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Sax Impey 'Atlantic'

Fully illustrated publication of the exhibition 'Atlantic' by Sax Impey at Anima Mundi

Fully illustrated publication of the exhibition 'Atlantic' by Sax Impey at Anima Mundi

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Rebecca Harper

The Waters of Dwelling

Sax Impey

. Atlantic


“And as the drop kissed the ocean,

it became the ocean itself.”

Sw. Chidananda Tirtha


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Anima Mundi are delighted to present

Atlantic, the latest solo exhibition by

environmental artist and mariner

Sax Impey.

Impey’s often large scale artworks, are

immersive and elemental, incorporating

precise detail and dexterity with an

expressive, behavioral use of medium.

These works are predominantly

derived from first hand experiences at

sea. Having sailed many thousands of

nautical miles around the world, these

extensive trips continue to have, for

the artist, profound personal resonance,

providing continued creative agency.

This particular body of works result from

two particular facets of sailing in the

Atlantic. The first, the specific conditions

of time and place crossing the Gulf

Stream whilst sailing to New York. The

Gulf Stream runs parallel to the Eastern

seaboard of North America, and then

tends in a more eastern direction to cross

the ocean. The main current also creates

eddies, which loop out and turn back

on itself. Wind, and swell, interacting

with this movement of water, can create

dynamic, sometimes volatile conditions.

Other works draw upon a very different

succession of Atlantic sailing experiences.

As Impey describes “The nights when

this mighty ocean, with all its’ flows

and movements, presents itself as

a sheet of mirrored glass. On these

celestial, spectral nights, we sail in two

worlds, the ocean and the Otherworld,

and mythologies of the past present

themselves in the existent moment.”

This often sublime reflection of an artists

unmediated reconnection with the natural

world creates a tableau for our existential

and spiritual focus. An important place of

vicarious insight in to a power far more

significant than our own, yet one we

are aware of being intimately connected

with. Pioneering environmentalist Rachel

Carson wrote, in her 1951 book ‘The Sea

Around Us’, “Eventually man, too, found

his way back to the sea. Standing on its

shores, he must have looked out upon it with

wonder and curiosity, compounded with an

unconscious recognition of his lineage. He

could not physically re-enter the ocean as

the seals and whales had done. But over the

centuries, with all the skill and ingenuity

and reasoning powers of his mind, he has

sought to explore and investigate even

its most remote parts, so that he might

re-enter it mentally and imaginatively.”

At a time of deep rooted ecological

concern, the damage that we continue to

wreak upon our planet, including, most

worryingly, the oceans is no longer a secret.

It is impossible not to observe, inhale and

be consumed by one of Impey’s paintings

and not be in awe. In part at an artist

in notable synchronistic unity with his

material and muse, in awe at the profound

ephemeral beauty of the painting so

exquisitely rendered, but mostly in awe of

the palpable power of the subject herself.

A liminal moment has been captured and

so creates an echo. We are humbled, in the

realization that these mighty waters will

remain long after we have left. The damage

that we wreak, we wreak upon ourselves.

Joseph Clarke, 2021

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Squall Study (1)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Squall Study (2)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Squall Study (3)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Passing Rain, Rising Light, North Atlantic

mixed media on panel, 122 x 183 cm

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Rain in the North Atlantic

mixed media on panel, 122 x 183 cm

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Passing Rain, North Atlantic

mixed media on panel, 71 x 104 cm

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North Atlantic, Rain

mixed media on panel, 71 x 104 cm

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Rain, and Distant Light, North Atlantic

mixed media on panel, 91 x 122 cm

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Gulf Stream Squall (2)

mixed media on panel, 122 x 183 cm

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Gulf Stream Squall (3)

mixed media on panel, 122 x 183 cm

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Gulf Stream Squall (4)

mixed media on panel, 91 x 122 cm

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Gulf Stream Squall (5)

mixed media on panel, 60 x 122 cm

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At Sea, Lights and Visions (1)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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At Sea, Lights and Visions (2)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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At Sea, Lights and Visions (3)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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38ºN 69ºW (Study)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Gulf Stream Squall, 38ºN 69ºW

mixed media on panel, 122 x 244 cm

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Atlantic Green (1)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Atlantic Green (2)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Atlantic Green (3)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Atlantic Green (4)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Atlantic Green (Study)

mixed media on paper, 15 x 30 cm

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Rain Curtain, North Atlantic (1)

mixed media on panel, 30 x 60 cm

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Rain Curtain, North Atlantic (2)

mixed media on panel, 30 x 60 cm

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Rain Curtain, North Atlantic (3)

mixed media on panel, 30 x 60 cm

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38ºN 69ºW

mixed media on paper, 90 x 122 cm

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Tir fo Thuinn

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Nocturne

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Cold Night (1)

mixed media on paper, 15 x 30 cm

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Cold Night (2)

mixed media on paper, 15 x 30 cm

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Burning Sea

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Nights of Glass (1)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Nights of Glass (2)

mixed media on paper, 30 x 60 cm

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Nights of Glass (3)

mixed media on paper, 15 x 30 cm

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Nights of Glass (4)

mixed media on paper, 15 x 30 cm

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Selected Biography

Sax Impey is a British artist born in Penzance, Cornwall.

He currently works from one of the prestigious

Porthmeor Studios in St. Ives. From 2005, he has

collaborated with the cross-cultural, environmental

art group Red Earth in the creation of site-specific

installations including a multi media performance at

Trafalgar Square, London and Birling Gap in Sussex.

In 2007 Impey’s work was selected for the ‘Art Now

Cornwall’ exhibition at Tate St Ives where he was

placed on the cover of the associated publication.

The same year he was heralded in The Times as one

of the ‘New Faces of Cornish Art’. In 2010 he was

featured in Owen Sheers’s BBC4 Documentary ‘Art of

the Sea (In Pictures)’ alongside Anish Kapoor, J. M.

W. Turner, Martin Parr and Maggi Hambling among

others. His work was selected as a finalist the 2013

Threadneedle Prize and the year before was elected an

Academician at the Royal West of England Academy.

Most recently Impey was included in ‘The Rime Of

The Ancient Mariner : Big Read’ project alongside

artists including Glenn Brown, Linder, Cornelia Parker,

Marina Abramović, Yinka Shonibare, Charles Avery,

Gavin Turk, Fiona Banner, Mark Dion, Derek Jarman,

William Kentridge and John Akomfrah accompanied

by readings from renowned voices including Jeremy

Irons, Willem Dafoe, Hilary Mantel, Simon Armitage,

Tilda Swinton, Iggy Pop, Marianne Faithfull, Alan

Cumming, Rupert Everett and Alan Bennett. Impey’s

paintings are in multiple collections including The Arts

Council, Warwick University, the Connaught Hotel and

the collections of Roman Abramovich and Lady Victoria

Getty alongside other private collections worldwide.


Published by Anima Mundi to coincide with Sax Impey ‘Atlantic’

Exhibition supported by

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or

by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the publishers

Anima Mundi . Street-an-Pol . St. Ives . Cornwall . +44 (0)1736 793121 . mail@animamundigallery.com . www.animamundigallery.com

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