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LYNNFIELD

AUGUST 5, 2021 • VOL. 60, NO. 31

WEEKLY NEWS

SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1957

16 PAGES • ONE DOLLAR

Calvary brings community together

with Crazy Cool Car Show

POSTAL CUSTOMER

LYNNFIELD, MA 01940

WOBURN, MA

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By Sam minton

LYNNFIELD — The sun was

shining down on the parking lot of

Calvary Christian Church as crowds

gathered to look at some crazy, cool

cars.

With inflatable bounce houses and

plenty of food, the Lynnfield church

had something for everybody. Car

lovers could see some wonderful

whips as worship music was being

played.

Pastor Jamie Booth said that the

event on Saturday was exactly what

they were hoping for.

“This past year and a half, it’s been

a pretty tough year for everybody, so

to be able to just have a good community

event, have people out, having

some fun with the bouncy houses,

the face painting, food trucks, ice

cream truck, and especially the cars

— it’s just a great thing,” Booth said.

“We’re just glad to be able to do it

CARS, PAGE 3

By anne marie toBin

LYNNFIELD — One of the hottest

new dining spots on the North Shore

is “The Lot” in Middleton. Located

across from Richardson’s Ice Cream,

The Lot is a food truck lover’s dream

situated on what used to be a vacant

corner lot on Rte 114.

In the center of it all is Chicken and

The Pig, the brainchild of Lynnfield

resident Guy Ciolfi, which, since

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

A flame paint job lights up the Crazy Cool Car Show in Lynnfield on Saturday.

Lynnfield resident’s food truck

bringing home the bacon

opening in June, has become a crowd

favorite when it comes to gourmet

chicken cutlet sandwiches and specialty

hot dogs.

“The response from the public has

been incredible, and our customers are

always posting things on social media

that our sandwiches are, by far, the best

you will ever have,” Ciolfi said. “We

got off to a slow start, but now we are

out straight. It’s been far better than I

ever expected, even with the delays

and bad weather.”

The Lot features three other food

trucks offering a variety of items to

satisfy any palate. From the homemade

pies at Curbside Wood-Fired Pizza to

gourmet burgers at Good Fellows to

lobster rolls at Salty’s, there’s something

for everyone.

Ciolfi’s entry into the food-truck world

Lynnfield

resident

returns to

CrossFit

Games

By Sam minton

LYNNFIELD — Thomas Ackerman

had quite the performance down in

Madison, Wisconsin.

The 67-year-old returned to the CrossFit

Games after missing out on 2020’s limited

event due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The competition took place over

three days and Ackerman participated

in seven different events. This was the

fourth Games that Ackerman has been

able to participate in.

The road to Wisconsin is a long one.

The journey started in February where

participants entered the competition by

submitting scores from their local gym.

In the following “qualifier,” Ackerman

ended up finishing in first place. After the

long process he eventually was among 20

individuals from his age group to get selected

for the games.

Out of the seven events at the games,

Ackerman finished in second place three

times, third twice and 16th place in the

swimming event — the performance that

FOOD TRUCK, PAGE 3 ACKERMAN, PAGE 2

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2

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 5, 2021

Lynnfield

Library

makes a

mystery

COURTESY PHOTO | THOMAS ACKERMAN

Thomas Ackerman, right, competes in an event at the 2021 CrossFit Games in Madison,

Wisconsin.

Lynnfield resident returns

to CrossFit Games

ACKERMAN

From page 1

likely knocked him out of the

running for the competition.

Ackerman said that it felt

great to make his return to the

CrossFit Games even though

he admitted there was some

concern due to a recent uptick

in COVID-19 cases. The

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67-year-old said that all the athletes

and volunteers were tested

or had to be vaccinated.

The best part about CrossFit

for Ackerman is the fact that it

has given him a second family.

“I see the people in the class

before me that are leaving

and the people in the class

after me,” he said. “It’s not a

three- or four- or five-thousand

member club like Life Fitness

or one of those places, it’s really

only a couple hundred

people, so you get to know

most of the members and you

hang around with them and you

know their kids.”

Ackerman said that he

has even been to a few kids’

birthday parties.

“I see these people everyday,”

he said. “The little kids, the

mother, the father, I see them

everyday. It’s almost like an extended

family.”

Though he doesn’t know for

certain if he will continue to

participate in the Games every

year like he used to, Ackerman

said that he intends on participating

in CrossFit for a long

time to come.

A TRADITION OF TRUST, CARING & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1952

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Complete Pre-Need Planning

Medicaid Approved Trust &

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Spacious Modern Facilities

Ample Private Parking

Handicapped Accessible

By Tréa Lavery

Members of the Lynnfield

Library had the opportunity last

week to create and solve their

own mystery case with the help

of several authors of the genre.

In a a virtual “Mystery

Making” event hosted by the library

on Thursday, authors from

Sisters in Crime New England

took suggestions from audience

members on setting, characters

and other story components to

come up with a unique murder

mystery tale, all while explaining

how they work through

their own writing process.

Author Joanna Schaffhausen

led the event along with Debra

Goldstein, Susan Oleksiw and

B.J. Magnani, and explained

that the authors’ organization is

centered around female crime

writers of all types, both fiction

and nonfiction.

“The goal is inclusiveness

and supportiveness in women

who are writing all kinds of

mysteries,” Schaffhausen said.

To kick off the event,

Schaffhausen asked audience

members to suggest a setting

for the new collaborative mystery

story. The other authors explained

that when writing their

own novels, they like to choose

a setting that evokes the right

feeling for their story, but often

also consider what they find familiar

from their own lives.

“The setting comes first for

me. I have to feel comfortable in

this place,” Oleksiw said. “Out of

this environment comes the set

of characters, because I really do

believe that place really shapes a

personality or a character.”

Contact the reporter,

Tell us your stories,

After the group settled on a

contemporary Cape Cod beach

house for their setting, they

moved on to characters. The

four authors said that they get

inspiration for their own characters

from different places:

Schaffhausen based the protagonist

of her first novel on a real

person from history; Magnani, a

toxicologist, first began writing

about her protagonist in short

stories to teach people about

toxicology. Goldstein said that

when she works on her own

mystery series, she has to make

sure the characters don’t feel

the same in every story.

“In each book my characters

have to evolve,” she said. “I

think that’s an important factor

that each book has the same

characters, but I have to make

them grow.”

The participants decided

on having their characters be

present at the reading of the

will of their Aunt Agatha, who

was soon discovered to have

been poisoned. As the story was

pieced together with help from

audience members, people from

the fictional family argued over

the succession of the family

business (a box factory), and

a niece fell overboard during a

boat ride while wearing a lifejacket

that was discovered to

have been cut by Aunt Bedelia’s

sewing scissors.

Finally, the group worked together

to come up with a title for

their story: “Corpse on the Cape.”

“I’m sure it would be a bestseller,”

Schaffhausen said of the

story. “If you ran out and wrote

it, it would fly off the shelves.”

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AUGUST 5, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

Calvary brings community together

with Crazy Cool Car Show

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Lochlan Thibodeau, 4, left, and his sister Zolana, both of Lynnfield go for a ride in the sidecar of their grandmother Linda

Stanley’s 1975 BMW motorcycle during the Crazy Cool Car Show at Calvary Christian Church in Lynnfield on Saturday.

CARS

From page 1

for the community.”

Pastor Ryan Madden echoed his colleague’s

sentiments, saying that nothing is

better than reuniting with this event.

“(It’s great) just being able to introduce

myself to a lot of people here and just kind

of (get) somewhat back to normal (with) barbeque

and bouncy houses,” Madded added.

“We’re having a good time out here, and nothing’s

better than having a 75-degree sunny

day as well.”

Madden also stated that the church is very

glad to have been able to help out the community

while also creating a community of

its own.

“The church, I believe, plays a huge role

in the community and I think there’s a lot of

people here that don’t know that they need a

community like this, to come to the church,”

he said. “I think the community comes out

and they see that this is what it’s all about.

You come and just meet new people and you

experience people that are going through a lot

of the similar things that you’re going through

and you’re just there for them. You’re there

to help them through it. So it’s a very significant

role that the church plays in a community

such as Lynnfield.”

Lynnfield resident’s food truck

bringing home the bacon

FOOD TRUCK

From page 1

was somewhat accidental.

For 20 years, he’s operated

Servizio, a catering company in

Burlington which provides corporate

food services, but “I’ve

always toyed with the idea of

opening a food truck.”

When COVID-19 hit, he

jumped at the opportunity and

contacted The Lot’s owner, Jay

Currier.

“He connected me with the

Salty’s guys,” Ciolfi said. “We

all thought it was a great idea

and knew we could make it

work. We bought a truck and

were ready to go in April.”

Unfortunately for Ciolfi,

The Lot was not ready to host

them for a number of reasons,

the most impactful being rainy

weather that slowed down the

construction schedule.

Originally open from

Wednesday through Sunday, the

truck recently added Tuesday to

its roster, so it is now open six

days of the week.

The most popular item on the

menu is the Vermont sandwich, a

cutlet topped with Kayem bacon,

buttermilk ranch dressing, lettuce

and tomato on a grilled, buttered

brioche roll. The All-American is

also a favorite. It has American

cheese, lettuce, tomato, Kayem

bacon and mayo and is also served

on a grilled, buttered brioche roll.

PHOTO | JAKOB MENENDEZ

Lynnfield resident and owner of the Chicken and the Pig food

truck, Guy Ciolfi, stands at the service window of his truck.

While chicken sandwiches are

preferred by most customers,

Ciolfi said hot dogs “are catching

on,” adding his top-seller is the

House Dog, which features a

quarter-pound Kayem all-beef

dog smothered in bacon, grilled

onions and homemade, brewery-style

mustard in a grilled bun.

While the month of July was

plagued by rain, Ciolfi said that

business has picked up, regardless.

Often on weekends, the

line of people waiting to order

will snake through the picnic-table

area.

“Weather has been a killer,”

said Ciolfi. “We were only open

for three days during the Fourth

of July week, but now we are

out straight.

Ciolfi said The Lot is the perfect

place not only for a quick

bite, but for family outings and

reunions.

“People love coming with

their families to celebrate special

occasions,” he said.

Ciolfi plans to stay open

through November.

“Food trucks have definitely

become cold-weather destinations

lately,” he said.

The truck does a robust

takeout business and recently

added DoorDash for customers

wanting delivery. On average,

Ciolfi sells more than 1,000

chicken sandwiches and 350

hot dogs each week.

Unlike the other food trucks

at The Lot, the Chicken and The

Pig truck — a former UPS delivery

van — is fully mobile.

“It’s completely driveable,”

Ciolfi said. “It runs on a generator

and has fresh water and wastewater

tanks along with a hot-water

heater, three refrigerators, one

freezer, a dishwasher and sink.

“They’re made to move, but

they can only hold so much,”

said Ciolfi.

During the winter months,

Ciolfi plans to move the truck to

Burlington to be used to bolster

his catering business.

In the meantime, Ciolfi’s

focus is on keeping up with increasing

demand.

“The response from customers

has been great. Many of

them compare us to (Beverlybased

fried chicken restaurant)

Flip the Bird,” said Ciolfi. “We

didn’t open to compete with

anyone but people keep telling

us that we have one of the best

chicken sandwiches you will

ever eat, so to be compared with

them is pretty good.

“We’re just trying to keep

giving people the best food we

can for as long as we can and

we’re hoping for some really

good summy weather the rest of

the summer into the fall.”

Salty’s employee Gary Moran

agrees. When asked why he was

waiting in line for a takeout

order for his crew, his answer

was simple.

“They have the best chicken

sandwiches I’ve ever had. We

love them.”


4

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 5, 2021

LYNNFIELD

WEEKLY NEWS

(USPS Permit #168)

Telephone: 781-593-7700 • Fax: 781-581-3178

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903

News and Advertising Offices: 110 Munroe St., Lynn, MA 01901

Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

www.weeklynews.net

Editor: Sophie Yarin syarin@essexmediagroup.com

Reporter: Anne Marie Tobin atobin@essexmediagroup.com

Sports Editor: Mike Alongi malongi@essexmediagroup.com

Advertising Reps: Ralph Mitchell rmitchell@essexmediagroup.com

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Retail Price: $1.00

Deadlines: News: Monday, noon; Display Ads: Monday, noon;

Classified Ads: Monday, noon;

No cancellations accepted after deadline.

The Lynnfield Weekly News is published 52 times per year on Thursday by Essex

Media Group, Inc. No issue is printed during the week of Christmas. The Lynnfield

Weekly News is delivered via US Mail to all homes in Lynnfield. It is also

available in several locations throughout Lynnfield. The Lynnfield Weekly News

will not be responsible for typographical or other errors in advertisements, but will

reprint that part of an advertisement in which a typographical error occurs if notified

immediately. Advertisers must notify the Lynnfield Weekly News of any errors in

advertisements on the FIRST day of insertion. The publisher reserves the right to

reject, omit or edit any copy offered for publication. POSTMASTER: Send address

changes to Lynnfield Weekly News, P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903. © 2016 Essex

Media Group, Inc.

Can’t get to

the store?

Get home

delivery.

Monday 7/26

Accidents

On Monday at 4:45 p.m. a

caller reported that they were in

an accident and that the other

vehicle fled the scene.

Wednesday 7/28

Medical Emergency

At 5:28 p.m. on Wednesday a

caller reported that an individual

was feeling dizzy on Maple

Street and they were taken to a

nearby hospital.

Thursday 7/29

Medical Emergency

On Thursday at 4:58 p.m. a

caller reported that a female was

having chest pain on Market

Street and the individual was

Police Log

taken to a nearby hospital.

Friday 7/30

Medical Emergency

At 7:42 a.m. on Friday, a caller

reported the discovery of a dead

body at 215 N Broadway.

Saturday 7/31

Accidents

At 12:19 a.m. on Saturday

a caller reported that she witnessed

a vehicle strike a stop

sign and flee the scene.

Hazards

On Saturday at 11:35 a.m.

a caller reported that a large

branch was blocking the

roadway on Grey Lane.

Sunday 8/1

Animals

At 2:48 p.m. on Sunday a

caller reported that a dog was

running on the highway.

Medical Emergency

On Sunday at 5:52 p.m. a

caller reports that a 70-year-old

was unresponsive at Summer

Street. The individual was transported

to a nearby hospital.

Vandalism

At 8:23 p.m. on Saturday a

caller reported that a vehicle was

vandalized on Doncaster Circle.

Monday 8/2

Accidents

On Monday at 1:22 a.m. officers

responded to a multiple

vehicle accident on N Broadway.

One party fled the scene into the

woods and was eventually found

by state police.

Body found on

Route 1 in Lynnfield

BY TRÉA LAVERY

LYNNFIELD — The body

of a New Hampshire man was

found on the shoulder of Route

1 North Friday morning.

According to State Police

spokesman Dave Procopio,

Massachusetts State Police

responded to a report from a

passing motorist at approximately

7:45 a.m. and found

the body of a deceased male

near the Fat Cactus restaurant,

at the bottom of a grassy embankment

near the tree line.

The right lane of the road was

closed temporarily to facilitate

the investigation.

The identity of the man has

not been released. Police do

Tréa Lavery can be reached at

tlavery@itemlive.com.

Subscribe for half the

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AUGUST 5, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 5

Religious News

Centre

Congregational Church

5 Summer St., Lynnfield

781-334-3050

www.centre-church.org

F a c e b o o k . c o m /

CentreChurchUCC

office@centre-church.org

YouTube.com/c/

centrecongregationalchurch/

In the Centre since 1720,

Centre Church is an open and affirming

congregation of the

United Church of Christ. No

matter who you are or where you

are on your life’s journey, you

are welcome at Centre Church.

Our worship services are

held at 10 a.m. every Sunday

morning.

Our summer services are in

the air-conditioned chapel. All

worshippers are asked to wear a

mask while indoors for worship

until further notice. Following

the service, we gather on the

front lawn for fellowship.

Our pastor, the Rev. Nancy

Rottman, and our Director of

Faith Formation, Ms. Larainne

Wilson, strive to provide inspiring,

down-to-earth messages

for people of all ages that are applicable

to everyday life.

We are committed to providing

children a warm, safe, and

inclusive environment. We will

be offering a summer program

for children called “Compassion

Camp.”

The overall theme is Be

Loved, Be Kind, Be You.

The Church of Jesus Christ of

Latter-day Saints

400 Essex St., Lynnfield

www.churchofjesuschrist.org

(781) 334-5586

Bishop Aaron Udy

Missionaries: 978-896-9434

Sacrament meeting: 10 a.m.

Sunday School/Youth/

Children Class: 11 a.m.

Youth Night: Wednesdays at

7 p.m.

Visitors Welcome!

Messiah Lutheran Church

708 Lowell St., Lynnfield

(corner of Lowell & Chestnut)

is currently open for in-person

worship Sunday morning at 9:30

am (summer hours). Worship

services will also be streamed

live on Facebook. Like us

on Facebook: facebook.com/

Messiah-Lutheran-Church

Worship times: Sunday mornings

at 9:30 am, Sunday evening

devotion on Facebook Live

at 6:30 pm, Wednesday evening

Prayer time at 7:01 pm on

Facebook Live.

Messiah Lutheran Church

is served by Rev. Dr. Jeremy

Pekari, and Rev. David Brezina.

Temple Emmanuel/Wakefield

For more information about

Temple Emmanuel, a member

of the Jewish Reconstructionist

Communities, call 781-245-

1886 or see our Facebook

page or website at www.

WakefieldTemple.org.

Request service links to

the Zoom streaming: info@

WakefieldTemple.org

Shabbat services: Friday, 7:30

p.m.: June 25.

Saturday mornings at 9:30 am:

June 5 and 19, July 17.

Wakefield-Lynnfield United

Methodist Church

Peace, Hope & Virtual Hugs

Deb Willis Bry, cell:

781-521-9726

Office Assistant, Wakefield-

Lynnfield United Methodist

Church

Assistant Coordinator, Greater

Boston Project Linus

Wakefield-Lynnfield United

Methodist Church, 273 Vernon

St., Wakefield, Mass., 01880

Church Office: 781-245-1359,

Parsonage: 781-245-0338 Email:

WLUMC272@gmail.com

www.facebook.com/

methodistchurchwakefield

www.instagram.com/

methodistchurchwakefield

*A Project Linus Blanket

Drop-Off Location*

www.bostonprojectlinus.com

Mahnfeldt joins Emerson Hospital

For the Weekly NeWs

CONCORD – Lynnfield resident

Mark Mahnfeldt, RN-BC,

MBA, MSN NEC-A, recently

joined Emerson Hospital as its

chief nursing officer. In this

role, he is responsible for the

planning, growth and operations

of nursing and patient care

services throughout Emerson’s

health system.

“I am delighted to welcome

Mark to Emerson,” said

Christine Schuster, RN, MBA,

president and CEO, Emerson

Hospital. “He brings a wealth

of leadership experience in

acute care and outpatient ambulatory

services, and a deep

commitment to outstanding patient

care. Mark’s tremendous

knowledge of nursing and his

ability to collaborate with clinicians

and patients, while developing

strong relationships,

align well with Emerson’s focus

on providing outstanding care.”

Since 2016, Mark has served

as vice president of acute care

nursing operations at South

Shore Hospital. During this

time, the hospital received numerous

awards for exemplary

acute care and nursing excellence.

Prior to this role, Mark

was South Shore Hospital’s

director of medical, surgical,

critical care, cardiovascular

nursing, inpatient surgical and

ambulatory surgical services.

He has also held nurse leadership

positions at Hallmark

Health, Melrose-Wakefield

Healthcare and North Shore

Medical Center.

“I am very excited to join

Emerson, a health system I have

long admired for its dedication

to providing the best care to patients

at every spectrum of life,”

said Mark Mahnfeldt. “One

of the aspects of working in a

community health setting that I

enjoy most is creating relationships

with people who live and

work in the area. I look forward

to serving the community and

continuing Emerson’s focus as

the hospital of choice for everyone

in its service area.”

Mark earned a BSN from

Northeastern University, and

received his MSN and MBA

from Salem State College (now

Salem State University).

Harvard professor Allen

will join the Lynnfield

Democrats Wednesday

For the Weekly NeWs

Professor Danielle Allen,

who is exploring a possible

run for governor of

Massachusetts in 2022, will

join the Lynnfield Democrats

on Wednesday, August 18th,

2021, at 7:00 p.m. Allen wants

to hear from the residents of

the Commonwealth about

their most crucial concerns

during this listening tour. She

“wants to make our commonwealth

serve all, not just the

few,” and to help make it a

place “where all are empowered

to succeed.”

The Maryland native is

a graduate of Princeton,

King’s College, Cambridge,

and Harvard universities.

She is currently the James

Bryant Conant University

Professor, and the director of

the Edmond J. Safra Center

for Ethics, both at Harvard.

Her book “Our Declaration:

A Reading of the Declaration

of Independence in Defense

of Equality” won the 2015

Francis Parkman prize, given

by the Society of American

Historians annually. For

more information about

Professor Allen, see her webpage

www.allenforma.org.

or her page at www.harvard.

edu.

If you are not already on the

Lynnfield Democratic Town

Committee email list and would

like to attend this meeting,

please contact us on our webpage:

www.lynnfielddems.com

or email us at lynnfield.democrats@gmail.com.

You can

also find us on Facebook and

Twitter.

Oosterman’s Rest Home offers a warm, homelike

setting and more personalized care at lower costs

than those big institutional facilities.

Come see for yourself the personalized care

our residents receive.

For more information, call Kate Oosterman

at 781-665-3188

93 Laurel Street

Melrose

781-665-3188

706 Main Street

Wakefield

781-245-4778


6

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 5, 2021

Seniors News

Tapping into senior connections

For the Weekly NeWs

LYNN — One result of the

global pandemic and its longterm

isolation is the need to find

innovative ways through which

people can stay connected.

One such effort includes a new

tool that Greater Lynn Senior

Services (GLSS), which serves

town residents, is piloting called

Uniper — a device that plugs into

your television set, along with a

small camera which perches on

top, enabling one-on-one communication

with case managers,

healthcare providers, counselors,

family and friends.

“The COVID-19 pandemic

pretty much destroyed the limited

social connections that

many older people or adults

living with disabilities already

experience,” said Kathryn C.

Burns, GLSS’ chief executive

officer. “Research shows that

isolation, particularly long-term

isolation, has a very negative effect

on people’s overall health,

significantly contributing to

premature death from all causes

and increasing a person’s risk of

diseases like dementia.”

Uniper loads an individual’s

contacts into its device, allowing

for immediate virtual connection.

“This is really the primary

reason we chose Uniper over

the many other platforms we

reviewed,” said Valerie Parker

Callahan, director of planning

and development. “We

view it first and foremost as a

communications tool to help

people better manage their

health and well-being, with

Uniper’s built-in programming

as a secondary — but very

helpful — add-on to reduce

social isolation and promote

stronger connections with the

wider community.” It is easy to

use with a simple remote that

allows people to quickly transition

from Uniper back to television

programming.

“Many platforms that allow

for virtual connection require a

computer, tablet or smartphone,

which many older people do not

have and might be uncomfortable

using,” Parker

Callahan noted. “But Uniper

only requires a TV, which most

people already have and use

regularly.”

Uniper’s existing content includes

access to hundreds of

videos — travel, arts and culture,

music and educational

programs, as well as “live” programming

that includes exercise

and other classes, peer-led

discussion groups, support

groups and more — which are

available throughout the day

and scheduled by Uniper.

GLSS is developing its own

content, which will be available

to users through a separate

channel, and is also working on

developing some live programming,

too.

“We envision, for example,

that our Wellness Pathways fall

prevention and health self- management

workshops will be offered

over the Uniper platform,

as well as group and individual

counseling through our Mobile

Mental Health and Family

Caregiver Support programs

in a private, HIPAA-compliant

setting,” Parker Callahan said,

“This would be in addition to

virtual case manager visits with

GLSS consumers.”

UniperCare is an innovative,

Israeli-based company with a

West Coast U.S. hub. Its programming

is starting to pop

up all around the country, but

GLSS is its first Massachusettsbased

customer.

One of the Uniper’s unique

features is the work they

have been doing with Jewish

Federation of North America,

connecting Holocaust survivors,

their descendants and people

of Jewish faith with tailored

supports and group meetings,

bringing together people from

all across the country in celebration

of some Jewish holidays

during the pandemic. They plan

to continue this programming

moving forward. Uniper also offers

a lot of content in Russian

and Spanish. GLSS is initially

hoping to sign up 100 people

age 60 and older or adults living

with disabilities in its service

area of Lynn, Lynnfield, Nahant,

Saugus and Swampscott for

the free one-year service. The

product will be reevaluated after

a year and could last beyond

that, depending on its results and

continued interest on the part of

funders.

Uniper offers training and a

helpline to troubleshoot any issues

users encounter. The program

is supported by funding

from the Administration for

Community Living as well

as funding through the Older

American Act administered

through the Massachusetts

Executive Office of Elder

Affairs, and a grant from

Beverly and Addison Gilbert

Hospitals, operated by Beth

Israel Lahey Health.

Interested individuals can

contact Andrew Wallace,

GLSS’ Title III Planner, at 781-

477-6702 or email awallace@

glss.net. More information can

be found at www.glss.net.

Senior Center

offers plenty to do

For the Weekly NeWs

LYNNFIELD — The Senior

Center is open and offering the

following programs. Get out of

the heat, and join us for some

laughs as we test our knowledge

every Monday at 1:30 p.m. with

Trivia. Friends, fun, prizes! Join

us every Tuesday at 9 a.m. for

Bingo. The Walking Club meets

every Wednesday at 9 a.m.

Walk at your own speed and

for as long as you are comfortable.

Let’s get those steps in!

Drop-in knitting will be every

Senior Citizens

Advisory Committee

For the Weekly NeWs

LYNNFIELD — The town

Senior Citizens Advisory

Committee’s role is to recognize

the significant contribution

Lynnfield’s senior citizen population

has made to the town.

The Lynnfield Senior Citizen

Advisory Council plays a critical

role in making sure our

senior citizens receive the community

support they rightly

deserve to enhance their health

and quality of life.

The council makes recommendations

to the Board of

Selectmen on how the town can

effectively implement and coordinate

services and programs

that would greatly benefit the

senior citizen population.

The council focuses on pursuing

opportunities to ease or

reduce the tax burden for the

senior citizen population in the

Town of Lynnfield.

Thursday at 9 a.m. Bring your

own project for some stitching

and chatting. Grab and Go

lunch every Tuesday, Thursday,

and Friday at 11 a.m. for two

dollars. It is too hot to cook, let

us do it for you! Registration for

lunch required.

The Lynnfield Senior

Center’s Diabetes Academy

will meet on Thursday, July 29

at 12:30 p.m. This will be an informal

meeting; please join us.

For questions and to sign up call

Elaine, 781-598-1078.

The Senior Citizen Advisory

Council considers and advises

on issues and concerns that

affect the senior citizen population

within the Town of

Lynnfield.

The council meets regularly

to discuss issues and concerns

brought to the attention of the

council. The Senior Citizen

Advisory Council is to appear

regularly before the Board of

Selectmen to update and advise

the board and Town of

Lynnfield on issues and concerns

that impact the senior citizen

population.

The Senior Citizen Advisory

Council is responsible for conducting

its activities in a manner

that is in compliance with all

relevant state and local laws and

regulations including, but not

limited to, the Open Meeting

Law, Public Records Law and

Conflict of Interest Law.

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AUGUST 5, 2021

Duncan Robert Alan McInnes, M.D., 75

1946 - 2021

By Tréa Lavery

Eddie Whalley, head PGA

professional at King Rail

Reserve Golf Course, isn’t

afraid of getting his hands

dirty with day-to-day management

of the course.

Whalley, a Lynnfield native

who has worked at the

course since it reopened

under its current name six

years ago, grew up in the

golf world under his father

Ed, a player and PGA professional

himself.

“It was in the house from

day one. I just followed

in my father’s footsteps,”

Whalley said of the family

pastime. “I remember always

loving the game. It’s

not always kind to us, but I

love the game, I love to play,

I love to compete.”

At King Rail, where the

management operates out of

a trailer, Whalley takes care

LYNNFIELD - Duncan Robert

Alan McInnes, M.D. age 75, of Lynnfield

died Wednesday, July 28 at

his home surrounded by family.

Born in Brandon, Manitoba,

Canada on June 20, 1946 he was

the son of the late John Duncan

and Coline (Wedgwood) McInnes.

Rob was raised and educated

in Kenora, Ontario, Canada. Following

high school he attended

the University of Toronto where

he received his medical degree in

1971. He married Diane McInnes

(Syrnyk) in 1968 and had two

sons, Colin and Brandon. He

continued his education with his

fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology

and Infertility at McGill

University in Montreal, Canada,

where he then practiced for several

years as the director of their fertility

clinic. He married Lucie McInnes

(Filiatrault) in 1988, adding children

Jade and Alix to the family. He

worked several years at St Mary

Medical Center in Long Beach,

CA, followed by a move to Boston

Regional Medical Center, where he

stayed until 1998. Rob then made

his way to Massachusetts General

Hospital where he worked as a fertility

specialist until his retirement

in 2016 at the age of 70.

An avid reader, he was always

learning and had a lifelong curiosity.

From high school valedictorian

to fellowship mentoring later

in his career, he loved and found

great fulfillment in his work. Later

in life, he and Lucie enjoyed RVing

and visiting family, with many visits

down to Florida with siblings and

to Saskatoon and beyond. He was

always dedicated to his patients,

his wife, his children and grandchildren.

He was the beloved husband of

Lucie (Filiatrault) McInnes. He was

the loving father of Colin McInnes

of Saskatoon, Canada, Brandon

McInnes of Saskatoon, Jade Tanner

and her husband Jayson of

North Smithfield, RI and Alix Berube

of Tewksbury, MA. He was the

brother of Lynne Thompson and

her husband Ross of Stonewall,

Canada and Bill McInnes and his

wife Chris of Mount Horeb, WI. He

is also survived by his seven grandchildren:

Dylan and Tia McInnes,

Isabelle, Myles, and Quinn Tanner,

and Hailey and James Berube.

Service Information: Funeral

Services will be private. Arrangements

were in the care of

the McDonald Funeral Home,

Wakefield.

In lieu of flowers, donations

may be made to: Resolve New

England, resolvenewengland.

org an organization providing

resources and information to

families dealing with infertility.

Star

of

the

week

Eddie Whalley

of everything from working

with the management software

to organize tee times

to maintaining the course to

filling golf carts with gas.

“My number one job is

to promote King Rail and

golf,” he said.

In addition to the

course, Whalley also runs

Lynnfield’s junior golf lessons,

which have gotten

more and more popular in

recent years. Whalley said

that he has been offering lessons

for 13 years, and loves

seeing kids who he taught

grow up loving the sport.

“That’s a big part of what

we do: We get kids going,

and they’re still playing

when they get into high

school,” he said. “They’re

not always going to be on the

team or going on tour, but

we get them on the course.

That’s what we’re good at.”

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 7

Community School’s

Summer of Fun Activities

August 9-13 schedule

LYNNFIELD — Here is the

Community School’s Summer

of Fun Activities (SOFA)

schedule for the week of August

9-13. Visit the Community

Schools’ website at lynnfield.

k12.ma.us for registration

information.

Programs cost $125 for residents

and $135 for non-residents,

unless otherwise specified.

All programs are held at

the high school, 275 Essex St.

Sports Zone 101 staff directs

the program called High Five

Sports. The program runs from

9 a.m. to noon, and is oriented

towards kids ages 3-5. The cost

is $135 for residents and $145

for non-residents.

The program is described as

follows: “Children of all ages

love to be silly and have fun,

especially the youngest of us.

We see this first hand every

time we run our Silly Games

program! We will play games

like: builders and Bulldozers,

where children either build or

bulldoze cones set up around

the gym; Bowling for Noodles,

like real bowling but with pool

noodles; and Kooky Relays!

Each game is designed specifically

for our tot friends and

includes elements that help further

develop the fine and gross

motor skills of our young champions.

Participants also have the

opportunity to practice working

together, sharing with other

children and working on their

problem-solving skills.”

Eileen “Miss Lee” Papagni

directs the program Bloom &

Grow. The program runs from

9 a.m. to noon, and it is initiated

towards kids enrolled in

grades 1-4. The cost is $125

for residents and $135 for

non-residents.

The program is described as

follows: “From trees in the sky

29 LONGBOW CIRCLE, LYNNFIELD

to plants on the ground, we’re

going to have fun with making

plant-themed crafts this week.

Students will become gardeners

through crafts and activities,

such as planting seeds, making

a “dirt” dessert to bring home

and more! Come bloom and

grow with us this week!”

Lisa and Francesca Pasciuto

both direct the program Jocks

& Smocks. The program runs

from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and is

initiated towards kids enrolled

in grades 1-5. The cost is $250

for residents and $260 for

non-residents.

The program is described as

follows: “Ready for hands-on

crafts and play time? Come

spend the week at “Jocks &

Smocks.” Each day we’ll do a

different craft in the morning

followed by a new sport activity

in the afternoon. We’ll have fun

getting crafty and sporty in the

sunshine!”

Sports Zone 101 directs

the program Tournament Of

Champions: Kids v. Coaches.

The program runs from 9 a.m.

to 3 p.m, and is oriented towards

kids enrolled in grades K-4. The

cost is $250 for residents and

$260 for non-residents.

The SOFA schedule describes

the program as follows: “Kids

will participate in a variety of

games, such as street hockey,

soccer, football, battleship, four

corners, dodgeball, basketball

and many others during our

fun-filled week. In addition to

learning the fundamentals of

these sports, we will have exciting

discussions about current

events in sports, good sportsmanship

and understanding the

cool statistics on sports cards.

Each participant will receive a

daily pack of cards as a major

prize. These prizes help emphasize

value and are a fun way to

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enhance learning! We also have

our weekly “SLUSH DAY”

which is a fan favorite for all

our kids every week! This week

the kids will participate in fun

games against our coaches.

Competitions will include many

of our favorite games in tournament

style format. Kids will get

a chance to organize fair teams,

make the rules, and learn how

to manage/coach their friends.

Our Sports Zone staff will help

guide and lead all kids when

deemed necessary.”

Sports Zone 101 directs the

program called Flag Football

Tourney. The program runs

from 9 a.m. to noon, and is initiated

towards kids enrolled in

grades 5-8. The cost is $135

for residents and $145 for

non-residents.

The SOFA schedule describes

the program as follows:

“In preparation for the

upcoming fall season, we are

proud to present a great program

to middle school students

in Lynnfield to get ready for

football season! During this

program, we will be playing

flag football together in a fun

and safe tournament style exclusively

for middle school students

in Lynnfield. Participants

will rotate through different

skills, drills and flag football

games each day, playing different

positions to help build

skills and confidence on the

field. All kids will learn the

proper technique of playing

and will also be given flags

and flag belts for games. Most

games will take place in a 5 vs

5 and 7 vs 7 style game each

week based on enrollment.

Kids should wear comfortable

running shoes! This program is

open to both boys and girls.”


8

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 5, 2021

These stuffed artichokes, suffused with garlic and Italian seasoning, are a creature comfort and a taste of home.

RECIPE: Stuffed artichokes

By ElizaBEth Cavallaro

Artichokes originated in the

Mediterranean region, namely

Italy, Spain, Jerusalem and

Tunisia circa 77 AD. Believe it

or not, the artichoke was a faux

pas which pulled itself from

the earth and frightened the

farmers. They were perplexed

as to what it was and what to do

with it.

Since nothing went to waste

at that time, the people discovered,

explored and experimented

new ways of cooking

this monstrous-looking plant. I

am sure they had many disasters.

They enjoyed them with

vinegar, honey and cumin.

Actually, the artichoke is

the flower bud of the thistle

plant of the sunflower family.

Artichokes are one of the oldest-known

foods dating to

antiquity. The belief was that

this plant was an aphrodisiac,

which was attributed to being

effective in securing the birth

of a boy. The Greeks and the

Romans considered artichokes

a delicacy.

The name derives from the

Italian word “articiocco” and

“articolos,” which translates to

a pine cone. The plant spreads

to a cover area of about six feet

and a height of four feet. If the

plant was not picked, it would

become the most beautiful

flower of a violet blue shade.

They are grown in perennial

culture for five to ten years.

Each crop is cut back several

inches below the soil surface to

stimulate new growth. This operation

is called stumping.

According to legend, the

first artichoke was symbolized

by Cynara, a lovely Greek girl

spotted by Zeus. He captured

and seduced her while his wife

Hera was away. He made her

a goddess and brought her to

Olympus. At this time, Cynara

missed her family and ran away.

Upon her return, Zeus was angered

and sent her back to earth

to transform her into an ugly

plant that we now know as the

artichoke.

As I look back in time, my

fondest recollection of my

childhood was the holiday when

my mother prepared her famous

stuffed artichokes. While she

sipped on her morning coffee,

she began to get out all her old

mixing bowls. I sat watching

her while eating my bowl of

oatmeal. It was the breakfast

of yesteryear. We never had

bacon, sausage, pancakes or

French toast. Oatmeal was ribsticking

and warm on those

cold winter mornings. It was

now perfect because it started

to snow and I knew that a big

holiday was upon us. The best

part of my life was wintertime

with blustery days and nights.

Many past winters we had three

feet of snow, perfect for snowball

fights and making caves

and tunnels to hide from our

mothers when they called us

in for lunch. We were never

hungry. We played in the snow

for hours. We donned our heavy

jackets, two pairs of socks,

scarves and woolen hats pulled

down over our ears. I had high

boots that were handed down

from my sisters; they were always

too big for me. I did not

care. We were never cold. There

were no cars on our street so we

had lots of room to play. No

one owned a car or knew how

to drive.

Our love of food and its

preparation held us together. I

remember coming home from

school to break off a piece

of bread hot from the bakery

down the street. There was

nothing like it. Over the years,

my siblings and I tried to keep

the family traditions alive.

Good food and wine was our

custom. I had my wine in a tiny

little glass diluted with water.

I loved it.

• Four artichokes

• Three cups of fresh bread

crumbs

• One cup of parmesan

cheese

• One half cup of chopped

parsley

• Twelve cloves of chopped

garlic (yes, 12)

• Two tablespoons of Italian

seasoning

• One teaspoon of black

pepper

• One quarter cup of olive oil

Do not add salt

1) In a bowl, measure out

bread crumbs, cheese,

parsley, garlic, seasoning,

pepper and oil. If too dry, add

more olive oil; if too wet, add

more bread crumbs. Select

tight-leafed artichokes in a

globe shape. Cut off stem for

a flat bottom. Cut one inch

off top. With scissors, snip

off thorns. Pull off two layers

of leaves on bottom. With

fingers, pull each leaf apart

leaving a cavity for the filling.

Run under cold water and

face upside down on a dish

Stuffed Artichokes

towel to dry. Tap all water

out. Hold artichoke over mixture

and fill in between each

leaf. Lay artichokes in sauce

pan. To prevent these from

falling over, scrunch tin foil

in between each. Pour water

in pan about one quarter up

to artichokes. Do not pour

water over artichokes. Pour

a sprinkle of olive oil and

parmesan cheese over all.

Cover and simmer on low

heat for about two hours.

2) Check water every half

hour; if dissipated add more.

Do not pour water over artichokes.

For doneness, pull

biggest leaf to taste. Take out

of water and let rest for a few

hours. Every part of the artichoke

is edible but not the

hairy fibers in the bottom.

This is the choke. You really

will choke on this part; I kid

you not — take the challenge.

Once you have mastered

the artichoke preparation,

you will make this

delicious treat again. Enjoy!


AUGUST 5, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 9

Sports

St. John’s Prep star D’Amico takes home

Item All-Star honors for 2021 season

By Mike Alongi

Following a stellar season

that saw him become a dominant

pitching force in the

Catholic Central League and

help lead his team to a second

straight Division 2 state title,

St. Mary’s junior Aiven Cabral

has been named the 2021 Item

Player of the Year for baseball.

Cabral was nearly unhittable

on the mound in 2021,

allowing just five runs on 32

hits in 64 2/3 innings of work.

He went 8-0 and also notched

an impressive 106 strikeouts

on the year, earning him CCL

Pitcher of the Year honors in

the process.

Cabral also did it with the

bat, knocking in eight RBI

over the course of the year and

holding down the No. 3 spot in

the order.

Six players have also

been named to the 2021

All-Item team for baseball,

with Angel Gonzalez (Lynn

English), Pat D’Amico (St.

John’s Prep), Charlie Titus

(Marblehead), Scott Emerson

(Bishop Fenwick), Bobby

Jellison (Salem) and Ryan

Knight (Peabody) all earning

recognition.

Gonzalez was the go-to guy

for the English offense this

season, batting a stellar .435

with an on-base percentage of

.629 and an eye-popping OPS

of 1.455. His one home run,

two doubles, two triples and

eight RBI all helped give him

a slugging percentage of .826

and earn him Greater Boston

League MVP honors.

But he didn’t only contribute

with his bat. Gonzalez

also performed on the mound,

pitching 10 2/3 innings over

four appearances and going

3-0. He also notched one save,

had 15 strikeouts for the year

and posted an ERA of 1.31.

D’Amico, a Lynnfield native,

wrapped up his Prep

career on a high note after

earning Catholic Conference

all-star honors. The senior

third baseman paced the

Division 1 North champion

Eagles from the leadoff spot,

batting .391 with a 1.218 OPS.

D’Amico hit four home runs

to go along with seven doubles,

scored 21 runs and stole

11 bases. He’s now moving on

to the next level, where he’ll

join fellow Lynnfield native

Jonathan Luders on the roster

at Seton Hall University.

Titus took home NEC

all-conference honors after a

strong season both behind the

plate and at bat. Titus caught

one of the deepest rotations in

the league while also hitting

.353 and knocking in 25 RBI

— good for second-most in

the NEC.

Emerson was one of the

best hitters on the entire North

Shore this season, hitting a

stellar .465 and leading the

Crusaders with 20 RBI, both

of which ranked in the top five

on the North Shore. A CCL

all-star selection, Emerson’s

33 hits and 24 runs scored

were also among the most in

the area. He also appeared in

eight games on the mound and

posted a 0.75 ERA in 9 1/3 innings

pitched.

Jellison was one of the most

difficult outs in all of baseball

this spring and summer,

getting a hit in just about half

of his at-bats on the entire

season. An NEC all-star selection,

Jellison hit a stellar .499

and had 27 hits. He drove in

13 runs, scored 20 runs and

stole nine bases.

But he was also a reliable

pitcher for the Witches,

striking out 46 batters in 40

innings of work and taking

home four wins.

Knight, the Tanners’

center fielder who will be

playing Division I ball at the

University of Hartford next

year, hit .404 and put up an

on-base percentage of .550 in

2021. He had 19 hits, scored

20 runs and stole 15 bases on

the year.

Also earning 2021 Item All-

Star Team honors for baseball

are Colby Magliozzi,

Terence Moynihan, Lucas

Fritz (St. Mary’s); Yordi

Contreras, Clodys Prandys

(Lynn English); Ethaniel

Almendarez, Nico Galeazzi

(Lynn Classical); Tucker

Destino, Alex Gonzalez

(Bishop Fenwick); Trent

Balian, Evan Balian

(Lynnfield); Godot Gaskins,

Jacob Sherf, Sami Loughlin

(Marblehead); Juan Tolentino,

Justin Powers, Brendan Smith

(Peabody); Max Doucette,

Mike Popp (Revere); Jack

Doyle, Ethan Doyle (Salem);

Nathan Ing, Jason Casaletto

(Saugus); Sam Belliveau, DJ

Pacheco, Payton Palladino (St.

John’s Prep); Connor Correnti,

Nate Stern (Swampscott);

Bobby Hubert, David DiCicco

(Winthrop).

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

After hitting .391 with four home runs and a 1.218 OPS this spring, Lynnfield native and St.

John’s Prep star Pat D’Amico has been named to the 2021 All-Item Team for baseball.

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10

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 5, 2021

FILE PHOTOS | JULIA HOPKINS

For their exploits during the 2021 softball season, Lynnfield’s Reilly Ganter, left, and Chloe Shapleigh have been named Item All-Stars. Shapleigh was one of six

members of the 2021 All-Item Team, while Ganter earned Item All-Star honors.

Shapleigh, Ganter named Item All-Stars for 2021 season

By Mike Alongi

After putting together one

of the most consistent pitching

seasons in recent memory, St.

Mary’s junior Lily Newhall

has been named the 2021 Item

Player of the Year for softball.

Newhall did it all for the

Spartans this year, starting on

the mound as the team’s ace.

She threw 143 innings and

racked up a 19-3 record that

included three shutout victories.

This season she allowed

32 earned runs on 114 hits,

32 walks and five hit batters.

Newhall finished the year with

an incredible 183 strikeouts —

by far the most on the North

Shore.

A CCL All-Star selection,

Newhall also got it done at the

plate. Despite an 0-for-11 start,

Newhall finished the year with

a .367 batting average, .448

on-base percentage and a .591

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slugging percentage. Newhall

had 18 hits, including a home

run and five extra base hits

while knocking in 11 RBI.

There were also six players

who were named to the 2021

All-Item Team for softball in

Alyssa Grossi (St. Mary’s),

Marina DiBiasio; Brooke

Warren (Lynn Classical);

Abby Bettencourt (Peabody);

Chloe Shapleigh (Lynnfield);

and Lauren Donovan

(Marblehead).

Grossi batted .485 on the

year with a .571 on-base percentage

and an eye-popping

.911 slugging percentage. The

CCL all-star laced six home

runs and nine doubles on her

way to racking up a North

Shore-leading 31 RBI, while

also stealing six bases.

DiBiasio was one of the

toughest outs in the area in

2021, batting .385 for the

season with an on-base percentage

of .426 and a .564

slugging percentage — good

enough to be named a CCL

all-star. She notched a home

run, had 19 RBI and stole

eight bases while only striking

out five times all year.

Warren was one of the senior

leaders for Classical, getting

the job done on the mound and

at the plate. Warren started

every one of the Rams’ 13

games this spring, striking out

88 batters and putting up an

ERA of 2.70. She also had a

solid year at the plate, batting

an even .400 and anchoring

the middle of the order.

Bettencourt — who was

named the Northeastern

Conference Player of the Year

— contributed all over the

field for Peabody, but her main

weapon was her pitching arm.

The clear ace of the Tanners’

staff, Bettencourt put up an

ERA of 1.25 in 79 2/3 innings

pitched. Her 107 strikeouts

helped lead Peabody to the

NEC North title, and her peak

came in the opening round of

the Division 1 North tournament

when she threw a perfect

game in a 6-0 win over

Haverhill. She also got the job

done with the bat, becoming

one of the Tanners’ most reliable

hitters over the course of

the year with a batting average

of .484 and 20 RBI.

Shapleigh, who played

shortstop for the Pioneers, led

her team in hitting with a batting

average of .630. She also

led the team in runs scored

(25), RBI (22) and home runs

(four). A Cape Ann League

first-team all-star, Shapleigh

will be off to Endicott College

this fall as a two-sport athlete

in softball and hockey.

Donovan was one of the top

pitchers on the North Shore

this year, striking out 120 batters

in 90 innings of work and

putting up an ERA of 2.25 —

earning NEC all-conference

honors.

Also earning 2021 Item All-

Star Team selections for softball

are Brooke Moloney (St.

Mary’s); Izzy Faessler, Abby

Fila, Mekayla Poisson (Lynn

Classical); Kelsey McNeil

(Lynn English); Mia Mercurio

(Bishop Fenwick); Reilly

Ganter (Lynnfield); Jolie

Quintana, Ashleigh Maude

(Marblehead); Emma Bloom,

Isabel Bettencourt, Avery

Grieco, Logan Lomasney

(Peabody); Adrianna Fusco,

Nina Cassinello (Revere);

Cassadi O’Leary, Skylar

Sverker (Salem); Leah Ventre,

Lily Ventre, Cat Schena

(Saugus); Nicolette Fraser,

Riley Scanlon (Swampscott);

Sofia Vitale and Izzy Mahoney

(Winthrop).

Luders, Navs ready for playoffs

By Mike Alongi

The regular season is now

over for Lynnfield native

Jonathan Luders and the North

Shore Navigators, meaning

it’s time to shift the focus over

to playoff baseball.

The Navs have earned the

No. 5 seed in the New England

Collegiate Baseball League

playoffs, and North Shore

will play on the road against

the Vermont Mountaineers

in a single-game elimination

Wild Card bout Tuesday

night (6:30) at Montpelier

Recreation Field.

It was a great season for

Luders, a rising junior at Seton

Hall University. Luders played

in 40 of the Navs’ 42 games

this summer, batting .250 with

three doubles and 16 RBI. His

.447 on-base percentage was

one of the highest on the team,

and he also led the team in hitby-pitches

with 15.


AUGUST 5, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 11

Lynnfield battles Peabody in Jimmy Fund Game

PHOTOS | Jakob Menendez

Lucas Deraps, the starting pitcher for Lynnfield, extends his arm during a pitch against Peabody at a Jimmy Fund Little League game Monday.

Tyler Maciorowski, right, connects on a hit during a game against Peabody Monday afternoon.

Chase Bergeron of Lynnfield rounds second base before eventually

scoring against Peabody.

The Lynnfield team walks out toward the outfield during an inning change.


12

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 5, 2021

Calvary brings community together

with Crazy Cool Car Show

PHOTOS | SPENSER HASAK

Calvary

Christian

Church hosted

the Crazy Cool

Car Show on

Saturday.

A modified Jeep shows what it’s capable of.

A Looney Tunes Roadrunner is stitched into the headrest of a

vintage Plymouth Roadrunner.

A miniature drive-in scene plays out in the window of Bob and

Carol Giannino’s 1955 Chevy Bel Air.

The Wallace siblings, from left, John, 9, Mary, 9, and KJ, 11, all of Lynnfield, hang out in a 1966

Ford Galaxie 500.


AUGUST 5, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 13

Calvary brings community together

with Crazy Cool Car Show

PHOTOS | SPENSER HASAK

Mikey Topping

of Lynnfield

climbs out of his

dad’s DeLorean

during the

Crazy Cool Car

Show at Calvary

Christian Church

in Lynnfield on

Saturday.

Marcus Giugliano, 3, of Lynnfield inspects a modified Honda Civic.

The wheel of a modified Mitsubishi Evolution.

Anthony

Gioioso of

Winthrop, left,

inspects the

engine bay of a

vintage Dodge

Dart as his

brother and

owner of the

car, Joe Gioioso

of Peabody,

fires it up.


14

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 5, 2021

LYNNFIELD

24 ASHWOOD RD

$539,900

B: Robert Skane & Tyavanna

Skane

S: Michael Petraglia & Nora

Shams

26 EDGEMERE RD

$1,030,000

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S: Elaine Moorman & Stephen

Moorman

1 FALL WAY

$625,000

B: 24 Bow Inv Prop LLC

S: Gloria J Flordeliza

3 LARA RD

$1,150,000

B: Alyssa A Dimaria & Peter J

Dimaria

S: Jessica Capodilupo & Paul

Capodilupo

25 MELCH RD

$725,000

B: Jeffrey Lupien & Jennifer Lupien

S: Capitol Management LLC

22 PARTRIDGE LN U:22

$550,000

B: Erika Streib

S: Juiling Lu Tr, Tr for Juiling Lu LT

855 SALEM ST

$557,000

B: Alessandra D Barbosa & Eber

DaSilva-Dossantos

S: Carolina N Nascimento &

Edson F Nascimento

909 SALEM ST

$625,000

B: Hyve Development Grp LLC

S: John F Alzate

12 SAUNDERS RD

$710,000

B: Jeffrey W Eldridge

S: Eleanor R Campbell & Norman

W Campbell

PEABODY

5 BENEVENTO CIR

$875,000

B: Lisa A Gendreau & Roland G

Gendreau

S: Susan D Stone

25 CEDAR GROVE AVE

$465,000

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4403 DEERFIELD CIR U:4403

$440,000

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1 DUBLIN RD

Real Estate Transfers

$755,000

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S: Kenneth J Mclean & Gregory J

Mclean

25 EISENHOWER RD

$721,000

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Spinos

5 FAIRVIEW RD

$640,000

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1 GEDNEY DR

$777,777

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Pardo

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12 GRANT ST

$655,000

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1804 HOLLOW TREE CT U:1804

$491,000

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Shannon

S: Michael R Gergely & Staci

Gergely

47 HOLTEN ST

$693,000

B: Rufino Matos

S: Dauntless Path LLC

24 KENWOOD RD

$705,200

B: Parisa Peyvast & Ali Shahrestani

S: Sandra C Valentim

129 LOWELL ST U:4

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S: Joanna Johnston

66 MARGIN ST

$563,000

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Francois

S: Heather E Quarles

12 MONSON DR

$665,000

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Blandford

S: Carol A Leonard Tr, Tr for 12

Monson Dr Peabody RT

21 OAK AVE

$735,000

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Gonzalez-Ramos

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18 PERLEY AVE

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Jr

S: Kenneth P Shea Tr, Tr for 18

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40 PROCTOR CIR

$370,000

B: Constitution Prop LLC

S: Lauretta M Silva & Robert J

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4 RAVENWOOD RD

$675,000

B: Gilmar P Fagundes

S: Alyssa A Dimaria & Peter J

Dimaria

7 ROCKDALE AVE

$450,000

B: Joseph D Vaudo

S: Suzanne L Coughlin Tr, Tr for

Lohring FT

15 STYLES DR

$720,000

B: Michael P Gochis & Nancy E

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1 WILLIS RD

$640,000

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Road Peabody NT

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$440,000

B: Heidi Fyfe & Judy R Fyfe

S: Breen Joseph A Est &

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AUGUST 5, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 15

Lynnfield resident’s food truck

bringing home the bacon

PHOTOS | JAKOB MENENDEZ

The House Dog at the Chicken and the

Pig food truck.

Guy Ciolfi works the grill inside his food truck.

Hector Sanabria, a line cook at the Chicken and the Pig food truck, holds a

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16

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 5, 2021

*ON MARKET*

*ON MARKET*

23 LYNN SHORE DRIVE, LYNN 603 GAZEBO CIRCLE, READING

NEW *ONTHIS MARKET* WEEK

NEW THIS WEEK

NEW THIS WEEK

29 LONGBOW CIRCLE, LYNNFIELD 44 PILLINGS POND ROAD, LYNNFIELD

88A MAPLE AVENUE, WOBURN

NEW COMING THISNEXT WEEK WEEK

COMING IN AUGUST

COMING IN NEXT AUGUST WEEK

COMING IN SEPT

10 ROCK STREET, NORTH READING

39 BROADWAY #304, MALDEN

37 BENEVENTO CIRCLE, PEABODY

85 PINE HILL ROAD, LYNNFIELD

UNDER AGREEMENT

UNDER AGREEMENT

UNDER AGREEMENT

UNDER AGREEMENT

32 HERITAGE LANE, LYNNFIELD 4 FORBES WAY, PEABODY 3 HILL STREET, NORTH READING 5 LONGBOW CIRCLE, LYNNFIELD

UNDER AGREEMENT

UNDER AGREEMENT

UNDER AGREEMENT

UNDER AGREEMENT

21 PINTA DRIVE, TEWKSBURY 18 HICKORY HILL, WAKEFIELD 69 STARK AVENUE, REVERE 55 WASHINGTON STREET, GROVELAND

23 Wildewood Drive, Lynnfield*

405 Main Street, Lynnfield

7 Homestead Road, Lynnfield

4 Michaels Road, Lynnfield

26 Edgemere Road, Lynnfield

55 Pillings Pond Road, Lynnfield

4 Gerry Road, Lynnfield

527 Salem Street U12, Lynnfield

56 Jordan Avenue, Wakefield

4 Ravenwood Road, Peabody

23 Erwin Road, N. Reading*

17 Shady Hill Road, Reading*

*representing buyer

Marjorie.Youngren@raveis.com 781-580-9357

www.MarjorieSells.com

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