August 2021 253 Lifestyle

livinglocal360

August 2021 253 Lifestyle

ISSUE NO. 32 AUGUST 2021

Working

TOGETHER

PIERCE COUNTY UNITES TO

END HOMELESSNESS

Q&A WITH

DL FOWLER

AWARD-WINNING AUTHOR

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 1


2 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


TRUSTED & REFERRED

Time and time again

253.961.5596

Sold in 2 days for $1,675,000

Sold in 4 days for $2,100,000

Sold in 5 days for $1,400,000

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Sold in 4 days for $1,790,000

Sold in 4 days for $705,000

Sold in 4 days for $630,000

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MLS# 1739699

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“We are so thankful we chose Carolyn to sell our home! She is professional and has the knowledge and experience to sell

any home, especially luxury homes. Our best advice is to listen to her and do what she suggests. Her marketing plan is very

impressive. We had the right offer for our home in less then 36 hours! Carolyn will keep you updated daily through the entire

process. She was very honest with us, kind, patient and available for any questions and comments.”

- Cory and Anne Garnaas

JENSEN WESTMORELAND

Broker | 253.240.5514

CAROLYN WESTMORELAND

Broker/Owner | 253.961.5596

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 3


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 5


MARKETING

MARKETING & SALES EXECUTIVE

Melodie Hill | 208.209.4237

melodie@like-media.com

WASHINGTON EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Julie Reed | 253.363.8832

julie@like-media.com

MARKETING COORDINATOR

Morgan Redal | 253.363.8830

morgan.redal@like-media.com

EDITORIAL

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Jillian Chandler | jillian@like-media.com

STAFF WRITERS

Colin Anderson | Taylor Shillam | Rachel Kelly

DESIGN

CREATIVE DIRECTOR | Maddie Horton

LEAD GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Darbey Russo

GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Kennedy Pew

GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Marisa Inahara

DIGITAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR | Whitney Lebsock

great things for

a great community

Founded in 1925, Peninsula Light is your member-owned, not-for-profit

electric cooperative, providing reliable power throughout Gig Harbor and

the Key Peninsula. We are dedicated to continually improving the quality

of life in this great community through system reliability, helping you

conserve and use electricity more efficiently and rising to the challenges

of a rapidly changing industry.

OPERATIONS

MANAGING PARTNER | Kim Russo

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR | Steve Russo

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS | Rachel Figgins

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING | Allyia Briggs

CONTRIBUTORS

Deann Hammer, Marguerite Cleveland, Lynn Castle,

Bri Williams, Missi Balison, Tina VanDenHeuvel

PHOTOGRAPHY

Samantha Elise Tillman pg. 28, Marguerite Cleveland pg. 62,

Tina VanDenHeuvel pg. 58, Asia Pacific Cultural Center pg. 32,

Galloping Gertie pg. 56, Grit City To Go! pg. 56

Advertising Agency

253.857.5950 | 888.809.8021

13315 GOODNOUGH DR. NW | GIG HARBOR, WA 98332

WWW.PENLIGHT.ORG

253 Lifestyle Magazine is published monthly and distributed freely

throughout the Pacific Northwest. Opinions expressed in articles

or advertisements do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the

publisher. 253 Lifestyle Magazine is not responsible for omissions

or information that has been misrepresented to the magazine. 253

Lifestyle Magazine is produced and published by Like Media, and no

part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted without

the permission of the publisher.

6

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Building Better Solutions for Clients

With almost 30 years experience serving families in Gig Harbor and Pierce

County, Felicia Soleil provides more constructive alternatives to dissolving

a marriage outside of a courtroom. In addition to her family law practice, she

also provides mediation services, offering legal support, education and case

management - from simple to complex - for separation and divorce, parenting

plans, child support and prenuptial agreements.

Facing a divorce or separation? Felicia focuses on reducing and resolving

conflict, helping you transition by moving on, not just moving out.

Felicia A. Soleil, Attorney at Law and Mediator

253.853.6940 • FamilyLawResolutions.com • 7191 Wagner Way, Suite 303, Gig Harbor, WA

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 7


PUBLISHER’S Picks

Steve Russo

Executive Director

EMBRACING THE FINAL WEEKS OF SUMMER

IT’S HARD TO BELIEVE THAT AUGUST IS UPON US, AND BEFORE

YOU KNOW IT, IT WILL BE TIME TO START BACK UP ON A DAILY

ROUTINE—no more sleeping in—and heading out for the annual backto-school

shopping trip. But … summer is not over yet! There are still

plenty of long days and sunshine to enjoy, so take the time to embrace

each day, filling it with thoughtful actions and intentions, creating many

more memories along the way.

It’s time to soak in what’s left of summer! Whether it’s meandering

through town, patronizing your local shops and restaurants; spending

a day out on the water kayaking, paddle boarding or boating; attending

a community concert or event; or relaxing in the yard with family and

friends; there’s no wrong way to enjoy these long, warm days. And before

we know it, the leaves will be turning and the temperatures dropping.

As the fun-filled days wind down, sit back and relax with another

wonderful edition of 253 Lifestyle Magazine. There are so many

wonderful things happening in our community, and we continue to be

honored to share what we’ve discovered for you, our readers, to enjoy.

As you read through the August 2021 issue, you will once again be

reminded of the wonderful place we live, the businesses that help our

community thrive, and the incredible people who surround us daily. We

are truly fortunate to be a part of such a caring community.

Memories are ready to be made, and the 253 is the perfect place to

create them.

22

WORKING TOGETHER:

JALAPEÑO

PIERCE COUNTY UNITES

TO END HOMELESSNESS

28

Q&A WITH DL FOWLER,

AWARD-WINNING AUTHOR

58POPPERS

WITH BACON: A SURE

WAY TO SPICE UP

YOUR NEXT PARTY

60

WILMINGTON, NORTH

CAROLINA: VIBRANT

DOWNTOWN,

RIVERWALK AND

BEACHES

8

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Celebrate

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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 9


CONTENTS

12 32

12

HOME

Tread Lightly: How to choose the right rug for

your home

16

TRENDING

Taking Summer Style into Fall: Top fashion

pieces for the transition to a new season

22

28

Q&A

Q&A with DL Fowler, award-winning author

36

HEALTH & LIFESTYLE

The latest tips and trends about living a healthy,

active life

22

TACOMA FOCUS

Working Together: Pierce County unites to end

homelessness

10 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

32

THE ARTS

Asia Pacific Cultural Center’s 24th Annual

Polynesian Luau: Tickets on Sale NOW

40

BUSINESS PINPOINT

MultiCare Health System: Community-based

nonprofit health care system with a passion

to serve


253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 1

sneak peek into August ...

44

60

ISSUE NO. 32 AUGUST 2021

Working

TOGETHER

PIERCE COUNTY UNITES TO

END HOMELESSNESS

44

FEATURE

Locals Answer the Call to Save our Waterways:

Small actions effect change in our greater world

54

ENTERTAINMENT

Events in August you don’t want to miss!

58

FEATURED RECIPE

Jalapeño Poppers with Bacon: A sure way to spice up

your next party

60

TRAVEL & LEISURE

58

Enjoy a Vibrant Downtown, Riverwalk and World-

Class Beaches: Charming Wilmington, North Carolina

Q&A WITH

DL FOWLER

AWARD-WINNING AUTHOR

About The Cover

DL FOWLER IS AN AWARD-WINNING AUTHOR AND

RECIPIENT OF A CREATIVE ENDEAVOR GRANT TO PRODUCE

A SERIES OF POETRY EVENTS THROUGH THE SUMMER

AND FALL MONTHS. Find out more about the author, ways

in which he gives back to his community, along with his

fascination with Lincoln, in our Q&A on page 28.

Cover photo by Samantha Elise Tillman.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 11


12

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Home

Tread Lightly

HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT RUG FOR YOUR HOME

BY DEANN HAMMER, BROADWAY DESIGN

C

arpets are the foundation of our home. With summer in full swing, many of us are shoe-free, and not only do carpets visually

impact the appearance of our home, but foot feel and durability is of great importance as well.

Carpets should be taken seriously and purchased for longevity, and many are considered fine art. With the popularity of hardwood

over the last decade, area rugs have taken center stage—and are here to stay. Carpets provide an opportunity to add pops of color and

create a design theme that is unique to you. If you are interested in decorating your home to the next level, a quality rug is a great first

step toward a room transformation.

When selecting wall-to-wall carpet, you want to look at the fiber content. Nylon or wool is still the best choice. There are many other

options, but olefin, and other new-to-market fibers, easily crush and soil, and are not made to last. I personally prefer a cut and loop

for wall to wall. Some fibers are looped like a Berber, mixed with cut fibers, giving the carpet a nice visual appeal. I like low pile wallto-wall

carpets in multicolor so that it gives the look of texture and hides foot traffic. The cut fibers in a cut and loop also prevent the

carpet from “running.” If a yarn gets loose in a vacuum, it will not pull through the whole run like a Berber will.

Large, patterned carpets are fun in an office, bonus room or master bedroom to add some character to a space. I also like to use

patterns on stair runners for interest.

There are staggering differences in the quality of area rugs. One of the largest mistakes people make when purchasing an area rug is

that if they have a busy household, they think a less-expensive rug will be a better choice, as it can be tossed when it wears out, or easily

cleaned. This is not the case! A high-quality wool rug will be much easier to clean and will save you money in the long run, as it will

last for many, many years.

The best quality wool rugs will have longer fibers that will not shed and will maintain their pile height (not flatten with foot traffic). An

average cost for a “better” rug will range between $1,500 to $5,000 for an 8x10-foot rug. They can top the charts at over $10,000, and

if it is vintage, a rug can be $10,000 to $20,000 for estate sized (larger than 8x10 feet).

Retail rugs sold online (like Pottery Barn), that sell for around $800 or less, are typically made with short fibers and shed like crazy—

steer clear from those! When purchasing, try to run your fingers across them to see if they shed. Shedding carpets are awful. They

make a mess of your home and really bother those with allergies.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 13


I love silk rugs. They are ultra luxurious and can last lifetimes. The

colors are more vivid, but they are very expensive. I paid $7,500 for a

4x6-foot rug more than a decade ago. But I love it! It is truly a work of

art and looks exactly the same as the day I purchased it.

Consider color. An area rug is a great opportunity to add life to a room.

Handmade rugs are the best, as they are not stiff, have natural dyes that

are rich and luxurious, and have a nice “flop,” meaning they bend and

move and are not stiff. When you run your hand over a high-quality

handmade wool rug, it should feel almost like silk.

Machine-made rugs are here to stay as well if your budget does not

allow for a real handmade wool or silk rug. These are often made from

recycled soda bottles and have a flatter feel to them. The current trend

is more muted colors and traditional “burned out” or vintage-looking

styles. An average cost for a polypropylene rug is around $400 to $600

for an 8x10-foot rug. Make sure to buy a premium pad to place beneath

your rug as well. I use a felt pad with a rubber back that stops the carpet

from sliding on the floor, while adding that extra cushy feel under foot.

These pads cost between $150 to $300 for an 8x10 and will extend the

life of your rug, as they allow the carpet to lift up off of the floor and

maintain its pile height.

Deann Hammer is the owner of Broadway Design, a boutique interior

design firm in Gig Harbor. She and her team craft spaces that are

tailored to each client’s personality and lifestyle, while mindful of their

budget, creating a perfect harmony between aesthetics and function.

BroadwayDesign.net

14 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


JOIN US FOR OUR FIRST

COMPASSION

WALK

SATURDAY AUGUST 28, 8AM-11AM

Compassion Connect Puget Sound and

Adorned in Grace Ministries will hold their

FIRST Compassion Walk to combat human

trafficking and exploitation in Pierce County.

Join us for this 5-mile walk from our ministry

office to our bridal boutique. Each person

raising $100 will receive a free t-shirt.

CLEAN CALM CONSTANT

360.394.7702

kimcoplumbing.com

Contact Kawehi Marshall for more info:

253.232.8363

kawehi@compassionconnect.com

REGISTER AT:

EVENTBRITE.COM/COMPASSIONWALK

A CLEAN HOME IS A BEAUTIFUL HOME.

Residential, commercial & real estate cleanouts

LICENSED. INSURED. BONDED.

360.670.7481

START

Adorned in Grace

3104 S. Union, Tacoma, WA

END

Adorned in Grace Bridal Boutique

10310 S. Tacoma Way, Lakewood, WA

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 15


Trending

TAKING SUMMER STYLE

INTO FALL

Top fashion pieces for the transition

to a new season

By Taylor Shillam

Living in a region with all four of the seasons

inspires the need for strategic seasonal

shopping. As the heat of the Pacific Northwest

summer begins to fade into shorter, cooler days, key

transitional pieces will become wardrobe essentials.

Light pieces that carry well into fall’s early days are

a great way to extend your summer wardrobe while

staying seasonally chic. This month, shop your local

boutiques for summery items with staying power. Here,

you’ll find shopping inspiration through a selection of

items to look for as you shop the Northwest’s seasonal

styles.

SWEATER VESTS. One of the season’s easiest ways

to add a layer is the sweater vest! You’ll notice sweater

vests and sleeveless knits back in style as we come

closer to fall. They’re perfect as easy pieces to wear

on their own as a sleeveless sweater, or to layer over

a crisp white button-down as the temperatures drop.

WHITE BUTTON-DOWN SHIRTS. If you don’t

have that crisp white button-down in your wardrobe

yet, now is the time to add one, as it’s sure to be a staple

in the coming months. Light enough to wear on its

own or to layer under a cardigan, jacket, sweater vest

16

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Gig Harbor

Gig harbor

Real Estate real Resource

estate resource

Average sales price

highest luxury sale

| SOLD

Fox Island | Sold

Downtown | SOLD

10,000 $790,892 $1,950,000 $2,699,000 9 Days $2,100,000

Up $13,357 from June

Down $155,000 from June

ales Price:

.

ays On Market:

ale in 3rd Quarter:

$672,653

* Data collected from multiple listing services on July 20, 2021

11

welcome home to your new gig harbor neighbors . . .

$3,100,000

average days on market

7.8

Down 1 from June

What's Your Home Worth?

www.key2see.com

key 2 see Team

"Pairing innovation with

Communication to create a long

lasting trust so you can Enjoy Home"

key 2 see team

hawkins CJ Stewart Whitney Johnsen

“Pairing innovation with communication to create a

long-lasting trust so you can enjoy home.”

jennifer hawkins | cj stewart | whitney johnsen

what’s your home worth?

www.key2see.com

(253) 229.1414

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 17


That little white tee in your closet might be of

bigger value than you realize.

or suit jacket, the crisp white shirt is one of the most versatile pieces

you’ll pick up this season. While temperatures stay hot, mix and

match the top with your favorite shorts and skirts to stay cool.

CROP TOPS. Don’t put away your summer crop tops just yet!

These hot-weather staples can keep you stylish in the transition

to autumn. Keep them to spice up a night out, as they are easily

covered under a jacket in the cooler evening temperatures, or keep

them peeking through light layers for a fun weekend look. Bonus

style points for crop tops in fun fabrics and leathers.

NEUTRAL MAXIS. Maxi dresses made their comeback this year,

and they are here to stay through the autumn. Keep your neutraltoned

maxi dresses for the fall—think cream-colored shirt dresses

paired with knee-high boots, or military-inspired greens with ankle

boots. Maxi dresses are an easy way to add a feminine touch to your

autumn days.

JUMPSUITS. Similar to the maxi dresses, jumpsuits are an easy

way to quickly pull together a chic outfit. An excellent combination

of fashionable and functional, jumpsuits carry well into fall

festivities. From satin jumpsuits to dress up a night out, to militarystyle

jumpsuits making a statement in the daytime, you can easily

layer them over a long-sleeve shirt or underneath a wool coat on a

cooler day.

WHITE BABY TEES. That little white tee in your closet might be

of bigger value than you realize. Cropped tops have been in style

all year, and that doesn’t stop at T-shirts. Keep your fitted white

“baby tee” as the ultimate base layer, then build an outfit around

it based on your plans. White tees are easily paired with just about

everything: this season’s carpenter pants, trousers, destroyed jeans

and maxi skirts, with additional warmth brought by cardigans,

denim, leather, or suit jackets.

CROPPED SWEATSHIRTS. Those cropped sweaters you kept

around for the late nights coming home from the beach, lingering

around a bonfire, or the occasional rainy day, are going to be one

of the best pieces to keep around for autumn. Cropped sweatshirts

can range from a simple, solid color, to a retro-inspired statement

piece. Get creative with your layers, and keep them in stock as a goto

piece this season.

SLOUCHY JEANS. The comfort promised by “boyfriend” jeans

and “mom” jeans alike has been deservedly embraced. These

flattering, yet flexible, jeans are on the slouchier side, making them

18 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


YOU ARE WORTH A

WHOLE LOT MOOOOORE!

TOP 3 SIGNS IT’S TIME TO MOVE ON FROM YOUR CURRENT PROPERTY MANAGER:

1. You are treated like a number, not a person!

2. Your investment property isn’t being treated as such!

3. You are being “nickel and dimed” on a regular basis!

GO SANDPOINT

vacation homes

For Bookings, Inquiries & Homeowner Information:

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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 19


easy for the transition not only between seasons, but between

day to night and work to weekend. As they fit well with just

about any selection of shoe, they’re easily taken from sandal

weather into boot weather.

FLORAL PRINTS. Flowers will continue to color and brighten

our wardrobes well into the upcoming months. Keep your light,

summery florals to add a burst of romantic energy to your fall

outfits. You’ll see florals stay on boutique shelves in the form of

patterned mini dresses, accessories, printed suits and more.

EXTRA-STRAPPY SANDALS. Keep your most fun, dramatic

sandals in the rotation this month, as they’re poised to become

a fall evening essential. Dressier sandals with far-reaching straps

are set to take you into autumn soirees, events and dinner parties.

WHERE TO SHOP

Pacific Northwest shoppers have a wide selection of local

boutiques to choose from, from Gig Harbor to Tacoma, and

everywhere in between.

Coastal Washington shoppers can visit Gig Harbor’s Dolly Mama

Boutique, “a boutique with a heart,” inspiring joy in women

through quality items that are a selection of every woman’s

favorite things. There’s also Dolly Mama Too, its sister store.

Additional boutiques not to miss in the Western Washington

area include Frankie Boutique and Tacoma’s Purpose Boutique.

The transition to cooler days doesn’t have to be complicated,

especially when it comes to keeping up with seasonal fashion.

With a few key pieces from the best of local boutiques, your

move into autumn will be seamless and stylish.

20 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 21


Tacoma Focus

WORKING

TOGETHER

PIERCE COUNTY UNITES TO END

HOMELESSNESS

BY RACHEL KELLY

Your landlord went bankrupt, and didn’t tell you.

The only reason you found out is because you

were served an eviction notice; you have to be

out by the end of the week. Already on the brink

of your funds, you need time to save up for a deposit for a

new place. With rent being high in the area, you also need

time to find a new roommate. You pack your things into

the car and find yourself in the shelter for the night. You

place all your important belongings into a locker (keys,

phone and wallet …) and hop in the shower. When you

get out you discover that someone has broken the lock and

taken off with your stuff. By the time you get a hold of the

bank, using someone else’s cell phone the next morning,

half your income is gone. Just like that, what would have

been a couple of weeks on and off the streets has become

several months. You’re homeless. An easy hole to fall in,

but a hard one to dig out of.

Homelessness can be a long journey coupled with a

feeling of invisibility. Getting out is an uphill battle against

prejudice, poverty, abuse and loneliness. Pierce County,

however, is determined to make progress toward health,

and sustainable living. By the end of 2021, Pierce County’s

goal is to end homelessness.

The first order of business in combating homelessness in

the area is to understand the structures and situations that

contribute to it. To provide this much-needed information,

Pierce County has developed the “point-in-time” count.

The point-in-time count is “a one-day snapshot that

captures the characteristics and situations of people living

here without a home.” In other words, Pierce County

workers are not attempting to solve homelessness from an

office. They are actually getting up and getting out to count

and converse with the homeless in our community.

The most recent point-in-time count surveys the situations

of 1,897 people experiencing homelessness. Of those 1,897,

47 percent have at least one source of income; 22 percent

are chronically homeless; 36 percent female; 6 percent

22 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 23


24 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


are unaccompanied youth; 8 percent are veterans; and 16 percent are

adult survivors of domestic violence. Also, even though people of color

make up only 27 percent of our population, they make up 47 percent

of our people experiencing homelessness. Surprisingly, not everyone

sleeps outside. Forty-six percent sleep in shelter, with 31 percent in a

car or abandoned building, and 9 percent in transitional housing; 17

percent live in a tent or on the street. Contrary to popular knowledge,

the majority of people experiencing homelessness lived in Pierce County

before becoming homeless, with the rest of the majority living within

Washington. Only 6 percent surveyed lived outside of Washington before

becoming homeless; meaning that homelessness is our problem, in our

community, rather than a far-off problem meant to be solved elsewhere.

Pierce County doesn’t just cover Tacoma, there are also cities such as

Graham, University

Place, Lakewood,

Steilacoom and Gig

Harbor. And there are THE WORK

unincorporated areas

such as Parkland and

Spanaway. Without IS PLENTY,

volunteers that branch

out in these areas, the

point-in-time count

BUT THE

is restricted to one

localized demographic.

In 2019, Gig Harbor

VOLUNTEERS

and the greater Key

Peninsula participated

in the point-in-time

ARE FEW.

count for the first time.

Previously, the number

for people experiencing

homelessness in the Key

Peninsula was 1.5, which is far from accurate. After the point-in-time

count, they updated that number to 49. Lakewood joined the pointin-time

count in 2016, adding their input and resources. The data of

unincorporated areas are often lumped in with the greater Pierce County.

While the PIT count fluctuates, and in 2020 in-person counts were

severely restricted, having a general understanding of homelessness is

intrinsically valuable. The results of the Key Peninsula PIT echo those

that are mirrored in the larger Pierce County, but it is also invaluable

for bringing Gig Harbor into the conversation. The assumption that

higher income areas, such as Gig Harbor and Steilacoom, are devoid of

homelessness is inaccurate. If anything, higher income areas struggle

to a greater percentage, when compared to their smaller population.

Tacoma may be at the forefront of the homeless discussion, but they

are not the only participants. Areas such as Lakewood experience a

huge income gap, with the levels of poverty (16 percent) matching

that of the above-average incomes. This is not necessarily a surprise, as

Lakewood is newly incorporated. They are currently addressing issues of

accessibility by providing infrastructure to encourage a city center and

a sense of community. They are also addressing issues that exist in the

lower income areas, such as homelessness. Unincorporated areas such

as Parkland also reside in Pierce County, with high levels of poverty and

homelessness. Unfortunately, the work is plenty, but the volunteers are

few. Since the pandemic interrupted the normal point-in-time process,

the current count is estimated to be much higher.

To address these issues, Pierce County has formed a coalition made

up of over 200 members. The Tacoma Pierce County Coalition to

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 25


End Homelessness is further subdivided into 13 action

committees that are meant to address issues head-on.

The committees establish housing, steering (support),

safe encampments and employment opportunities.

Essentially, the coalition is a team made up of faith-based

organizations, nonprofits and city resources (including

the police department and social services). “We feel that

any communication between nonprofits, government

representatives and community leaders is positive,” says

Daniel Johnson of Harbor Hope Center. The Harbor Hope

Center helps teens that are experiencing homelessness in

our community, but they are also actively involved in the

dangers of Fentanyl that specifically affect the area. Harbor

Hope Center continues to increase their involvement

with drug counselors as a result. On-the-ground firsthand

knowledge, such as what Harbor Hope Center offers, is

exactly why the Coalition to End Homelessness was formed.

No one understands the challenges that our communities

face more than those who experience it and see it.

The Pierce County Coalition uses the information from

their members to address issues pertaining to housing

inequalities, income gaps, shelter stability, health equality

and more. Members of the coalition break into smaller

groups to individually address each issue, at times lobbying

at the state level for affordable housing rights. Individually,

each nonprofit and city represents their individual sector

and experience. Together, they combine their knowledge,

and give weight to issues addressing our communities. For

instance, according to new state law, landlords must give

tenants 20-day notice for eviction. One of the committees

in the coalition ensures that Pierce County is in compliance

with this law.

The issue may be vast, but the resources are broad. What’s

more, now these resources are unified, accessible, and ready

to go. Ending homelessness has gone from being a lofty ideal

to being a real goal. Through the power of unity, we can end

homelessness in Pierce County.

26 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Q&A

DL FOWLER

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28 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 29


“I RECENTLY RECEIVED A CREATIVE

ENDEAVOR GRANT FROM THE CITY

OF GIG HARBOR ARTS COMMISSION

TO PRODUCE A SERIES OF POETRY

EVENTS DURING THE LATE SUMMER

AND FALL OF THIS YEAR. I LIKE

TO PROMOTE OUR LOCAL POETS

BECAUSE I FIND EXERCISING MY

POETRY MUSCLES MAKES ME A

BETTER NOVELIST.”

30 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


DL Fowler is an award-winning

author who is known locally as “the

Lincoln Guy” for his writings on

President Abraham Lincoln. He and his wife

Judi settled in the Pacific Northwest over 40

years ago. In 2008 they moved to Gig Harbor

to be closer to their daughter and her family.

He spends his time writing and supporting

the local writers’ community. Fowler taught

creative writing classes at the Tacoma

Community College Continuing Education

program. With the COVID-19 pandemic

affecting everyone, he partnered with Gary

Parker, owner of BBQ2U and the subject of

our March 2021 cover, to bring authors and

the public together in a COVID-safe setting.

It gave authors a place to sell and autograph

books, and helped make up for canceled

book signing events and festivals.

Fowler and his wife support the Peninsula

Youth Orchestra of Gig Harbor. “It is a

treasure for the community, especially

families who want to give their children an

opportunity to develop musically, regardless

of skill,” he said.

Q. You are known as “the Lincoln Guy.” Why

President Abraham Lincoln? What did you find

so intriguing about him?

A. I was drawn to Lincoln as a Boy Scout. I lived

in a community in Southern California that hosted

a pilgrimage each year, drawing youth from all

over the region. I began writing about his life

when I discovered he struggled with depression. In

writing about him in an intimate way, beginning

with his earliest days, I hoped to unlock his secret

to leading a productive life despite emotional

baggage. I found his example not only instructive,

but highly motivational.

Q. You attended the prestigious Defense

Language Institute in Monterey, California,

to learn Bulgarian and served in the Air Force

during the 1970s and the Cold War. What was it

like studying such a difficult language to learn

as an adult? Did your service in the military

influence any of your writing?

A. Yes, DLI was founded in 1963. I don’t know

why, since I struggled with languages in college, but

I didn’t find learning Bulgarian to be difficult. That

probably was because of the immersion experience.

Our instructors were lifelong native speakers, and

for a whole year the language was our entire focus.

We attended language class all day, five days a

week. We had daily homework assignments that

involved listening to hours of recordings. I had no

previous exposure to the language, but at the end

of the year I received the Maxwell Taylor Award as

the top student for all languages and all branches of

service: Air Force, Army, Navy and Marines.

I think my time at DLI and my service as a

translator at NSA helped me with my writing. I had

also studied Spanish in high school and college,

and German for a semester of college—I was a

disaster at German. That exposure to different

sentence structures and nuances in the meanings

of words has helped me find ways to use language

to evoke a variety of emotions in readers.

Q. Your book “Ripples” is a complete departure

from your previous books of historical fiction.

What sparked your interest in writing a

psychological thriller?

A. For me, “Ripples” was more of a writing

exercise than an attempt to create a novel. I was

experimenting with different approaches to

giving readers visceral experiences that mirrored

characters’ emotions. Of course, I had to put it out in

the world to see how readers reacted, but the novel

makes me uncomfortable, so it’s a hard book for me

to market. The story is about six different people’s

experiences with home or lack of home.

Q. Can you share with our readers how you

use your writings on Abraham Lincoln to help

veterans who are suffering from PTSD and

depression?

A. There is a myth that Lincoln overcame a great

deal of failure in his life. While that is not true,

he was a highly sensitive individual who suffered

many tragedies and emotional traumas. There is a

part in “Lincoln Raw” where I describe the medical

treatment he endured for his “melancholy.” It was so

horrific he swore he’d never do it again, though his

depression continued. Another doctor helped him

identify triggers that incited his attacks and offered

strategies for dealing with those triggers. That could

be one of the most valuable models we can take

away from Lincoln’s life.

Q. What are you working on now? Any plans for

dates for your Lincoln Lectures?

A. I recently received a Creative Endeavor Grant

from the City of Gig Harbor Arts Commission to

produce a series of poetry events during the late

summer and fall of this year. I like to promote our

local poets because I find exercising my poetry

muscles makes me a better novelist.

My current writing project is about an Army

nurse who cared for the Lincoln family after

Willie Lincoln’s death. According to Lincoln’s

own testimony, and that of Mrs. Lincoln, Rebecca

Pomroy was one of the most important people in

the family’s support system during the most crucial

period of Lincoln’s presidency.

As for the Lincoln Lectures, we discontinued them

during COVID, mostly because I am terrible at

hosting Zoom events. Once things are fully open,

we’ll take a look at resuming the series.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 31


Arts

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32 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 33


It was 1997, and the newly formed Asia Pacific Cultural Center

was looking at a dilemma faced by many nonprofits just

starting out. It needed money. So, the organization turned to

what they knew well: celebrating culture. After some spirited

brainstorming, the Samoan leaders in the group suggested a

ticketed Luau.

That year the event was held at the South End Neighborhood Center

and raised a much-needed $5,000. It also started a wonderful

tradition that 24 years later is APCC’s largest annual fundraiser.

The 24th Annual Asia Pacific Cultural Center Polynesian Luau is

scheduled for Saturday, August 28, from 3 to 6pm at the beautiful

park grounds surrounding their location on South Tacoma Way.

The Luau, an ancient Polynesian ritual, is a popular social gathering

meant to unite the people of a village or town in celebration of a

significant life event, achievement, war victory, or launching of a

new canoe. In 2021 at APCC, it will be the celebration of the return

to normal in our town. And what a celebration it will be!

The APCC annual Luau is a chance to showcase the various cultures

that make up the “Pacific” in Asia Pacific Cultural Center’s name.

Performances include dancers from traditional Luau areas like

Hawaii, Tonga and Samoa, as well as some you may not think about

including Guam, Fiji, Tahiti and New Zealand. The highlight of the

day features authentic Fire Knife Dancers to close out the event.

Many Pacific Island cultures celebrate with Luaus. While the food

served may vary from culture to culture, the passion and love for

the event does not … Everyone loves a Luau! The APCC Luau will

feature a delicious island menu of Roasted Pig, Sapa Sui-Chop Suey,

Coconut Salmon, Teriyaki Chicken, Island Salad, and a variety of

tropical fruit.

34 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Don’t stress about what to wear. Polynesian print shirts for men and floral dresses for

women are the easiest and most comfortable choices. When paired with khaki shorts or

slacks, the aloha shirt goes from casual to dressy. Women can choose to wear a beautiful

flower in their hair over the ear—but remember, married ladies wear it over the left ear

and single women over the right.

Fun door prizes will be awarded throughout the event including a voucher for a roundtrip

airline ticket on Alaska Air. To register for door prizes in advance, attendees are

encouraged to register at Bit.ly/apccluaudoorprize2021. Local vendors with traditional

island wear, crafts, jewelry, food and more will be showcased at the event, giving it a

festival atmosphere.

According to Faaluaina Pritchard, executive director of Asia Pacific Cultural Center,

“This is the event of the year that all our members look forward to.” She added, “Not

being able to see everyone in person last year makes the 2021 event even more special.

Now we can enjoy the day in each other’s company.”

To learn more about the delicious food, fun prizes and the lineup of presentations featured

during the 24th Annual APCC Polynesian Luau, please visit the APCC Facebook Page at

Facebook.com/AsiaPacificCulturalCenter.

Purchase tickets online at Bit.ly/apccluautickets2021 or call APCC at 253.383.3900.

Tickets are $50 per person; $500 for a table of 10 seats; children ages 4 to 11 are $12.50,

and children 3 and younger are free.

Can’t make the event in person? Then watch as it unfolds on APCC’s Facebook Live page

or through their YouTube channel that day.

Asia Pacific Cultural Center is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization formed in 1996 with

the mission to bridge communities and generations through art, culture, education and

business. It serves as an interactive cultural crossroads between local and international

communities. For more information about APCC, visit their website at APCC96.org.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 35


Health

BOTOX ®

The miracle treatment for wrinkles

BY BRI WILLIAMS, RN, BSN

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons,

over 2 million Botox® treatments were carried out in

2019, and that number has continued to rise. Considered

the most common cosmetic intervention, and with good reason,

this miracle treatment can take years off your appearance and

prevent the signs of aging in a quick (we’re talking five-minute)

appointment. With FDA approval to treat moderate to severe

wrinkles in the frown lines, crow’s feet and forehead lines, and a 92

percent “worth it” rating from consumers, this treatment may be

just what you are looking for to age gracefully and look as young as

you feel. Below we break down your most common questions.

What is Botox®?

Botox® is a safe, purified, FDA-approved protein that relaxes and

softens the muscles responsible for causing frown lines, creases

between the brows, around the eyes (crow’s feet), and worry lines

in the forehead. Years of muscle use in our faces—from smiling,

squinting, stressing—create what begin as fine lines, and deepen

over time. Botox® can heal that dermal cracking or can be used

preventatively to help deter their deepening.

How much does Botox® cost?

Botox® pricing varies from clinic and region, and your total price

depends on what areas you are treating and the number of units

each individual needs. To treat the area in between the eyebrows

(a.k.a. frown lines) is typically $240 to $300; the forehead is typically

$150 to $180; and crow’s feet are typically $300 to $450. It is best to

schedule a consultation with your aesthetic provider to determine

the appropriate dosing and cost for your individualized treatment.

How long does Botox® last?

You can expect to notice a more youthful, relaxed appearance within

two to 14 days, and results last three to four months. Some clients

find that with consistent treatments they get longer-lasting results.

How long will my appointment take?

Botox® appointments are quick and easy. Your initial appointment

will take approximately 30 minutes to review medical forms, discuss

your goals with your provider, and develop a treatment plan. After

your first visit, your subsequent visits are generally quick and take

only a few minutes.

Does Botox® hurt?

Most patients describe Botox as painless. A very tiny needle is used

to inject Botox® in strategic muscles on the face, and techniques

are used to make the treatment comfortable. If you are concerned

about pain or discomfort, talk to your provider prior to treatment

to discuss pain relieving modalities such as topical numbing cream

and/or ice.

Is there any downtime or recovery?

Botox® is generally considered a “no social downtime” treatment.

Most patients leave their appointment with small pink bumps where

Botox was injected, and these generally subside in 15 minutes.

Bruising is a possibility. Patients are asked to avoid vigorous exercise

and facial massage for 24 hours after treatment.

When should I start Botox®?

There is not a set age when one should start Botox®. Once you notice

static lines (the lines that appear on the face at rest), you can begin to

speak to your aesthetic provider about treatment to soften the lines

and prevent them from getting worse. When treatment is started

early, the static lines can often be reversed. After they have been

present for years, they can be more difficult to diminish.

Botox® is an excellent treatment option for individuals wanting

to prevent or reverse the signs of aging. Talk with your aesthetic

provider to see if Botox® is right for you.

36 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 37


Health

KEEP COOL!

As the temperatures rise, protect yourself against heat exhaustion

BY MISSI BALISON

Summer is in full swing, and as the summers here are short,

you’ll want to get outside and enjoy as much of it as you can!

But when you are out hiking, gardening, biking, or out doing any

of the amazing things the Pacific Northwest has to offer, you want

to be careful that you don’t succumb to heat illness.

A heat illness happens when your body is unable to dissipate heat

effectively, the balance of salt and water in your body becomes

unbalanced, and your temperature rises. Sweating fails to keep

you cool.

HEAT EXHAUSTION

Heat exhaustion is the body’s response to a high loss of the water

and salt, usually through excessive sweating. Often those most

prone to heat exhaustion are those who are elderly, have high blood

pressure, and those working or exercising in a hot environment.

It can be easy to step into heat exhaustion when you’re out and

about having a good time or focused on a project in the yard. Be

sure to pay attention to the symptoms before they sneak up on you.

SYMPTOMS OF HEAT EXHAUSTION INCLUDE:

• Headache

• Nausea

• Dizziness

• Weakness

• Irritability

• Thirst

• Heavy sweating

• Elevated body temperature

• Decreased urine output

WHAT TO DO:

• If medical care is unavailable, call 911.

• Remove yourself from the hot area and get liquids to drink.

• Remove unnecessary clothing, including shoes and socks.

• Cool yourself with cold compresses or wash your head, face and

neck with cold water.

• Take frequent sips of cool water.

Heat stroke is the most serious of heat injuries, so you definitely

don’t want to take symptoms of heat stroke lightly. The main

problem with heat stroke is that your organs can be damaged by

prolonged high body temperatures.

SIGNS OF HEAT STROKE:

• High body temperature

• Altered mental state or behavior (Confusion, agitation, slurred

speech, irritability, delirium, seizures and coma can all result from

heatstroke.)

• Nausea or vomiting

• Flushed skin

• Rapid breathing

• Headache

• Altered sweating (Skin may be hot and dry to the touch, or you

may start sweating abnormal amounts.)

WHAT TO DO:

• Find a shady spot.

• Remove excess clothing.

• Place cold rags in these areas: back of neck, groin, armpits. And

if you have access to a hose or cold packs, use those to cool down.

• Find a fan or breeze to help your body cool off.

• When feeling cooled off, head to a clinic or emergency room for

medical evaluation and treatment.

Get out there and enjoy this beautiful weather—but it is imperative

that you keep an eye on things and listen to your body.

Missi Balison is a personal trainer, exercise physiologist and Certified

Precision Nutrition coach.

Be careful that you don’t succumb to heat illness.

38 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 39


40

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


pinpoint

TACOMA, WA

PARTNERING FOR HEALING

and a

HEALTHY FUTURE

Community-based nonprofit health care

system with a passion to serve

BY JILLIAN CHANDLER

It was 1882 when Tacoma’s first hospital opened its doors to the

community. Fannie C Paddock Memorial Hospital was named in

honor of Frances “Fannie” C Paddock, the wife of Reverend John

Adams Paddock, who was appointed the first Protestant Episcopal

missionary bishop of Washington Territory, and commissioned to move to

Tacoma. While preparing for their move across country to their new home,

the couple learned of the dire health conditions of the region, and Fannie

was determined to raise the funds needed to establish a hospital.

Unfortunately, Fannie would pass away before her vision was realized,

but John would carry out her mission. The Fannie C Paddock Memorial

Hospital opened its doors for care on April 29, 1882, one year to the day

after Fannie’s death.

MultiCare carries out its mission, vision and values with that same passion

for service to community that inspired the Paddocks to bring Tacoma its first

hospital—known today as Tacoma General Hospital.

Caring for communities in Washington state ever since, today MultiCare

is comprised of more than 20,000 team members—including employees,

providers and volunteers.

“We’ve grown from a Tacoma-centric, hospital-based organization into the

largest not-for-profit, community-based, locally owned health system in the

state of Washington,” says William G. “Bill” Robertson, president and CEO

of MultiCare.

With multiple locations throughout Washington state, including Tacoma,

Pierce County and the surrounding Puget Sound region, MultiCare is

overseen by a volunteer board of directors and led by a team of executive

leaders, including Bill Robertson and Florence Chang, executive vice

president and chief operating officer.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 41


MultiCare’s network of care includes 11 hospitals:

• MultiCare Allenmore Hospital, Tacoma

• MultiCare Auburn Medical Center, Auburn

• MultiCare Capital Medical Center, Olympia

• MultiCare Covington Medical Center, Covington

• MultiCare Deaconess Hospital, Spokane

• MultiCare Good Samaritan Hospital, Puyallup

• Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital, Tacoma

(the region’s only children’s hospital and statedesignated

Level II Pediatric Trauma Center for

Western Washington)

• MultiCare Tacoma General Hospital, Tacoma

(home to the Puget Sound Region’s only Level IV

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit)

• MultiCare Valley Hospital, Spokane Valley

• Navos Behavioral Health Hospital, West Seattle

(independently operated affiliate)

• Wellfound Behavioral Health Hospital, Tacoma

(independently operated joint venture of

MultiCare and Virginia Mason Franciscan Health)

“The communities we serve are also where we live,

work and raise our families. We understand the needs

of our region because this is where we are from,” shares

Robertson. “MultiCare has been here for nearly 140

years, and we remain fully committed to serving our

western Washington communities and to supporting

our valued employees and providers here in the Puget

Sound region.”

MultiCare’s steadfast commitment to being the Pacific

Northwest’s highest value system of health, as well as its

dedication to their mission of “Partnering for healing

and a healthy future,” are the driving force behind their

service to their patients and community.

“Our incredible all-volunteer system board and our

executive leadership team bring knowledge, experience

and a deep belief in the importance of accessible health

care for all communities to the work that they do every

day to steer our organization toward success,” affirms

Robertson.

The organization looks to partner with like-minded

groups in improving the health and wellness of this

region—beyond the delivery of exceptional health

care. MultiCare has a long history of involvement in

the community, and has partnered with and supported

numerous organizations also working to improve the

lives of the people within our communities, including

Habitat for Humanity, the American Heart Association,

the United Way, Hilltop Artists and the Crystal Judson

Family Justice Center.

MultiCare team members also engage in a wide range

of volunteer activities that benefit the communities they

serve. In 2019, MultiCare employees contributed an

estimated 28,000 hours to volunteer and/or community

service activities.

MULTICARE HEALTH SYSTEM

820 A STREET, TACOMA, WA 98402

253.403.1000

MULTICARE.ORG

“MultiCare will continue to expand care to the

communities it serves,” says Robertson, “ensuring

primary, emergency and specialty care is easily

accessible to all.”

42 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


WE HAVE ROBOTIC-ASSISTED SURGERY

THAT CAN STRAIGHTEN THE SPINES

OF SCOLIOSIS PATIENTS WITH MORE

ACCURACY AND REDUCED RISK.

WE ALSO SERVE FREE SANDWICHES.

Robotic-assisted surgery

Free lunch program

It’s called the Mazor Robotics Renaissance Guidance System, and MultiCare has the only children’s hospital in the

PNW that offers it. It’s amazing technology that can improve safety, decrease complications and reduce recovery times.

What it can’t do is solve food insecurity. Which is why, along with offering advanced health care, we also provide free

lunches to school kids. Because healthy communities need more than health care. See how we’re supporting communities

at MultiCareCommunity.org.

We’re here for you.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 43


Feature

LOCALS ANSWER THE CALL TO SAVE

OUR WATERWAYS

SMALL ACTIONS EFFECT CHANGE IN OUR GREATER WORLD

BY RACHEL KELLY

There are some things that we can’t do alone. There

are some things that we were made to face together,

as a community, as a state, or as a people. Things

like raising our families, or building safe neighborhoods,

we face together. There are some problems that require

a whole world to come together to ensure success. Large

problems usually involve a lot of people, and it takes a lot

of people to solve them. Problems like global pollution and

global warming are big problems. Problems that we can’t

solve on our own. But together, united by our common

humanity, we can.

“It’s important to think about the way we live and its impact

on the planet,” says Tara Galuska of the Washington Fish

and Wildlife. And there are many such impacts. We can

see those impacts locally, on our beaches and especially in

our waterways. We can see the impacts we have on rivers

through the salmon and the residents they support, such

as bears. Another such resident is the Southern Orca,

resident of the Puget Sound and Canada, which survives

off of Chinook salmon. Salmon, in turn, survives off of

krill. Krill survives off phytoplankton. There is currently

estimated to be only 75 Southern Orca left in the whole

swath of salt water that exists from the Washington Sound

up to the Strait of San Juan de Fuca. Their low numbers,

coupled with their dependence on the health of the local

waters, makes them an endangered species.

The declining numbers of Southern Orca illustrates the

circular pattern of the effects of our actions on the world,

beginning with the global rise in temperatures. Scientists

believe this is due to an increase in atmospheric carbon

dioxide. There is still a lot of research being done on exactly

why this is happening, but it is apparent that our world

is changing. This change is affecting our local residents,

animals and humans alike. According to the Southern

Resident Orca Task Force, the carbon dioxide in the

atmosphere has stayed below 300 parts per million prior

to 1950. Since then, our carbon dioxide has increased to

405 parts per million. This has caused a one-degree Celsius

increase in global temperatures since pre-industrial levels,

suggesting that industrialization and pollution plays a part

in the health of our Earth.

Twenty-five percent of the carbon dioxide in the

atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean, causing an increase

in ocean acidification. Algae, often seen in freshwater

ponds, lakes and basins across Washington and Idaho,

grows plentiful in order to consume the carbon dioxide

and produce oxygen. The ocean’s acidification makes an

inhospitable environment to most species aside from

algae, which adapts to grow in the ocean. Like a fail safe

for an imbalance in the atmosphere, algae grow wild, fed

by an overproduction of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide

is often present due to various levels of pollution, from

44

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 45


untreated sewage to various inhospitable factories.

Unfortunately, large amounts of algae are toxic to all

fresh and saltwater species.

The one-degree Celsius rise in global temperatures

also affects our streams and lakes, as snow melt

decreases every year. The re-circulated warm

water makes for warmer winter lakes and rivers,

and dryer summer river beds. Occasionally, a rise

in warm winter waters causes an overabundance

of rain versus snow, increasing sediment flow

and mudslides. The increased rain also runs into

our drains, occasionally overwhelming our water

treatment plants. Which means that sewage dumps

into our ocean. More algae grows.

According to scientifically backed collected data

of Washington Fish and Wildlife, major effects

from climate change will be seen as soon as 2030.

If conditions continue as they have been, 2030

through 2052 will see a 1.5-degree Celsius increase,

which will result in the following conditions: a 67

percent increase in days over 90 degrees, 38 percent

decrease in snowpack, 16 percent increase in winter

streamflow, and a 23 percent decrease in summer

streamflow. To lower these temperatures, and to

decrease their overall effects, we must cut our

carbon emissions by 45 percent by 2030.

Our changing rivers affect salmon, who spawn

in rivers in the spring. They lay their eggs in the

gravel, from which alevins emerge one to three

months after spawning. Fry then grow from alevins,

then develop into smolt. Smolt then migrate to the

ocean, where they grow into adults and live for up

to four years. All the combined effects of pollution

and carbon dioxide disturb the breeding grounds

of our salmon at all their various developmental

levels. Increased flooding impacts the salmon eggs

and alevins. Reduced spring flows affect the fry and

smolt. The increased algae in our oceans kill the

zooplankton on which the herring and other fish

feed, in turn on which the salmon feed. Salmon is

considered a keystone species, meaning that they

are essential for the survival of a variety of wildlife.

As their rate of survival drops, the underlying food

According to

scientifically backed

collected data of

Washington Fish and

Wildlife, major effects

from climate change

will be seen as soon

as 2030.

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web becomes unstable. This is why the Orca are

showing up less and less in Pacific Northwest waters,

and why the health of our fresh water suffers. When

salmon suffer, we all suffer. And so, our actions come

full circle.

Our seemingly small actions that we, as a people,

do on the daily affect the greater world. Trash from

our picnics on the beach, the chemicals that we use

in our cleaners, the medications that we dispose

of, waste water, improper drainage and everyday

food waste all play a part in pollution. Individually,

our actions are small. But together, they have a

big impact. Everything eventually ends up in our

waterways, and in turn runs into the oceans. Our

Earth is a complicated web of interconnected pieces,

of which we are also a part of.

“What we do as an individual and as a society to

reduce global warming and to improve water quality

for these majestic creatures also supports a better

ecosystem for humans,” says Tara. This means that

any movement toward change is a win-win.

The Orca are especially sensitive to any environmental

changes, as are all endangered species, which is why

their numbers have been in steady decline in our

waterways. Individuals on land and water play a large

part in our Earth’s health, but so do large companies

whose ships produce a lot of emissions. Noting the

sensitivity that Orca and other wildlife have toward

our actions in the water, TOTE Maritime Alaska

is one company that has decided to do something

about it.

Alaskan fishermen have long begun their spring

season in the southern part of Washington’s Puget

Sound, and still leave every year to fish for the

summer season. As the polar ice melts, and less and

less re-freezes every winter, fishermen and shipping

companies are able to go further and further north.

Many ships and fishermen are advised to be whale

wise as they expand their reach into the northern

waters. Ships are advised to keep their distance

from whales, and to steer away from fishing in their

feeding waters. There are even flags that local ships

hoist to alert other ships and boats as to the presence

of whales. In 2010, the coastal waters of North

America were deemed emission control areas. Most

companies simply adhere to the bare minimum,

adhering to the emission controls and occasionally

following Whale Wise protocol.

TOTE Maritime Alaska is one such company that

moves up and down the northern seas. The leader in

the industry in environmental practices, they chose

to respond to the emission controls in a way that went

above the bar for the safety of our coastal species.

TOTE Maritime Alaska invested in liquified natural

gas. In partnership with Puget Sound Energy, which

is known for their groundbreaking and accessible

environmental activism, TOTE Maritime Alaska

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outfitted its Orca class vessels to run on liquified natural gas. Liquified natural gas decreases particulate matter by 99 percent,

vessel sulfur emissions by 98 percent, and nitrogen oxides by 91 percent. These numbers are groundbreaking. Through decreasing

the waste that ships normally dump into the waters, TOTE Maritime has made some of the most environmentally friendly ships

in the world, showing the world once again just how unique the Pacific Northwest is.

It is actions such as these that greatly affect our waters and the sensitive wildlife that live in it. Large companies, such as shipping

and fishing companies, play a direct part in keeping our waterways clean by the ways that they choose to conduct business. TOTE

Maritime Alaska is especially inspirational in their refusal to go along with the status quo, and the hope is that other companies

will follow suit. In the face of such incredible effort, we must do the same. We must allow ourselves the flexibility of positive change.

Maybe not all at once, but perhaps little by little. Even the smallest steps can have a big impact. Especially when they inspire others

to make steps as well. Little by little, greater change happens. There’s no better example of what a community can do when it comes

together than what we see here, in the Pacific Northwest.

50 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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“PERHAPS IN OUR OWN SMALL WAY

WE WILL INSPIRE OTHERS TO GO

UPSTREAM AGAINST APATHY. IT IS IN

THESE SEEMINGLY SMALL EVERYDAY

ACTS THAT WE MAKE BIG CHANGES,

FIRST CHANGING OURSELVES UNTIL

WE HAVE ALL CHANGED TOGETHER.

We can and do reduce the waste that goes in our waterways, by

participating in the reduction of litter or washing our cars in

professional car washes (that have proper disposal techniques).

We can also conserve the water that we use, treating it as the

precious resource that it is. We can reduce our carbon footprint

by reducing our car use, from riding bikes to riding public

transport. We can implement the wise use of our resources,

reducing food waste by planning ahead and composting. Using

products with fewer chemicals not only betters our overall health

but benefits the health of our world.

Individually we are small people, with a small impact. We live

as people of character by our individual everyday decisions.

Together we live as part of a delicate web called “community,”

where each impacts the other. As such, our daily decisions of

character make small dents in what our world looks like as a

whole. Perhaps in our own small way we will inspire others to go

upstream against apathy. It is in these seemingly small everyday

acts that we make big changes, first changing ourselves until we

have all changed together.

Global impact comes full circle, into our backyards. Into the

realm of personal responsibility. As much as we want to pretend

that global problems are beyond our reach, it’s the quality of our

local watershed and the health of our resident species that speak

to just how much we are doing to preserve its health. When it

comes to saving our waterways, we must answer the call to

responsible living. Just like TOTE Maritime Alaska is doing. Just

like the Southern Resident Orca Task Force. Just like us, who

choose to not go it alone.

It is in this fearless spirit of innovation that we discover that the

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52 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

August 2021

SEE WHAT’S HAPPENING

54

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 55


RUN THE BRIDGE

GALLOPING GERTIE OFFERS THREE DISTANCES

By Colin Anderson

Runners of all skill levels can once again enjoy one of the area’s favorite and most scenic runs. Registration for the annual Galloping Gertie is

currently open, and organizers are hoping for another great turnout after missing out on the run in 2020.

The race, whose namesake comes from the dubious nickname of the previous Tacoma Narrows Bridge that collapsed back in November of 1940,

will traverse across the newest section of bridge, the eastbound, which opened back in 2007. No matter if you choose the half marathon, 10k, or 5k,

each run will send you across the iconic bridge that holds spectacular views of the Puget Sound, Olympics and Mount Rainier.

The starting line for all three distances is the Tacoma Narrows Airport. The 5k course will depart from the airport, catch Stone Drive and then

move onto the bridge. Runners will go about halfway across then turn around and go back the same route. The 10k is a similar route, however,

runners will go all the way across the bridge before their turnaround. The half marathon adds several additional miles, including a pass through

some beautiful old-growth forest. The course is now flatter than in previous years, so faster times can be expected.

The event takes place on Saturday, August 7, which is also when you’ll receive your race packet. Be sure to pick up your bib and packet no later than

7:45am, as the first run goes off at 8am. There are aid stations and porta-potties located along each course, and each participant will receive a tech

race shirt, complimentary downloadable race photos, a finisher’s medal and entrance to the after-party.

You can register in advance at Galloping-Gertie.com. Volunteers are also needed for the event, and you can sign-up at the race homepage as well.

The event is sponsored by the Gig Harbor Rotary, and proceeds from the Galloping Gertie will help fund many community-centric projects like

Food Backpacks 4 Kids, Children’s Home Society and Communities in Schools Peninsula.

56 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


MOVIES UNDER THE STARS

ENTERTAINMENT

/ August

FOR EVENTS, VISIT 253LIFESTYLEMAGAZINE.COM.

6, 13

& 20

14

28

Join Metro Parks Tacoma Friday evenings in August at the SERA Complex

(South End Recreation & Adventure), located at 6002 South Adams Street

in Tacoma, for their Movies Under the Stars. This free summer movies

series invites the community, family and friends to gather under the stars

for these family friendly movies that start at dusk. Be sure to bring a blanket

or chair so you can sit back and relax, along with some movie snacks.

August 6 features Black Panther (rated PG-13); August 13 Coco (rated

PG); with the last movie showing Raya and the Last Dragon (rated PG)

on August 20. For additional information, and for other events happening

courtesy of Metro Parks Tacoma, visit MetroParksTacoma.org.

GRIT CITY TO GO! THE TABLE

Support local farms and businesses! Tacoma Farmers Market invites the

community to participate in their second annual Grit City to Go!, a unique

dining experience utilizing all things local from the food to the chefs—and

the experience! Each standard meal serves four people and comes with a

complimentary bouquet of market flowers. Gather around “The Table” to

support the Tacoma Farmers Market. Experience the flavors of creative,

fresh, handcrafted Pacific Northwest cuisine. The premier option adds

dessert and a signature cocktail to complement the dishes you will dream

about long after the last morsel. The Standard Package is priced $200,

while the Premier Package is $250. Purchase your meal online today at

TacomaFarmersMarket.com/grit-city-to-go. The next Grit City to Go! on

October 3 will feature Tacoma Pie.

24TH ANNUAL POLYNESIAN LUAU

Join Asia Pacific Cultural Center on Saturday, August 28, for the 24th

Annual Polynesian Luau. The fun begins at 3pm for this in-person and

virtual fundraiser—APCC’s only fundraising event of the year! Guests

will hear about the organization and what makes it so special and worth

supporting “with your hearts and with your donations.” Stream the

lively fun and excitement virtually via Facebook Live (Facebook.com/

AsiaPacificCulturalCenter) and YouTube (Bit.ly/apcc96youtube). Guests

will experience in-person live performances, delicious island foods, local

vendors, and a beautiful gathering of family and friends. Please note:

APCC will strictly adhere to the current COVID-19 restrictions of Pierce

County and Washington state. Based on the success of last year’s virtual

program, they will continue to have this event live on their Facebook and

YouTube pages for guests who cannot attend the in-person event. Tickets

are priced $50 each; $12.50 for children 4 to 11.

* Please note, as of press time, these events were still scheduled to take place

as planned. Due to the continuing pandemic, there is the possibility that event

schedules may change or events canceled completely. Be sure to visit event

websites to stay up to date with current information.

SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE!

Want your event to appear on the largest event site in the Northwest?

Submit your events to us online at Events.DirectoryNorthwest.com 24/7, 365 days a year!

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 57


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

Eat & Drink


JALAPEÑO POPPERS

WITH BACON

Recipe Courtesy of Tina VanDenHeuvel

You can follow Tina @madebetterforyou on Instagram

INGREDIENTS:

12 jalapeños

1 8-oz. package bacon, each piece cut into thirds

2 8-oz. blocks of cream cheese, softened

6 oz. Mexican-blend cheese, shredded

2 jalapeños, seeded and diced

1 tbsp. cumin

2 tsp. garlic powder

1/2 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. pepper

METHOD:

• Preheat your oven to 400˚F. Spray a broiler pan, or cover a sheet pan with

aluminum foil, and place a wire rack on top with non-stick cooking spray. Set

it aside for later.

• Start by prepping the jalapeños using a chef’s knife to cut off the stems, and

cut the jalapeños in half lengthwise. Then, use a spoon to scrape out all the

seeds and the white membrane inside the pepper. You can discard the seeds

once you’re done or keep a few to add to the cream cheese mixture if you

like it extra hot.

• In a medium-size mixing bowl, mix together the cream cheese, cheese,

jalapeños and seasonings. Fill each jalapeño with the mix.

• Cut bacon strips into thirds and lay a piece on top of the cream cheese mix.

Once you have filled and topped all the jalapeños with bacon, place them in

the oven and bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until bacon is done.

• Let cool before serving. Enjoy!

Yields 24 poppers

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 59


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253

LIFESTYLE

LIFESTYLE

MAGAZINE

MAGAZINE


Travel

ENJOY A VIBRANT DOWNTOWN,

RIVERWALK AND WORLD-CLASS BEACHES

CHARMING WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA

BY MARGUERITE CLEVELAND

Wilmington, North Carolina, is less known as a destination than its more famous Southern neighbors

Charleston, South Carolina, and Savannah, Georgia, and that is its charm. You won’t find the hordes of

tourists; only those in the know about this vibrant city on the banks of the Cape Fear River. Just a short

drive from downtown Wilmington you will find some great beaches, each with its own unique vibe.

WHERE TO STAY

Downtown has a variety of places to stay, but you can’t beat the Front Street Inn for its location. It is just a short walk

to the shops, restaurants and lively nightlife that abounds downtown. This cute Inn has onsite parking—a plus when

downtown. There are a variety of rooms, and some are on the smaller size, but there are public spaces you can utilize.

This is an historic hotel, so you won’t have all the amenities of a large chain hotel, but its charm and location more than

make up for it. Breakfast is included in the morning.

Another option is the Hampton Inn Wilmington-University Area/Smith Creek Station, which has a great location that

is close to both downtown and the beaches. Rates include breakfast.

WHERE TO EAT

Wilmington has an eclectic dining scene, with a bounty of local seafood and area farms providing fresh produce to the

city’s restaurants. There is also the Gullah Geechee influence from the Africans who were enslaved in the area. If you

are new to Southern dining, make sure to try Pimento Cheese. This yummy spread is now featured on many menus as

a starter and is served with crisp lavash crackers. The local oysters are so good they even have their own trail. Shrimp

and Grits are a staple of low-country cuisine, and just about every restaurant you go to has its own recipe.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 61


PinPoint Restaurant is located downtown and is the epitome of farm to

table with the freshest bounty from local farmers, fishermen, oystermen and

shrimpers. Their names are on the menu. Speaking of menus, it changes every

day to reflect what fresh ingredients are available. You will find a catch of the

day, chicken, beef and pork dishes, as well as a vegetarian entrée. Each one is

prepared utilizing the fresh produce and herbs. On the menu during my visit

was hogfish, which must be spear caught. It eats crustaceans, so the meat has a

sweet richness to it. Local Carrots was the name of a shareable plate layered with

purple carrot hummus, topped with a variety of carrots, herbs and seasoning. It

is a unique dish and highlights the types of food the chef makes.

The Pilot House is one of the oldest restaurants in the downtown area and has

a huge local following. Located overlooking the Cape Fear River, it is a lovely

venue to dine at. The menu is heavy on fresh seafood and traditional Southern

dishes, but the chef ’s not afraid to be creative. For example, the Shrimp and

Grits include collard greens, and to keep it from becoming a soupy mess, a

fried grits cake is the base of this dish. It soaks up the jus from the greens, and

with the shrimp and other ingredients is such a unique take on this traditional

Southern recipe.

Out on the boardwalk at Carolina Beach, make sure to stop at Britt’s Donuts.

It has been a beach staple since 1939. The donuts are simple yeast donuts with

a glaze that is not too sweet. They sell so many that your order is hot from the

fryer. So yummy! Also in this area is the Fat Pelican, one of the diviest dive bars

in the United States. This place is wild at night, but if you stop in when they first

open, you will have the place to yourself. It is known for its huge walk-in cooler.

You go in and choose your beverage from canned beers and other alcoholic

beverages, and the bartender will ring you up.

WHAT TO DO

Wilmington, with its surrounding beaches, provides a plethora of things to

do. Explore the downtown area and visit the many local shops, restaurants

and museums. The newly revitalized Riverwalk is a lovely place to stroll with

cute little pocket gardens and views of the Cape Fear River. A one-hour river

cruise on the Henrietta is a great way to learn a bit about the history of the area

and some fun, local anecdotes. A must stop is Cape Fear Rum Cakes on Front

Street. This family owned business is kicking out some seriously good cakes.

The rum keeps them moist and helps preserve the cakes in a vacuum seal for

six months. There are three sizes available, and the 5-ounce size is enough for

one to two people and makes a perfect gift. Nothing on the shelves is older than

a day or two because they are selling as fast as they make them.

Plan to spend a full day out at the Fort Fisher area. In the morning, do a beach

hike along the Basin Trail with views of the ocean before it gets too hot. Then

tour the North Carolina Aquariums with its state-of-the-art exhibits. The otters

are always popular, as well as the sharks in the big tank. Don’t miss the outside

trails with some beautiful artwork. For lunch, either pack a picnic or dine at

62 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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64 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


the café at the aquarium. After lunch, explore the Fort Fisher Museum and learn about this Civil War site. Then walk around the outside

exhibits to see the remnants of the fort.

A beach day is a must while visiting this area. Kure Beach is a quieter beach popular with retirees and families. Wrightsville Beach is bustling

and more of a challenge to find parking. At Carolina Beach, you will find the boardwalk with lots of shops and amusement park rides. There

is really something for everyone. Each beach also has fishing piers where you can rent fishing equipment.

Insider Tip: Make sure to read the parking signs. The side street parking by shops and restaurants is usually two hours and turns over more

frequently. The lots have all-day parking options. All parking is fee based. You can download an app to make the process easier. Some parking

meters have swipers for credit cards.

Airlie Gardens is a beautifully landscaped coastal south garden with 67 acres of formal gardens and walking paths. The crown jewel of the

gardens is the Airlie Oak, which is a Southern Live Oak tree almost 500 years old. It sits amidst an expansive lawn surrounded by azalea

bushes. Pick up a self-guided walking tour brochure at the entrance. Explore more than a dozen gardens including the Pergola, Minnie Evans

Bottle Chapel, a seasonal butterfly house and much more.

With its revitalized downtown, Riverwalk, and charming walkable historic district, as well as the spectacular beaches, Wilmington is the

perfect vacation destination.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 65


66 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Galloping Gertie

Art Is Everywhere, Look For It

Shop gallery & commissioned art pieces! Torenzo offers contemporary realism,

abstract expressionism in oil, acrylic, sculpture and the work of social relevance.

Torenzoart.com | 561.818.6259 |

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 67


*****************ECRWSS****

Please Deliver By August 6, 2021

Local Postal Customer

PRSRT STD

U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

Post Falls, ID

PERMIT NO. 32

68 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

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