HOME AUG SEPT

online.magazines

Improver

AUGUST | SEPTEMBER | 2021

Kitchen

TASTY DECOR AND STYLE TO

trends

GET YOU COMING BACK FOR MORE

Also inside: Great cleaning hacks •

Grow a kitchen garden


CONTACT US

AFRICAN

NEWS

AGENCY

PUBLISHER:

Vasantha Angamuthu

vasantha@africannewsagency.com

PICTURE SAMSON KATT

EXECUTIVE EDITOR PROPERTY:

Vivian Warby

EDITOR HOME IMPROVER:

Vivian Warby

vivian.warby@inl.co.za

DESIGN:

Kim Stone

kim.stone@inl.co.za

PRODUCTION:

Renata Ford

Renata.ford@inl.co.za

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT:

Keshni Odayan

Keshni.odayan@inl.co.za

SALES:

Charl Reineke

charl.reineke@inl.co.za

DO JOIN US ON:

@homeimproverZA

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

WHAT I know about kitchens I learnt from

my mom Dot and my grandmother Niddy.

To me, as a young girl, whatever

was going on in this room was totally

otherworldly.

I’d be in awe as I watched pickled

turnips turn bright pink overnight,

believing it was some form of magic

and not knowing it was thanks to the

chunk of beetroot thrown in with the

vinegar and salt.

It also took me a long time to

realise that the chickens in the velhok

were not my pets but instead dinner on

the table. I never much liked

eating chicken after that.

That said, Mom and Gran spent

many hours and days cooking for family,

friends and strangers. Squashed around

a small table, they’d prepare delicacies

that people would drive from all over to

come and eat. Just two ordinary woman

concocting such magic in this room –

our home’s headquarters – where many

a plot and plan was brewed for the

longevity of our family.

I remember how excited my mom was

when, finally, my dad had enough money

to fix up the kitchen which would afford her

more space to prepare these meals.

A kitchen renovation is a big deal.

This is, after all, the place from where

the weary, the disheartened, the broken

hearted, the jovial and the lonely get

nourished.

This kitchen edition hopes to be

aspirational and inspirational to our

readers, but also a practical guide on

how to honour this most special room

in your home.

Enjoy!

Vivian Warby

Vivian warby

Vivian.Warby@inl.Co.Za

0 2 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


contents

AUGUST | SEPTEMBER 2021

27

2

3

4

11

14

15

Letter

Contents

Trends

Kitchen on a tight

budget

Must-haves

Mom’s dos & don’ts

19

20

24

26

27

30

Contractor’s tips

Makeover

Best cleaning hacks

Outdoor kitchen

Chefs’ choices

A feast growing

in the garden

15 29

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 0 3


trends

SERVE UP SOME

style

PICTURE FRANCESCA TOSOLINI / UNSPLASH

The kitchen has become the heart of the

home, where we not only cook but also

entertain and sometimes work, create

and dine. Home Improver editor

Vivian Warby explores trends and ideas

for a pandemic world

FLOORING – WOOD

We personally love wooden floors

because of their warm ambiance

and nowadays you have an unlimited

selection of laminated flooring – it’s

completely budget dependent.”

SUE LEDERLE, FOUNDER OF LEDERLE DESIGN

“I’m all for wooden floors – which

these days have great finishes,

making them kitchen-friendly.

I like a seamless look from the

kitchen throughout the house.”

WILL ENGELBRECHT OWNER OF WillDesign

PICTURE MAX VAKHTBOVYCH

0 4 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


PICTURE LEDERLE COLLECTION

GREEN IS THE NEW KITCHEN COLOUR

We are seeing a huge shift from a more neutral, traditional colour

palette to one of colour, such as reds and greens, and also

interesting textures.”

SUE LEDERLE OF LEDERLE DESIGN

“There’s a definite move to colour for the kitchen. We are seeing

more pastel and comforting shades: think pistachio green,

ballet-pump pink and duck-egg blue.”

WILL ENGELBRECHT OF WillDesign

trends

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 0 5


trends

LIGHTING

In your kitchen you want the

lighting to be both inviting

as well as bright enough to

see what you’re doing while

preparing your meals. For

warmth, we enjoy a woven

lampshade but this will

depend on the style of the

home and its owner.”

SUE LEDERLE OF LEDERLE DESIGN

“Think flexible lighting –

especially the new “train

lights” that you can move

and adjust to where you

need them. Layered lighting

is still big – go for spotlights,

pendants, table lamps, floor

lamps. A multi-purpose

kitchen, which serves so

many uses today, means you

need lighting to change the

mood in an instant.”

WILL ENGELBRECHT OF WillDesign

PICTURE MAX VAKHTBOVYCH / PEXELS

And don’t forget natural light

– skylights and windows

are big in the trend to bring

the outside in.

0 6 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


PICTURE ADAM WINGER / UNSPLASH

trends

THE KITCHEN-DINING ROOM

With the move to a more open-plan multipurpose

kitchen, it makes sense that the

formal dining room has been ditched and

is now part of the kitchen. This offers a

practical and functional answer to how

we operate in a pandemic world. The

trend is multi-pronged. Some families are

converting the formal dining room into a

study, using it as a storage space or an

“isolation bedroom”. Another way to bring

the dead space of a dining room back to

life is to break down a wall and incorporate

it into the kitchen. The extended island (see

overleaf) is a result of this trend.

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 0 7


trends

PICTURE CHRISTIAN MACKIE / UNSPLASH

THE EXTENDED ISLAND

One of the biggest trends right now is the extended

island, with seating hidden under it and not jutting

out. This is partly because of the death of the dining

room. Extended islands functioning as dining tables

also reflect the bigger trend of having more kitchen

seating. A table abutting the island similarly creates

a versatile workspace or a homework spot for the

kids. It becomes a casual gathering place as well as a

designated dining area. Added to that, extra storage

can be incorporated into the island.

0 8 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


PICTURE MARKHILLTOUT.COM

trends

ROOM DIVIDERS

With the move to more

open-plan kitchens,

designers are having

to come up with clever

ways to handle the bigger

space. We are seeing

glazed walls, sliding

panels – such as the

ones in the picture by

artist Mark Hilltout – and

slatted screens being used

instead of walls, offering

greater flexibility. The

key, say the experts, is to

ensure the space can be

transformed into different

areas, if necessary.”

TIPS: Use removable

wallpaper, painted panels,

a big rug or different

flooring to separate areas,

for instance a patterned

vinyl floor in the cooking

area and hardwood in the

dining/living section. But

use colours and textures

that link the areas.

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 0 9


trends

PICTURE ANDREA DAVIS

EXTRA STORAGE

No, we are not just talking about extra cabinets

for pots and pans which, of course, are a must.

We are talking about spaces beyond the pantry.

The pandemic has seen people stock up on food

and other goods and often the pantry or shelves

are just not enough to contain them. Never

mind all that extra toilet paper. There is a move

to second freezers, bigger pantries and using

cupboards in other rooms (think the dining room)

for storage.

CAFE CORNER NOOK

This trend is growing as a small-space solution.

To recreate it, conjure up the idea of your

favourite coffee shop. You can do this by

adding a wooden bar counter against a wall or

a window and accompanying that with bright

bar stools creating a place to eat, drink, read

or even work. Plus a view outdoors, if you have

one, will create the illusion of more space.

1 0 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


PICTURE VITALIY ZAMEDYANSKIY \ UNSPLASH

Budget menu

A renovated kitchen is a good selling point - and it need not be expensive

ONE PLACE that adds value when selling a home is the

kitchen, say estate agents.

But budgeting to redo a kitchen can be scary, especially

now with the cost of building materials.

Experts say the cost of a new kitchen depends on the

finishes you use and on the size of your kitchen.

ROUGH COST ESTIMATES:

The average cost of renovating a large kitchen with high-end

appliances and semi-custom cabinets can range from

R200 000 to R300 000 and up.

For a full designer kitchen that figure jumps to R1 million,

while a small to medium kitchen renovation can range from

R10 000 to R200 000.

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 1 1


WHAT ARE YOUR BIGGEST COSTS:

KITCHEN cupboards will

be your biggest expense.

Building work your

second biggest expense.

Counter tops come in

at number three for costs.

You will also have to

fork out for electrical work,

plumbing and also gas

points which could

altogether set you

back over R40 000.

You need to know

what you can skimp on

and what you can’t, says

designer Will Engelbrecht.

HIS ADVICE: If you

want a kitchen you’ll love,

and one that will last, you

will have to spend money

to get you the longevity,

however, if you do some

DIY you can cut costs

dramatically.

You need to know

what you can skimp

on and what you

can’t skimp on

1 2 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


PICTURE ARNO SMIT, CHASTITY CORTIJO \ UNSPLASH

A KITCHEN RENO ON A BUDGET

THERE are many ways to

renovate a kitchen on a budget:

Spray or paint old cabinets

This will cost about R8 000 –

that is about R70 000 less than

getting new ones made.

TIP Ensure you use a paint that

can resist moisture and that has

a sheen for ease of wiping.

Go second-hand Use movable

furniture instead of built-in

cabinets. Buy these pieces

from a second-hand shop and

DIY as regards restoring them.

Create a feature of open

shelving (but mind the dust)

for decorative purposes by

removing the doors of one of

the cabinets.

DIY as much as possible

This is one of the best ways to

reduce costs as professional

installation and repairs

contribute significantly to the

cost of kitchen renovation.

Go for white appliances

Make an art gallery on a

wall. This can include recipes

that are framed or photos of

family and friends eating meals

together or having celebrations

around food. This will work to

remind you of good times too.

Backsplashes can be made

of off-cuts of bigger slabs of

kitchen counters, which can

be cut into various sizes and

stacked up.

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 1 3


GASTRONOMIC

must-haves

Gleaming gadgets to gladden

the heart of any cook or budding

barista - and all just a few clicks

away from your kitchen

VICTORINOX

CLASSIC

KITCHEN SET

BLACK (4 piece)

Every kitchen needs a

great set of knives and

this Swiss classic range

is a must for

any chef.

Loot price: R1 780

CLICK HERE TO

BUY NOW

BOSCH

14- PLACE

SETTING

DISHWASHER

(silver/inox)

Its high energy efficiency

means this dishwasher is

better for the environment

– and we are always for

greener options.

Loot price: R7 399

CLICK HERE TO

BUY NOW

EIGER ROMEO

2-CUP ESPRESSO

MACHINE

This retro-style machine

has an easy-to-use

three-switch operating

system. The two-inone

professional

filter works

with ground

coffee or pods

for creamy

espresso,

while the

stainlesssteel

milk

frothing

arm makes

for great

cappuccinos.

Loot price:

R1 999

CLICK HERE

TO BUY NOW

SMEG CPF9GMAN

PORTOFINO COOKER AND

MULTI- FUNCTION OVEN

(90cm, anthracite)

An energy-efficient, large-format cooker,

with a European A+ energy rating. We

also love its good looks and the fact

that it is freestanding.

Loot price: R44 999

CLICK HERE TO BUY

SMEG STAND MIXER

(pastel blue) We love this iconic,

retro-looking stand mixer with its

soft curves and in trendy blue.

Loot price: R8 999

CLICK HERE TO BUY NOW

MILEX POWER

AIRFRYER (3.6 litre)

This seven-in-one airfryer will cook

you up healthier versions of your

favourite fried foods in no time.

Loot price: R1 299

CLICK HERE TO BUY NOW

1 4 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


PICTURE AUGUST DE RICHELIEU \ UNSPLASH

WORDS VIVIEN HORLER

Mom knows best

REAL-LIFE stories about

kitchen wins and

disasters are the best

place to find out if an

idea works well.

For this article, we are happy

to team up with Renovating

Moms (Cape Town and Joburg)

– a Facebook group of women

with a membership of more than

65 000, full of useful ideas, tips

and advice. Here are some dos

and don’ts from moms who have

tried and tested them.

WASHING THINGS Will

you have a separate scullerycum-laundry?

If you do, have

the dishwasher in the kitchen or

you’ll be carrying dirty dishes and

crockery into the scullery and then

clean dishes back into the kitchen,

says one mom. It’s much easier to

pack and unpack if the dishwasher

is near the crockery cupboard.

A wall-mounted drying rack

above the sink in the scullery can

accommodate larger dishes that

don’t fit into the dishwasher.

If you have both a washing

machine and a tumble dryer, the

dryer can be mounted on the

wall above the washing machine,

saving floor space.

PREP BOWLS Is it necessary

to have a prep bowl in the

kitchen if you have a scullery?

There were mixed feelings on this

one, but having one won out.

How do you know designers’

ideas will work for you and your

family’s needs? Welcome the

Renovating Moms who don’t

mince words on what works

and what doesn’t

However, do ensure you have a

hot as well as a cold tap.

“The plumber who said I needed

only a cold tap on the prep bowl

obviously didn’t do the cooking in

his home,” said one mom.

Another mom says if both the

main sinks are full of dirty dishes,

a prep bowl can be “invaluable”

and if your main sinks are in a

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 1 5


The plumber who said I

needed only a cold tap on the

prep bowl obviously didn’t do the

cooking in his home

separate scullery, a prep bowl in

the kitchen “proper” saves a lot

of walking.

For those who don’t have

much counter space, place a glass

cutting board on top of a prep

bowl and voila! extra space.

FRIDGE One mom says it’s a

good idea to have a free-standing

fridge rather than one tucked

away surrounded by cupboards.

Should you buy a bigger fridge at

some point, it won’t fit in the gap.

COOKING What sort of oven

are you wanting? Many people

swear by eye-level ovens, rather

than an under-hob version which

requires bending every time you

want to check on the progress of

the roast or cake.

If you’re going to have a gas

hob, figure out where you’re going

to put the gas cylinder. There are

compliance rules about this, so

check with the installer.

And whatever you do, say

two moms, do not go for stoves

and ovens with touch displays,

especially not one with a hob

above.

“I am constantly inadvertently

making the oven beep, and once

even turning it on, while I stand

and use the hob. Biggest pain

ever. I hate it.”

Another mom agrees: “We

had one and would often use the

counter top to drop groceries on

when coming home – and a few

times the hob would turn on and

melt the bags before I noticed.”

Create a built-in niche for

the microwave which means it

doesn’t take up counter space.

STORAGE Do you have room

for a pantry or at least a decentsized

pantry cupboard? If you go

for a pantry cupboard, make sure

it has a light.

You’ll need plenty of storage –

more than you think.

PLUGS The same goes for plug

points. You want lots.

“There is a new life-changing

electrical appliance every year

which you’ll have to plug in.”

Another mom says: “You get

plug points with two-point plugs

in them. I am going to change

some of mine as most appliances

come with two-point plugs. Also,

plugs with USB charger points.

Life changer.”

ISLANDS Will you have an

island? “We’ve got a huge island

and got rid of our dining table

which was the best decision. The

dining room was a wasted space

as we never used it. Nowadays we

sit as a family at the island,” said

on on-trend mom.

Another suggested extra

cupboards under the island.

“I would recommend – if

you can – putting cupboards

underneath the island on the

‘outside’ – the side that you

normally have the seating.

“Your island obviously

needs to be deep enough and

the overhang far enough to

accommodate this, but it is

great for extra storage for all the

random things that one does not

use every day – tablecloths, extra

glasses, wine decanters, fancy

cutlery, etc etc. It doesn’t detract

from the look of the island at all,

so it is basically bonus space.”

Will you have room for an

appliance cupboard? These allow

you to put away things like the

toaster and food mixer so they

are not occupying valuable

counter space.

Or you could build, as one

mom suggests, “a waist-high shelf

in the pantry for all appliances

with plug points so you can use

them immediately and not have

to climb a ladder, drop a lid or

trip over your feet”.

RUBBISH Plan where the

dustbin and recycling bin will go.

SHELVING Do open shelves

work better than storage

cupboards? The moms are

pretty dubious. Says one: “Open

shelving is a design feature, not a

storage solution. You’ll find you

have dust everywhere.”

Says another: “Open shelving

is great for plants and recipe books

1 6 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


PICTURES SARAH CHAI \ PEXELS • JACEK DYLAG, DANE DEANER \ UNSPLASH

If you’re considering

open shelving, take

your cupboard doors

off for a few weeks

and see how that

works for you before

you commit

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 1 7


PICTURE OPTICAL SHADES MEDIA SANGROHA

and glass storage containers, but

they need constant styling, and

cleaning, and they’re more hassle

than they’re worth. If you are

considering open shelving, take

your cupboard doors off for a few

weeks and see how that works for

you before you commit.”

STORAGE AND

CABINETRY Cupboard units

should go all the way to the floor

or you’ll spend your life cleaning

under them, says one mom. And

take them right up to the ceiling

too, or you’ll end with dust and

unsightly clutter on top of them.

Large pot drawers are the

storage solution for everything

you keep below counter height.

Obviously, they are good for

pots, but also for Tupperware and

other plastic containers, as well as

casserole and other cooking and

serving dishes.

Another mom suggests a drawer

for spices. She advises you consider

the height of items you have to

store in cupboards. Sometimes two

shelves are better than three for tall

items like vases and olive oil, fabric

softener and so forth.

Avoid corner cupboards,

unless they are tall, walk-in ones.

Or, as one mom says, “Corner

cupboards are where things go

to die.”

And think carefully about

your counter tops. One mom

said: “Wish I hadn’t put in black

counter tops. Yes, we were at the

end of our budget and I didn’t

care too much about the colour

as long as it was granite... But it’s

difficult to tell how clean they are

(and to spot any lurking ants).”

• Find renovating moms on Facebook

in Cape Town here and in Joburg here

Cupboard

units should

go all the

way to the

floor or you’ll

spend your

entire life

cleaning

under them

1 8 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


COOKING UP

A FAIR DEAL

We have all come

across terrifying

accounts of

homeowners

wanting to update

their kitchens, and

being left in the lurch

by unscrupulous

building contractors.

So, how do you

ensure this doesn’t

happen to you?

WORDS DON MACALISTER

WHAT DO YOU WANT? Before calling

in contractors for quotations, draw up a

detailed plan of what you want done and

what you can afford.

For substantial work, get a detailed

cost estimate.

Find a qualified person to draw up

plans, determine specifications and submit

them to the local authority for approval. If

you don’t do this, you may have problems

later when it comes to selling the property.

CHOOSING A CONTRACTOR Go with

recognised companies that have a track

record and are registered and compliant.

A so-called bakkie builder may be cheap,

but does he have insurance should one of

his workers be injured in your home? If the

builder doesn’t, the worker could sue you.

Do you have any recourse if the contractor

causes defects to your existing home?

Contractors don’t have to be members

of the Master Builders Association but

membership will give you some protection

if things go wrong.

Ensure your contractor is registered

with the necessary legal or statutory

bodies, such as Workman’s Compensation

Insurance, the Bargaining Council for the

Building Industry and the Receiver

of Revenue.

Get references from all contractors.

QUOTES Get quotations from at least

three reputable contractors.

To compare costs, make sure each

contractor is quoting on the same written

specifications and conditions and includes

VAT. Be cautious of unrealistically low

quotations. Do not begin any work while

the price is still under negotiation.

ACCEPTING THE QUOTATION

Get a written agreement with the

contractor you have chosen. Don’t sign

acceptance unless the contractor’s offer

is firm, in writing, clear, covers all your

requirements and is signed.

Make sure the agreement includes the

starting date, the approximate duration of

the work, the anticipated completion date,

specifications for cleaning up during the

work, including the disposal of waste or

rubble, and payment details.

Use a Master Builders SA or Master

Builders Association-approved building

contract.

INSURANCE Your contractor should

be insured for public liability and have

contract insurance.

Appropriate insurance should be

agreed to cover any damage to your

existing building and contents. Tell your

insurance company you are having

renovations done.

EXTRA WORK AND/OR

VARIATIONS Establish the cost of any

extra work you want the contractor to do,

again in writing, before the work is carried

out and confirm any changes, in writing,

with both you and the contractor signing.

PAYMENT Usually, you will not be

expected to pay a deposit before work

starts or be asked to pay the wages of

workers during the contract. With fairly

large jobs, interim payments on completion

of certain sections can be specified in a

contract or agreement.

A request for a progress payment

should be accompanied by an invoice

detailing the percentage and value of the

work completed. For a small job, payment

is usually made in one lump sum when the

work is satisfactorily completed.

Before making the final payment,

inspect the completed work and detail

in writing any complaints or defects. It is

acceptable to withhold money for defects

or incomplete work but it is unfair to

withhold a large sum for minor defects.

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 1 9


BEFORE The client

wanted a timeless look and

feel for the new kitchen

in her traditional southern

suburbs home, which would

fit in with the palette of the

rest of the house.

Thought

for food

Interior designer Kimberley Richmond, of Beautiful Spaces, tells us how she

recreated the kitchen of her client’s Cape Town home

CLIENT I was looking for a timeless look and

feel for my new kitchen. One of my limitations

was that the house was painted and tiled with the

same palette throughout when it was bought, so I

had to use that palette and make my kitchen fit in

with it.

DESIGNER The house has quite a traditional

southern suburb, Cape Town, feel so I couldn’t go

too modern. My client likes to cook and entertains

a lot, so the design had to work with that. I

wanted it to be convenient, easy for her and

family to move around in and practical in terms

of cooking.

The main kitchen felt too spacious and I felt

an island would make it more complete. We also

created a mini “bar” area for her husband from

where to serve drinks as they like entertaining.

I also made the oven area with spice racks, pullout

drawers and all requirements close at reach.

I added wood, and a hint of grey as a finish, to

make it look less sterile. The scullery was divided

by a gorgeous barn door in charcoal to separate

the main kitchen and to allow that to be the

coffee station/cleaning area.

ADVICE Have your list of requirements before

you design. Look at the size of your family and

make life convenient. Have your wish list and

design around that. A good kitchen design is one

of the biggest investments in your home so it

needs to be right.

AFTER The designer

used wood, and a hint of

grey as a finish.

2 0 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


AFTER A centre island was

added to the kitchen which was

designed to be convenient, easy

to move around in and practical

in terms of cooking.

My client likes to cook and

entertains a lot, so the design

had to work with that

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 2 1


Improver

Priceless

advice for

all your home

improvements

M A R C H 2 0 2 1

PICTURE CHRIS SNOOK/HOUZZ—THE WASHINGTON POST

Improver

Bathroom

splash issue

Also inside: A palatial home • Gardens that will grow on you

To advertise here contact

Charl Reineke | charl.reineke@inl.co.za | Vivian Warby | vivian.warby@inl.co.za

2 2 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


The world’s wealthiest are favouring sumptuous ‘whole life’ homes where they can

seclude themselves from the Covid-19 pandemic and other disasters

WORDS VIVIAN WARBY

ONLY A

MOTHER’S

LOVE

The ultimate

L U X U

Make your

R

cleaning

experience an

Y

eco-friendly, beautiful

and uplifting one

with Mother’s Love

Products.

| Best quality eco-friendly ingredients | Biodegradable within 28 days

| Safe to use with grey water systems | Uplifting fragrance of pure essential oils

that will leave you feeling energised and your home looking pristine.

AVAILABLE IN LEADING STORES OR PLACE YOUR ORDER AT www.mothersloveproducts.com


WORDS VIVIEN HORLER

GREAT KITCHEN

CLEANING HACKS

Kitchens are busy spaces and get grubby fast. Here’s how to get yours spotless

SUCH a high-traffic area can be

tough to keep clean. There are often

dirty dishes in the sink, there might

be gunk in the secret spaces of the

dishwasher and cooking means

surfaces, stove tops and cupboard

tops tend to get sticky with grease.

Here are some ideas for getting

your kitchen gleaming.

THE COUNTERS Some people

manage to keep their counters

spotless and clear, others let them

attract clutter. It’s much easier

to clean an uncluttered kitchen.

Remove everything that doesn’t

belong on the counters, or in the

kitchen at all, and put it away. Then

wipe down with a cleaner.

White vinegar can be great to

wipe down surfaces but be careful

with natural stone tops like granite –

vinegar can eat into the stone.

THE OVEN This is one of the most

disliked cleaning jobs in the kitchen.

Some ovens have an auto-clean

setting but forget it. It’s a very high

temperature setting and has been

known to set off fire alarms.

But there’s an easy way to clean it

overnight. Fill a spray bottle with a

solution of a third of a cup of water,

a third of a cup of white vinegar and

half a cup of bicarbonate of soda.

When the oven is cool, take out

the shelves and spray the inside,

avoiding the heating elements. Then

close the door and go to bed, while

the solution does its work.

Twelve hours later, you can clean

the oven with soapy water, then dry

it with a dish towel.

THE HOB AND OVEN

EXTERIOR When cleaning your

oven, don’t forget the hob and the

exterior of the oven.

Start at the top. If you have a gas

stove, remove the grids and wash

them if they’re sticky. Then clean the

surface of the hob with all-purpose

cleaner. Electric plates can be wiped

off with diluted dish-washing soap.

An electric glass hob is the

easiest of all – just wipe it down

2 4 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


with warm, soapy water.

Once the top is clean, wipe

down the front of your oven with

all-purpose cleaner, white vinegar,

or diluted dish-washing soap. Don’t

forget the knobs and displays.

THE EXTRACTOR FAN You just

have to look at it to know that the

extractor fan casing collects grease.

The grease catches dust and the

whole thing becomes disgusting.

But you can clean it simply by

wiping it down with a few drops of

sunflower oil on sheets of kitchen

paper. Then wipe it down again with

your usual spray and a sponge.

Inside the extractor fan you’ll

find a fabric filter which needs to

be washed from time to time. You

might need to unscrew the grill to

get at it. It can be washed in hot,

soapy water, left to dry and replaced.

THE SINK First rinse it out. Then

use a scrubbing cleaner – or bicarb

– and scrub it with a sponge or

cleaning brush.

Clean the taps, sponge holders

and soap dishes. Wipe down the

drying rack.

When you’re done, fill the sink

with hot water with some bleach

added, let it sit for about 10 minutes,

then drain.

If your sink isn’t draining well,

it might be that you have a build-up

of grease in the drain. A kettleful of

boiling water might well sort out

the problem.

SMALL APPLIANCES Wipe off

the exteriors. Check the filter in the

kettle and clean it. Empty the toaster

of crumbs. Check both the interior

and exterior of the microwave and

clean them.

THE FLOOR Sweep or vacuum

clean the floor. Use a dust-buster to

get into nooks and crannies.

Then wash it with a mop dipped

in soapy water. Some people prefer

those ghastly string mops, others

prefer the ones you can squeeze to

wipe dry.

When

cleaning

your oven,

don’t forget

the hob

and the

exterior of

the oven

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 2 5


SETTING UP YOUR

Outdoor kitchen

Make a space where you can cook al fresco while entertaining guests

PICTURE IBIZA IBIZA IBIZA / UNSPASH

IT MAY be winter but warm days in between the

cold ones mean that an outdoor kitchen can be a

year-round asset.

Choosing the right location is important.

It should be wind free and as close to the kitchen

as possible, so going back and forth is not a chore,

as often these kitchens do not have a second set of

dishes, cookware or appliances.

Whether your space is a back garden in the

suburbs, a roof deck in the city or a wide porch in the

country, you’ll want to consider hard-wearing materials

for built-in counters, seating benches and storage

units which remain fresh-looking while surviving the

onslaught of cooking activities, dirt, dust and rain.

YOU WILL

NEED

Cooking and

grilling areas

Counter tops and

prep stations

Storage

A dining area

Accessories

HOW TO GET COOKING

If you already have a sizeable patio or deck area, incorporating

an outdoor kitchen into that space is relatively simple.

An existing deck can easily be turned into a basic outdoor food

prep and dining area by adding a braai stand or grill, a counter top

and a table with comfortable chairs.

Remember to consider the lighting and power points for

appliances. In the luxury market, we’re seeing full-on outdoor

kitchens complete with bar areas, islands, ovens, stoves and extra

storage space.

These features allow the host to be present with their guests

outside while they are preparing a meal.

While custom kitchens give you more choices, a prefab outdoor

kitchen will be more cost effective.

2 6 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


AT YOUR

SERVICE

Two local chefs give us

the low-down on their

style and fare

I have loved cooking and creating dishes from an early

age and used to help my granny and mom stir pots for

family gatherings. I saw how food was a good enough

reason to gather even the busiest of family members around

the table and even the simplest of dishes was enjoyed amidst

chatter, gossip and laughter. Food is also a great peace

offering and has always been my secret weapon.

CHEF

Lerato Zondi

Twenty-five-year-old chef Lerato

Zondi from Thornton, Cape Town,

established her own food company

during the pandemic called Otarel,

baking custom-made cakes to fit

any occasion as well as catering

for events big and small. Against

all odds, it has been doing well.

Otarel is her name backwards.

FAVOURITE

COOKING TOOLS:

I love my cakesicle mould. As a girl

who lives for close to zero waste,

I love the idea of being able to use

my cake off-cuts in a beautiful way.

Also my pastry-horn baking mould

which makes it really easy for me

to make pastry shells. I make a

“milktart” cannoli

STYLE:

Food is my unspoken language of

love, with energy and love being

the main ingredients, and I hope

that other people feel that too

whenever they eat my food. One of

my goals is to introduce the world

to South African flavours.

I am also passionate about

ensuring no one is denied access

to wholesome and nutritious food

and my dream job would be to

somehow be involved in a project

aimed at ending world hunger.

CONTACT

otareleats@gmail.com

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 2 7


PICTURE CHRIS VON ULMENSTEIN

In my restaurants, fresh is best and

less is more. I keep it simple. No smears,

smoke, foam or gel. The ingredients

are the heroes of the plate

CHEF

Pavel Dimitrov

Bulgarian-born Chef Pavel Dimitrov

arrived in South Africa at the

age of 21 and connected with the

Gonsalves family in Johannesburg

at its popular Vilamoura in Rosebank

and at Gold Reef City. Dimitrov

followed restaurateur Victor

Gonsalves to Cape Town, helping

him to open Pigalle in Green Point

and NV-80 in The Point Shopping

Centre in Sea Point. When The Vue

changed to Utopia Cape Town,

Dimitrov became co-owner of the

restaurant and its executive chef

about two years ago. He has also

recently opened Zest Restaurant at

the newkings boutique hotel in Sea

Point. Dimitrov speaks highly of

Gonsalves, regarding him as one of

the best restaurateurs in the country,

one who is honest and who

keeps his word.

FAVOURITE COOKING TOOLS:

The brand-new wood-fired grill that

was installed at Zest. The coals of

the kameeldoring wood give a woodsmoked

aroma to the meat, fish

and vegetables. Another essential

is a good chef’s knife – a Swiss or

Japanese one being a priority.

STYLE

Fresh is best and less is more. I

do not use smoke, gels, foams or

smears in my dishes and I do not

use more than three ingredients per

dish, to give texture and flavour. Fish

is a favourite, prepared with some

salt and olive oil. Ingredient sourcing

is also important for a restaurant –

buying the best quality at a good

price. For example, I use a small

olive oil producer for extra-virgin,

cold-pressed olive oil.

CONTACT:

www.zestcapetown.co.za

Insta: @chefpavelcapetown

2 8 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


Let’s

help

rebuild

Mzansi

Support local

food businesses.

Let’s #EatLocal

Register your

business now.

Visit:

eatlocal.org.za


PICTURE ALEKSANDRA BOGUSLAWSKA / UNSPLASH

FOOD GARDEN

The pandemic and fears of food shortages have turned even the

most diehard convenience foodies into avid gardeners.

WORDS KAY MONTGOMERY

3 0 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


You can harvest a carrot

crop in about three

months after planting.

The garden

is nature’s

classroom

and gives kids

insight on

how food is

produced

eDIBLE gardening

has become a

popular trend

that continues

to grow.

And there are

pluses which

go beyond being able to grow

to eat. Growing veg is also a

great way to introduce children

to the hobby of gardening and

encourage them to spend more

time outdoors. The garden is

nature’s classroom and gives

kids first-hand insight on how

food is produced.

PREPPING A NEW PATCH

Correct placement is the key to

success with vegetables. Find

a space that receives about

six hours of sun every day.

However, if this is a challenge in

your garden, there are a number

of crops which can grow well in

partial shade. A vegetable patch

doesn’t have to be huge – 1.5m

by 2m is ample.

Assess your soil quality.

Sandy soil runs through your

fingers and clay soil forms

clumps when squeezed. Loamy

soil, considered best for

gardening, is a crumbly, dark

soil that retains water without

becoming waterlogged.

If you have sandy or clay

soil, improve the quality by

digging in plenty of organic

matter (compost and manure)

for better retention, drainage,

texture and air flow.

REWORKING AN

OLD PATCH

Remove the last of the summer

crops and any weeds that might

have invaded the patch. You

don’t want them completing

for nutrients and water with the

new crops later on.

If you put mulch down

earlier in the season, don’t

remove it, just dig it into the

soil. Add more compost or

manure to condition the soil

and dig it over to break up clods

for better drainage.

BOXES AND RAISED

BEDS

Raised beds not only protect

your crops from pests but also

make weeding and watering that

much easier.

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 3 \


MAIN: Raised beds not

only protect your crops

from pests but also

make weeding easier.

PICTURE: LUKAS OTTO

TOP: Keep the soil moist

as dry periods can spoil

the crop

ABOVE: As cabbage

heads begin to mature,

cut back on watering

as too much water can

cause heads to split.

PICTURE: LUKAS OTTO

In smaller gardens,

wooden crates can be used for

vegetables.

They don’t take up too much

space and can provide a good

supply of food for the family

table.

In larger gardens, consider

raised beds that provide the

look and feel of the potagers or

kitchen gardens of yesteryear.

Raised beds also provide a

solution in gardens where soil

quality is poor.

Beds can be constructed

out of wooden planks or bricks

and a rich top soil and organic

matter added before seeds are

sown.

GETTING STARTED

Several vegetables can be grown

throughout the year in some

locations, while others are

seasonal.

What you grow depends

on your climate. You can sow

seeds or get a head start with

seedlings purchased from your

local nursery. Remember to

mulch after planting to keep the

soil moist.

TIPS FOR VEGETABLES

Onions take four months or

longer from seed to harvest, but

they have a relatively good shelf

life so you can plant a goodsized

crop.

Sow seeds in trays and

transplant seedlings into the

garden. Soil needs to drain well.

Ask your local nurseryman

which onion varieties are best

for your region.

Beetroot is easy to grow.

Sow seeds in rows, every 3cm

to 5cm, with rows about 30cm

apart.

Keep the soil moist as dry

periods can spoil the crop.

Cabbages thrive in welldraining,

fertile soil. Sow seeds

in seed trays or beds, with

successive planting every three

to four weeks.

Carrots enjoy a loose

soil, but don’t add too much

3 2 | HI A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1


compost when working the soil.

Loose, friable soil will ensure

that your carrots are straight

and not misshapen. Sow seeds

in furrows (1cm deep), with

successive plantings every three

to four weeks.

Seeds which you can sow

now (Western Cape): dwarf

beans; beetroot; broccoli,

Brussels sprouts, carrots – all

year; cabbage – all year; celery

and lettuce – all year. From

March: leeks; spinach; radishes;

Swiss chard and turnips. Plant

onions in April and May.

Sow seeds now (Gauteng):

broccoli; beetroot; Brussels

sprouts, cabbage; carrots – all

year; leeks; spinach; lettuce –

all year; cauliflower; onions,

radishes; Swish chard as

well as turnips.

EARTHWORMS ARE

GOOD GUESTS

Earthworms break down

organic matter in the soil and

release nutrients for plants.

They are an important part of a

garden’s ecosystem, themselves

providing a tasty meal for birds.

As earthworms tunnel down,

they aerate the soil, providing

better water penetration and

space for roots to grow.

Earthworms feed on

decaying plant matter and small

micro-organisms in the soil.

Their castings (waste) are a rich

fertiliser that supply nutrients

to plants.

Encourage them to stay by

improving your soil quality.

Dig in organic matter such

as compost, manure or leaf litter

and add organic mulch to the

soil surface. Earthworms don’t

like to be disturbed. Use a fork

when you dig.

Garden earthworms should

not be confused with red

wigglers (Eisenia fetida), which

are used in vermiculture, to

compost waste matter.

These earthworms cannot

live in garden soil.

MAIN: Ask your local

nurseryman which onion

varieties are best for your

region.

TOP: Swiss chard is

as ornamental as it is

delicious. It grows well in

partial shade.

PICTURE: LUKAS OTTO

ABOVE: Earthworms

break down organic

matter in the soil and

release nutrients for

plants. PICTURE:

LUKAS OTTO

A U G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 1 HI | 3 3

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines