15.07.2021 Views

Falstaff Magazin International 00/2021

You also want an ePaper? Increase the reach of your titles

YUMPU automatically turns print PDFs into web optimized ePapers that Google loves.

summer 2021

WINE FOOD TRAVEL

CALIFORNIA

WINE COUNTRY

REVISITED

EATING OUT

25 MUST-VISIT

RESTAURANTS

MASAI MARA

AFRICA’S GREAT

SPECTACLE

A New Beginning

07 07

07

07 07

COME AND JOIN US ON OUR ADVENTURE

01/2021

€ 12.– | $ 17.– | £ 10.–

WWW.FALSTAFF.COM

99 004524 9 004524 9000851

9004524 000851

000851

07


photo © Martin Wacht


@SunSquareInternational


RIEDEL.COM


“IT IS WINE TIME!“

11 TH AND 10 TH GENERATION RIEDEL ENJOY NAPA VALLEY CABERNET

IN THE VARIETAL SPECIFIC RIEDEL WINEWINGS GLASS.


POLARIS MARINER

MEMOVOX


WELCOME TO THE HOUSE OF GÜBELIN –

LET YOURSELF BE INSPIRED

gubelin.com


SeaQ

Dive into the Original


DEEPLY INSPIRED

Let yourself be inspired by floral creations from the “Lily Dew” line .

Cabochon-cut coloured gems reminiscent of delicate drops of dew glistening on a lily.

Find out more about the new line at gubelin.com / lilydew.

Gübelin – Swiss and family-owned since 1854


ESCAPE TO NATURE

Find me at my happy place!

Between rolling meadows, uncut forest and mountain wilderness,

nature hotel Forsthofgut in Leogang is an idyllic Alpine retreat.

The perfect hospitality extends from exquisite organic and local cuisine to spa treatments in

Europe‘s first waldSPA, a forest spa with a seperate adults only and family & kids area.

The nature is waiting for you!

NATURE HOTEL FORSTHOFGUT | LEOGANG, AUSTRIA

WWW.FORSTHOFGUT.AT/EN


waldSPA Escape

waldSPA ADULTS ONLY

DELICACIES MARKET

3-5 nights

12 th September – 2 nd October 2021

from Euro 855 per person

BOOK NOW

SURROUNDED BY NATURE

waldSPA FAMILY & KIDS

ROOMS & SUITES IN

EXCLUSIVE DESIGN


EDITORIAL FALSTAFF

INTERNATIONAL

Welcome

Dear Readers!

It is with real pleasure and quite some excitement that we present the very

first edition of Falstaff International Magazine to you. We believe there is

nothing quite like it in the world of publishing: an accessible yet luxurious

magazine founded entirely on the joyful trinity of wine, food and travel.

Our inaugural cover, quite fittingly, is titled A New Beginning. When we first

defined the overarching theme for this first issue, way back in spring, still locked

down, it came naturally. For us, of course, it is the start of a new publishing

venture, but our main stories also revolve around fresh starts, new directions

or alternative perspectives.

wolfgang M. Rosam

Publisher

wolfgang.rosam@falstaff.com

@RosamWolfgang

Our project is unusual: we are new but by no means a start-up. Founded

in 1980 as a wine magazine in Austria, Falstaff today is an established media

platform with leading publications in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

This brand-new English language edition thus unites a depth of experience

with a fresh, young and global outlook.

We take you around the world with this jam-packed issue: through European

and Californian vineyards, via an African safari to the Mediterranean and

back home into your kitchen with some recipes. Let us be your inside track to

a whole world of pleasure. No matter where on this globe you are, welcome

to the world of Falstaff and our community.

Here’s to you,

ANNE KREBIEHL MW

Editor-in-Chief

anne.krebiehl@falstaff.com

@Anneinvino

Photos: Helge Kirchberger, Ian Ehm

wolfgang M. Rosam

Publisher

ANNE KREBIEHL MW

Editor-in-Chief

summer 2021

falstaff

13


WWW.FALSTAFF.COM

07 07

07

99 004524 9 004524 9000851

9004524 000851

000851

07

INT_AT_2001_Cover.indd 1 07.07.21 10:48

9 004524 000851

07 07

SUMMER 2021

108

Eating out: our globetrotting

gourmet‘s absolute bucketlist

of 25 must-visit places.

/ summer 2021

CALIFORNIA

WINE COUNTRY

REVISITED

WINE FOOD TRAVEL

EATING OUT

25 MUST-VISIT

RESTAURANTS

MASAI MARA

AFRICA’S GREAT

SPECTACLE

COVER

PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK

A New Beginning

COME AND JOIN US ON OUR ADVENTURE

01/2021

€ 12.– | $ 15.– | £ 10.–

18

California: topography and the

proximity to the Pacific Ocean

determine viticulture.

40

Ribera del Duero: formerly

marginal areas come to the fore .

WINE

16 WINE NEWS

18 BIRTH OF A LEGEND

Supertuscans: how Tuscany's wines

have changed and keep evolving

26 THINK DIFFERENTLY

Guest contributor Angelo Gaja shares the

insights that made him succeed

28 BORDEAUX: TAKING A FRESH LOOK

We revisit the region and find much to be

excited about

40 RIBERA DEL DUERO:

THE NEW FRESHNESS

The move to higher altitudes, towards more

freshness and elegance

50 CALIFORNIA DREAMING

Napa and Sonoma are easily typecast

but defy all stereotypes

58 PROFILE: CARLO MONDAVI AT RAEN

The family story continues on California's

Sonoma Coast

60 RIESLING RELOADED

A global tour and reassesment of this

thrilling grape variety

70 CELEBRITY WINES

A closer look at this global phenomenon

176

The best Proseccos tasted

and scored: pleasure for

every occasion

Photos: Lauren di Matteo, © 2020 JAK WONDERLY PHOTOGRAPHY, @ 2019 Carlos Sanchez Benayas/Shutterstock, Othmar Kiem, Getty Images/ 2012 AFP, WWW.POV.AT, Shutterstock

14 falstaff summer 2021


international

140

Kenya: the great migration –

one of nature's greatest

spectacles.

fOOD

80 food News

82 tasting the Ocean

Recipes for oysters, lobster and

octopus from top chefs

90 beef breeds

The differences between beef

breeds and why they matter

96 smoke signals

Three enticing reasons to fire up

the grill: pork, prawns and steak

106 lily cook's

kitchen jottings

Clams: tenacity and balance

108 eat your heart out

The ultimate bucket-list: 25 mustvisit

restaurants around the globe

114 six pack

Six restaurants visited, reviewed

and scored

120 The multitalent

Why Alain Ducasse is not only a

brilliant chef but a global brand

TRavel

130 Travel News

132 french riviera

The eternal charm of the Côte Azur

140 the great migration

Safari in Kenya’s Masai Mara

148 Austria: top 9 summer

destinations

156 Finding grüner veltliner

A wine tour in Lower Austria

THE REST

78 the lighthouse column

124 letter from new york

Guest column: Aldo Sohm

126 ESSAY: Come outside

Forest bathing explored

164 GOURMET ELDORADO

166 SINGLE MALT SCOTCH

Even classics push boundaries

204 THE DREGS

120

Alain Ducasse:

a portrait of the

chef who became

a global brand.

156

Travelling to where

Grüner Veltliner grows:

a wine tour.

13 editorial

174 contributors

TASTINGS

176 Prosecco

186 supertuscans

THE next falstaff issue IS OUT ON 17 SEPTEMBER 2021

166

All that is new in single malt

Scotch Whisky.

summer 2021

falstaff

15


More news

Get news directly into your inbox

with our newsletter. Sign up at

falstaff.com/newsletter/

WINE

HILL OF GRACE

2016 RELEASED

Considered one of Australia’s most

iconic wines, Hill of Grace Shiraz

was made from 161-year-old vines,

planted in 1860 on Gnadenberg, a single

vineyard in South Australia’s Eden Valley,

named after a Lutheran church. Henschke

Cellars released it alongside Mount Edelstone

Shiraz, also from a single site, planted

in 1912. “The 2016 vintage will be recognised

for deeply coloured, plush, dark-fruited

wines, which are concentrated, complex,

vibrant and energetic,“ Stephen Henschke

said who runs the estate with his wife Prue

and son Johann. henschke.com.au

PORT COCKTAILS NOW

AVAILABLE IN HIP CANS

Two Port houses have released ready-todrink

cocktails in 250 ml cans. Both use

tonic water as a mixer: Croft presents its

Pink Port & Tonic, while Taylor‘s Port

offers Chip Dry & Tonic, one of Portugal‘s

most popular aperitifs made with white

Port. Adrian Bridge, CEO of the Fladgate

Partnership which owns both brands, hopes

that the cans “will help to bring more consumers

to appreciate Port wine.“ Considered

a world-first, the cans will be available

in the UK, the US and Portugal and, said

Bridge, “demonstrate the versatility and

range of Port wine.“

fladgatepartnership.com

CALL AND PETITION

FOR PINK WINE EMOJI

The producers of Chiaretto di Bardolino, Italy‘s

most popular dry rosé wine, have called

for the creation of a pink wine emoticon.

Pictograms for white, red and sparkling

wine already exist. An online petition is live

and an application has been filed to the

Unicode Consortium. chiaretto.pink

16 falstaff summer 2021


NEWS

Photos: Hill of Grace - Dragan Radocaj Photography , Louis Roederer/Emmanuel Allaire, 2020_RICHARD BRIGGS, provided

© UniWien, IfGR

"2013 has everything:

the precision, the salinity,

the raciness. It‘s a gift

from nature."

JEAN-BAPTISTE LÉCAILLON, CELLAR MASTER

CRISTAL 2013 LAUNCHED

Champagne Louis Roederer released the 2013

vintage of its prestige cuvée Cristal. From a

cooler year, its restrained and pure yet expressive

nature epitomises the sleekness and

elegance the house is known for. Cellar master

Lécaillon called it “Cristal of Cristals plus.“

louis-roederer.com

AUSTRIAN

VINEYARDS

MAPPED

The Austrian Wine Marketing Board (AWMB) has released the

world’s first digital wine atlas covering an entire wine-producing

country. The digital map, released in June, features all legally

defined appellations of origin and drills down to single vineyard

detail . It also contains statistical information.

austrianvineyards.com

Elevation: 266-708 m

Ortswein («villages» wine): -

Winegrowing municipality: -

Winegrowing cadastral municipality: -

Ried (single vineyard): -

Ried within a Ried: -

DOMAINES OTT RELEASE ÉTOILE ROSÉ

Étoile 2020 is the second release of this prestige Provençal rosé.

Partially matured in ceramic vats to aid the “precise definition of fruit,“

the wine was crafted to express the essence of each of the three

estates that make up Domaines Ott in the south of France: “The elegance

of Château de Selle, the salinity and crisp fruit of Clos Mireille

and the structure and the body of Château Romassan,” explained

winemaker Jean-Francois Ott. The wine retails at EUR 110/£100.

domaines-ott.com

teep slopes of Südsteiermark characterise one of the most charming

e home to a large number of white grape varieties that serve as the

tandout wine, however, is the Sauvignon Blanc that is influenced by

sites. The slate soils in the Sausal hills are also a unique feature here.

NEW SUBREGIONS DEFINED

FOR CHIANTI CLASSICO

After years of discussions, the Chianti

Classico Wine Consortium has approved

smaller geographic denominations

(UGAs). The move will allow the names

of 16 villages within the Chianti Classico

production zone to be named on the

label. The villages which have been

defined as Unità Geografiche Aggiuntive,

or UGAs, are Castellina, Castelnuovo

Berardenga, Gaiole, Greve, Lamole,

Montefioralle, Panzano, Radda, San Casciano,

San Donato in Poggio (including

the territories of Barberino Tavarnelle

and Poggibonsi) and Vagliagli. According

to the Consortium, they are “distinguishable

on the basis of specific criteria

such as oenological recognisability,

historical authenticity, renown and significance

in terms of volumes produced.”

The move is designed to “stimulate

demand by differentiating supply.“

Initially these villages can only be named

on wines that meet the Chianti Classico

Gran Selezione standards, a superior

denomination introduced in 2013.

chianticlassico.com

NEW ZEALAND HAILS 2021

VINTAGE BUT FEARS SHORTAGE

The island nation reported a 19% drop in

harvest volume compared to 2020.

“While the quality is exceptional, the

overall smaller harvest means many of

our wineries will face tough decisions

over who they can supply in their key

markets. There is going to be some supply

and demand tension because of this,”

said Philip Gregan, CEO of New Zealand

Winegrowers. nzwine.com

summer 2021

falstaff

17


wine / SUPERTUSCANS

BIRTH OF A

Tignanello, Sassicaia, Flaccianello, Cepparello, Pergole Torte: all these top Italian wines were once

created in protest against obsolete winemaking regulations. This represented a fresh start for

Tuscany and led not only to new wine styles, but a reassessment of Tuscany‘s indigenous grape,

Sangiovese. A win-win situation for the region that is once again forging ahead.

WORDS OTHMAR KIEM

Photo: Shutterstock

18 falstaff summer 2021


LEGEND

Florence

Rome

TUSCANY

Italy

Tuscany still has the same

breath-taking landscape as

ever. The wines, however, have

evolved massively over

the past 50 years.

summer 2021

falstaff

19


wine / SUPERTUSCANS

San Felice in Chianti Classico’s

south: a wonderful Borgo with

wine estate, hotel and fine

dining restaurant.

Vignorello di San Felice is the

forefather of all Supertuscans –

this is where it all started.

It was the British Master of Wine

Nicolas Belfrage who first coined the

term in the mid-1980s. He dubbed

the range of new wines that had

emerged in Tuscany in the preceding

years as Supertuscans. Until then, Italian

wine had steadily gone downhill. Its most

famous proponent was Chianti Classico –

deep in crisis and marketed at ridiculously

low prices. At the time, Italy was not

considered a country of fine wine. Where

red wine was concerned, France, with

Bordeaux and Burgundy, towered over

everything; apart from that there were

perhaps a handful of exotic wines that had

some standing.

CHANGING TRADITIONS

At that time, production regulations for

Chianti Classico still stipulated that white

grapes like Trebbiano or Malvasia Bianca

had to form part of the blend alongside the

traditional red varieties Sangiovese,

Canaiolo and Colorino. For the steadily

Photos: Bruno Bruchi Photo, Martino Balestreri, Maurizio Gjivovich , Andrea Getuli ,

20 falstaff summer 2021


AT THE TIME, SANGIOVESE WAS CONSIDERED TOO WEAK TO MAKE GOOD

WINE ON ITS OWN, MERLOT AND CABERNET WERE SUPPOSED TO REMEDY

THAT. YET SOME STILL FIRMLY BELIEVED IN TUSCANY’S INDIGENOUS VARIETY.

growing number of winegrowers who

wanted to show that great, long-lived red

wines could be produced in Tuscany, this

antiquated regulation which prized

quantity over quality was an insurmountable

obstacle. Thus, the idea was born to

produce a wine solely from red grapes.

Enzo Morganti, oenologist and director of

the San Felice winery in southern Chianti

Classico, took the first step: from the 1968

vintage onwards, he produced a wine only

from Sangiovese, which he called Vigorello.

Initially, however, the wine world took little

notice.

This changed abruptly three years later.

The Marchesi Antinori, then as now one of

the leading brands of Italian wine, presented

their Tignanello in 1971 – made

entirely without white grapes and in this

first vintage exclusively from Sangiovese. It

was not until the next vintage, 1974, that

Cabernet Sauvignon was added. Because

the wine did not comply with existing

regulations, it was not allowed to be

labelled Chianti Classico: the mandatory

white varieties were missing. The solution

was easy: Tignanello was simply declared

as vino da tavola, as a table wine, because

in this category everything was

allowed. There were over

130,000 bottles of the

first vintage, and they

sold like hot cakes

- even though the

price for Tignanello

was five times

that of a Chianti Classico Riserva. In the

mid-1970s, Antinori also took over the

distribution of Sassicaia, produced by

Incisa della Rocchetta in Bolgheri, which

was still completely unknown at the time:

a red wine made from Cabernet Sauvignon

and Cabernet Franc, without any Sangiovese

at all – an absolute novelty for Tuscany.

AN IDEA TAKES FLIGHT

At the end of the 1960s,

Sergio Manetti, a successful

industrialist from Milan,

bought an abandoned

farmhouse near Radda

which he

converted into a

holiday home.

<

Martino Manetti continues making wine

in the same clear vein as his father

Sergio at Montevertine Estate.

summer 2021

falstaff

21


wine / SUPERTUSCANS

With its with its Coltassala bottling, Castello

di Volpaia, high in the hills above the tiny

village of Radda in Chianti, was amongst the

first to produce a Supertuscan.

<

Surrounding the house were some

vineyards from which he produced wine.

At first, his Montevertine was still labelled

as Chianti Classico.

But then he fell out with the Consorzio,

the powerful association that sets the

production rules, because he too wanted

to use only red varieties. With the 1977

vintage, Pergole Torte finally debuted –

made exclusively from Sangiovese and, of

course, labelled as vino da tavola. Just as

Tignanello became the first Supertuscan

based on Sangiovese and a little Cabernet

Sauvignon, Pergole Torte has since been

considered the model for all pure Sangiovese

wines. By the early 1980s, a tipping

PRICE DECLINE AND

SOCIETAL CHANGE –

THE VITICULTURAL

CRISIS OF THE 1970S

PROMPTED RADICAL

CHANGE.

Giovanni Poggiali

(o.) and Giuseppe

Mazzocolin brought

Fèlsina and its

Fontalloro to fame.

point was reached. A veritable flood of new

wines saw the light of day: I Sodi di San

Niccolò by Castellare (1977 vintage),

Cepparello by Isole e Olena and Sammarco

by Castello dei Rampolla (both 1980),

Flaccianello by Fontodi, Coltassala by

Volpaia, Camartina by Querciabella (all

1981), Cabreo by Rufino (1982) and

finally Fontalloro by Fèlsina

and Percarlo by San Giusto a

Rentennano (both 1983).

With these new vini da

tavola, Italy now

produced red wines for

the first time that could

“compete with the

world“, as Paolo de

Marchi of Isole e Olena

says. In the following years,

there seemed to be no limits

to creativity. Every winery

produced at least one Supertuscan. The

names often followed the well-known

models and ended in “-ello“ or “-aia“. Many

of these new creations have since quietly

disappeared. Nonetheless, the producers of

these first-wave Supertuscans are still

among the pioneers of modern Italian

viticulture and their wines – some of them

with cult status – are sought-after across

the globe.

With the amendment of Italian wine law,

these vini da tavola were classified as

Toscana IGT from 1995 onwards. In 1996

it became possible to produce Chianti

Classico DOCG exclusively from Sangiove-

Photos: Filippo Venturi, ANGELO TRANI, Bruno Bruchi Photo, beigestellt

22 falstaff

summer 2021


With their Cabreo botting,

Tenute Folonari followed the

style set by Tignanello.

se. Many Supertuscans could have been

declared Chianti Classico from that point

on. However, in view of the price difference

between the best Supertuscans and a

Chianti Classico, most producers continued

as before. In 2013, another attempt was

made to bring these prestigious wines back

into the fold with the introduction of the

new category Chianti Classico Gran

Selezione. Since then, some Supertuscans

have actually been labelled as Gran

Selezione, such as Coltassala from Volpaia

or Sassello from Castello di Verrazzano.

Giovanni Manetti of Fontodi, president of

the Consorzio Chianti Classico, hopes that

more wines will follow. But Renzo Cotarella

of Antinori is no fan of the idea. Tignanello,

he argues, has become a brand in its

own right after 50 years – and it should

stay that way.

<

SUPERTUSCANS

The wines are categorised

according to the grape

varieties they are made from.

SANGIOVESE & CABERNET / MERLOT

Antinori‘s Tignanello was the model for this

style and all follow a similar recipe: predominantly

Sangiovese with a little addition of

Cabernet or Merlot to lend power and density.

Famous wines of this style are: Cabreo

(Folonari), Siepi (Fonterutoli) and Camartina

(Querciabella).

Mr Flaccianello: Giovanni Manetti of

Fontodi. Recently he has started using

his own, home-made amphorae in

his cellar.

100 % SANGIOVESE

This style was pioneered by Sergio Manetti at

Montevertine with his Pergole Torte bottling.

These wines are in that same category: Flaccianello

(Fontodi), Percarlo (San Giusto a Rentennano),

Fontalloro (Fèlsina) and Cepparello (Isole

e Olena). More and more Chianti Classico Gran

Selezione wines also fall into the category.

CABERNET & CO.

WITHOUT SANGIOVESE

This was pioneered by Sassicaia in Bolgheri

and then popularised with Antinori’s Solaia

(the latter nonetheless always with a small

addition of Sangiovese). This category also

includes: d’Alceo (Castello dei Rampolla), Il

Pareto (Folonari), Mormoreto (Frescobaldi),

Apparita (Castello di Ama). Today, San Felice‘s

Vigorello is also made without Sangiovese.

Then there are Galatrona (Petrolo), Giorgio Primo

(Tenuta La Massa), Oreno (Sette Ponti) and

Andrea Franchetti’s wines at Tenuta di Trinoro.

summer 2021

falstaff

23


wine / SUPERTUSCANS

The rolling hills of

Tuscany‘s wine country.

24 falstaff summer 2021


BEST OF

SUPERTUSCANS

100

98

98

PERCARLO TOSCANA IGT 2016

San Giusto a Rentennano

Deep ruby colour. Extremely

appealing, multi-layered nose of

cigar box and cypress, then rich

notes of wild raspberry and black

cherry. Very full-bodied on the

palate with firm, sturdy tannin, very

well developed fruit, profound with

earthy notes on the finish, an

experience!

D’ALCEO TOSCANA IGT 2016

Castello dei Rampolla

Opaque purple colour. Opens with

slightly smoky notes, then lush

elderberry, cassis and liquorice. This

lines the palate richly with lots of

vivid fruit, opening with hearty,

gripping but layered tannin, fine,

earthy notes on the finish,

melting texture.

GIORGIO PRIMO TOSCANA IGT

2017, Tenuta La Massa

Rich, shimmering ruby colour with

a dark core. Intense nose with notes

of molasses and liquorice, then lots

of elderberry and cassis. Substantial

and dense, builds up in many layers,

firm and gripping, juicy and with real

drive on the finish.

99

98

98

TENUTA DI TRINORO TOSCANA

IGT 2018, Tenuta di Trinoro

Deep purple colour. Intense and

multi-layered nose, some mint, then

blackcurrant and blackberry,

compact but also fresh. Fills the

palate magnificently, mountains of

finely woven tannin, paired with juicy,

vivid fruit, very long finish.

FLACCIANELLO DELLA PIEVE

TOSCANA IGT 2017, Fontodi

Rich ruby colour. Compact, concentrated

nose of black truffle, blackberry,

a little black cherry, plus fine

balsamic tones. Powerful and

gripping on the palate, showing

powerful, layered tannins, wrapped

in a melting texture, rich and long, a

rough diamond that still needs to be

polished by time.

ORENO TOSCANA IGT 2018

Tenuta Sette Ponti

Rich, shimmering ruby colour with

purple reflections. Complex nose

with notes of cedar wood, black

truffle, then lots of cassis and

blackberry. Round and smooth on

the palate, shows beautifully

captured fruit, extremely precise,

fine, polished tannin, very long,

dark chocolate on the finish.

98

98

98

Fotos: Getty Images, Othmar Kiem

COLORE TOSCANA IGT 2018

Bibi Graetz

Powerful, bright ruby colour. Very

intense nose with accentuated spicy

notes, clove, blackberry, black

cherry, rich wild raspberry, balsamic

notes in the background. Dresses

the palate wonderfully, lots of silky,

very finely-woven tannin, lots of

juicy fruit, salty and long on the

finish.

GALATRONA MERLOT VAL

D’ARNO DI SOPRA DOC 2018

Petrolo

Rich ruby colour. Impressive nose, of

cigar box and cardamom, behind it

lots of rich berry fruit, exciting. Rolls

over the palate with a lot of presence

and tons of juicy fruit, opens

up in the middle with finely-woven,

layered tannins, long and polished.

SOLAIA TOSCANA IGT 2017

Antinori

Rich, impenetrable ruby colour with

a dark core. Compact and extremely

dense nose of ripe, dark currant,

mulberries, cardamom and some

beetroot. Rich and lush, lots of ripe

fruit, opens with dense, finely-woven

tannin, bedded on melting texture,

very long finish.

Up to € 20 / $ 30 € 21 – 30 / $ 31 – 40 € 31 – 50 / $ 41 – 60 € 50 – 100 / $ 61 – 110 € 100+ / $ 110+

summer 2021

falstaff

25


guest column / ANGELO GAJA

THINK

DIFFERENTLY

Angelo Gaja is the fourth-generation winemaker at his family estate Gaja in

Barbaresco, Piedmont, Italy. He revolutionised winemaking in his home region

and thus put Barbaresco on the map – which until then had been eclipsed by

its more famous neighbour Barolo. Here, Angelo Gaja shares the insights that

made him succeed and are still key to his world view.

WORDS ANGELO GAJA

Barbaresco has not had it easy in

the past. When compared with

Barolo, it only ever shone with

what it had less of: less body,

less structure, less perfume, less

alcohol, less ageability, less fascination.

Two aspects in particular have helped to

take it to the top: the winemakers’ commitment

in vineyard and cellar and climate

change – not all bad things come to an end.

It was climate change that helped the

Nebbiolo grape to reach full ripeness in

every vintage – not something that could be

taken for granted in the past – and it has

given Barbaresco just a little more

roundness along with harmony and

elegance. I would not be surprised if

Barbaresco wore the crown of il grande

classico italiano, the great Italian classic, in

the future.

PHILOSOPHIES

GAJA contributed to the rebirth of Barbaresco

in international markets in the 1960, 70s

and 80s when it still was the great unknown.

I was privileged because of the valuable

lessons I had learned from my grandmother

and my father – but I also formed some of

my own thoughts: think differently: if you

do as others do, you are like everyone else.

Cultivate the culture of doubt: do not rest

on certainty, you can always do more, you

can always do better. Learn to manage the

slight imperfections of wines made from

Nebbiolo without denying them: they help

"CULTIVATE THE

CULTURE OF DOUBT:

DO NOT REST ON

CERTAINTY, YOU CAN

ALWAYS DO MORE,

ALWAYS DO BETTER."

ANGELO GAJA

WINEMAKER

It was Gaja‘s pioneering actions in vineyard

and cellar that turned the fortune of an entire

region around. By looking at the world,

he understood his home; by taking the world as

his standard, he excelled. Quality has always

been his chief aim and today his wines

are sought-after across the globe.

reveal the origin, the identity of the wine.

Do not produce wines to please: do not

chase after opulence, majesty, excess but

calmly accept the judgements of those who

prefer other wines to Barbaresco. The label

reveals the personality of the producer: it is

the first message that the bottle conveys to

the consumer, it should not be wasted. Leave

it to the professional tasters to put their

noses in the glass: apply yourself instead to

tapping into the universe of wine that is

outside the glass.

LOOKING AHEAD

The future of GAJA is in the hands of

Gaia, Rossana and Giovanni, the fifth

generation. They will be the ones to carry

on the projects started in the Langhe hills

at altitudes above 500 metres – and on

Etna – with the aim of producing still

white wines (we have no interest in

producing sparkling wines). The challenge

of the children is to remain united, each

with their own task. This does not,

however, prevent them from increasing

their knowledge of vineyard, cellar and

market. They need to develop and combine

their thinking and planning together, with

originality and the uniqueness of artisanal

know-how. They need to be animated by

passion. As the great Piedmontese poet

Cesare Pavese wrote: “As long as you have

passion you will not cease to discover the

world.“ This also applies to the world of

wine.

gaja.com <

Photo: provided

26 falstaff summer 2021


T OSC A N A

20 years of Oreno

www.tenutasetteponti.it


wine / BORDEAUX

Paris

BORDEAUX

France

BORDEAUX:

TAKING A

FRESH LOOK

No other region epitomises wine as much as Bordeaux. It is home to some

of the world’s best, most long-lived and expensive wines. But are Bordeaux

wines really beyond the reach of any but the wealthiest wine lovers? Falstaff

investigates and finds a region that has much to offer in every respect.

WORDS DR ULRICH SAUTTER

Photo: 2018 SpiritProd33/Shutterstock

28 falstaff summer 2021


Summer sunrise over

Langoiran in the Entre

Deux Mers subregion of

Bordeaux, France.

summer 2021

falstaff

29


wine / BORDEAUX

The barrique cellar at

Château Latour where

precious wines mature in

perfect conditions. Right:

Jean Thienpont and Eric

Jeanneteau.

Whenever you call Jan

Thienpont on the

telephone, the first

thing you hear is the

whistling of the wind.

The winemaker and merchant is rarely

found in his office and mostly in the

vineyard. The 42-year-old tends the vines at

Château Robin in the appellation of Côtes

de Castillon and at Clos Fontaine in the

appellation of Côtes de Francs – and makes

wines at a price point of EUR 20 which are

artisanal and absolutely solid refutations of

the prejudice that Bordeaux wines are too

expensive.

But Thienpont is also an astute observer

of planet Bordeaux. There is not a single

aspect of the business he is not familiar

with. Like more than 50 other members of

the Thienpont family, he is co-owner of the

legendary Pomerol property Vieux Château

Certan, he also is a second nephew of both

Alexandre Thienpont, head of VCC, and of

Jacques Thienpont, the owner of cult estate

Le Pin. Yet, at the broking business he runs

with his brother Florian, he mainly

distributes wines from far less exalted

estates. The brothers’ wine range exemplifies

a Bordeaux that is steeped in expertise

and cultural

awareness. It is

exactly that kind

of unflashy

Bordeaux that was

trammelled twice over

the past 20 years: first it

was deliberately ignored by the

hype because it was neither blingy, exorbitant

or excessive. Then later, when the

hype turned into the backlash that is

Bordeaux-bashing, this quieter side of

Bordeaux was tarred with the same brush.

THIENPONT IS AN

ASTUTE OBSERVER

OF PLANET BORDEAUX.

THERE IS NOT A SINGLE

ASPECT OF THIS

BUSINESS HE IS NOT

FAMILIAR WITH.

HIDDEN

TALENTS

Bordeaux still has

estates that fly below

the radar. Xavier Piton’s

is one such example.

Striding across the gravel

courtyard of his Château Belles-Graves,

the art historian and oenologist leads

the way to the small tasting room where

the barrel samples of the 2020 vintage are

waiting. Piton does not sell his wines via

the Place de Bordeaux, the complex web of

middlemen, and thus is not part of the

usual en primeur business whereby

collectors buy the wine two years before it

is bottled and delivered. However, as

vigneron independent, or independent

winemaker, he has offered his clients the

option of advance sales for years: they pay

half the purchase price immediately and

the balance upon delivery of the goods in

two years’ time. Considering that a bottle

clearly costs less than EUR 20, this is an

attractive proposition. “I earn good money

this way,“ Piton says with a smile and

adjusts his statement: “Or rather, I should

be saying that my parents made good

money that way 30 years ago.“

Photos: provided

30 falstaff summer 2021


HE UNRAVELS A

POSTER-SIZED

PHOTOGRAPH

THAT DEPICTS A

GEOLOGICAL

CROSS SECTION.

Even before he pours the samples of the

various parcels of his 17 hectare/43 acre

estate, he unravels a poster-sized photograph

that depicts a geological cross

section. Below the uppermost layer of the

name-giving gravels (graves) and loam, a

reddish crasse de fer shows, a layer of loam

rich in iron-oxide. Below that a layer of

bluish loam and underneath that a further

sandy layer with a reddish sheen.

Belles-Graves is in the village of Néac and

thus has the right to label its wines Lalande-de-Pomerol,

but its soils are only slightly

different from those of the celebrated

plateau of Pomerol. No surprise really since

there is just a little brook, the Barbanne,

and a little greenery between Belle-Graves’

vineyards and the prized Pomerol site Le

Gay – whose wines go for five times the

price.

Château Belles-Graves in

the Lalande-de-Pomelrol

appellation where Xavier Piton

(below) makes his wines. A

bottle of the 1949 vintage of

the estate.

Estates that do not make a

huge fuss about their privileged

sites and soils, like that of Xavier

Piton, are not exactly plentiful in

Bordeaux – yet more numerous than one

might expect. There is, for instance, Clos

Louie of Pascal and Sophie Lucin-Douteau.

In the village of Saint-Philippe-d’Aiguille in

Côtes de Castillon, they tend one of the last

ungrafted vineyards of the region: 130-

year-old vines, planted on limestone with a

thin loam cover as a field blend before

phylloxera devastated most vineyards. You

taste exactly what these vines transported

from the limestone to the grapes: a

<

summer 2021

falstaff

31


wine / BORDEAUX

<

profound minerality supported by

tannins of the greatest nobility. A further

example is Tertre de la Mouleyre belonging

to Eric Jeanneteau. He manages two feats

at once: to produce a wine still just within

the confines of Saint-Émilion that is

amongst the finest and richest the appellation

has to offer; and to make a living from

just 1.8 hectares/4.4 acres of vineyard

without being ranked in a classification.

THE EQUILIBRIUM OF SOILS

What about the economy of Bordeaux?

While the most sought-after châteaux

evidently prosper like they never did in the

20th century, at the other end of the scale,

the bulk wine price for the generic Bordeaux

appellation has fallen below one Euro

a litre. Then there are whole subregions

suffering from a depression, namely

Sauternes, Barsac and their neighbouring

appellations – because our gastronomic

zeitgeist finds little room for the intricacies

of these rich and nobly sweet wines.

“It is not the economy,“ Jan Thienpont

says with a good measure of

defiance in his voice, “that

will determine the future

of Bordeaux. The

actual factor is the

biology of the

soils and their

incredibly

complex

equilibrium.

This and

nothing else is

the point with

which Bordeaux

can differentiate

itself in the long

term. Compared to the

enormity of this task, the

economy is almost irrelevant.“

Eric Boissenot, a highly respected

oenological consultant in the Médoc

stresses a similar point. The wines of the

most prestigious estates of the Médoc are

analysed in Boissenot’s small laboratory.

He works for four of the five premiers crus

classés and about forty of the rest, but also

for dozens of smaller châteaux. Together

with the teams at each estate he develops

THE ACTUAL FACTOR IS

THE BIOLOGY OF THE

SOILS AND THEIR

INCREDIBLY COMPLEX

EQUILIBRIUM.

JAN THIENPONT WINEMAKER

Above: Eric Jeanneteau tasting and toasting with friends.

Left: Justine Tesseron of Château Pontet-Canet and

amphorae at their cellar used for maturing wine.

concepts that lend even more detail and

definition to the wines – far removed from

any oenological standard formulas. When

asked what his clients’ most pressing

concern has been in recent years, he says:

“The estates put enormous effort into

viticulture, they focus on proper and

respectful farming methods. At the winemaking

level, time and again it is about

understanding the terroirs.“ Boissenot also

emphasizes that Bordeaux needs both

glamorous top châteaux and solid professional

practice at entry level. “A great many

people in Bordeaux are very good at what

they do,“ he says. “At the crus classés and,

Photos:©I.Mathie, Julie Rey,

32 falstaff summer 2021


just a few kilometres further, at less

well-known estates.“

Yet it was also the Médoc that was rather

slow to innovate, especially in terms of

organic farming. A not insignificant reason

for this was also that a 60–80 hectare/150-

200acre estate of a typical Médoc estate on

the Left Bank is harder to convert than a

10 hectare/25 acre estate on the Right

Bank. It is therefore all the more telling that

the paradigm shift that is now underway

started in Pauillac – at the very top: at

Château Latour and Château Pontet Canet.

Château Latour worked according to a

phased plan. In summer 2008, a team

IT IS THEREFORE ALL

THE MORE TELLING

THAT THE PARADIGM

SHIFT THAT IS NOW

UNDERWAY WAS

STARTED IN PAUILLAC,

AT THE VERY TOP: AT

CHÂTEAUX LATOUR

AND PONTET CANET.

member hired specifically for the task

of organic conversion started the first

trials of alternative farming methods in

the vineyards. In 2009, three parcels

were farmed biodynamically. By 2014,

the entire enclos, the 32 hectare/79 acre

vineyard that makes up most of the grand

vin had been convertad, since 2016 the

entire 65 hectares/161 acres of the estate.

“We realised that our wines reach a perfect

balance of their own accord

via these farming methods,“ Latour’s

technical director Hélène Génin says.

“They have healthier pH levels, fresher

aromatics.“

<

summer 2021

falstaff

33


wine / BORDEAUX

WE REALISED THAT

OUR WINES REACH A

PERFECT BALANCE OF

THEIR OWN ACCORD

VIA THESE FARMING

METHODS.

HÉLÈNE GÉNIN TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

<

Alfred Tesseron of Château Pontet-

Canet dared to convert his estate even

earlier. It was in 2004 that he took the first

steps towards biodynamic farming with his

estate manager Jean-Michel Comme. The

conversion was interrupted in summer

2007 since mildew threatened to overwhelm

the vines but certification followed

in 2010 for all of his 81 hectares/200 acres.

Early on during the conversion, Comme

was trying to purchase second-hand

tractors. Since older models are lighter, he

hoped to avoid soil compaction by using

them. The logical next step was to use

horses. By now there is a special tract at

Pontet Canet, housing coopers, farriers and

other artisans whose skills are needed for

these viticultural methods. Even the

biodynamic preparations are made here.

Comme now works as an independent

viticultural consultant to share his experience

with other estates.

AHEAD INTO THE PAST

Two to three dozen estates now uses horses

in the vineyard – a point they love to stage

effectively. But one should not forget that

these horses also symbolise many small

changes that have been wrought in

vineyards and cellars – often unreported

– over the past years. The focus now, across

the board, is the return to that cool

elegance – the actual strength of this region

with its Atlantic climate. Less use of oak,

less alcohol, more appetite for artisanal

vinification – that is the credo. When a

deuxième cru classé estate like Château

Durfort Viviens in Margaux, next to

registering spectacular results in organic

farming, also holds an organic certification

in oenology and vinifies its entire, albeit

unusually small 2018 harvest in clay

<

illustration: Stefanie Hilgarth

34 falstaff summer 2021


summer 2021

falstaff

35


wine / BORDEAUX

Morning mood in the

Bordelais vineyards.

Below: Jean-Pierre

Boyer of Château Bel

Air Marquis d‘Aligre.

<

vessels – illustrates

how far the avantgarde

has come in rethinking.

It is exactly this quest

for maturation vessels which

have less influence on the wine

than oak that looks to the past.

There is one principal witness for

this: Jean-Pierre Boyer of Château Bel Air

Marquis d’Aligre. The 88-year-old has harvested

70 vintages on his estate in Soussans

near Margaux. His vineyard soils are pervaded

by flint – Château Margaux grows

wines for its Pavillon Blanc on a neighbouring

parcel – and Boyer turns the low yield

of his old vines into a scented, delicate

Margaux. He is a master in keeping tradition.

Not due to obstinacy or luddism, he

simply sees no necessity to change anything

and has not for decades. You look in vain

for barrels. The wines mature for three to

four years in cement tanks. Boyer likes to

mock his colleagues’ faith in technology

WHAT HE DOES IS

ALMOST GROUND-

BEAKING. YOU CANNOT

HELP BUT SEE IN HIM

THE VERY SOUL OF

PURE AQUITAINE

VITICULTURE MADE

MANIFEST.

and takes visitors to the weather station in

his vineyard: an old metal box with peeling

paint. Boyer holds that this apparatus,

when used properly, is more reliable than

the weather forecasts on TV, throwing a

questioning glance that is mischievous,

cryptic and guileless at once.

Perhaps Boyer, revered like a rockstar by

sommeliers in recent years because his wines

are so incredibly fine and gastronomic,

is the last remaining link to a Bordeaux

that preceded agrochemicals and Parker

points. He is so retro that he has almost

come full circle: what he does is almost

ground-breaking. Talking to him reveals his

thoughtful nature and incredible wit. You

cannot help but see in him the very soul of

pure Aquitaine viticulture made manifest.

His is a spirit that revolves around gnarly

old vines, around anthocyanins and aromas,

wide awake, pensive, sober – a spirit

that will always prevail, in any generation,

simply because it is one of a kind.

<

Photos: Shutterstock, provided

36 falstaff summer 2021


wine / BORDEAUX

BEST OF

UNSUNG BORDEAUX

TASTING

TASTING

INFO

WEITERE BEWERTUNGEN

MORE TASTING

UND BESCHREIBUNGEN

NOTES AT

FINDEN SIE

FALSTAFF.COM

AB SEITE 148.

96

95

94

2018 CHÂTEAU DURFORT

VIVIENS

Margaux Deuxième Cru Classé

Cedar, tobacco and sandalwood on

the nose, ripe plum, pine resin, blackberry

and elderberry juice. Rose

petals in the empty glass. Mellow

tannin, acidity remains mild but

effortlessly supports the structure,

everything seems to be of one piece,

rounded and typical of 2018, but

without heaviness, fascinatingly

multi-layered finish: liquorice, pepper,

allspice, cardamom. U.S.

2020 CHÂTEAU BELLES-GRAVES

Lalande de Pomerol

On the nose a little caramel, red

berry, mineral fruit, wild cherry.

On the palate there is juiciness and

finesse, a medium measure of finegrained

tannin, classic in stature

without any fat but fine mineral play

and a firm structure for extended

ageing. U.S.

2016 CLOS LOUIE

Castillon, Côte de Bordeaux

On the nose there is some wood

with black cherry, blueberry and

balsamic undertones. On the palate

pressure builds with great finesse,

salty, ripe, long-lasting acidity, the

wine combines generosity and

underlying smoothness, great

extract without any astringency.

Still youthfully compact on the

finish, with a powerful mineral grip.

U.S.

96

95

93

2020 SOL BÉNI COUP DE

CHAPEAU

Saint Emilion Grand Cru

Deep ruby, opaque core, purple

reflections. Delicate toasted

aromas, a touch of noble wood,

blackberry fruit, a hint of liquorice,

touch of vanilla and nougat. Powerful,

chocolaty texture, dark cherry,

taut tannins, mineral on the finish,

just on the verge of over-extraction,

some black tea on the finish, shows

length and future potential P.M.

2009 CHÂTEAU TÊRTRE DE LA

MOULEYRE

Saint-Emilion Grand Cru

Wild cherry, damson and chocolate

on the nose, with more air also

truffle tones. Very fine on the palate,

at the same time rounded, soft and

creamy, yet also juicy, nervy. Ripe, in

an unobtrusive way, firm tannin, lots

of juice. Elegance. Very homogeneous

in its structure, fruit, chalkiness

and velour-like tannins result in a

great harmony. U.S.

2019 CHÂTEAU ROBIN

Lussac Saint Emilion

Very clear cherry fruit in various

shades, from red to black cherry,

but also brighter fruit aromas,

raspberry blossom, some moss and

herbs, almond. Juicy and elegant on

the palate, well extracted, sinewy

but not astringent, with intense

tactile minerality and a classic

structure for mid-term ageing. Neat

cherry fruit on the finish. Seems

complete. U.S.

96

95

91

2020 CHÂTEAU CARMES

HAUT-BRION

Pessac-Léognan

Dark ruby, opaque core, purple

reflections. Hints of wood, ripe

cherry fruit, delicate nougat, wild

berries, candied orange zest, inviting

bouquet. Juicy, ripe cherries, fine

fruit expression in the texture, well

integrated, ripe tannins, peppery

aftertaste, certain ageing potential.

P.M.

2018 CHÂTEAU FERRIÈRE

Margaux

Dark ruby, purple reflections. The

cherry fruit on the nose has floral

overtones, dried rose petal and

hibiscus, tender hints of liquorice

and bergamot peel. There is inviting

spice, juiciness and tightness on the

palate, fresh acidity and silky, ripe

tannins. The finish is full of fruit and

while youthful, this already drinks

well. This has an almost Burgundian

finesse and real potential. A great

organic grand cru. P.M.

2019 CHÂTEAU SURAIN MERLOT

Bordeaux AC

Dark ruby colour, purple reflections,

subtle watery rim. Nuances of fresh

plum and black cherry alongside a

touch of red berry and orange peel.

The palate comes with a juicy,

elegant texture, offers dark forest

fruits, fine tannins, subtle herbal

savouriness and nougat on the

finish. A friendly, uncomplicated

entry into the world of Bordeaux.

P.M.

Photos: provided

38 falstaff

Up to € 20/$ 30 € 21 – 30 / $ 31 – 40 € 31 – 50 / $ 41 – 60 € 50 – 100 / $ 61 – 110 € 100+ / $ 110+


wine / RIBERA DEL DUERO

RIBERA

DEL DUERO:

THE NEW

Change is afoot in the Spanish region of Ribera del Duero. Instead of power and

richness, winemakers are now aiming for freshness and elegance. They look for it in

the high altitude vineyards in the north and east of the region.

WORDS DOMINIK VOMBACH

Photo: @ 2019 Carlos Sanchez Benayas/Shutterstock

40 falstaff summer 2021


Madrid

RIBERA DEL DUERO

Spain

Tempranillo grapes

grow across Spain.

In Ribera del Duero

they are called

Tinto Fino.

FRESHNESS

summer 2021

falstaff

41


wine / RIBERA DEL DUERO

The Picos de Urbion

mountains in the sparsely

populated retgion of

Soria.

Apparently, there are more deer

in Soria than people, at least

that is what the winemakers

like to joke about. But like so

many things said in jest, this

contains some truth: Soria, along with

Cuenca in Castillla-La Mancha and Teruel

in Aragon, is one of the most thinly

populated areas in all of Spain. Soria is

located at the eastern end of the Ribera del

Duero region, far away from wine hotspots

like La Horra and Aranda de Duero in

Burgos or Pesquera and Penafiel in

Valladolid. Soria is the highest and coolest

subzone of the D.O. Ribera del Duero, an

appellation created in 1982. The Picos de

Urbion mountain range, where the headwaters

of the Duero River rise, is just 50km/30

miles away. Most of the vineyards here are

at an altitude of about 900m/2,953ft above

sea level – and altitude is key. The grapes

ripening in these cooler temperatures differ

significantly from those of other Ribera del

Duero subregions. Tinto Fino, as Tempranillo

is called in Ribera del Duero, needs

these elevated,

cool sites to

retain sufficient

acidity – without

it the wines run the

danger of disappearing

into a rather

uniform triviality of high

alcohol and concentration.

Soria thus offers a rather different

kind of potential.

THE GRAPES

RIPENING IN

THESE COOLER

TEMPERATURES

DIFFER SIGNIFICANTLY

FROM THOSE OF

OTHER RIBERA DEL

DUERO SUBREGIONS.

BENEFITTING FROM CLIMATE

CHANGE

The freshness that characterises the wines

from Soria is not only down to altitude. It

is also boosted by its location between two

mountain ranges: Sistema Ibérico and

Sistema Central. Growing conditions for

vines here are more extreme than in Burgos

where approximately 80% of Ribera del

Duero vineyards are located. The danger of

spring frosts is higher and the vegetation

period is shorter – and in the cooler past

this meant that grapes often struggled to

ripen fully. They still do today in cooler

years. For a long time, growing grapes in

Photos: Shutterstock, @ 2020 Dewald Kirsten/Shutterstock.

42 falstaff summer 2021


Maturing wine

being sampled

from the barrel.

Soria was considered a daring challenge.

But climate change – ever more noticeable

– also changed attitudes. Peter Sisseck, the

region’s star winemaker of Dominio de

Pingus fame, now buys about 20% of the

grapes for his PSI wine in Soria. PSI is a

wine this legendary Danish winemaker

blends from the grapes of around 800 wine

growers across all of Ribera del Duero. In

Soria he finds the limestone soils which

define the style of this wine – and more

freshness than in other subregions.

It was not Sisseck, however, who put the

region on the map and revived it. That was

down to a different visionary. In the late

A

DESERTED VALLEY,

A SORT OF WILDER-

NESS WITH COUNTLESS

OVERGROWN VINE-

YARDS. TIME SEEMED

TO HAVE STOOD STILL

IN VALE DE ATAUATA.

1990s, Miguel Sanchez, a wine merchant

from Madrid, chanced upon a deserted

valley, a sort of wilderness with countless

overgrown vineyards. That was Soria. Time

seemed to have stood still in Vale de

Atauta: at the almost ludicrous altitude for

viticulture of 1,000m/3,281ft, Sanchez

found ancient vines that had been planted

before the phylloxera crisis late in the 19th

century. A true treasure that prompted

Sanchez to start the Dominio de Atauta

estate in 1999. Even his earliest vintages

beguiled the critics and Dominio de Atauta

became the new star of Ribera del Duero

in record time. It was the star that

<

summer 2021

falstaff

43


wine / RIBERA DEL DUERO

Old bush vines in

Valladolid, Ribera del

Duero. Below: Bertrand

Sourdais in the vineyard.

<

heralded a new generation of top

producers who prefer the fruit from this

elevated, cooler region and who created a

new regional wine style that puts freshness

and elegance centre stage.

Today, Dominio de Atauta processes

grapes from around 60 hectares/148 acres

of vineyards, split across 600 different

parcels of vines. Most of these still belong

to the same families that have owned them

for generations. The vines in these parcels

are old – between 60 and 120 years.

Around 90% of these vines pre-date the

phylloxera crisis and are thus ungrafted,

which is to say they grow on their own

roots and are not grafted onto phylloxera

resistant rootstocks. Even Dominio de

Atauta’s entry-level wine is made from

grapes grown on vines that are on average

at least 60 years old. Dominio de Atauta

achieved much wider fame with its single

vineyard wine Llanos del Almendro from

the 2002 vintage. In a blind tasting of 31

top wines from France and Spain, organised

by the French wine critic Michel

IN THE PAST, TINTO

FINO AND ALBILLO

MAYOR WERE TRADI-

TIONALLY CO-PLANTED

IN FIELD BLENDS, THE

WHITE GRAPE TAKING

BETWEEN 20–50% OF

THE SHARE.

Bettane, it took first place

together with the 1994

vintage of Vega Sicilia,

another star winery from

Ribera del Duero. The 2002

vintage of Atauta’s Llanos del

Almendro was made by French

oenologist Betrand Sourdais. While

working at Atauta he fell in love with the

region and its ancient vineyards, so he

leased 25 parcels on the Vale de Atauta

himself – this was the birth of the Dominio

de Es project: on just 3.5 hectares/8.6 acres

he grows Tinto Fino and Albillo Mayor, a

white grape variety.

WHITE GRAPES FOR

FRESHNESS

In the past, Tinto Fino and Albillo Mayor

were traditionally co-planted in field

blends with the white grape taking between

20-50% of the share. From the 2019

vintage onwards, white wines have also

been allowed to be sold under the denomination

of Ribera del Duero – and this

<

Photos: mauritius images / Carlos Sánchez Pereyra, mauritius images / age fotostock / Juan José Pascual

44 falstaff summer 2021


Aldeadávila reservoir

in the Los Arribes

del Duero Natural Park.

summer 2021

falstaff

45


wine / RIBERA DEL DUERO

Bodegas Marta Maté‘s new

winery building in Tubilla del

Lago – also showing off the

limestone soils.

Old bush vines in

Aranda del Duero.

Photos:@ 2017 Gema Garcia Martin/Shutterstock, PacoSantamari, provided

46 falstaff summer 2021


has put Albillo Mayor into the spotlight

of many winemakers once again. In the

past, the field blends were also co-harvested

and co-fermented into a kind of rosé

wine which was called ojo de gallo, or eye

of the chicken, due to its pale colour.

Today, Sourdais always blends some Albillo

Mayor into his wines, as a nod to this

ancient tradition. Sourdais, who also

founded Bodegas Antidoto, is an important

figure for the region, especially considering

that there are still too few young winemakers

interested in preserving the old vines

and traditions.

Fresh wines and old vines are also a

central part of Bodegas Marta Maté‘s

concept – taking Ribera del Duero’s wine

Marta Maté farms its vineyards with horses

and according to biodynamic methods.

Below: the Marta Maté team tasting.

style even further. While the wines of

Dominio de Es and Atauta show the

outlines of elegance, they still set store

by concentration and clear wood

influence, Marta Maté’s wines,

however, are a kind of revolution.

“My wines are not typical of Ribera

del Duero. They are fresh and

different,“ says César Maté. He

founded the Marta Maté project

with six friends several years ago.

Even before they started selling their

first commercial vintage in 2008, they

made wine from their single parcels in

Gumiel de Mercado in the sub-zone of

Burgos – at an altitude of 900m / 2,953ft.

BACK TO THE ROOTS

When Marta Maté released their Primordium

wine in 2008, made from 100% Tinto

Fino, aged for 18 months in new French

oak, the wine received a 95-point-score

from The Wine Advocate. Maté remembers

how powerful and concentrated that wine

was – a style they continued making until

2012. Today, Maté still ages the wine in

100% new French oak – but it matures for

five years before its release to allow the

wood influence to become more integrated.

Maté now sees this wine as a reminiscence

of the old Ribera del Duero – an absolutely

valid style, coined by the monolith of the

region, Vega Sicilia, and all the winemakers

that trained there – but also as a relic of the

past. César Maté says: We want to push the

expression of minerality as far as possible,

make it possible to taste the soil. Wood is a

distraction. Yes there can be wood influence

but it has to be subtle.“ Biodynamic

farming methods play an important role for

Maté. He wants to increase the microbial

life of the soil and biodiversity. For years,

he has also been on a quest for Tino Fino

clones that are perfectly suited to local

WE WANT TO PUSH THE

EXPRESSION OF

MINERALITY AS FAR AS

POSSIBLE, MAKE IT

POSSIBLE TO TASTE

THE SOIL. WOOD IS A

DISTRACTION.

CÉSAR MATÉ WINEMAKER

conditions and retain acidity. He took

cuttings from old vines across the region

and leases old vine parcels which would

otherwise disappear. In Maté’s view, the

switch to higher altitude zones will be

unavoidable for Ribera del Duero. There

has been a stylistic shift in the kind of

wines people want to drink – not least

furthered by Spain’s top restaurants

looking for fresher wines. Evolution is

under way – and Ribera del Duero is

changing.

<

summer 2021

falstaff

47


wine / RIBERA DEL DUERO

BEST OF

RIBERA DEL DUERO

TASTING

TASTING

INFO

WEITERE BEWERTUNGEN

MORE TASTING

UND BESCHREIBUNGEN

NOTES AT

FINDEN SIE

FALSTAFF.COM

AB SEITE 148.

100

98

96

2012 PINGUS

Dominio de Pingus, Burgos

Floral nuances of candied violets

and hibiscus, sweet hints of oriental

spice, fine oak savouriness, dark

berries, nuances of blueberries, dark

minerality. Complex and full-bodied

with textured, ripe tannins, supported

by a fresh acid structure.

Salty nuances and convincing

length, cool, ripe fruit on the finish,

certain ageing potential.

2016 DOMINIO DEL AGUILA

RESERVA

Dominio del Aguila, Burgos

Wonderful mix of Morello and

Amarena cherry. Fresh notes of

cassis, blueberry and ethereal hints

of pepper and cinnamon. Dense and

powerful on the palate without

being overbearing. Juicy acidity,

aroma of wild berries and cherry.

Fine-grained tannin, seems creamy

and persists on the palate. Polished,

fresh and salty.

2016 VALBUENA N°5

Vega Sicilia, Valladolid

Complex bouquet with fruity notes of

ripe plum and blackberry, followed by

hints of cassis, redcurrant and dark

dried fruits as well as sour cherry and

a fine, extremely well-integrated

wood savouriness. Notes of caramel

and black pepper, as well as ethereal

notes. On the palate soft, flattering

attack, fresh dark berry fruit, cherry,

blueberry, fine-grained tannin, beautiful

creaminess and immensely long

finish. Great potential.

99

98

96

2009 UNICO

Vega Sicilia, Valladolid

Deep ruby colour with purple reflections.

On the nose fine notes of

tobacco, underlaid with dark forest

fruit and red berries. Pleasant notes

of oak, some leather, delicate

nougat tones. On the palate juicy

and full-fruited with nuances of

cherry and dark forest fruit. Silky

tannins with salty minerality on the

finish, very harmonious, majestic

style with great potential.

ÚNICO RESERVA ESPECIAL

(2008/2009/2010)

Vega Sicilia, Valladolid

Blend of the vintages 2008, 2009

and 2010. On the nose extremely

complex. Notes of ripe blackberry,

blueberry, plum and all kinds of

Christmas spices: cinnamon, clove

and allspice. Hints of tobacco, white

pepper and coconut. On the palate

fresh, juicy, structure, seems elegant

in its own way. Fine tannins

and mineral, long finish.

2017 AALTO PS

Bodegas y Vinedos Aalto, Valladolid

Concentrated aromas on the nose

with notes of blackberry, sour

cherry and raspberry followed by

hints of liquorice, graphite and

sweet tobacco as well as smoky

notes. Powerful and elegant on the

palate, with fleshy, beautiful dark

berry fruit and a fine spiciness.

Velvety, flattering tannin and a long

finish.

98

97

95

2017 LA DIVA

Domino de Es, Soria, Spain

Complex nose with concentrated

dark forest fruit, raspberry and a

fine spiciness. Mineral impressions

on the palate, ripe juicy acidity, fresh

dark fruit and liquorice. Finely

woven tannins, spicy-fruity impression,

mineral, long-lasting and elegant.

Made from 89% Tinto Fino

and 11% Albillo Mayor.

2014 LA MALA

Dominio de Atauta, Soria, Spain

From 130-year-old vines in the

easternmost parcel of the estate,

characterised by limestone.

Concentrated, precise fruit aromas

on the nose with dark forest berries.

Herbaceous, spicy hints with notes

of rosemary and chamomile as well

as mocha and Christmas spices.

Juicy acidity on the palate, dark

forest fruit and spicy notes.

Fine-grained tannin and long finish.

Good balance.

2017 MARTA MATÉ

Bodegas Marta Maté, Burgos,

Spain

Complex, intense nose with notes

of dark flowers and wild berries.

Hints of fig and dried plums as well

as spicy hints of oak. Juicy and

flattering on the palate from the

start. Ripe, attractive acidity and finegrained

tannin. Aroma of dark dried

berries and spicy hints. Seems lively

and fresh. Mineral impression on the

long finish. A new Ribera style.

Photos: provided

48 falstaff summer 2021

Up to € 20 / $ 30 € 21 – 30 / $ 31 – 40 € 31 – 50 / $ 41 – 60 € 50 – 100 / $ 61 – 110 € 100+ / $ 110+


You have a favourite

place. So does your

favourite wine.

You probably have a favourite spot in your home.

Your favourite wine has one too – in a Liebherr

multi-temperature wine cabinet. With its two

temperature zones, different kinds of wine can

be stored at their ideal drinking temperatures. And

are thus always ready for you to enjoy. Discover

temperature management at home.liebherr.com

Refrigeration and freezing


wine / CALIFORNIA

Mountainous terrain,

giant redwoods

and Pacific fog on

northern California‘s

Sonoma Coast.

CALIFORNIA

DREAMING

Photo: © 2020 JAK WONDERLY PHOTOGRAPHY

50 falstaff summer 2021


Washington

CALIFORNIA

USA

The ‘Golden State’ is sunny, dry and hot – or is it? This perception

changes as soon as you land at San Francisco International Airport,

the gateway to California’s Napa and Sonoma regions. The coolness

of the air wipes out the preconception. But who needs stereotypes

anyway? Californian wine defies them all.

WORDS GUS ZHU MW AND ANNE KREBIEHL MW

summer 2021

falstaff

51


wine / CALIFORNIA

The tasting room at the Harlan

family‘s Promontory Estate, in

the hills of Oakville.

San Francisco is constantly caressed

by a cool Pacific influence:

coastal fog is a feature of life in

Northern California. Clearly,

the attribute ‘golden’ in California’s

nickname refers to its inland areas

where sunshine is always abundant. But it

is exactly this ocean influence that makes

so much possible. The clash of cold Pacific

air and inland heat is exactly what creates

such compelling climates for wine growing.

Drive north out of the city, across the

Golden Gate Bridge, and you reach wine

country: Napa and Sonoma, California’s

most famous wine regions. They are as

diverse as they are beautiful with a mountainous,

sometimes even wild landscape,

fragrant redwood forests, statuesque and

singular valley oaks and vineyards ablaze

with yellow mustard flowers in spring and

red clover in summer.

QUALITY NOT QUANTITY

While California with its 257,000

hectares/635,000 acres of vineyard represents

81% of the total US wine production,

Napa and Sonoma vineyards

represent just 16% of the total

vineyard acreage. This tells

you that quality not quantity

is key here. More

than half of California’s

wineries are in this northern

part of the state:

many have world fame,

some even have cult

status among collectors.

Sonoma and Napa are

distinct but both get their

character from the coastal

topography that also shapes

the climate: mountain ranges and

elevations govern how much or how little

Pacific influence there is and, consequently,

which grape varieties are cultivated. With

their range of climates, Sonoma and Napa

can cover the entire spectrum of wine

styles, from brisk and refreshing sparkling

wines, via fruity white and reds to the most

structured and long-lived red wines.

NAPA

Getting to Napa

Valley makes the

climatic situation clear.

The valley is framed by the

Mayacamas and Vaca mountain

ranges, running either side from north

to south. Intense sunshine lights up and

warms the entire valley but then nature‘s

fantastic air conditioning kicks in. The

cool ocean fog waits until the daytime heat

starts to dissipate and is drawn into Napa

Valley from the Pacific via San Pablo Bay.

INTENSE SUNSHINE

LIGHTS UP AND

WARMS THE ENTIRE

VALLEY BUT THEN

NATURE‘S FANTASTIC

AIR CONDITIONING

KICKS IN.

Photos: © 2020 JAK WONDERLY PHOTOGRAPHY, provided

52 falstaff summer 2021


Thev vineyard crew

at Peay Vineyards

in the rugged

wilderness of the

Sonoma Coast.

As it tucks into the valley floor, it allows

the grapes to consolidate all the sugars and

complex flavour compounds accumulated

during daytime by arresting them in this

cooling air. The mountainside vineyards

may receive less of the ocean influence, but

the cool nights still offer excellent concentration

and balance due to the higher

altitudes. The two mountain ranges are

key: the Mayacamas prevent the cooler air

from the Pacific from having a permanent

influence, the Vaca range is a barrier to the

even fiercer inland heat of the Central

<

summer 2021

falstaff

53


wine / CALIFORNIA

Peay Vineyards in

northwest Sonoma

are just four miles

from the Pacific

Ocean.

<

Valley – and Napa in

between is like a paradise

for the cultivation of premium

wine grapes – especially Cabernet

Sauvignon which reaches sublime expressions

here. But Napa Valley is also known

for its Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blancs and

Zinfandels.

SONOMA

Sonoma covers the area between the coast

and the Mayacamas and is more exposed

to the Pacific‘s influence. Here, the

vineyards can be within or above the fog

line and the cooler climate favours different

grape varieties, especially Pinot Noir

which, depending on where it is grown, can

either be plush and cherryish or slender

and berry-scented. Chardonnay also plays

as big a role, yet stereotyping is not possible

because there also is Cabernet Sauvignon

and Zinfandel, Viognier and Sauvignon

Blanc. Vineyards here can be flat and

expansive along the Russian River or wild

WE HAVE

SPENT 40

YEARS FARMING

ON THE EAST-FACING

SLOPES OF THE WES-

TERN HILLS OF OAK-

VILLE. WE FIND THAT

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

FURNISHES THE IDEAL

LENS THROUGH WHICH

TO EXPRESS THE

CHARACTER OF THE

LAND WITH GREAT

TRANSPARENCY.

WILL HARLAN MANAGING DIRECTOR OF

HARLAN ESTATE

and remote along the coastal ranges. Some

sites are spectacular: surrounded by giant

redwood and madrone forests that seem to

lend their perfume to the wines or offering

dramatic ocean views. Here, closer to the

coast, the interaction of cold and warm air

is more pronounced. Vineyards are often

shrouded in cool Pacific fog until the brilliant

sunshine gets the upper hand.

DIVERSITY AND CROSS-OVERS

Naturally, this makes us think of Napa and

Sonoma as cool versus warm, but the real

picture is a little more complex. The diversity

of both regions becomes clear when

you consider that there are 33 different

AVAs or American Viticultural Areas in the

two regions. These are sub-zones whose

names you may find printed on a label,

like Stags Leap District or Rutherford from

Napa or Fort-Ross-Seaview from Sonoma.

Then there are a few AVAs that defy the

climatic assumptions: like arid and warm

Alexander Valley AVA in Sonoma, famed

Photos: © 2020 JAK WONDERLY PHOTOGRAPHY, provided

54 falstaff summer 2021


for its Cabernet Sauvignon or cool and

elevated Wild Horse Valley AVA in Napa,

home to vivid Pinot Noirs and Chardonnays.

Nonetheless, it is in Napa Valley

that some of the world’s most distinct and

prestigious Cabernet Sauvignons grow

while Sonoma has made its name with both

Pinot Noirs and Chardonnay.

Will Harlan, managing director at

Harlan Estate in Oakville, Napa Valley,

explains: “The Napa Valley’s warm days

and cool nights, which typically persist

throughout the growing season, in combination

with its diverse soils, have made the

region’s reputation for cultivating Cabernet

Sauvignon with an alluring balance

of acidity, tannin and structure. We have

spent 40 years farming on the east-facing

slopes of the western hills of Oakville, and

here, where we enjoy the freshening influences

of the San Francisco Bay and the

forests we find that Cabernet Sauvignon

furnishes the ideal lens through which to

express the character of the land with great

transparency.“

HISTORY AND ZINFANDEL

Ever since the first grapes were planted

in Sonoma in 1812 and in Napa in 1839,

northern California’s eminent suitability for

quality viticulture was evident.

A gnarly, old Zinfandel vine at Seghesio Family Vineyards‘ Pagani Ranch. Most of these ancient

vines, some more than 100 years old, are not trellised but bush-trained and dry-farmed

ZINFANDEL, ALSO

KNOWN AS

PRIMITIVO, WAS THE

GRAPE FIRST PLANTED

BY MANY ITALIAN

IMMIGRANTS WHO

SETTLED IN NAPA AND

SONOMA.

The Sacrashe Estate Vineyard

of Hall Wines in the hills of

Rutherford in Napa Valley.

While Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir and

Chardonnay find some of their greatest

expressions here, it is another grape variety

that expresses much of California‘s history:

Zinfandel, also known as Primitivo, was

the grape first planted by many Italian immigrants

who settled in Napa and Sonoma.

It is completely suited to the climate and

there are some ancient, gnarly vines that

make powerful, perfumed red wines. “It is

often said that Zinfandel is the only truly

American grape,“ says Andy Robinson,

winemaker at Seghesio Family Vineyards.

“In many ways, the Seghesio story is a true

reflection of the American dream.“ The

Seghesio family planted their first vines in

1895 and own some of the oldest vineyards

in California. “Every bottle of Zinfandel we

make is a realisation of the dreams and aspirations

of an Italian immigrant who came to

Sonoma County in the late 19th century to

build a family and a future,“ Robinson says.

THE CALIFORNIAN DREAM

These dreams are still revealed as you taste

the wines. So many went west in order

to create something special and live their

dream: to find a new home, to settle into

a new life, to grow and make wonderful

wine. This explains what Californian wine

is – an expression of the American dream

that you can actually taste. A dream that

came true and that still is essentially about

farming and about expressing and preserving

that unique sun-kissed landscape so

perfectly cooled by the Pacific Ocean.

<

summer 2021

falstaff

55


wine / CALIFORNIA

BEST OF

CALIFORNIA

100

100

98

2015 HARLAN ESTATE

PROPRIETARY RED

Oakville, Napa Valley

Dark ruby colour, purple reflections,

delicate brightening on rim. Notes of

ripe cherries, nougat, fine notes of

spice, a hint of tangerine zest, very

multi-faceted bouquet. Velvety, elegant

and expressive, perfect tannins,

silky, round texture, mineral and

endowed with great length, already

very seductive, certain development

potential for several decades. P.M.

2012 CABERNET SAUVIGNON

SCREAMING EAGLE, Napa Valley

Deep colour, opaque core, purple

reflections. Beguiling black fruit

with hints of cassis and liquorice,

ethereal nuances, some mint and

honeysuckle and notes of oak and

cedar. Powerful, chocolatey, taut,

concentrated, supported by tannins.

Flexes its muscles on the finish with

a flash of ripe cherry. P.M.

2015 VECINA

BOND ESTATES, Napa Valley

Deep ruby colour, opaque core,

purple reflections. Dark berry fruit is

accompanied by toasted aromas

and ethereal spice. A multi-faceted,

attractive nose. The palate is

complex, silky, textured, elegant and

supported by well integrated

tannins, mineral and lasting. There

is some nougat in the aftertaste.

Will definitely evolve. P.M.

100

2014 HILLSIDE SELECT

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

Stags Leap District, Napa Valley

Dark ruby colour, purple reflections.

Ripe blackberries, fresh cassis,

delicate hints of mint and lime zest,

toasty aromas in the background,

pleasant oak spice, very multi-faceted

bouquet. Juicy, complex and round,

expressive texture, firm tannins that

persist for a long time, mineral and

lasting, fine nougat, delicate minerality

in the background, very powerful,

yet elegant finish, spicy-peppery

aftertaste. P.M.

100

2013 CABERNET SAUVIGNON

EXCELLENZ

HALL WINES, Napa Valley

Dark ruby colour, opaque core,

purple reflections. The nose opens

with cassis and overtones of violet,

fresh blackberry, a touch of cedar

and oak: a most attractive nose. The

palate is uncommonly harmonious,

fine fruit expression, ripe cherry,

perfectly integrated tannins,

impressive length. Certain to

evolve. P.M.

97

2012 LARRY HYDE & SONS

VINEYARD

AUBERT WINES, Carneros

Bright straw colour, silver

reflections. On the nose there are

nuances of tropical fruit, a touch of

pineapple, candied lime zest, white

blossom with a hint of brioche and

honey in the background. The palate

is complex, shows dark minerality

and is finely meshed. White stone

fruit appears on the long finish

which comes with a salty aftertaste.

P.M.

100

99

97

STAGLIN FAMILY VINEYARD,

ESTATE CABERNET SAUVIGNON

Rutherford, Napa Valley

Deep ruby, opaque core, purple

reflections. Pleasant note of oak, a

touch of dark berry, nuances of

liquorice and cassis, fresh orange

zest, nougat, inviting bouquet. Juicy,

expressive and elegant, ripe black

cherries, fine tannins, round and

supportive, chocolate touch on the

finish, perfect and long lasting, silky,

already immensely seductive. P.M.

2014 DOMINUS

DOMINUS ESTATE, Napa Valley

Dark ruby colour, purple reflections.

On the nose attractive, dark fruit

with overtones of spice, cherry

nougat and an ethereal touch. The

palate is powerful, taut and brims

with dark berry confit. Bold tannins,

mineral nuances on the finish, great

length. This is one for laying down.

P.M.

2015 KRONOS VINEYARD,

CORISON WINERY

Rutherford, Napa Valley

Dark ruby colour, purple reflections.

Ripe cherries and dark forest fruit,

tobacco nuances, typical dusty

Rutherford spiciness, delicate

notions of oak, ethereal nuances of

violets and eucalyptus. Juicy,

medium complexity, expressive and

equipped with fine tannins, shows

good length, taut style, marked by

precision and freshness. P.M.

Photos: provided

56 falstaff summer 2021


TASTING

TASTING

INFO

WEITERE BEWERTUNGEN

MORE TASTING

UND BESCHREIBUNGEN

NOTES AT

FINDEN SIE

FALSTAFF.COM

AB SEITE 148.

97

2016 RESERVE CABERNET

SAUVIGNON TO KALON VINEYARD

ROBERT MONDAVI WINERY, Oakville,

Napa Valley

Deep crimson, still deep core. Floral

nuances and hints of black cherries,

delicate cassis and tobacco, dry

spices, cardamom, a hint of rose

petals. Full-bodied but not lush,

blackberries and blueberries,

embedded in spicy, ripe tannins that

give the wine great length, sweet

dark fruit, comes with a great promise

for ageing, Drink 2025-2050. P.M.

97

2016 INGLENOOK RUBICON

RUBICON ESTATE

Rutherford, Napa Valley

A notion of tar and petrichor,

appears before subtle black fruit.

Dark, brooding fruit intensifies on

the palate where dense but elegant

tannins subside to reveal layer upon

layer of elegant fruit, of cherry-skin

savouriness, of graphite. The majesty

of Cabernet is right here in this

glass. Give it a decade and you will

have an emblematic wine of place

and grape. Drink 2025-2050. A.K.

96

2015 SCALLOP SHELF, PEAY

VINEYARDS ESTATE PINOT NOIR

Sonoma Coast, California 13%

Subtle cherry, peony, blood orange

zest and tea leaf combine into a

heady, seductive aroma. The shimmering

notions of these flavours

persist on the sinuous and

structured palate where silken

tannins and pervasive freshness

frame the purity of the red fruit.

Great elegance and depth, purity

and poise. Drink 2021-2035. A.K.

96

2014 KUTCH WINES MCDOUGALL

RANCH PINOT NOIR

Sonoma Coast, California 12.4%

White pepper, ripe, red cherry, a touch

of Amarena, mossy forest floor and a

notion of crushed green cardamom

make for a heady nose. More air opens

up hints of iron oxide. The palate is

sleek and profound, displaying that

full range of fruit and spice on an elegant,

concentrated yet translucent

body that simply draws you in. Much

depth and aroma, no fat at all, just poise.

Drink 2021-2035. A.K.

96

2014 OPUS ONE

OPUS ONE WINERY, Oakville,

Napa Valley

Deep ruby colour, purple reflexes.

The nose seems restrained and

needs air, then shows liquorice and

cassis, cardamom, oak spice and

orange zest. The palate is complex,

very elegant, finely-meshed with

pronounced fruit and texture, fine

freshness and a chocolatey aftertaste,

lasting and most promising.

P.M.

96

2014 PROMONTORY

PROMONTORY, Napa Valley

Ethereal blackcurrant on the nose

with floral overtones. The palate

opens with silkiness, generosity and

intense fruit. There is tactile minerality

and ripe acidity with a rich background.

The rounded body is filled to

the brim with fruit. All the elements

are deeply fused. There is rigour,

length and aromatic complexity.

Impressively long. U.S.

95

2016 SEGHESIO FAMILY

VINEYARDS CORTINA ZINFANDEL

Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma,

California

Rich yet translucent ruby colour.

The nose is filled with ripe blueberry,

raisin, prune-like aromas

dressed with Chinese five spice.

A surprisingly fresh palate show

integration of alcohol and rich

flavours, fine tannins and structured

acidity. It is rare to find a Zinfandel

that shows so much concentration

and elegance at the same time. G.Z.

95

2018 INGLENOOK SAUVIGNON

BLANC, RUBICON ESTATE

Rutherford, Napa Valley

The nose opens with promising

smokiness and a hint of waxiness.

There is a classical balance. All the

fruit – peach, plum, Meyer lemon –

is present but insinuating itself with

subtlety. There is well controlled

generosity and an exquisite, smooth

but textured mouthfeel. Lovely,

timeless elegance here. Gorgeous

now, certain to evolve. Drink by

2040. A.K.

94

2014 RIDGE GEYSERVILLE

RIDGE VINEYARDS, Alexander

Valley

Dark ruby colour, purple reflexes.

The nose has pronounced red berry

and fresh red cherry, the Carignan

shines through, fine herbal savouriness.

The palate is vibrant, comes

across as light-footed, there is a

touch of Morello cherry and firm

tannin. Pleasant spice on the finish.

Shows real potential. P.M.

Up to € 20 / $ 30 € 21 – 30 / $ 31 – 40 € 31 – 50 / $ 41 – 60 € 50 – 100 / $ 61 – 110 € 100+ / $ 110+

summer 2021

falstaff

57


profile / CARLO MONDAVI

Carlo Mondavi in one

of the Pinot Noir

vineyards he farms

on California‘s

extreme Sonoma

Coast.

CARLO MONDAVI

ON STARTING OVER

Carlo and Dante Mondavi are the scions of one of California‘s most influential wine

dynasties. Their family history shows that new beginnings are in their blood.

RAEN Winery, on the Sonoma Coast, is both a continuation and a fresh start.

WORDS ANNE KREBIEHL MW

Photography provided by Raen Winery

58 falstaff summer 2021


It was Carlo and Dante Mondavi‘s

great-grandparents Rosa and Cesare

Mondavi who left their native Italy

to start a new life in California.

Their grandfather, Robert Mondavi,

Rosa and Cesare’s son, founded his

eponymous winery in Napa Valley in 1966

and the groundbreaking Franco-Californian

joint venture Opus One in 1980.

Family strife led to the sale of the estate in

2004, but Robert’s children and grandchildren

all started over in the wine business.

“Every time my family has had a setback,

and we have had major setbacks, here’s

what we do: you fall down, you get back

up,“ Mondavi says when asked about his

family history. “When my family sold the

Robert Mondavi Winery in 2004, it was

not something we had planned. My father

and grandfather took everything and

began Continuum.“ At the time, Mondavi

recalls, his grandfather was the first to ask:

“What’s next?“

In 2005, together with his son Tim Mondavi,

Carlo’s and Dante’s father, Robert

started Continuum, also in Napa Valley.

The brothers, however, started a completely

different project on the extreme Sonoma

Coast, making Pinot Noir. This

is something of a departure

from the plush Cabernet

Sauvignons the Mondavi

name is usually

associated with. “I

have always been

drawn to the

Sonoma Coast.

I had grown

up there, going

surfing,“ Mondavi

says. “It’s always

been a goal to fulfil;

a personal thirst that

Dante and I both had,

our dream of making a

wine that could have impact:

when you closed your eyes and smelled and

tasted it, it had a bigger emotion than just

enjoying wine. I just felt this was possible

on the coast. Finally in 2013, Dante and I

began RAEN, after more than a decade of

researching and looking.“

ONE HUNDRED HARVESTS

The 2019 vintage of RAEN has just been

released. “2019 marks my family’s 100th

consecutive harvest – not through the same

winery,“ he says, “and we have not missed a

year of making wine in one hundred years.

Wine is sacred for my family. It’s something

that has sustained our livelihood, so I had

to get the approval of my family and also

have the confidence and know-how to go

out there. I spent a lot of time working,

learning, travelling and studying – and then

searching for the rare vineyards.“

“We are still beginning; we have a long

way to go. I think it’s going to take Dante

and I our whole lives to build the foundation

for RAEN,“ Mondavi says. “The next

generation will hopefully build it to the

next level. Not by size but by quality and

WHEN YOU

CLOSED YOUR EYES

AND SMELLED AND

TASTED IT, IT HAD

A BIGGER EMOTION

THAN JUST ENJOYING

WINE.

CARLO MONDAVI

WINEMAKER

the measurement of the mind’s eye of the

wine world, our community.“ When starting

Continuum, his father Tim had asked

“how do we elevate this to the next level?,“

Mondavi remembers and answers: “By focusing

on a single wine form a single site at

the highest level.« This is very much what

he and Dante do now: focussing entirely

on single vineyard expressions. “You pour

everything into what you are doing, it takes

your entire life to get it somewhere. This is

a slow, long business plan. There

is a reason Dante and I have

no investors.“

His aim in winemaking,

likewise, is

long-term: “In thirty

years’ time, we

will start seeing

some of these

wines starting

to have these

really beautiful

characteristics you

see in mature Pinot

Noir,“ he says. So he

and Dante have branched

out into a new region,

with a different grape variety,

catering to a different market. And yet they

do just what their forebears did: “I’d like to

think of it as a continuation – and a new

beginning for sure – because in my family’s

history in the wine business there has never

been a dedicated Pinot Noir project like

this. It’s a departure in that regard, we’ve

left Napa Valley, we’re on the Sonoma

Coast, we are focused on Pinot Noir, but in

terms of the qualitative aspirations I’d say

there are a lot of similarities.“ <

96

RAEN, ROYAL ST. ROBERT PINOT

NOIR, 2019

Sonoma Coast, California

The crunch of tart, red fruit that

strikes first: raspberry and cranberry

surrounded by coniferous perfume.

Peppery, floral hedgerow notes

become distinct. Silkiest tannins

spell exceptional sinuousness, all

is pervaded by pristine freshness:

tender, slender, profound, pure and

evocative. Exceptional.

summer 2021

falstaff

59


wine / RIESLING

RIESLING

RELOADED

Riesling renaissances, revivals or resurgences are regularly

hyped as imminent but never materialise. Why? Because

Riesling is niche and still beset with an image problem. But

there is an upside: even the most stellar wines are shockingly

affordable. Let Falstaff take you on a global tour.

WORDS ANNE KREBIEHL MW

Y

es, Riesling is a minority

sport. It simply has too much

personality to be everybody’s

darling. But personality is

the least of its problems

– since it is rather splendid. The idea that

all Riesling is sweet, despite most Riesling

made today being dry, also stubbornly

persists. But there are other reasons why

the wines made from this ancient and noble

grape variety still lead a marginal existence

– despite their undoubted quality. These are

so intricate that we summarised them in a

separate box (page 69) as a salutary tale of

how not to market wines. Of course they

all emanated from Riesling’s epicentre

Germany: exactly the place that now makes

the most spellbinding Rieslings in the

world.

<

Photo: Getty Images

60 falstaff summer 2021


Few white wines are

as bone-tinglingly

refreshing as

bone-dry Riesling.

summer 2021

falstaff

61


wine / RIESLING

Vineyards at the foot of

the Rotenfels mountain in

Germany‘s dramatic Nahe

region. Right: winemaker

Cornelius Dönnoff.

<

RIESLING’S

NATURE

Riesling’s most

distinctive feature is its

naturally high acidity. It

is what makes the myriad

flavours of Riesling so

clear-cut and puts everything into

sharp relief – sometimes it even feels

electric. This is not to everyone’s taste – but

for those who are smitten it is a hit they

crave in every wine. Acidity is also what

allows for residual sweetness in wine: sugar

from the grape that has not fully fermented

into alcohol, thus leaving some sweetness

in the wine. It is only by virtue of Riesling’s

acidity that this

sweetness comes

across as balanced in

the wine. Few varieties

can pull this high-wire

act off with such bravado

as Riesling. That said, our

focus here is on dry Riesling.

Two further factors captivate Riesling

lovers: Riesling can mirror its origin and

provenance in almost uncanny fashion; it

can also age and evolve for decades.

Tasting Rieslings from the same vintage,

made by the same winemaker in the same

cellar, from vines planted at the same time

but grown in different soils – say limestone,

RIESLING EXCELS

WHERE OTHERS

FOUNDER. THIS IS

ONE OF THE MOST

BEAUTIFUL THINGS TO

CONTEMPLATE ABOUT

RIESLING: THAT THE

GREATEST STRUGGLE

BRINGS FORTH THE

GREATEST BEAUTY.

Photos: DWI, ANDREAS DURST, provided

62 falstaff summer 2021


BEST OF

German

Riesling

98 SCHLOSSBÖCKELHEIMER

FELSENBERG FELSENTÜRMCHEN

RIESLING GG 2019, Weingut Dönnhoff, Nahe

Weingut Dönnhoff is one of the top estates in

the Nahe, loved for their crystalline style.

FORSTER KIRCHENSTÜCK RIESLING

98 GG 2018, Weingut von Winning, Pfalz

This site was already designated one of Pfalz‘s

best in a 1828 official vineyard classification.

WESTHOFENER MORSTEIN RIESLING

97 2019, Weingut Keller, Rheinhessen

Pure limestone and one of Germany‘s star

winemakers turn this into a killer combo.

KIEDRICHER GRÄFENBERG RIESLING

97 GG 2019,

Weingut Robert Weil, Rheingau 2019

Grapes from an ancient and elevated site interpreted

by absolutely pristine winemaking.

WESTHOFENER MORSTEIN RIESLING

97 GG 2019

Weingut Wittmann, Rheinhessen

The same exquisite limestone site, made by

yet another Riesling world champion.

NIERSTEINER PETTENTHAL

97 RIESLING GG 2019

Weingut Gunderloch, Rheinhessen

Rieslings from the Roter Hang, or Red Slope,

a rhyolite escarpment, are always savoury.

PÜNDERICHER MARIENBURG

97 FAHRLAY TERRASSEN RIESLING

2018, Weingut Clemens Busch

For years, the Busch family have pioneered an

absolutely uncompromising soil-driven style.

DORSHEIMER GOLDLOCH RIESLING

96 GG 2019, Schlossgut Diel

From a slightly warmer part of the Nahe, this

shows off Caroline Diel‘s outstanding talent.

GRAACHER HIMMELREICH RIESLING

96 GG 2019

Weingut Schloss Lieser, Mosel

Few Mosel estates bottle wines with such

consistent brilliance and sheer luminosity.

WILTINGER SCHARZHOFBERG

95 PERGENTSKNOPP RIESLING

GG 2019, Van Volxem

An exquisite interpretation of what probably

is Germany‘s most iconic Riesling vineyard.

sandstone and granite – will show you

three really distinct Rieslings. Riesling thus

has a beautiful site signature.

Riesling also is beautiful at every stage of

its life: in its youth it brims with primary

flavours of fruit. Depending on climate, its

aromas span the entire citrus spectrum and

move from green apple via stone fruit to

ripest mango and pineapple – the best

wines offset these fruity notions with floral

and herbal, stony and earthy overtones. As

Riesling evolves in bottle, it changes texturally

and aromatically. It becomes balmlike

and almost otherworldly aromas

appear: fresh fruit notions are transmuted

into hints of herbs, dried citrus peel, beeswax,

lanolin and stone. Even modest wines

go through this magical transformation.

Riesling is also adaptable: it thrives in

varied climates – even though it prefers

coolness. Yet, with all this personality,

Riesling demands the best sites: the

stoniest, poorest, steepest vineyards. It

Dönnhoff wines are

celebrated across the

globe for their purity

and expression. Below:

ripe Riesling grapes in

Dönnhoff‘s vineyards.

excels where others founder. This is one of

the most beautiful things to contemplate

about Riesling – that the greatest struggle

brings forth the greatest beauty.

INFINITE VARIETY

Riesling’s greatest strength is also its

greatest weakness: Riesling’s nature means

that it can be and is made in a mind-boggling

variety of styles: from dry, via off-dry,

medium sweet to downright luscious. Some

Rieslings are ultra-light, others full-bodied

and muscular. While this is a source of

fasciation to initiates, it puts average

drinkers off – especially since the label

rarely gives a clue to style. The market

prefers a clear taste profile and Riesling

simply refuses to be shoved into a box. The

only solution: taste, keep track of what you

like and speak to your specialist wine

merchant.

GERMANY

We have to start with Germany: it is

Riesling’s spiritual home, where it evolved

and where it first found fame. Nobody

grows as much Riesling as the Germans:

their 24,049 hectares/59,426 acres represent

38% of the world’s Riesling plantings.

It grows in every region and reaches its

most diverse and heightened expressions

here. Germany’s paradigm shift from

<

summer 2021

falstaff

63


wine / RIESLING

BEST OF

Lucas Pichler, right, is one of

Austria‘s Riesling superstars.

His contemporary winery is

surrounded by his vineyards.

<

quantity to quality over the past three

decades, in combination with climate

change, has wrought a revolution. Riesling

often struggled to ripen fully in a pre- climate-change

Germany. Now Riesling ripens

fully and makes expressive, properly dry

wines in every vintage.

One of Germany’s foremost Riesling

winemakers, Klaus-Peter Keller from

Rheinhessen, says: “Riesling is a unique

grape variety. It is one of the great winners

of climate change. Grapes would not

always ripen in the 1970s and 80s but ever

since the 1990s one good vintage followed

another. The 2019 vintage was like a

crowning glory.“ For Keller, the 2020

vintage is a worthy follow-up. The string of

great vintages and ever more honed site

expressions across Germany resulted in

much positive reporting. He notes steadily

increasing demand for his Rieslings,

especially in Asia. He also notes a change in

how Riesling is perceived: “Drinkers across

the world – with curiosity and openness –

are learning to appreciate Riesling in all its

uniqueness. We still have some way to go

but we are moving in the right direction.“

The regions of Rheingau, Mosel with its

tributaries Saar and Ruwer, Pfalz, Rheinhessen

and Nahe are Germany’s Riesling

DRINKERS ACROSS

THE WORLD – WITH

CURIOSITY AND

OPENNESS – ARE

LEARNING TO

APPRECIATE RIESLING

IN ALL ITS UNIQUENESS.

KLAUS-PETER KELLER, WINEMAKER

Austrian

Riesling

RIESLING KAMPTAL DAC RIED

100 ZÖBINGER HEILIGENSTEIN 1ÖTW

ALTE REBEN 2019

Weingut Bründlmayer, Kamptal

Willi Bründlmayer is crafting true monuments

of Riesling from the Heiligenstein site.

RIESLING SMARAGD “UNENDLICH“

99 2019

Weingut F. X. Pichler, Wachau

Lucas Pichler‘s Unendlich – or infinite – Riesling

has become a benchmark for the Wachau.

RIESLING SMARAGD RIED

99 SINGERRIEDEL 2019

Weingut Franz Hirtzberger, Wachau

Rieslings from this terraced, steep site in Spitz

are synonymous with Wachau excellence.

RIESLING SMARAGD RIED

98 ACHLEITHEN 2019

Weingut Rudi Pichler, Wachau

Achleithen probably is the most iconic site of

the Wachau, often spoken of in hushed tones.

RIESLING KAMPTAL DAC RIED HEI-

97 LIGENSTEIN 1ÖTW ALTE REBEN 2019

Weingut Jurtschitsch, Kamptal

Another exquisite interpretation of this legendary

Kamptal site: vibrant and captivating.

Photos: @chrissingerme, Shutterstock, provided

64 falstaff summer 2021


IIT IS SAFE TO SAY

THAT GERMAN

RIESLING HAS NEVER

BEEN AS GOOD,

DIVERSE OR BREATH-

TAKING AS IT IS TODAY.

View of Kayserberg – Alsace

vineyards are sheltered

by the Vosges mountains.

Below: a limestone rock , but

there is granite, sandstone

and basalt too.

hotspots. They all have their distinct

characters, informed by soils and climate:

Pfalz Rieslings from Triassic soils of limeand

sandstone are traditionally dry and

show ideal proportions of body, substance,

fruit and freshness. Rheinhessen has varied

soils including pure limestone and rhyolite.

Its dry Rieslings range from cool, soothing

limestone elegance to rhyolite savouriness.

The Rheingau with its quartzite, schist,

loam, loess and clay soils has a more moderate

climate and makes statuesque,

poised Rieslings. The cooler Mosel, Saar

and Ruwer valleys are dominated by

Devonian slate: the marriage of Riesling

and slate results in nervy, fine-boned

Rieslings of unique thrill. Formerly

marginal in climate, these Rieslings now

ripen fully and are true originals. Most

vineyards here are vertiginously steep. The

Nahe, also formerly marginal, has the most

complex soils, many of volcanic origin: its

dry Rieslings are hair-raising. It is safe to

say that German Riesling has never been as

good, diverse or breath-taking as it is today.

FRANCE – ALSACE

Almost all of France’s Riesling is in Alsace.

The region shares much of its history with

Germany, which explains the grape‘s predominance

in this north-eastern French

region. A fifth of Alsace vineyards or 3,126

hectares/7,724 acres, are planted to Riesling

along the sunny, well-drained, steep

and east-facing slopes of the Vosges

mountains. The shelter afforded by the

mountains and a

mild climate afford

Riesling the long

growing season it needs.

The best single vine- yards

are designated grands crus – they cover

just 8% of Alsace vineyards and make just

3% of Alsace wine. These 51 grands crus

have diverse soils – limestone, sandstone,

granite, marl and basalt. One of the most

famous grands crus is Schlossberg,

composed of granite and gneiss. Catherine

Faller of Domaine Weinbach likens the

Schlossberg to a tool that carves and cuts

the “diamond“ that is Riesling. The

precision and clarity of Schlossberg

Rieslings are a marvel. Search out the

grand cru Rieslings – they are spectacular:

often full-bodied, shimmering with fruity

and spicy notions of richness – but they

can also be taut and linear. So taste and

find a producer whose style suits you.

<

BEST OF

Alsace

Riesling

RIESLING CLOS SAINT URBAIN RAN-

98 GEN DE THANN GRAND CRU 2013

Domaine Zind-Humbrecht

A legend in its own right from the southernmost

and only volcanic Alsace grand cru.

RIESLING SCHLOSSBERG GRAND

97 CRU “CLOS DES CAPUCINES“ 2012

Domaine Weinbach

Schlossberg Rieslings, grown on this steep granitic

slope are always precise and thrilling.

RIESLING VORBOURG “CLOS SAINT

97 LANDELIN“ 2014

Domaine Muré - Clos St Landelin

Vorbourg juts out into the Rhine plain. Its limestone

soils lend inherent elegance to the wine.

RIESLING CUVÉE FRÉDÉRIC EMILE

97 2017, Trimbach

Trimbach is known for its racy, uncompromisingly

dry long-lived styles of Riesling.

GROSSI LAÜE RIESLING 2013

96 Famille Hugel

The Hugel family relase their Grossi Laüe (a

dialect term for grand cru) with bottle age.

summer 2021

falstaff

65


wine / RIESLING

<

USA – WASHINGTON STATE

AND THE FINGER LAKES, NY

There are two Riesling hotspots in the

United States. Most plantings are in Washington

State. Its lean soils are home to

2,468 hectares/6,099 acres of Riesling.

A dry climate and abundant sunlight in

the inland wine regions provide the long

growing season Riesling needs. Kevin

Corliss, vice president of viticulture for

Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, the largest

Riesling producer in Washington and

the US, says: “Like it or not, we do really,

really great Riesling. And we should

because vast sections of our state are

well-suited to it.“ Corliss describes its

flavours as, “Key lime, mandarin oranges

and wet rock.” Washington’s dry Rieslings

pack a punch and transport the stark

beauty of the landscape. The other US

Riesling hotspots are New York’s Finger

Lakes. The climate is much cooler and

there are just 384 hectares/950 acres of

BEST OF

Australia

Riesling

POLISH HILL RIESLING 2020

96 Grosset Wines, Clare Valley

Jeffrey Grosset is the high priest of Australian

Riesling. Grown at 460m, this is pure thrill.

WATERVALE RIESLING 2020

95 Mount Horrocks Wines, Clare Valley

From a small, single vineyard, this really stands

out for its texture and complex aftertaste.

RIESLING 2020

94 Pewsey Vale, Eden Valley

Grown at almost 500m, this expresses glorious

freshness and Eden Valley charm.

ISOLATION RIDGE RIESLING 2019

93 Frankland Estate, Western Australia

Not from your classic Riesling region, but a

total, textural wonder fermented in neutral oak.

WATERVALE RIESLING 2020

93 Jim Barry Wines, Clare Valley

Another iconic name in Australian Riesling,

another stunningly pure, zesty

expression.

Peter Berry of Jim

Barry in Clare Valley,

South Australia, is one

of Australia‘s foremost

Riesling protagonists.

Here he is pictured with

his sons Sam and Tom.

Photos: ©Don Brice Photography 2008, provided

66 falstaff summer 2021


View of the Danube from one

of Weingut Hirtzberger‘s steep

and terraced vineyards in

Austria‘s Wachau region.

Riesling. The lakes – Canandaigua, Keuka,

Seneca and Cayuga – moderate what

can be a harsh climate. Finger Lake

Rieslings can be delicate and show best

with bottle age.

AUSTRALIA

Riesling first arrived in Australia in 1837

and has been a stalwart of the country’s

wine scene ever since. For a long time,

Riesling was Australia’s most widely

planted white grape and was only overtaken

by Chardonnay in the 1990s. Today

there are 3,157 hectares/7,801 acres of

Riesling in Australia. Rieslings from Eden

Valley and Clare Valley in South Australia

are classics in their own right: they have a

lime-driven freshness, vivid urgency,

moderate alcohol and show real intensity

and steeliness. With just a little bottle age,

they develop a beguiling aroma that recalls

lime curd and even lanolin – they are

almost always bone-dry. The soils in both

valleys are diverse: limestone, slate, quartz,

loam, sand, clay and gravel – but it is the

large difference between night- and daytime

OUR RIESLINGS TEND

TO BE LEAN, FRESH,

LIMEY AND QUITE

PURE. A LOT OF

THE VINEYARDS

ARE PLANTED IN

CHALLENGING SITES.

JEFFREY GROSSET, WINEMAKER

temperatures that makes these Rieslings so

distinct. “Riesling, more than any other

variety to me, expresses place,“ says Jeffrey

Grosset of the eponymous winery in Clare

Valley. “Our Rieslings tend to be lean, fresh,

limey and quite pure. A lot of the vineyards

are planted in challenging sites, the vines

have to struggle. The fruit is concentrated

and creates an intense wine.“ Aged Australian

Riesling is a joy and a collector‘s item:

the wines are already intense in their youth

and become even more so with age.

AUSTRIA

There are just 1,985 hectares/4,905 acres of

Riesling in Austria – yet Austrian Rieslings

are prized across the world for their

intensity, brilliance and purity. Austrian

Riesling grows primarily along the river

Danube in Lower Austria in the regions of

Wachau, Kremstal, Kamptal and Traisental.

These regions are also famous for Austria’s

flagship variety, Grüner Veltliner – but this

is exactly what explains Riesling’s disproportionate

fame. It is only planted in the

most suitable sites: on the stony slopes

dropping down to the Danube and Kamp

rivers. Further down on those same slopes

where the soil is richer, Grüner Veltliner

takes pride of place, but in the poorest,

stoniest, steepest sites, Riesling triumphs.

It loves the ortho- and paragneiss, shale

and sandstone soils. Austrian Riesling is

full-fruited and of brilliant purity, usually

bone-dry, often sports overtones of apricot

and peach and runs the full gamut of citrus

flavours. It clearly enjoys the extended

growing season afforded by the deeply

continental climate.

<

summer 2021

falstaff

67


wine / RIESLING

The climate in Marlborough,

New Zealand, is cool but sunny

and thus ideal for the aromatic

development of Riesling.

BEST OF

Rest of the world

Riesling

<

THE REST OF THE WORLD

In New Zealand, there are 569 hectares/

1,406 acres of Riesling, mostly in Marlborough

on the South Island, a cool but sunny

climate ideal for the aromatic development

and acid retention in the grapes. In South

Africa, there is even less: just 126

hectares/311 acres and they are mostly in

Elgin, the country’s coolest growing region.

Jessica Saurwein of the eponymous estate,

says: “There is simply no other region at the

moment in South Africa that can do

Riesling as well.“

She also notes the weathered shale soils,

the cooling altitude and maritime influences

of her vineyards.

INCREDIBLE VALUE

Riesling grows on every continent and

makes distinct wines with much character

and ageability Yet, compared to other white

varieties, it still has an image problem.

While things are changing slowly, the

THERE IS SIMPLY

NO OTHER REGION

IN SOUTH AFRICA

THAT CAN DO

RIESLING AS WELL.

JESSICA SAURWEIN, WINEMAKER

remarkable thing about Riesling is its price:

even the best wines are still in the realm of

the affordable – most are actually incredible

value. Riesling remains an absolute bargain.

In some ways this is a scandal: just think of

the back-breaking work it takes to farm the

steep, stony slopes that Riesling loves so

much. For Riesling lovers, however, this is a

boon. Single-vineyard Rieslings, no matter

where in the world they are grown, are

exquisite, expressive wines and can age for

decades. If you like the thrill of acid and if

crystalline purity turns you on, you had

better get in on the game.

<

F-SERIES OLD VINE RIESLING 2009

96 Framingham Wines, Marlborough,

New Zealand

This tiny boutique estate has a huge reputation

for its pristine Riesling interpretations.

DRY RIESLING 2009

96 Felton Road, Central Otago,

New Zealand

Renowned for its stellar Pinot Noir, Felton Road

makes outstanding Rieslings, too.

BEL CANTO RIESLING 2015

95 Pegasus Bay, North Canterbury,

New Zeland

Rich but dry, Bel Canto has become a byword

for premium New Zealand Riesling.

EROICA XLC DRY RIESLING 2017

94 Chateau Ste Michelle & Dr. Loosen,

Washington, USA

This German-American joint venture pushes

Riesling boundaries in Washington State.

CHI RIESLING 2020

93 Saurwein Wines, Elgin, South Africa

Jessica Saurwein‘s expressive Riesling from

Elgin is as stony as it is fruity.

DRY RIESLING LEIDENFROST

92 VINEYARD 2017

Forge Cellars, Finger Lakes, USA

Unusual flavours characterise this single

vineyard Riesling from upstate New York.

EROICA RIESLING 2019

92 Chateau Ste Michelle & Dr. Loosen,

Washington, USA

Deliberately named after Beethoven‘s

ground-breaking symphony, this dry Riesling

has become a Washington classic.

Photos:NZW.Inc.Giesen.Wines, Ralf Kaiser - Weinkaiser.de, provided

68 falstaff summer 2021


GERMAN RIESLING

GLORY, DOWNFALL AND COMEBACK

Riesling is inextricably linked with Germany.

Growing along the river Rhine and its tributaries, it evolved as a quality

variety and reached its greatest fame in the late 19th century.

Few pictures illustrate Riesling‘s stylistic diversity

better than the one below, taken on the same

October day in 2018 in the Pündericher Marienburg

vineyard farmed by Clemens Busch and his

family in Germany‘s Mosel valley.

SELECTIVE HARVESTING

Modern trellised farming methods can ensure

even ripening of grapes, but Riesling from old

vines, grown on single stakes, ripens unevenly

and this uneven ripeness – along with selective

harvesting – is behind Germay‘s system of Prädikate:

the greenish grapes will result in Kabinett

wines, the yellow ones in Spätlese, the amber

ones in Auslese, Beerenauslese and eventually

Trockenbeerenauslese.

When these grapes are vinified separately, they

result in very different styles. This gave rise to

the use of Prädikate. These became an established

and accepted quality key for Riesling in the

growing regions that specialised in it: Rheingau,

Mosel, Saar and Ruwer, Pfalz and parts of Rheinhessen.

The Prädikate were predominantly applied

to Riesling. The best wines, often kept in barrel

to mature for years, were called Cabinet. Wines

without a Prädikat were simply labelled by site

or village.

HISTORIC QUALITY LINKED TO PROVENANCE

In pre-climate change Germany, Riesling with its

need for an extended growing season, would only

ripen fully in the very best sites. Most of these

wines were dry. Only in exceptional years would

overripe grapes, or grapes affected by noble rot

(Botrytis cinerea), result in rare and precious

sweet wines. Harvested selectively from single

sites, these grapes resulted in strikingly different

styles of wine. It was the wines from these single,

exceptional sites that created Riesling’s reputation.

Despite the old German wine law which had

never clearly defined origin, Prädikate were a real

currency. Quality was linked to Riesling as a grape

variety and to site – but the 1971 wine law severed

that link to a large degree. It allowed German

wine, and above all Riesling, to become a mockery

of itself.

THE LEGAL PROBLEM

The 1971 wine law applied Prädikate to all grapes

after setting minimum ripeness levels measured

in degrees of Oechsle (the density of sugar in

grape juice). It appropriated the Prädikate and

FEW PICTURES

ILLUSTRATE

RIESLING‘S STYLISTIC

DIVERSITY BETTER

THAN THE ONE BELOW.

mis-appropriated the term Cabinet by turning it

into Kabinett, as the lowest ripeness level.

That earlier-ripening grape varieties can assimilate

more sugar more quickly and thus could be

made into wines that qualified meaninglessly as

Auslese or Spätlese did not matter to the law.

TECHNICAL ADVANCES AND DECLINE

However, the law did not change the reality that

Riesling is a late-ripening grape that demands

the best sites. Riesling planted in lesser sites had

eye-watering levels of acidity. But technological

advances meant that non-Prädikat wines could

be sterile-filtered and sweetened (legally) to the

desired level. Thin, meagre Rieslings were thus

sold with sweetness levels decoupled from any

ripeness of the grapes harvested. Then there were

the confusing German labels, with unintelligible

names, and the wildly unpredictable flavour profile

of the wines themselves. The fact that a Kabinett

wine can be dry, off-dry or sweet confuses consumers

to this day. The combination of all these

factors meant that Riesling took a huge reputational

hit – one it is still recovering from today.

THE COMEBACK

German Riesling was almost driven to its knees.

But in the 1980s and 90s things slowly began to

change. Two factors reversed the trend: climate

change and the return to the idea of provenance.

After the aberrations of the 20th century, German

Riesling is back where it belongs – at the top.

<

Riesling grapes all picked

in one Mosel vineyard on

the same October day.

summer 2021

falstaff

69


wine / CELEBRITY WINES

CELEBRITY

WINES

Wines made or endorsed by famous names are now a firm part of

the wine business – if done right, they are a perfect extension of a

celebrity’s brand. Nonetheless, some wine lovers are sceptical and

see these wines as nothing but a calculated exploitation of fame.

Falstaff put the wines to the test.

WORDS BENJAMIN HERZOG, DOMINIK VOMBACH, ANNE KREBIEHL MW

Photo: Darenote Ltd

70

falstaff summer 2021


Kylie Minogue‘s wines

do not come across as

a cynical marketing

ploy, on the contrary,

it is entirely credible

that she enjoys drinking

them too.

summer 2021

falstaff

71


wine / CELEBRITY WINES

K

ylie Minogue, Mary J. Blige,

Gordon Ramsay, Idris Elba,

Sting and John Malkovich

are just a few of the

celebrities who have entered

the wine business. Such wines – either made

or endorsed by celebrities – have become

almost ubiquitous. Some see this as a

cynical move: why drink these wines? Why

pay for a famous name on the label? Why

play their game? That is why Falstaff put

them to the test. Our conclusion? Some

celebrity wines are downright stunning:

some are really well-made and delicious

– neither are they more expensive than

other wines of their class.

Our tasting of almost 90 wines showed

clear front-runners: two red wines, one

from Tuscany, one from California, and a

stunning Champagne, selected by British

actor Idris Elba. The California red was

Inglenook Rubicon 2011, a Cabernet

Sauvignon-dominated blend from Rutherford

in Napa Valley, made at the winery of

filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola – the man

behind The Godfather and Apocalypse

Now. The Tuscan wine was O.T. Toscana

Rosso 2015 from the winery of star

photographer Oliviero Toscani who

achieved notoriety with his provocative

shots for the Italian fashion label Benetton

from the 1980s onwards. As it turns out,

both Coppola and Toscani are old hands.

Their involvement in wine goes back to the

1970s – just as they were making their

names in filmmaking and photography.

OUR CONCLUSION?

SOME CELEBRITY

WINES ARE DOWN-

RIGHT STUNNING: SOME

ARE WELL-MADE AND

DELICIOUS.

American actor John Malkovich

likes to keep a lower profile

when promoting the wines

grown at his Provence estate.

Photos: provided-

72 falstaff summer 2021


TOP WINES FROM TOP STARS

The Falstaff tasting team was also impressed

by much less well-established wine

projects: Idris Elba‘s Blanc de Blancs

Champagne, for instance, has as much

substance and effortless style as the actor

himself. He partnered with Champagne

Sanger in Avize for this project. Likewise,

the wine range presented by British chef

Gordon Ramsay, launched just a few weeks

ago, convinced the team. Ramsay, known

equally well for unvarnished criticism and

infallible taste, remains true to form – and

the team did not have to resort to swear

words when describing the wines. Made by

Seabold Cellars in Monterey, California,

Ramsay’s wines are currently sold in the

United States only, but further distribution

can only be a question of time. His

<

IDRIS ELBA‘S CHAM-

PAGNE HAS AS MUCH

SUBSTANCE AND

EFFORTLESS STYLE AS

THE ACTOR HIMSELF.

Neat rows of vines

in the rolling

countryside of

Tuscany.

Sting and his wife Trudie

Styler not only produce

wine but also honey and

olive oil at their Tuscan

farm.

summer 2021

falstaff 73


wine / CELEBRITY WINES

<

numerous restaurants in Britain

and the US are a ready route to

market.

Celebrity wines are clearly more

than a nod to fans or a hobby for

the stars: they are serious business.

Despite their split, the former

Hollywood dream couple Angelina

Jolie und Brad Pitt still own Château

Miraval in Provence, France. When the

couple launched their first wine in 2012,

the world did not necessarily expect that it

would become a benchmark for Rosé de

Provence – but that is Miraval’s status

today. Much of the wine’s success is down

to the expertise of the legendary winemaking

family Perrin, owners of the iconic

Château de Beaucastel in the Rhône Valley

– but it is fair to say that by now Château

Miraval wines sell because they are good,

not because of the famous names attached

to them. The current vintage, 2020, scored

93 points after all.

Francis Ford Coppola‘s

involvement in wine goes

back to the 1970s. Below:

his Inglenook Estate.

Idris Elba presenting a

magnum of his exquisite

Blanc de Blancs

Champagne to the

consultant sommelier of

Soho House in London

Photos: @alexjpiper VISUALSBYAJP.COM, ©2019 The Family Coppola, provided

74 falstaff summer 2021


COMMERCIAL SUCCESS

It is some time now that Kylie Minogue‘s

pop hits dominated the airwaves, but the

British-Australian singer is now taking off

with the wine brand she launched last year.

Minogue has sold more than a million

bottles to date. The fresh, accessible style of

her wines convinced the Falstaff team. The

portfolio includes a French rosé and a

recently launched rosé Prosecco – with

swish packaging. The name Kylie is

emblazoned on the labels and the promotional

shots would not look out of place in a

glossy fashion magazine. Yes, Minogue

deliberately wears a pink dress for her pink

wines, but it is entirely credible that she

enjoys drinking them too. It is the same for

American singer Mary J. Blige and her Sun

Goddess wines, for which she partnered

with a winery in Italy. “I guess the inspiration

was just loving white wine,“ Blige says.

And while it sounds good as a marketing

blurb, what she says about the creation of

the name Sun Goddess under which she

produces a Pinot Grigio and a Sauvignon

Blanc made in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia

American singer Mary J. Blige was

deeply involved in blending the

wines and getting to know the entire

winemaking process: because she

wanted to make the kind of wines

she likes to drink.

IT IS FAIR TO SAY

THAT BY NOW,

CHÂTEAU MIRAVAL

WINES SELL BECAUSE

THEY ARE GOOD, NOT

BECAUSE OF THE FAME

ATTACHED TO THEM.

region is a truism for wine: “As a child I

always tried to capture the sun’s warmth

and energy.“ That is exactly what wine does

and Blige has created the style she likes to

drink: light, fruity and refreshing.

American actor John Malkovich takes

a different approach. The wines from his

estate in southern France are sold under

the name of Les Quelles de la Coste, yet

his name appears only in small print on

the back label of the bottles. When we

enquired why this was the case, we were

told that he preferred to keep a low profile:

this was about the wines, not about him.

He and his wife Nicoletta Peyran are thus

working on putting Les Quelles de la Coste

on the map and on making a really good

Cabernet Sauvignon.

THE VERDICT

Sadly, there also are more cynical examples

of celebrity wines. In Formula One racing,

for example, it was fashionable for a while

to market wines with the names of famous

drivers on the label. The quality of the

wines, however, took a back seat.

<

summer 2021

falstaff

75


wine / CELEBRITY WINES

Gordon Ramsay in the

vineyard with one of his

wines on California‘s

Monterey Coast.

<

Then there are music bands who just

license their names, like Kiss or The

Rolling Stones – their names grace wine

bottles but usually without input from the

artists themselves – such wines were not

part of our tasting.

Our tasting made it abundantly clear

that it takes more than a famous name to

be successful in the wine business. All the

wines tasted had significant input from the

respective stars. The wines that scored well

come with a clear identity and line of

communication; they are well-made wines

from quality grapes which merit their

price. They are credible projects made by

real professionals – in the spheres of wine

and communication. They are more than

lifestyle hobbies of the rich and famous

dabbling in wine and when done properly

they are convincing extensions of that

famed personality – with just a little

stardust. And who knows how many of

these wines have converted fans into real

wine lovers – that can only be a good

thing.

<

Brad Pitt and winemaker

Marc Perrin at

Château Miraval, also

pictured below.

Photos: CM004 ©sergechapuis, Lionel Cironneau / AP / picturedesk.com, provided

76 falstaff summer 2021


BEST OF

CELEBRITY WINES

TASTING

TASTING

INFO

WEITERE BEWERTUNGEN

SEE MORE TASTING

UND BESCHREIBUNGEN

NOTES AT

FINDEN SIE

FALSTAFF.COM

AB SEITE 148.

95

2011 INGLENOOK RUBICON

FRANCIS FORD COPPOLA

WINERY

Rutherford, Napa Valley, California

Intense nose with notes of dark

forest fruit, dried plum and blackberry

jam. In addition, fresh hints of

grapefruit and sour cherry as well

as spicy notes. Full-bodied and gripping

on the palate. Powerful stature,

aroma of dark forest fruit and

caramel as well as liquorice. Finely

polished tannin, long finish.

94

2018 CHARDONNAY SONOMA

COUNTY RESERVE GORDON

RAMSAY WINES,

Sonoma, California

Appealing citrus aromas on the

nose. Lime, lemon and grapefruit.

Hints of buttered toast and peach

as well as mirabelle plum. Juicy,

beautiful acidity on the palate.

Full-bodied without being overbearing.

Fine citrus aromas and yellow

stone fruit. Long mineral finish.

92

2020 CARMÉNÈRE LES QUELLES

DE LA COSTE

Provence, France

Top wine from John Malkovich and

team. Intense fruit on the nose.

Notes of strawberry and raspberry

as well as ripe plum, alongside hints

of liquorice and caramel. Dense and

juicy on the palate with ripe acidity

and fine tannin. Lots of fruit, plum,

raspberry and cherry. Long finish

with spicy hints.

95

2010 PORTE NOIRE CHAMPAGNE

BRUT 2010 GRAND CRU –

SÉLECTIONNÉ PAR IDRIS ELBA

Champagne, France

An initial whiff of oyster shell is

soon overtaken by a rich notion of

buttery, salted shortbread. That

creamy, rich shortbread notion

remains a firm feature also on the

palate where it clothes and enriches

that chalky poise and rounds out the

ultra-cool and vivid, chalky depth.

Real elegance and presence and

very long-lasting. Bravo.

95

2015 OLIVIERO TOSCANI

OLIVIERO TOSCANI

Casale Marittimo, Tunscay, Italy

Concentrated aromas on the nose.

Notes of dark berry compote and

sour cherry, accompanied by spicy

notes of bay leaf, black pepper and

liquorice. Dense and juicy on the

palate. Fine-grained tannin and ripe,

juicy acidity. Aromas of plum, blackberry

and sour cherry as well as an

elegant spiciness. Long finish.

93

2020 MIRAVAL CÔTES DE

PROVENCE CHÂTEAU

MIRAVAL

Le Val, Provence, France

Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt‘s

rosé is a modern classic. Intense

nose with notes of grapefruit,

peach, pineapple, lychee and

passion fruit along with hints of

white flowers. Taut acidity on

the palate, light on its feet, lots

of fruit with strawberry, ripe

apple and citrus. Long finish.

92

2016 SISTER MOON ROSSO

TOSCANA CASTELLO IL PALAGIO,

Mercatale Val di Pesa, Tuscany,

Italy

Red wine from Sting‘s vineyard in

Tuscany. Appealing nose with notes

of ripe Morello cherry and dark

forest berries. In addition, smoky

hints and some grapefruit. Juicy

acidity on the palate, pleasantly

elegant. Discreet fruit aromas with

sour cherry and redcurrant. Slightly

noticeable tannin, long finish.

91

PROSECCO ROSÉ NV KYLIE

MINOUGE WINES,

Veneto, Italy

Intense fruity-powdery nose. Notes

of strawberry, redcurrant and

lychee. Also honeydew melon and

dried pineapple. Noticeable pleasant

sweetness on the palate, juicy acidity,

citrus notes, white stone fruit

and apple. Pleasantly fine mousse,

medium-long finish.

90

2020 SUN GODDESS BY

MARY J. BLIGE SAUVIGNON

BLANC,

Fantinel, Friuli-Venezia-Giulia,

Italy

Inviting fruity-fresh bouquet with

notes of ripe apple and pear, followed

by citrus and apricot as well

as white flowers and some caramel.

Fresh acidity on the palate, light

and filigree, lots of yellow fruit,

apple, apricot, citrus, long finish.

Up to € 20 / $ 30 € 21 – 30 / $ 31 – 40 € 31 – 50 / $ 41 – 60 € 50 – 100 / $ 61 – 110 € 100+ / $ 110+ summer 2021 falstaff 77


column / LIGHTHOUSE

CONTEMPLATING

CHANGE

Over the past year, life has forced changes on most of us.

Whether they were welcome or not, they were valuable

because they forced us to decide what the really important

things are. Our columnist comes to a rather optimistic

conclusion.

WORDS PETER PHAROS

My Penguin Classics copy of

Ovid’s Metamorphoses is

an unnerving affair. People

turn into plants and animals,

they sprout leaves

and grow scales. Things don’t end well: in

one gruesome passage, which I perhaps

read at too tender an age, an avid hunter is

turned into a deer and torn apart by his

own dogs. The cause is, invariably, divine

whim. Not so much the hubris of Ancient

Greece, but the random accident of the

American horror film. The heroes cross a

line they never knew was there. For a

Roman such as Ovid, the moral was clear:

change is for the worst.

The past year felt like a painful metamorphosis,

a once-in-a-lifetime change. Interestingly

though, the reasons people give for

this always seem to say more about the

person than the event: the pandemic as a

Rorschach test. Like the ancients, we need a

narrative, a justification, even if it is just a

cosmic whim.

CHANGE AND IDENTITY

Yet, most of the time at least, I feel optimistic.

Maybe it is apathy sharpening into

denial, a year under the hammer of unreal

headlines can do that to a person, after all.

Or maybe it is the onset of summer, a subconscious

certainty that there will be sun

and sea, lazy afternoons with a book and

mellow nights with Assyrtiko. Whatever the

78 falstaff summer 2021

reason, I try to think of what will come as a

new beginning. Yes, a lot has happened, and

untangling it will take time. But a metamorphosis

also brings opportunity. If old certainties

no longer hold, then everything can

change: a mind, a life, the world.

No, worry not, I am not on a revolutionary

pulpit. I have no answers for the

important things for you – I am not even

sure I have any for me. I will be here to talk

about the things immediately after those.

Yes, underneath it all we all share the same

human identity, the same fundamentals. But

what makes us human is also that, while

fundamentally the same, we are not identical.

As in so many other things, the past year

brought this into stark relief. What gives

each of us solace, the condiments that turn

existing into living are diffrent for everyone.

My ‘condiments’ are the things I want to

talk about.

IF OLD CERTAINTIES

NO LONGER HOLD,

THEN EVERYTHING

CAN CHANGE: A MIND,

A LIFE, THE WORLD.

Illustration: Gina Müller


PETER PHAROS

Our wine, food and

life-loving columnist

and thinker writes

under a pseudonym -

hence the title of

this column. Pharos:

the Lighthouse.

I am thinking of travelling, which I long

took for granted. If I think of the biggest

change in my lifetime, I don’t think of the

internet, but of how flights went from magical

to mundane, the real Jet Age. The first

time I set foot on foreign soil, at twelve

years of age, it really felt like I was changing

worlds; by thirty-two, it felt like I was changing

shirts. After the stasis, I feel ready to

rediscover the enchantment of a different

place. But I also want to put last year’s experience

to good use, become a better, more

mindful traveller. Travelling is a privilege,

and I never want to let it slip back into the

everyday.

And I am thinking of food. Its endless

capacity to delight and amaze, how disparate

ingredients metamorphose into something

cosy or exciting, comfortingly familiar

or seductively exotic. How it signals a pause

or change in the day, brings families

together, and forms a protective wall that

separates the hours that belong to others

from the hours that belong to you. As work

saturated every sense of personal space and

time this past year, food was the one thing

that warded it off. In the new era that will

start, this is a change I intend to keep.

TRIVIAL IMPORTANCE

But most of all, I think about wine, so simple,

yet so complex. I don’t think I’ll ever

stop being amazed by the depth of meaning

with which we infuse the fermented juice of

grapes, a carrier of aroma, taste, feeling,

memory, history, and culture. How we

perceive it as a living thing, always metamorphosising

in bottle. And how there is no

act that feels more celebratory than popping

a cork. It always feels like the start of something,

a new beginning, be it of a life, a year,

a relationship, a career, or something as

trivial, and as important, as a meal. <

summer 2021

falstaff

79


More news

Get news directly into your inbox

with our newsletter. Sign up at

falstaff.com/newsletter/

FOOD

ROADRUNNER: NEW

ANTHONY BOURDAIN

DOCUMENTARY

A

new documentary about the charismatic

chef, writer and TV documentary host

Anthony Bourdain who took his own life

in June 2018 went on general release on July 16,

2021. Bourdain had initially found fame with

his frank confessional of a chef’s life, Kitchen

Confidential, published in 2000. This led to

him fronting a series of engaging and compelling

TV shows: A Cook’s Tour which ran from

2002-2003, No Reservations from 2005-2012

and finally Parts Unknown which ran from 2013

until his death. Distributed by Focus Features

and directed by Oscar-winner Morgan Neville,

the documentary promises an “intimate,

unflinching look“ at Bourdain’s life and legacy.

It intersperses interviews with Bourdain’s friends

and fellow chefs David Chang and Eric Ripert

with unseen archival footage and uses

Bourdain’s own voiceover for narration.

focusfilms.com/roadrunner

LONDON

ALPINE-THEMED RESTAURANT TO OPEN IN LONDON

The UK-based restaurant group D&D London

is to open an Alpine-themed restaurant

in Stratford, East London, in September

2021. Haugen will be located in a purpose-built

pavilion at the gateway to Queen

Elizabeth Olympic Park, a legacy venue of

the Olympic Games held in Stratford in 2012.

The Olympic theme is key: the restaurant

will be named after Anders Haugen, a ski

jumper and America’s first Olympic skiing

medallist in 1924. The all-day dining concept

will feature dishes from Germany, Switzerland,

Austria and France. The ambitious

restaurant complex will have 544 covers

spread across a ground floor deli with a ‘grab

and go‘ counter, a casual ground floor

restaurant with an indoor winter garden and

large terrace, a first-floor dining room, a

cocktail bar with an outdoor terrace, two

private dining rooms and a rooftop bar with

“spectacular views“ of Stratford and the

Olympic Park. D&D London who already run

43 restaurants in the UK, France and the US,

have tasked the hospitality creative studio

Afroditi Krassa to develop the creative

concept to create “an atmosphere reminiscent

of Alpine chalets with a fun and

convivial ambience.“ The pavilion, designed

by Acme, will be a wooden structure.

danddlondon.com

80 falstaff summer 2021


NEWS

NEW YORK

NEW YORK OUTDOOR DINING IN NEGOTIATIONS

TO BECOME PERMANENT

Prompted by the pandemic, New York mayor

de Blasio suspended existing zoning rules in

June 2020 to allow restaurants and bars to

use sidewalks and parking spaces for outdoor

seating, providng a vital lifeline for more

than 11,000 businesses – and delighting

restaurant goers in the process. Negotiations

are now under way at New York‘s Department

of Transport to overhaul or end several

of the zoning rules to make outdoor dining a

permanent feature. A decision is expected

later in 2021.

PARIS

DIOR TO OPEN PARIS

RESTAURANT

The fashion house announced it will open

a restaurant in its historic headquarters

at 30 avenue Montaigne, following two

years of renovations. The menu will be

devised by chef Jean Imbert who has previously

collaborated with Dior. An opening

date has not yet been disclosed. In June,

Dior opened a roof-top pop-up restaurant

at Selfridges department store, London.

dior.com

CHEF DANIEL CALVERT OPENS

SÉZANNE IN TOKYO

Initially expected to open last September

but delayed by the pandemic, Sézanne,

dedicated to fine French cuisine, just

opened in the Four Seasons Hotel Tokyo

at Marunouchi. British-born chef Daniel

Calvert took his former posting, Belon in

Hong Kong, to fourth place of Asia‘s 50

Best Restaurants, so his move to Tokyo

is promising. Named after a southerly

subregion of Champagne, Sézanne will

feature “an eclectic collection of

Champagnes.“

sezanne.tokyo

Photos: ©Focus Features / Everett Collection / picturedesk.com, Shutterstock, provided

COPENHAGEN

DANISH CHEF RENÉ REDZEPI

LAUNCHES NOMA PROJECTS

Known for his pioneering approach, Redzepi

has launched an online business called Noma

Projects, selling unusual condiments. The first

two products, known as Project 001, are

garums. These are fermented “umami-rich

sauces“ which “have been key to Noma‘s vegetarian

and vegan menus.“ Smoked Mushroom

Garum (ve- gan) and Sweet Rice and Egg Garum

(vegeta- rian) are aleady available for pre-order:

“Ferments are currently brewing and will be

ready to ship later this year,“ the dedicated

website says. The condiments will come with

“an extensive recipe collection.“

nomaprojects.com

ALAIN DUCASSE TO OPEN NEW

OSTERIA BBR IN SINGAPORE

Chef and superbrand Alain Ducasse

(read our feature on page 120) is to open

another outlet of his restaurant empire.

Italian-themed Osteria BBR will open

later in July in the historic Bar & Billiard

Room of Singapore‘s iconic Raffles

Hotel. Ducasse-trained Francesco Saletti

will be chef de cuisine.

raffles.com/singapore/dining/bbr/

summer 2021

falstaff

81


food / RECIPES

82 falstaff summer 2021


TASTING

THE

OCEAN

Lobster, oysters and octopus: they really are the big

three from the sea. Their taste evokes open waves,

cool water and salty depths. Falstaff asked three top

chefs to share their favourite recipes using this

luxurious trio.

PHOTOS STINE CHRISTIANSEN

CONCEPT & PRODUCTION THOMAS HOPFERWIESER

FOOD STYLIST THOMAS STEINMANN

More recipes at:

falstaff.com/recipes

summer 2021

falstaff

83


food / RECIPES

84 falstaff summer 2021


STEAMED OYSTER

Cider Vinegar Emulsion - Tarragon Oil

(SERVES 2)

INGREDIENTS FOR THE CIDER

VINEGAR EMULSION

125 ml apple cider vinegar, at room temperature

100 g brown sugar

1 clove of garlic

375 ml grape seed oil, at room temperature

1 egg yolk

Salt, pepper

TO FINISH

– Place the oyster shells on plates of coarse salt.

Place the oyster meat back into the shells and

pour the apple cider emulsion on top. Drizzle

carfully with a few drops of tarragon oil and garnish

each oyster with two fresh tarragon leaves.

METHOD

– Blend the apple vinegar, brown sugar and garlic

with a hand blender.

– While blending, slowly add the grapeseed oil until

an emulsion forms.

– Then add the egg yolk, emulsify fully and season

with salt and pepper.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE TARRAGON OIL

100 g fresh tarragon

80 ml rapeseed oil

METHOD

– Blend the tarragon with the rapeseed oil with a

hand blender for about five minutes.

– Pass through a straining cloth or very fine sieve

and pour into a squeeze bottle.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE STEAMED OYSTERS

6 wild oysters, unopened

100 g butter, clarified

METHOD

– Bring a pot of water to the boil and place a steaming

basket on top.

– Steam the oysters in the basket for about three

to four minutes.

– Melt the butter in a small saucepan.

– Now open the oysters and remove them from the

shell. Briefly dip the oyster meat in the melted

butter.

Recipe by Tobias Fesser, Restaurant

XO Seafoodbar, Hamburg, Deutschland

In a port city like Hamburg, it is only natural to eat

seafood. Fesser’s seafood bar in the hip St Pauli

district is the place to be. His focus is not only on

creativity but also on quality and sustainability.

Photo: Wim Jansen

summer 2021

falstaff

85


food / RECIPES

OCTOPUS SALAD

with tomato, potato and celery

(SERVES 4)

INGREDIENTS FOR THE OCTOPUS

1 fresh octopus, approx. 800g

PREPARING THE OCTOPUS

– Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil, add

the pulpo bring back to the boil, turn down heat

and simmer gently for 45–60 minutes until soft.

Recipe by Markus Furtner, Restaurant

Didi’s Frieden, Zurich, Switzerland

Didi Bruna’s restaurant is centrally located in

Zurich. Success is down to a great combination

of down-to-earth Swiss fare and Mediterranean

lightness. Head chef Markus Furner has won

numerous accolades for his cooking.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE VEGETABLES

4 San Marzano tomatoes

400 g potatoes, waxy

1 red onion (approx. 80 g)

150 g celery stalks

40 g Taggiasca olives, pitted

10 basil leaves

PREPARING THE VEGETABLES

– Boil the potatoes in their skins until soft and leave

to cool, then peel and cut into small cubes

– Peel the tomatoes, remove the seeds and cut

them into small cubes

– Slice the celery and onions thinly

– Halve the olives lengthwise, chop the basil leaves

into fine strips.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE DRESSING

80 g olive oil, cold pressed

Juice of ½ organic lemon

Sea salt

White pepper, freshly ground

TO FINISH

– Remove the octopus from the pot and allow to

cool down a little, slice it into small pieces while

still warm

– In a large bowl, mix octopus and chopped vegetables,

olives and basil, then dress with sea salt,

pepper, olive oil and lemon juice.

86 falstaff summer 2021


Photo: provided

summer 2021

falstaff

87


food / RECIPES

88 falstaff summer 2021


SAUTÉED LOBSTER TAIL

with cauliflower and celery

(SERVES 4)

INGREDIENTS FOR THE LOBSTER

4 lobster tails

PREPARING THE LOBSTER

– Bring a large pot of water to the boil. Add the

lobster tails, boil for 1.5 minutes, remove and

rinse in iced water. Then halve the tails

lengthwise with a sharp knife. Set aside.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE CAULIFLOWER

CREAM

1 large cauliflower (keep some florets

aside for later)

120 g whipping cream

80 g butter

salt

pepper

nutmeg

METHOD

– Cut the cauliflower into small pieces and put

into a pot with the cream and butter and simmer

until soft.

– Blend with a stick blender until smooth, then

season to taste.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE RAW CAULIFLOWER

SLICES

some of the remaining cauliflower

a little cold water

METHOD

– Slice the raw cauliflower very finely, usig a truffle

slicer or a mandolin

– Soak in cold water until needed.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE CAULIFLOWER

FLORETS

the remaining cauliflower florets

water

salt

METHOD

– Take three to four florets per person, bring

some salted water to the boil and blanch the

florets briefly.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE CELERY

1 bunch of celery

a little butter

METHOD

– Remove the stringy bits from the outer stalks of

the celery, then slice finely.

– Melt the butter and toss the celery slices in it.

– Some of the celery leaves can be used for

garnish later.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE SAUCE

(MAKES APPROX. 1 LITRE)

1 kg crab or lobster shells

100 ml olive oil (for frying)

100 g mixed vegetables: the white part of leeks,

celery, fennel, all finely diced.

Recipe by Hubert Wallner,

Gourmet Restaurant Huber Wallner,

Dellach on Lake Wörthersee, Austria

Having trained with chefs like Hans Haas, Hermann

Huber and Toni Mörwald, Hubert Wallner now

heads up the eponymous Gourmet Restaurant on

Lake Wörthersee in Carinthia, Austria.

100 g tomato paste

some garlic paste

salt, pepper, chamomile tea, sugar, Madras curry

powder, ground paprika

1 l vegetable stock

1 l fish stock

½ l whipping cream

50 g crème fraîche

50 g mascarpone

METHOD

– Heat the olive oil in a pan and gently fry the crab

or lobster shells, then add the finely diced vegetables.

Fry until slightly golden.

– Add the tomato paste, stir and mix, then deglaze

with the vegetable stock and add the fish stock.

– Season with the spices and some chamomile tea,

increase heat and reduce the sauce by half.

– Stir in the whipping cream, add the garlic paste

and bring to the boil again briefly.

– Strain through a sieve and finally mix in the

crème fraîche and mascarpone.

INGREDIENTS FOR SERVING

olive oil

butter

salt, pepper, lime juice

vegetable stock

TO FINISH

– Warm the serving plates.

– In a large pan, heat some olive oil and butter and

sauté the lobster tails. Season with salt, pepper

and lime juice.

– Drain the raw cauliflower slices and dress with

olive oil and lime juice.

– Warm the blanched cauliflower florets in a pot

with vegetable stock, drain, toss in some butter

and season with salt.

SERVING

First dot the cauliflower cream on the plates. Place

lobster tails on top, along with cauliflower florets,

raw slices and celery. Drizzle with the

sauce and garnish with celery leaves.

Photo: Lukas Kirchgasser

summer 2021

falstaff

89


food / BEEF BREEDS

BEEF

BREEDS

Limousin, Chianina, Criollo, Rubia Gallega and Hereford – all these

beef breeds are prized for their meat. Chefs and food lovers know

they all bring distinct attributes to the table. Here is a primer.

WORDS ZEREN WILSON

Photo: Shutterstock

90 falstaff summer 2021


A well-hung rib of

beef with the rich

marbling of fat

that determines so

much of the meat‘s

quality and flavour.

summer 2021

falstaff

91


food / BEEF BREEDS

Sirloin, rib-eye, rump or fillet?

How do you like your steak?

Medium or medium-rare?

Perhaps the more important

question is: which is your

preferred breed? Lovers of good food know

that provenance matters. The mantra which

dictates that great food relies as much on

the quality of the raw ingredients as the

skills of the chef, is as true as ever.

Beef has played a role in the human diet

for thousands of years: cattle have been

domesticated since around 10,000 BC. Beef

is the third most widely consumed meat in

the world after pork and poultry, accounting

for 25% of worldwide meat production.

That’s a whole lot of bovine love.

There are key aspects that determine how

the meat ends up tasting when it lands on

your plate: what the animals feed on,

namely grass or grain, how they are raised,

WHAT MATTERS IS

THE DIFFERENT

BREEDS‘ DISTRIBUTION

OF INTRAMUSCULAR

FAT, NAMELY THE

MARBLING WE PRIZE

SO MUCH.

and how old they are at slaughter. Then

there is the time allowed for hanging, a

process that tenderises and enhances

flavour. All this applies to all cattle – but

then there are the genetics and intrinsic

qualities of different beef breeds.

Each breed has its history and certain

dispositions: how fast they can grow to

maturity, their hardiness to the weather and

resistance to certain diseases. What matters

when it comes to eating beef, is the

different breeds’ distribution of intramuscular

fat, namely the marbling we prize so

much. Much of it evolves during the later

stages of growth and contributes greatly to

the tenderness of the meat and its flavour.

Fat distribution forms the basis for the

American USDA system of grading: higher

levels of marbling achieve a higher grade

and price. Depending on where in the

world you are, you will come across

different breeds on menus and pastures

– they matter.

LIMOUSIN

The cave drawings in the Lascaux Caves

near Montignac, France, estimated to be

20,000 years old, are of cattle thought to

be related to today’s Limousin breed.

Revered by top chefs across the world for

its strong beefy flavour, Limousin meat has

a relatively low proportion of bone and fat

and is valued for its high yield of quality

<

The animals depicted

in the 20,000-yearold

drawings in the

Lascaux Caves in

France are thought to

be precursors of the

Limousin breed.

Photos: Shutterstock

92 falstaff summer 2021


Hanging beef, i.e.

ageing it in the

correct conditions,

both tenderises the

meat and enhances

its flavour.

summer 2021

falstaff

93


food / BEEF BREEDS

<

meat. Weighing in at around 650kg/

1430lb, Limousin is also lighter than many

other breeds. Originating in the west of

France’s Massif Central, Limousin is now

found in over 80 countries. In France it is

the second-most popular breed after

Charolais. It is often crossed with Angus to

achieve a balance of yield and marbling,

and have a more robust immune system.

CHIANINA

Chianina is one of the oldest and largest

cattle breeds in the world. Taking its name

from its homeland of the Valdichiana in the

provinces of Arezzo and Siena in Tuscany,

Italy, it provides the meat for the famous

Bistecca alla Fiorentina, the iconic Tuscan

T-bone steak. Praised by the Georgic poet

Virgil – his father was a cattle farmer – the

Romans valued Chianina cattle so highly

they made sculptures of them. Noted for

having plenty of well-defined muscle and a

distinctive snow-white coat, Chianina is

known for its particularly lean and tender

meat. It does not benefit from force-feeding

BRIGHT, WHITE AND

LACY VEINS OF FAT

CRISS-CROSS THE MEAT

IN MESMERIC TAPES-

TRIES, MAKING FOR

RICH AND FULL-

FLAVOURED MEAT.

with grain, so it is only right that both the

area and origin of the cattle has been

protected since 1946: this requires the

cattle to be raised on the plains of the

Valdichiana and the hillsides of Casentino

and the Valtiberina.

ANGUS

Aberdeen Angus cattle was bred in the

early 19th century, mainly from the black

cattle of northeast Scotland, known locally

as doddies and hummlies. Resilient in harsh

weather and early maturing, Angus is

valued for being an adaptable breed that

can survive in all weather with relatively

little maintenance, yielding well-marbled

meat. It remains the most popular breed

among North American farmers, due to its

fat marbling and tenderness combined with

its ability to gain weight quickly and

reliably. Angus are also relatively easy to

cross-breed. Farmed across the world,

Angus dominates in Britain, Argentina,

Canada, New Zealand and Australia.

WAGYU

Wagyu refers to all Japanese cattle, with wa

meaning Japanese and gyu meaning cattle.

Wagyu has been present in Japan since at

least the first century. The meat is synonymous

with rich, marbled fat. The degree of

marbling, called sashi in Japanese, is used

to grade the meat. Wagyu has exceptionally

tender meat, often described as ’melting.’

Genetically, Wagyu breeds are predisposed

to have the highest marbling levels amongst

all cattle – and Wagyu is the most expensive

beef. Bright, white and lacy veins of fat

Rubia Gallega meat

is distinguished by

its maroon-coloured

meat and its thick

coating of yellow,

buttery fat. The

finest meat comes

from older cows,

slaughtered at up to

18 years of age.

Photos: StockFood / Gonzalez, Albert, Shutterstock,

94 falstaff summer 2021


Wagyu cattle grazing

at sunset on open

pasture in Japan.

criss-cross the meat in mesmeric tapestries,

making for rich and full-flavoured meat,

with a silky mouthfeel. Some connoisseurs

feel it deserves much more delicate cooking.

Some go as far as flattering it even further

by enjoying it raw like sashimi with just a

splash of soy sauce.

LONGHORN

Regarded as the source of England’s

historic fame for roast beef, English

Longhorn is the oldest British breed.

Originating in northern England, it was

first used as dairy cow. With distinctive

large, white horns, Longhon is famed for

being docile and easy to breed. Longhorn

grow slowly and develop good marbling

throughout without piling on too much

external fat – unlike some other breeds.

Best reared on grass, their slow growth

allows for a buttery depth of flavour via

their beautiful marbling.

GALICIAN BLONDE

Also known as Rubia Gallega, this breed is

from Galicia in northern Spain, mostly

from the province of Lugo. The meat of

these retired dairy cows has dominated the

menus of global top restaurants in recent

years. The finest meat comes from animals

more than eight years old, sometimes rising

to 18 years of age. The older animals bring

higher fat content: their maroon-coloured

meat with its thick outer coating of yellow,

buttery fat achieves deeply savoury

flavours. Its most famous expression is the

Txuleton, a giant T-bone cut. Since most

beef is slaughtered at two and a half to

three years of age, Galician beef is particularly

distinctive and memorable due to the

animals’ age.

HEREFORD

Originally believed to have descended from

the small red cattle of Roman Britain,

Hereford take their name from the county

of Herefordshire on the English-Welsh

border. Mentions of the breed date back to

the 16th century. With an unmistakable

white face, richly coloured red coat, and

small, thick horns, their export began in

1817, originally to Kentucky. Hereford

cattle are now found in over 50 countries

and often compared to Angus for its exquisite

marbling.

CHAROLAIS

The Charolais is a tall, elegant and muscular

breed, originating in the French

departments of Charolles and neighbouring

Nièvre. Noted for being fast growing, it

was the first continental breed to be

introduced to Britain in the late 1950s. It

revolutionised the UK beef industry due to

its faster growing rate. It now is an

important part of cross-breeding programmes,

often involving Hereford and

Angus, allowing cattle to be ready for

slaughter after a year. Charolais was the

third French breed to recieve a protected

designation of origin. Rated as one of the

best breeds in the country, they must be

raised without growth hormones and

antibiotics. The fillet is regarded as one of

its most tender cuts, albeit lacking depth of

flavour, so it is traditionally served with a

rich sauce: Boeuf Charololais Sauce à

l’Époisses is one indulgent example, found

in Burgundy.

CRIOLLO

Covering 750,000 square kilometres/

185 million acres of Argentina, the flat

grasslands of Las Pampas are the pasture

of some of the finest beef in the world.

The Criollo breed is raised for both dairy

and meat production and is thought to

have descended from the first animals

brought to the Americas by Christopher

Columbus. Free to graze on the lush

grasses, Pampas-raised cattle tend to

pack in more flavour, especially when

compared to 100% grain-fed USDA beef

from the USA.

Beef does not equal beef. Chefs and food

lovers have known that for a long time.

<

summer 2021

falstaff

95


food / RECIPES

More recipes at:

falstaff.com/recipes

SMOKE

SIGNALS

Barbecuing is primal, even carnal, but above all delicious. Here are

three enticing reasons to fire up the grill: chops, prawns and steak –

followed by a little barbecue science and ten pro tips.

PHOTOS STINE CHRISTIANSEN

FOODSTYLING GITTE HEIDI RASMUSSEN

96 falstaff summer 2021


summer 2021

falstaff

97


food / REZEPTE

RECIPES

98 falstaff summer 2021


COSTINE AL LIMONE

(SERVES 4)

INGREDIENTS

4 tbsp grainy mustard

1 unwaxed lemon, grated zest and juice

5 tbsp olive oil

2 cloves of garlic, crushed

2 further unwaxed lemons

1.5 kg pork cutlets (=Costine, about 8 pieces)

Sea salt

Black pepper

METHOD

– Mix mustard, lemon zest and juice, olive oil and

garlic in a big bowl

– Add the pork cutlets to the bowl, mix and leave

to marinade for an hour

– After an hour, drain the cutlets and set marinade

aside

– Cut the two remaining lemons in 2 cm thick slices

– Put the cutlets on the barbecue and grill on

medium heat for about 40 minutes on all sides,

basting every now and then with more of the

marinade

– Char the lemon slices on the barbecue for about

10 minutes, turn once

– When done, season the cutlets with salt and

pepper, rest for a few minutes and serve

garnished with the charred lemon slices.

summer 2021

falstaff

99


food/ REZEPTE

GRILLED KING PRAWNS

with tomato, mint and chili

(SERVES 4)

INGREDIENTS

16 large king prawns in their shell

60 ml extra virgin olive oil

3 Roma tomatoes, deseeded and finely chopped

1 red chili, finely chopped

Zest and juice of one lime plus more limes to cut

into wedges for serving

Half a bunch of mint, finely chopped (reserve a few

leaves for garnish)

1 red onion, finely chopped

2 tbsp white wine vinegar

Sea salt, black pepper

METHOD

– Heat barbecue to high heat.

– Cut lengthwise through the king prawns with a

sharp knife, also cutting through the head, devein

and discard innards, rinse under running water

– Brush prawns with a little oil.

– Mix tomato, chili, lime zest and juice, the

remaining olive oil, mint, onion and vinegar into a

salsa, season with salt and pepper and set aside

– Grill the prawns with the cut side down for 2-3

minutes, then turn onto the shell side and grill

for a further minute.

– Take the prawns off the grill, drizzle with the

salsa, garnish with mint leaves and lime wedges

and serve.

100 falstaff summer 2021


summer jun 2018 2021

falstaff

101


food / REZEPTE

RECIPES

102 falstaff summer 2021


TOMAHAWK STEAK

with grilled vegetables and sweet potato

(SERVES 10)

INGREDIENTS FOR THE HERB BUTTER

130 g butter

130 g green herbs (chives, borage, pimpernel,

chervil, sorrel, parsley, cress)

3 g fine sea salt

5 ml lemon juice

0.5 g white and black pepper, finely ground

0.5 g ground Cayenne pepper

METHOD

– Allow butter to come to room temperature, then

beat until fluffy in a food processor

– Wash, dry and finely chop the herbs

– Then blend salt, peppers, lemon juice and herbs

with the butter

– Roll into a sausage shape and wrap in cling film

and refrigerate until serving

INGREDIENTS FOR THE GRILLED VEGETABLES

330 g carrots

330 g purple carrots

330 g yellow carrots

330 g parsnips or parsley root

28 g garlic

135 g red onion

50 g lemon grass

5 ml chili oil

10 ml lemon oil

50 ml olive oil

25 g sugar

50 g fresh lime

15 g sea salt flakes

3 g fresh thyme

6 g fresh rosemary

METHOD

– Peel the vegetables, cut carrots and parsley root

or parsnip into even batons. Crush the garlic and

slice the onions. Crush the lemon grass with the

back of a knife

– Mix the lemon grass with the remaining

ingredients and marinade the vegetable batons in

this mix

– Preheat oven to 180 °C and roast the vegetables

for 15 minutes so they are still firm to the bite.

Check and adjust seasoning

INGREDIENTS FOR THE STEAK

5 kg tomahawk steaks

40 ml sesame oil

30 g sea salt flakes

125 g butter

17 g garlic

5 g fresh thyme

10 g fresh rosemary

METHOD

– Preheat oven to 120 °C

– Heat grill to high heat

– Make sure the meat is at room temperature and

rub the steaks with sesame oil. Put on the grill

until charred grill marks show, about 2 minutes

on each side.

– Take steaks off the grill, salt and put into a

roasting pan with the butter, garlic, thyme and

rosemary, put in the oven and, using a meat

thermometer, cook to the desired stage.

– Once cooked, allow to rest in a warm place and

baste with the melted butter from the roasting

pan just before serving.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE SWEET

POTATO CHIPS

1.75 kg sweet potatoes

10 g rice flour

5 g fine sea salt

Vegetable oil for deep-frying

METHOD

– Peel sweet potato and cut into 1cm batons

– Dust the batons with rice flour

– Deep fry at 170 °C until golden and crispy

– Drain on kitchen paper and season with salt

INGREDIENTS FOR ASPARAGUS AND LIMES

350 g fresh limes

10 g brown sugar

20 g hazelnut butter

330 g green asparagus

10 ml sesame oil

2 g sea salt flakes

10 g mixed fresh herbs

METHOD

– Wash the limes, cut off the ends, cut in half and

dip the cut surfaces in the sugar

– Caramelise the limes in a hot frying pan, once nicely

browned add the hazelnut butter, allow to

bubble up and cover the limes in the butter. Serve

warm

– Snap off the woody ends of the green asparagus,

drizzle with sesame oil and grill until just cooked

– Season with salt and the herbs and serve

SERVING

– Arrange the tomahawk steak on a warmed plate

Add some herb butter to each steak

Arrange the sweet potato chips, the grilled

vegetables, the asparagus and limes

Decant the roasting juices into a warmed gravy

summer 2021

falstaff

103


food / RECIPES

TEN PRO TIPS

FOR YOUR

BARBECUE

WORDS HACKER & ELSBROCK

1) It is often recommended that meat

should be marinated for hours or even overnight

before grilling. While this adds flavour,

it is not really necessary. What is necessary

is to allow meat to come to room temperature

before cooking. Season it and brush

with oil – that is all that is required.

2) Even-sized pieces of meat or vegetables

ensure even cooking.

3) Only place food on the grill when it is really

hot and flames are no longer flickering

or even blazing. The charcoal should be

covered with a grey layer of ash.

THE THRILL

OF THE GRILL

4) When preparing marinades or grill sauces

with sugar or honey, be sure to apply them

only towards the end of cooking as sugar

caramelises quickly and can burn.

5) Make sure you can adjust the distance

between food and embers if necessary.

Meat that is to be seared quickly can be

grilled close to the heat. Larger pieces of

meat should be further from the heat and,

if possible, cooked in indirect heat.

WHAT MAKES THOSE FLAVOURS

SO SPECIAL?

WORDS ANNE KREBIEHL MW

T

he thrill of barbecued food

has a lot to do with smoky,

charred flavours. Wood

consists of lignin, hemicellulose,

and cellulose. Different

woods have different compositions of these

and as wood burns, these constituents burn

at varying rates, releasing different volatile

compounds which flavour food. That is

why hickory or apple wood chips can

make such a difference. Charcoal no longer

has these compounds and what causes

the smokiness, even on a gas grill, is the

food itself: cooking juices drip, burn and

release those smoky compounds that flavour

the food on the barbecue. Too much

burning and the smokiness will taste acrid

and bitter.

However, charring is the real point of grilling.

It is the result of a complex series of chemical

processes known as Maillard reactions. They

create both flavour and texture and occur

between amino acids (the building blocks of

protein) and sugars. The brown crust of bread,

of baked cheese, meat or vegetables are all

down to Maillard reactions. They even occur

very slowly in cold conditions, for instance

during the ageing of Champagne. But apply

heat and everything speeds up: it ensures the

evaporation of water (think frying, baking or

roasting) and accelerates the entire process.

Really high heat supercharges the Maillard

reactions: searing food on a hot grill is a surefire

way of making this happen. Those enticing

grill marks and charred flavours are entirely

down to these myriad, complex reactions.

>

6) Do not press down on smaller cuts of

meat such as steaks, cutlets or chops as

this releases juice. Make sure not to overcook

and then rest the meat – it continues

cooking for a little while even when removed

from the heat. Resting time should be

about half the cooking time and ensures

juiciness.

7) If you have a kettle grill, resist the temptation

to constantly check on your food. The

longer the lid remains closed, the more heat

is retained. Grilled food does not need to be

turned several times, once should be enough.

Each time the lid is opened, valuable

heat escapes.

8) A meat thermometer allows you to reach

the perfect cooking point every time. Digital

devices can even sound an alarm when the

desired temperature has been reached and

show how long the meat should be rested.

9) Fresh herbs should only be added after

grilling since they burn quickly. This is also

true for pepper.

10) Grilling fish requires some practice as it

dries out quickly. Beginners should start

with oily fish like salmon or trout.

Photo:@ 2019 Gligatron/Shutterstock

104 falstaff summer 2021


KITCHEN JOTTINGS

Kitchen Columnist

LILY COOK

CLAMS: TENACITY

AND BALANCE

Grounded at home like most of us, our columnist refused to give up travel.

Spurred by vivid dreams of clams, she travelled the world, and found

creative solace, in her kitchen.

Dreaming of clams is the cause

for some debate amongst

dream experts. Some interpret

it as a sign of secrecy, others

as a sign of tenacity and

balance during a transitional period. After

the past year, I suspect a lot of us are still

transitioning. I held on to sanity by achieving

new mastery in the kitchen.

The obsession has been most useful, it

gave me an outlet, an opportunity to focus

on something other than home-schooling

and, dare I say it, a chance to shut myself in

the kitchen and get away from the family. I

have never regretted our big move out of

the city, London in my family’s case – I love

the silence, the big open spaces, foraging

for wild garlic in spring and mushrooms in

autumn. I am a novice vegetable ’patcher’,

enjoying the fruits of my labours including

beans, courgettes, berries. I have embraced

jam-making, soon I will attempt chutneys.

So, while all of this suits me down to the

ground, literally, the one thing I have

missed is the metropolitan array of gastronomy.

Whilst I love our quaint country

pubs, warm pints and pork scratchings, my

palate craves flavour, the assault on the senses:

the fiery taste of Szechuan cooking in

London’s Chinatown; the explosion of aromas

from the city’s Indian restaurants;

handmade pasta, if I’m lucky, with a

shaving of truffle over the top. My day job

meant I was in London regularly, able to

satisfy this craving – but then 2020 hit.

Faced with the prospect of no more trips

and London flavour hits, I quickly and simply

took matters into my own hands. Thus

began my quest to cook authentic dishes

from around the world. I have travelled to

India and Mexico, to Neapolitan pizzerias,

all without ever leaving the kitchen. I now

make a mean (and healthier) crispy roast

duck with pancakes and, after many years

of languishing in the cupboard, my pasta

machine is my new toy. My favourite ingredient

at the moment, and the subject of my

dreams, is clams. I have always loved

clams. With a much more delicate flavour

than mussels, and much more visually pleasing,

clams are pure joy. Sweet and juicy,

they can be enjoyed on their own, simply

griddled with a dash of dry sherry or white

wine and lashings of good-quality olive oil

that you simply need to soak up with fresh,

crusty bread.

Perhaps my favourite recipe, however, is

one I like to think I have perfected over the

last year. Spaghetti Vongole, heavenly! My

key advice: do not be scared to add butter,

it will add a richness and coat the spaghetti,

helping to soak up the flavours. Personally,

I don’t put tomatoes in my vongole,

but I know many chefs do, and I love a

dash of lemon in mine, too. Apart from

that, good-quality olive oil, fresh clams,

parsley and chilli are really all you need.

Oh, and a dash of white wine – make it

something you enjoy drinking, and you can

have a glass while you eat, too.

SPAGHETTI VONGOLE

(Serves 2)

INGREDIENTS

500 g clams (cleaned) *

200 g spaghetti

1 tbsp olive oil

½ red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped

(or a generous pinch of dried chilli flakes)

A handful of parsley finely chopped

(more to taste if you like it)

25 ml white wine

25 ml Dry Sherry (Fino or Manzanilla are ideal)

40 g salted butter

Juice of half a lemon

* To clean your clams, place them in a bowl of cold,

salty water for 20 – 30 minutes. This will allow

them to naturally release all the sand and dirt in

their shells

PREPARATION

– Cook your spaghetti according to package

instructions in plenty of salted water

– Once cooked, drain your spaghetti, reserving

200 ml of the cooking water

– Heat the oil in a pan

– Add the garlic and chilli and cook for a couple

of minutes

– Add the clams, wine and Sherry, cover and cook

for 5 minutes, or until all the clams are open

– Discard any unopened clams. Remove half the

clams from their shells and return to the pan

– Add the butter and once melted, add the

spaghetti into the pan

– Toss the spaghetti, clams and sauce all together.

If you want more liquid, add some of the reserved

pasta cooking water

– Season with salt and pepper

– Add the parsley, a squeeze of lemon (to taste)

– Serve

Photo: StockFood / The Picture Pantry

106 falstaff summer 2021


More recipes at:

falstaff.com/recipes

summer 2021

falstaff

107


food / RESTAURANTS

108 falstaff summer 2021

Photo: Lauren di Matteo


EAT YOUR

HEART OUT

Hans Mahr is a flavour obsessive and compulsive restaurant goer. The pandemic

nearly drove him up the wall – but now life and travel are back. Here is our

globetrotting gourmet‘s bucket-list of the 25 places he simply cannot wait to go

back to – from swanky to street food and across continents.

WORDS HANS MAHR

Oh how we missed it: sitting

down at a laid table, choosing

from a menu and being

served spectacular food.

summer 2021

falstaff

109


food / RESTAURANTS

Mykonos beckons with beaches and tiny

tavernas you can only reach on foot.

SPAIN / SEGOVIA

RESTAURANTE JOSÉ MARIA

This is the region of the black pig and you

will be served the best roast suckling pig

in Spain. Crispy, delicious, not too fat, and

chef José Maria himself carves it directly at

your table.

restaurantejosemaria.com

ITALY / VENICE

TRATTORIA ALLA RIVETTA

Five minutes behind St Mark’s Cathedral,

practically under a small bridge, join the

gondoliers and enjoy Venetian specialities

from spider crab to sarde in saor and

spaghetti vongole in this landmark

trattoria.

Ponte San Provolo, 4625 Castello

T: +39 041 528 7302

ITALY / ROME

SALUMERIA ROSCIOLI

The best deli in the Italian capital plus

a ristorante in the back where you can

eat salami, cheese, ravioli, tagliolini and

gnocchi with first class wine from all over

the country.

salumeriaroscioli.com

SPAIN / BARCELONA

BARCELONETA

First floor terrace over the yacht harbour

with all the seafood you ever dreamed of

eating. And don’t forget to order the best

paella in town straight off the large pan.

restaurantbarceloneta.com

FRANCE / PARIS

FRENCHIE

When Greg Marchand worked in London,

he was nicknamed ’Frenchie’ – so he used

this moniker when opening his small restaurant

in Paris and basically invented the

’neobistro’ trend – typical French fare with

a lighter, more modern touch.

frenchie-restaurant.com

ENGLAND / LONDON

KERBISHER & MALT

For me, this is the best place to indulge in

Britain’s number one classic, fish & chips:

there are three outlets in town. I eat mine

with vinegar (not too much, please) but

without mushy peas (I hate them).

kerbisher.co.uk

GERMANY / BERLIN

ZOLLHAUS RUTZ

The 3-Michelin-starred chef Marco Müller

took over a former listed customs house for

his second venture and transformed it into

a contemporary Berlin restaurant – with

local food: classy sausages, traditional

Königsberger Klopse (meatballs) and

German wines.

rutz-zollhaus.de

Feel like you are part of

the family at Salumeria

Roscioli in Rome.

Photos: mauritius images / EyeEm / Andrei Timofte, @2016 Maurizio Camagna, © WienTourismus/Peter Rigaud, provided

110 falstaff summer 2021


Spago Restaurant

is still the place to

be in L.A.

GERMANY / MUNICH

WALDWIRTSCHAFT

A typically Bavarian beer garden and

restaurant in the green outskirts of the city.

Lots of beer, Munich Schmankerln, or small

bites – like speck, ham, cheese and radish.

Roast pork in beer sauce is also on the

menu, of course.

waldwirtschaft.de

AUSTRIA / VIENNA

DO & CO

On the 7th floor of this hotel, in full view

of St. Stephan’s Cathedral, this informal

place serves Viennese cuisine par excellence:

Wiener Schnitzel, Tafelspitz but also fresh

fish and pasta. One floor down, Nobu-style

Asian food comes from the same kitchen.

doco.com

GREECE / MYKONOS

KIKI‘S TAVERN

By hiking down a stony path, you get to a

Greek taverna like it must have been 50 years

ago. Fish, lamb, Greek house wine and

a dip in the ocean afterwards if you follow

the path till the end. No reservations, so

come early in order to avoid queuing time.

at the beach of Agios Sostis

T: +30 6940759356

ISRAEL /

TEL AVIV

RESTAURANT ABU

HASSAN

This is the hummus hotspot

– hummus with lemon, with tahini, with

broad beans, you name it. This is a hole in

a wall in Jaffa, where you order and eat

your hummus on wobbly tables and chairs.

Don’t turn up too late in the afternoon,

Abu closes when the hummus is eaten up.

Ha-Dolfin St 1, Tel Aviv-Yafo

T: +972 3-682-0387

It‘s only right to eat

Viennese specialities

when you are right

in the heart of

Vienna at Do & Co.

USA /

LOS ANGELES

RESTAURANT

SPAGO

Chef Wolfgang Puck’s original

start-up, before his Oscar fame, now

in Beverly Hills. Easy-going, great food

from tuna via veal tartare to his signature

dish: pizza with salmon and sour cream.

The courtyard in summer (isn’t it summer

all year round in California?) is still the LA

place to be.

wolfgangpuck.com

<

summer 2021

falstaff

111


food / RESTAURANTS

A legend in her own

lifetime: Jay Fai has a fierce

reputation in Bangkok,

Thailand.

THAILAND / BANGKOK

JAY FAI

Dark skiing goggles are her trademark: Jay

Fay dons them to prepare her famous crab

omelette over charcoal which even earned

her a Michelin Star. She runs the most

famous street food place in Bangkok, just a

five-minute-walk from the Golden Palace.

327 Samran Rat Intersection

T: +66 2 223 9384

SINGAPORE / SINGAPORE

LAU PA SAT MARKET

Of course there are great restaurants

in town, but the best way to enjoy the

Singapore food scene is to visit one of the

many markets. The best is the historic Lau

Pa Sat. Shi Hui Yuan and Satay. Stalls No.

7 and 8 come highly recommended – and

don’t worry about food hygiene, the authorities

check daily.

laupasat.sg

USA / NEW YORK

KATZ‘S DELICATESSEN

A typical New York deli? It’s Katz’s of

course on the Lower East Side. Noisy,

cramped and always at least 15 minutes

waiting time – but you will love the

sandwiches with pastrami, corned beef,

roast beef, tuna salad with the famous

fresh pickles. Don’t over-order: a sandwich

easily feeds two.

katzsdelicatessen.com

USA / MIAMI

JOE‘S STONECRAB

Nothing beats fresh stone crabs when you

are in Florida. Joe’s is a landmark in Miami

– sorry, no reservations, so you have to

queue or tip the bouncer. And don’t go for

the extra-large crab, medium or large taste

much better, especially when accompanied

by a crisp Californian Chardonnay anyway.

joesstonecrab.com

RUSSIA / MOSCOW

RESTAURANT LAVKALAVKA

Authentic, local food not far from the

Bolshoi theatre. The ingredients come

from different farmers’ cooperatives, the

recipes from the 18th century – real Russian

cuisine in a garden outside

or on solid wooden tables inside. The

wines hail from the Black Sea or the

Caucasus.

lavkalavka.com

SOUTH AFRICA / CAPE TOWN

RESTAURANT THE POT LUCK CLUB

In the centre of the Saturday market at the

Old Biscuit Mill, you have to climb five

stairs to reach Cape Town’s hidden gastro

gem. Order the entire list of tapas-like

specialities (mussel chowder, crayfish with

sauce caramel, pork belly with coconut)

from top to the bottom of the menu.

thepotluckclub.co.za

CHINA / BEIJING

DADONG

If you want to taste the best Peking Duck,

look no further. The fat has melted away

underneath the crispy skin, the meat is tender

as it should be and the waiter artistically

carves the bird at the table. He will also

tell you exactly how to wrap everything in

thin pancakes.

beijingduck.com.cn

CHINA / SHANGHAI

RESTAURANT JESSE

Most of Jesse’s guests are Chinese, so don’t

expect anyone to speak English. Point at

your neighbours’ dishes and at the pictures

on the menu – then enjoy the most authentic

food you can get in gastronomically

overdeveloped Shanghai: crab jelly noodles,

baked fish with spring onions, drunken

chicken.

41 Tianping Rd, Xuhui District, Shanghai

T: +86 21 6282 9260

Photos: Shutterstock, ©StockFood / Brachat, Oliver

112 falstaff summer 2021


Lima is the place to head to

for authentic ceviche.

TAIWAN / TAIPEI

DINTAI FUNG TIANMU

You like dim sum? Then you will be in

heaven. Unimpressive from the outside, but

inside an incredible range of dim sum and

small cold and hot dishes are offered. Come

early for lunch or dinner or you will have

to queue for up to half an hour.

Zhongshan North Road 77

Shilin District, T: +886 2 2833 8900

JAPAN / TOKYO

SUSHI DAI

Around the old fish market is the place

to be if you love sushi – it doesn’t get any

fresher than this. The sushi master and his

team will offer the right selection. Give

yourself into their hands, eat what they

serve and say stop when you are done.

Toyosu Fish Market

6 Chome-6-2 Toyosu, Koto City

Tokyo 135-0061, Japan

T: +81 3-6633-0042

AUSTRALIA / SYDNEY

ROCKPOOL

Chef Neil Perry started the Australian

gourmet revolution 30 years ago. He is

not in the kitchen anymore but overlooks

Rockpool in Sydney, Melbourne and Perth

as a consultant. The Australian-fusion food

is as good as ever, go for the lobster with

herb butter and the dry-aged steaks.

rockpoolbarandgrill.com.au

PERU / LIMA

RESTAURANT LA MAR

If you want to savour the best ceviche,

trust Peruvian chef Gaston Acurio. Be it

fish, mussels or octopus, in La Mar you get

them splendidly marinated – all the seafood

is as fresh as can be. That’s why Gaston

closes his cevicherias in the afternoon when

the catch of the day is fully consumed. You

can find outlets also in Buenos Aires and

Santiago, Chile.

lamarcebicheria.com

BRAZIL

CHURRASCARIA PALACE

The old and new kid on the Copacabana.

Famous steakhouse Fogo de Chao is now a

worldwide chain, slipped in quality. So the

Palace has taken over the number one spot

and is the place to go. Skewers of meat are

offered nearly minute by minute and the

waiters carve your favourite cut – rib, fillet,

rump – right at your table. If your companions

are not meat eaters, no problem, they

also serve great fish.

churrascariapalace.com.br

<

summer 2021

falstaff

113


SIXPACK

1

2

3

4

5

6

MOMOFUKU SSÄM BAR

89 South Street, Pier 17

New York, NY 10038

T: +1 212 254 3500

ssambar.momofuku.com

CAFÉ DECO

43 Store Street

London WC1E 7DB

T: +44 20 8091 2108

cafe-deco.co.uk

ETXEBARRI

San Juan Plaza 1

48291 Axpe, Bizkaia

T: +34 946 58 3042

asadoretxebarri.com

ARNAUD NICOLAS

46 Avenue de la Bourdonnais

75007 Paris

T: +33 1 45 55 5959

arnaudnicolas.paris

DÖLLERERS WIRTSHAUS

Markt 56

5440 Golling an der Salzach

T: +43 6244 4220

doellerer.at

THE BRIDGE ARMS

53 High St, Bridge

Canterbury CT4 5LA

T: +44 1227 286534

bridgearms.co.uk

The creations at Döllerer are minimalist works of art. Here is a

composition of roast pikeperch, oyster mushroom, roast potato

dashi, char caviar and hop shoots.

WHAT’S NEW?

Our Sixpack is a round-up of all that is new and exciting in six

restaurants around the world. In this issue, we take you to

New York, Paris, London and the Spanish, Austrian and English

countryside.

Photo: Jörg Lehmann

114 falstaff summer 2021


www.scheiblhofer.at

www.theresort.at

www.thequarter.at


food / SIXPACK

MOMOFUKU

SSÄM BAR

New York, USA

1David Chang’s influence on New

York City’s dining scene and

beyond has been huge: anything

new or re-imagined from his growing

stable of restaurants always merits attention.

With the lease on the original Ssäm Bar

coming to an end, Chang has decided to

re-locate the restaurant from its East Village

home of fifteen years to the South Street

Seaport, the historic waterfront district

space that was previously home to Wayõ

cocktail bar.

Head Chef Eunjo Park’s New York Korean

menu has fire-cracking hits all over it,

kicking off with chilli jam popcorn shrimp,

the gochujang-based sauce inspired by dak

kang jung, sweet and crisp nuggets of

shrimp replacing chicken, as a nod to this

new seaport location.

Park’s signature dishes include her kimbap

(Korean sushi rolls), like extremely spicy

scallop with crispy tempura and a pickled

onion-shiso kimbap. The famous ssäm

makes an appearance via versions that

include a sizzling skirt steak, galbi-marinated,

sliced and served with watercress,

onions, garlic and ssämjang. Rice cakes

with cacio e pepe, black truffle and parmesan;

spicy pork sausage ragù with

Chinese broccoli and Sichuan peppercorn –

it’s all a riotous progression of lip-tingling

flavours, full of verve.

The wine list is a vinous playground,

with a strong Grower Champagne list and

savvy picks of Riesling from Klaus-Peter

Keller in Rheinhessen and Sauvignon Blanc

from Shaw + Smith in Australia’s Adelaide

Hills.

Momofuku‘s new sun-flooded

space at the South Street Seaport.

REVIEWER

Zeren Wilson

Food

Service

Wine List

Ambiance

TOTAL

47 of 50

17 of 20

20 of 20

8 of 10

92 of 100

MOMOFUKU SSÄM BAR

89 South Street, Pier 17

New York, NY 10038

T: +1 212 254 3500

ssambar.momofuku.com

CAFÉ DECO

AMENDED

London, England

2The highly anticipated first restaurant

from chef-owner Anna Tobias

has finally opened in Bloomsbury,

London, and already feels like it has been

here for years. Her culinary CV includes

some of the industry’s titans, including

time in the kitchens of The River Café and

veteran Jeremy Lee, as well as her first

head chef role at Rochelle Canteen, the

hidden-away schoolyard Shoreditch gem

from Margot Henderson and Melanie

Arnold.

A vocal champion of ‘brown food,’ Anna

delights in putting the kind of items on her

menus that are all about comfort and cosseting

flavours, rather than the indulgence

of Instagram-orientated gimmickry. You’ll

find the joys of lovingly made quiches

alongside simple plates that sing with the

clarity of their ingredients, such as a dish

of asparagus, Jersey Royals, and the

silkiest Italian ham, adorned with a blob of

butter. Or how about buckwheat- and

mushroom- stuffed cabbage rolls, an unashamed

peasant dish sauced with a tomato

sugo that a nonna in Palermo would be

proud to serve.

A confidently strutting menu continues

with lamb faggots with creamed nettles

and gravy; pork tonnato; egg mayonnaise;

braised artichokes with carrots, saffron

and dill; chicken and wild garlic pie.

Desserts offer the classics of crème caramel,

or treacle tart and rhubarb trifle.

Jams, preserves, soups and more are

available to takeaway, and the bustle of the

room and outside tables has the feel of a

genuine neighbourhood joint – a modern

classic has arrived.

REVIEWER

Zeren Wilson

Food

Service

Wine List

Ambiance

TOTAL

49 of 50

19 of 20

15 of 20

8 of 10

91 of 100

A new neighbourhood

eatery in Store Street.

CAFÉ DECO

43 Store Street

London WC1E 7DB

T: +44 20 8091 2108

cafe-deco.co.uk

Photos: SAM A HARRIS, mauritius images / Alamy / Juanma Aparicio,

116 falstaff summer 2021


ETXEBARRI

Axpe, Bizkaia, Spain

3In the tiny village of Axpe in northern

Spain, against the stunning

backdrop of the Basque mountains,

an hour’s drive from San Sebastián, Etxebarri

has slowly cemented its reputation as

one of the best restaurants in the world.

Self-taught chef-owner Victor Arguinzoniz

cooks everything over la brasa, a huge grill

with a system of winches and pulleys to

lower and raise ingredients towards the

heat – he even makes his own charcoal in

a kiln, using different wood to suit specific

ingredients. His and his team’s attention to

detail is mesmerising.

They smoke their home-made butter, salt

their own anchovies, and keep live Palamós

prawns in sea water to ensure that when

kissing the grill, they are as fresh as they

can possibly be. Simply grilled and served,

they are a star dish with incredible depth of

flavour. Grilled baby squid is delivered with

equal precision, showing no char from the

grill, having been gently smoked – the

manipulation of smoke is a key part of

many of the nuances in each dish. Oysters

are grilled in their shells, as are fat, smoky

mussels, and rarer items like sea cucumber.

Txuleton steaks from Rubia Gallega Galician

cows are cooked over grape vine cuttings,

the ultimate expression for this prized

meat. Even desserts carry the influence

of the grill, even an apple tart is served with

smoked milk ice cream.

Open for just six lunches a week, serving

in a simple, unpretentious stone-adorned

dining room, Etxebarri continues to be a

site of pilgrimage for food lovers – it is

worth the trek.

Nuances of smoke

flavour everything in

the most subtle fashion

at Extebarri.

REVIEWER

Zeren Wilson

Food

Service

Wine List

Ambiance

TOTAL

50 of 50

19 of 20

18 of 20

10 of 10

97 of 100

ETXEBARRI

San Juan Plaza 1

48291 Axpe, Bizkaia

T: +34 946 58 30 42

asadoretxebarri.com

ARNAUD NICOLAS

Paris, France

4

Arnaud Nicolas started out as a

butcher. His fine charcuterie was

served by chefs like Alain Ducasse.

Then Nicolas started a boutique shop in the

Montmartre neighbourhood and people

queued up for his sausages, patés and pies.

Finally, he has opened his own eponymous

restaurant, just around the corner from the

Eiffel Tower. This is his temple to gastronomic

charcuterie.

When you enter the restaurant, you can

study a presentation of great patés to

choose from: there is La terrine grand-mère,

honouring his grandmother’s recipe, a pork

and chicken terrine with pickles, jambon

persillé, the famous potted ham with parsley.

There are also more exotic options like

clam and cod terrine with courgette, a

poultry pie with foie gras, pork trotter terrine,

also with foie gras. Of course, there also

is just a ‘simple’ duck foie gras, you probab-

ly will not have tasted a better one, even at

Michelin-starred establishments. Ask the

charming staff at the counter to put a selection

of your favourites together and let the

whole table join in the feast.

But do leave some room for the main

courses – fortunately they are lighter than

the starters: Arnaud Nicolas knows that his

charcuterie is rather filling. He thus offers

salmon with asparagus and lardo or a tartare

of seabream flavoured with miso. The

most advantageous way to sample the butcher’s

cooking is to go for lunch. 28 Euro

for pie, terrine, foie gras and a Rhum Baba

to finish – offers simply unbeatable value.

Should all of this indulgence make you

worry about your waistline, simply climb

the Eiffel Tower afterwards. 14 stairs and

1665 steps will do wonders for your figure.

REVIEWER

Hans Mahr

Food

Service

Wine List

Ambiance

TOTAL

48 of 50

18 of 20

15 of 20

7 of 10

88 of 100

ARNAUD NICOLAS

46 Avenue de la Bourdonnais

75007 Paris

T: +33 1 45 55 59 59

arnaudnicolas.paris

Charcuterie

gets central

billing at this

new Parisian

venture.

95–100 points 90–94 points 85–89 points 80–84 points

summer 2021

falstaff

117


food / SIXPACK

DÖLLERER

Golling an der Salzach,

Austria

Austrian cuisine: either

down-to-earth or rarefied -

but both executed brilliantly.

5Heading to Salzburg to hear soprano

Anna Netrebko at the famous Salzburg

Festival? Then book a table at

Döllerer one evening. It is just a 25-minute

drive from Salzburg. There are two options:

you can either go for the old-style tavern

with the wooden interiors typical of a traditional

Wirtshaus, or inn, and indulge in

Schnitzel, Backhendl, Tafelspitz, goulash or

other Austrian classics. Do not worry that

your black tie will look out of place – the

locals are used to festival guests and love

mixing with them.

The other option is the fine dining restaurant.

It comes with a beautiful terrace and

garden where chef Andreas Döllerer grows

his own fruit and vegetables. He is one of

the fathers of Alpine Cuisine, a lighter, contemporary

interpretation of the usually more

rib-sticking Austrian tradition. His sevencourse-menu

will be made exclusively from

local ingredients including fish and meat

from the surrounding rivers and mountains

– even the caviar comes from a nearby Salzburg

fish farm. You will be delighted by

gentian root, young kohlrabi and cherry

tomatoes, flamed char with marinated

Chioggia-beet and spruce, by pink saddle of

venison with white strawberries and spicy

mushrooms. For dessert, Döllerer serves a

real Mozartkugel, that delectable confection

of nougat, pistachio and almond marzipan

coated in chocolate.

The wine list also deserves credit. No

wonder, the chef’s father runs one of the

best wine shops in Austria. Ask the sommelier

to serve Austrian Grüner Veltliner or its

red counterpart, Blaufränkisch.

REVIEWER

Hans Mahr

Food

Service

Wine List

Ambiance

TOTAL

48 of 50

20 of 20

19 of 20

10 of 10

97 of 100

DÖLLERERS WIRTSHAUS

Markt 56

5440 Golling an der Salzach

T: +43 6244 4220

doellerer.at

THE BRIDGE

ARMS

Canterbury, England

6The pedigree behind this new

opening in the petite village of

Bridge near Canterbury, Kent,

ensures locals and visitors from afar that

it’s worth securing reservations before

word spreads of its calibre. Owners Dan

and Natasha Smith have already wowed

Kent with The Fordwich Arms, swiftly

picking up a Michelin star and laying the

foundations for their second pub.

A former coaching inn dating from the

16th century, the bucolic setting sees a former

pub given a sensitive makeover, maintaining

its essential character while giving

it a sheen of sophistication. A large, sprawling

garden at the back is a perfect sun

trap to enjoy elevated snacks of buttermilk

fried chicken to be dredged through garlic

mayonnaise, while whipped cod’s roe with

delicate home made barley crackers and

potato flatbreads slicked with Kentish

rapeseed oil, studded with confit garlic, are

a fine complement to pints of Estrella in

the sun.

A solid selection of carefully sourced

meat is skilfully cooked in the Josper grill,

taking in racks of Blackface lamb, fat slabs

of Hereford beef, and a mighty côte de

boeuf, alongside excellent chips and sauces.

Other mains include artfully presented

plates of Stour Valley guinea fowl, and

hake with mussels and smoked butter

sauce – the plating has a very ’Michelin’

feel to it, hinting at the ambition in the

kitchen.

The whole set-up is rounded off with

dextrous desserts such as Kentish honey

tart with impeccable pastry, and a razor

sharp wine list that inspires confidence.

A sure fire hit.

REVIEWER

Zeren Wilson

Food

Service

Wine List

Ambiance

TOTAL

49 of 50

19 of 20

18 of 20

9 of 10

95 of 100

Ambition and delciousness

make for a sure fire hit in Kent.

THE BRIDGE ARMS

53 High St, Bridge

Canterbury CT4 5LA

T: +44 1227 286534

bridgearms.co.uk

Photos: Jörg Lehmann, provided

118 falstaff summer 2021

95–100 points 90–94 points 85–89 points 80–84 points


Join us for a stylish journey at

SO/ VIENNA, A VIBRANT LIFESTYLE HOTEL &

DAS LOFT, THE CITY’S MOST SOUGHT-AFTER RESTAURANT & BAR IN THE SKY!

The creative fusion of architecture & design, award winning cuisine,

breathtaking views of the city and sophisticated yet playful and welcoming vibe,

provide an unrivaled holistic travel experience in Austria’s capital.

FEEL THE PULSE!

SO/ Vienna Hotel, Praterstraße 1, 1020 VIENNA, AUSTRIA Tel: +43 1 90 616-0, Email: h6599@so-hotels.com, www.so-vienna.com


food / ALAIN DUCASSE

SERIES

RESTAURANT

ICONS

PART 1

ALAIN

DUCASSE

THE

MULTITALENT

Alain Ducasse is the only chef to hold 20 Michelin stars. The Frenchman is also a

celebrated author of cookery books and the mastermind behind more than 30

restaurants across the globe. Then there are chocolate boutiques in France,

England and Japan, cafés and cookery schools as well as two country house

hotels. In short: the 64-year-old is not just a brilliant chef – he is a brand.

WORDS CORINNA VON BASSEWITZ

Cooking, Alain Ducasse once

said, was absolute craftsmanship,

with the ingredients at the

centre of this craft. There was

no room in his kitchen for airs

and graces. It was with this simple recipe

that the 64-year-old Frenchman managed,

over four decades, to become one of the

world’s most successful gastro-entrepreneurs.

The term entrepreneur is key

because the times when he manned the

stoves himself are long gone. Whether he

cooked himself was, he opined, of secondary

importance because his head chefs

were capable of that, too. Instead, Alain

Ducasse is a visionary, a doer. He employs

2,000 people across the globe, achieving

healthy turnovers and profits. His Michelin-starred

restaurants alone – Le Louis

XV in Monte Carlo, Alain Ducasse at The

Dorchester in London and, until May

At Le Louis XV, owned by the Principality of

Monaco, Ducasse relies on chef Dominique

Lory for exquisite creations – like this dish of

seabass with fennel.

2021, Hôtel Plaza Athénée in Paris,

generate profits in the region of 20 million

Euros per year with their crossover of

French and Mediterranean cuisine.

THE BRAND ALAIN DUCASSE

Ducasse, a country boy from Castelsarrasin

in southwest France, learnt his trade

from scratch at his parents’ farm: plucking

geese, cleaning vegetables, gutting fish. It

was at the farm that he discovered his love

for authentic produce. He then trained

with the greats of that time: Michel

Guérard, Roger Vergé and Alain Chapel,

first as an apprentice, then as sous chef.

Alain Chapel taught him French classics

like Bresse chicken, sauces, foie gras. Vergé

added the lighter Mediterranean touch of

herbs, courgette flowers and olive oil.

Ever since, the Mediterranean element

has been central to Ducasse’s cuisine

<

Photos: Pierre Monetta, Getty Images

120 falstaff

summer 2021


ACOUNTRY BOY

FROM THE

SOUTHWEST OF

FRANCE TURNED INTO

A GASTRONOMIC

ENTREPRENEUR.

It was at the “Hotel de

Paris“ in Monte Carlo

in 1988 that Alain

Ducasse set out on the

path that turned the

Michelin-starred chef

into a global gastronomic

entrepreneur.

summer 2021

falstaff

121


food / ALAIN DUCASSE

Exquisite ingredients and

perfect execution turn

a simple Baba au Rhum

into an experience.

than 30 restaurants across the globe. He

sets the pace, the rhythm and the direction.

He alone decides on ingredients,

recipes, the style of table settings, the

crockery, the décor of each establishment

and every detail down to the menu design.

This means that the standards at Morpheus

in Macau are as exacting as those at

Spoon in Paris or at Idam in Quatar. But

not only that, Ducasse also nurtures new

talent in order to proliferate his own

philosophy of haute cuisine à la Ducasse:

new chefs are trained and immersed in the

Ducasse DNA in the three cookery schools

he runs in France.

THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS

STANDSTILL

Ducasse has never been short of ideas. He

authored 20 cookery books and his Grand

Livre de Cuisine is a reference of French

cookery for chefs around the world. In

2006, he reinvented what astronauts eat.

Instead of subsisting on unimaginative

<

brute. He first showed his

mettle in 1981 when he became

head chef at La Terrasse in Juan-les

Pins on the Côte d’Azur at the

tender age of 25. Three years later he

received his first two Michelin stars.

In 1988, Ducasse signed a contract with

Prince Rainier of Monaco who had

offered him the role of running the Le

Louis XV restaurant at his Hotel de Paris

in Monte Carlo. Both hotel and restaurant

are owned by the principality and Ducasse

was hired under one condition: to achieve

three Michelin stars within five years. Just

33 months later Ducasse had met this

contractual challenge – while simultaneously

developing a profitable concept:

take a first class hotel, make this hotel pay

for kitchen, dining room and staff and

charge a consultancy fee for yourself.

Ducasse then successfully replicated this

concept at the Hotel Plaza Athénée in

Paris and in 2008 at Alain Ducasse at the

Dorchester in London.

GLOBAL TRENDSETTER

By now, Alain Ducasse is the creative

director and mastermind behind more

Hushed understatement

at Alain Ducasse at The

Dorchester in London.

Photos: Pierre Monetta, Gary Hamill, provided

122 falstaff

summer 2021


EATING AT

ALAIN

DUCASSE

ducasse-paris.com

LE LOUIS XV – ALAIN DUCASSE ***

Hôtel de Paris, Place du Casino

98000 Monaco, T: +377 98 068864

For more than thirty years, this has been the

Ducasse calling card: he took less than three

years to achieve three Michelin stars at Monte

Carlo’s most famous hotel.

ALAIN DUCASSE

AT THE DORCHESTER ***

The Dorchester Hotel

53 Park Lane, Mayfair

W1K 1QA London, T: +44 207 6298866

Shortly after opening in 2009, the restaurant

received two Michelin stars. The third

followed a year later. Fish and crustacea

are specialities here. The wine list is

impressive, too.

BBR BY ALAIN DUCASSE

1 Beach Road Singapore

189673 Singapore, T: +65 6337 1886

The essence of Portuguese, Spanish and

Italian cuisines is celebrated in a relaxed

atmosphere. Tip: reserve a table in the

open kitchen.

SPOON

Palais Brongniart, 25 Place de la Bourse

75002 Paris, T: +33 1 83922030

The Spoon in Paris was Alain Ducasses‘ first

concept restaurant, offering minimalist décor

and fusion cooking. By now there are outlets

from London to Mauritius.

ALAIN DUCASSE AT MORPHEUS

Morpheus at City of Dreams

Estrada do Istmo, Macau

T: +853 8868 3432

In 2019, this restaurant designed by Jouin

Manku manged to make the shortlist of

the vaunted Restaurant & Bar Design Awards

– you can enjoy Ducasse’s food in beautiful

surroundings.

Mediterranean influences are

central to Ducasse’s cooking

– in his colourful vegetable

dishes for instance.

blandness, the researchers

at the International Space

Station enjoy lamb shoulder

with sage, Breton lobster or

boeuf bourguignon. All these dishes

were developed in collaboration with

the National Centre for Space Studies in

Toulouse. Ducasse also bought two

country mansions in Provence, France,

and turned them into boutique hotels.

He presides over the Les Collectionneurs

booking platform that represents 585

top European hotels and restaurants. In

2005, together with the French Ministry

for Europe and Foreign Affairs, he

initiated Goût de France, an event that

sees chefs around the world present

typically French menus on the same day.

SETBACKS ARE INCENTIVES

Ducasse accepted that he had to lose a

star here and there on his way to the top

– and noted when they were won back.

He also accepted the loss of the license

to run the Jules Verne restaurant at the

Eiffel Tower. Losing a star, he said, was

an incentive to do better. In the meantime,

he has a very different perspective

on the Eiffel

Tower: his

Ducasse sur

Seine, a floating

restaurant, offers a

spectacular view of the

Paris landmark. In 2018, Ducasse entered

the coffee business. His Manufacture de

Café now operates successfully in Paris

and London. His speciality is Yemeni

coffee, made from Arabica beans grown at

an altitude of 2,300 metres / 7,546 feet in

Yemen. Regarding the pandemic, Ducasse

said: “I didn’t have to give up any of my

establishments.“ On the contrary, he

invested and created the delivery service

Ducasse chez moi and Naturaliste Paris.

He spent 50,000 Euros on aerosol

filtration at his restaurant Allard which

allowed him to operate at 80% capacity

and remain open. He also added five

further shops to his chocolate empire –

there now are 28 of them. “A further ten

are in the pipeline,“ Ducasse says. Once

the world opens up again, Ducasse intends

to “make all the restaurants into ultimate

must-visit destinations once again.“ We

can only say, “Bonne chance, maître!“ <

summer 2021

falstaff

123


guest column / ALDO SOHM

LETTER FROM

NEW YORK CITY

Aldo Sohm is wine director at Le Bernardin, a three-Michelin-starred

restaurant, and owner of Aldo Sohm Wine Bar, both in Manhattan.

He has won countless accolades and authored his first book,

Wine Simple, in 2019. For Falstaff he reflects on wine and the Big Apple.

WORDS ALDO SOHM

It has been interesting to observe our

collective change in values, needs

and desires over the past year. After

all, we had plenty of time to reflect

on our old habits. Even I was not

immune to change: I tasted far fewer wines

professionally but personally I drank more.

In my 20-plus-year career as a wine

professional, this was a new one for me.

Le Bernardin opened its doors again on

17 March 2021 and Aldo Sohm Wine Bar

opened two weeks later. We knew it was a

new beginning and thus we staggered the

openings. We were right, looking back it all

felt like it must have done when Prohibition

was finally repealed in the United

States in 1933 or Paris in the années folles,

or crazy years, of the 1920s.

UNRECEDENTED APPETITE

Lots of our old regulars came and keep

coming to the restaurant to support the

business and the sales of iconic wines –

think Domaine de la Romanée Conti,

Petrus, Coche-Dury, Liger-Belair – is

breath-taking. We sell these at a frequency I

have never seen before. Stunning liquidity

seems to be pent-up in the market: people

simply could not spend money last year.

This is also obvious when you look at

wine auctions and see one record sale after

another. Right now, demand outstrips

supply and my guess is that this will only

push prices up further.

This year’s spring frost in France added

another layer of complexity to the fine

THERE IS AN

INCREDIBLE ENERGY

IN THE CITY. THE

PEOPLE WHO

PREDICTED NEW

YORK CITY NOT

RECOVERING FOR

YEARS HAVE BEEN

PROVEN WRONG.

ALDO SOHM

SOMMELIER

Austrian-born and trained, Sohm now is an

integral part of the New York fine wine scene. His

first book, Wine Simple, was published by Crown

Books, New York, in November 2019.

wine buying world. The brick-and-mortar

stores see challenges, while the online retail

with hyperactive social media is doing

super well. There are these contradictions

but we feel excitement in our lives again –

and we are indulging even more. Even

simple neighbourhood places are turning

into sidewalk and street parties. There is an

incredible energy in the city. The people

who predicted New York City not recovering

for years have already been proven

wrong.

But our industry is never without its

particular challenges: right now staffing is

the big issue. It is difficult to recruit

sommeliers since they nimbly transitioned

to retail, auctions or consultancy. It is the

same with line cooks and chefs as well. I

was lucky to hang on to the majority of my

team – now more than ever it is about that

team spirit.

JUGGLING OPPORTUNITIES

Then there is the international container

shortage. Containers arriving from Europe

now take twelve weeks when it used to be

five. Of course, this has a knock-on effect

on the wine supply. You have to be pretty

quick to juggle your daily routine to make

sure you remain fully stocked.

But it turns out our city has come back

and is stronger than ever. More change will

come. People get rid of old habits and have

new desires. Personally, I see this as an

excellent opportunity for us and the

hospitality industry.

<

Photo: Thomas Schauer

124 falstaff summer 2021


WE BUY HEIRLOOMS

AND FAMILY TREASURES.

As a subsidiary of Gübelin, we would be happy to assist you with

the sale of antique jewellery or gemstones. We can help you to best

assess their value and market potential.

For a consultation, please contact us at: +41 41 429 18 18

www.edigem.com


essay / FOREST BATHING

COME

126 falstaff summer 2021


OUTSIDE!

The call of the great outdoors, the longing to move in

the fresh air, that wholesome feeling of breathing in

nature: we are not just imagining it – it really does do

us a world of good.

WORDS MATTHIAS SCHICKHOFER

ILLUSTRATION GINA MÜLLER

summer 2021

falstaff

127


DIVING INTO HEALING POWERS

Spending time in the complex ecosystem of

the forest thus does not just feel good but

has actual health-promoting benefits. This is

not really surprising since we have developed

as a species in intensive evolutionary interaction

with forests. These scientific findings,

however, have led to a new appreciation

of forests – and their therapeutic use.

Namely in the form of so-called “forest baessay/

FOREST BATHING

R

ays of sunshine penetrate cathedrals

of mighty beech and

oak. Like spotlights in a theatre,

shafts of sunlight brighten

the still cool forest air as the

scent of moss, leaves and forest floor rises …

and we are almost magically drawn outside.

We long for that invigorating seaside walk,

that hike across country – but forests still

hold a special attraction. They enable us to

dive deep into soothing green, switch off and

escape our own minds. Forests have always

been important to humans: as a home and

habitat, a source of food and raw materials –

and more recently as a recreational space. Forests

have been around for 300 million years.

Throughout that time, forests have evolved

as some of the most complex ecosystems supporting

numerous life forms. They are home

to an abundance of tree and other plant species,

fungi, birds, mammals and insects, but

also to life forms not visible to the human

eye. In just one-third of a cubic metre of forest

soil there are more than 1.5 trillion microorganisms

– all living creatures.

COMPLEX, DELICATE NETWORKS

The soils of unspoilt, natural forests are pervaded

by huge fungal networks. These socalled

mycelia interact with root networks

and optimise nutrient and water uptake, but

they also constitute a sophisticated communication

network. These delicate networks,

however, are severely damaged in monocultures

or by intensive logging: the trees are

weaker and more susceptible to crisis. But

trees also emit aerosols – which we perceive

as forest smell. The terpenes they contain

have bactericidal and virucidal effects and

have been proven to strengthen our immune

system. Scientific studies also show that time

spent in forests helps to lower heart rate and

blood pressure and makes our muscles

relax. Forest air contains 90 percent fewer

dust particles than city air.

128 falstaff summer 2021


WHAT IS FOREST

BATHING?

• In Japan, where it is called shinrin

yoku, forest bathing has a long tradition

and is an acknowledged stress

management therapy.

• Forest bathing combines aspects of

aroma therapy, sensory excercises

and meditation.

• Time spent in forests has an effect on

our physical and psychological wellbeing:

ethereal oils in forest air

strengthen our immune system while

stress hormones decrease. Studies

have also shown the positive effects

of forest bathing on depression and

anxiety.

TREES RELEASE AEROSOLS

WHICH WE PERCEIVE AS

FOREST SMELL. THE

TERPENES THEY CONTAIN

HAVE BACTERICIDAL AND

VIRUCIDAL EFFECTS.

FORESTS ARE SCIENTIFI-

CALLY PROVEN TO PRO-

MOTE OUR WELLBEING.

thing“. The Japanese term for it, where the

idea was developed and is highly regarded,

is shinrin yoku. The various approaches deal

with aromatherapeutic aspects, psychological

and sensory exercises of “conscious perception“

or methods of meditation. Yet when

walking in the forest we are often too absorbed

in our own thoughts or in conversation

to perceive the nature around us. “Forest bathing

means walking or hiking with open

senses“, explains Martin Kiem, an Austrian

nature and forest therapy guide. “The slower

we move, the more we perceive.“ He thus often

covers just a few hundred meters of trail

during his forest bathing tours. In addition

to “discovering slowness“, Kiem also emphasises

the need to be in the moment: “Many

people live either a bit in the future or in the

past. But when we think about what has

been or what is coming, we miss so much of

what is happening all around us,“ Kiem

says. “In forest bathing, we want to unite

body and mind in the now.“ What does that

look like in practice? “On a sensory tour in

the forest, we explore everything consciously:

standing, leaning, smelling, listening, feeling

with the soles of our feet“, Kiem says.

“We connect with trees through breathing.

Or we try to perceive the forest as though

we were seeing it for the very first time.”

Kiem notes that “it is de-stressing to surround

oneself with living things and to become

aware.“ He encourages people to get

out into nature and consciously perceive it

with all senses: with sight, smell, touch and

sound. Those who manage to immerse

themselves and devote all their senses will

perceive the forest, nature itself, more intensely

than before: as a healing wonderland

right on our doorstep. <

summer 2021 falstaff 129


More news

Get news directly into your inbox

with our newsletter. Sign up at

falstaff.com/newsletter/

TRAVEL

UAE, DUBAI

RAFFLES THE PALM

TO OPEN IN DUBAI

The Accor hotel group continues its

expansion with its first ultra-luxury

resort in the Middle East. Due to

open in the last quarter of 2021, Raffles the

Palm will open on the Palm Jumeirah

man-made island in Dubai. The ultra-luxury

hotel will feature 389 rooms, suites and

villas. Guests will be able to enjoy butler

service, eight different gastronomic concepts,

a spa with 23 treatment rooms and two

private spa suites, Dubai’s largest indoor

pool and a 500-metre beach.

raffles.com

EUROPE

FOUR SEASONS OFFERS

BESPOKE ROAD TRIPS

Taking advantage of the pandemic-prompted

trend for self-driving holidays, the Four

Seasons hotel group has devised a series of

bespoke European road trips, connecting its

hotel properties. The suggested itineraries

cover sights and scenic routes within

England, Switzerland, France and Russia or

border-crossing journeys from Spain to

Portugal and the Czech Republic to Hungary.

Each trip features trip highlights like

vineyard visits, sports activities or historic

sights recommended by local Four Seasons

concierges, sommeliers and managers.

fourseasons.com

JAPAN

WORLD‘S FIRST

CARBON-NEUTRAL HOTEL

Powered entirely by hydrogen generated from

waste products, Tokyu Hotels opened the King

Skyfront Tokyo Rei Hotel. 30% of energy is

derived from plastic waste, 70% from food

waste. tokyuhotelsjapan.com

130 falstaff summer 2021


NEWS

ITALY

VENICE IN DANGER

In June, the UNESCO‘s World

Heritage Centre recommended

that Venice be added to the agency‘s

list of World Heritage in Danger.

The committee stated that the

“complex impacts“ of mass tourism,

constant population decrease

and deficiencies in governance had

led to “a significant loss of historical

authenticity within Venice.“ A

decision on whether Venice will be

added to the list is expected by the

end of July.

SILVERSEA CRUISES LAUNCHES

TWO NEW CRUISE LINERS

Silversea Cruises, the ultra-luxury cruise

line, lauched its new expeditionary vessel

Silver Origin with a maiden voyage to the

Galapagos Islands. Its new Silver Moon

liner debuted its immersive S.A.L.T culinary

programme on its maiden sailing from

Athens to the Greek Islands.

silversea.com

SCOTLAND

BELMOND‘S

HIGHLAND FLING

Photos: Nicolas Dumont, Shutterstock, LAHCEN GOURRMA, provided

MOROCCO

RADISSON GROUP EXPANDS

In partnership with Madaëf, a Moroccan tourism

investment company, Radisson announced seven

new properties in tourist hotspots on the country‘s

Mediterranean and Atlantic coasts. The portfolio

includes four Radisson Blu Resorts and Radisson

Residences opening in July in Al Hoceima, Saïda and

Taghazout Bay, the remaining three are scheduled to

open in 2022 and 2023. radissonhotels.com

Luxury train operator Belmond

has partnered with the Scotch

Malt Whisky Society to host a

Classic Whisky Journey aboard

its Royal Scotsman train. The

four-day tour includes tastings

at the Tomatin, Macallan and

Tullibardine distilleries as well

as 24-hour steward service, an

on-board spa, full Scottish

breakfast, three-course-lunch

and four-course dinner.

belmond.com

FRENCH START-UP PLANS TRANS-

EUROPEAN RAIL SLEEPER ROUTES

French travel start-up Midnight Trains

plans a route network between large

European cities for 2024. With Paris as

a central hub, the company is to launch

routes connecting Edinburgh, Hamburg,

Berlin, Brussels, Milan, Florence, Venice

Rome, Barcelona, Madrid and Porto.

Backed by French investors, both rolling

stock and use of railway networks is still

being negotiated. With travellers increasingly

concerned about carbon emissions,

Midnight Trains plans to entice passengers

away from airports with high-standard

sleeper cabins featuring private

bathrooms. “It‘s a train, a hotel, a restaurant

and an app conecting Europe and its

cultures with no limit,“ co-founder Adrien

Aumont said.

midnight-trains.com

summer 2021

falstaff

131


travel / FRENCH RIVIERA

FRENCH

RIVIERA

The French Riviera’s appeal is timeless. Who can

resist the scenery, the incredible light, the smell of

salty air and pine carried on the Mistral wind?

WORDS REBECCA WHITLOCKE

Photo: Getty Images

132 falstaff summer 2021


The port at

Villefranche-sur-

Mer bathed in

evening light.

summer 2021

falstaff

133


travel / FRENCH RIVIERA

Saint Paul de

Vence, one of the

picturesque hill

towns.

The Côte d’Azur, that stretch of

the French Riviera from Cassis

in the west to Menton in the

east, already was a destination

in the 18th century. Aristocrats

wintered here to escape the cold of their

homelands. From the mid-19th century

onwards, trains linked this part of southern

France to Paris, but it was the Blue Train,

Le Train Bleu, which clinched the Riviera’s

reputation as the playground of the

wealthy. Connecting with the British cross

Channel ferry, it ran from Calais all the

way south. Railway posters advertising

destinations like Juan les Pins, Antibes,

Nice and Monte-Carlo are vivid mementoes

of that time.

Passengers travelled overnight in a

luxurious trifecta of food, drink and

comfort: boarding the luxurious train in

the afternoon: with Champagne flowing,

they would dine and sleep on board – and

wake to southern sunshine and a dramatic

view of the Massif de l’Esterel. The rich, the

powerful, the international jet-set flocked

south. And who can blame them: far-reaching

coastlines with secluded beaches and

coves, pine forests and citrus groves. That

same lure still draws visitors, but food and

flavour will be as memorable as sunshine

and scenery.

Nestled on the edge of

Marina Baie des Anges, facing

the boat masts and a towering

residential complex, La

Flibuste-Martin’s is the first

Michelin-starred restaurant in

Villeneuve-Loubet. Chef

Eugénie Béziat connects diners

to the fruits of land and sea with

classic French cooking. On the

menu? A selection of dishes representing

fire, earth, air and water: saddle of

local lamb, Giol oysters from Tamaris Bay,

sweetbreads with Provençal celery and

lavender from Gréolières. Go with the

six-course menu and finish with the

sumptuous desserts.

The Riviera’s beautiful light has always

drawn artists. Matisse, Chagall, Picasso

and Renoir all spent time here and the

THE RICH, THE

POWERFUL, THE

INTERNATIONAL JET-

SET FLOCKED SOUTH.

AND WHO CAN BLAME

THEM? THE SAME LURE

STILL DRAWS VISITORS.

Creative cooking at

Grand Hotel du

Cap Ferrat

tradition continues: The Colombe d’Or, a

hotel and restaurant in the hilltop town of

Saint-Paul de Vence, has welcomed some of

the most important artists of the 20th

century. The owners, the Roux family,

would often exchange lodgings for works

of art. A sign at the hotel entrance reads:

“Ici on loge à cheval, à pied ou en peinture.“

This roughly translates as “here we host

those on horseback, on foot or with

paintings.“ Guests come for the food, but

stay for the artworks adorning hotel rooms,

hallways, the dining room and the courtyard

– all displayed without labels or

plaques and making for a lovely guessing

game.

Photos: Shutterstock, Christian Horan Photography,

Getty Images/ Jean-Pierre BONNOTTE/GAMMA-RAPHO ,provided

134 falstaff summer 2021


Grand Hotel du Cap

Ferrat embodies the

style and charm of

Riviera luxury.

Alain Delon,

Eric Tabarly and

Brigitte Bardot off

the coast in Saint-

Tropez in 1968.

NICE AND FURTHER INLAND

The region’s hub, Nice, is an obvious base

for exploring the region. As France’s fifth

largest city, it is unusual for having

vineyards within its city limits. Under their

own appellation since 1941, white, red and

rosé AOC Bellet wines grow in the hills

above the town. The dark grapes Braquet

and Folle Noire are of particular note, so

wine tasting is an option, too. You must

not miss the historic centre of Nice, Vieux

Nice. Wander the streets: along and around

Cours Saleya, you will find beautiful

trompe l’oeil buildings amidst bistros

offering hearty Niçoise specialities. This is

the place to come for fresh soupe au pistou,

a summery soup with France’s answer to

pesto sauce; or pissaladière, a savoury

<

summer 2021

falstaff

135


travel / FRENCH RIVIERA

Colourful boats moored

at the port in Nice.

The coast is

lined with scenic

coves. Above: a dish

of tellines, tiny clams,

a speciality of Nice.

<

tart topped with onions, olives and

anchovies. At the port of Nice, fishermen

tumble forth the day’s catch which then

features heavily on the local menus. Go for

rouget (red mullet), loup de mer (sea bass)

served on coarse salt with a simple wedge

of lemon or tellines, tiny clams steamed

with parsley.

You can follow the Route du Sel (salt

route) which traces the old trade route

from Nice through the Vésubie Valley via

the village of St-Martin-Vésubie to Italy.

An endless zigzag of mules carried goods

across the mountains to Italy, monitored

by the gabelous, customs officers who

collected the gabelle du sel de Nice, the

unpopular salt tax. The ancient stone

buildings are hidden gems – in St-Martin-Vésubie

you can see the listed Maison

Gubernatis where the mule cargo was

YOU SHOULD MAKE

YOUR WAY BACK TO

THE COAST ON THE

FAMOUS MOYENNE

CORNICHE, ONE OF

THREE STUNNING

PANORAMIC ROUTES.

checked and weighed, and the occasional

contraband salt smuggler passed.

It is worth coming away from the busy

coast to explore further inland. Pastures,

craggy gorges, lakes and pine forests offer

a slower pace. You should make your way

back to the coast on the famous Moyenne

Corniche, one of three stunning panoramic

routes, carved into the rocks in the 1920s. It

will take you from the mountains to the sea

Photos: Shutterstock, mauritius images / Ilona Barna BIPHOTONEWS / Alamy, LOOK PHOTOS

136 falstaff summer 2021


in less than an hour, passing the hilltop

village of Éze. The route offers views of

Villefranche-sur-Mer and, to the east, the

Principality of Monaco’s high rise buildings

pushing against the sky.

Monaco has always been fantastical

with its heady combination of luxury

yachts, Formula 1 racing, the Prince’s

Palace and Casino de Monte-Carlo.

High-end dining is right at home here but

if you want something more earthy, head

to the Marché de la Condamine tucked

behind Port Hercules. You will find

Monégasque fare such as barbagiuan, a

savoury pastry stuffed with Swiss chard

and ricotta, or stocafi, a dish of dried cod,

simmered in tomato sauce, vegetables and

black olives. Get just the right local buzz

with a local gin and tonic: the

Distillerie de Monaco’s

is infused with local

oranges and

lemon thyme.

WHAT MAKES SAINT-

TROPEZ STAND

OUT IS ITS UNUSUAL

MIX OF RELAXED,

SMALL-TOWN FLAIR

AND UNDERSTATED

GLAMOUR.

FIRST CITRUS, THEN

SAINT-TROPEZ

If fruit is your thing, head to Menton. It is

the perfect antidote to Monaco. The town

is famed for its lemons, prized by top chefs

for their vibrancy, lack of bitterness and the

high oil content of their peel. Locals sit in

the sunshine on the gentle curve of Plage

des Sablettes, chatting away.

Making your way back west along

the coast, Saint-Tropez awaits.

With its small harbour, pastel buildings,

exclusive beach clubs, boutique hotels and

some serious high-end shopping, it is

emblematic of the entrire coast. What

makes Saint-Tropez stand out is its unusual

mix of relaxed, small-town flair and

understated glamour. Notwithstanding the

luxury yachts, the authentic, southern

French charm that draws revellers and

celebrities alike has been preserved.

A day at one of its legendary beach clubs

along Plage de Pampelonne is a must. Club

55 still carries off its inimitable mix of

effortless style and simplicity.

It seems that the more life changes

elsewhere, the more it stays the same on the

Côte d’Azur. There has always been glitz

and glamour, yet they have never quite

managed to obscure the essence of the land,

its coast and dramatic mountains, its smells,

flavours and sounds. It still is the place of

unhurried summers – always bathed in that

incredible light.

<

St. Tropez

has preserved its unique

character and southern

charm.

summer 2021

falstaff

137


travel / FRENCH RIVIERA

The private beach at

Hotel Cheval Blanc

is what summer

dreams are made of.

HOTELS

HOTEL CAP ESTEL

Just 30 minutes from Nice, this luxury hotel sits on

its own peninsula. Seclusion guaranteed.

06 360 Èze-Bord-de-Mer

+33 493762929

capestel.com

GRAND-HOTEL DU CAP-FERRAT

Everyone who is anyone has stayed here: Elizabeth

Taylor, for instance. A luxurious classic.

06230 Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat

+33 493765050, fourseasons.com

HOTEL CHEVAL BLANC

Close to Saint-Tropez, yet away from the crowds,

this beachfront hotel offers luxury and charm.

83990 Saint-Tropez

+33 494559100

chevalblanc.com

LA RÉSERVE DE BEAULIEU

Italianate style sets the tone in classic resort from

the 1880s. The pool is spectacular.

Creative and refreshing cocktails are a firm

feature of Riviera life.

06310 Beaulieu-sur-Mer

+33 493010001

reservebeaulieu.fr

HOTEL BYBLOS

This iconic Saint-Tropez address is a veritable

magnet for celebrities.

83990 Saint-Tropez

+33 494566800

byblos.com

HOTEL LILY OF THE VALLEY

A contemporary take of luxury with Philippe

Starck‘s open plan design.

83420 La Croix-Valmer

+33 422732200

lilyofthevalley.com

LA COLOMBE D‘OR

Family-run, legendary hotel with a famous restaurant

and intimate rooms housing magnificent artworks.

06570 Saint-Paul de Vence

+33 493328002

la-colombe-dor.com

Photos: V.MATI, provided

138 falstaff summer 2021


RESTAURANTS

LA TABLE DE PATRICK RAINGEARD

All the flavours of the Mediterranean get their due

here at this one-star Michelin restaurant.

06360 Èze

+33 493762929

capestel.com

LE MIRAZUR

Italo-Argentine chef Mauro Colagreco‘s creativity

and excellence was awarded three Michelin stars.

06500 Menton

+33 492418686

mirazur.fr

LA FLIBUSTE-MARTINS

Chef Eugénie Béziat champions local produce at

her Michelin-starred harbourside restaurant.

06270 Villeneuve-Loubet

+33 493205902, restaurantlaflibuste.fr

DISTILLERIE DE MONACO

Monaco‘s first and only distillery crafting gins

and liqueurs with citrus fruits from the

Principality.

98000 Monaco

Tel: +377 99 90 43 38

distilleriedemonaco.com

COURS SALEYA

Pedestrianised heart of Vieux Nice with Niçoise

restaurants serving local specialities.

06300 Nice

LE CLUB 55

Legendary beach club founded in 1955 and still

going strong with its motto of simplicité et

authenticité. There also is a lovely boutique.

83550 Ramatuelle

+33 494555555

club55.fr

<

LE BLUE BAY

Exceptional restaurant with a cuisine that features

a fusion of Caribbean and Mediterranean flavours.

Monte-Carlo Bay Hotel & Resort

98000 Monaco

+377 98060360

La Distillerie

de Monaco uses

local oranges.

LA VAGUE D’OR

Part of Hotel Cheval Blanc, chef Arnaud Donckele

proposes “fireworks of flavour.“

83990 Saint-Tropez

+33 494559100

chevalblanc.com

LE GIRELIER

Located in Saint-Tropez old harbour, Girelier offers

an exquisite range of fish and seafood.

83990 Saint-Tropez

+33 494970387

legirelier.fr

VISIT

CASINO DE MONTE CARLO

In the mood for some gambling? Then this is one of

Europe‘s most legendary casinos.

98000 Monaco

+377 98062000

montecarlosbm.com

DOMAINE DE TOASC

HIgh in the hills above Nice, this tasting room is

open Tuesday to Friday afternoons in summer.

06200 Nice

+33 492151414

domainedetoasc.com

MARCHÉ DE LA CONDAMINE

Typical market offering fresh produce, Monégasque

fare and local delicacies.

98000 Monaco

+377 93306394

Local lemon gets

central billing at

La Table de Patrick

Raingeard.

summer 2021

falstaff

139


travel/ MASAI MARA

AFRICA:

THE GREAT

MIGRATION

Zebras and wildebeest,

or gnus, graze under the

African sun as they move

across the plains in their

annual migration.

Foto: @ 2018 Delbars/Shutterstock

140 falstaff summer 2021


Every July and August thousands of animals migrate from

Tanzania’s Serengeti to Kenya’s Masai Mara in search of fresh

pastures. It is one of the last great mammal migrations of the

world and a once-in-a-lifetime experience for visitors.

WORDS SARAH MARSHALL

summer 2021

falstaff

141


travel / MASAI MARA

Bateleur Camp is sheltered by the Oloololo Escarpment at

the base of the Great Rift Valley and offers splendid views.

GATHERING LIKE

DARK CLOUDS ON

THE STEEP, DUSTY

SLOPES OF THE MARA

RIVER, SWELLING

HERDS OF WILDEBEEST

GRAZE AND GRUNT.

The thunder of several thousand

hooves ripped along the

riverbank, disappearing into

plumes of amber dust.

Gathering like dark clouds on

the steep, dusty slopes of the Mara River,

swelling herds of wildebeest had grazed

and grunted for several hours before

galvanising themselves into action. Eventually

their slow-brewing storm erupted with

a force so energetic and earthy, it sent

shockwaves to the planet’s very core.

Witnessing a wildebeest river crossing is

undoubtedly one of nature’s greatest

spectacles. Every year, an estimated

1.2 million animals make a daredevil dash

across crocodile-infested waters to reach

Kenya’s Masai Mara, returning several

months later to continue their never-ending

circuit of Tanzania’s Serengeti. Driven by

rain and a promise of fresh pastures, these

four-legged nomads travel en masse to form

one of the world’s last true mammal migrations

– but it is the river crossings that

showcase life and death dramas in the wild.

Like anywhere in nature, there is no strict

schedule. In recent years, movements have

been confused by the maelstrom of climate

change. But there is a general pattern for

travellers to follow: led by a pioneering

dazzle of zebras, the first arrivals usually

reach the Mara in July, heading back

around October.

Eager to catch the first wave of visitors, I

based myself at the Bateleur Camp in the

Mara Triangle, a quieter corner of the

Masai Mara National Reserve within close

range of the northern section of the Mara

River – the stretch wildebeest cross first.

Buried into the base of the Oloololo

Photos: DOOKPHOTO, Robin Moore

142 falstaff summer 2021


Bateleur Camp evokes

a bygone area with

its nostalgic yet

contemporary style.

Luxury is guaranteed.

Escarpment, forming part of

Africa’s Great Rift Valley, the

18-tent camp fans into two separate

areas within a private concession. A

soaring rock face sweeping into big skies

and endless plains, it is a setting so

dramatic, it famously provided the

backdrop for the final scenes of the movie

classic Out of Africa. Inside, illustrated

maps, metal-clasped voyager trunks and

Art Deco mini bars nostalgically evoke an

era of exploration, while a game-viewing

infinity pool and fine-dining bush menu

bring the property up to date.

PATIENCE REWARDED

Days earlier, there had been reports of

restless antelopes gathering on the horizon,

so we set off at dawn to scope out one of

their favourite crossing points. We

<

Sala‘s Camp along the banks

of the Sand River offers

exquisite cuisine - likely the

best in the bush.

summer 2021

falstaff

143


travel / MASAI MARA

Wildebeest dramatically

crossing the Mara River:

one of nature‘s great and

most moving spectacles.

<

arrived to find a rigid line of animals

trooping obediently towards the water.

Joining herds teetering along the edge of

crumbling cliffs, their shiny pelts

coruscated in the early morning sun.

Waiting for wildebeest, I soon discovered,

requires patience. For hours, we watched

the indecisive animals charge back and

forth, grunting and honking in a rhythmic

see-saw fashion which became strangely

meditative after some time. Limbering up

like athletes before a race, they would start

to maniacally sprint in circles. This circling,

we were optimistically informed by our

guide, was an indication something might

happen soon.

No one knows for certain why the

wildebeest choose a certain place to cross.

In an area booby-trapped by enormous

crocodiles and lions lurking in the thick of

riverine bushes, no safe passage is ever

guaranteed.

THE DRAMATIC CROSSING

Most people deride the ‘gormless gnus’ for

being stupid. But I would argue the opposite

true. Some scientists suggest the animals

have a sweat gland in their hooves, leaving a

trail for others to follow. But, ultimately,

everything hinges on one courageous

individual daring to make a move.

There are no leaders or alphas in this

animal democracy; instead, herds obediently

follow whoever takes charge at that

point. In a split second, without hesitation,

they are united in one common purpose: to

reach the other side.

Even though we had had plenty of time

to prepare, the main event still took us by

surprise. Splashing through water, their

cavalcade flowed more furiously than any

cataract, powering forward in an unstoppable

flow. Horns and hooves crashed against

rocks, leaving some poor souls floundering

with broken limbs. Others fell victim to the

jaws of hungry predators. But there was no

turning back; only the fittest and strongest

had a chance to survive.

Both powerful and perturbing, the

experience left us silent and lost in thought

for the drive back to camp, requiring a

glass of Constantia Glen THREE to finally

settle our mood. A Bordeaux-style blend, it

burst with flavours of tobacco and deep,

A

SMALL BUT

REFINED CHOICE

OF BOTTLES FROM

SOUTH AFRICA

MATCHES WHAT IS

ARGUABLY THE FINEST

DINING IN THE BUSH.

Rekero Camp offers rustic luxury right on the

riverside. Lions often lay in wait for their prey.

Photos: @ 2018 Jane Rix/Shutterstock, © Asilia / Niels van Gijn, Shannon Wild, @ 2016 Maggy Meyer/Shutterstock, © Asilia / Niels van Gijn

144 falstaff summer 2021


dark fruits, perfectly reflecting our surroundings

with its old-world profile.

While the safari staple has always been a

gin and tonic, many camps now have

extensive wine lists. Sala’s Camp, set on the

other side of the Mara along the banks of

the Sand River, where wildebeest later

cross, has a small but refined choice of

bottles from South Africa to match what is

arguably the finest dining in the bush.

During my stay in the glass-fronted,

semi-tented suites, a memorable dish of

lemon-marinated lamb cutlets served with

olive ugali pyramids could easily have been

served by a Michelin-starred kitchen in a

European capital. But it was the wildlife

sightings that really stole the show.

Attracted by the abundance of prey,

predators swarmed around the area,

enjoying their own delectable buffet.

Also benefitting from a front row

riverside spot, Asilia’s Rekero Camp has

equally commendable culinary offerings.

Peeping discreetly from a woodland area,

the rustic nine-tent camp is in the

<

Taking a sundowner by the plunge pool at

Sala‘s Camp: an indelible memory

A cheetah with her three cubs looks

for prey in the Masai Mara

summer 2021

falstaff

145


travel / MASAI MARA

Hemingways

in NairobI is a

luxurious pitstop

between arrival and

onward travel to the

bush camps.

ADDRESSES

ANDBEYOND BATELEUR CAMP

Sheltered by the towering Oloololo Escarpment at

the base of the Great Rift Valley in the peaceful

Mara Triangle, this elegant camp echoes the nostalgic

travels of safari pioneers.

Menus are a mixture of gourmet dishes and lighter

options, with a choice of in-tent, in-bush or dining

room locations.

Rates from $725 per person (two sharing), full

board in a tented suite.

T: +27118094300, andbeyond.com

ASILIA REKERO CAMP

Rustic luxury is at the core of this tented riverside

camp. Watch wildebeest cross during migration

season, while lions hide between granite boulders

to ambush their prey.

The menu focuses on modern, international cuisine.

Italian arancini, Kenyan smoked sailfish, and

Indian curries all feature.

Rates from $712 per person, full board.

Tel: +27 21 418 0468, asiliaafrica.com

SALA’S CAMP

Glass-fronted tents with plunge pools overlook the

Sand River. The area is renowned for its large buffalo

herds tracked by lions.

Fine dining is served on a vast table cut from a

single piece of fallen East African rosewood found

on Mount Kenya. Dishes are beautifully presented

and sustainably sourced using largely local ingredients

and palm oil-free products.

Rates from $950 per person, full board.

T: +254 725 675 830,

thesafaricollection.com

ANDBEYOND NGORONGORO CRATER LODGE

»Where Masai meets Versailles« is the strapline of

this luxurious camp on the edge of the Ngorongoro

crater in Tanzania. Guests stay in stilted, thatched

huts that come with butler service.

A dining highlight is banqueting on the crater floor

or a private dinner in the wine store.

Rates from $1,115 per person (two sharing), full

board in a thatched suite.

T: +27 11 809 4300 andbeyond.com

ANGAMA MARA SAFARI LODGE

Only fifteen tented suites make up this camp

located on an escarpment above the Great Rift Valley,

on the edge of the Serengeti National Park.

Shamba-(or garden) to-table-lunches are available

with home-grown vegetables and fruit from the

on-site garden – or barbecues in lantern-lit forests.

Rates from $1,250 per person (two sharing), full

board in a tented suite.

T: +254 730 630630 angama.com

FLIGHTS

Travel to Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta airport.

Transit to the Mara from Wilson Airport on either

Safari Link or AirKenya. Camps can advise on the

correct air strip.

Before you fly: if overnighting in Nairobi, stay at the

five-star Hemingways Nairobi, a plantation-style

property in the leafy Karen district, set in beautiful

gardens and overlooking the Ngong Hills.

HEMINGWAYS NAIROBI

Rooms from $490, with breakfast.

T: +254 711 032 204/205,

hemingways-collection.com/nairobi/

TALISMAN

Eat out at Talisman, a country home transformed

into Nairobi’s finest dining experience serving a

fusion of African and international dishes in a bohemian

setting.

T: +254 705 999 997

thetalismanrestaurant.com

<

Photos: provided

146 falstaff summer 2021


Making

Memories.

www.tirol.at


travel / TOP AUSTRIAN DESTINATIONS

TOP 9

THE

THINGS TO DO

IN AUSTRIA

Headquartered in Vienna, Falstaff is delighted to show off

Austria‘s must-visit destinations.

WORDS KLAUS HÖFLER

Photo: Tourismus Salzburg GmbH

148 falstaff summer 2021


Salzburg on the river

Salzach: it simply is a

splendid setting.

SALZBURG

IN MOZART’S FOOTSTEPS

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is one of the

most famous Austrians. His operas,

symphonies and concerts still fill concert

halls around the world. In his home

country, however, there is no way of

escaping him. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

is something of a patron saint in the city of

Salzburg. This is where the composer was

born in 1756 and where he wrote some of

his famous works – at an age when

normally gifted children go to kindergarten.

It is here that the annual summer and

Easter festivals are celebrated for which

Mozart was and always will be the

inspiration. It is here that small, fine

chocolate confections bearing his name are

produced: Mozartkugeln are made from

nougat, almond and pistachio marzipan coated

in chocolate. Salzburg is Mozart’s city.

– even if the cityscape is dominated by an

imposing fortress enthroned on a rock in

the town centre, surrounded by narrow

streets, romantic squares and a dominant

cathedral complex. All the art and architecture

do not mean that you should

forget about worldly pleasures: do not

leave without indulging in Salzburg’s very

own dessert speciality: a fluffy, sweet

soufflé of egg, sugar, flour called Salzburger

Nockerln.

summer 2021

falstaff

149


travel / TOP AUSTRIAN DESTINATIONS

Schönbrunn expresses

imperial splendour and

majestic grandeur in

equal measure.

VIENNA IMPERIAL SPLENDOUR

What Buckingham Palace is to London or

Versailles is to Paris, Schönbrunn is to

Vienna: this palace is the epitome of the

imperial splendour that has long characterised

Austria. Back when the Habsburgs

ruled the Austro-Hungarian Empire – and

thus half of Europe – the palace was built

as the emperor’s summer residence in the

18th century. Today it is one of the most

popular and visited sights in Vienna.

Rightly so. A visit to the glamorous

interiors is like a journey back in time. The

palace has a total of 1,441 rooms, some of

which are used as a museum. What sets this

palace apart, however, is that you can

actually stay there: yes, guests can book a

suite – with a four-poster bed and a perfect

view of the magnificent palace gardens:

both park and palace have been a

UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1996.

The best view is from the Gloriette – an

arched pavilion – on a hill above the

palace. Here the city lies at your feet. In the

extensive park itself, however, another

attraction awaits: the oldest zoo in the

world that still is in existence.

Phots: Shutterstock, OeWm Marcus Wiener

150 falstaff summer 2021


Picturesque

Burgenland with

vineyards and

a view of Lake

Neusiedl.

BURGENLAND

PRINCELY PALACE AND LAKE NEUSIEDL

It is in Burgenland that Austria becomes

unfaithful to its reputation as a country of

Alpine heights and snowy peaks. In its far

east, the landscape is vast. Only gentle,

vine-clad hills interrupt the plains. In this

setting, not far from Lake Neusiedl,

Europe’s second-largest endorheic

lake and the national park with

its wildlife reserves, lies

Eisenstadt, the capital of

Burgenland.

The centre of gravity of

the small town is Esterházy Palace, once the

residence of the Esterházy family. The

magnificent building, partially converted

from baroque to a classical style in the 19th

century, was also home to the famous

composer Joseph Haydn, who lived here

for 40 years working as a composer and

conductor. The palace gardens are definitely

worth a visit, laid out like an English

landscape park. The grounds seem massive,

almost too big for the tranquil surroundings,

which are best explored by bicycle.

STYRIA

GRAZ – FULL OF SURPRISES

Styria’s capital Graz has a lot to offer: the historic town centre

with its castle Eggenberg, a UNESCO World Heritage site

surrounded and contrasted by contemporary architecture like the

Kunsthaus, an art gallery, which was dubbed “friendly alien“ by the

locals. Then there is one of the most beautiful Renaissance courtyards in

Central Europe and a futuristic steel construction floating in the middle of the river:

Graz is an architectural marvel tucked away in Mitteleuropa – it deservedly was European

Capital of Culture for a year. The city is home to festivals for early music, electronic music, for

avant-garde art and film. Six universities and 50,000 students inject young life. Then there is

Schlossberg Mountain with the world’s highest indoor slide, spiralling down 64 metres in

exhilarating curves. And where else would two passenger planes “park“ on the roof of a hotel?

summer 2021

falstaff

151


travel / TOP AUSTRIAN DESTINATIONS

UPPER AUSTRIA

AUSTRIA ENCAPSULATED

The Salzkammergut is a kind of Austrian

treasure trove. Everything that makes

Austria special is encapsulated here in a

small space: mountains, lakes, culture,

history and good food. Dreamy lakes like

Wolfgangsee, Traunsee, Attersee or Hallstättersee

are framed by rugged mountains.

They are places steeped in history. In

Hallstatt, for example, you can visit the

oldest salt mine in the world, in Bad Ischl

you can visit the Kaiservilla, an imperial

villa, where Emperor Franz-Joseph and his

wife Elisabeth, lovingly known as “Sisi“

once spent several summers. At Lake

Attersee you can visit the villa where

painter Gustav Klimt stayed.

The most spectacular view

of the Salzkammergut,

however, is from the Schafberg

mountain, high above the

village of Sankt Wolfgang. You

ascend with one of the oldest and

steepest cogwheel steam locomotives in the

world – or with muscle power and hiking

boots. At any rate, 14 lakes lie glistening at

your feet once you get to the top. Back in

the valley, it is time to enjoy the hospitality

and gastronomic specialities of the region.

Dishes of local lake fish await in cosy

restaurants, the magnificent views over the

lake will only whet your appetite even

more.

Austria has a wealth of

scenic Alpine lakes, here

is a view of Wolfgangseee

in the Salzkammergut.

Photos: Lukas Kirchgasser, © Christof Wagner, WWW.POV.AT

152 falstaff summer 2021


6

apricots

LOWER AUSTRIA

THE BLUE DANUBE

The Danube is Austria’s largest river. It is

a highly frequented transport route

through Central Europe and its hydroelectric

power plants are important

sources of energy. But despite all this

utilitarianism: the Danube is full of charm

– especially in the Wachau region. Here

mountains slope steeply down to the river,

most of them terraced and home to neat

rows of vines – predominantly Riesling

and Grüner Veltliner. But there is another

famous Wachau crop: highly aromatic

which are distilled into beguiling

eau-de-vie. Orchards, vineyards and

historic villages take turns along the river.

The castle ruins at Dürnstein or the

imposing Melk Abbey, built on hills above

the river, stand guard like watchful

sentinels. Indeed, the Wachau region is one

of the most scenic stretches along the river

Danube. You can experience this at first

hand on a cycle path that follows the river

– or on a boat: enjoy the view and get off

at the wine town of Krems.

summer 2021

falstaff

153


travel / TOP AUSTRIAN DESTINATIONS

CARINTHIA

SUMMER PARADISE IN

THE ALPS

Deep in Austria’s south, the land of

mountains becomes the land of lakes.

Numerous lakes entice you to swim,

wind-surf, sail, paddle-board or sunbathe

and make this region a popular summer

holiday destination. The undoubted

highlight: Lake Wörthersee. The turquoise-blue

colour of its water is a result of lime

particles from Alpine rivers, algae and the

sun’s rays. Beach bars serving cocktails and

refreshing drinks make it a perfect and

stylish spot to relax.

To explore the surroundings and get the

best view, we suggest you visit the small

church on the peninsula of Maria Wörth

– the best way to get there is on board the

Thalia, a steamer built in 1909 that cruises

the lake as an excursion boat.

The best view of the lake itself, however,

is from a bird’s perspective. So up to the

Pyramidenkogel peak, a mountain on the

south shore of the lake. The lookout tower

spiralling up into the sky is one hundred

metres high and the highest wooden

lookout tower in the world.

VORARLBERG

BETWEEN MOUNTAINS AND STAGE

Vorarlberg is Austria’s smallest federal state and home to the

country’s biggest body of water: Lake Constance. Germany, Switzerland

and Austria share the 273-kilometre/170-mile shoreline which

comes with plenty of special features. Thhe River Rhine, for example,

flows right through it: it enters the lake in Vorarlberg’s capital

Bregenz and leaves it again in the far west.

Bregenz is famous for its annual open-air summer arts festival on

an opera stage built into the lake. The spectacular productions and

concerts attract renowned artists, musicians and a global audience.

As is usual in Austria, visitors combine the pleasures of music with

those of the table. The nearby Bregenzer Wald region is famous for

its cheeses. Vorarlberg might be tiny, but it does pack a punch.

Photos: tinefoto.com | martin steinthaler, ©anja koehler | andereart.de, Jean Paul Bardelot, TVB Osttirol/Quest4Visuality

154 falstaff summer 2021


TIROL

SPARKLING PARADISE

800,000 crystals glisten and sparkle here:

the contemporary art installation Kristallwolke,

or crystal cloud, is a mystical

masterpiece and one of the highlights of

Swarovski’s Kristallwelten in Wattens near

Innsbruck.

Here, artists from all over the world have

transformed a park with quirky installations

and works of art into a fantasy

landscape: a giant with a water-spouting

face made of grass guards the entrance to

its interior, where so-called ’chambers of

wonder’ are located: exhibition spaces

hosting international artworks fashioned

from Swarovski crystals.

The presentation is impressive, imaginative

and unique. At the centre: the small,

typical glass stones, cut into sparkling

crystals. The polishing and cutting machines

were developed by Daniel Swarovski more

than a hundred years ago. Today, the

flawless, cut gemstones are coveted all over

the world: they grace catwalk fashion and

are made into jewellery, sewn into dresses,

used in interior design and objects d‘art.

They simply make life sparkle.

summer 2021

falstaff

155


travel / LOWER AUSTRIA

FINDING

GRÜNER

VELTLINER

Austria has many attractions: world-class ski slopes,

Mozart’s Salzburg , Vienna’s splendour – and wine country.

Yes, Austria’s wine regions are beautiful destinations within

easy reach of the capital. Let us take you to the home of

Grüner Veltliner, Austria’s favourite wine.

TEXT ANNE KREBIEHL MW

Photo: Raimo Rudi Rumpler

156 falstaff summer 2021


Grüner Veltliner is

Austria‘s indigenous

grape variety. It is at home

right here in Vienna and

along the beautiful valleys

of the Danube.

Krems

Vienna

AUSTRIA

summer 2021

falstaff

157


travel / LOWER AUSTRIA

Town or country? Heuriger

Wieninger on Vienna‘s

Nussberg offers the best

of both worlds in its urban

vineyards.

Touring a wine region is one of

the most immersive and

memorable ways of getting

under the skin of a country: you

see the lay of the land, feel the

same sunshine that ripens the grapes and

meet the people who make the wine. You

taste, eat and drink right in situ, experiencing

the place, its people and its wines. In

Austria, of course, everything begins and

ends with Grüner Veltliner. In between

there are picturesque villages, gorgeous

landscapes, unique Kellergassen and lovely

Heurigen inns – all ready to welcome you.

A HUNDRED SHADES OF

GRÜNER VELTLINER

Grüner Veltliner is Austria’s indigenous and

most widely planted grape variety: there

are 14,423 hectares/35,640 acres of it –

representing 31%

of all vine plantings.

It makes

everything from

easy-drinking,

refreshing whites to

the most savoury,

full-bodied single site

wines. Grüner Veltliner is a

stylistic chameleon and the

purpose of your trip is to taste as many

shades of ’Grooooner’ as possible. Being

indigenous, Grüner is perfectly suited to

the local conditions. It is right at home in

the wine regions of Lower Austria – those

along the Danube and surrounding Vienna:

Wachau, Kremstal and Kamptal, Traisental,

Wagram and the beautiful Weinviertel that

stretches all the way to the Czech border in

the north. Winemakers know exactly how

Grüner Veltliner

ripening on the vine.

Grüner Veltliner ripeing

on the vine,

SOME WINES ALMOST

HAVE A MISO- OR

SOY-LIKE SALTINESS

AND COME WITH

OVERTONES OF FENNEL

SEED, ROCKET LEAVES

OR CRUSHED CHERVIL.

Photo: © WienTourismus/Peter Rigaud, WM/Robert Herbst / OTS, StockFood / Lehmann, Herbert,

Mayer am Pfarrplatz, www.pov.at

158 falstaff summer 2021


View of a typical Kellergasse

and the church at Wartberg in

the Weinviertel region.

Right: Heuriger

Mayer am

Pfarrplatz. Below:

Backhendl, or fried

chicken, is typical

Heurigen fare.

to tease out Grüner Veltliner’s special

characteristics: it makes a savoury white

wine, often showing notes of white

pepper – a character known as Pfefferl in

Austrian dialect, meaning pepperiness.

Once you have a taste for it, you will want

to taste it again and again. But there is

savouriness that goes well beyond pepper.

Some wines almost have a miso- or soy-like

saltiness and come with overtones of fennel

seed, rocket leaves and crushed chervil.

Cooler reaches in the Weinviertel and

cooler vineyards bring out the pepperiness,

warmer vineyards and vintages bring out

the herbal savour and that beautiful

textural, pithy quality that makes Grüner

Veltliner – arguably – the most versatile

food wine ever.

TOURING WINE COUNTRY:

WEINVIERTEL

The start and end point of our wine

ex-pedition is Vienna. It is Europe’s only

state capital with a sizeable wine industry

within its city limits. Before setting out on

our tour, we suggest you get yourself to one

of the Heurigen inns on the Nussberg, like

Mayer am Pfarrplatz, Weingut Wieninger

or Weingut Christ in Florisdorf. Have your

first taste of Grüner Veltliner, rest well and

set off the next morning. Your first

<

summer 2021

falstaff

159


travel / LOWER AUSTRIA

Fine food and wine is served in

down-to-earth surroundings at the

Hofmeisterei in Weissenkirchen in

the Wachau region.

IN LESS THAN AN HOUR YOU WILL BE ABLE TO

WALK ALONG A TYPICAL KELLERGASSE, OR

CELLAR LANE, A HISTORIC FEATURE OF

AUSTRIAN WINE CULTURE.

Exploring the Wachau

region by boat: one of the

most pleasant ways of

taking in the vineyards

is from the Danube, here

with a view of the village

of Dürnstein

<

destination is Poysdorf. You are heading

straight to the Weinviertel region and in

less than an hour you will be able to walk

along a typical Kellergasse, or cellar lane.

Kellergassen are a historic feature of

Austrian wine culture. These neat flights of

squat buildings are not human dwellings

but press houses. In the past, the wines

were pressed, matured and stored here.

Whoever held the keys to the cellar was

head of the household – so ingrained was

winemaking in the area. Poysdorf’s Kellergasse

is particularly picturesque. There are

more than 1000 of these lanes in Lower

Austria – with notable ones in Falkenstein,

Retz, Hadres and Pillersdorf – you can even

book guided tours. Don’t forget to look up:

there is something special about those huge,

open Weinviertel skies. If you are happy to

plan ahead, do book a tasting at Weingut

Ebner-Ebenauer in Poysdorf, one of the

region’s best estates with stellar Grüner.

NEXT STOP: WAGRAM

The next destination is Feuersbrunn in the

region of Wagram. Pretty much all of

Photos: WINKELMANN MICHAEL // www.michael-winkelmann.com, Markus Haslinger / picturedesk.com, www.pov.at, G¸nter

Standl / laif / picturedesk.com, provided

160 falstaff summer 2021


Wagram is a vast bank of wind-blown loess

which makes excellent vineyard soil. Grüner

Veltliner grown on loess is rounded,

rich and fruity. Its herbal notes accompany

rich pear flavours. There are two must-visit

estates: Anton Bauer and Bernhard Ott

– both famous for their expressive, fullbodied

Grüner Veltliners. Comparing the

styles of these neighbouring estates will be

fun. Should hunger strike, we suggest you

lunch at Restaurant Zur Traube – it is part

of Austrian celebrity chef Toni Mörwald’s

gastronomic empire. If you are lucky, his

cream of Grüner Veltliner soup is on the

menu – as are various Austrian specialities.

The village of Feuersbrunn

in the Wagram region.

NEXT STOP: KREMS

From Feuersbrunn it is just a short hop

to the next wine region: Kremstal.

You can drive via Schloss Grafenegg,

a somewhat strange

confection of mock-medievalism

with a beautiful park. Its

real attraction, however, is

the Wolkenturm, a purpose-built

open-air stage

Domäne Wachau‘s

Kellerschlössl and its

Baroque dining room.

with a stupendous programme of classical

music and jazz concerts. But onto Krems:

this town on the Danube gives the region

its name. The Grüner Veltliners here are

different: grown on rockier, river-facing

vineyards, these wines have more back

bone and bite. Taste them at Weingut

Salomon Undhof or at the municipal

winery, Weingut der Stadt Krems. Then

head across the Danube to Weingut Stift

Göttweig, the winery at the imposing

Benedictine abbey that can be seen from

afar on the southern bank of the Danube.

The abbey is definitely worth a visit –

for the view alone – and it is just a

20-minute-drive from Krems.

NEXT STOP: WACHAU

Both Kremstal and the Wachau, Austria’s

most famous growing region, extend on

either side of the Danube. As you descend

from Stift Göttweig, stay on the southern

bank and drive along the river to the car

ferry at Sankt Lorenz – it is a lovely way to

arrive in Weissenkirchen in the Wachau.

Take a left turn and head for Weingut

<

summer 2021

falstaff

161


travel / LOWER AUSTRIA

THIS IS THE PLACE

TO GET TALKING

AND TASTING BEFORE

HEADING BACK TO

VIENNA WITH SOME

UNFORGETTABLE

MEMORIES.

Letting the sun set over

a glass of wine: a

summer evening in a

Buschenschank. Right: a

typical Brettljause.

<

Josef Jamek. This is a

Wachau institution: both

as a destination restaurant

and an address for great

wines. Carry on to the westernmost

corner of the Wachau, to the

bijou town of Spitz an der Donau. Climb

its steep streets: you will have a splendid

view of the dramatic and terraced vineyards

and dry stone walls. Taste worldclass

Grüner Veltliners made by Weingut

Hirtzberger and Weingut FJ Gritsch

Mauritiushof. In fact, every village in the

Wachau boasts world-class Grüner

Veltliner: there is Weingut F.X. Pichler in

Wösendorf, Weingut Knoll and Weingut

Alzinger in Dürnstein as well as one of the

best co-operatives in the world: Domäne

Wachau. They often hold events at their

historic Kellerschlössl property. Look out

for the wallpaper with gnomic depictions

of peasants from all over Austria. Tasting

the concentrated Grüner Veltliners of the

Wachau is illustrative of how the region

gets gradually warmer from Spitz in the

west towards its border with Kremstal in

the east. The villages themselves are

beautiful – with countless inns, restaurants

and hotels. Besides

wine, the Wachau

boasts another

speciality: its exceptionally

aromatic apricots.

They make a most fragrant

distillate: the famous Marillenschnaps.

It makes an excellent digestif and a perfect

Wachau souvenir, along with wine and

apricot jam.

You could do this tour on a weekend or

over weeks: there is so much to discover

and taste – luckily everything is within easy

reach of Vienna and rather compact. Since

Austria’s wine industry is so fragmented,

with most wineries still family-run, you

stand a good chance of tasting wine not

with a hired hand to run the cellar door

but with the people who actually tended

the vines and made the wine. You can also

rub shoulders with the locals at one of the

numerous Buschenschanks, pop-up

restaurants run by wineries serving their

own wines. These are informal affairs

where wine flows freely over more or less

rustic fare. This is the place to get talking

and tasting before heading back to Vienna

with some unforgettable memories.

BUSCHEN-

SCHANK OR

HEURIGER?

What is a Buschenschank,

what is a Heurigen and what

is the difference?

Both Heurigen and Buschenschanks are wine

taverns that serve food. Both have the same

tradition, going back to an imperial decree from

1784 that allowed winegrowers to sell their

own wine seasonally and serve simple food

alongside. The term Heurigen is derived from

Heuriger, the wine of the most current vintage,

which was offered for sale. Today, the law

makes a distinction between the two: Heurigen

are wine taverns that are open all year round

and are allowed to serve warm food. Many of

them are proper and sophisticated restaurants.

A Buschenschank still is closer to the original

idea: it is a temporary pop-up run by a winery

serving its own wine – often just with cold food

(depending on local regulations). Buschenschanks

can be rustic or sophisticated, but they

are always fun and great value. As you drive

along the roads, you will see fresh greenery

with colourful ribbons, or beautiful straw wreaths

decorated with ribbons and flowers hung

outside the wineries: these denote an open

Buschenschank.

Photos: WWW.POV.AT, @ 2018 Rene Walter/Shutterstock, Ernst Weingartner / picturedesk.com

162 falstaff summer 2021


WINE ESTATES

WEINVIERTEL REGION

Weingut Ebner-Ebenauer

Laaer Straße 3-5, 2170 Poysdorf, +43 2552 2653

ebner-ebenauer.at, Tastings by appointment

WAGRAM REGION

Weingut Anton Bauer

Neufang 42, 3483 Feuersbrunn, +43 2738 2556

antonbauer.at, Cellar Door open Monday – Friday

Weingut Bernhard Ott

Neufang 36, 3483 Feuersbrunn, +43 2738 2257

ott.at, Tastings by appointment

KREMSTAL REGION

Weingut Salomon Undhof

Undstrasse 10, 3500 Stein, +43 2732 83 226

Opening hours, salomonwines.com/undhof

Cellar Door open afternoon Monday – Friday and

Friday morning

Weingut der Stadt Krems

Stadtgraben 11, 3500 Krems, +43 2732 801 441

weingutstadtkrems.at,

Cellar Door open Monday – Friday

Weingut Stift Göttweig

Göttweig 1, 3511 Furth, +43 2732 801440

weingutstiftgoettweig.at,

Cellar Door open Monday – Friday

WACHAU REGION

Weingut Josef Jamek

Josef-Jamek-Straße 45, 3610 Joching

+43 2715 2235, jamekwein.at

Cellar Door open Monday – Saturday

Weingut Franz Hirtzberger

Kremserstraße 8, 3620 Spitz, +43-2713-2209

hirtzberger.com, Tastings by appointment

Weingut FJ Gritsch Mauritiushof

Kirchenpl. 13, 3620 Spitz, +43 2713 2450

gritsch.at, Cellar Door open Monday – Saturday

Weingut FX Pichler

Oberloiben 57, 3601 Dürnstein,

+43 2732 85375

fx-pichler.at, Tastings by appointment

Domäne Wachau

Dürnstein 107, 3601 Dürnstein, +43 2711 371

domaene-wachau.at

Cellar Door open Monday – Saturday

Weingut Emmerich Knoll

Unterloiben 132, 3601 Dürnstein,

+43 2732 793550 No website, Tastings

by appointment

MENU SPEAK

Weingut Alzinger

Unterloiben 11, 3601 Dürnstein, +43 2732 77900

alzinger.at, Tastings by appointment

HOTELS

WEINVIERTEL REGION

Hotel und Weingut Neustifter

Am Golfplatz 9, 2170 Poysdorf, +43 2552 20606

hotel-neustifter.com

Schlosshotel Mailberg

Mailberg 1, 2024 Mailberg, +43 2943 30301

schlosshotel-mailberg.at

WAGRAM REGION

What to order in a

Buschenschank?

BRETTLJAUSE

a plate of cheeses and charcuterie,

served with pickles, bread and butter

LIPTAUER

a savoury, home-made dip made from

cream cheese, seasoned with paprika,

onion and caraway seed

BLUNZN

the local version of black pudding, often

served with sauerkraut

GRAMMELSCHMALZ

seasoned lard with greaves (pork rinds)

served with bread

GSELCHTES

slices of roast and smoked ham

KREN

freshly grated horseradish, always

served with cold meats

WURSTSALAT

finely sliced sausage dressed with

vinaigrette and onions

ERDÄPFEL

Austrian term for potato

PARADEISER

Austrian term for tomato

Mörwald Relais & Châteaux Hotel am Wagram

Kleine Zeile 13-17, 3483 Wagram, +43 2738 22980

moerwald.at/hotel-am-wagram

Das Weinspitz – Wachau

In der Spitz 3, 3620 Spitz, +43 2713 2644

donabaum.at

Hotel Schloss Dürnstein

Dürnstein 2, 3601 Dürnstein,

+43 2711 212

schloss.at

RESTAURANTS

& HEURIGEN

VIENNA

Mayer am Pfarrplatz – Vienna

Pfarrpl. 2, 1190 Wien, +43 1 370 1287

pfarrplatz.at, Open daily 12 noon to midnight

Weingut Weininger

Stammersdorfer Strasse 31, 1210 Wien

+43 1 290 10 12, wieninger.at

Cellar Door open Monday – Saturday

Heurigen open Friday, Saturday, Sunday

Weingut Rainer Christ – Vienna

Amtsstraße 12, 1210 Wien, +43 1 2925152

weingut-christ.at, Heuriger open from

Monday – Sunday – check website for hours

WAGRAM REGION

Moerwald Zur Traube – Wagram

Kleine Zeile 13-17, 3483 Feuersbrunn

+43 2738 22980, moerwald.at, Open daily

WACHAU REGION

Hofmeisterei Hirtzberger

Hauptstraße 74, 3610 Wösendorf, +43 2715 22931

hofmeisterei.com, closed Tuesday,

Wednesday and Thursday lunchtime

Restaurant Jamek – Wachau

Josef-Jamek-Straße 45, 3610 Joching

+43 2715 2235, jamekwein.at

Closed Sundays and Mondays – check for opening

times on other days

Landhaus Bacher – Wachau

Südtiroler Pl. 2, 3512 Mautern an der Donau

+43 2732 82937, landhaus-bacher.at

Closed Mondays and Tuesdays

Wachauer Stube – Wachau

Unterloiben 24, 3601 Dürnstein,

+43 2732 8 59 50

wachauerstube.at, closed Wednesdays

and Thursdays

Loibnerhof Knoll

Unterloiben 7, 3601 Dürnstein, +43 2732 82890

loibnerhof.at, closed Mondays and Tuesdays

Pulker’s Heuriger

Rührsdorfer Kellergasse, 3602 Rührsdorf

+43 664 39 35 312,

pulkers-heuriger.at

Closed Wednesdays

<

summer 2021

falstaff

163


ANGELIKA ROSAM

TRENDY,

BEAUTIFUL,

SUMMERY

HERE COMES

THE SUN …

If you are in need of an extra dose

of vitamin D, look no further than

these colourful serving plates from

Lab Design. With a hand-painted

sun design they are exquisite mood

boosters. artemest.com

BBQ-STAR

At long last, barbecue season is here again.

If attending to smoky charcoal for hours on

end is not your idea of fun, this tabletop

grill is a wonderful alternative. Barbecue

newbies will be pleased with the easy handling.

Available in several colours.

lotusgrill.co.uk

SOUNDS OF

THE SEA

These pretty wooden spoons

from the Marini label come in

maritime-themed bags that kill

two birds with one stone: they

bring that holiday feeling and

save on harmful plastic.

marini-designandcraft.com

ICE, ICE, BABY

Hot days call for cool drinks –

and a stylish wine cooler is de

rigueur for the summer season.

This classically sleek Pilastro

design by Francis Cayouette

sports fine grooves and evokes

an elegant art déco flair.

finnishdesignshop.com

Phots: Rafaela Pröll, provided-

164 falstaff summer 2021


eldorado

LIFESTYLE

The longing for

seaside and summer,

for holidays and lazy

days in the sun: time

to bring some of that

holiday feeling right

into your home. These

beautiful objects will

bring these notions

right home to you.

Our columnist ANGELIKA ROSAM

is publisher and co-owner of Falstaff

Publishing. With her inimitable

flair for the beautiful things in life, she

presents her favourite picks for house

and home.

BOHO-VIBES

Basket weave and rattan are once

again – or still – on trend.

Whether you use them as place

mats or as décor, these beautifully

woven mats from natural

materials immediately bring an

Ibiza vibe to your home. Holiday

and summer are right there in

front of you.

caravane.co.uk

COOL COLLAB

What happens when an Italian fashion label

meets a Parisian patisserie? They come up

with a fabulous home collection, of course.

La Double J and macaroon specialist Ladurée

prove the point – especially with their

range of strikingly floral aprons.

ladoublej.com

FRESHLY SQUEEZED

What could be more Mediterranean than

ripe citrus fruit? If you are longing for lemon

groves and the sound of cicadas, these

breakfast plates from &Klevering are just

the ticket. Summer is here.

trouva.com

summer 2021

falstaff

165


spirits / SCOTCH WHISKY

Single malt Scotch on the

rocks is a classic - but the

category has seen much

innovation recently.

Photo: @ 2020 banu sevim/Shutterstock

166 falstaff summer 2021


THE NEW FACE OF

SINGLE MALT

SCOTCH

WHISKY

In the early 1960s, Scotch single malt whisky started

conquering the spirits world to become the classic it is today.

But even classics need innovation, so distilleries have been

experimenting and pushing boundaries to present ever more

creative single malts.

WORDS BENJAMIN HERZOG

summer 2021

falstaff

167


spirits / SCOTCH WHISKY

Malted barley mash is

distilled into whisky in these

large copper pot stills.

Photos: StockFood / Cephas Picture Library, @ 2018 SeaRick1/Shutterstock, @ 2020 SpockyPo/Shutterstock

168 falstaff summer 2021


Scotch glasses lined

up for tasting in the

distillery afer ageing

for years in barrel.

Below: the raw

material barley.

In 1853, whisky merchant Andrew

Usher senior created the first Scotch

whisky blend. He blended various

malt whiskies for the Old Vatted

Glenlivet – which kicked off the

commercial rise of Scotch whisky. His son,

Andrew Usher junior, added grain whisky

from 1856 onwards, i.e. not only whisky

that was made from expensive barley malt

but also from cheaper grain. With Usher‘s

Green Stripe, he created a new type of blended

whisky that could be reproduced again

and again by sophisticated combining and

mixing of various whiskies. His innovation

was the birth of industrial production of

blended whisky and gave rise to the

founding of well-known whisky companies

such as Ballantine’s, Chivas, Dewar or

Walker in the following years.

THE REBIRTH OF SINGLE MALT

World-famous single malt Scotch whisky is,

of course, the counterpart to Usher’s

creation. It must fulfil two conditions: first,

it must be distilled from nothing but malted

barley; second, it must be the product of a

single distillery. Legend has it that the

rediscovery of single malt whisky, as it was

known before the introduction of blending,

only took place in 1963 – less than 60

years ago. It is disputed whether the

Glenfiddich distillery really

reinvented the single malt at

that time or whether it only

revolutionised whisky

marketing. What is certain,

however, is that their launch

of the Straight Malt in that

year ushered in a new age for

whisky – the era of the single malt.

Today, around 90 per cent of the

whisky produced in Scotland is blended.

Yet the single malt category has been

growing for years – not only in terms of

production volume, but also in terms of

price. This is due to increased demand as

well as the innovative and creative prowess

of various distilleries: they constantly

devise new selling points for their single

malt whiskies.

WHAT IS CERTAIN,

HOWEVER, IS

THAT THEIR LAUNCH

OF THE STRAIGHT MALT

IN THAT YEAR USHERED

IN A NEW AGE FOR

SCOTCH WHISKY.

UNIQUE SELLING POINTS

Glenfiddich, for example, who started the

single malt hype, launched a single malt

whisky in 2019 that not only tastes good in

front of a roaring fire or with a cigar, but is

also intended for festive and celebratory

moments. Glenfiddich Grand Cru is a

23-year-old whisky that has spent a second,

six-month maturation period in French

casks which previously held base wines of

some of the world’s most prestigious

Champagnes. It is a particularly well-balanced,

fine whisky that should please not

only seasoned single malt fans but also

beginners. The Grand Cru whisky line was

crowned only recently, with the launch of

the 26-year-old single malt Grande

Couronne. An exquisite single malt that

was finished for two years in used

<

summer 2021

falstaff

169


spirits / SCOTCH WHISKY

Charring barrels to

achieve the desired

toasting grade is a

craft that takes

much skill.

<

Cognac casks. The presentation of the

Grand Cru series, which also includes the

21-year-old Gran Reserva from Sherry and

rum casks, clearly shows that new drinkers

are being converted to the joys of whisky.

The idea was to imbue the occasion of

drinking these exclusive spirits with the

celebratory feel associated with popping a

Champagne cork.

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE FINISH

Distilleries around the world use special

casks to give their whiskies a finishing

touch. However, the process only gained

real traction in the 1980s when producers

like The Balvenie began to refine their

whiskies that had aged in ex-Bourbon casks

by giving them a finishing stint in Sherry

casks. Many producers, Glenmorangie for

example, followed in the same vein and

today the list is almost endless. There are

single malts from Madeira, rum or Port

casks, but also from casks that previously

contained German Pinot Noir, Californian

Cabernet Sauvignon or even craft beer.

There are no limits to the imagination

when it comes to choosing barrels. In the

THE IDEA WAS TO

IMBUE THE OCCA-

SION OF DRINKING

THESE EXCLUSIVE

SPIRITS WITH THE

CELEBRATORY FEEL

ASSOCIATED WITH

POPPING A CHAM-

PAGNE CORK.

US there is even a brand that treats its

whisky to a finish in used Tabasco casks.

Each to his own.

For Scottish distilleries, of course, this is

going too far. The Glenmorangie distillery

from Tain in the Northern Highlands

recently caused a sensation with a new

edition that also shines with a special finish

and an even more special name: the single

malt A Tale of Cake, launched in autumn

2020. According to the house’s legendary

director of whisky creation, Dr Bill

Lumsden, the intention was to capture the

“joy of a cake“ in a bottle. For the finish of

this single malt, casks of the legendary

sweet Hungarian dessert wine

Tokaji were used – not the kind

of cask you find every day in

the cask warehouses of

Scottish distilleries. The

colourful, playful label

marks a departure for

the self-image of many

single-malt producers.

Marketing no longer has

to be classic, it can and

should attract attention.

Photos: @ 2015 Megan Snedden/Shutterstock, @ 2016 AlexeyMarchuk/Shutterstock, @ 2019 GolubSergei/Shutterstock

170 falstaff summer 2021


WHISKY WITH TERROIR

The Islay distillery Bruichladdich is

undisputedly one of the pioneers of

innovative bottle design and creative

interpretation of the term single malt. All of

Bruichladdich’s whiskies are marketed as

single malts even though they differ greatly

in style. They are not peated, so they do not

have the typically smoky taste of many

Islay whiskies. Their whiskies under the

Port Charlotte label, on the other hand, are

slightly peated, while their Octomore

enjoys legendary status among friends of

this style as “the most heavily peated single

malt whisky in the world“. Bruichladdich

looks back on a turbulent history. Since

opening in the late 18th century, the

distillery has closed down time and again,

most recently in 1994 – only to re-open

again in 2001. This continuous spirit of

rebirth clearly also informs the company’s

innovative spirit which has been legendary

on many levels.

Bruichladdich thus bottles whiskies made

from barley grown on the island of Islay

where the whisky is distilled and matured.

The distillery was the first to apply the

notion of terroir that is more prominent in

wine than Scotch: it is the idea of a product

expressing the conditions and culture of its

origin and provenance. This still is an

absolute exception in the whisky business.

Single malt’s raw material, malted barley, is

not usually from regional cultivation but

bought in from various sources. This

THE DISTILLERY WAS

THE FIRST TO APPLY

THE NOTION OF

TERROIR THAT IS MORE

PROMINENT IN WINE

THAN SCOTCH.

ensures constant availability of barley malt.

Neither is the origin of the barley considered

to have much influence on the taste of

whisky. Processes like malting, kilning,

distilling and maturation in particular are

far more important factors. But Bruichladdich

are not the only ones to disagree.

Many distilleries follow their example. The

legendary Speyside distillery Macallan, for

example, launched their single malt The

Macallan Estate in 2019, made from barley

from the distillery’s own estates. The

Balvenie also launched The Edge of

Burnhead Wood last year, made with

produce from the immediate area: not only

barley but also local heather over whose

smoke the malt was kilned, i.e. dried. Even

if the influence on the taste remains

controversial, the topic of regionality and

origin plays a decisive role in many modern

single malts – authenticity and regionality

are good selling points, not just in food or

wine.

<

Maturation in barrels

of various origins

and sizes has a great

bearing on the final

flavour of the whisky.

summer 2021

falstaff

171


spirits / SCOTCH WHISKY

BEST OF NEW

SINGLE MALT WHISKY

TASTING

INFO

WEITERE BEWERTUNGEN

MORE TASTING

UND BESCHREIBUNGEN

NOTES AT

FINDEN SIE

FALSTAFF.COM

AB SEITE 148.

99

95

94

GLENFIDDICH GRANDE

COURONNE 26 YEAR OLD

Matured in American and European

oak. Finished in cognac barrels. On

the nose vanilla, toasted oak, some

crème brulée as well as patisserie,

subtle vegetal, mossy hints that

provide complexity. Very elegant

and balanced. Pleasantly round and

soft on the palate with a sweet

impression of raw cane sugar and

spicy hints. Lingering finish.

glenfiddich.com

HIGHLAND PARK CASK

STRENGTH RELEASE NO. 1

Cask Strength is the first cask

strength whisky from Highland Park

to be released worldwide. The whisky

was created by bringing together

dozens of individual casks, predominantly

American sherry casks. Elegant,

sweet smoky aroma with spicy

vanilla nuances, subtle white flowers.

Rich and exceedingly full-bodied

on the palate with an intense,

long finish of spice.

highlandparkwhisky.com

BRUICHLADDICH PORT

CHARLOTTE PAC:01

An intense whisky with present,

notes of smoky bacon, but also

malty hints and spicy nuances like

cinnamon. With the second sniff,

fruity aromas are also recognisable.

Seems very balanced. On the

palate again very intense with

vivid smoky notes, sweet midpalate

and long finish with salty

impression.

bruichladdich.com

96

95

93

ARDBEG SCORCH

Limited Edition from particularly

heavily toasted casks. Peat and cask

smoke on the nose, as well as

leathery and spicy nuances. Round

and nicely balanced on the palate,

again smoky but also characterised

by ripe fruity, sweetish nuances.

Ends long on smoky notes with a

sweet impression. Very enjoyable.

Ardbeg.com

THE MACALLAN EDITION NO. 6

Elegant, complex nose with notes

of nutmeg, vanilla as well as fruity

impressions like orange. Also

nuances of toffee. Sweetish on

the palate with balanced roasted

aromas and citrus hints. Ends long

on fresh fruits and warm spices.

themacallan.com

BRUICHLADDICH ISLAY BARLEY

2012

The barley for this whisky was

grown on 8 farms on Islay, where it

was also distilled and matured. A

terroir whisky if you will. Delicate,

light nose with notes of vanilla,

pear and white flowers, citrus

nuances are also discernible. Also

elegant on the palate with subtle,

sweet cereal notes, smoky hints

and a long finish.

bruichladdich.com

95

95

93

THE MACALLAN ESTATE

Distilled from home-grown barley.

Engaging, warm spice on the nose

with notes of cinnamon blossom,

oak and toffee, plus nuances of

dried fruits such as sultanas and

dates. Soft on the palate with toasty

oak notes as well as fruity nuances

in the long finish.

themacallan.com

THE BALVENIE THE EDGE OF

BURNHEAD WOOD 19 YEAR OLD

The fourth release of The Balvenie

Stories was made exclusively from

produce from the Balvenie Estate in

Dufftown: barley, water and wild

heather for drying the malt. Light on

the nose with notes of blossom

honey, white flowers and citrus,

nuances of warm spice. Pleasantly

soft on the palate with notes of

dried figs. Finishes with oak notes.

balvenie.com

GLENMORANGIE A TALE OF CAKE

Multi-layered, sweet nose with

notes of vanilla, almonds and sultanas,

as well as apricot and pear

compote. Rather sweet on the

palate with honey aromas and fruity

notes. Long finish with citrus and

spicy hints.

glenmorangie.com

Phots: provided

172 falstaff summer 2021

Up to € 20 / $ 30 € 21 – 30 / $ 31 – 40 € 31 – 50 / $ 41 – 60 € 50 – 100 / $ 61 – 110 € 100+ / $ 110+


… tasting the best of Kamptal, site by site!

Every sip is a pleasure …

94 Falstaff-Points 93 Falstaff-Points

TROPHY

2019

INTERNATIONAL WINE & SPIRIT COMPETITION

QUALITY AWARD


INTERNATIONAL SUMMER 2021

FALSTAFF SCORES & KEY TO SYMBOLS

CONTRIBUTORS

WINE TASTING & SCORES

Falstaff scores wines according to the 100-point scale.

Falstaff tasters also write detailed tasting notes for each wine, putting the score into

context.

All wines are tasted, described and scored by our Falstaff wine editors. Each editor, and

their respective tasting teams, are internationally recognised specialists for their regions.

Where tastings by more than one taster are presented in the same feature, the taster‘s

initials are shown.

International

Austria, Bordeaux, Fortified Wines

Germany, Bordeaux, Burgundy

Italy

Switzerland, Spain and Portugal

The Scores

95 – 100 absolute classic

93 – 94 outstanding

91 – 92 excellent

88 – 90 very good

85 – 87 commended

Up to € 20 / $ 30

€ 21-30 / $ 31-40

€ 31-50 / $ 41-60

€ 50-100 / $ 61-110

€ 100+ / $ 110+

Anne Krebiehl MW (AK)

Peter Moser (PM)

Dr Ulrich Sautter (US)

Othmar Kiem, Simon Staffler (OK, SS)

Benjamin Herzog, Dominik Vombach (BH, DV)

WINE PRICE CATEGORIES

We divide wines into five different price categories,

symbolised by coins.These are based on cellar door

and recommended retail prices.

We regret that import taxes and excise duties of

specific countries cannot be reflected here,

nonetheless the categories should still provide a

useful guideline about a wine‘s retail price.

GUEST CONTRIBUTORS IN THIS ISSUE:

Angelo Gaia is one of Italy’s most prominent and visionary winemakers.

Together with his family, he runs the Gaja estate in Barbaresco, Piedmont, Italy.

Aldo Sohm is one the wine director for Le Bernardin in Manhanntan where he

also runs a wine bar. His first book, Wine Speak, was published in 2019

CONTRIBUTORS

Hans Mahr is our peripatetic restaurant obsessive, addicted to ordering

everything on the menu.

Sarah Marshall is an travel writer specialising in Africa. For this issue,

she travelled to the Masai Mara for us.

Peter Pharos moonlights as a writer and is the mystery man behind our

Lighthouse Column.

Rebecca Whitlocke is a New Zealand writer based in the south of France

where she reports on yachting and local culture

Zeren Wilson is our London-based restaurant critic and omnivore.

In this issue he reported on the importance of beef breeds.

Gus Zhu MW is the first Chinese-born Master of Wine. He also holds a degree

in viticulture and oenology from UC Davis, which is why he co-wrote our

Californian feature.

FALSTAFF INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE ISSUE 00/2021

FALSTAFF INTERNATIONAL

The articles published in this issue are protected by

copyright. Translation, reprinting, reproduction and

storage in data processing systems only with express

permission of the publisher. Quotations from articles

in this issue are only permitted if the source is

acknowledged.

MEDIA OWNER:

Falstaff Verlags-GmbH

Führichgasse 8, 1010 Vienna, Austria

T: +43 1 9042141

editorial@falstaff.com

MANAGEMENT

Mag. Elisabeth Kamper,

Ronald Tomandl, M. Sc.

201920021

PUBLISHER

Wolfgang M. Rosam

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Anne Krebiehl MW

MANAGING DIRECTOR

Jana Scheidmantel

MANAGING EDITOR Herta Scheidinger

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Manuela Prieth

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Anton-Georg Kiener

ART DIRECTOR Karolina Stasiak

DESIGN INTERN Julia von Wenzl

PHOTO DIRECTOR Thomas Hopferwieser

PRINT PRODUCTION Konstantin Riemerschmid

CONTRIBUTORS IN THIS ISSUE

Corinna von Bassewitz, Lily Cook, Angelo Gaja,

Benjamin Herzog, Klaus Höfler, Othmar Kiem,

Hans Mahr, Sarah Marshall, Peter Pharos, Angelika Rosam,

Dr. Ulrich Sautter, Matthias Schickhofer, Aldo Sohm,

Simon Staffler, Dominik Vombach, Rebecca Whitlocke,

Zeren Wilson, Gus Zhu MW

ILLUSTRATIONS Gina Mueller

PROOFREADING Artemis Burger, Kate Hart

INTERNATIONAL AD SALES

advertising@falstaff.com

AUSTRIA

Lisa Tschernig, M. A.

Christiane Ceccarelli

BENELUX: Mediacontact International

T: +32 2 3434371, j.mineur@mediacontact.net

GERMANY: Claudia Roman Navarro

T: +49 211 9666299-3, claudia.roman-navarro@falstaff.com

ITALY: Wineline International

T: +39 0473 292370, M: +39 329 0977299, info@wineline.it

SWITZERLAND: Nicole Steffen, T: +41 43 2107029

nicole.steffen@falstaff.com

SPAIN: AIM, About International Media

T: +34 91 3203770, olga.martinez@aboutim.es

SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES

subscriptions@falstaff.com

Falstaff International Magazine appears quarterly.

Follow us on Instagram: @falstaff.international Twitter: @falstaff_intl Facebook: falstaff.international

174 falstaff summer 2021


SCHRAMM ORIGINS COMPLETE Cleo – Design Hanne Willmann

Handmade in Germany

schramm-werkstaetten.com


tasting / PROSECCO DOCG

ITALIAN

BUBBLES

Prosecco, the sparkling wine from the hills around Conegliano and Valdobbiadene in

Italy‘s Veneto region, has conquered the world. No wonder: it is light-bodied, refreshing,

affordable and always lifts the mood. This is our Italian editors‘ pick of Prosecco Superiore

DOCG, from the heart of the production zone. Here are the highest scoring wines from

their comprehensive tasting in spring 2021.

TASTING NOTES AND SCORES OTHMAR KIEM AND SIMON STAFFLER

The green hills of

Valdobbiadene and

Conegliano are the true

home of Prosecco

DOCG.

Photo: Shutterstock

176 falstaff summer 2021


summer 2021

falstaff

177


tasting / PROSECCO DOCG

KEY TO SYMBOLS

94


white wine, dry

red wine, dry

• dessert wine

• rosé

95 – 100 absolute classic

93 – 94 outstanding

91 – 92 excellent

88 – 90 very good

85 – 87 commended

Prosecco DOCG

Valdobbiadene Superiore di

Cartizze DOCG Dry 2020

Bortolomiol, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with

soft green reflections. Expressive and

fragrant aromas of sea salt, white peach

and spring flowers. Complex and delicate

palate, shows beautiful concentration

and precision. An excellent, very elegant

Cartizze.

bortolomiol.com


Vigneto della Riva di San Floriano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Brut 2020

Nino Franco, Valdobbiadene (TV)

12 Vol.-% Brilliant silver with strawyellow

reflections and persistent, airy

mousse. Fragrant and inviting aromas of

jasmine and white roses, fresh pears and

hints of quince. A pristine, youthful concentrated

palate, very juicy acidity with a

vibrant freshness and long finish.

ninofranco.it


Giustino B. Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Extra Dry

2019,

Ruggeri, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-%, Clear, bright silver with fine,

persistent mousse. Fragrant, finely delineated

nose with notes of apple, white

peach and some basil. Round and fullbodied,

very balanced, fills the palate

beautifully, finishes persistently and with

fine mousse.

ruggeri.it

93


Vigneto Giardino Rive di Colbertaldo

Valdobbiadene DOCG Asciutto

2019, Adami, Colbertaldo di Vidor (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant straw yellow with persistent

mousse. Highly aromatic notes of

peach blossom and white peaches, crisp

apple and light sea salt. Vibrant and concentrated

palate with ripe sweet fruit,

generous, round and elegant, with a clear,

long lasting finish.

adamispumanti.it


Col Credas Rive di Farra di Soligo

Valdobbiadene DOCG Extra Brut 2019

Adami, Colbertaldo di Vidor (TV)

11 Vol.-% Clear, light yellow, fine mousse.

Very fragrant and clear aromas of lemon,

apple blossom and fresh, crisp apple.

Juicy and clear on the palate, very appealing,

salty texture. A vibrant fresh style

with a persistent finish.

adamispumanti.it


Bosco di Gica Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut

Adami, Colbertaldo di Vidor (TV)

11 Vol.-% Radiant, brilliant straw yellow

with silver and persistent, filigree mousse.

Bright, precise aromas of pears, acacia

blossom and white peach with hints

of light sea salt. A clear, precise palate,

very juicy, with a wonderfully integrated

mousse and a clean flinty and crystalline

finish.

adamispumanti.it


26. Primo Rive di Col San Martino

Prosecco Valdobbiadene Superiore

DOCG Brut 2020

Andreola, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright yellow with persistent,

fine mousse. Open and accessible nose

with precise notes of fresh apple, some

banana and jasmine blossom. Juicy and

very appealing palate, fine aromatics,

lightweight and fresh appearance, delivers

exactly as a great Prosecco DOCG

should.

andreola.eu


Valdobbiadene Superiore di

Cartizze DOCG Dry 2020

Andreola, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant, light silver-grey with

persistent mousse. Multi-layered fragrant

nose, of fruit salad, white peach,

lots of white spring blossom. Multilayered

palate, with a fresh, vibrant

mousse and concentrated fruit, generous

on the finish.

andreola.eu


Col del Forno Rive di Refrontolo

Valdobbiadene DOCG 2020

Andreola, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant, flint silver with

persistent, elegant mousse. A precise,

mineral driven nose underlaid with

fresh citrus, white flowers and hints of

white peach. A highly balanced palate,

very clear and very fresh mousse forming

a gentle cloud in the mouth, the

wine develop effortlessly. Precise and

elegant.

andreola.eu


San Fermo Conegliano Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut

2020

Bellenda, Vittorio Veneto (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright silver-grey with a fine

mousse. Hint of yeast on the nose, then

vibrant citrus and hints of almond. The

palate is very juicy, great acidity, lively

with a long length. Finish is bright, clear

and fresh.

bellenda.it


Cartizze Valdobbiadene Superiore

DOCG Brut 2020

Bisol 1542, Santo Stefano di

Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant lemon silver with a

fine persistent mousse. Highly fragrant on

the nose: stone fruit and white blossom.

On the palate balanced and harmonious,

with clear vibrant fruit and fine mousse,

long complex, satisfying finish.

bisol.it


Prior Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Bortolomiol, Valdobbiadene (TV)

12 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with fine,

persistent mousse. Inviting and fresh aromas

of white peach, acacia blossom and

meadow herbs. A palate with an airy

mousse, very expressive with filigree texture

at the same time. Impressive, elegant

finish.

bortolomiol.com


Labano Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut 2019

Ciodet, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright lemon silver with light

airy mousse. Smells of quince, green apple

and nuances of peach and mineral

notes. On the palate, clear fruit

sweetness, the mousse and citrus acidity

carries the wine. Clear and crystalline,

refreshing length.

ciodet.it


Rive di Susegana Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Brut 2019

Col Sandago, Susegana (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Clear, light yellow, fine bubbles.

Opens on the nose with notes of

fresh pear, white melon and mirabelle

plums. Shows real tension on the palate,

juicy, vibrant fruit with a long finish.

colsandago.com


Cuvée 5 Valdobbiadene DOCG

Extra Brut 2020

Col Vetoraz, San Stefano di

Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant, light straw yellow,

powerful, persistent mousse. Very intense

and appealing nose, of white peach,

apple and jasmine blossom. Creamy and

fine palate, vivid, fresh fruit, long finish.

colvetoraz.it


Cuvée 13 Valdobbiadene DOCG

Extra Dry 2020

Col Vetoraz, San Stefano di

Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, flint silver, fine, persistent

mousse. Very clear and fresh nose,

shows notes of acacia flowers, fresh pear

and some banana. Juicy and clear on the

palate, ripe, concentrated, fruity, fine salty

notes on the finish.

colvetoraz.it


Valdobbiadene Superiore di

Cartizze DOCG Dry 2020

Col Vetoraz, San Stefano di

Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant lemon silver with persistent

mousse. A fragrant nose of bright

stone fruit, jasmine, acacia honey and

hints of iodine-salt. A palate with great,

clearly defined fruit sweetness, generous

and mouth filling with a filigree elegant

mousse. A long, precise finish.

colvetoraz.it


Valdobbiadene DOCG Brut 2020

Col Vetoraz, San Stefano di

Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright silver-grey with persistent

mousse. Inviting aromas of fresh,

Photos: provided

178 falstaff summer 2021


green apples, fragrant white flowers and

hints of young pineapple, inviting. A balanced

palate, juicy and clearly concentrated

fruit, with a light and elegant finish.

Classic style.

colvetoraz.it


RY Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Brut 2020

Daldin, Vidor (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Shiny, light grey-yellow, with

fine bubbles. Clear, finely delineated

nose with notes of white peach, melon

and hints of nutmeg in the background.

A palate with fresh, crisp apple fruit,

good tension and a fine saltiness on the

finish.

daldin.it


Doro Nature Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Le Vigne di Alice, Vittorio Veneto (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant straw yellow with

persistent mousse. Fragrant nose of ripe

stone fruit, beeswax, banana, a touch of

vanilla, toasted hazelnut. The palate is

very complex, taut with vibrant youthful

fruit, mineral drive and a satisfying saline

note. Fresh pure fruit core, long, precise

finish. Highly intriguing.

levignedialice.it


Cuvée del Fondatore Rive di

Col San Martino Millesimato

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Brut 2019

Merotto, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant, bright silver-grey

with persistent, small bubbles. Inviting

nose of very fragrant jasmine blossom,

grapefruit and lemon. A very delicate palate

but still offering a firm structure,

stretching to a fine, crisp acidity and a

long, precise finish.

merotto.it


Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Extra

Brut 2020

Nani Rizzi, Guia di Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, light grey-yellow with

many fine bubbles. Finely drawn nose,

fresh white peach and ripe banana, appealing

style. Creamy and finely woven, fresh

core, shows vibrant fruit, a sense of

fullness yet with a lightness of body.

nainirizzi.it


Rustico Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut

Nino Franco, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11 Vol.-% Bright, radiant silver-grey with

persistent mousse. Aromas of quince,

pear, meadow herbs and white blossom.

A juicy palate, with very well integrated

mousse, crisp acidity and a sweet orchard

fruit core. Very correct and highly

appealing Prosecco Superiore.

ninofranco.it


Primo Franco Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Dry 2020

Nino Franco, Valdobbiadene (TV)

10,5 Vol.-% Brilliant, luminous silver-grey

with persistent, filigree mousse. Aromas

of fruit salad, white peaches and fresh

white English roses. A balanced palate,

with marvellous fruit sweetness, great

concentration and a long salty finish.

ninofranco.it


Cartizze Valdobbiadene Superiore

di Cartizze DOCG Brut

Ruggeri, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver with fine mousse.

Aromas of sea salt, iodized salt, wet

stone, lime and subtle floral scents. A

taut and clear palate, juicy acidity with a

long, crystalline citrus focused finish.

ruggeri.it


Millesimato Conegliano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Brut 2020

San Giuseppe, San Pietro di Feletto

(TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant, noble silver with persistent,

filigree mousse. Finely fragrant nose

of fresh, juicy peaches, acacia blossom and

ripe pears. Vibrant juicy palate, shows

great freshness, a lively mousse, lightfooted

and crystalline on the finish.

aziendaagricolasangiuseppe.it


Cuvée del Fondatore Millesimato

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Brut 2019

Valdo, Valdobbiadene (TV)

12 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with soft green

reflections. Fine ripe pear on the nose with

hints of vanilla sugar, melon, ripe Amarena

cherries. A palate with clear focus and

charm, creamy texture embedded pleasantly

in the mousse, sweet ripe fruit concentration

and an elegant drinking flow.

valdo.com


Gocce di Perle Millesimato

Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Costaruel, San Vendemiano

11 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with persistent,

filigree mousse. Aromas of crisp

apples, fresh pear and newly opened jasmine

flowers. The palate offers attractive

sweet ripe fruit concentration, well embedded

mousse and juicy acidity. Already

drinking very well.

costaruel.it

92


Dirupo Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Dry 2020

Andreola, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, light straw yellow, lively,

fine-grained mousse. Very clear and

intense nose, aromas of juicy pear, yellow

melon and delicate sweet pastries. Generous

palate, rich, appealing and full-bodied.

Creamy texture with a firm drive on

the finish.

andreola.eu


Arzanà Valdobbiadene Superiore

di Cartizze DOCG Dry

Astoria, Crocetta del Montello (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright lemon silver with delicate

mousse. A nose of pink peach,

subtle acacia honey and white spring flowers.

On the palate a lot of fruit expression

and well integrated mousse, juicy and

fresh, well integrated and put together

wine, drinking very well already.

astoria.it


Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Bacio della Luna, Vidor (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant silver grey. Fragrant

aromas of sea salt and slightly lemony

nuances. Has a concentrated fruit

sweetness at its core, with pleasant

mousse, spreads harmoniously over the

tongue, reverberates clearly and with

considerable length.

baciodellaluna.it


Sei Uno Rive di Carpesica Metodo

Classico Conegliano Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Extra Brut

2018, Bellenda, Vittorio Veneto (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Clear, light straw yellow,

somewhat subdued mousse. Attractive

nose, shows notes of juicy pear, white

melon, fresh notes of basil. Supple and

appealing, clearly defined ripe fruit, salty

on the finish.

bellenda.it


Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Dry 2020

Bellussi, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11 Vol.-% Clear straw yellow, fine lively

mousse. Opens on the nose with notes of

banana and juicy Williams pear. A generous

palate, fresh orchard fruit, juicy acidity

and a long finish.

bellussi.com


Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Bellussi, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11 Vol.-% Bright lemon silver with persistent

mousse. Aromas of fruit salad,

young pear and white flowers. A very

fresh and crystalline palate with a wonderful,

airy, generous mousse. Hints of

bitterness on the finish do not distract

from this attractive style.

bellussi.com


Conegliano Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Extra Dry

2019, BiancaVigna, Conegliano (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, light straw yellow, persistent,

fine mousse. Smells beautifully

of lime blossom, yellow melon and pear.

The palate is juicy, then opens with ripe

fruit of apricot and peach, balanced and

long style with a sweet, textural finish.

biancavigna.it


Relio Rive di Guia Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2019

Bisol 1542, Santo Stefano di

Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver grey. Expressive

aromas of hay, meadow herbs, yellow

stone fruit and scents of acacia honey. A

pleasant palate with yellow-fruited core,

well integrated mousse and beautiful

structure.

bisol.it


Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut

Borgoluce, Susegnana (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver green. Very

fragrant and expressive nose, predominantly

mineral components, wet stone,

iodized salt, some lime juice. On the

palate, very fresh and crisp, opens out

with a delicate mousse, saline nuances,

as clean as a whistle.

borgoluce.it


Senior Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Extra Dry

2020

Bortolomiol, Valdobbiadene (TV)

Up to € 20/ $ 30 € 21 – 30 / $ 31 – 40 € 31 – 50 / $ 41 – 60 € 50 – 100 / $ 61 – 110 € 100+ / $ 110+

summer 2021

falstaff

179


tasting / PROSECCO DOCG

11,5 Vol.-% Delicate, straw yellow, fine

mousse. Aromas of acacia blossom,

brioche pastries and ripe apple. Generous

palate with ripe, sweet fruit and

creaminess on the finish.

bortolomiol.com


Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut

Canella, San Donà di Piave (VE)

11 Vol.-% Bright silver-grey with medium

mousse. Aromas of banana, bright honey

and a hint of ripe pineapple. A palate with

very clearly expressed fruit sweetness, vivid

mousse, concentrated yellow-fruit. A

pleasing and individual style of wine.

canellaspa.it


Terre del Faè Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore Extra Brut 2020

Canevel, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11 Vol.-% Bright, light straw yellow with

fine mousse. Fresh crisp apple, delicate

musk tones and hints of banana. Very

juicy on the palate, shows good tension,

fine salty notes on the finish.

canevel.it


Vigna del Cuc Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Brut 2019

Col Sandago, Susegana (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver grey with persistent

mousse. Restrained aromatics. The

palate offers ripe fruit and a well integrated

mousse, cool citrus acidity. A finely

woven style with a classy finish.

colsandago.com


BIO Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Colesel, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant, flint silver-grey. Fragrant

and inviting nose of acacia blossom,

light honey, crisp apple and green pear. A

palate with a lot of tension, well integrated

mousse and delicately fruity, fresh

core, precise, driven and with good length.

colesel.it


Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Daldin, Vidor (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with persistent

mousse. A little muted on the nose.

The palate, domianted by concentrated

ripe orchard fruit, offers fine texture, real

ripeness, well integrated bubbles and an

appealing, juicy finish.

daldin.it


Verizzo Conegliano Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut

Dotta, Refrontolo (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant lemon silver with persistent

mousse. On the nose restrained

aromas of wet stone and fresh lime. A

palate with a juicy core, expressive fruit,

shapes up nicely, with a long, clear finish.

cantinadotta.it,


Rive di Santo Stefano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Extra Dry 2019

Drusian, Bigolino di Valdobbiadene

(TV)

11 Vol.-%. Bright, light straw yellow, lively,

fine mousse. Delicate nose of ripe apple,

fine pears and some buttery pastry. Round

and smooth on the palate, a rich style with

vivid fruit and a concentrated finish.

drusian.it


Millesimato Conegliano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Brut 2020

Il Colle, San Pietro di Feletto (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with persistent,

airy mousse. Fragrant nose with

slightly iodine-salty notes with white floral

nuances. A palate that offers very

fresh and lively fruit, great foam, with

juicy-crisp acidity. Correct and appealing.

proseccoilcolle.it


Conegliano Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Extra Dry

Il Colle, San Pietro di Feletto (TV)

11 Vol.-% Shiny, bright silver, persistent

mousse. Shows fine and ripe aromas on

the nose, opens with notes of acacia blossom,

quince and yellow peach. Juicy, finely

worked out fruit, salty on the finish.

proseccoilcolle.it


Conegliano Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut

Il Colle, San Pietro di Feletto (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-green with persistent

mousse. Very fragrant, floral nose

of jasmine, elderflower and citrus scents.

A palate with fine fruit sweetness,

spreads out beautifully on the mid

palate, crisp pear and citrus notes, a

pleasant length.

proseccoilcolle.it


Rive di Farra di Soligo

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Extra Dry 2019

La Farra, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Delicate, light straw yellow,

persistent, fine mousse. Intense and finely

delineated nose of jasmine flowers,

ripe pear and some melon. A full-bodied

palate, showing a lot of ripe fruit, creamy

and persistent finish.

lafarra.it


Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

La Farra, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant, bright silver with persistent,

filigree mousse. A nose of white

stone fruit, salty nuances and meadow

flowers. A palate full of delicate fruit

sweetness, shapes up nicely, pleasantly

embedded mousse, compact and well

made.

lafarra.it


Valdobbiadene Superiore di

Cartizze DOCG Dry

La Tordera, Guia di Valdobbiadene

(TV)

11,5 Vol.-%. Brilliant silver-grey with persistent

mousse. Beautiful aromas of spring

blossom, meadow herbs and bright stone

fruit, with hints of pink peach. An attractive

palate with clear, juicy and precise

acidity, generous fruit concentration.

Amazingly dry with a crystal clear finish.

latordera.it


Tittoni Rive di Vidor Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Dry 2020

La Tordera, Guia di Valdobbiadene

(TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with

filigree, persistent bubbles. Inviting

aromas of sea salt, fresh melon and

white flowers. Possesses real fruit

expression on the palate and comes with

really creamy, fine and smooth mousse,

airy and light, a pleasure.

latordera.it


BIO Colle 170 Millesimanto

Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

La Vigna di Sarah, Vittorio Veneto (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver yellow with

medium mousse. Defined aromas of ripe

fruit, apricot, peach, yellow pear, then

floral touches. A palate just as fruit concentrated,

compact core with fresh

mousse, spreads finely across the palate,

alternative style of very pleasing

Prosecco Superiore.

lavignadisarah.it


Alice .G Metodo Classico

Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Brut 2016

Le Vigne di Alice, Vittorio Veneto (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant, bright straw yellow

with persistent mousse. Appealing nose

of pineapple, ripe lychee, yellow peach,

substantial, mineral flint notes and hints

of blood orange. Palate opens with great

complexity, generous mousse, juicy acidity

and a long, salty texture and finish.

Highly individual and very attractive

Prosecco Superiore.

levignedialice.it


Amolèr Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Brut

Marsuret, Guia di Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Clear, light yellow. Fine and

fragrant nose of fresh apple and finely

tuned pear. Vibrant youthful yellow fruit

on the palate, spreads out finely, creamy

mousse, long satisfying palate.

marsuret.it


R.D.O. Rive di Ogliano Conegliano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Brut 2019

Masottina, Conegliano (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, radiant silver-grey.

Highly aromatic notes, flowery and fragrant,

of jasmine and white roses, light

citrus fruit and sea salt. A palate with

great structure, vibrant juicy acidity, a

light texture, ripe sweet fruit on the mid

palate and a substantial elegant finish.

masottina.it


Millesimanto Conegliano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Dry 2020

Mass Bianchet, Vidor (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with persistent

mousse. An unusual nose with

hints of iodine and floral jasmine notes.

A palate with sweet ripe fruit and a well

integrated mousse. Balanced and precise

with a satisfying finish.

massbianchet.it


Borgo Grotta Conegliano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Extra Brut 2019

Mass Bianchet, Vidor (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Clear, light grey-yellow,

somewhat restrained mousse. Finely

drawn, fragrant nose of jasmine blossom,

orange peel and fresh apple. Juicy and

salty at the palate, fine mousse, shows

notes of apple and strawberry.

massbianchet.it

Photo: provided, Shutterstock

180 falstaff summer 2021



Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut

Nino Franco, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11 Vol.-% Radiant, brilliant silver with persistent

mousse. Fragrant, expressive

nose of jasmine, acacia flowers. The palate

offers fresh honey and yellow peach,

generously concentrated with sweet

ripeness and a precise, focused finish.

ninofranco.it


BIO Canah Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut

Perlage, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver with straw

yellow, medium mousse. Fragrant, floral

aromas of jasmine and elderflower, grapefruit

and crisp pear. A palate with a

fresh fruit core and juicy-soft mousse,

elegant appealing finish.

perlagewines.com


Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut

Rivalta, Bigolino di Valdobbiadene

(TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright silver-grey with persistent,

fine mousse. Aromas of fruit salad,

ripe banana and yellow blossom. On

thepalate delicate fruit sweetness, tight

juicy acidity which fills the mouth. Clear,

linear drive into a crystalline finish.

dearivalta.it


Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Salatin, Cordignano (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey. A nose of ripe

citrus fruit, pear fruit, wet stone, florally

scented notes. A very fresh and clean palate,

well integrated mousse with subtle

fruit sweetness, a filigree style with fitting

concentration leading to a long finish.

salatinvini.com


Bosco di Fratta Millesimato

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Dry 2020

Sanfeletto, San Pietro di Feletto (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright silver-grey with persistent

mousse. Cool elegant fruit with

hints of sea salt. A very fresh palate with

restrained fruit, offering elegant textural

notes with real length .


52 Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut 2019

Santa Margherita, Fossalta di

Portogruaro (VE)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant lemon silver. On the

nose, blood oranges, fresh quince, sea

salt, hints of candied pear, tropical overtones.

A supple and rounded palate

shows pleasantly integrated mousse,

with fruity-sweet core, stone fruit holds

up the long finish.

santamargherita.com


BIO Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Stramaret, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with persistent

mousse. Aromas of vibrant crisp

pears and apples with scents white flowers.

A juicy palate, clear and precise acidity,

good balance of youthful fruit and a

noble bitter note on the finish that adds

additional freshness.

stramaret.it


Rive di Guia Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2019

Tanorè, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with persistent,

filigree mousse. Aromas of light

honey, crisp white peaches, floral nuances

and hints of pear. A fine and juicy palate

with concentrated fruit and elegant

long finish.

tanore.it


Conegliano Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2019

Tenuta 2castelli, Susegana (TV)

11 Vol.-% Radiant, brilliant silver-grey

with persistent mousse. Inviting aromas

of beautifully scented fruit, jasmine and

oranges. A very juicy palate, seems bonedry

at first, textural, mineral then elegant

fruit comes forth. A very delicate style,

very appetising.

2castelli.com

• BIO Cuvée di Boj Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut

Valdo, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with persistent,

filigree mousse. On the nose crisp

pear nuances, freshly cut grass, grapefruit

and wet stone. Complex palate with

very juicy acidity, generous and concentrated

citrus fruit, with a slight but appealing

bitterness on the finish.

valdo.com


BIO Numero 10 Metodo Classico

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Brut 2018

Valdo, Valdobbiadene (TV)

12,5 Vol.-% Brilliant straw yellow with

finest mousse. Elegant, complex aromas

of light brioche, some butter, salt, then

baked apple. On the palate juicy, clear,

with tender creamy body, very well integrated

mousse, long and fresh.

valdo.com


BIO Rive di San Pietro di Barbozza

Millesimanto Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut Nature

2019

Valdo, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Clear, light yellow, persistent,

fine mousse. Clear and fine with aromas

of fresh apple and white melon. Fresh,

clear fruit on the palate, fine mousse and

a delicate salty texture on the finish.

valdo.com


BIO Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Extra Brut

2019

Vigne Matte, Cison di Valmarino (TV)

11 Vol.-% Bright, light yellow, abundant

fine bubbles. Shows notes of white peach

and white melon on the nose. Great tension

on the palate, juicy, with fresh fruit

and an attractive, lightweight finish.

vignematte.it


Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Dry 2019

Vigne Matte, Cison di Valmarino (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant, bright straw yellow

with persistent mousse. Complex aromas

of scented flowers, fresh quince, saffron

and sea salt. A lot of consistency on the

palate, juicy, integrated mousse, with a

really lasting finish.

vignematte.it


Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut

2020

Villa Sandi, Crocetta del Montello (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with persistent,

fine mousse. Aromas of white

peach, melon, acacia blossom and young

pear. A palate with clear fruit core and

beautiful freshness, generous soft mousse

and a clear, fruit accentuated finish.

villasandi.it


Nero Asolo Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Extra Brut

Villa Sandi, Crocetta del Montello (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant, light greenish yellow

colour with persistent mousse. Expressive

aromas with nuances of green apple,

green pear, fresh grass and spring flowers.

A juicy palate with a salty texture

and a delicate slightly bitter finish.

villasandi.it


Millesimato Conegliano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Dry 2020

Vincenzo Toffoli, Refrontolo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey. Attractive

floral nose of jasmine and white roses and

hints of stone fruit. A fruit-focused palate

of ripe peach, with generous, crisp acidity

and a clear precise finish.

proseccotoffoli.it


47/87 Rive di Vidor Conegliano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Extra Dry 2019

Castello, Vidor (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant, bright straw yellow,

lively bubbles. Beautifully ripe, fresh apple

on the nose with hints of butter pastries.

Generous ripe, fresh fruit on the palate.

pear and yellow peach. Persistent finish.


Col Volpere Rive di Farra

Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut 2019

Le Volpere, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant, luminous silver-grey.

On the nose, fragrant hints of light honey,

ripe white peach, paired with floral

scents. A cool palate with a juicy core

and a well defined finish.

levolpere.it

Up to € 20/ $ 30 € 21 – 30 / $ 31 – 40 € 31 – 50 / $ 41 – 60 € 50 – 100 / $ 61 – 110 € 100+ / $ 110+

summer 2021

falstaff

181


tasting / PROSECCO DOCG

91


Col Fondo Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut Nature

Sui lieviti 2019

Adami, Colbertaldo di Vidor (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant straw yellow with

slight cloudiness. Yeasty aromas quickly

evolve into attractive baked apple and

orange zest. Bone dry, fine mousse, cool,

salty fruit, linear, with a strong finish.

adamispumanti.it


Sesto Senso Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Dry

2020, Andreola, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with

persistent, fine mousse. Aromas of

acacia blossom, white melon and white

peach. A sweet, vinous palate, concentrated

and full, with subdued mousse

and vibrant ripe peach on the finish.

andreola.eu


Dirupo Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Andreola, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey. Fragrant

nose of white peach, acacia blossom and

yellow pear. A palate with fine fruit

sweetness and balanced, great mousse.

Well integrated and vibrant on the finish.

andreola.eu


Akelum Asolo Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Brut 2020

Andreola, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-yellow with

persistent mousse. Smells of fresh green

apple and citrus notes. A precise palate,

crisp acidity, well-paced fruit sweetness

and concentration.

andreola.eu


Akelum Asolo Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Extra Dry 2020

Andreola, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey. Aromas of

wet stone, light sea salt and hints of

white flowers. Upfront palate with

freshness and a ripe, fruit-focused core,

light vibrant acidity and a clean finish.

andreola.eu


Medaglia Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Extra

Dry 2020

Astoria, Crocetta del Montello (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright silver, lively mousse.

Inviting aromas of fresh apple and white

melon. Balanced, crisp fresh apple and

acacia blossom on the palate, juicy finish.

astoria.it


Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Extra Dry

2020,

Bacio della Luna, Vidor (TV)

11 Vol.-% Vibrant lemon green, hints of

silver with a delicate mousse. Delicate

aromatics of jasmine flowers and ripe,

yellow apple. Round and supple on the

palate, harmonious, delicious fruit on

the finish.

baciodellaluna.it


Crede Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Bisol 1542, Santo Stefano di

Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver with filigree

mousse. Hints of delicate blossom,

yellow stone fruit and sea salt. On the

palate with a delicate creaminess,

embedded in finest mousse, juicy, slightly

salty, great tension.

bisol.it


Rive di Collalto Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG 2019

Borgoluce, Susegnana (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Shiny, light greyish-yellow,

fine, long lasting mousse. Open nose with

ripe fruit notes, some fresh apple, peach

and honeydew melon. Full-bodied on the

palate with good weight, the long finish

leaves a ripe apple flavour.

borgoluce.it


BIO Campofalco Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Canevel, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11 Vol.-% Brilliant silver with a delicate

straw-yellow core and filigree, persistent

mousse. Aromas of fruit salad, ripe quince

and yellow roses. A very dry palate, salty

texture, tension on the finish.

canevel.it


Progetto 1 Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Extra Dry

2019,

Cantina Progettidivini, Farra di Soligo

(TV)

11 Vol.-% Clear, bright straw yellow. Pretty

aromatics on the notes of fresh white

bread and juicy pear. A delicately fragrant

palate with juicy acidity, fine apple

blossom and a long finish.

progettidivini.it


Giosuè Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Extra Dry

2019, Ciodet, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, light straw yellow,

powerful, persistent mousse. Opens with

notes of lime and jasmine blossom and

fresh, crisp apple. Substantial and rounded

on the palate, full-bodied, long finish

with lovely balance between sweet fruit

and a subtle bitter note.

ciodet.it


Prato Scuro Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Colesel, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright silver yellow. Fragrant

aromas of citrus fruit and orange blossom.

Shows an attractive ripe fruit

sweetness on the palate, vibrant mousse,

fresh acidity with a salty texture and

tension. A touch bitter on the finish but

drinking well.

colesel.it


Valdobbiadene Superiore di

Cartizze DOCG Brut 2020

Colesel, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright straw yellow with green

hints and a persistent mousse. Aromas of

green pear, freshly cut grass and yeasty

nuances. A palate with slightly bitter,

yeasty undertones, restrained orchard

fruit, saline notes, clean and precise on

the finish.

colesel.it


Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Dry 2020

Daldin, Vidor (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, light silver, rich, fine,

bubbly mousse. Opens with notes of acacia

flowers, ripe Williams pear and quince.

A palate with generous fresh fruit,

soft and smooth on the finish.

daldin.it


Rive di Farra di Soligo

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Extra Brut 2019

La Farra, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, light yellow, persistent,

fine mousse. Aromas of fresh

apple and white peach. Round and

smooth on the palate, fine mousse,

discreet bitter note on the finish.

lafarra.it


Biodiversity Friend Asolo Prosecco

Superiore Millesimato DOCG Extra Dry

2019

La Gioiosa, Crocetta del Montello (TV)

11 Vol.-% Bright yellow with persistent

mousse. Very scented nose of crisp green

apple, white peach, jasmine blossom and

a drop of lemon juice. A palate with fine

fruit expression and integrated mousse,

spreads finely across the tongue to come

to an elegant finish.

villasandi.it


Grappoli di Luna Conegliano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Extra Brut 2020

La Vigna di Sarah, Vittorio Veneto (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Delicate, bright yellow, fine

mousse. Very fresh and fragrant nose of

yellow apple and freshly cut melon. Vivid,

ripe fruit on the palate, lovely flow and a

fine, well-crafted mousse with a lasting

finish.

lavignadisarah.it


Conegliano Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2020

Le Manzane, S. Pietro di Feletto (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant, light straw yellow

with persistent mousse. Chalky notions

on the nose with delicate floral notes and

vibrant fruit. A beautifully balanced

palate, clear and precise, soft and

textural, with a generous finish.

lemanzane.com


Cartizze Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Dry

Marsuret, Guia di Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant, bright silver with

green-yellow core and a persistent

mousse. A fine, fragrant nose. The palate

shows pronounced sweet fruit expression,

well-integrated bubbles and an

elegant finish.

marsuret.it


Rive di Colbertalto Conegliano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Extra Dry 2019

Mass Bianchet, Vidor (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, light straw yellow,

delicate, persistent mousse. Opens with

notes of ripe pear, quince and acacia

blossom. Round and smooth on the

palate, mild concentrated sweet fruit of

apricot and acacia honey. Appealing.

massbianchet.it

Photo: provided

182 falstaff summer 2021

Up to € 20/ $ 30 € 21 – 30 / $ 31 – 40 € 31 – 50 / $ 41 – 60 € 50 – 100 / $ 61 – 110 € 100+ / $ 110+


tasting / PROSECCO DOCG


Castè Millesimato Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Extra Dry

2019

Merotto, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright silver. Restrained

aromas of banana and quince. Round and

smooth on the palate, a creamy, fine

mousse, generous mouthfeel and a

satisfying finish.

merotto.it


Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Dry 2020

Nani Rizzi, Guia di Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, silver with a fine,

persistent mousse. Opens with notes of

haw-thorn blossom and green apple.

Round and smooth on the palate, juicy,

crisp apple, delicate mouthfeel and

mousse on the finish.

nainirizzi.it


BIO Genesis Asolo Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Brut

Perlage, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with a fine

mousse. On the nose delicate yellow

stone fruit and hints of iodine salt. A very

straightforward and bone-dry palate,

with a beautiful, underlying core of ripe

fruit and a crystalline citrus finish.

perlagewines.com


Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Dry 2019

Riccardo, Vidor (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with

persistent, fine mousse. Aromas of fresh

white roses, white peach hints of pear.

Fruit accentuated palate, juicy fruit with a

very well integrated, generous mousse,

citrus acidity that is a touch drying, and a

ripe very appealing sweetness on the

finish.

proseccoriccardo.it


Giall‘Oro Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Dry

Ruggeri, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11 Vol.-% Clear, bright straw yellow with

lots of fine mousse. Finely marked nose

with notes of ripe apple and acacia

blossom. Creamy and round on the palate

with a generous, juicy finish.

ruggeri.it


Saltèr Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Brut

Ruggeri, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, light straw yellow, fine

bubbling mousse. Open on the nose with

notes of white melon, mirabelle plum

and crisp apple. Juicy acidity, great

tension on the palate with fine fruit and

an attractive finish.

ruggeri.it


Millesimato Conegliano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Extra Dry 2020

San Giuseppe, San Pietro di Feletto

(TV)

11 Vol.-% Clear, bright silver, persistent,

strong mousse. Delicate aromas of fresh,

yellow apple and hints of apple blossom.

Full-bodied and rounded on the palate,

fine ripe fruit, soft mousse and elegant

finish.

aziendaagricolasangiuseppe.it


Bosco di Fratta Millesimato

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Extra Dry 2020

Sanfeletto, San Pietro di Feletto (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, light silver, fine bubbles.

Very fragrant and inviting nose of

hawthorn blossom and generous white

peach. Creamy and round on the palate,

light salty notes, generous length and

salty finish.


Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Brut

Santa Margherita, Fossalta di

Portogruaro (VE)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey. Nose is a

little muted, needs some time to open

up. More upfront on the palate with ripe ,

sweet, tropical fruit and fresh honey.

A bright juicy finish.

santamargherita.com


BIO Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Brut 2020

Stramaret, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Bright, light grey-yellow,

delicate mousse. Elegant aromatics of

acacia blossom and ripe yellow apple.

Round and appealing on the palate,

generous, with finely woven subtle fruit

on the finish.

stramaret.it


Valdobbiadene Superiore di

Cartizze DOCG Dry 2019

Tanorè, Valdobbiadene (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant green-silver with

persistent mousse. Slightly reductive on

the nose, opens up to slightly yeasty

nuances, lemon zest and wet stone. A

juicy, straightforward palate, with a

beautiful fruit core, delicate acidity but

a touch dry on the finish.

tanore.it


Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Dry

Villa Sandi, Crocetta del Montello (TV)

11 Vol.-% Clear, bright straw yellow, fine

mousse. Aromas of fresh Williams pear,

mirabelle plum, thyme and fine savoury

notes. Salty and compact on the palate

with juicy pear concentration and a

vibrant finish.

villasandi.it


Millesimato Conegliano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Brut 2019

Vincenzo Toffoli, Refrontolo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver with light

straw-yellow reflections. Aromas of fine

yellow stone fruit and delicate blossom.

A juicy and clear palate, good concentration

with an airy mousse and a flinty

finish.

proseccotoffoli.it


Treventi Rive di Ogliano

Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Brut

Zardetto Spumanti, Conegliano (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Delicate, light grey-yellow, fine

bubbles. Shows notes of white peach and

fresh apple on the nose. Spreads nicely

on the palate, lots of vivid yellow fruit,

creamy, good tension.

zardettoprosecco.com


Ripido Conegliano Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut 2019

Le Volpere, Farra di Soligo (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with

persistent mousse. Aromas of grapefruit,

lemon citrus, a touch of salt on the finish.

A palate with juicy fruit sweetness,

frothy mousse, exciting structure and

clear, precise finish.

levolpere.it


Valdobbiadene DOCG Brut 2020

Gemin, Valdobbiadene (TV)

12 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey. Concentrated

aromas of pear. Juicy and clean on

the palate, with well-integrated mousse,

slightly bitter finish.

spumantigemin.it


Col Miliane Conegliano

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Extra Brut 2019

Le Volpere, Farra di Soligo (TV)

12 Vol.-% Clear, light straw yellow, fine

mousse. Opens on the nose with notes of

hawthorn blossom and pear. Fresh and

crisp, rounded palate, delicate salty

notes on the finish.

levolpere.it

90


Dei Casel Valdobbiadene Prosecco

Superiore DOCG Extra Dry

Adami, Colbertaldo di Vidor (TV)

11 Vol.-% Clear, bright straw yellow,

gently foaming mousse. Clear nose,

shows notes of yellow apple, quince and

hints of acacia blossom. A very clear palate

with straightforward pear fruit and

well integrated fine mousse.

adamispumanti.it


Casa Vittorino Millesimato

Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore

DOCG Brut 2020

Astoria, Crocetta del Montello (TV)

11,5 Vol.-% Brilliant silver-grey with

filigree mousse. Delicate mineral hints

of wet stone and green, crisp apple. A very

dry palate, but with an appealing juicy

backbone and a clean flinty, dry finish.

astoria.it


BIO Sui Lieviti Valdobbiadene

Prosecco Superiore DOCG Brut

Nature 2019

Borgoluce, Susegnana (TV)

11,5 Vol.-%, Brilliant straw yellow with

persistent mousse and fine clarity. On the

nose, red-skinned apple, cherries, also

with yeasty nuances, walnut, notes of

raisins in the background. Expresses

itself well on the palate, bone-dry, light in

body, crisp, clean finish.

borgoluce.it

More tasting notes

online at

falstaff.com

Photo: provided

184 falstaff summer 2021

Up to € 20 / $ 30 € 21 – 30 / $ 31 – 40 € 31 – 50 / $ 41 – 60 € 50 – 100 / $ 61 – 110 € 100+ / $ 110+


tastings / SUPERTUSCANS

SUPER-

TUSCANS

Following on from our feature on Supertuscans – Birth of a Legend on pages 18–25,

our Italian editors present the results of their extensive tasting.

TASTING NOTES AND SCORES OTHMAR KIEM, SIMON STAFFLER

Photo: @ 2020 StevanZZ/Shutterstock

186 falstaff summer 2021


A coastal view of Tuscany: the

town of Castiglione della Pescaia,

Maremma, Tuscany, Italy

summer 2021

falstaff

187


tastings / SUPERTUSCANS

KEY TO SYMBOLS

100


Supertuscans

BIO Percarlo Sangiovese Toscana

IGT 2016

Fattoria San Giusto a Rentennano,

Gaiole in Chianti (SI)

15 Vol.-% Deep, rich ruby colour.

Ex-ceedingly appealing, complex nose of

cigar box and cypress tree, followed by

wonderfully rich notes of wild raspberry

and black cherry. Very sumptuous on the

palate with firm and sturdy tannin, beautifully

ripe fruit, profound earthiness on

the finish. What an experience!

fattoriasangiusto.it

99


Tenuta di Trinoro Toscana IGT 2018

Tenuta di Trinoro, Sarteano (SI)

15,5 Vol.-% Rich ruby colour with purple

reflections. Intense and multi-layered

nose with notes of mint, followed by

blackcurrant and blackberry, concise and

bright. Filling the palate magnificently

with incredibly fine and noble tannins,

paired with juicy, pronounced fruit and a

long finish.

vinifranchetti.com

98


white wine, dry

red wine, dry

• dessert wine

• rosé

95 – 100 absolute classic

93 – 94 outstanding

91 – 92 excellent

88 – 90 very good

85 – 87 commended

Oreno Toscana IGT 2018

Tenuta Sette Ponti, San Giustino

Valdarno (AR)

15 Vol.-% Shimmering rich ruby colour

with purple reflections. Complex nose

with notes of cedar, black truffle, followed

by ample cassis and blackberry fruit.

Round and smooth on the palate showing

ripe fruit, extremely precise, polished tannin,

very long finish with a hint of dark

chocolate.

tenutasetteponti.it


Giorgio Primo Toscana IGT 2017

Tenuta La Massa, Panzano in Chianti

(FI)

14,5 Vol.-% Rich ruby colour with a dark

core. Captivating nose with notes of

molasses and liquorice, followed by

aromatic elderberries and cassis. Tightly

textured initially but slowly unveiling

numerous layers, vivid and vigorous finish.

lamassa.com


BIO Flaccianello della Pieve

Toscana IGT 2017

Fontodi, Greve in Chianti (FI)

15 Vol.-% Rich, dark ruby colour. Compact

and concentrated nose of black

truffle, blackberry, some black cherry,

fine balsamic tones. Powerful and grippy

on the palate, revealing tightly-woven,

multi-layered tannin, embedded in a mellow

texture. A rough diamond needing to

be polished by time.

fontodi.com


BIO Galatrona Merlot Val d'Arno di

Sopra DOC 2018

Petrolo, Bucine (AR)

14,5 Vol.-% Rich ruby colour with a purple

shimmer. Impressive nose with notes of

cigar box and cardamom. In the background

a plethora of berries, exciting.

Filling the palate with an abundance of

vivid and juicy fruit, unveiling finely-knit,

multi-layered tannin. Long and polished

expression.

petrolo.it


BIO D'Alceo Toscana IGT 2016

Castello dei Rampolla, Panzano in

Chianti

14,5 Vol.-% Opaque ruby colour. Enchanting

nose of rich elderberry, cassis and

liquorice. Lining the palate with ample,

vibrant fruit, unfolding fully, grippy tannin.

Exquisitely earthy notes on the finish

and a mellow texture.

castellodeirampolla.it


Colore Toscana Rosso IGT

2018

Bibi Graetz, Fiesole

14 Vol.-% Bright ruby colour. Exceedingly

intense nose with accentuated

spicy notes, clove, blackberry, black

cherry, lush wild raspberry and balsamic

notes in the background. Fills the palate

wonderfully, plenty of silky, very

finely-knit tannin, ample juicy fruit with

an long slightly salty finish.

bibigraetz.com


Solaia Toscana IGT 2017

Marchesi Antinori, San Casciano In

Val Di Pesa (FI)

14 Vol.-% Rich, impenetrable ruby colour

with a black core. Compact and exceedingly

dense nose of ripe blackcurrant, mulberry,

cardamom and a hint of beetroot.

Rich and lush with ripe berries galore,

opening up with tight, finely-knit tannin,

embedded in mellow texture with a

pro-longed finish.

antinori.it

97


Camartina Toscana Rosso IGT 2016

Querciabella, Greve in Chianti (FI)

13,5 Vol.-% Bright ruby colour. Riveting

nose with exquisite spicy notes, cinnamon

blossom and clove, followed by cassis

and damson. Full-bodied and vibrant,

revealing many layers of vivid tannin followed

by the generosity of juicy berries.

querciabella.com


Campo di Tenaglia Toscana Rosso

IGT 2018

Tenuta di Trinoro, Sarteano (SI)

16 Vol.-% Deep ruby colour with purple

shimmer. Concentrated nose of ripe

damson in abundance and notes of cinnamon

alongside blackcurrant. Filling the

palate with juicy and slightly salty fruit

embedded in tightly-woven tannin against

a mellow texture. The finish shows notes

of rich tobacco and a real drive.

vinifranchetti.com


Il Caberlot Toscana IGT 2017

Podere Il Carnasciale, Mercatale

Valdarno (AR)

13,5 Vol.-% Shimmering ruby colour with

a purple sheen. Captivating nose with

notes of cigar and cedar, a hint of bay

leaf, alongside blackcurrant. Structured

and spicy on the palate, followed by

dense tannin, presented in a mellow

texture with a long finish.

caberlot.eu


Colore Toscana Rosso IGT 2016

Bibi Graetz, Fiesole

14 Vol.-% Rich ruby colour with a garnet

shimmer. Enchanting nose with notes of

damson, wild raspberry, bathed in cinnamon.

A plethora of ripe, juicy cherries on

the palate, unveiling grippy tannin, a

precise and smooth wine with real vigour.

bibigraetz.com

96


Mormoreto Toscana IGT 2017

Castello Nipozzano, Nipozzano

14,5 Vol.-% Rich ruby colour. Compact

and intense nose, brimming with tobacco,

black truffle and liquorice, plus lots of

cassis and spice. Multi-layered on the palate,

opens with textured, very noticeable

tannin, luscious berries, unfolding their

aroma beautifully, still very youthful.

frescobaldi.com


Testamatta Toscana Rosso IGT

2018

Bibi Graetz, Fiesole

13,5 Vol.-% Rich ruby colour. Intense nose

Photos: Othmar Kiem, Shutterstock

188 falstaff summer 2