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LYNNFIELD

WEEKLY NEWS

AUGUST 12, 2021 • VOL. 60, NO. 32 SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1957 16 PAGES • ONE DOLLAR

POSTAL CUSTOMER

LYNNFIELD, MA 01940

WOBURN, MA

PERMIT #168

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ECRWSSEDDM

PRSRT STD

Lynnfield’s got a gymnast star

By Daniel Kane

Brian Solomon has been doing gymnastics

for about as long as he can remember,

and plenty has changed over

the near decade since he started.

But still the passion that sparked the

first time he walked into a gym hasn’t

dimmed much.

“I probably realized this was something

I wanted to do when I was really

little,” Solomon said. “I had just started

and I remember every time I learned a

new skill it was just a lot of fun. I just

wanted to keep learning new things.”

Solomon, now a sophomore at

Lynnfield High School, has learned

plenty — especially in the gym. At age

15, Solomon is a nationally-competitive

Level 10 gymnast, the highest level in

the USA Gymnastics (USAG) Junior

GYMNAST, PAGE 2

PHOTO |SPENSER HASAK

Lynnfield gymnast Brian Solomon works on his pommel horse routine at

GymStreet USA in Wilmington.

Lynnfield delivering a healthy message

By anne Marie ToBin

A Healthy Lynnfield (AHL) is taking

another positive step in making sure

that parents have the tools they need to

keep their kids healthy.

On Monday, the results of a survey of

parents and caregivers addressing perceived

norms, attitudes and preventive

behaviors were the subject of a presentation

by Scott Formica of Social Science

Evaluation Inc. to the AHL coalition.

“This survey is hugely valuable to

our work at A Healthy Lynnfield,”

PHOTO |THOR JOURGENSEN

said AHL Substance Use Prevention

A Healthy Lynnfield’s Substance Use Prevention Coordinator Peg Sallade, Coordinator Peg Sallade. “This will

says that community involvement is key to coming up with solutions

around substance abuse.. SUBSTANCE ABUSE, PAGE 3

A vision

for Willis

Woods

By anne Marie ToBin

The town is on pace to become a part of

what is being touted as a unique project

designed to protect and preserve hundreds

of acres of open space at the intersection

of four neighboring communities.

Lynnfield Director of Planning and

Conservation Emilie Cademartori said she

has been informed by the Metropolitan

Area Planning Council (MAPC) that

Lynnfield has been awarded funding to

participate in the agency’s technical assistance

program (TAP).

“Preservation of this undeveloped

acreage holds the potential for a large,

connected wooded-trail network as well

as access to the Ipswich River,” said

Cademartori

Titled “A Vision for Willis Woods,” the

grant will support the development of a

regional effort to create a vision, and ultimately

a work plan, for open space at

the intersection of the communities of

Lynnfield, Middleton, North Reading and

Peabody.

Working with MAPC, Lynnfield will

act as the lead community. The vision

plan will focus on perpetual protection of

this large collection of contiguous open

space.

WOODS, PAGE 2

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2

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 12, 2021

A shared

vision

for Willis

Woods

PHOTO |SPENSER HASAK

Lynnfield gymnast Brian Solomon specializes in the pommel horse and floor routines.

GYMNAST

From page 1

Olympics Program.

Solomon already boasts

an impressive list of accomplishments,

starting with

a Massachusetts Level 10

Championship in April. He

finished as a Massachusetts

state medalist, Region 6 champion

and medalist and USAG

National Championship

qualifier.

Solomon competes in six

events: floor, pommel horse,

rings, vault, parallel bars and

horizontal bar, each of which

are scored individually and

combined for an all-around

score.

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Competitions have taken

Solomon and his family all

over the country, including

the Horton Invitational in Fort

Worth, Texas, a few weeks ago,

where he finished eighth overall

for his age group.

But right at the top of the list

for Solomon was qualifying for

and competing in his first national

championship in 2019.

“You’re around all of the best

guys in the country,” Solomon

said. “Most of them have been

there before and all of them

are committed to colleges. You

look up to them and want to be

like them.”

Solomon knows that getting

to that level takes plenty of commitment.

He spends so much

time training at Gymstreet USA

in Wilmington that he said it’s

almost like a second home. He

trains four to five hours a day

for most of the week, and with

all that time comes a strong

connection with his teammates,

just like in any sport.

“All my years in the gyms

I had a really good team

around me and it was basically

a family,” Solomon said.

“Through the years there have

been a lot of better guys than

me, so you really start to look

up to them.

“Everyone is really close.

We’re always hanging out together

and then at practice

we’re working hard together.”

The pandemic shook that up a

little bit. Gyms were obviously

closed down for a large stretch

of time last year, which resulted

in Solomon training at home

over Zoom calls. Even the 2020

National Championships were

canceled by USAG. Now, as

competitions return, Solomon

is finding there’s still plenty to

get used to.

“We’ve had a couple of little

dual competitions with other

local gyms,” Solomon said.

“States and regionals will be

virtual this year.

“I haven’t done a virtual meet

yet, but I think it will basically

be the same for us,” he said.

“I’ve heard from other people

that it’s just a little weird.”

Weird or not, the young athlete

will still be working hard

to keep his impressive gymnastics

career trending upward.

He has aspirations to compete

in college, even if the odds are

stacked against men’s gymnastics

itself.

“There’s a lot less college opportunity

for the sport,” he said.

“A lot of schools are dropping

their programs and there’s only

about a dozen out there, so it’s a

lot harder to get on a team. The

sport is not mainstream. But my

goal is to make it on a college

team and hopefully even more

beyond that.”

WOODS

From page 1

The aggregate area includes

various conservation-owned

properties, municipal water

district lands and large, privately-owned

parcels, all adjacent

to the Ipswich River and two

miles of the abandoned Salem-

Lowell Rail Line.

“Our town is truly grateful

for this opportunity to work collaboratively

with the towns of

Middleton and North Reading

and the City of Peabody to

preserve this vast area of undeveloped

forest,” said Lynnfield

Town Administrator Robert

Dolan. “Our four communities,

and clearly the larger region, increasingly

depend on these open

spaces to safeguard our natural

resources and strengthen our

climate resiliency. This grant

award marks a tremendous step

in advancing those goals.”

“This is wonderful news

for Lynnfield, North Reading,

Middleton and Peabody, as this

grant will help further their collective

efforts to preserve hundreds

of acres of shared open

space, protect local drinking

water sources and provide more

passive recreational opportunities

for all residents,” said

House Minority Leader Bradley

H. Jones Jr. (R-North Reading).

“My thanks to the Metropolitan

Area Planning Council for recognizing

that the proposed ‘A

Vision for Willis Woods’ will

offer many tangible, long-term

environmental benefits to all

four communities and to the region

as a whole.”

“The City of Peabody is

pleased to see this vision to

connect recreation trails to

the Peabody Independence

Greenway,” said Peabody

Assistant Director of Planning

Brendan Callahan. “The development

of a work plan and

shared vision between the

neighboring towns will move

the communities towards the region’s

goal to link our existing

trail network system.”

MAPC, Essex County

Greenbelt, the Lynnfield Center

Water District, Ipswich River

Watershed Association and

other critical regional stakeholders

have long expressed

interest in preservation of this

area.

The project has recently

come into focus with the recent

activity surrounding the

pending private sale of 20 acres

of forested land in Lynnfield,

known as Richardson Green,

to developer Angus Bruce, who

has proposed a 16-home development.

The property is one of

the last unprotected parcels in

Lynnfield, and a possible “keystone”

to this larger area.

The town has a right of first

refusal on the land at a price tag

of $2.7 million or it can assign

that right to a nonprofit organization,

such as Essex County

Greenbelt. Should the town

choose to do neither, the land —

located between Sagamore Golf

Course, Ipswich River and the

town’s water district wellfields

— will proceed to sale for the

development of housing.

In January 2021, Selectman

Phil Crawford said that given

current circumstances, the

town was not looking to spend

such a hefty sum of money

on the parcel despite having a

$200,000 commitment from

the Conservation Commission.

Allowing the land to proceed

to sale with Bruce, however, is

also not ideal.

“Nobody really wants the

development,” said Crawford,

referring to Bruce’s plans. “The

town doesn’t need 16 more

homes when there’s already a

school capacity issue.”

Since then, the town has

obtained a $1.6 million grant

bringing the town’s total available

funds available to purchase

the property to approximately

$1.8 million, Crawford said on

Sunday.

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Check the real estate section!


AUGUST 12, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

Lynnfield delivering a healthy message

SUBSTANCE ABUSE

From page 1

allow us to keep pulling everything

together, as there are multiple

aspects to this. The data

was really valid to help deliver

a normative message to support

and uplift the positive behavior

of parents. This data allows us

to celebrate the good things in

the community.”

The survey was conducted

this spring. Parents with at

least one child in grades 5-12 in

Lynnfield schools were eligible

to participate, with 349 parents

and caregivers responding to 82

questions.

The questions focused on six

key areas: home and community

life, health and wellness,

communication, attitude and

beliefs, parenting behaviors and

preventive support.

The results showed that parents’

opinions varied widely

when it came to gender. Parents

whose oldest child is female

said they are more likely to feel

concerned about limited activities

for youth and feel concerned

about academics. Parents whose

oldest child is male didn’t say

anything about academics or

activities; they focused instead

on alcohol consumption, saying

they were more likely to think

it’s okay to allow youth alcohol

consumption at home and at another

family’s home if done responsibly

and not excessively.

“That’s more of a message

that says that parents are talking

to their daughters about substance

use, but not their sons,”

Sallade said. “They need to be

talking to both.”

The survey ranked several

major concerns parents have

about their children, the top one

being technology (cell phones,

screen time, social media),

followed by emotional and

mental health (anxiety, depression)

and youth social culture

(friendships, cliques, exclusion,

teasing). Other areas of concern

were academics, community

culture (adults modeling unhealthy

behaviors) and social

justice.

Results showed that the community

is strong when it comes

to parents knowing where their

children are, who they are with

and where they will be when

out with their friends.

Ninety-four percent of parents

said they have discussed

family guidelines regarding

alcohol use, while 96 percent

A sign of good things to come

said they had discussed safety

strategies when children find

themselves in alcohol and/or

drug settings and 53 percent

had conversations with other

parents about their own alcohol

and drug policies.

The survey identified several

areas as opportunities for improvement,

the top one being

parents’ belief that Lynnfield

adults do not listen to what

children say. Parents said feel

they are pressured to drink socially,

have limited awareness

of community- or school-based

support regarding mental health

or substance use, believe that

parents are less likely to respect

values held by different races

and cultures, believe that too

many parents turn a blind eye to

underage alcohol and drug use

and say that adult alcohol consumption

at school-sponsored

athletic events is a problem in

Lynnfield.

In terms of grade level, parents

whose oldest child is in

middle school are more likely

to feel it’s wrong for youth to

drink. They were also more

likely to spend time together as

a family and felt more comfortable

calling other parents.

High school parents are more

likely to visually assess their

children when they come home

and be concerned about youth

substance abuse, yet many

knowingly allow their children

to attend parties. Many said

they talked with their children

during the school year about the

risks of alcohol.

“There really weren’t any

real surprises, much of the data

met my expectations,” said

Vasundhra Ganju. “Most of it I

could relate to.”

“There’s a lot to celebrate

here, which is not always the

case,” said Formica. “There

were a lot of positives here.”

“I think that all parents

should hear what Scott said,”

said Police Capt. Nick Secatore.

“It’s an eye opener. These are

things that people have to hear.”

Sallade said the survey is just

the beginning. AHL will host

a coffee hour this fall for the

community to share the results

and will also be establishing a

parent advisory committee.

“Parents hear messages and

programming better when they

are involved in the solutions,”

Sallade said. “Our invitation

will be to be part of the solution

and to work with us in using the

data to guide the strategies.”

We want to hear

from you!

Send us a letter at

editor@weeklynews.net.

Letters should be no more

than 300 words.

PHOTO | JAKOB MENENDEZ

From left to right, Donald Martin, Steve Todisco, Doreen DiFillippo, John Michalski, Karen Nescembeni, and Kirk

Mansfield join together in celebration of the newly-installed Pope-Richard Lynnfield Historical Center sign.


4

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 12, 2021

LYNNFIELD

WEEKLY NEWS

(USPS Permit #168)

Telephone: 781-593-7700 • Fax: 781-581-3178

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903

News and Advertising Offices: 110 Munroe St., Lynn, MA 01901

Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

www.weeklynews.net

Editor: Sophie Yarin syarin@essexmediagroup.com

Reporter: Anne Marie Tobin atobin@essexmediagroup.com

Sports Editor: Mike Alongi malongi@essexmediagroup.com

Advertising Reps: Ralph Mitchell rmitchell@essexmediagroup.com

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Retail Price: $1.00

Deadlines: News: Monday, noon; Display Ads: Monday, noon;

Classified Ads: Monday, noon;

No cancellations accepted after deadline.

The Lynnfield Weekly News is published 52 times per year on Thursday by Essex

Media Group, Inc. No issue is printed during the week of Christmas. The Lynnfield

Weekly News is delivered via US Mail to all homes in Lynnfield. It is also

available in several locations throughout Lynnfield. The Lynnfield Weekly News

will not be responsible for typographical or other errors in advertisements, but will

reprint that part of an advertisement in which a typographical error occurs if notified

immediately. Advertisers must notify the Lynnfield Weekly News of any errors in

advertisements on the FIRST day of insertion. The publisher reserves the right to

reject, omit or edit any copy offered for publication. POSTMASTER: Send address

changes to Lynnfield Weekly News, P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903. © 2016 Essex

Media Group, Inc.

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or call 781-593-7700, ext. 1239

Monday 8/02

Arrests

Michael Kennedy, 41, of 63

Prescott St., Apt. 2., Reading,

was arrested and charged

with trespassing at 2:28 p.m.

Monday.

Complaints

A report of juvenile offenses

at 1:09 p.m. Monday at 4 Elliot

Road. A caller reported she has

video footage of kids at her

front door. Police said there

was no property damage and

the kids appeared to be playing

ding-dong ditch.

Juvenile offenses were

reported at 9:42 p.m. Monday at

58 Pillings Pond Road. A caller

reported she was being harassed

by a group of kids on bicycles,

who were ringing her doorbell a

few times and knocking on her

door very loudly.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 4:35

p.m. Monday at 4 Magnolia

Drive. A person walked into the

station to report stolen tools.

TUESDAY 8/03

Complaints

A report of juvenile offenses

at 9:14 p.m. Tuesday at 14

Yorkshire Drive. A caller reported

youths rang her doorbell

and rode off on their bicycles.

Police spoke with several

youths at the high school, who

agreed not to ring doorbells

anymore.

Vandalism

A report of malicious destruction

of property at 7:26 p.m.

Tuesday at Panera Bread, 430

Have a story to share?

Need a question answered?

contactus@essexmedia.group

Police Log

Market St. A caller reported

several youths damaged the

restroom.

WEDNESDAY 8/04

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash with personal injury at

6:15 p.m. Wednesday on S

Broadway.

Complaints

A report of a suspicious

person at 12:36 p.m.

Wednesday on Summer Street.

A caller reported a man was

urinating in public. The man left

prior to police arrival.

Theft

A larceny was reported at

10:32 a.m. Wednesday at 5

Durham Drive. A caller reported

jewelry was stolen from her

drawer.

A stolen package was reported

at 4:26 p.m. Wednesday

at 375 N Broadway.

Vandalism

Malicious destruction of

property was reported at 8:30

a.m. Wednesday at Lynnfield

Commons at 375 N Broadway.

A man reported his car was

keyed and the tail light was

damaged.

THURSDAY 8/05

Vandalism

A report of motor vehicle vandalism

at 9:52 p.m. Thursday

at Boston Sports Club at 425

Walnut St.

FRIDAY 8/06

Accidents

Looking for a house?

Check the real estate section!

A report of a hit-and-run

motor vehicle crash at 9:42 a.m.

Friday on Condon Circle.

SATURDAY 8/07

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 4:32 p.m. Saturday on

Condon Circle.

Complaints

On Saturday at 10:43 p.m., a

resident of 375 N Broadway reported

threatening notes left at

his door. The caller was advised

that this was a civil issue.

At 11:08 p.m., a loud party

was reported on Locust St near

Lynnfield Glass. Partygoers

were advised to turn it down at

midnight.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 4:59

p.m. Saturday at Amazon Books

at 1115 Market St. A manager

reported someone stole items

from the store. Alexander

Meador, 18, of 191A Green

St., Marblehead, was issued

a summons for shoplifting by

asportation.

MONDAY 8/09

Suspicious Activity

An officer was dispatched to

29 Pillings Pond Rd at 12:01

a.m. on Monday after a homeowner

said they heard footsteps

on the basement stairs. The

house was searched and found

to be all clear.

Complaints

A report of loud music at

12:55 a.m. Monday at 6 Ivanhoe

Drive. The party agreed to turn

the music down.

We want to hear

from you!

Send us a letter at

editor@weeklynews.net.

Letters should be no more

than 300 words.


AUGUST 12, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 5

Religious News

Ave Maria Parish is a Catholic

community of faith comprising

two worship sites in

Lynnfield: Our Lady of the Assumption

Church located at 758

Salem Street and Saint Maria

Goretti Church located at 112

Chestnut Street.

Fully-vaccinated people

are no longer required to wear

masks or socially distance in our

churches. All non-vaccinated

and partially-vaccinated people

are advised to continue to wear

masks. If you wish to continue

to practice social distancing,

designated pews in both churches

have been reserved. Pre-registration

for Masses is no longer

required.

Our Mass schedule is as follows:

WEEKEND MASS SCHED-

ULE:

- 4PM on Saturday at OLA

- 7:30AM on Sunday at OLA

- 9:30AM on Sunday at SMG

- 11AM on Sunday at OLA

DAILY MASS SCHEDULE:

OLA - 9am on Mondays,

Wednesdays, and Fridays

SMG - 9am on Tuesdays and

Thursdays

The Church of Jesus Christ of

Latter-day Saints

400 Essex St., Lynnfield

www.churchofjesuschrist.org

(781) 334-5586

Bishop Aaron Udy

Missionaries: 978-896-9434

Sacrament meeting: 10 a.m.

Sunday School/Youth/Children

Class: 11 a.m.

Youth Night: Wednesdays at

7 p.m.

Visitors Welcome!

Centre Congregational

Church

5 Summer St., Lynnfield

781-334-3050

www.centre-church.org

Facebook.com/Centre-

ChurchUCC

office@centre-church.org

YouTube.com/c/centrecongregationalchurch/

In the Centre since 1720,

Centre Church is an open and

affirming congregation of the

United Church of Christ. No

matter who you are or where

you are on your life’s journey,

you are welcome at Centre

Church.

Our worship services are

held at 10 a.m. every Sunday

morning.

Our summer services are in

the air-conditioned chapel. All

worshippers are asked to wear a

mask while indoors for worship

until further notice. Following

the service, we gather on the

front lawn for fellowship.

Our pastor, the Rev. Nancy

Rottman, and our Director of

Faith Formation, Ms. Larainne

Wilson, strive to provide inspiring,

down-to-earth messages

for people of all ages that are

applicable to everyday life.

We are committed to providing

children a warm, safe, and

inclusive environment. We will

be offering a summer program

for children called “Compassion

Camp.”

The overall theme is Be

Loved, Be Kind, Be You.

Wakefield-Lynnfield United

Methodist Church

Peace, Hope & Virtual Hugs

Deb Willis Bry, cell: 781-521-

9726

Office Assistant, Wakefield-Lynnfield

United Methodist

Church

Assistant Coordinator, Greater

Boston Project Linus

Wakefield-Lynnfield United

Methodist Church, 273 Vernon

St., Wakefield, Mass., 01880

Church Office: 781-245-1359,

Parsonage: 781-245-0338

Email: WLUMC272@gmail.

com

www.facebook.com/methodistchurchwakefield

www.instagram.com/methodistchurchwakefield

*A Project Linus Blanket

Drop-Off Location*

www.bostonprojectlinus.com

Messiah Lutheran Church

708 Lowell St., Lynnfield

(corner of Lowell & Chestnut)

is currently open for in-person

worship Sunday morning

at 9:30 am (summer hours).

Worship services will also be

streamed live on Facebook.

Like us on Facebook: facebook.

com/Messiah-Lutheran-Church

Worship times: Sunday

mornings at 9:30 am, Sunday

evening devotion on Facebook

Live at 6:30 pm, Wednesday

evening Prayer time at 7:01 pm

on Facebook Live.

Messiah Lutheran Church

is served by Rev. Dr. Jeremy Pekari,

and Rev. David Brezina.

Temple Emmanuel/

Wakefield

For more information about

Temple Emmanuel, a member

of the Jewish Reconstructionist

Communities, call 781-245-

1886 or see our Facebook page

or website at www.Wakefield-

Temple.org.

Request service links to the

Zoom streaming: info@WakefieldTemple.org

Shabbat services: Friday, 7:30

p.m.: June 25.

Saturday mornings at 9:30 am:

June 5 and 19, July 17.

Lynnfield celebrates Purple Heart Day

Lynn-Lynnfield Line

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8/14 Saturday 12:00 to 2:00

and 8/15 Sunday 12:00 to 2:00

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TOP REALTY TEAM

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PHOTO | LYNNFIELD VETERANS SERVICES’

On Purple Heart Day 2021, as Americans paused to remember and honor the brave men

and women who were either wounded on the battlefield or paid the ultimate sacrifice with

their lives, the Town of Lynnfield recognized its Purple Heart recipients by projecting an

image of the medal on the side of its Meeting House the evenings of August 6th and 7th.

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net


6

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 12, 2021

Seniors News

PHOTO | CLAIRE FOUSTOUKOS

Last week, the towns seniors were able to go on their first outing since the beginning of the pandemic. They went to Kennebunkport, Maine, stopping at

The Clam Shack for fried seafood.

For the Weekly NeWs

LYNN — One result of the

global pandemic and its longterm

isolation is the need to find

innovative ways through which

people can stay connected.

One such effort includes a

new tool that Greater Lynn

Senior Services (GLSS), which

serves town residents, is piloting

called Uniper — a device

that plugs into your television

set, along with a small camera

which perches on top, enabling

one-on-one communication

with case managers, healthcare

providers, counselors, family

and friends.

Tapping into senior connections

“The COVID-19 pandemic

pretty much destroyed the limited

social connections that

many older people or adults

living with disabilities already

experience,” said Kathryn C.

Burns, GLSS’ chief executive

officer. “Research shows that

isolation, particularly long-term

isolation, has a very negative effect

on people’s overall health,

significantly contributing to

premature death from all causes

and increasing a person’s risk of

diseases like dementia.”

Uniper loads an individual’s

contacts into its device,

allowing for immediate virtual

Rooted in

Your Health

PILGRIM REHABILITATION

& SKILLED NURSING

Our team of clinical professionals get you home feeling

healthier and stronger following an illness or surgery. You at

your best! We are proud to offer high quality rehabilitative

care through our Steps to Strength Program including:

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connection.

“This is really the primary

reason we chose Uniper over

the many other platforms we

reviewed,” said Valerie Parker

Callahan, director of planning

and development. “We view

it first and foremost as a communications

tool to help people

better manage their health

and well-being, with Uniper’s

built-in prog amming as a secondary

— but very helpful

— add-on to reduce social isolation

and promote stronger

connections with the wider

community.”

It is easy to use with a simple

96 Forest Street • Peabody, MA 01960

www.pilgrimrehab.org

remote that allows people to

quickly transition from Uniper

back to television programming.

“Many platforms that allow

for virtual connection require a

computer, tablet or smartphone,

which many older people do not

have and might be uncomfortable

using,” Parker

Callahan noted. “But Uniper

only requires a TV, which most

people already have and use

regularly.”

Uniper’s existing content includes

access to hundreds of

videos — travel, arts and culture,

music and educational

programs, as well as “live” programming

that includes exercise

and other classes, peer-led

discussion groups, support

groups and more — which are

available throughout the day

and scheduled by Uniper. GLSS

is developing its own content,

which will be available to users

through a separate channel, and

is also working on developing

some live programming, too.

“We envision, for example,

that our Wellness Pathways fall

prevention and health self- management

workshops will be offered

over the Uniper platform,

as well as group and individual

counseling through our Mobile

Mental Health and Family

Caregiver Support programs

in a private, HIPAA-compliant

setting,” Parker Callahan said,

“This would be in addition to

virtualcase manager visits with

GLSS consumers.”

UniperCare is an innovative,

Israeli-based company with a

West Coast U.S. hub. Its programming

is starting to pop

up all around the country, but

GLSS is its first Massachusettsbased

customer.

One of the Uniper’s unique

features is the work they

have been doing with Jewish

Federation of North America,

connecting Holocaust survivors,

their descendants and

people of Jewish faith with tailored

supports and group meetings,

bringing together people

from all across the country in

celebration of some Jewish

holidays during the pandemic.

They plan to continue this programming

moving forward.

Uniper also offers a lot of content

in Russian and Spanish.

GLSS is initially hoping

to sign up 100 people age 60

and older or adults living with

disabilities in its service area

of Lynn, Lynnfield, Nahant,

Saugus and Swampscott for

the free one-year service. The

product will be reevaluated

after a year and could last beyond

that, depending on its results

and continued interest on

the part of funders.

Uniper offers training and

a helpline to troubleshoot any

issues users encounter. The program

is supported by funding

from the Administration for

Community Living as well

as funding through the Older

American Act administered

through the Massachusetts

Executive Office of Elder

Affairs, and a grant from

Beverly and Addison Gilbert

Hospitals, operated by Beth

Israel Lahey Health.

Interested individuals can

contact Andrew Wallace,

GLSS’ Title III Planner, at 781-

477-6702 or email awallace@

glss.net. More information can

be found at www.glss.net.


AUGUST 12, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 7

Frances R. Söderberg Scholarship

STAR OF

THE WEEK

Keeping history

alive in Lynnfield

FOR THE WEEKLY NEWS

Soderberg Insurance Services

Inc. is offering an educational

scholarship dedicated in memory

of the agency’s co-founder

Frances Soderberg. Frances was

an active member of the North

Shore community for over 50

years.

Her youngest daughter Karen

was born with Down’s Syndrome.

Mrs. Soderberg was

instrumental in the integration

of recreational and educational

programs for children and

young adults who are mentally

disabled.

The Frances R. Soderberg

Memorial Scholarship will be

awarded to an individual who

shares her same passion to help

those with special needs. Any

current college student, or college-bound

student, who shares

her commitment to the education

of individuals with disabilities

and improving their overall

quality of life is invited to apply.

The candidate would be a

student pursuing a degree or other

higher education/vocational

career that will help those with

disabilities. The selection committee

would also like to see evidence

of the student’s involvement

with the special-needs

community.

Please visit our website

where you will find the Scholarship

Application. Feel free to

include a personal statement, including

personal and professional

goals to info@soderbergins.

com. Applications will be accepted

through November 30th.

The award will be made in 2021.

Tree committee seeking photo

contest entries

PHOTO | ANNE MARIE TOBIN

Kirk Mansfield addresses a question during the August 9

meeting of the town’s Historical Commision, of which he is

chairman.

BY SAM MINTON

Preserving history is no easy

task, but it’s something Kirk

Mansfield has been tasked with

nonetheless.

Mansfield has been a part of

Lynnfield’s Historical Commission

for two years and has been

chairman for about a year.

According to the Lynnfield

resident, his family has a deep

connection to the town. His

great-grandparents moved to

Lynnfield over 100 years ago

after living in Western Massachusetts.

“They bought this little dirt

road with four or five cottages

on it on Pillings Pond. My

great-grandfather, he named the

road after himself and he restored

the cottages,” said Mansfield.

“They stayed in the family

until the 70s and then they all got

sold off except for one — which

is the one I’m living in now.”

Mansfield added that he has

always lived in Lynnfield and

loves its history. As chairman

of the Historical Commission,

he enjoys getting to learn about

elements of the town’s story that

can’t exactly be found in any

historical documents.

“(Meeting) older people that

are still in Lynnfield that can tell

you a story, is truly my favorite

part because there’s not a lot of

them left,” he said. “But they

can sit down and tell you stories

about the town that we don’t

have in our history books. It’s

just great to hear them talk about

what life was like in Lynnfield

70 or 80 years ago, and that’s

really my favorite part, meeting

the people.”

Being a part of the Historical

Commission, Mansfield believes

that it’s important to keep

history alive and pass it on to the

next generations.

“You don’t learn from erasing

history, you learn from understanding

it,” he said. “If you just

bought a brand-new house in a

beautiful neighborhood, don’t

you wonder where that came

from, where that land came from

and the people that developed

it way before your house was

built? We should always learn

from the past.”

FOR THE WEEKLY NEWS

The Lynnfield Tree Committee

is once again presenting

a photo contest, Lynnfield

Through The Lens, for residents

to show us your best view of

Lynnfield’s trees.

All ages are invited to participate,

with six categories to

choose from and three chances

to win. A winning photo can be

submitted starting on August 15

until September 25, 2021, and

should be in digital format, preferably

jpeg, with a high enough

resolution to be reproduced as a

quality print.

Winning photos from each

category will be matted and

prominently displayed at the library

in October. Please remember:

This needs to be a tree in

Lynnfield, and the person submitting

should be the photographer.

The award ceremony and

presentation of prizes will be at

the 1714 Meeting House on Saturday,

October 2, at 10 a.m. The

grand prize for the winning photo

from each category will be a

native tree.

Northrup Associates

Helen Bolino

REALTOR ®, CBR

Chairman Circle Gold

2020 Boston Magazine Top Producer

26 Main Street

Lynnfield, MA 01940

Cell: 617-797-2222

WHAT IS YOUR

HOME REALLY

WORTH?

MORE THAN YOU

THINK!

Age 12 to 18? Under age 12?

Enter to win a tree with three

photos of your choice subject

matter.

Take a closer look at the trees

we have around us and capture

them in a photograph. Do you

have a tree that is Most Magnificent?

It can be mighty, majestic,

unusual or simply distinctive

to you. At this time of year,

trees have food for both wildlife

and humans on their mission to

spread seeds for future tree generations.

Forest Food comes in

many forms; fruit and cones are

the most common. Trees provide

Habitat for many, be it for nesting,

shelter, food or cover from

prey. Living Together, trees

support life in different ways. A

vine that needs light uses a tree

to reach the upper canopy. Fungi

and lichen live happily together

on living trees, but also on decomposing

dead trees.

To help applicants prepare

to enter this town-wide photo

contest, the Tree Committee is

presenting a special program, A

Photo Walk on the Trail to Partridge

Island, with local photographer

Greg Pronevitz. On Saturday,

August 28, we will meet at

the trailhead for a nature-themed

photo walk through one of our

conservation areas — Partridge

Island. Greg will highlight how

to effectively capture our relationship

with trees and nature

by taking cues from the photo

contest categories. This is appropriate

for photographers of all

ages; under 12 must be accompanied

by an adult. This is open

to Lynnfield residents only. For

the best experience for all of us,

there will be two groups with a

limit of 12 people per group (including

children) with pre-registration

required. Join us!

To pre-register for the photo

walk or submit contest photos,

you can directly access a link

from the town website (www.

town.lynnfield.ma.us) or from

www.lynnfieldtreecommittee.

org. Questions? Contact the

Conservation Commission office

at 781-334-9495 or email

the Tree Committee at lynnfieldtreecommittee@gmail.com.

Call for information on current market conditions!

Cell: 617-797-2222


8

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 12, 2021

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Think before you cut

To the editor:

I went for a walk around my

neighborhood this morning as I

have often done in the almost 30

years I have lived in town.

It was the first sunny morning

I have been able to walk in a

while. While it was enjoyable, it

was also almost alarmingly striking

how very hot it seemed even

though it was only 8:30 in the

morning and the reported temperature

was 74 degrees.

What made it seem so hot?

Full sun. Blazing sun. The reason

I have likely worn tracks in the

streets around my house is because

our neighborhood was so

lovely, green and wooded.

Both of my kids were born

in late spring. I was so grateful I

didn’t have to worry about excessive

heat or sun damaging their

new skin when I walked my babies

because the streets were cool

and shaded.

No more. Developers seem

to have it in for our trees. What

were once beautiful wooded lots

with pines that often hosted great

horned owls are now barren, marginally-landscaped

altars to pavement

and grass.

Sometimes, even when the

developer left a tree or two, the

new owners cut them down. This

is happening all over town. It’s

amazing what a difference a few

trees can make.

I took the temperature at the

corner of Bourque and Pillings

Pond roads. According to my

phone, the ambient temperature

was 84 degrees; the pavement

was 138 degrees. At the other

end of the street, by the path to

the high school, where there are a

lot of trees, the pavement was 59

degrees. Even in the sun, at this

end of the street, the pavement

was only 81 degrees.

Out of curiosity, I also took

the temperature of the grass in

the shade behind the crumb-tire

fields and it was 62 degrees; the

fields were 148.5 degrees, which

is not too bad.

A couple of summers ago, I

wondered about the fields on a

hot summer day and I got a reading

of 178 degrees on the turf.

Again, it’s amazing what a

difference trees can make. It’s not

just the shade, which is glorious

on a hot day. They also cool the

air through evapotranspiration.

They provide beauty, privacy and

habitat. They control stormwater

and clear the air. Houses get

so much hotter when there are

no trees around, significantly increasing

energy consumption in

homes that use air conditioning.

In many cases, the decision to

remove trees significantly affects

the entire community. As we lose

trees, we lose free vector control

as owls and insect-eating birds

leave the area; air quality decreases;

other trees become more

likely to experience damage;

flooding increases and energy

consumption increases, further

increasing climate effects. When

asphalt replaces trees, it creates

a significant loss in groundwater

recharge as well as a significant

net increase in water usage and

wasting.

Property values significantly

decrease. You don’t often see

beautiful, treeless landscapes in

a real estate description. Who

wants to live in a parking lot?

Once a tree is gone, it cannot

be replaced. Think before you

cut.

Patricia Fabbri

100 Hemlock Road, Wakefield MA 01880

781-246-0810 ext. 1640

Fall 2021 Community Education Programs

and State Licensing Programs

APPRENTICE PROGRAMS

Construction Carpentry 1 - 4

Electrical 1 - 4, & Masters

Electrical Exam Prep

HVAC/Refrigeration Training

Plumbing Tier 1 - 4, & Masters

Plumbing Exam Prep

COMPUTER COURSES

Microsoft Office:

(Word, Excel & PowerPoint)

QuickBooks

Typing For the Beginner

Understanding Your Microsoft

Windows Personal Computer

ENRICHMENT COURSES

1031 Exchanges & Investments

Buying & Selling a House

Creative Cooking

Digital Photography

Effective Public Speaking

Floral Design

Knitting 1 & 2

Ukulele Lessons

Watercolor & Acrylic Art

Watercolor & Pastel Art

You Can Afford College

Classes fill fast – Register Early!

LANGUAGE COURSES

French 1

Let’s Talk Spanish

Spanish 1

MASS CONTINUING ED

CSL 12-Hour Update

Electrical 15-Hour Update

Electrical 6-Hour Update

Plumbing 6-Hour Update

MEDICAL COURSES

Biology

Chemistry

Electrocardiograph (EKG)

Phlebotomy Training

HEALTH & FITNESS

Cardio Belly Dancing

Zumba Gold

TRADE PREPARATION

40-Hour Real Estate Pre-License

Auto Body Repair

Auto Damage Appraisal

Auto Mechanics Basic & Advance

Basic Home Improvement

Fine Wood-Working

OSHA Construction Safety & Health

Small Engine Repair

Welding Basic & Advance Welding

Certification Testing Prep

To register on-line or for detailed course information visit us at:

www.neadulted.com or neadulted@gosignmeup.com

Community Schools’

Summer of Fun

Activities Aug 16 -20

Here is the Community

Schools’ Summer of Fun Activities

(SOFA) schedule for

the week of the 16-20. Visit the

Community Schools’ website at

lynnfield.k12ma.us for registration

information.

Programs cost $125 for

residents and $135 for non-residents,

unless otherwise specified.

All programs are held at the

high school, 275 Essex St.

Mini Movers Dance Studio

directs the program Dance It

Out: Fairy Tale Magic. The program

runs from 9 a.m. to noon,

and is oriented towards kids

ages 3-5. The cost is $125 for

residents and $135 for non-residents.

Eileen “Miss Lee” Papagni

directs the program Happy

Animal Habitats. The program

runs from 9 a.m. to noon, and is

initiated towards kids enrolled in

grades 1-4. The cost is $125 for

residents and $135 for non-residents.

Lisa & Francesca Pasciuto

both direct the program Backyard

Shenanigans. The program

runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and is

initiated towards kids enrolled in

grades K-5. The cost is $250 for

residents and $260 for non-residents.

Sports Zone 101 directs the

program Tournament of Champions:

Mystery Week. It runs

from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and is oriented

towards kids enrolled in

grades K-4. The cost is $250 for

residents and $260 for non-residents.

Pam Shapleigh directs

the program The Sweet Shoppe.

The program runs from 9 a.m.

to noon, and is initiated towards

kids enrolled in grades 2-4. The

cost is $125 for residents and

$135 for non-residents. Please

note: We cannot guarantee nuts/

peanuts are not included in the

food products used. This program

is not designed to handle

food allergies.”

Staff of Top Secret Science

directs the program Spectacular

Hands-On Science. The program

runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.,

and is oriented towards kids enrolled

in grades K-5. The cost is

$280 for residents and $290 for

non-residents.

Have a story to share?

Need a question answered?

contactus@essexmedia.group


AUGUST 12, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 9

Sports

North Shore Navigators win NECBL North title

By Mike Alongi

LYNN — The North Shore

Navigators are the champions

of the New England Collegiate

Baseball League’s Northern

Division and will play for their

first Fay Vincent Sr. Cup since

2010.

Thanks to Monday’s 4-2 win

at Fraser Field, fifth-seeded

North Shore completed a

two-game sweep of the second-seeded

Upper Valley

Nighthawks in the Northern

Division Finals. The Navs

earned the opportunity to clinch

the best-of-three set on their

home turf with the previous

night’s 5-0 shutout win in White

River Junction, Vt.

North Shore now awaits the

winner of the Southern Division

Finals between the top-seeded

Martha’s Vineyard Sharks

and fourth-seeded Danbury

Westerners, who are scheduled

to break a 1-1 series deadlock

during a deciding third game

on Tuesday in Oak Bluffs. The

NECBL Championship Series

will begin with the Navs traveling

to the South winner on

Wednesday before returning to

Lynn for Game 2 at 7:05 p.m.

Thursday.

As for the division-clinching

game, the Navs broke a scoreless

tie with all three runs they

ultimately needed in the bottom

of the second inning. Four

straight batters reached base

to start the frame as catcher

Cal Christofori (Santa Clara)

walked, designated hitter

Ryan Marra (Brown) was hit

by a pitch and shortstop Alex

Lemery (Marymount) singled

to right.

Right fielder Dylan Brazil’s

(Stetson) fielder’s choice drove

home the first North Shore run

before Marra scored on a wild

pitch during the next at-bat.

After Brazil stole second, he

scored when second baseman

Jonathan Luders (Seton Hall)

knocked a single through the

vacated right side of the infield.

Marra led off the fourth inning

with a single and was

balked over to second base.

Left fielder Jake McElroy’s

(Holy Cross) two-out infield hit

put runners on the corners, allowing

Marra to cross the plate

on a wild pitch for the second

time in the game.

North Shore starter Austin

Amaral (Stetson) worked

around a pair of first-inning

baserunners and then faced the

minimum over the next four

innings. Amaral finished his

second postseason start with

five total strikeouts and was

credited with a six-inning complete

game as the contest was

deemed official following more

than an hour-long rain delay.

Center fielder Brett Callahan

(Saint Joseph’s) scored on a

wild pitch and first baseman

Kyle Novak’s (James Madison)

run-scoring infield single cut

the Upper Valley deficit to 4-2

in the sixth, but the threat ended

as Amaral induced a double

play ball to Luders and snagged

a line drive back to the mound.

FILE PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Lynnfield native and North Shore Navigators infielder Jonathan Luders went 1-for-4 with an

RBI in a win over the Upper Valley Night Hawks in Game 2 of the NECBL North Division Final.

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Navigators starter Austin Amaral was credited with a six-inning,

complete-game victory after a rain delay caused the game

to end early Monday night.

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978.774.4080 giblees.com


10

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 12, 2021

‘The Gigi Method’ makes its way to the North Shore

By Mike Alongi

NAHANT — The town got

a special treat last Tuesday afternoon,

as former two-time

Olympic gold medalist and 17-

time major winner in doubles

tennis Gigi Fernández visited

to host her patented “The Gigi

Method” doubles tennis clinic at

the Nahant Tennis Club.

“It was an awesome day from

start to finish,” said Andrea

Gogolos, who is on the Board of

Directors at the Nahant Tennis

Club. “It’s so incredible to have

someone who reached the pinnacle

of their sport come in and

teach you a whole new way to

play tennis.”

Fernández is considered to

be one of the greatest doubles

players of all time. She is an

International Tennis Hall of

Famer and the winner of 17

Grand Slam doubles titles with

various partners along with two

Olympic gold medals.

In 2000, Fernández was

named Puerto Rican Athlete of

the Century. In October 2014,

espnW voted Gigi Fernández the

10th-most-influential Hispanic

athlete in history. The bigserving

and hard-hitting native

of San Juan, Puerto Rico was

the first female athlete from her

country to become a professional

in any sport.

Fernández was fiery, tenacious,

exuberant, and displayed

her emotions on the court freely

en route to 17 major doubles titles

with four different partners.

Fourteen of those titles were

shared with Natasha Zverera,

who complimented her spirited

partner perfectly. While the duo

weren’t complete opposites,

Zvereva’s all-court game balanced

her partner’s aggressive

mantra. Whereas Fernández

was fire, Zvereva was ice.

Appropriately, the pair entered

the Hall of Fame together in

2010.

In international competition,

Fernández represented

the United States and won gold

medals in doubles play alongside

Mary Jo Fernández in 1992

and 1996.

“Winning the Olympic gold

medal is a life-changing experience,

and nothing matches that,”

said Fernández. “Not many

people remember or relate to

the 17 Grand Slam victories, but

everyone remembers who won

the gold medal. No one can ever

take that away from you.”

Fernández now spends her

time coaching adult players

how to excel at doubles. She

travels the country doing clinics

and camps and hosts The Gigi

Method Tennis Camps for enthusiasts

who want more in-depth

instruction from Fernández.

Tuesday’s event included a

full schedule, with Fernández

breaking down The Gigi Method.

Her patented approach includes

six steps: positioning, court coverage,

the serve, the return, shot

selection and competition.

The clinic, which ran from

8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., also

covered:

— Positioning and coverage

at the net so you are not passed

— How to eliminate middle

confusion

— The secrets and benefits of

the stagger formation

— Movement patterns at the

net for optimal poaching

— How to beat the lobbers

“It was incredibly informative

and interesting, because

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Former two-time Olympic gold medalist and 17-time major winner Gigi Fernández, center,

brought her patented “The Gigi Method” tennis clinic to the Nahant Tennis Club last Tuesday.

her method and strategy are so

different from what a lot of us

have been taught about doubles

play,” said Gogolos. “We really

learned a lot, and it’s making me

want to take part in more of her

clinics in the future.”

The event was also a big day

for the Nahant Tennis Club, a

small nonprofit that resides on

the grounds of Nahant Country

Club. Nahant has a special connection

to the game of tennis,

having been the site of the firstever

tennis match, when Jim

Dwight and Fred Sears faced off

on Dr. William Appleton’s lawn

in 1874.

“We’re a small club and we

don’t have the big membership

or hallowed grounds that some

other bigger clubs have,” said

Gogolos. “To be able to have

an event like this and work with

an international tennis star is

just incredible and we’re very

fortunate.”

State champion St. Mary’s baseball team to hold celebratory golf day

By Mike Alongi

LYNN — To celebrate its

Division 2 state championship

victory last month, the St. Mary’s

baseball team will be hosting an

entire day of celebrations, which

include a golf tournament in

Lynnfield and a night of festivities

in Lynn on Aug. 20.

The day will begin at 4 p.m.

over at Reedy Meadow Golf

Course in Lynnfield, where the

team will host a nine-hole, shotgun-style

tournament until 7 p.m.

The celebration will then shift

over to Lynn, where Gannon

Municipal Golf Course will host

a “Night at the Races” event.

The “Night at the Races”

event will feature toy horses that

will be named after players and

coaches on the St. Mary’s championship

roster. Those horses can

then be bet on and moved via a

roll of the dice. There will also

be raffle prizes, a scratch ticket

board, a cash bar and appetizers

running until 10 p.m.

Those interested in donating

to the day or sponsoring some of

the events have several options.

An overall event sponsorship

costs $500 and includes eight

tickets, your name listed on the

event program and mentioned

throughout the day. A race or

golf cart sponsorship costs $250

and includes four tickets and

your name listed on the event

program. The cost to play in the

golf tournament and have access

to the celebration afterwards is

$125, while $100 will get you in

as a sponsor of a table or a golf

hole during the event. Those who

would only like to attend the celebration

event can do so for a

cost of $35.

All proceeds from the event

will go toward a championship

banquet for the St. Mary’s

players and coaches.

Those who wish to register

for golf must do so no later than

Friday, Aug. 13, as space is limited

to 80 players.

For more information or to

register, please contact St. Mary’s

head coach Derek Dana, St.

Mary’s assistant coach Tim Fila

or St. Mary’s Athletic Director

Jeff Newhall.

FILE PHOTO | JULIA HOPKINS

The St. Mary’s baseball team, which won its second straight Division 2 state title this year, will

be hosting a celebratory golf tournament at Lynnfield’s Reedy Meadow Golf Course on Monday,

Aug. 20.


AUGUST 12, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 11

Peabody, Lynnfield hold The 2 Cup tournament

PHOTOS | Spenser Hasak

From left, Janet Spanos of Amesbury, Anne Marie Twiss of Peabody, 2 Cup

organizer Maureen Fagundes of Peabody, and Deb Decillis of Lynn take part

in The 2 Cup Breast Cancer awareness fundraiser at King Rail Reserve Golf

Course last Friday.

From left, Deb Quinn of Peabody, Jo-Anne O’Brien Fay of Peabody, Maripat

Osborne of Peabody, and Doreen Donohue of Peabody take part in The 2 Cup

Breast Cancer awareness fundraiser.

From left, Kate Splaine of Boston, Patty Splaine of Hamilton, Joanne Diamantides of Lynn,

and Reba O’Donovan of Peabody decorated their carts with bras for The 2 Cup breast cancer

awareness fundraiser.

Standing, from left, Gail Anderson of Lynn, Dianne Hamilton

of Peabody, and Doreen Ortins of Peabody reenact the “see no

evil, hear no evil, speak no evil,” saying with Michelle Teixeira of

Peabody during The 2 Cup breast cancer awareness fundraiser

From left, Tricia L’Abbe of Peabody, Janet Yeremian of

Peabody, Debi Mitchell of Cranston, R.I., and Carol L’Abbe

of Peabody take part in The 2 Cup breast cancer awareness

fundraiser.

The “Boob-tenders” from left, Kathy Albertian of Tewksbury, Jayne Sheehan of Pembroke,

and Marianne Shauan operated the beverage cart during The 2 Cup breast cancer awareness

fundraiser.


12

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 12, 2021

Strumming lessons with a pro on

Lynnfield Common

PHOTOS | SPENSER HASAK

Dave Maloof performs on his ukulele for the crowd gathered at Lynnfield Common last

Tuesday.

Dave Maloof teaches Peter Barden, 5, of Lynnfield about the

history of ukuleles.

Sarah Bacci of Reading, left, and Hallie Barden, 2, of Lynnfield sing along during Dave

Maloof’s ukulele concert.

Jack Silva, 4,

of Lynnfield

sits in the lap

of his dad,

Cliff, as he

strums the

ukulele at

Lynnfield

Common.

MELKONIAN'S

NORTH READING

SUBARU

Michael Garabedian

Mike Garabedian

welcomes his friends and former customers

to NORTH READING SUBARU

Mike says he will beat any deal from any Subaru dealer!

Dave Maloof and Urwah Qazafi, 9, of Lynnfield discuss the

ukulele’s history as an instrument.

260 Main Street

North Reading MA 01864

Sales: 978 396 6090

Direct: 844 720 9034

mgarabedian@northreadingsubaru.com


AUGUST 12, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 13

Lynnfield middle schoolers get

vaxxed to the max

PHOTOS | JAKOB MENENDEZ

Brenda Fortin applies a bandage to the injection site on 12-year-old Brendan Flynn’s arm.

Adrian Marton, a 12-year-old who goes to school in Lynnfield,

receives his first COVID-19 shot.

Brenda Fortin,

a pharmacist from

PelMeds in Waltham,

was the lead for the Lynnfield

Middle School COVID-19

vaccine clinic.

AUTO | HOME | BUSINESS | LIFE

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info@supinoinsurance.com

Anyone receiving a shot in the middle-school gym was mandated must wait 15 minutes before

leaving.

www.supinoinsurance.com


14

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 12, 2021

LYNNFIELD

24 ASHWOOD RD

$539,900

B: Robert Skane & Tyavanna Skane

S: Michael Petraglia & Nora Shams

26 EDGEMERE RD

$1,030,000

B: Cristina L Petersen & Brett J

Petersen

S: Elaine Moorman & Stephen

Moorman

1 FALL WAY

$625,000

B: 24 Bow Inv Prop LLC

S: Gloria J Flordeliza

3 LARA RD

$1,150,000

B: Alyssa A Dimaria & Peter J Dimaria

S: Jessica Capodilupo & Paul

Capodilupo

25 MELCH RD

$725,000

B: Jeffrey Lupien & Jennifer Lupien

S: Capitol Management LLC

22 PARTRIDGE LN U:22

$550,000

B: Erika Streib

S: Juiling Lu Tr, Tr for Juiling Lu LT

855 SALEM ST

$557,000

B: Alessandra D Barbosa & Eber

DaSilva-Dossantos

S: Carolina N Nascimento & Edson F

Nascimento

909 SALEM ST

$625,000

B: Hyve Development Grp LLC

S: John F Alzate

12 SAUNDERS RD

$710,000

B: Jeffrey W Eldridge

S: Eleanor R Campbell & Norman W

Campbell

PEABODY

5 BENEVENTO CIR

$875,000

B: Lisa A Gendreau & Roland G

Gendreau

S: Susan D Stone

25 CEDAR GROVE AVE

$465,000

B: Eric Morin

S: James A Lyons

4403 DEERFIELD CIR U:4403

$440,000

B: Richard Cumming

S: Sandra Lerner

1 DUBLIN RD

Real Estate Transfers

$755,000

B: Venetia R Christopher & Christos

Vlachos

S: Kenneth J Mclean & Gregory J

Mclean

25 EISENHOWER RD

$721,000

B: Daniela Lewis & Edward J Lewis

S: Jennifer S Lawrence & James A

Spinos

5 FAIRVIEW RD

$640,000

B: Jennifer Blood

S: Christopher Garofalo & Jennifer

Garofalo

1 GEDNEY DR

$777,777

B: German E Mancera & Ingrid D

Pardo

S: Deena E Cole & Joel C Solimine

12 GRANT ST

$655,000

B: Laila Mouaouia

S: John R Brackett & Debra Vietri

1804 HOLLOW TREE CT U:1804

$491,000

B: Debra Shannon & William Shannon

S: Michael R Gergely & Staci Gergely

47 HOLTEN ST

$693,000

B: Rufino Matos

S: Dauntless Path LLC

24 KENWOOD RD

$705,200

B: Parisa Peyvast & Ali Shahrestani

S: Sandra C Valentim

129 LOWELL ST U:4

$370,000

B: Nicole F Kovil

S: Joanna Johnston

66 MARGIN ST

$563,000

B: Nathaniel S Barton & Paula

Francois

S: Heather E Quarles

12 MONSON DR

$665,000

B: Barbara H Blandford & Paul D

Blandford

S: Carol A Leonard Tr, Tr for 12 Monson

Dr Peabody RT

21 OAK AVE

$735,000

B: Cassio Raggi & Santos G Gonzalez-

Ramos

S: William H Madden Jr Tr, Tr for K A

Madden 2019 T

18 PERLEY AVE

$500,000

B: Jackie Moran & James F Moran Jr

S: Kenneth P Shea Tr, Tr for 18 Perley

Avenue RT

40 PROCTOR CIR

$370,000

B: Constitution Prop LLC

S: Lauretta M Silva & Robert J Silva

4 RAVENWOOD RD

$675,000

B: Gilmar P Fagundes

S: Alyssa A Dimaria & Peter J Dimaria

7 ROCKDALE AVE

$450,000

B: Joseph D Vaudo

S: Suzanne L Coughlin Tr, Tr for Lohring

FT

15 STYLES DR

$720,000

B: Michael P Gochis & Nancy E

Gochis

S: Edward Mattuchio

1 WILLIS RD

$640,000

B: Nicholas W Bertone & Chayanna B

Dasilva

S: Lori S Mchugh Tr, Tr for 1 Willis Road

Peabody NT

4202 WOODBRIDGE RD U:4202

$440,000

B: Heidi Fyfe & Judy R Fyfe

S: Breen Joseph A Est & Christopher

J Igo

HOME AND BUSINESS SERVICES

The Leonard Co.

Residential Window

& Screen Cleaning

Yard clean-ups

Gutter cleaning

Power Washing

Comp. Clean-outs

Graffiti removal

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Call 617.512.7849

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or email: fondinib@aol.com

If you need it clean,

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Paul DeNisco

Mason Contractor

Brick • Block • Stone

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978-532-4066

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House and Roof washing services

Pressure Washing Service

Gutter Brighting

Concrete. Stucco. Wood .

Sports Courts / Tennis Courts

Residential and commercial

Northshore Softwash

978-317-1700

NOTICES

MISC.

Lifetime portable and adjustable

basketball hoop in very good condition

with 54 inch backboard. Only a few

years old. Asking $250 or best offer

($600 new). Call Debbie

978-531-9292

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you

know?

Home delivery

subscribers

get FREE access

to the e-edition on

• Residential

• Commerical

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RELOCATING?

“Helpful tips”

for a S-M-O-O-T-H

trouble-free move!

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sheets and towels for

quick access the first

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Plan a garage/yard

sale before you move.

Fresh coffee, baking

soda, or charcoal in a

sock, placed inside

your refrigerator will

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Pack your current

phone book — it’s a

quick easy reference to

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Have a story to share?

Need a question answered?

contactus@essexmedia.group


AUGUST 12, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 15

Worth a thousand words: LAG

photography submissions

The Lynnfield Art Guild (LAG) is a membership-based arts organization that dates back

to 1964. Today, it boasts five talented photographers. Below is a sample of their work.

Michael Aaronson, “Fairyland Bryce Canyon.”

Mary Lynch, “Here’s Lookin’ Atcha.”

Philip Hermann, “Martha’s

Vineyard.”

Mark Bankoff, “Boston Public Gardens Lagoon Bridge.”

Mark Bankoff, “Rockport MA-Motif #1.”

Louise Pellegrino, “Magnolia Plantation, South Carolina.”


16

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 AUGUST 12, 2021

The North Shore’s Premier Real Estate Agency

Newly Priced

Hamilton Offered at $4,200,000

Savin Hill ~ Stately 1924 brick Georgian

residence on 15+ acres in the heart of horse

country offers classic symmetry, impeccable scale,

charm, livability, and irreplaceable craftsmanship.

Susan Bridge

Prides Crossing Offered at $3,950,000

Malibu Beach on Boston’s Gold Coast! Ultra-private

direct waterfront, custom Mid-century Modern

jewel has panoramic vistas from every room in an

elevated living space. Tennis court, mooring.

Alle Cutler

Middleton Offered at $3,895,000

Custom Contemporary on 3.9 acres in Smith

Crossing has every amenity: Marble foyer with

double bridal staircase, chef’s quartzite kitchen,

outdoor kitchen, basketball court, heated garage.

The Lopes Group

Middleton Offered at $3,250,000

WOW! Sophisticated, brilliantly designed home.

Open living room-chef’s marble kitchen has

2 islands. Enjoy 2-sided gas fireplace from living

room or outdoor kitchen. Spa-like master retreat.

The Lopes Group

Commercial

Newly Listed

Hamilton Offered at $1,050,000

Two large units of commercial space with off-street

parking in freestanding, 2-story building adapt to

various uses: medical, law, accounting, education,

offices. Can rent 3rd unit.

Julia Virden

Wenham Offered at $999,000

Gracious home on 3+ acres has Old World charm,

an elegant front porch, luxurious open ambiance,

high ceilings, and gleaming hardwood floors. Up to

8 bedrooms. Engineering plans available.

Kristin Kelly

Saugus Offered at $960,000

Colonial home with recent renovations that include

a marble & stainless kitchen, master bedroom with

bath and private deck. Two-car garage and inground

heated pool with hot tub.

The Lopes Group

Wenham Offered at $959,000

Colonial home on 1.29 acres with a flexible floorplan,

5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths and large fireplaced living

room. Additional apartment has 1 bedroom, plus

office space. Close to commuter routes and shops.

Deb Evans

Newly Listed

Newly Listed

Newly Priced

Rockport Offered at $950,000

Fabulous views of the Atlantic Ocean from this two

bedroom, 2 bath condo unit with period details,

open concept living space and wrap-around deck.

Access to Cape Hedge Beach and close to downtown.

Mary Ciaraldi

Topsfield Offered at $885,000

High Rock Cottage, a well-maintained Victorianstyle

home with four beds, 2.5 baths on nearly two

acres with period details, large fireplaced living room,

post & beam barn, 2-bay garage and spacious lawns.

Sue McGrath

Marblehead Offered at $849,000

Downtown Marblehead! 3-family income property

has 3 one-bedroom units with separately metered

utilities and paying tenants. Across from bus stop,

laundromat, eateries. Near schools and beach.

Cressy Team

Beverly Offered at $829,900

Charming Cape with a classic yet modern look

offers 4 beds, 2.5 baths, light and bright kitchen,

master bedroom with bath. Bonus building for

office or studio. Deck and fenced-in yard.

Kate Richard

Newly Listed

Newly Priced

Newly Listed

Swampscott Offered at $799,900

Two-family on large lot in ideal location has ample

parking. 2 beds, 1 bath, laundry hookup in each

unit. 3 blocks to train; half mile to shopping,

beach. Unit 1 is TAW. Unit 2 is vacant.

The Lopes Group

Salem Offered at $779,000

Colonial home, circa 1800, in North Salem with

wide pine and oak floors, four bedrooms and new

custom kitchen (2018). Large fenced-in yard,

apartment over garage and close to downtown area.

Jenny May

Hamilton Offered at $739,999

Fabulous perennial gardens and stone patio

grace Colonial with Bosch stainless appliances in

renovated kitchen open to dining room. Master

bedroom has full bath. Full basement, 2-car garage.

Sheila MacDonald

Wakefield Offered at $739,900

Renovated Colonial style home with 4 bedrooms,

2 full baths, granite kitchen with breakfast bar

and lower level with family room and office space.

Close to major routes, shopping and more!

Maria Salzillo

Newly Priced

Wenham Offered at $672,000

Huge potential in this exceptional 3-bedroom,

2.5-bath Cape near the Bessie Buker School on

level landscaped lot. 1st floor master suite. Updates

include gutters, insulation, windows, roof.

Joel Margolis

Beverly Offered at $569,900

Tastefully renovated 4-bed Colonial has modern

amenities, open concept living and a stunning

kitchen. Enclosed front porch, deck. Walk-up

attic, full basement, central air, 1-car garage.

Maryellen Mitchell

Magnolia Starting at $550,000

Beauport Shores - Boutique complex. 6 single-level

residential units and 1 commercial unit (approved for

restaurant) in beautifully designed elevator building

across from Magnolia Beach.

Mary Ciaraldi

Salem Offered at $449,900

Condominium unit with two bedrooms, 1 full and

1 half bath near downtown Salem and commuter

routes. Sun soaked fireplaced living room, modern

kitchen and plenty of natural light!

Daniel Meegan

100 Cummings Center, Suite 101K • Beverly, MA 01915 • 978.922.3683

J Barrett & Company, LLC supports the principles of both the Fair Housing and the Equal Opportunity Acts.

www.jbarrettrealty.com

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