leadership, Management, Diversity and

Inclusion, Communications, Personal Development and

Professional Development. By taking these trainings, the women

of our league are given the opportunity to grow and enhance their

knowledge and skill set, which will help make them more wellrounded

volunteers within the league and our community.

THE POTENTIAL

5 certificates make up the Certificate Training Program. Each

certificate has a set amount of trainings to take per category

within the six skill sets. Every certificate requires at minimum (1)

Diversity and Inclusion credit, which aligns with the league's

mission to increase D&I training and awareness amongst its

members. Each training a member takes counts towards the

certificate she is choosing to work towards. Each certificate is

designed to take over a year to complete, which allows members

to have a long term goal to work towards. Due to this timeframe

we have training trackers for members to keep up with the

trainings they’ve taken, and the training sessions they still need

to complete within each category. Once a certificate is completed,

members will be acknowledged at the May Annual Meeting with a

certificate.

OF WOMEN

In our first year offering the training certificate program, we

offered exclusively virtual trainings from a variety of different

trainers. Our first training was hosted by one of our community

partners, Leadership Greater Hartford, which covered the 5

practices of exemplary leadership. Near the holidays, we hosted

interactive trainings aimed at self-care to help members find

balance and deal with stressors that come around this time of

year. Next, we focused on communication styles, networking and

hosting engaging meetings virtually with partners like those from

Dale Carnegie.

B Y C A T H E R I N E C A R R O O N & M A U R A K E A T I N G

L E A G U E L I N E S 2 0


is Show House? Every three years JLH spends many

What

searching for a notable home or estate in the

months

Hartford area, and selects designers, both

Greater

and local, to makeover the interior and

regional

grounds. During the months of April and

surrounding

the public is invited to view the grand home that has

May,

transformed inside and out. Show House is more

been

a home tour, it is an experience. In the past, guests

than

been able to shop at our boutique full of exclusive

have

items, or purchase designer furnishings featured in

gift

Show House. A percentage of these sales go directly

the

the Junior League of Hartford.

to

Show House anchors a season of social

Additionally,

for the Junior League and members of the public,

events

showcasing the home and grounds, and prominently

all

the Show House sponsors. Guests have the

recognizing

experience of attending the opening celebration to

unique

the house in its “Bare Bones” form, in addition to

view

House was first introduced to the Junior League

Show

Hartford by League member Mary Lynn Gorman,

of

had firsthand experience with a Junior League

who

House in Ohio. This introduction resulted in the

Show

House of 1979 and began a successful history of

Show

(and counting!) Show Houses.

fourteen

are raised through ticket sales to tour the

Funds

Show House, by special events associated

decorated

Show House, boutique and designer sales,

with

and corporate sponsorship, and program

individual

next Show House was scheduled to occur in the

The

of 2021 but due to the global pandemic the

Spring

made the decision to postpone the event until

League

Spring 2022. We look forward to celebrating the

the

in various other ways as we get ready for

League

2022.

Reach out to co-chairs Whitney Sweeney

Questions?

Molly Towne.

and

A T R A D I T I O N S I N C E 1 9 7 9

THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF HARTFORD (JLH) SHOW HOUSE IS THE

LEAGUE’S SIGNATURE FUNDRAISING EVENT, RAISING MORE THAN

$1.6 MILLION OF FUNDS THAT SUPPORT CHARITABLE PROJECTS

AND PROGRAMS IN THE GREATER HARTFORD COMMUNITY. THIS

HIGHLY ANTICIPATED EVENT OCCURS EVERY THREE YEARS AND

THERE IS NO SIMILAR EVENT IN CENTRAL CONNECTICUT.

ads.

other social events throughout.

B Y W H I T N E Y S W E E N E Y & M O L L Y T O W N E

L E A G U E L I N E S 2 1


THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF HARTFORD, INC. IS AN ORGANIZATION OF WOMEN COMMITTED TO

PROMOTING VOLUNTARISM, DEVELOPING THE POTENTIAL OF WOMEN, AND IMPROVING

COMMUNITIES THROUGH THE EFFECTIVE ACTION AND LEADERSHIP OF TRAINED

VOLUNTEERS. ITS PURPOSE IS EXCLUSIVELY EDUCATIONAL AND CHARITABLE.

THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF HARTFORD

P.O. BOX 270956, WEST HARTFORD, CT 06127

P: 860.233.4300 | E: INFO@JLHARTFORD.ORG

WWW.JLHARTFORD.ORG

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