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JULY 22, 2021 • VOL. 60, NO. 29 SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1957 16 PAGES • ONE DOLLAR

Daigle takes aim at development

By Anne Marie Tobin

PEABODY — Ward 4 City Council candidate Julie Daigle

unveiled a new campaign advertisement last week pledging to

hold developers more accountable and protect the quality of life

of city residents.

“As city councilor, I will scrutinize development proposals to

ensure that they meet the needs of our city and are appropriate

for the areas in which they are proposed,” Daigle says in the

video ad. “I believe in responsible development that benefits all

of us, not just the developer.”

In the 90-second ad, Daigle discusses the housing development

project known as Kings Residences Peabody slated for 15

King St., the former site of the J.B. Thomas Hospital and Cura

Healthcare facility. The developer, Hemisphere Development

Group LLC, had originally proposed senior housing for those 55

and over, but reversed course, deciding to proceed under Chapter

Newhall Fields shows how to plant smart

By Tréa Lavery

DAIGLE, PAGE 2

PEABODY — Newhall Fields Community Farm’s own

herbalist Rebecca Ingalls is offering several programs this

summer and fall to teach the community about the uses and

benefits of different plants in the farm’s designated herb

garden.

The classes, offered in collaboration with the Peabody

Recreation Department, allow participants to explore the

garden and learn more about the plants that grow there.

“So many people don’t know that that’s their herb

garden,” Ingalls said. “Especially after COVID, it really

came clear to me that it’s a very important part of a community

to have those herbs be accessible and to have the

knowledge. This is how we’ve survived all these years,

with plants.”

The next course, which will be held on August 14, is a

continuation of one held earlier this month about herbal

infusions. Ingalls explained that many of the herbs in the

garden can be used to create infused oils, vinegars and

honeys, or even infused in alcoholic spirits, like vodka.

The second part of the program will show participants

how to use these tinctures to make salves, body creams and

INGALLS, PAGE 2

PHOTO | OLIVIA FALCIGNO

Julie Daigle, former executive director of the Chamber

of Commerce, sits in her office after recently moving

to Mills 58.

PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

Rows of garlic grow tall and strong at Newhall

Fields Community Farm in Peabody.

Bettencourt

Requests $5

million in

capital

improvements

By Sam Minton

PEABODY — The City Council unanimously

approved $5 million in capital

improvements for the city during a special

meeting Thursday night.

The funds were requested by Mayor

Edward A. Bettencourt Jr., who had received

unanimous approval from the

Finance Committee earlier in the evening.

The funds were authorized following a

late change in plans from Bettencourt, who

initially sought $4.8 million for capital improvements

which included upgrades for

the police, fire and school departments and

improvements to city playgrounds.

In the Finance Committee meeting,

Bettencourt explained that the increase

in the budget request was due to the police

department requiring more funds and

more money being needed to upgrade

playground equipment.

Following the council vote, Bettencourt

thanked the councilors for their support.

“I really think it’s going to help each of

the departments — not only the work that

they do but the morale also,” he said. “I

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2

PHOTO | OLIVIA FALCIGNO

Julie Daigle, who is running for a Ward 4 City Council seat, is also the general manager at Mills 58.

DAIGLE

From page 1

40B, which is the state’s affordable

housing law. That law

allows developers to override

local zoning laws to increase affordable

housing in communities

where affordable housing makes

up less than 10 percent of the

total available housing. Chapter

40B enables local zoning boards

of appeals to approve affordable

housing developments under

flexible rules if at least 20-25%

of the units have long-term affordability

restrictions.

Approved by MassHousing,

the Kings Residences project

calls for a 133-unit condominium

complex consisting of

three five-story buildings nearly

50 feet high on just three acres

of land in what is primarily a

residential neighborhood, said

Daigle.

“I am committed to making

sure that Peabody remains an affordable

place to live for young

adults, families and seniors,”

Daigle said. “But responsible

housing development should

Get your car looking

great this summer

Before

Julie Daigle takes

aim at development

After

Don Winslow’s

AUTO B O D Y

Celebrating 49 Years

enhance the quality of life of our

residents and neighborhoods and

not detract from it.

“Unfortunately, the housing

proposal for King Street is not

responsible and does not represent

the best interests of either

our neighborhood or our city as

a whole.”

In the video, Daigle says the

project is too big in size and

scope and that it will put added

stress on city services like education,

public safety, and water

and sewer.

Daigle said she is “running to

provide the leadership that we

need to prevent development

that we don’t need to improve

our quality of life and make

Peabody an even better place to

live.”

Kings Residences is one of

several 40B projects that have

either been approved or proposed

in Peabody. In April, at a

standing-room-only community

meeting organized by Ward 5

Councilor Joel Saslaw, several

residents expressed their strong

objections to a proposal for a

220-unit apartment complex

on a 7.7-acre parcel of land off

Winona and Newbury streets.

That project called for three

four-story buildings to be clustered

near the back of the parcel

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JULY 22, 2021

with access directly from Route

1 near the entrance to Honey

Dew Donuts.

Just about a half-mile south

alongside Route 1, construction

is ongoing on a 60-unit project

on Dearborn Road behind Sonic

Restaurant (a so-called friendly

40B as it has the support of the

city). Other projects in the mix

are located at or near Oak Street,

Endicott Street, Wallis Street

and Farm Avenue, which is also

considered friendly.

A lifelong Peabody resident,

Daigle is a graduate of Peabody

Veterans Memorial High School

and Merrimack College, where

she earned a degree in business

administration and accounting.

She currently is the general manager

at Mills 58 on Pulaski Street.

Prior to that, she was the executive

director of the Peabody Area

Chamber of Commerce.

Daigle has worked in the administrations

of three Peabody

mayors over the span of her 20-

year career in public service.

She spent a little more than five

and a half years working in the

Community Development and

Planning office. She then served

as the city’s business liaison

from 2013-2017, and afterward

as the city treasurer from 2017-

2020, when she moved to PACC.

A TRADITION OF TRUST, CARING & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1952

Service to all faiths

Complete Pre-Need Planning

Medicaid Approved Trust &

Insurance Plans

Spacious Modern Facilities

Ample Private Parking

Handicapped Accessible

Bettencourt Requests

$5 million in capital

improvements

BETTENCOURT

From page 1

think it’s a great step forward

for us to take.”

The approved capital improvements

include a new

HVAC (heating, ventilation and

air conditioning) unit at the police

station and the purchase of

seven new police cruisers. The

city also plans to replace a fire

ladder truck at an estimated cost

of $1 million. The radio systems

for both the police and fire departments

will also be replaced.

The improvements call for

$50,000 to be spent in order to

purchase “defensive equipment,

tools and training aids.” Police

Chief Thomas Griffin said his

department was grateful for

the city’s support during a time

when municipalities across the

country are reducing funding

for law enforcement.

Some Peabody schools will

also see improvements, such

as the Thomas Carroll School,

which will receive some roof

repairs. Peabody Veterans

Memorial High School will see

upgrades to its chiller system.

The city also plans to purchase

two trucks for the public

works department and a tool

truck for the water department.

Bettencourt said during

Thursday’s meeting that the

city’s police department is understaffed.

He stated his hope

that the police department

would see a return to a full allotment

of officers, explaining

that the necessary hires are included

in the city budget. The

fire department will also be

growing, as six firefighters have

been hired, which will increase

its staffing to normal levels.

Bettencourt also announced

that through community preservation

money awarded to

the city, the Driscoll Rink will

have a multifunctional play area

which can be used for “futsal”

— a type of soccer game played

on a hard court — and street

hockey. It will still have the capability

of being used as an iceskating

rink.

Newhall Fields shows

how to plant smart

INGALLS

From page 1

other self-care products.

“The whole idea is to teach

folks the practical living arts,”

Ingalls said. “The beauty is you

can have that herb garden with

you all year long.”

On August 28, Ingalls will lead

a program called “Marvelous

Mints,” teaching community

members about the aromatic

family of herbs. She explained

that mints aren’t merely limited

to plants like peppermint and

spearmint, but many of the herbs

commonly used for cooking —

rosemary, lavender, sage, basil

and oregano — fall under the

umbrella. That family of herbs

have antibacterial and preservative

properties, she said.

In September, the farm will

host a program on herbal teas,

steams and scrubs. They will use

what is left in the garden, drying

it and mixing it with salts and

sugars; in October, participants

can learn about how to use herbs

that have been harvested during

the warm months through the

winter until they begin growing

again.

Ingalls said that they hope to

once again hold the “Fire Cider

at the Farm” fundraiser this fall

— which was held last year as

well — although it has yet to be

scheduled. In addition, they plan

to promote the herb garden more

over the next year, along with

their other programs addressing

food insecurity and accessibility.

“The folks who might come out

to explore the herb garden would

be very beneficial in pushing the

whole mission forward,” Ingalls

said.

The herb garden programs

cost $25 per person per class

and are open to ages 16 and up.

Registration can be found at peabody.myrec.com.

MON-FRI 8-5 • SAT. 9-12

166 Holten Street • Danvers

(corner of Center & Collins)

978-762-6366 • 978-535-2474

www.DonWinslowAutoBody.com

19 YALE AVE.,

WAKEFIELD, MASS.

Area Code 781

245-3550 • 334-9966

Conveniently Located off Exit 39 (North Ave.) Rt. 128

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net


JULY 22, 2021

Literacy and school-readiness

program to support parents in

Peabody and Salem

BY ANNE MARIE TOBIN

PEABODY — Peabody Public

Schools has received a $131,980

state grant, which the district will

use to help parents and caregivers

prepare their children for early education.

Awarded by the state Department

of Early Education and Care,

the ParentChild+ of the North

Shore program aims to equip

parents — as their children's first

teachers — with early learning specialists

who provide families with

high-quality learning tools, books

and toys.

Families are also given guidance

aimed at promoting parent-child

interaction; developing

language, early literacy and social-emotional

skills; and building

school readiness.

A total of 48 children can participate

in the program, which is run

out of the Peabody school district

but also serves Salem families.

Peabody is capped at 21 children

and Salem is allowed 27.

ParentChild+ is just one component

of the district's early education

programs. Peabody and eight

other North Shore communities

— Beverly, Boxford, Danvers,

Marblehead, Middleton, Salem,

Swampscott and Topsfield — offer

services through the Coordinated

Family and Engagement (CFCE)

Network of the North Shore. It is

funded by a $242,118 grant to the

Peabody Public Schools through

the state Department of Early Education

and Care.

"Our main goal is to support

parents as their children's first

teachers," said CFCE of the North

Shore and ParentChild+ Director

Donna Connelly. "The priority is

low-income families and we provide

hub-based centers in each

community at places like Essex

Tech and various churches. They

give families a chance for playgroups

as well as the benefit of

outreach."

ParentChild+ is an evidence-based

school readiness

model that preempts the achievement

gap by providing young children

and their parents with learning

tools and skills.

To support healthy development

and educational success,

families receive 32 twice-weekly,

one-on-one 30-minute visits with

a trained early learning specialist.

Parents are also provided with connections

to community resources,

educational services and free access

to the Ages and Stages developmental

and social-emotional

questionnaires.

"We also address things like

food resources and childcare needs,

so it is really about going back to

the old-school style," Connelly

said.

ParentChild+ of the North

Shore says that, compared to their

peers who do not participate in the

program, ParentChild+ graduates

entering school perform 10 months

above their chronological age. In

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

addition, they are 50 percent more

likely to be prepared for kindergarten,

score 2.5 times higher on

social-emotional skill assessments

and have a 30 percent higher graduation

rate.

Connelly said Peabody has also

been selected to participate in the

EEC Family Ambassadors program,

which offers virtual training

to parent leaders.

"We are thrilled to be accepted

as ambassadors this year," said

Superintendent of Schools Dr. Josh

Vadala. "The program supports

a number of families with preschool-aged

children."

Connelly said the city is looking

to hire additional staff for its programs

to replace former employees

who left when the city's programs

went virtual.

"We're looking for people who

are bubbly, fun and energetic to

sing songs and read books," said

Connelly.

Parents and caregivers of children

from 16 months to 4 years old

from Peabody and Salem are eligible

to apply for the ParentChild+

program at: www.pcplusofthenorthshore.com

or by calling 978-

536-6543.

Participants for the Family

Ambassadors program are eligible

to receive up to $800 in stipends.

Registration is open through July

23, with training beginning in

mid-August. To register, call Connelly

at 978-536-6543 or send her

an email at connellyd@peabody.

k12.ma.us.

Shakespeare’s As You Like It,

directed by Peter Sampieri,

comes to Salem Willows

Peabody

Institute Library

Summer Concert:

Dance Caliente

FOR THE WEEKLY NEWS

The Peabody Institute Library

will be hosting ballroom

dance duo Dance Caliente for

an interactive performance and

lessons on Monday, August

30th, at 7 PM in the Sutton

Room, as we welcome our patrons

back to indoor programming

at the library.

This special performance

represents the last entry in our

spring/summer concert series

for 2021. The performance is

funded by the Peabody Institute

Library Foundation and the Mc-

Carthy Family Foundation.

Interested patrons can sign

up at https://peabodylibrary.

assabetinteractive.com/calendar/summer-concert-series-dance-caliente/.

Together as Dance Caliente,

Raul Nieves and Eileen Herman-Haase

share a compelling

magnetism as master teachers,

choreographers and performers.

Their goal is to impart the joy of

partner dancing onto their students.

They welcome students

of varying ages and experience.

Dance Caliente will do an interactive

sampler performance.

They will perform 4-5 various

dances (i.e. Waltz, Swing, Argentine

Tango, Salsa, Foxtrot),

and leave time in between each

performance for a short lesson

on that dance. The lessons will

be interactive and low-impact,

tailored to seniors and beginners,

and do not require a partner.

Audience members can sit

back and watch Raul and Eileen,

or get up and dance themselves!

For further

information, contact:

Gabi Toth

Senior Adult Services and

Public Programming Librarian

978-531-0100 x17

gtoth@noblenet.org

We want to hear

from you!

Send us a letter at

editor@weeklynews.net.

Letters should be no more

than 300 words.

FOR THE WEEKLY NEWS

Third Citizen Theatre Company

presents William Shakespeare’s

As You Like It as their

first annual Shakespeare at the

Willows event to take place at

the Salem Willows Bandshell.

Performances are 6pm on

August 28th and 29th, September

4th, 5th, and 6th.

Tickets: $20 Suggested Donation

(general seating, cash or

PayPal); $25 Advance Donation

secures Premium Seating (limit

30 per performance) and a

$50 Advance Donation secures

front-row seating and a chance to

get pulled into the performance

(limit 10 per performance).

Audience members are encouraged

to bring lawn chairs,

picnic blankets, food and drink.

Performances are rain or

shine. Running time: 90 minutes.

To donate, secure Premium

or Front-Row seating, and more

information visit https://www.

thirdcitizentheatre.org/tickets

Description:

On the run from her vengeful

uncle and his fascist court, noble

Rosalind escapes to the wilds of

the Forest of Arden, where she

disguises herself as a man to

avoid imprisonment and death.

Joined by other renegades, outcasts

and peasants, she gets entangled

in a love triangle, fooling

her true love with her disguise.

A raucous and zany romantic

comedy with original live music,

Third Citizen’s As You Like

It is the premiere production of

Shakespeare at the Willows, an

annual outdoor summer Shakespeare

series.

Third Citizen Theatre Company

is a nonprofit committed to

creating politically and socially

relevant theatre with a focus on

reimagining and re-contextualizing

classical works. We deliver

high-quality productions centered

on modern themes to engage

and entertain all ages.

At Third Citizen, we believe

in and value artistic excellence,

community engagement, and

making space/empowering others

to create a culturally-competent

society educated through

the arts.


4

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JULY 22, 2021

Police Log

MONDAY 7/12

Arrests

Eduardo Dias Costa, 54, of 157

Chelsea St., Everett, was arrested on

a warrant at 12:58 p.m. Monday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 9:30 a.m. Monday at Route 128

North and 208 Andover St.; at 1:02

p.m. Monday at 174 Andover St. and

2 Cross St.; at 4:31 p.m. Monday at 2

County St. and 91 Lynn St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering

at 6:46 a.m. Monday at Brothers

Kouzina at 25 Newbury St. An overnight

break-in was reported.

TUESDAY 7/13

20

Arrests

Saulo Santa, 21, of 3 Highland

Park, Apt. 2, was arrested and

charged with two counts of malicious

destruction of property over $1,200,

operation of a motor vehicle with

a suspended license, unregistered

motor vehicle and arson of a dwelling

house at 11:52 a.m. Tuesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 7:57 a.m. Tuesday at Sisak/

Methadone Clinic at 172 Newbury

St.; a report of a motor vehicle crash

at 2:54 p.m. Tuesday at Andover

Street and Route 128 North; at

3:17 p.m. Tuesday at Andover and

Newbury streets.

PEABODY

WEEKLY NEWS

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Telephone: (978) 532-5880 • Fax: (978) 532-4250

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903

News and Advertising Offices: 110 Munroe St., Lynn, MA 01901

Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

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Deadlines: News: Monday, noon; Display Ads: Monday, noon;

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No cancellations accepted after deadline.

The Peabody Weekly News is published 52 times per year on Thursday by Essex

Media Group, Inc. No issue is printed during the week of Christmas. The Peabody

Weekly News is delivered via US Mail to homes in Peabody. It is also available

in several locations throughout Peabody. The Peabody Weekly News will not be

responsible for typographical or other errors in advertisements, but will reprint that

part of an advertisement in which a typographical error occurs if notified immediately.

Advertisers must notify the Peabody Weekly News of any errors in advertisements

on the FIRST day of insertion. The publisher reserves the right to reject,

omit or edit any copy offered for publication.

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A motor vehicle crash was reported

at 4:42 p.m. Tuesday at 49

Pine St. A homeowner reported a vehicle

drove through her fence.

Christian Skyler Clemons, 28, of

58 Cabot St., Beverly, was issued a

summons for operation of a motor

vehicle after a motor vehicle crash

was reported at 9:06 p.m. Tuesday at

305 Lowell St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle

breaking and entering at 1:48 p.m.

Tuesday at 5 Nickerson Road.

Complaints

A report of suspicious activity at

1:23 p.m. Tuesday at 10 Hoover Ave.

A caller reported a suspicious person

wearing a jumpsuit was on a skateboard

outside her house. He was

reportedly banging on doors in the

neighborhood. An officer reported the

man works for “Fox Exterminators.”

Solicitors were advised to check in

with police.

Fire

A report of an arson/bombing at

11:52 a.m. Tuesday at 3 Highland

Park. A caller reported his brother got

into an argument and tried to burn

down the house. Police reported the

fire was extinguished and the brother

fled in a vehicle, which was stopped

at Wallis and Tremont streets. Saulo

Santa, 21, was arrested (see arrests).

Theft

A report of a larceny at 2:26 p.m.

Tuesday at Gaeta Enterprises, Inc.

at 14 Newbury St. A caller reported

someone drove off without paying

for gas. Police reported the person

would go back to pay their bill.

A larceny was reported at 5:23

p.m. Tuesday at 37 Walnut St. and

20 Wallis St. A caller reported a man

in a baseball cap was shouting “call

the cops” while chasing a man in a

hoodie. Police reported the caller was

a cab driver who got beat for a fare.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 12:07

p.m. Tuesday at 161 Newbury St.

WEDNESDAY 7/14

Arrests

John Mello, 28, of 31 Gardner St.,

was arrested on a warrant at 2:56

p.m. Wednesday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash at

6:35 p.m. Wednesday at 6 Batchelder

Ave.; at 6:58 a.m. Wednesday at

7-Eleven at 115 Main St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 4:03

p.m. Wednesday at City Hall at 24

Lowell St. A caller reported kids were

skateboarding and refusing to leave

the property. An officer spoke with

four males, who left without incident.

A report of suspicious activity at

7:12 p.m. Wednesday on Jubilee

Drive. A caller reported a man was

sleeping on the grass behind 4

Centennial Drive. Police reported the

man was taking a nap on the grass.

A report of a road rage incident at

8:57 p.m. Wednesday at Skate Park

at 27 Perkins St. A man walked into

the station to report he was punched

in the face.

Theft

A report of a stolen motor vehicle

at 4:14 p.m. Wednesday at Elite Pre-

Owned Auto at 153 Newbury St.

THURSDAY 7/15

Arrests

Stephanie Ann Lohnes, 31, of 138

S Common St., Apt. 306, Lynn, was

arrested and charged with shoplifting

by asportation at 3:27 p.m. Thursday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 9:33 a.m. Thursday at Route 128

North and Centennial Drive; at 10:39

a.m. Thursday at 152 Washington

St.; at 10:53 a.m. Thursday at Central

Street and Munroe Court; at 11:32

a.m. Thursday at 136 Main St. and

8 Caller St.; at 2:57 p.m. Thursday

on Route 128 South, Exit 39; at

7:50 p.m. Thursday at 232 Newbury

St. and 550 Lowell St.; at 6:40 a.m.

Friday at 137 Lowell St. and 91

Endicott St.

A motor vehicle crash was reported

at 6:45 p.m. Thursday at 11

Winter St. Michael F. Carvalho, 49,

of 12 Lowe St., Apt. 1C, was issued

a summons for operation of a motor

vehicle with a suspended license –

subsequent offense.

A report of a hit-and-run motor vehicle

crash at 10:10 p.m. Thursday at

52 Endicott St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at 4:59

p.m. Thursday at 21 Caller St. A

caller reported a man was knocking

on doors. Andres E. Reyes, 28, of 47

Hanover St., Apt. 1, Lynn, was issued

a summons for three counts of Class

C drug possession – subsequent offense

and Class D drug possession

with intent to distribute.

Theft

A report of shoplifting at 3:27 p.m.

Thursday at Liquor & Smoke Shop

at 117 Newbury St. A store clerk

reported a woman showed a knife

and stole a lighter. Police stopped

the woman, Stephanie Ann Lohnes,

of Lynn, by the Plaza Motel, and arrested

her (see arrests).

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 1:59

p.m. Thursday at Peabody Council

on Aging at 79 Central St. A caller

reported vandalism to work vehicles

at the Torigian Center. An employee

said video footage showed a van was

damaged by a landscaping company

hired by the Council on Aging.

FRIDAY 7/16

Arrests

Charles G. Kirby, 64, of 1102

Crane Brook Way, was arrested and

charged with negligent operation of

a motor vehicle, OUI-liquor third offense,

operation of a motor vehicle

with a suspended license for OUI,

possession of an open container of

alcohol in a motor vehicle and OUI

while license is suspended for OUI at

5:49 p.m. Friday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash at

1:49 p.m. Friday at 161 Main St. and

2 Eagan Place; at 3:34 p.m. Friday

at 1 Main St.; at 3:44 p.m. Friday at

Lowe Mart Liquors at 474 Lowell St.;

at 5:52 p.m. Friday at 220 Lowell St.

and 2 Forest St.; at 9:13 p.m. Friday at

Andover Street and Route 128 North.

A motor vehicle crash was reported

at 3:12 p.m. Friday at 1102

Crane Brook Way. A maintenance

worker reported a man drove his

truck into a fence, left beer cans on

the ground and stumbled into his

apartment. Charles Kirby, 64, of

1102 Crane Brook Way, was issued

a summons for leaving the scene of a

motor vehicle accident with property

damage and operating a motor vehicle

with a suspended license.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 9:35 p.m.

Friday at Alliance Health at Rosewood

at 22 Johnson St. A caller reported

two suspicious men entered the

building, filled a cart with items from

the kitchen, loaded an unknown vehicle

and fled the area. Management

was contacted and advised of some

security issues at the location.

SATURDAY 7/17

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash at

2:29 p.m. Saturday at 303 Lowell St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering

at 7:47 a.m. Saturday at Maddy’s Car

Wash at 300 Andover St. Police reported

a man in his 60s broke into

the vacuum machine and stole $200

to $300 in change. He was reportedly

driving a black Land Rover with a

trailer.

Complaints

A caller reported a coyote was

going through residents’ trash at 1:09

p.m. Saturday at 2 Farm Ave. Police

reported the coyote was no longer on

scene upon arrival, but there was a

good amount of trash out front.

A report of a fight at 11:12 p.m.

Saturday at 35 Tremont St. and 84

Wallis St. The victim of the fight

showed up at the police station.

Annamarie Cosgro, 29, of 2 Mcintire

Court, Apt. 2, was summoned for assault

and battery. Nicholas Anthony

Gravallese, 30, of 12 Madison Ave.,

Chelsea, was summoned for assault

and battery. Renato J. Bouchard, 48,

of 74 Wallis St., Apt. 2, was summoned

for assault and battery.

Theft

A report of a carjacking at 6:13

a.m. Saturday at Dunkin’ Donuts at

3 Central St. A caller reported his

car was stolen from the parking lot.

Salem Police located the vehicle at

280 Highland Ave. in Salem. Joseph

Mandes, 40, homeless, was issued a

summons for carjacking, aggravated

assault and battery with a dangerous

weapon and operation of a motor vehicle

with a suspended license. The

owner of the vehicle was treated at

Salem Hospital for his injuries.

SUNDAY 7/18

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash at

11:01 a.m. Sunday at 2 Greenwood

Road and 161 Lynn St.

Complaints

At 9:40 p.m. Sunday, a caller from

5 Normandy Road reported someone

had put a suspicious package in his

mailbox. An officer reported the

package was mail for the caller.

MONDAY 7/19

Breaking and Entering

A breaking and entering was

reported at 9:48 a.m. Monday at

25 Shore Drive. Police reported

someone had come to the address

last week to fix the crown molding

and stole $600 from the dresser.

Complaints

A report of suspicious activity at

9:11 a.m. Monday at 154 Lynnfield

St. A caller reported an unknown

person was dumping trash on her

front lawn in the middle of the night.


JULY 22, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 5

16 & UNDER WEDNESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FREE! JULY 15T H 4:05PM J ULY 20TH 6:35PM

J ULY 22ND 6:35PM

FRIDAY

J ULY 23RD 6:35PM

G ROU P OU TINGS C O N TA C T

KEL LY NSNAVS. COM

Religious News

All Saints Episcopal Church of

the North Shore

Good morning and thank you!

All Saints Episcopal Church of

the North Shore in Danvers has

in-person worship, as well as

Zoom opportunities on Sunday

mornings and throughout the

week. Our webpage is https://

allsaintsepiscopalnorthshore.org/,

and we are also on Facebook,

Twitter and Instagram.

In-person Worship

Join us for our modified service

of the Holy Eucharist at

8:30 Sunday mornings, with

COVID-19 safety protocols in

place. Advanced registration is

required (call the church at 978-

774-1150).

Outreach

Join us on the third Sunday of

each month as we prepare 40-50

bagged lunches for the food insecure

in Peabody. Contact the

church office (978-774-1150) if

you would like to donate food or

help prepare the lunches.

We also have the following

Zoom services and fellowship opportunities:

Worship on Sundays at 10 a.m.

https://zoom.us/j/134596872

Meeting ID: 134 596 872

Phone: 929-205-6099

Coffee hour on Tuesdays at 10

a.m.

https://zoom.us/j/201985541

Meeting ID: 201 985 541

Phone: + 1 929 205 6099

Frank Time Discussion on

the second Wednesdays of each

month at 5:15 pm

https://us02web.zoom.

us/j/85499949543

Meeting ID: 854 9994 9543

Phone: +1 929 205 6099

Morning Prayer on Fridays at

8:30 a.m.

h t t p s : / / z o o m .

us/j/96760775904

Meeting ID: 967 6077 5904

Phone: +1 929 205 6099 US

Perfect Paws Pet Ministry, the

third Sunday of each month at 5

p.m.

https://zoom.us/

j/990855545?pwd=YVN4bzFhOEpLZkY3Y1dxQkt2OTJMdz09

Meeting ID: 990 855 545

Password: Saintfranc

Parish office: Call 978-774-

1150 or email allstoffice@gmail.

com

Peace,

Michelle Behling, Parish Administrator

All Saints Episcopal Church of

the North Shore

46 Cherry Street

Danvers, MA 01923

978-774-1150 / allstoffice@

gmail.com

Carmelite Chapel

Carmelite Chapel in the Northshore

Mall

Holy Mass:

Monday through Friday: Noon

and 3 p.m.

Saturday: Noon, 4 and 5:30

p.m.

Sunday: Noon

Confession:

Monday through Friday

11-11:45 a.m. and 2-2:45 p.m.

Saturday

11-11:45 a.m. and 2:45-3:45

p.m.

Gift Shop

Open Monday through Saturday:

11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Phone: 978-531-8340

Congregation Tifereth Israel

The next Congregation

Tifereth Israel Shabbat service is

scheduled for Friday, August 13,

at 7:30 PM. It will be held both

in person at our synagogue at 8

Pierpont Street, Peabody, and also

on Zoom. The Zoom link is sent

to all members several days prior

to the service. To be added to

the email list, please leave a voice

mail message at 978-531-8135, or

email info@ctipeabody.org.

President Elliot Hershoff

Soloist Joanne Pressman

Congregation Tifereth Israel

8 Pierpont Street

Peabody, MA 01960

Tel. 978.531.8135

web: www.ctipeabody.org

North Shore Baptist Church

706 Lowell St., W. Peabody

Sharing God’s Truth for Life’s

Transitions

Small Group Worship & Bible

Study (in-person) - 10:30 a.m.

Sundays. For info, prayer or help,

contact us at 978-535-6186

or office@northshorebaptistchurch.org.

St. Clare of Assisi

(non-Roman)

Our Parish family welcomes

everyone. We are not here to

condemn, criticize, or judge you.

Rather, we want to offer our love,

our support, and our prayers for

you. Your presence is an important

part of our celebration of the

Mass and when you are not here,

you are missed!

The Rev. Fr. Mike Otero-Otero,

O.S.F.

978-804-2250

www.stclarepeabody.org

Holy Mass: Saturdays at 3 p.m.

St. Clare Mission (feeding the

hungry)

Saturdays at 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Mission Outreach Services

(Homelessness Outreach)

Call Jill at 267-481-5725.

Al-Anon Meetings

Find us at:

https://alanonma.org/.

St. John Lutheran Church

Worship: 9:30 a.m., Sunday,

in-person and on Zoom

Bible Study: 11 a.m.

22 Ellsworth Road, Peabody

Website: https://stjohnpeabody.org

Church phone: 978-531-1731

Pastor: The Rev. Charles N.

Stevenson

Email: stjohnpastor@earthlink.net

For the Zoom link, please

email the pastor.

Temple Ner Tamid

Service Times

Sunday to Thursday: 7 p.m.

Friday: 8 p.m.

Saturday: 9:30 a.m.

Holidays as published.

Join Us Online.

Services and all other programs

are being held virtually

using Zoom, Facebook and

YouTube

Rabbi Richard Perlman

Associate Rabbi Bernie

Horowitz

Visit our website

www.templenertamid.org

Contact office

978-532-1293

office@templenertamid.org

368 Lowell St.

Peabody, Mass.

Temple Tiferet Shalom

Services and all other programs

are being held virtually via

Zoom and StreamSpot.

Services Friday evenings at

7:30 p.m. and Saturday mornings

at 9:30 a.m.

Rabbi David Kudan

Music Director Bryna Toder

Tabasky

Prayer Leader Gary Gillette

489 Lowell St.

Peabody, Mass

978-535-2100

www.templetiferetshalom.org

The Children’s Piazza in Peabody is open for play.

FOR THE WEEKLY NEWS

The piazza is a fun, indoor place for

pre-school children to play. It is located

in the Peabody Education & Business

Center at 83 Pine St., behind Covenant

Christian Academy. When entering the

parking lot, continue to the very end of

the building and turn left. The piazza is

just a few doors down from Authentic

Karate and parking is along the soccer

fields.

The piazza is open Monday-Friday

from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday

from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. On Wednesdays,

the piazza is closed from 1-3 p.m.

Limited play space is available and

parents are encouraged to reserve spots

online in advance. To reserve your spot,

or for more information, go to https://

www.thechildrenspiazza.com/.

Parents are advised to check the

weekly online schedules as the piazza

sometimes closes for private events.

Events and times are subject to change,

so please confirm events prior to attending.

The piazza is recommended for preschool

age children. The cost per child

Have a story to share?

Need a question answered?

is $12 and $8 each for additional siblings.

One adult is allowed to attend per

child. The cost for an additional adult is

$8 each. Children under the age of one

are free.

Masks are no longer required for

vaccinated adults and children under the

age of six.

A waiver (available online) is required

of all participants prior to attending.

Socks are mandatory for all adults

and children in the play area. Food is

not allowed in the play area, however

adults may have a beverage. The piazza

is a nut-free facility. Adults may not

contactus@essexmedia.group

leave unattended bags or food on tables.

Adults are advised that they are responsible

for their children and belongings

and keep an eye on both at all times.

The Piazza also features The Coffee

Shop, serving scratch-baked muffins,

scones, homemade cookies, real fruit

smoothies, coffee and teas. The shop is

open to the public with online ordering

for in-person pick up.

For more information, call 1-978-

817-2809 or email thechildrenspiazza@

gmail.com .


6

Peabody Area Chamber of

Commerce Summer Events:

MassHire Employee

Resources Webinar

Date and Time

Thursdays 2pm

July 15th - September

Location

Virtual

Fees/Admission

No Fee

Website

https://www.mass.gov/topics/masshire

Registration:

https://www.eventbrite.

com/e/masshire-employer-resources-webinar-tickets-163047115311

PACC Annual

Summer Shindig -

Olympic-Sized Fun!

Date and Time

Thursday, August 12th

5:00 to 8:00 pm

Location

Smith Barn

38 Felton St. Peaobdy MA

01960

Fees/Admission

Tickets: $40 per person advance

At the Door: $50 per person

Sponsorship Packages Available

Description

Join us for our annual

PACC Annual Summer Shindig

on Thursday, August 12th

at 5:00pm at the Smith Barn!

Enjoy a fun night of food, adult

beverages and games. A great

company outing opportunity!

PACC Health and

Wellness Expo 2021

Date and Time

Sunday Aug 22, 2021

5-8pm

Location

Leather City Commons

53 Lowell Street Peabody

MA 01960

Fees/Admission

Admission to the Expo is Free!

Description

Put the stress of 2020 behind

you with our 16th Annual Health

& Wellness Expo, happening on

Sunday, August 22nd on Leather

City Commons during the Mayor's

Concert featuring Renee

and the Renegades. Learn and

experience the latest in health

and wellness trends with over

20 area businesses and organizations.

There will be a food

truck and craft beer featured.

There's something for everyone

from home organization tips, to

healthy eating to spring cleaning

your financials.

Attendee admission is free!

PEABODY LIONS 29th

Annual Golf Tournament

Date and Time

Monday Sep 13, 2021

12:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Registration/Lunch: Noon

Event: 12:30 Shotgun

Location

Thomson Country Club

2 Mid Iron Drive

North Reading, MA

Fees/Admission

Entrance Fee: $165/golfer

SPONSORSHIPS:

$1500 Flag Sponsor — Golf-

Status.org applies your company

name & branding on a professional

2-sided pin flag at EV-

ERY hole.

$1250 Premier Technology

Sponsor — GolfStatus.org

applies your company name &

branding exposure on tournament’s

website and within all

functions on mobile golf app.

$1000 Double Eagle Sponsor

— 4 golfers, tee sign prominently

posted on the course at one of

the 18 holes, company name &

branding exposure on all print

materials, mobile golf app/website

access, lunch & dinner.

$800 Eagle Sponsor — 4

golfers, tee sign prominently

posted on the course, mobile

golf app/website access, lunch

Have a story to share?

Need a question answered?

contactus@essexmedia.group

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JULY 22, 2021

COURTESY PHOTOS | PEABODY AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

& dinner.

$100 Hole Sponsor — name

on tee sign prominently posted

on the course at one of the 18

holes.

Website

http://www.e-clubhouse.org/

sites/peabody/

Contact Information

For more information please

contact Lion Kayla (978-587-

6255), or Lion Peter (978-535-

4828) or email peabodylionsclub@gmail.com.

Description

Our primary fundraiser,

hosted at the Thomson Country

Club, North Reading, MA

supporting PEABODY LIONS

CHARITIES, a nonprofit organization

serving the Peabody

area. For more than 75 years,

PEABODY LIONS continues to

assist local residents with vision

and sensory impairments. This

includes obtaining and receiving

services and equipment such as

eyeglasses, vision screenings

and technology. PEABODY LI-

ONS CHARITIES also works

to support elders and families,

and assists in a variety of community-related

initiatives in

alignment with all of the LIONS

Service areas:

• VISION

• DIABETES

• HUNGER

• YOUTH

• ENVIRONMENT

• HUMANITARIAN

Our golf tournament is open

to all individuals and organizations!

We continue to strive

for a record number of golfers

and sponsors to enjoy a day of

golfing supporting our community.

Please consider becoming

a partner with the PEABODY

LIONS with one of our sponsorship

opportunities.

"WE SERVE!"

Thank you all & hope to see

you at our event!

ZBA approves

Kings Residences

BY ANNE MARIE TOBIN AND

SAM MINTON

PEABODY- Much to the dismay

of many neighboring residents,

the path has been cleared

to build a 133-unit housing complex

on the property formerly

occupied by J.B. Thomas Hospital

on King Street.

Monday night, the Zoning

Board of Appeals (ZBA) voted

4-1 to issue a comprehensive

permit (with 44 conditions) under

Chapter 40B, the state's affordable

housing law, to Hemisphere

Development Group,

LLC for the Kings Residences

project

Despite the fact that the

meeting was not open for public

discussion, it was contentious

at times, with several residents

attempting to express their opinions.

This prompted ZBA Chairman

Frances Gallugi to remind

the audience that, "we do not

hear from people in the audience.

What we hear from is the

board and the attorney."

Councilor-at-Large Anne

Manning-Martin objected immediately,

reminding Gallugi

that the attorney (former ZBA

Chair Jason Panos) represents

the developer's interests, not the

city's.

"He is not there to tell you

what to do," Manning-Martin

said. "You are deliberating."

There were also other words

exchanged with residents clamoring

for board members to use

their microphones as one crowd

member claimed they couldn't

hear board member Stephen Zolotas.

Barry Osborne, the only

member of the board to vote no,

also expressed some concerns

about the density of the project

and also stated that he was torn

on voting on the residences.

"I really believe that something

needs to happen at that

site because it's just going to get

worse; it's going to continue to

be an eyesore," he said. "My

own personal feeling is that at

this number of units, it's too

dense."

Fellow board member Daniel

Sencabaugh stated that he appreciated

Osborne's concerns and

talked about how tough these

"40B projects" can be.

"We listened to a lot of people,

we had a lot of different department

heads weigh in, we had

an opportunity to have several

meetings to discuss this project,"

he said. "We shouldn't lose

sight of the fact that we're putting

44 conditions on this project

and if we were to outright reject

this project that they can appeal

and they can get what they want

and they don't have to do any of

these conditions."

Ward 4 Councilor Ed Charest

said he wasn't surprised.

"I was always in favor of the

55-and-over project for many

reasons, not just because it had

23 fewer units, but the fact that

it was going to be owner-occupied,"

Charest said. "There

would have been no impact on

the schools and no three-bedroom

units. The problem was the

people kept saying they could

stop it and I kept saying they

can't but they didn't listen and

now look at what we have."

Ward 4 candidate Julie Daigle

said her main goal is to help

Peabody remain affordable.

"We all share the goal of making

sure that Peabody remains an

affordable place to live and raise

a family," she said. "My neighbors

and I recognize the constraints

that Chapter 40B places

on local control of developments

like Kings Residences. But there

are opportunities to negotiate a

better outcome every step along

the way."

Manning-Martin wasted no

time turning her dissatisfaction

into action. Frustrated with the

board for refusing to address

density, size or scope, she filed a

Freedom of Information request

with the city first thing Tuesday

morning, requesting ZBA

documents, all meeting minutes

— including executive session

— and "any and all documentation

and communications from

the petitioner's attorney, Jason

Panos, dictating these conditions

and with whom in the City of

Peabody they were exchanged,

discussed and deliberated."

Manning-Martin said the

board has admitted that it never

addressed size, scope or density

issues of the project.

"ZBAs all across the commonwealth

downsize these projects

all the time," she said. "It's

the only power the city has to

control the size and scope. Once

that's done, the burden is on the

developer to show that it is uneconomic

and not supported by

the local concerns that outweigh

the residents' need for affordable

housing… This is shocking and

sad to watch."

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net


JULY 22, 2021

Obituaries

Vivien A (Covino) Regan, 90

1931 - 2021

PEABODY - Vivien A (Covino) Regan

of Peabody, formerly of Saugus

and Winthrop, passed away

peacefully on July 17, 2021, at

the Melrose-Wakefield Hospital.

She was the devoted wife of the

late Walter J. Regan, with whom

she shared over sixty years of marriage.

No doubt Dad was waiting

with open arms.

Born in Boston, she was the

daughter of the late Joseph (Giuseppe)

Covino who emigrated

from Italy and Eva (Studzinska)

who emigrated from Poland. Vivien

grew up in Winthrop and was

a proud graduate of WHS, Class of

1949 (the 49ers). She was also

proud not to be a member of the

Naughty Niner’s. Her mom, Eva

(pronounced Ev ah) had a green

thumb, was an animal whisperer,

and was terrified of thunder and

lightning. When thunder rumbled

through Winthrop, her mom would

sit on the table in the middle of

the kitchen, clasping Holy Water

to her chest. No lightning ever

dared strike Eva’s Catholic home.

Her dad Joseph was a gentle and

well-educated man who once

owned a fish market in Boston and

died in his beloved Italy.

Vivien was a dear and dedicated

sister to Rose Larson, Connie

Mustone, Gloria Panarello, Grace

Price, Josephine Natale, and

Francis (Frank) Covino - the only

son of a proud Italian father, and

that made him a big deal. Mom

and her sisters were affectionally

known as CBS (the Covino Broadcasting

System) based on their

timely and efficient dissemination

of local “news” from one sibling

to the next, a telephone line Vivien

manned with her family and

friends for the rest of her life.

Vivien is survived by her sons

Tim (Deb) Regan, Paul Regan,

Matt (Kathy) Regan, Jack (Michaela)

Regan and her daughter who

was her “heart”, the aptly named

Joy (Andrew) Wallace; her beloved

grandchildren, Chris and TJ

(Stephanie) Regan, Alex, Matthew

and Nicole Regan, Jill, Katie and

Samantha Wallace, and Jack and

Caitlyn Regan; and by two great

grandchildren, Mason Regan and

Brody Walter Regan. She loved her

siblings’ children as her own and

was the “favorite” Auntie Bib to so

many loving and devoted nieces

and nephews. Their love for our

mom was palpable and kept her

heart full as she prepared to move

on to heaven.

Our mom also had a legion of

friends, and many would say that

she was the glue that kept them

together all these years. It is impossible

to reflect upon our mom’s

life without thinking of all her Pals.

Before she died, she told me to

“tell my Pals I love them”. And that

she did.

To our Mother, Grandmother,

Great Grandmother, Sister, Aunt,

and Friend, we are so lucky to

call you ours. 90 years on earth

is quite the accomplishment. What

an honor it was to share our time

with you.

Service Information: Friends

and family were invited to attend

Vivien’s Funeral Mass on

Wednesday, July 21, 2021, at

10:30 a.m. at Saint Adelaide’s

Church, 708 Lowell Street,

Peabody, MA. In lieu of flowers,

donations may be made in her

name to Saint Jude at www.stjude.org.

For the on-line obituary

visit www.ccbfuneral.com

William F. Keane, 99

1921 - 2021

PEABODY - William Keane, age

99, passed away on Sunday, July

18, 2021, at the Brudnick Center,

Peabody. He was the beloved

husband of the late

Helen (Fox) Keane, with

whom he had shared 54

wonderful years of marriage.

Born in Peabody, MA

on July 28, 1921, he was a son

of the late John and Irene (Meagher)

Keane. William graduated

from Peabody High School, and

then proudly enlisted in the United

States Army. He was active during

World War II, and spent much of

his time in Europe, ending in Berlin.

William was honorably discharged

as a Corporal in 1945.

Upon his return home, he settled

down with his wife and daughter

in Lynn. During his time in Lynn,

before moving in with his daughter

in Peabody, William worked as a

custodian for the City of Lynnfield.

He was a member of the American

Federal State County Municipal

Employees. In his free time, William

loved working on cars when

he was able. He would often refurbish

and sell vehicles he worked

on. Above all else though, William

loved his family; and the time

he spent with his wife, daughter,

grandchildren and great-grandchildren,

meant everything to him.

Surviving William is his dear

daughter, Patricia Ann Denny and

her husband Charles J. of

Peabody; his grandchildren,

Charles J. Denny,

Jr. and his wife Angeli of

Peabody, and William F.

Denny of Peabody; his

great-grandchildren, Jared

Denny, Angela Denny, Angelo Denny,

Andrei Denny, and Scott Denny;

his sister, Noreen Dubiansky and

her husband Joseph of Deerfield,

NH, as well as many other dear

nieces, nephews, and loved ones.

William was the brother of

the late John Keane, Dorothy

Kolodziej, Margaret Keane, and

Ruth Sullivan.

Service Information: Friends

and family were invited to call

at the Cuffe-McGinn Funeral

Home, 157 Maple St., Lynn on

Thursday, July 22nd from 11

a.m. until 12 p.m. His Funeral

Service was held in the Funeral

Home at 12 p.m. Burial followed

in Cedar Grove Cemetery,

Peabody. To leave an online

message or condolence, please

visit www.cuffemcginn.com.

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 7

Full steam ahead for

peabody peaker plant

Anne Marie Tobin

69 STARK AVENUE, REVERE

LUDLOW — After a temporary

pause to address public concerns

and set the record straight

about Project 2015A, a proposed

55-megawatt capacity plant in

Peabody, the Massachusetts

Municipal Wholesale Electric

Company (MMWEC) is moving

forward with the project.

MMWEC announced Friday

that it has filed an update with

the Department of Public Utilities

(DPU) regarding Project

2015A, which will provide required

capacity for 14 cities and

towns during periods of peak

electricity demand. The decision

to resume was made July 13 at

an MMWEC Board of Directors

meeting.

“MMWEC appreciates the

recent input on the project from

everyone,” said MMWEC Chief

Executive Officer Ron DeCurzio.

“As proven leaders in the

incorporation of carbon-free

technologies, MMWEC and its

members continue to look for

ways to increase the carbon-free

generation in their energy portfolios,

while ensuring they are

providing the required capacity,

grid reliability and dependable

service for their customers.”

As required by the DPU’s

previous order, MMWEC informed

DPU Thursday that it

is moving forward to seek DPU

authority to issue tax-exempt,

long-term debt to finance the

project. In its filing, MMWEC

requests that the DPU set July 29

as the deadline for initial briefs

in the case, with reply briefs due

by Aug. 5.

In May, the board had authorized

a minimum 30-day pause

to address concerns brought to

the MMWEC board, while also

considering available options to

fulfill required capacity obligations

under ISO New England

rules. The Project has been under

development and public review

for more than three years

and has secured required state

permits through the state’s robust

regulatory processes.

During the pause, MMWEC

reexamined the project (including

termination); project participant

needs, obligations and

rates; and alternative technologies

(including battery storage).

MMWEC also reexamined environmental

justice issues and

concerns related to the project.

In coordination with

MMWEC’s efforts, the Peabody

Municipal Light Plant (PMLP)

will use a portion of Project

2015A to replace the capacity

from its existing Waters River

Unit 1 generator. The decision

involves the replacement and

decommissioning of its existing

20-megawatt generator, which

dates to the 1970s. The capacity

replacement would result in the

generator being shut down in

compliance with PMLP’s obligations

in the ISO New England

capacity market and in accordance

with ISO New England

tariff requirements.

During the pause, which began

on May 11, MMWEC engaged

with numerous interested

parties, including residents

of Peabody, legislators, other

state and local elected officials

and the administration. Public

meetings were held in Peabody

and Danvers. Numerous open

public meetings were held with

the public invited to comment.

During the Peabody meeting,

MMWEC provided a near-two

hour update on the project in an

attempt to set the record straight.

MMWEC also expanded the information

posted on the project

website, www.project2015A.

org, in response to questions

asked.

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PMLP Manager Charles Orphanos

indicated his frustration

over the fact that many people at

the meeting appeared to believe

they are experts who would substitute

their opinions for those

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their time to educate themselves,

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he said. “What people don’t

know is this is a very technical

issue and we needed to give it

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referring to things that just aren’t

true, like the fact after being informed

multiple times the project

is $85 million, someone still

said it was $170 million.”

During the pause, MMWEC

reversed course on the proposed

installation of a new

200,000-gallon oil storage tank.

Instead, it will now use urea, a

non-hazardous substance, rather

than ammonia, as a scrubbing

agent for NOx emissions. In

addition, MMWEC undertook

extensive discussions with the

equipment manufacturer about

the potential to incorporate

green hydrogen into the fuel

mix to further reduce emissions.

Because green hydrogen as a

fuel source is an extremely new

technology, those efforts are ongoing.

“Contrary to what people are

falsely saying, we are already

investing in wind and solar

projects,” Orphanos said. “It’s

disheartening to listen to people

who don’t know the facts. The

fact is we agree that renewables

are great and need to be a priority,

but renewables do nothing

on the capacity side. That’s what

people refuse to accept and that

really strikes a vein.

“We are not making this

stuff up.”

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JULY 22, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 9

Sports

Peabody West takes home District 16 title

By Mike Alongi

LYNN — Thanks to a

walk-off RBI single from Gabe

Casiano, the Peabody West

Little League All-Stars notched

a 3-2 win over crosstown rival

Peabody in the District 16

championship game Saturday

afternoon at Reinfuss Field in

Wyoma Square. With the win,

Peabody West keeps its season

alive and moves on to the

Massachusetts Little League

state sectional tournament.

“What a game and what a

day for the city of Peabody,”

said Peabody West coach Mark

Bettencourt. “Both sides just

battled and found ways to

score runs, and it was truly a

great battle between two very

deserving teams.”

Casiano and Marc

Bettencourt each had an RBI

in the win for Peabody West,

while Bettencourt also earned

the win on the mound in relief.

Jimmy DiCarlo earned the

start and pitched a great game

before hitting the pitch count

limit.

Liam Smith and Dylan

Cunningham each had an RBI

in the loss for Peabody, with

Smith taking the loss on the

mound in relief. Caleb Penn

earned the start and pitched a

stellar game before hitting his

85-pitch count limit.

“I didn’t expect anything

other than for this to be a close

game,” said Peabody coach

Rick DeLoreto. “It wasn’t

going to be a 10-2 game or

even a 5-0 game, it was going

to be 3-2 or 2-1. That’s just

how these two teams play

when they meet up. Credit to

Peabody West, they came up

with three big hits exactly when

they needed them. Someone

has to lose, and unfortunately

(Saturday), that was us.”

The game was scoreless until

the bottom of the second inning

when Peabody West was

able to get a runner on base and

take advantage by scoring on a

passed ball.

But Peabody answered

right back, putting runners on

base in the top of the third.

Smith then tied the game at

1-1 with an RBI single before

Cunningham followed it up

with an RBI single of his own

to give Peabody a 2-1 lead.

But, as plenty of teams have

learned already, you never

count out Peabody West.

Marc Bettencourt tied things

up for his team with an RBI

single in the bottom of the

third, then he came out to pitch

with one out in the top of the

fourth after DiCarlo hit his

pitch limit. The coach’s son

Learning from an Olympian

MacLean speaks to runners at Braz Running Camp

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Peabody West players swarm Gabe Casiano, center, after he notched a walk-off RBI single to

beat Peabody in the District 16 Little League championship game Saturday at Reinfuss Field.

shut things down from there,

pitching 2 2/3 scoreless innings

to set up the final-inning

theatrics.

Peabody West was able to

load up the bases in the bottom

of the sixth for Casiano, who

turned on a ball and laced the

game-winning hit into the

outfield.

Peabody wraps up its season

and has plenty to look back and

be proud of.

“This group had a tough

time as 10-year-olds and got

bounced really quick, but

then they grew and came back

ready as 11-year-olds,” said

DeLoreto. “Obviously we

missed last season because of

COVID, but the guys came

back early this year and really

gelled. I couldn’t be more

proud of what these guys have

accomplished this year.”

Peabody West will move

on to the state sectional tournament,

where it will take on

District 14 champion Andover

North on Wednesday (5:30) at

Harry Ball Field in Beverly.

“We’ll take a day to enjoy

this and then reset our goal,

which is now to win the sectional

tournament,” said Mark

Bettencourt. “A lot of these

kids were on the 10-year-old

team (that went to sectionals)

and they know that the level

gets better from here. Our practices

on Monday and Tuesday

will be crucial in raising our

own level, and then we’ll come

out Wednesday and try to get

another win.”

By Mike Alongi

PEABODY — It’s not

every day you get to meet an

Olympian, and last week the

kids at the Fernando Braz

Running Camp got that special

treat when city native

and former Peabody High star

Heather MacLean visited before

making her trip to Tokyo

to represent the United States

on the women’s track-and-field

team.

At the Olympic Trials on June

21 in Eugene, Ore., MacLean

ran a time of 4:02.09 in the

1500-meter to finish third and

qualify for the Olympic team.

The women’s 1500 will be run

on Aug. 2 in Tokyo.

Last Wednesday, MacLean

visited Braz Camp and spoke

with the cross-country and allsports

athletes, describing her

Olympic-qualifying 1500 three

weeks earlier as a race where

she let her mind and body take

over and simply executed.

MacLean answered a

number of questions from

campers about her training and

life as a professional runner.

She remains amazed that her

job is not to go into an office

to “work” but to go for a run —

twice a day.

“I would say, for starters, the

success comes from being a

part of a great team,” MacLean

said. “It’s been amazing

working with (New Balance

Boston) Coach Mark Coogan.

He’s brought me a long way. I

have six teammates and we’re

all so supportive of each other

and build each other up. It’s a

great support system.”

She congratulated the crosscountry

and all-sports athletes

for dedicating a part of their

summer to building their speed

and endurance for success in

the fall.

Before heading to UMass -

Amherst, where she achieved

All-American status three

times, MacLean was a star

runner for the Tanners — setting

records in the 400, 600

and 800 and winning Division

1 state titles in the 600 and 800.

Her personal-best time in the

800 is 1:59, while her personal-best

in the one-mile is 4:25.

MacLean has become one

of the best professional runners

in the country, a career

that has included becoming a

professional runner for New

Balance Boston in 2018. And

it looks like in 2021, she’s hit

her stride.

In January, MacLean posted

a world-leading 4:27.54 time

in the mile at American Track

League Meet No. 1. Last month

she also won the 1500-meter

at the New Balance Indoor

Grand Prix, posting the best

American time in the event

this year: 4:06.32. She also

leads the nation in the 800m

this year following a 2:00.53

time at American Track League

Meet No. 4. She was named

U.S. Track and Field New

England’s Athlete of the Month

for February.

All of that led up to her qualifying

time for the Olympics,

and later this week the Peabody

native will be seen taking part

in the Opening Ceremonies at

the Tokyo Olympics on Friday

at 7 a.m. ET.

COURTESY PHOTO | FERNANDO BRAZ

Olympian and Peabody native Heather MacLean, right,

poses with her former high school coach Fernando Braz after

speaking at the Braz Running Camp last week before leaving

for Tokyo.


10

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JULY 22, 2021

Peabody West hangs

on to beat Peabody

PHOTO | JOE BROWN

Peabody West’s Cullen Pasterick went 2-for-3 with a double and an RBI and also earned the win

on the mound in a victory over Lynnfield last Tuesday.

Peabody West blanks Lynnfield

in District 16 Tournament bout

By Mike Alongi

LYNN — After jumping out

to a 3-0 lead in the first two innings,

the Peabody West Little

League all-stars were forced to

hang on to a close 3-2 win over

crosstown rival Peabody in a

District 16 Tournament winners

bracket game Thursday evening

at the Pine Hill Little League

Field.

With the win, Peabody West

remains undefeated and moves

on to the District 16 Tournament

championship.

“Jumping out early like that

was the difference in the game,

because Peabody’s pitching was

phenomenal,” said Peabody

West Coach Mark Bettencourt.

“Peabody rallied and put some

pressure on us late, but the guys

stood tall, took a deep breath

and earned the win.”

Cullen Pasterick was a key

figure in the win for Peabody

West, tossing a complete game

on the mound and allowing

two runs on three hits with nine

strikeouts. He also went 1-for-3

with a triple and an RBI.

Marc Bettencourt went

1-for-3 with an RBI in the win,

while Jimmy DiCarlo (1-for-4,

double), Ryan Skerry (1-for-2),

Jackson Taylor (1-for-1) and

Gabe Casiano (1-for-2) each

added a hit.

For Peabody, Joseph Tavilla

(1-for-1, double) had the lone

RBI in the loss. Caleb Penn

(1-for-3) and Matt Nazzaro (1-

for-2) each had a hit.

Dylan Cunningham took the

loss on the mound after pitching

the first four innings, while TJ

Bayko pitched the final two.

Cunningham allowed three runs

on two hits with 11 strikeouts,

while Bayko gave up four hits

and struck out two.

“I think we just got things

going a little too late out there,”

said Peabody Coach Rick

DeLoreto. “The kids put in a

great effort and came back, but

we just didn’t get things going

soon enough.”

Peabody West wasted no time

in jumping out to a lead, getting

a walk from Aiden Horgan before

Pasterick launched an RBI

triple to make it a 1-0 game.

Next up was Bettencourt, who

lined an RBI single into center

field to put Peabody West up

by two runs. After picking up

another run on a passed ball in

the top of the second, Peabody

West held a 3-0 lead.

But Peabody didn’t go away.

After struggling to get things

going over the first three innings,

Peabody started clicking

in the bottom of the fourth.

After a single and a fielder’s

choice put runners on first

and second with one out, Penn

faked that he was going to steal

third base to draw a throw. After

the throw got into the outfield,

Penn was able to come all the

way around and score to get

Peabody on the board. Two

batters later, Tavilla stepped in

as a pinch hitter and knocked

an RBI single to make it a 3-2

game.

But Pasterick didn’t let things

get any worse, buckling down

and getting a strikeout to escape

the inning without further

damage.

Pasterick only allowed one

more hit over the final two

innings, hanging on to give

Peabody West the victory.

By Mike Alongi

LYNN — After 48 hours,

several inches of rain and a

field change, the Peabody West

Little League All-Stars finally

were able to finish the job with

a 5-0 victory over Lynnfield in

a District 16 Tournament battle

Tuesday.

“The key for us out there,

and it never changes from high

school to Little League to the

pros, is that we need to throw

strikes,” said Peabody West

Coach Mark Bettencourt, who

also coaches the Peabody High

baseball team. “We had three

guys go out there (Tuesday) and

throw strikes, challenge a good

Lynnfield team and come away

with the win.”

Brendan Kobierski led the

offensive attack for Peabody

West, going 2-for-3 with a

double and two RBI in the win.

Cullen Pasterick went 2-for-3

with a double and an RBI, while

Marc Bettencourt went 1-for-2

with a double and an RBI.

Pasterick earned the win on

the mound after going the first

three innings and allowing only

one hit with five strikeouts.

Lynnfield was only able to

scatter two total hits in the loss,

with James Pasquale (1-for-3)

and Grant Neal (1-for-2) each

notching one.

Pasquale took the loss on the

mound after 1 2/3 innings of

work, while Neal and Charlie

Piccotti saw time in relief.

Things got started on Sunday

evening, when Peabody West

jumped ahead early with a pair

of runs in the top of the first. A

pair of walks and a passed ball

put two runners in scoring position,

then Brendan Kobierski

notched an RBI infield single. A

throwing error on the same play

brought a second run home,

giving Peabody West an early

2-0 lead.

After two nights of rain

pushed the conclusion of the

game until Wednesday, Peabody

West came back and added another

run in the top of the third

thanks to back-to-back doubles

to start the inning. Pasterick led

things off with a two-bagger to

get into scoring position, then

Bettencourt stepped in behind

him and laced an RBI double to

make it 3-0.

After Pasterick moved 1-2-3

through the order in the bottom

of the inning, Peabody West

came back in the top of the

fourth and scored two more.

A leadoff walk, a single and a

passed ball put two runners in

scoring position, then Pasterick

knocked an RBI single to

make it 4-0. Two batters later,

Kobierski brought home another

run via a sacrifice fly.

Peabody West’s relief

pitching took over from there,

as James DiCarlo pitched two

scoreless innings and Mark

Bettencourt shut the door in the

final frame to seal the shutout

win.

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Peabody West’s Jimmy DiCarlo reacts to Peabody’s Joseph

Tavilla being called safe at second during a District 16

Tournament game Thursday.

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JULY 22, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 11

Championship: Peabody VS. Peabody West

PHOTOS | Spenser Hasak

Peabody West players take off on a celebration lap around Wyoma Little League Field on Saturday after defeating Peabody and winning the Little League

Massachusetts District 16 Championship.

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Peabody West’s Marc Bettencourt pitches against Peabody in

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12

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JULY 22, 2021

Championship: Peabody VS. Peabody West

PHOTOS | Spenser Hasak

Peabody's Connor Quigley makes contact against Peabody West.

Peabody’s Caleb Penn pitches against Peabody West in the District 16 Little League title game

on Saturday.

Peabody West’s Cullen Pasternick celebrates after tagging

Peabody’s Caleb Penn out at first.

Peabody West’s Brendan Koblerski leaps into the air after

scoring on an RBI single hit by Gabe Casiano.

Peabody West’s Gabe Casiano makes contact with the bases loaded in the bottom of the sixth

and knocks home the winning run.


JULY 22, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 13

More Peabody Little League games

Peabody West’s Jimmy DiCarlo snags a ground ball.

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Peabody’s Liam Smith looks back at his teammates before stepping back into the box against

Peabody West’s 1.

PHOTO | JOE BROWN

Lynnfield 2nd baseman Cole MacKinnon makes the leap to get

the ball from the outfield, but West Peabody’s Colin Pasternak

is safe on the base with a hit double.

West Peabody’s Marc Bettencourt makes a heroic effort to tag home, but was deemed to be out by Lynnfield catcher Coley Walsh.

PHOTO | JOE BROWN


14

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JULY 22, 2021

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B: Jonathan M Lopez

S: Jessica E Fenty-Scotland

4 GOODALE TER

$885,000

B: Alison Luongo & Chad Luongo

S: Anne C Correia & Steven C Correia

14 HAMERICK RD

$650,000

B: Radairy M Vittini & Ramses Vittini

S: Daniel I Connelly & Donna M Connelly

4 LENOX RD

$580,000

B: Ryan Childers & Kathryn Safreed

S: John W Duff Tr, Tr for 4 Lenox Road RT

9 LONGWOOD AVE

$440,000

B: Nathaniel R Spencer & Rachel S

Spencer

S: Benjamin Howland & Jaclyn Milne

156 LOWELL ST

$692,000

B: Anna Jacqueline-Lajoie & Jovana

Bullock

S: Piruza Bogossian

163 LOWELL ST

$600,000

B: Escarlyn M Crisostomo

S: Walber J Moura

82 MARGIN ST

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B: AMV 679 Broadway LLC

S: Holly A Maribito & James F Maribito

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$500,000

B: A&P Borges LLC

S: Brian Lynch & Maureen D Lynch

22 NEWCASTLE RD

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B: Emily L Gaither & Justin Beau-Gaither

S: Jaclyn E Pierce & Michael M Pierce

7 POCAHONTAS DR

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B: Jean R Crescenzo & Laura J Dube

S: Carissa Karakaedos & Joel

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32 PULASKI ST

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B: Melissa L Curley & Yazmanny Robles

S: Kendra J Merrill & Donald E

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B: Abbie E Dore & Nathan G Dore

S: Daniel B Abramson

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B: Rosa T Bui & Hung M Le

S: Brendan M Mckenna & Patricia F

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B: Sopheak Casaletto

S: Richard Dangelo

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B: Jeffrey B Aronson & Tianna Aronson

S: Brandon H Tarricone & Randall L

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AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CODE OF THE CITY OF PEABODY

CHAPTER 7 BUILDINGS AND BUILDING REGULATIONS

OF THE CODE OF THE CITY OF PEABODY

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF PEABODY AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION ONE: That the Code of the City of Peabody adopted on January 9, 1986,

as amended, is hereby further amended by amending Section 7-58 entitled Fees

for Permits and Inspections:

The following schedule of fees for the application, the issuance and inspections

relating to Sealing of Weighing & Measuring Devices is hereby established:

By deleting in its entirety, Section F entitled Building Permit Fees as adopted on

June 12, 2008 and in place thereof the following:

SEALING OF WEIGHING AND MEASURING DEVICES

Devise

Price

OVER 10,000 LBS $175.00

5K-10K POUNDS $125.00

1K-5K POUNDS $85.00

100-1000 POUNDS $70.00

>10-100 POUNDS $40.00

10 POUNDS OR LESS $40.00

WEIGHTS $5.00

CAPACITY MEASURES $25.00

FUEL TANK PUMP $45.00

VEHICLE TANK PUMP $100.00

BULK STORAGE $100.00

OIL, GREASE $15.00

TAXI METERS $40.00

LEATHER MEASURE $40.00

WIRE, ROPE, CORDAGE $20.00

FABRIC MEASURE $20.00

YARD STICKS $10.00

TAPES $20.00

SCANNERS 1-3 $100.00

SCANNERS 4-11 $200.00

SCANNERS 12 + $300.00

ADJUSTING FEE $20.00

RESEALING FEES $15.00

OUT OF DISTRICT $50.00

REVERSE VENDING $25.00

VENDING $25.00

SECTION TWO: The Building Commissioner shall review said fees every three years

hereafter.

SECTION THREE: All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent herewith are

hereby

repealed.

SECTION FOUR: This Ordinance shall take effect as provided by law.

INTRODUCED JULY 8, 2021

ORDERED PUBLISHED JULY 8, 2021

PUBLISHED JULY 22, 2021

WEEKLY NEWS: July 22, 2021

Legal Notice

There will be a Tree Removal Hearing on Friday July 23, 2021 @ 9:00am at the

Recreation, Parks & Forestry Department office located at 50 Farm Avenue,

Peabody, MA, for the removal of a Public Shade Tree(s) at the following

location(s).

Address: 2 Pond Street As per the petition of (Marianne Duhaime)

Peabody, MA 01960

Per Order of Brian Grant, Tree Warden

Weekly News: July 15 & 22, 2021

LEGALS

PEABODY CITY COUNCIL

CITY OF PEABODY, MASSACHUSETTS

BOND ORDER - CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

BE IT ORDERED by the City Council of the City of Peabody that $5,000,000 (Five

Million Dollars) is appropriated to pay costs of the following projects, including the

payment of any costs incidental or related thereto:

Police HVAC 250,000.00

Cruisers 385,000.00

Microwave Repeaters 1,200,000.00

Defensive Equipment,

Tools & Training Aides 50,000.00

Fire Radios 300,000.00

Ladder 1 Truck 1,000,000.00

Police Radios 300,000.00

Boiler Replacements 190,000.00

School Roof Repairs 75,000.00

Chiller Replacements 125,000.00

Vehicles 255,000.00

Trucks 340,000.00

Technology Upgrades 240,000.00

Playground Equipment 215,000.00

Boom Attachment 75,000.00

and that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the Mayor is

authorized to borrow said amount under Chapter 44 of the General Laws or any

other enabling authority; that the Treasurer, Mayor and any other City official is

authorized to take actions necessary or convenient to carry out the purposes of

this Order; that any premium received upon the sale of any bonds or notes

approved by this vote, less any such premium applied to the payment of the costs

of issuance of such bonds or notes, may be applied to the payment of costs

approved by this vote in accordance with M.G.L. c. 44, §20 of the General Laws,

thereby reducing the amount authorized to be borrowed to pay such costs by a like

amount; and that this Order be advertised and read.

INTRODUCED JULY 15, 2021

ORDERED PUBLISHED JULY 15, 2021

PUBLISHED JULY 22, 2021

Weekly News: July 22, 2021

LEGALS

Selling a house?

Buying a house?

Find out what properties

recently sold in your area.

Check out

the Real Estate page

in Saturday’s paper.


JULY 22, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 15

Neverland Theatre performs Alice in Wonderland at Peabody Black Box on Saturday.

Black Box Theater heads to ‘wonderland’

By Sam Minton

PEABODY — Residents got

to take a trip to "wonderland"

over the weekend.

Neverland Theater Company

now calls Peabody's Black Box

Theater home; they put on a performance

of "Alice in Wonderland"

on Saturday and Sunday,

with two shows each day.

Tim Brown of Northeast Arc

mentioned that the city's Black

Box theater recently received

feedback from the community

and one of the more prominent

things that they heard was that

they wanted to be able to enjoy a

community theater program.

"Neverland Theater is really

able to meet the need that was

identified through our early conversations

when we were building

out the theater," he added.

This was the first performance

that Andy Diskes and his Neverland

Theater put on since the beginning

of the pandemic and also

was their debut at the Black Box.

Diskes mentioned how supportive

Black Box has been.

"Coming to a new facility is

always a transitional period," said

Diskes.

This is also Neverland's 31st

anniversary as a company. Unfortunately,

due to COVID-19, they

were unable to do anything big to

celebrate the 30-year milestone

last year.

However, with this being the

first performance in front of a

crowd in a year and a half, Diskes

mentioned that the air of the first

Joshua Madruga performs his role of Humpty Dumpty.

Jamie Cabot as the March Hare, left, and Joshua Madruga as the Mad Hatter perform at

Peabody Black Box during Neverland Theatre’s rendition of Alice in Wonderland.

show was filled with excitement

— as well as nerves.

Part of this was due to the fact

that a few cast members were

struck with last-minute illnesses.

Due to some quick rearranging,

which included cast members

playing multiple roles, the show

was able to go on.

"It's a good experience for cast

members, adults and teens, and

children to work together, and to

learn from each other, and to play

different roles," Diskes said.

Collaboration is a big part of

Neverland Theater's ethos. Diskes

also mentioned that he lets the

cast help out with staging and

other aspects of the production,

in addition to their acting duties.

"They don't just act," he said.

"We say they can help direct

scenes and things, so it's a collaborative

effort."

Neverland Theater's collaboration

with the Black Box will

also yield a production of Peter

Pan on July 24 and 25, where attendants

are encouraged to view

the show in costume. In November,

the theater company will

be putting on a performance of

"Annie," which they have been

rehearsing for almost two years.

"By November we will have

been here several months so I

think the show will even be stronger

and fancier just because there

is a learning curve coming to a

new facility," said Diskes.

On Saturday afternoon, Claudia

Drakos' performance as Alice,

as well as that of the rest of

the cast, allowed for some much

needed-escapism; next weekend,

Wonderland will be traded for

Neverland and the magic will

continue.

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16

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 JULY 22, 2021

Alice in Wonderland at the Black Box

PHOTOS |Spenser Hasak

Alice, played by Claudia Drakos, performs at Peabody Black Box during Neverland Theatre’s

rendition of Alice in Wonderland on Saturday.

Olivia Wagner performs as the Cheshire Cat.

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