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By Anne MArie ToBin

PHOTO | ANNE MARIE TOBIN

Lynnfield residents cast their votes in favor of Article 13, authorizing an additional

$1.75 million for the $17 million elementary school expansion project. The vote was

98-14 in favor.

Volleyball team gets town salute

By Anne MArie ToBin

LYNNFIELD — The

Pioneers girls volleyball

team was honored for excellence

at the Town Meeting

meeting held in the school

gymnasium last Saturday.

The team finished with an

overall record of 11-1 and

won its third straight Cape

Ann League (CAL) regular

season championship. This

past April, the team won

the CAL Championship

Tournament, defeating

Ipswich in the semifinals

(3-1) and archrival North

Reading in the final (3-0).

The Pioneers also excelled

off the court, raising

more than $5,000 at their

annual Dig Pink fundraiser.

The team carries an average

grade point average of 3.51

and has taken a combined 20

honors and advanced placement

courses.

LYNNFIELD — The

town has approved Phase 1

of what Town Administrator

Rob Dolan describes as “the

largest public works facilities

project in the history of

Lynnfield.”

According to Department

of Public Works Director

John Tomasz, Phase 1 will

cost approximately $5.7

million, but it won’t cost

taxpayers a single dollar.

“It will all be paid for

through energy savings,”

Tomasz said.

Residents unanimously

approved a warrant article

at Saturday’s Town Meeting

that authorizes the town to

enter into a lease-purchase

financing agreement to fund

energy-efficiency improvements

to town buildings.

MEETING, PAGE 3

“This was one of the most

challenging seasons ever,”

said Coach Brent Ashley.

“Even so, we never missed

a practice and raised more

money than we ever have

at the Dig Pink match. This

team is representative of

the incredibly special and

talented student-athletes

we have at Lynnfield High

School.”

Select Board member Joe

Connell presented a citation

on behalf of the Select

Board to Ashley.

The citation read in part,

“this regular season and

playoffs is a reflection on

a remarkable team effort

and is a reflection of the

dedication of the athletes,

coaches and parents whose

commitment and efforts

are necessary for such high

achievement.”

VOLLEYBALL, PAGE 2

School

equity

policies

questioned

By Anne MArie ToBin

LYNNFIELD — The School Committee

and Superintendent of Schools Kristen

Vogel are defending themselves after being

criticized in a letter sent by a group calling

itself “Lynnfield United” on the district’s

decision to conduct an equity audit.

They are also setting the record straight

on what is and isn’t being taught about

racism in Lynnfield classrooms.

“In (Lynnfield United’s) letter there is an

assumption that Critical Race Theory, the

1619 Project and an Anti-Racist curriculum

are all being taught in the Lynnfield Public

Schools,” the district stated in a letter dated

June 10. “These assumptions are not based

on facts. We do not have a Critical Race

Theory curriculum, nor have we adopted

the 1619 Project curriculum or an LPS Anti-

Racist curriculum.”

Jason Kimball presented the group’s letter

at the committee’s June 8 meeting, asking

questions about the equity audit along with

what it claims are other school anti-racism

initiatives and curricula implemented by the

district. He said the letter was signed by approximately

100 residents.

SCHOOL, PAGE 3

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2

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 17, 2021

Volleyball team gets Town Meeting salute

VOLLEYBALL

FROM PAGE 1

COURTESY | ANNE MARIE LEONARD

Select Board member Joe Connell presents a citation to volleyball coach Brent Ashley, standing right, during Saturday’s Town

Hall at the high school.

The citation went on to

commend the team’s coaches,

Ashley and Emily Babon,

under whom “players Jillian

Babine, Ava Buonfiglio,

Daniella Colarusso, Olivia

Murphy, Vanessa Torosian,

Natalie Connell, Sarah Foley,

Grace Davie, Ella Gizmunt and

Celia Carbone demonstrated

the highest levels of skill, dedication

and sportsmanship that

stand as a credit to the team,

Lynnfield High School, the

league and the community of

Lynnfield.”

Ashley said that winning the

CAL tournament crown was

bittersweet.

“They feel like they had the

ability to go for a state championship

(which was not held

due to the pandemic) if it was

possible,” he said. “But still,

I’m so proud of the team for

how they approached this

season, how they stayed focused

all year and how they

accomplished what they set out

to do.”

WenKai Fitzgerald

We can all learn from Ecocolumns

An Ecocolumn is an incredible

middle-school activity. It

is very exciting and I learned a

lot and had fun.

An Ecocolumn is made up of

a terrarium and the aquarium.

The Terrarium is the land part

and the Aquarium is the water

part.

To build the Ecocolumn,

we first brought in recycled

soda bottles and we planted

alfalfa, grass, and mustard in

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the terrarium.

We learned how these plants

are all important to our ecocolumn.

Later we observed

our plants. They had grown

healthy, green, tall and strong.

It was cool to see how the

plants had changed.

Then we put live animals

such as isopods (roly-polies)

and crickets into the terrarium.

I had to be careful so I

wouldn’t hurt the animals.

I then learned about respiration.

Respiration is the exchange

of gasses. For example,

plants help animals live by exhaling

carbon dioxide, which

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the plant needs to perform

photosynthesis. The plant releases

oxygen, which animals

need to breathe.

After I set up the aquarium,

we put plants like duckweed,

chara, and algae into the

aquarium.

Duckweed is a plant that

floats on the surface of the

water and has small fronds

(they’re like its leaves). If it

overgrows, it will block out

all the sunlight and the other

plants will die. Luckily, ducks

love to eat duckweed. That’s

how it got its name.

Algae can be green, brown,

red and gold. If there is too

much algae in the water, there

will be little oxygen in the

water and animals could die.

This is called an algae bloom.

Chara and elodea are very

adaptive. They can live in

warm and cold water. If you

cut chara in half both pieces

will still grow. It can grow in

the ground or just float in the

water. This hardy plant is so

adaptive that it easily clogs up

waterways.

Even though the plants all

have a downside, they are

still very important to the ecosystem.

Fish eat the chara,

ducks feed on the duckweed

and snails need the algae to

eat.

Our class learned about dependent

and interdependent

relationships between organisms

and how they contribute

to an ecosystem. For example,

a fish needs a plant for food

and the plant needs the fish

to eat it so it doesn’t overgrow

and kill other plants and

animals.

Do you know what the best

thing about the Ecocolumn

is? It’s that you do not need

to care for it. The water in

the aquarium evaporates into

the terrarium giving the land

plants water. Then that water

moves back down into the

aquarium taking some of the

soil nutrients, which helps the

water plants grow better. The

fish eat some of those plants

and poops, which is like fertilizer

to the water plants helping

them grow. It is a cycle.

At the end of the unit we

learned about pollution and

how it hurts ecosystems. A

pollutant is something that

when too much of it is released

into an ecosystem, it is bad for

the organisms living there.

Acid rain can kill plants,

which affects animals that eat

plants. Road salt can be very

harmful to an ecosystem because

it “burns” plant leaves.

Fertilizer goes on runoff into

bodies of water. This pollutant

pollutes the water and can be

very harmful to organisms

living there.

Making ecocolumns was an

incredible experiment and I

will never forget it.

WenKai Fitzgerald is a

Lynnfield Middle School fifth

grader.


JUNE 17, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

Energy savings will pay for phase one

infrastructure improvements project

MEETING

FROM PAGE 1

“This is an incredible

way to do this work without

using any operating or capital

funds,” Dolan said.

“We have numerous items

that need to be repaired.

The investment will be paid

off within 20 years by the

savings of the project. It

will be completely off the

tax rolls, completely off the

Prop 2 ½ rolls. It sounds

incredible, almost too good

to be true, but I’ve experienced

it.”

Dolan said countless

communities across the

Commonwealth have embarked

on similar projects.

Lynnfield’s project is expected

to begin this fall

before the start of school

with additional phases,

including more HVAC

(heating, ventilation and air

conditioning) and solar upgrades

to follow. The project’s

completion date is expected

to be in September

2022.

The agreement allows the

town to negotiate a term of

up to 20 years, which is the

estimated useful life of the

improvements.

High-efficiency boiler

plants will be installed at the

high school, middle school,

library, senior center and

South Lynnfield fire station.

Dolan said the boilers

currently in use run at only

60 percent efficiency, while

the new units will run at 90

percent or more.

A new steam-to-hot, water-heating

conversion unit

with new HVAC equipment

will be installed at the high

school.

Trane BAS (building

automation systems) controls

will be installed at the

high and middle schools,

Huckleberry Hill and

Summer Street elementary

schools, Town Hall,

Summer Street fire station,

police station and library. A

building automation system

uses interlinked networks

of software and hardware to

monitor and control a building’s

mechanical and electrical

systems, including

HVAC; lighting; security;

and fire systems.

LED-lighting

upgrades

will be made at all four

schools, Town Hall, the

police station, both fire

stations, library, senior

center and the DPW garage.

Building envelope

improvements will be made

at every school as well as at

the senior center, south fire

station and DPW garage.

The schools will also have

new walk-in cooler and

freezer controls as well as

kitchen hood controls. Pipe

insulation will be installed

at each school, Town Hall,

police station, both fire stations

and the library.

The overall impact of

the project is significant.

Indoor environmental

quality will be drastically

improved, all town facilities

will be connected

with 24/7 monitoring, all

spaces will have efficient

and uniform lighting, and

an ongoing maintenance

plan will ensure sustainable

performance.

A Town Hall handout

highlighted the benefits of

the project, which is expected

to reduce annual

utility costs by more than

30 percent. Current costs

are $773,815. Following

the completion of the

project, cost will be reduced

to $530,774, a savings of

almost $250,000 since last

year. Gas and utility rebates

to qualified residents are

estimated to be $261,000.

The projected energy

savings over the 20-year

term of the lease arrangement

is expected to be $7

million, which, along with

Reading Municipal Light

Department incentives,

will be used to pay for the

project.

Dolan said the town is

working with Wilmingtonbased

Trane, which guarantees

that the savings

incurred by energy upgrades

will pay for the entire

project. If savings fall

short, Dolan said Trane will

reimburse the town.

Tomasz said Wakefield

and Melrose have undertaken

similar projects and

that guaranteed savings

have exceeded costs.

“Things don’t last forever

and our equipment is old,”

he said. “This project will

guarantee that the savings

will pay for it. The important

thing is to keep up

with maintenance.”

Trane Account Executive

Morgan Perras told the

Select Board during

a March presentation

that Trane has a proven

track record, with every

Massachusetts customer

seeing savings in excess

of that guaranteed by the

company.

“On average, projects

are 11-13 percent over the

guaranteed savings,” she

said. “Lynnfield already

has Trane systems in every

building and we have a service

relationship, so that

also works to reduce costs.”

“I’ve always had strong

support for building maintenance

and some of our

buildings are nearing the

end of their lives, so the

time is right,” Select Board

member Phil Crawford said.

“This is an excellent way to

fund a project like this and

will keep your buildings up

to date for a very long time.

This is a great opportunity

for our town.”

Group questions school equity policies

SCHOOL

FROM PAGE 1

“We have a lot of questions

on this,” Kimball

said at the meeting. “There

are a number of Lynnfield

residents who are confused

and unaware of what

exactly an equity audit is

and why it is needed. I understand

it was discussed

earlier (tonight) but it was

very vague … it seems like

there are already plans to

implement Critical Race

Theory in our public

schools even prior to the

audit being conducted.”

Lynnfield United’s letter

stated, “we are writing to

express our concerns about

recent initiatives from

Superintendent Vogel and

the School Committee.

The Superintendent recently

announced an

anti-racism initiative

for LPS and the School

Committee unanimously

voted to uphold the MASC

Anti-Racism resolution …

we are deeply concerned

about the underlying assumptions

of these initiatives

and statements.”

Vogel confirmed

Monday that the committee

signed the MASC

resolution in September

2020, but said that anti-racism

initiatives, as

claimed by Lynnfield

United in its letter, were

not in place in the district.

The Lynnfield United

letter also took issue with

a statement attributed

to Vogel that the district

“must reckon with

how certain educational

laws, statewide regulations,

school policies and

teaching practices have

served to privilege specific

groups of students

at the expense of other

groups, most notably

Black students.”

“We are shocked to discover

that some students

are receiving services at

the expense of other students,”

Kimball wrote, on

behalf of the group. “(We)

deserve to know what

racist policies currently

exist in our school and

how we let this happen.”

While the district’s response

did not address that

specific claim, it did state

that the district’s priority

remains the “safety and

wellbeing of all children.

“The goal of the

Lynnfield Public Schools

has always been and shall

continue to be provide a

high-quality education

that will ensure that all

students, regardless of socio-economic

status, level

of ability, native language,

gender identity, sexual

orientation, religion, race

or ethnicity to receive the

support and resources they

need...to be successful.”

The district’s response

did not satisfy Lynnfield

United, who fired off another

letter on June 11. In

it, the group said the equity

audit, the anti-racism

initiative announced in

September and the MASC

Anti-Racism Resolution

remains its focus.

“The majority of the

questions from the (June

8) Lynnfield United letter

remain unaddressed,”

the letter said, adding it

was “encouraged” by the

district’s statement that

Critical Race Theory,

the 1619 Project and anti-racism

curricula have

not been implemented in

Lynnfield schools and “we

agree that these programs

should be rejected.”

For the record, the district’s

June 10 response

did not state the programs

had been rejected, as

claimed by the group. It

stated only that they were

not currently in place.

Representatives from

the company selected to

conduct the equity audit

— The Equity Process —

told the committee at its

June 8 meeting (before

Kimball spoke) that the

audit will begin sometime

in July and will be completed

in September.

“We work hand in hand

with principals, educators

and families to connect

with the community,” said

Founder and Executive

Director Elizabeth Redley.

“Inequity has many faces,

not just race. Full transparency,

there is some

discomfort in processes

like these, but through discomfort,

we achieve the

greatest growth.”

“It’s humanity over

politics,” said Founder

and CEO Cyndi Weekes

Bradley. “Humanity for all

and not just one or two.”


4

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 17, 2021

LYNNFIELD

WEEKLY NEWS

Police Log

(USPS Permit #168)

Telephone: 781-593-7700 • Fax: 781-581-3178

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903

News and Advertising Offices: 110 Munroe St., Lynn, MA 01901

Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

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Editor: Thor Jourgensen tjourgensen@essexmediagroup.com

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Sports Editor: Mike Alongi malongi@essexmediagroup.com

Advertising Reps: Ralph Mitchell rmitchell@essexmediagroup.com

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Retail Price: $1.00

Deadlines: News: Monday, noon; Display Ads: Monday, noon;

Classified Ads: Monday, noon;

No cancellations accepted after deadline.

The Lynnfield Weekly News is published 52 times per year on Thursday by Essex

Media Group, Inc. No issue is printed during the week of Christmas. The Lynnfield

Weekly News is delivered via US Mail to all homes in Lynnfield. It is also

available in several locations throughout Lynnfield. The Lynnfield Weekly News

will not be responsible for typographical or other errors in advertisements, but will

reprint that part of an advertisement in which a typographical error occurs if notified

immediately. Advertisers must notify the Lynnfield Weekly News of any errors in

advertisements on the FIRST day of insertion. The publisher reserves the right to

reject, omit or edit any copy offered for publication. POSTMASTER: Send address

changes to Lynnfield Weekly News, P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903. © 2016 Essex

Media Group, Inc.

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full online access.

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or call 781-593-7700, ext. 1239

Friday, June 4

Arrests

Frank P. Caruccio, 47, of

375 Broadway, Apt. 213, was

arrested on a warrant at 9:09

a.m. Friday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 4:12 p.m. Friday at

Vineyard Vines at 650 Market

St.; at 5:34 p.m. Friday at 11

Essex St. and 758 Main St.

Saturday, June 5

Accident

A report of a motor vehicle

crash with personal injury at

12:42 p.m. Saturday on I-95

southbound, Exit 61.

Complaints

A report of fireworks at

11:09 p.m. Saturday at Willow

Cemetery on Summer Street.

A caller reported the occupants

of a vehicle with a loud muffler

were setting off fireworks in

the cemetery. Police checked

the area and were unable to

locate.

Monday, June 7

Accidents

At 9:25 a.m. Monday at 199

Salem St. and 511 Walnut St.;

at 2:23 p.m. Monday on I-95

southbound, Exit 61.

A report of a hit-and-run

motor vehicle crash at 2:15

p.m. Monday at 22 Locksley

Road.

A report of debris in the

roadway at 8:57 a.m. Monday

at 244 Main St. A caller reported

four lawn signs had

been dumped in front of his

house. The Department of

Public Works was notified.

Tuesday, June 8

Accidents

A report of a hit-and-run

motor vehicle crash at 2:29

p.m. Tuesday at 807 Salem St.

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 3:14 p.m. Tuesday on

Walnut Street.

Wednesday, June 9

Accidents

A report of hazardous

road conditions at 7:24 a.m.

Wednesday at Sagamore

Spring Golf Club at 1287 Main

St. A caller reported a large

rock in the middle of the road.

Police reported DPW needed

to use a loader to remove the

boulder, which appeared to

have fallen off a truck.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at

12:09 p.m. Wednesday at

Colonial Shopping Center at

584 Main St.

Thursday, June 10

Accident

At 12:17 p.m. Thursday on

Market Street.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 8

a.m. Thursday at 49 Lynnbrook

Road. A caller reported jewelry,

including an engagement ring,

engagement band and earrings,

were stolen over a fiveyear

period.

Friday, June 11

Accident

At 6:51 a.m. Friday at Post

Office Square on Salem Street.

Police responded to a motor

vehicle accident reported at

I 95 Exit 61 on Friday at 2:19

p.m. One person was transported

to Lahey Burlington.

Complaints

Police assisted in responding

to a strong odor

in an Edgemere Road basement

on Friday at 8:31 a.m.

Fire Department checked and

cleared.

Police responded on Friday

at 8:37 p.m. to Panera Bread

on a complaint of youths going

in and out of the store and refusing

to make purchases. The

youths were asked to leave the

premises.

Medical

Police assisted with medical

transport from Market Street

to Lahey Burlington on Friday

at 2:31 p.m.

Enforcement

Police conducted motor vehicle

rule violation enforcement

on Summer Street on Friday at

8:49 p.m.

Saturday, June 12

Enforcement

Police conducted motor vehicle

law violation enforcement

on Summer, Essex and Walnut

streets Saturday morning.

Police issued motor vehicle

law violation enforcement citations

and warnings to North

Reading and Methuen drivers

on Main Street on Saturday at

5:30 p.m.; on Essex Street to

a Lynn driver on Saturday at

6:44 p.m.; to a Lynnfield driver

on Summer Street on Saturday

at 7:23 p.m.

Sunday, June 13

Complaint

Police responded on Sunday

at 12:10 a.m. to Glen Meadow

Park on a report of breaking

glass and found a portable

toilet tipped over.

Police dispersed a gathering

at the high school on Sunday

at 9:09 p.m.

Enforcement

Police issued a verbal

warning for a motor vehicle law

violation to a Reading driver

on Salem Street on Sunday at

9:13 a.m.

Medical

Police assisted with medical

transport from South Broadway

to Melrose-Wakefield Hospital

on Sunday at 9:38 a.m. Police

responded to an unattended

death reported at King Rail

Drive and assisted with transport

to Melrose-Wakefield

Hospital on Sunday at 10 a.m.

Police assisted with transport

from Smith Farm Trail to Lahey

Burlington on Sunday at 1:24

p.m.; assisted with transport

on Sunday at 3:31 p.m. from I

95 to Lahey Burlington.

Animal

Police were notified about

a dog found in Glen Meadow

Park and aided with returning

the animal to its family on

Sunday at 10:15 a.m.

Monday, June 14

Enforcement

Police conducted motor vehicle

law violation enforcement

on Salem Street on Monday at

6 a.m.


JUNE 17, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 5

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OPENING DAY 06.04.21

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Religious News

Centre Congregational

Church

5 Summer St., Lynnfield

781-334-3050

www.centre-church.org

Facebook.com/CentreChurch

UCC

office@centre-church.org

YouTube.com/c/centrecongregational

church/

In the Centre since 1720,

Centre Church is an open and

affirming congregation of the

United Church of Christ. No

matter who you are or where

you are on your life’s journey,

you are welcome at Centre

Church.

Messiah Lutheran Church

708 Lowell Street, Lynnfield

(corner of Lowell & Chestnut)

is currently open for in-person

worship Sunday morning

at 10:30 am. Worship services

will also be streamed

live on FaceBook. Like us

on FaceBook: facebook.com/

Messiah-Lutheran-Church

Worship times: Sunday

mornings at 10:30 am, Sunday

evening devotion on Face Book

Live at 6:30 pm, Wednesday

evening Prayer time at 7:01 pm

on Face Book Live.

Messiah Lutheran Church

is served by Rev. Dr. Jeremy

Pekari, and Rev. David Brezina.

Temple Emmanuel/

Wakefield

For more information about

Temple Emmanuel, a member

of the Jewish Reconstructionist

Communities, call 781-245-

1886 or see our Facebook

page or website at www.

WakefieldTemple.org.

Request service links to

Two win LAG scholarships

FOR THE WEEKLY NEWS

LYNNFIELD — The Lynnfield

Art Guild (LAG) is proud

to announce the two 2021 winners

of its art-based scholarships

from Lynnfield High School.

Alexia Dellaporta is the recipient

of the Karen Rae Simpson

Duggan Memorial Award

for $1,000, which honors a graduating

senior interested in fine

arts, graphic arts or computer

design. She plans to attend the

School at the Museum of Fine

Arts at Tufts. “My dream is to

become a medical illustrator. I

would never choose a career that

isn’t art related because I am too

passionate about art to just keep

it as a hobby or a side job. I want

art to be a constant force in my

life, and I will do anything to

achieve that," Dellaporta said.

Yvonne Chen is the award

winner for the Marjorie Gershaw

$600 Scholarship, which

was fostered by Gershaw’s love

of and commitment to art and

the understanding that art is a

passport to creativity. Chen will

attend Dartmouth College to minor

in human-centered design.

“I am excited to study such

an interdisciplinary and creatively-challenging

course of study in

which I can apply my artistic

style to projects that can benefit

human needs. By studying

psychology, culture and design,

I will challenge myself to become

a problem-solver through

art…. I hope to use my career

as a means to enjoy my life by

continuing to create art and constantly

grow creative," she said.

The Guild also offers Lynnfield

High School students

the chance to participate in the

judged Spring Show to be held

online through the end of June.

During the show, student

members can join to enjoy all

other privileges of membership

for free for an entire year.

For more information and to

visit the show, please visit www.

lynnfieldarts.org and check out

its Facebook and Instagram pages

under the name Lynnfield Arts.

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net

the Zoom streaming: info@

WakefieldTemple.org

Shabbat services: Friday,

7:30 p.m.: June 1 and June 25.

Saturday mornings at 9:30

am: June 5 and 19, July 17

Wakefield-Lynnfield

United Methodist Church

Peace, Hope & Virtual Hugs

Deb Willis Bry, cell:

781-521-9726

Office Assistant, Wakefield-

Lynnfield United Methodist

Church

Assistant Coordinator,

Greater Boston Project Linus

LYNNFIELD — The Lynnfield

Senior Center is open and

offering four great programs. Get

out of the heat, and join us for

some laughs as we test our knowledge

every Monday at 1:30 p.m.

with Trivia. Friends, fun, prizes!

Join us every Tuesday at 9

a.m. for Bingo. The Walking Club

meets every Wednesday at 9 a.m.

Walk at your own speed and for

as long as you are comfortable.

Let's get those steps in! Drop-in

Knitting will be every Thursday at

9 a.m. Bring your own project for

some stitching and chatting.

Call the senior center, 781-

598-1078, to sign up.

The Center offers Grab and

Go lunches three days each week

in our parking lot — advance

sign-up is required. The Center's

SHINE representative is available

to offer insurance assistance by

Spring Cleanups

and

Tree Removal

and

Dog Waste

Removal

Low Rates

Call • 877-688-7667

$2.29

PAYLESS OIL

All Cities and Towns

No Minimum. Senior & Veteran Discounts.

1-800-698-6313

Price subject to change

Wakefield-Lynnfield United

Methodist Church, 273 Vernon

St., Wakefield, Mass., 01880

Church Office: 781-245-

1359, Parsonage: 781-245-0338

Email: WLUMC272@gmail.

com

www.facebook.com/method

istchurchwakefield

www.instagram.com/meth

odistchurchwakefield

*A Project Linus Blanket

Drop-Off Location*

www.bostonprojectlinus.com

Senior Center offers

plenty to do in June

appointment, and we hope you

will enjoy all of the staff cooking

and craft videos that we post each

week, along with our Virtual Travel

Monday Trips.

For more information, please

call the senior center at 781-

598-1078.

Join Elaine every Monday at

1:30 p.m. for Trivia. Test your

knowledge and have lots of

laughs. Sign up with Elaine at

emoorman_coa@hotmail.com.

Join Elaine for Zoom Bingo

every Tuesday at 9 a.m.

We will send you the bingo

cards. Grab your beans and

have some fun. Sign up with

Elaine at emoorman_coa@hotmail.com.

Free.

Our van service will pick up

and drop off your library books.

Call the Lynnfield library, 781-

334-541, to make arrangements.


6

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 17, 2021

Town Meeting raises school spending concerns

BY ANNE MARIE TOBIN

LYNNFIELD — There may

not have been any real surprises

at last Saturday's Town Meeting,

but there certainly were a few

residents who expressed concerns

about the town's spending

when it came to schools.

Meeting highlights included

the approval of $1.75 million

in additional funds for the $17

million elementary school project

(Article 13), approval of the

fiscal year 2022 $60.84 million

operating budget (Article 6), approval

of an FY22 $1.04 million

capital budget (Article 7) and

approval of a $5.7 million bond

for energy improvements (Article

15).

"It's always a pleasure to have

a fair and open Town Meeting,"

said Town Moderator Joe Markey,

presiding over his seventh

meeting. "This is the purest form

of democracy, and you saw that

today. Town Meeting is a process

that is great when it works

like it does here every year."

As expected, Article 13, recommended

by both the Finance

Committee and Select Board and

endorsed by the School Committee,

generated the most discussion.

The article proposed adding

$1.75 million to the elementary

school expansion project for

drainage ($700,000), sidewalks

($70,000), security ($110,000),

additional parking lot improvements

($100,000) and contingency

reserve ($770,000).

"If this isn't passed, the school

expansion plan will be in serious

jeopardy," said Town Administrator

Rob Dolan. "There will be

no additional taxation to pay for

this, and there needs to be this

contingency to remain on budget."

According to Dolan, the cost

of building materials has been "a

massive roller coaster over the

last few months.

"We need to protect this project

in such an unstable economic

environment. This was unforeseen

and is not in our control,"

he said.

Pat Campbell questioned the

number of classrooms in the

project, saying "the town approved

the building project but

didn't know how much it would

cost.

"We only need 48 classrooms,

but they put in 52," she

said. "They are building more

classrooms than they actually

need."

Kenneth Peterson said that

the project should be revisited.

"The need for that contingency

indicates that the original

budget was rushed to judgement,"

he said.

Jack Dalhstedt and Paige

Wilkins disagreed with Campbell

and Peterson, with each receiving

loud applause.

Dahlstedt urged residents to

"reaffirm our commitment to our

community.

"Rob Dolan talked about this.

A contingency between 5 and 10

percent is common and a contingency

of 3 percent is prudent,"

he said.

"I'm a newcomer to Lynnfield,

but the town did not rush

to judgement," Wilkins said.

"There was a clear mandate at

Town Meeting. This is a big

problem and we need to fix it."

After Campbell's motion to

vote by ballot failed, the article

passed by an overwhelming

margin of 98-14.

Article 15, which sought approval

for funding a $5.7 million

project to upgrade energy efficiency

at town buildings, passed

unanimously. Dolan said the estimated

energy savings over the

next 20 years will pay for Phase

1 of the project.

"This is an incredible way

to do this work without spending

any operating funds," Dolan

said. "Savings are guaranteed. If

the savings come up short, we

get reimbursed by the contractor."

Other articles passing muster

included Article 10, imposing

spending limits on revolving

funds expenditures of $50,000

(Council on Aging), $15,000

(Board of Health), $10,000 (Library),

$325,000 (Recreation),

$75,000 (Public Works - fields),

and $10,000 (Public Works -

Merritt Center); Article 11, an

$811,371 appropriation from

the Emergency Medical Services

Enterprise; Article 12, a

$1,008,300 appropriation from

the Golf Enterprise Fund; Article

14, a rescission of unused

borrowing authority for several

initiatives including the Reedy

Meadow and Centre Farm purchases,

septic loans and the Senior

Center van; and Article 16,

which dealt with fee changes.

Articles 17 and 18 were

unanimously approved; Article

17 increases the number of senior

service hours to obtain real-estate

tax reductions to 125,

while Article 18 doubled state

exemption amounts for seniors,

disabled veterans and 100 percent

disabled veterans to $1,500,

$800 and $2,000, respectively.

Article 19 (acceptance of Zepaj

Lane as a public way) and

Article 20 (the method by which

Stormwater Management bylaw

changes are noted) passed.

Article 3, which proposed

modest increases in compensation

for elected officials, also

passed, which Campbell questioned.

"It used to be called a stipend

and is now called salary," she

said. "Do they get health insurance,

life insurance and retirement

benefits?"

Assistant Town Administrator

Bob Curtin corrected Campbell,

saying the compensation

has been referred to as "salary"

for the past 36 years.

"Since 1985, it's always been

called salary, and if it's a salary,

you pay into retirement based

upon the amount of the salary,"

he said.

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JUNE 17, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 7

Lynnfield High Valedictorian Anthony Zhang delivers his speech during commencement ceremonies held June 4 at the high school.

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

STUDENT OF

THE WEEK

A valedictorian’s vision for greatness

BY STEVE KRAUSE

LYNNFIELD — More than

anything else, Anthony Zhang

captured the duality of life

as a graduating student in his

valedictory address earlier this

month on the grounds of Pioneer

Field.

"Today is a celebration of

both unity and uniqueness," he

told the Class of 2021. "Whether

your passion is in the classroom

or on the stage or on this

very field, we are all here, in

one place. We are all Pioneers."

Zhang did not pretend to offer

advice to his peers. In fact,

he went out of his way not to

offer any.

"I’m supposed to share with

you some advice," he told his

class. "My advice? Nothing.

That’s right. I don’t have some

motivational quote or inspiring

advice to give. And that’s not

just me being lazy."

More to the point, he'd heard

his class being called "resilient"

for most of the second half of the

year. And even now, he's philosophical

about the trials and

tribulations of the COVID-19

pandemic, its shutdown and the

new protocols that resulted.

"There isn't much you can

do," he said last week. "You

deal with all the obstacles as

best as you can. It wasn't ideal.

But I didn't do anything that nobody

else did."

Besides, he said, remote

learning had its upside — one

of them taking a calculus class

from his bed early in the morning.

And even if he had to get

out of that bed about an hour

earlier so he could get ready to

go to school once it started back

up again, that wasn't so bad either.

"But I liked going back," he

said. "It's better than sitting in

your bedroom all day."

Zhang, headed to Duke University

this fall, doesn't have a

problem with being called a "techie."

"I guess that would be accurate,"

he says.

"I like math and science,"

he said, adding that his current

plan is to major in aerospace engineering.

"I've been interested in rockets

and stuff," he said. "We'll

see if that pans out. I just like

the prospect of exploring, maybe

going back to the moon.

That's interesting stuff."

Even in his spare time, he

leaned toward the scientific.

One of his favorite movies is

the 2014 science-fiction classic

"Interstellar," starring Matthew

McConaughey, which featured

a dystopian plot where Earth is

running out of food, "so space

explorers have to find another

planet so they can feed the human

race."

But it wasn't all work for

Zhang while at the high school.

He did play soccer when he was

younger, and was on the boys

tennis team for all four years.

"We did have a season," he

said, "and I was very grateful to

get out there and play."

He also played saxophone

for the school band, and plays

the violin.

"I definitely like playing music,"

he said. "But I'm not going

to pursue it in college."

He doesn't have a particular

favorite kind of music, "but I

just like it in general."

And, of course, he appreciates

the simpler things in life.

"I like hanging out with my

friends," he said. "There definitely

needs to be a balance

between amusement and workload.

I love having good friends

by my side.

"Also," he said, "we had a

small graduating class. I enjoyed

how close we were as a class."

Financial planning is

more important than ever…

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© 2021 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC. 21-BRNAO-0003 TA 1/21


8

For the Weekly NeWs

LYNNFIELD — After

more than 20 years helping

buyers and sellers throughout

Massachusetts, Debra Roberts

has joined Compass, the fastest-growing

independent brokerage

in the country.

She is excited to offer her

clients tailored programs such

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COURTESY PHOTO | COMPASS

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WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 17, 2021

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Compass’ innovative tools

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with everything that Compass

has to offer. We are successful

together," Roberts said.

You can reach Debra Roberts

at debra.roberts@compass.

com or direct at 781-956-0241.

CORRECTION

James Considine

Have a story to share?

Need a question answered?

contactus@essexmedia.group

DINING GUIDE

DIRECTORY

Due to an editing error,

Lynnfield High School

Class of 2021 member

James Considine was

incorrectly identified in

the June 10 graduation

publication.

To advertise here,

contact 781-593-7700,

ext. 1355 or email

advertising@itemlive.com

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CATERING SERVICES AND GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

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TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS:

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JUNE 17, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 9

Lynnfield couple paddling to raise money

By Anne MArie ToBin

LYNNFIELD — A town

couple is spearheading an effort

to help community members

have more outside fun while

raising awareness and funds for

clean water.

Amy and Ken MacNulty are

participating as Ipswich River

Water Association (IRWA)

Paddle Raisers for the 2021

IRWA Paddle-a-Thon.

Amy serves as co-chair of

the volunteer committee and

is raising awareness and funds

by walking in five towns the

river runs through, including

Lynnfield. Ken, who serves as

IRWA vice president, is raising

funds by biking the length of

the river, 40 miles from its origin

in Burlington to the mouth

of the river at Ipswich Bay.

The couple currently is in

fourth place among all participants

in the amount of money

raised.

During the Ipswich River

Watershed Association’s annual

Paddle-a-Thon event (https://

www.ipswichriver.org/paddlea-thon/),

supporters are encouraged

to to paddle, walk, bike

and more to spread awareness

of the river and the challenges

it faces.

Many community teams and

individuals are competing to

raise funds. Team Long Haul

is in the lead, with Reading

Ripples and Team Headwaters

coming in second and third for

raising funds.

To learn more about the

Paddle-a-Thon and how you

can support the good work of

keeping the river flowing with

clean, plentiful, swimmable

water, please visit ipswichriver.

org/paddle-a-Thon. If you want

to show your support by donating

on behalf of another

Paddle Raiser, you can read

their stories and find the donation

link at https://app.etapestry.com

/onlineforms/Ipswich

RiverWatershedAssociat/

PAT2021give.html

This year the Paddle-a-Thon

will wrap up with a party for the

Paddle Raisers on June 19 at the

Topsfield Fairground, Lot E, Rt.

97 entrance from 3-7 p.m.

Activities will include a

guided history walk, the Grand

Wenham Canal Race and a party

with music, Dylan & Pete’s Ice

Cream and Ipswich Ale Beer. If

you plan to attend, please register

on the website.

The Ipswich River provides

the drinking water for 14

local communities, including

Beverly and Salem. Each year,

since 2016, the event raises

funds from a combination of

corporate sponsorship and individual

donors to support

IRWA’s Clean Water Program,

including RiverWatch, a volunteer

water-quality monitoring

program.

American Rivers named the

Ipswich River among America’s

Most Endangered Rivers of

2021, citing the grave threat to

our regional water security in

the context of climate change.

https://www.ipswichriver.org/

endangered/

COURTESY PHOTO | IPSWICH RIVER WATER ASSOCIATION

Amy MacNulty enjoyed raising money on behalf of the Ipswich River Water Association.

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Ken MacNulty pauses at Pavilion Beach in Ipswich.


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Sports

Lynnfield’s Weaver learning the ropes under

USGA Boatwright Internship

By Mike Alongi

Lynnfield native Abbie

Weaver’s relationship with the

game of golf has evolved over

the years, and what started as a

leisurely activity with her father

and sister a few times a summer

as a kid has now turned into a

true career path.

Since April, Weaver has been

working as a women’s events

intern for Mass Golf under the

United States Golf Association’s

(USGA) P.J. Boatwright

Internship.

“It’s an incredible honor to be

given the opportunity to get this

internship and work with Mass

Golf,” said Weaver, who graduated

from UMass-Amherst’s

Isenberg School of Management

in 2020 with a degree in sport

management and marketing.

“I’m excited to gain a more

comprehensive knowledge of

the game of golf and to grow my

network within the golf community.

I also look forward to

working with female golfers in

hopes of growing representation

and leadership within our demographic

in the sport.”

The internship’s namesake,

P.J. Boatwright, was the USGA’s

third executive director and was

one of the sport’s key founders

in terms of developing golf in

the United States. Boatwright

was an amateur player, a rules

expert and served as the executive

director of the Carolinas

Golf Association prior to joining

the USGA in 1959. Boatwright

was a recipient of the USGA’s

highest honor in the Bob Jones

Award, and was also enshrined

in the South Carolina Athletic

Hall of Fame, the Wofford

College Hall of Fame and the

Carolinas Golf Hall of Fame,

among other honors.

The USGA is funding 135 internships

across its network of

59 Allied Golf Associations in

2021 through the P.J. Boatwright

Internship program. Currently,

one-third of all state and regional

golf association staff members

are alumni of the Boatwright

program. That number includes

21 AGA executive directors and

16 USGA staff members.

This year also marks the

30th anniversary of the P.J.

Boatwright intern program. The

USGA has invested more than

$30 million into the program

since it launched in 1991, and

those efforts have helped to

propel the careers of more than

3,000 individuals.

Weaver never really focused

too much on golf during her

high school days, as she was

busy being a three-sport athlete

and team captain in soccer, basketball

and softball at Lynnfield

COURTESY PHOTO | ABBIE WEAVER

Lynnfield native Abbie Weaver has been working as a women’s events intern for Mass Golf

under the USGA’s P.J. Boatwright Internship since April.

High. But as the years went

on — and especially last year

during the pandemic — Weaver

found that golf was really the

only place she could meet with

and see her friends and family in

a safe, fun atmosphere.

“I didn’t focus on golf as much

because I was so busy doing my

other sports, but I always loved

and had a really strong respect

for the game,” said Weaver.

“With the pandemic last summer,

it was really a great way to see

friends and family, and eventually

I was playing probably once

a week.”

That eventually led to her

applying for a job within Mass

Golf’s First Tee program. After

she didn’t get the position, she

figured that was the end of that.

But then First Tee Director of

Operations Kyle Harris called

her back and said there was an

opening in the internship program

which would suit her much

better.

And so now she finds herself

working women’s events and

tournaments for Mass Golf, including

hosting women’s clinics

during National Women in Golf

Day on June 1. She works hand

in hand with Mass Golf Manager

of Women’s Events and Player

Development Naomi Nesenoff.

“(Nesenoff) has so much experience

and she has been such

a great person to work for,” said

Weaver. “Being a woman in the

sports industry is always going

to be about growing our representation

within the game, so it’s

nice to be able to make a small

impact on that.”

One of the big things that

sticks out to Weaver is that of the

six Boatwright interns this year,

three of them are women — the

highest number for one year in

the program’s history.

And for Weaver, someone

who is relatively late coming

into the world of golf, there were

never any feelings of unwelcomeness

or awkwardness when

she showed up to the Mass Golf

offices.

“Golf is such a tight-knit community

and everyone knows everyone,

more so than any other

sport I know of,” said Weaver.

“That’s really intimidating as

someone who’s fairly new to

the game in this capacity, but

everyone has been so welcoming

and helpful. Most of the

people on the staff are former

Boatwright interns as well,

so they all know where we’re

coming from and they’ve incredibly

helpful.”

As for what’s next, Weaver

will be spending the next month

or so bouncing around the office

to different departments and getting

a taste of what other aspects

of the organization are like. In

addition, she’ll be doing a lot of

preparation work for all of the

summer tournaments coming

up.

“It’s going to be an exciting

time for me because I’ll be able

to bounce around and see how

the big championships are run,

then I’ll also get to see how

some of the tournament setup

things are done and see what

all the other departments are

doing,” she said. “My goal is to

just keep gaining experience and

knowledge about how the operations

side of the game works.”


JUNE 17, 2021

PHOTOS | JULIA HOPKINS

Lynnfield softball seniors Reilly Ganter, left, and Chloe Shapleigh, right, were honored prior to

the Pioneers’ win on Senior Night last Wednesday.

Lynnfield softball battles

back to win on Senior Night

SOFTBALL

By Daniel Kane

LYNNFIELD — The

Lynnfield softball team had

to come back three times, but

in the end it survived to close

the regular season with a 10-9

win over visiting Pentucket on

Senior Night.

“It’s a nice way to end the

season with a win, especially

for the seniors,” Lynnfield

coach Peter Marinelli said.

The Pioneers got the bats

going in this one with 13 hits

and shut down Pentucket when

it needed to after taking a slim

lead in the last three innings.

“We hadn’t (been hitting) for

a few games and when we did

we were also giving up a lot of

runs,” Marinelli said. “We had

opportunities and you’ve got to

take advantage of them when

you can.

“The last three innings,

we were playing our best defense,”

Marinelli said, “Which

obviously always makes a difference.

If you’re playing good

defense it picks everybody up.”

Before the game Lynnfield

honored its pair of seniors —

shortstop Chloe Shapleigh

and pitcher Reilly Ganter —

for their contributions to the

program.

“I couldn’t be prouder

of them,” Marinelli said.

“They’ve given 100 percent

every day from day one. If we

had played last year, Chloe

would’ve been in the program

for five years. And Reilly

played her freshman year as a

first baseman before starting to

pitch two years ago.”

Both put on a great performance

Wednesday. Ganter

pitched all seven innings and

gave up 12 hits (none coming

in the last three innings with

a lead) while walking two and

striking out seven. At the plate,

Ganter also had a pair of RBI.

Shapleigh went 3-for-4 with an

RBI and three runs scored and,

on the defensive side, made a

crucial leaping grab on a line

drive in the fifth inning.

Celia Carbone drove in a

team-high three runs. Laruen

Amico had an RBI and two

runs scored. Ava Gamache

scored two runs.

Pentucket jumped right on

Lynnfield with three runs in

the first inning but the Pioneers

started just as hot.

Ava Gamache and Shapleigh

rattled off hits in the first and

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 11

Ganter brought them both

home with a two-run single.

Lauren Amico singled next and

Carbone laced a two-run single

to put Lynnfield up 4-3.

But Pentucket didn’t slow

down, tacking on another four

runs in the second to go back

ahead 7-3.

Lynnfield responded in the

third. Shapleigh, Ganter and

Carbone all singled to bring

across one run and the Pioneers

scored two more runs to tie the

game at 7-7.

Pentucket went ahead 8-7

in the fourth, but it was all

Pioneers from there.

Gamache singled and

Shapleigh plated her on a single

to tie things up. From there,

Amico singled to bring home

Shapleigh and scored herself

thanks to some smart baserunning

on a rundown after a walk

from Carbone to put Lynnfield

ahead 10-8.

From there, Ganter cruised

through two straight innings

and although Pentucket pushed

across one run in the seventh,

a nice catch by Ava Marotta in

left field sealed the game.

Lynnfield finishes the season

at 8-5 and waits for state tournament

seeding.

Lynnfield stays hot on

the court coming down

the stretch of season

TENNIS

By Mike Alongi

The Lynnfield boys and

girls tennis teams are coming

down the home stretch of their

respective seasons, with one

match left on the docket for

each. The Lynnfield boys won

both of their matches over the

past week, while the Pioneers

girls won two of their three

matches.

On the boys side, the Pioneers

beat Manchester-Essex 4-1

last Wednesday. Lynnfield got

wins from Jamil Khodr (6-1,

6-0) and Dan Levin (6-1, 6-2)

in singles and in doubles by

David Kasdon and Jason Yang

(6-3, 7-6, 7-4) and Rafik Khodr

and Russell Kasdon (6-1, 7-6,

7-4).

Monday saw Lynnfield take

home a 5-0 win over Pentucket

to remain undefeated on the

year. The Pioneers (10-0) were

flawless in singles, with Jamil

Khodr, Dan Levin and David

Kasdon all winning 6-0, 6-0.

In doubles, Connor Sohop

and David Picavilli (6-2,

6-1) and Anthony Zhang and

Nick Jacops (6-1, 6-0) won in

singles.

For the girls, Lynnfield

dropped a close 3-2 match

to Manchester-Essex last

Wednesday. The Pioneers got

wins from Anna Radulski in

third singles (6-3, 6-2) and the

doubles team of Emily Goguen

and Lauren Grava (3-6,7-5,

10-5).

The next day, Lynnfield

notched a 5-0 win over

Amesbury. The Pioneers

blanked their Cape Ann League

foes thanks to singles wins

from Emma Gallucci (6-0,

6-1), Ava Buonfiglio (6-4,

6-2) and Anna Radulski (6-0,

6-0) and doubles wins from

the team of Emily Goguen and

Lauren Graba (6-2, 6-0) and

the team of Genna Gioioso and

Gabi Mellor (6-1, 6-2).

The Pioneers earned a close

win of their own on Monday,

taking down Pentucket 3-2.

The Pioneers (9-3) sneaked

by their Cape Ann League rivals

during an indoor match

at Woburn Racket Club. Anna

Radulski (6-1, 6-1) got a win

in third singles while Emily

Goguen and Lauren Graba

(6-2, 6-2) and Genna Gioioso

and Gabi Mellor (6-4, 6-2) got

the wins in doubles play.

Both teams closed out their

respective regular seasons with

rivalry matches against North

Reading Tuesday afternoon.

COURTESY PHOTO | JOHN DIAS

The Lynnfield Hurricanes youth softball team, coached by Kelly

Pagliuca, just completed a strong season. The Hurricanes are

made up of Delaney Bowen, Hayden Bayer, Avary Brangiforte,

Gianna Briggs, Sawyer Field, Molly Geary, Lily McKanas,

Charlotte McManus, Leah Nguyen, Olivia O’Connor and

Madeline Sullivan.

COURTESY PHOTO | JOHN DIAS

The Lynnfield Wolfpack youth softball team, coached by Kelly Giardullo, wrapped

up its season last week. The Hurricanes are made up of Tracey DeLeo, Andrea

Dockery, Stacey D’Onofrio, Allison Farraher, Lauren Gentile, Sheri Gentile, Kelly

Giardullo, Keith Knox, Crystal Lavino, Karen Costin, Tara Mancini, Dennis

Marrone, Kara Pagliuca, Michael Palmer, Brian Regan and Theordora Roumeliotis.

COURTESY PHOTO | JOHN DIAS

The Lynnfield Firecrackers youth softball team, coached by Adam Mancini, has

seen its season come to a close. The Hurricanes are made up of Cassie Angilly,

Alyssa Attubato, Lilly Briggs, Sofia Elliott, Emma Esposito, Kiley Flynn, Nora

Hutter, Emily Kayola, Anna Lawler, Belle Maccini and Violet Morreira.


12

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 17, 2021

Capping off the year with a win

PHOTOS | Julia Hopkins

The Lynnfield softball team participates in an honor ceremony prior to the Senior Day game

against Pentucket on June 9.

Chloe Shapleigh runs home after rounding the bases. She was

honored on Senior Day along with Reilly Ganter.

Lynnfield third-base player Ava Marotta keeps and eye on the

ball in the June 9 matchup against Pentucket.

Lynnfield’s Reilly Ganter pitches to Pentucket. Lynnfield won the game.

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JUNE 17, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 13

Capping off the year with a win

PHOTOS | Julia Hopkins

Lynnfield senior Chloe Shapleigh returns to the dugout.

Senior Riley Ganter is honored with her family during Lynnfield softball Senior Day.

Lynnfield’s Riley Ganter hits the ball during the Senior Day game against Pantucket.

Lynnfield’s Abi Travers played first base as a Pentucket runner

waits to run during the June 9 game.

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14

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 17, 2021

Red Cross facing severe blood shortage

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WAKEFIELD — Lynnfield

residents are urged to donate

blood on Monday, June 21, 2-7

p.m. at the Crystal Community

Club, 77 Preston St., and on

Friday, June 25, 1-6 p.m. at the

Wakefield Masonic Building,

370 Salem St.

The American Red Cross is

experiencing a severe blood

shortage as the number of trauma

cases, organ transplants and elective

surgeries rise – and deplete

the nation’s blood inventory.

Donors of all blood types – especially

type O and those giving

platelet – are urged to make an

appointment to give as soon as

possible to prevent further impact

to patients.

Right now, hospitals are responding

to an atypically high

number of traumas and emergency

room visits, as well as

overdoses and resulting transplants.

In comparison to 2019,

the Red Cross has seen demand

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more advanced disease progression,

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Blood is perishable and cannot be

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lynfldha@comcast.net

The Lynnfield Housing Authority is seeking qualified applicants for a responsible

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candidate will be responsible to perform all the necessary administrative and

clerical work to support the State Aided Housing Programs (667&689). Duties

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JUNE 17, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 15

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16

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JUNE 17, 2021

Land Court sides with town versus Clear Water

By Anne Marie Tobin

LYNNFIELD — The town

has prevailed in an important

Land Court case filed by Boston

Clear Water Company, LLC.

The company is challenging

a Zoning Board of Appeals

(ZBA) decision that BCW is

not a “public water supply”

as defined by the town zoning

bylaws and, as such, is not allowed

use “as of right.”

The decision essentially prevents

Clear Water (BCW) from

expanding its operations.

“This is a very significant

win for the town because a loss

would have entitled Clear Water

to operate its business anywhere

in Lynnfield as of right (regardless

of zoning), except the

Elderly Housing District,” said

Town Counsel Tom Mullen.

“The company could have expanded

its operation onto the

adjoining two lots, which it or

related entities have purchased,

and could have purchased and

branched out to other lots,

perhaps even non-contiguous

ones.”

Clear Water challenged the

ZBA’s decision with an appeal

in Land Court, titled Boston

Clear Water Company, LLC

versus Shaffer. The town filed a

motion for summary judgment.

Justice Jennifer Roberts

ruled in favor of the town on

June 1, dismissing the action

with prejudice.

The decision upheld the

ZBA’s interpretation under the

town’s zoning bylaws that a

“public water supply” means

a water system operated by a

public entity, not a private entity

like BCW. The ZBA argued

that its interpretation, based on

well-established law, is reasonable

and entitled to deference.

In response, Clear Water contended

that the ZBA interpretation

was preempted primarily

by state drinking water regulations

and was arbitrary. The

court disagreed.

“This much seems clear to

the court: There is no expressed

intent that these regulations preempt

local zoning in the siting of

public water supplies,” Roberts

wrote. “To the contrary, the regulations

embrace local zoning

and non-zoning controls as a

means of fostering their goal of

safe, fit and pure water… add to

this the long history of land use

as a subject of local regulations,

and the conclusion that the

ZBL (zoning bylaw) is not preempted

by state law insofar as it

defines ‘public water supply’ is

inescapable.”

Roberts found that BCW’s interpretation

would require that

other businesses with transient

non-community water systems

be treated as public water systems,

and thus, allowable as of

right in every zoning district in

FILE PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Charles Gonzalez of Peabody fills up his five-gallon jug with

spring water from a Boston Clear Spring Water dispenser on

Lowell Street.

the town. This would affect not

just Clear Water, but also other

transient water systems, including

restaurants, parks, golf

courses and community centers.

“BCW’s interpretation, which

in contrast to the interpretation

adopted by the ZBA would

wreak havoc with the town’s

Table of Use Regulations, is

unreasonable,” Roberts wrote.

“The ZBA’s interpretation that

‘public water supply’ means

a water system operated by a

public-sector entity — not private

or commercial entity — is

reasonable and in accord with

the two public water supply

companies (Lynnfield Water

District and the Lynnfield

Center Water District) and the

Water Company in town.”

The court noted that both

water districts serve “municipal

purposes,” while BCW has only

one service connection — to

the house of a former owner of

the business — and that it was

not designated as a transient

non-community public water

system until 2012. The court

also noted that BCW owners

and operators considered their

businesses to be private water

supply companies in their annual

filings with the Board of

Health for permits “to engage in

the business of manufacturing

or bottling carbonated...spring

water.” Assessor’s records filed

by BCW and predecessors indicate

it serves a “store” use.

The court also rejected

BCW’s contention that, because

it makes its products available

to the general public, it constitutes

a “public water supply.”

Mullen noted that the case

had ramifications for another

Land Court case filed by abutter

William O’Brien against the

ZBA (O’Brien v Shaffer).

O’Brien was contesting the

board’s finding of a lawful, preexisting

nonconforming use.

The case, which had been consolidated

with BCW’s, was severed

and is still in progress.

“Had the town lost in this

case, Mr. O’Brien’s case would

probably have been dismissed

as moot,” said Mullen.

Clear Water has 30 days to

appeal the decision.

“I think they will appeal as

they appeal everything,” Mullen

said. “Legal costs never seem to

be an issue for them. I believe

the chances of success are extremely

slim, but the results —

if they are successful — could

be significant for them.”

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