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Get Out! GAY Magazine – Issue 483

Featuring content from the hottest gay and gay-friendly spots in New York, each (free!) issue of Get Out! highlights the bars, nightclubs, restaurants, spas and other businesses throughout NYC’s metropolitan area that the city’s gay a population is interested in.

Featuring content from the hottest gay and gay-friendly spots in New York, each (free!) issue of Get Out! highlights the bars, nightclubs, restaurants, spas and other businesses throughout NYC’s metropolitan area that the city’s gay a population is interested in.

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BY JIM SILVESTRI

On Point

With:

LUIS FERNANDO

After a casual gig DJing a friend’s

rooftop party just this past spring, Luis

Fernando’s career exploded overnight.

He’s since become one of the city’s

busiest and most prolific beat-droppers.

Interview >>>

Thotyssey: Hello Luis.

Thanks so much for

chatting with us today.

So we’re already in late

August, which means

summer is almost over.

How did the season treat

you?

Luis Fernando: Honestly,

it has been one of the best

summers of my life. This was

the summer when I had the

chance to share my joy and

passion for music with the

world.

Where was the first place

you DJed here?

The first time I made my

DJing public was in May

of this year, at my friend’s

rooftop in Brooklyn. There

were so many people that

day, and things were so

crazy that a photographer

from the New

York Times

stopped by

and a picture

from it was

published in

a story about

the summer of

“young love,”

where they

mentioned

the party as

a “rager on

a rooftop in

Brooklyn.”

After that, I was

everywhere.

You’ve been DJing at the Q

in Manhattan a lot, which

is of course the hot new

venue of 2021. How do you

like spinning there?

I think the project and

space that Frankie Sharp

[and partners] created is

fantastic and ambitious.

I love that the producers

have been very intentional

about bringing a diverse cast

of DJs and performers, to

make sure that the crowd

and the parties hosted there

are diverse.

You’ve also been busy at

3 Dollar Bill in Brooklyn.

How did your flagship

party there, “HER,” come

about?

For years now, I’ve intended

to create spaces where

everyone in my community

feels accepted, seen,

celebrated, and desired. So

I put together everything I

love from a party, which is

bringing together people

from all the spectrums of the

queer community, bringing

my dolls and queens to give

us shows and lewks, and

having the best music to

dance to. It is very important

that people know that my

parties are very intentionally

inclusive.

What is coming up for you?

I have iterations of “HER”

coming up on September 25,

November 6 (my birthday)

and our big Halloween

one on October 22. I also

have a monthly party at the

Phoenix, which is always so

much fun.The next one is on

September 17.

What’s a song, new or old,

that is giving you your

whole life on this day?

“MacArthur Park” by Donna

Summer. I know, I know…

it’s been played for literally

years. But there’s a sense in

me that when I play it, I am

connecting to the queers

who came before me, to

the people who danced to

it again and again. Without

fail, it’s a song that makes

my dance floor go nuts. And

that’s my fuel. Seeing other

people having joy is what

makes me the happiest.

Read full interview on Thotyssey.com | Follow Luis Fernando on IG @ luisfernandospins



BY JIM SILVESTRI

On Point

With:

ELI ESCOBAR

An iconic NYC nightlife

champion and native,

“Tiki Disco” co-founder

Eli Escobar reflects on

his long and storied

career as a club DJ

and recording artist

while preparing to spin

for several exciting

events in a rapidly

evolving nightlife

scene.

Interview >>>

Thotyssey: Has summer

been treating you well so

far, Eli?

Eli Escobar: Getting back to

DJing and nightlife…words

can’t do justice to how

exciting, healing, therapeutic

and even moving it was. I

always knew I needed this,

but I never realized how

much I’d fall apart without it!

During lockdown, were

you angry with the DJs,

promoters, etc. who tried

to carry on with parties or

did part of you get what

they were going through?

Of course I get it. More than

anything, I wanted to play

music and be around people,

etc. But it did feel like a huge

slap in the face to those

of us who were doing the

right thing and sacrificed so

much, to see others just go

about their business. More

than anything, I just feel

like blatant disregard for

people’s health and safety

is somewhat unforgivable.

I did get angry a lot; I won’t

lie. Right now, I am trying to

focus my energy on being a

bit more understanding of

how complex all of this is and

how there can, at times, be

grey areas in this discussion.

It’s not always black and

white.

What are some big changes

that have happened in

nightlife since you started,

from a DJ’s perspective?

There’s a lot! I’ve been

DJing a looooong time, haha.

Digital DJing, of course,

has completely changed

everything. Also, ticketed

parties…I don’t remember

that being a thing. You took

your chance at the door

wherever it is you wanted to

go. I’m not saying anything

is better or worse. I think

nightlife in New York has

been amazing for the past

decade or so. I think we will

look back at the recent years

(minus Covid, of course) as

a real moment in nightlife

history.

On September 11th, you’ll

be spinning a Madonna

party called “Into the

Groove” at 3 Dollar Bill.

OG queer folks will never

abandon our Queen M!

Well, I did one at the

beginning of the summer

and there were a lot of

young people there, too. I

confess that I haven’t really

loved much of her music in

a very long time now, but I

won’t ever get tired of the

glory years. I was obsessed

with her as a kid–like, seeing

Desperately Seeking Susan

opening day when I was

10 years-old, and posters

all over my wall. I think

her catalogue is sort of

untouchable, too. I mean,

there’s not too many artists

who you can play a whole

night of their music and still

realize you forgot some

songs afterwards!

Thanks, Eli!

Read full interview on Thotyssey.com | Follow Eli Escobar on IG @eliescobarnyc





BY JIM SILVESTRI

On Point

With:

PINK PANCAKE

Pennsylvania-born Michael Witkes

is perhaps best known for creating,

writing, directing and starring in

the acclaimed queer web series

“Interested In.” But in recent years

he’s also become a NYC drag star

on the rise, with a unique aesthetic

all her own. Have a taste of Pink

Pancake!

Interview >>>

Thotyssey: You seem to be involved in

tons of projects this summer. Is it all a

challenge to balance?

To be honest, it really can be. In addition to

drag, I’m also a writer/actor. This summer, I

produced the second season of Interested

In, a queer series I wrote. It was a huge

undertaking and was delayed because

of Covid. And on top of that, I dove head

first into drag, which has been so fun and

rewarding. I’m used to wearing many hats,

but it’s not easy! I’ll say that.

I bet! What inspired the characters and

stories of Interested In? I’m guessing

there’s a lot of autobiographical stuff

there.

The initial impetus to write came from

my total confusion after I came out of

the closet. I thought that I would just

immediately accept myself, but it’s

obviously a much longer journey to selfacceptance.

At the time, all the queer

stories ended with the queer characters

coming out—or they didn’t survive to the

end of the story. So I wanted to start the

story right after the closet and showcase

a character learning to love himself for the

first time, highlighting unapologetic queer

sexuality as he starts to shed his shame.

In so many movies and shows, they pan

away from the gay sex scenes and strip

gay relationships of queerness. So, it was

important to me to highlight that.

And what inspired you to become a drag

queen?

It’s hard to say how Pink Pancake was born.

There’s always been something in me that

felt confused by my gender and felt stifled

by the notion of “masculinity” and feared

my natural feminine side. So, Pancake

was born from that desire to explore the

limits of gender. It’s also a love letter to my

childhood. I’m now able to do all the things

I wanted to as a kid, but instead I turn the

toys into costumes.

Where do your look inspirations come

from?

I like to say my looks are Club Kid meets

second childhood meets genderfuck. I like

to bring a full concept to my costumes and

lip syncs.

What’s coming up for you?

I’m finishing filming Season 2 of Interested

In. So be sure to stay tuned for that, and

watch Season 1, if you haven’t already. I’ll

also be competing in “Drag Wars All-Stars”

[at Pieces Bar], so come out and support

the dolls!

Okay, last question: What’s been the

song of the summer for you?

I mean…the middle school girl in me has to

pick “Good 4 U!”

Read full interview on Thotyssey.com | Follow Pink Pancake on IG @hausofpancake



BY JIM SILVESTRI

On Point

With:

MOROCCO KENNEDY

Despite coming from

Texas, this slender and

edgy young queen has

a very impressive New

York drag pedigree. And

while she’s serving us

fierce looks on stage

and on camera, Morocco

Marrakech Kennedy is

also gracing our retro

punk fantasies while

paving the way for the

new generation of drag.

Interview >>>

Thotyssey: Hi, Morocco. I

guess you’d be considered

a Covid Queen, i.e. one

of the new generation

of queens that sprang

up here in NYC during

lockdown.

Morocco Kennedy: Well,

I’ve been doing drag on and

off in Texas since 2016. I

jumped into the Brooklyn

drag scene three months

ago. I started with the lip

sync competitions–the

first at Janelle No. 5’s “Are

You the Next Diva,” and

then “Drag Wars” at Pieces

and “Polish the Queen” at

Playhouse in the city.

The scene has already

changed so much here in

just those three months.

Yes, nightlife has definitely

picked up. There are so

many shows, and I think

people being trapped inside

for so long has motivated a

lot of queens to take this as

their opportunity to really

glow up. There are so many

queens up and coming in

the scene right now.

You’re also a model.

I moved to NYC to pursue

modeling and ended up

working on drag more.

Eventually I’m sure both

paths will fuse together.

When I first visited NYC,

one of my favorite queens

was West Dakota, who’s

really a great example of

the direction I’d love to

take my drag and enter the

modeling world. I’m slowly

becoming known for my

walk in drag; I’m always

strutting and giving them

drag runway wherever I’m

at performing, or off-stage.

And what about your

stage numbers?

A lot of the numbers I do

are heartbreak songs.

Morocco is a romantic.

She’s nostalgic, and I grew

up around a lot of ‘80s

pop and rock music. I love

Blondie and Pat Benatar

and Joan Jett, but I also

do a lot of contemporary

music as well.

Let’s close on your native

Texas’ lunatic governor

Greg Abbott, who is doing

everything he can to get

his state to go maskless.

And now he has Covid,

too! What’s up with that

guy?

I’ll never understand Texas

politics, but with the new

census out, demographics

are changing. In 10 years,

things will be very different

in Texas. He’s feeding

into his own ideology and

what he thinks will get

him reelected. But yes, my

friends still in Texas think

he’s just a nut, too. Lord

help us all. Haha!

Read full interview on Thotyssey.com | Follow Morocco Kennedy on IG: @theyskinnylegend



BY JIM SILVESTRI

On Point

With:

X-EMMA

Getting her drag name

and look inspirations from

interesting places, new

dark glamour clown and

supermodel chanteuse on

the scene X-Emma is here

to slay.

Interview >>>

Thotyssey: Greetings,

X-Emma. How is your

summer treating you so

far?

X-Emma: My summer has

been hectic. I’ve been a

creature of the night…like,

it’s literally sleep all day and

then go out at night, like a

fucking bat.

T: Meh, who needs the

sun? Do you generally

prefer the “darker,” more

monstrous spectrum of

drag over the “I’m just a

pretty girl” end of things?

X: There is definitely a

duality to my drag. I hate to

be put in a box. I love to look

like a circus clown monster,

but I also love to serve

“beautiful fucking woman.”

I’m a model when I’m not

doing drag, and I’ve got to

utilize the face, honey.

Is drag less a “gender”

expression to you than a

visual art statement or a

cosplay sort of experience?

Hmm…I think all of the

above.

Fair enough. So, where are

you from originally and

how did the drag journey

begin for you?

I am from Orange County,

California. I started drag

in my bedroom, practicing

makeup and stealing my

mom’s clothes. It wasn’t

until I moved to New York

that I found a place where I

could actually express that

interest.

How might you describe

the numbers you like to

do today, and where you

get your look inspirations

from?

I want to tell stories. I want

to have concepts. I get my

inspiration definitely from

club kids of the past…and

also doing poppers.

How did the name come

to you?

I grew up with severe

eczema; it bled and hurt, and

I could never stop scratching

it. It was so bad, I got it

on my eyelids. Now I take

steroids, and it went away.

What an ordeal! So

“X-Emma” is like taking

ownership of that, in a way.

Yeah. I also just like the

name.

Good luck! And finally:

if X-Emma were in the

X-Men, what would her

mutant power be?

OMG, that’s a tough one! I

think it would be the power

to shapeshift. Oh wait,

maybe teleport. Or a fire

blender!

Why not all three!?

Thanks, X-Emma.

Read full interview on Thotyssey.com | Follow X-Emma on IG: @x.emma.the.queen



BY JIM SILVESTRI

Arguably the most popular and successful alum of “RuPaul’s

Drag Race” (but really, who would dare argue?), international

treasure Roy Haylock, aka Bianca Del Rio, is finally going back

on the road with an all-new world comedy tour. Lord knows, the

world needs her brilliantly irreverent take more than ever before.

Interview >>>

Thotyssey: Thanks so much for

talking to us, Bianca. One of the

last times I saw you, we were

judging the premiere of the Lady

Liberty drag competition at the

Q in NYC! Have you been asked

to judge, like, a billion local drag

competitions in the years since

your Drag Race win?

Bianca Del Rio: I have an opinion and

judge everything. I do it every day,

so it’s always nice when I get to do it

in an official capacity, so I don’t just

look like a bitch. I really do love local

drag queens, though, and always

encourage people to support their

local queens because that’s where

we all started. I worked in local bars

for many, many, many, many, many

years.

You’ve conquered multiple media

and industries since Drag Race,

but you still had time to make an

enjoyable surprise cameo during

this memorable season of Drag

Race All-Stars. Did anything about

the production’s current setup

seem really different from your

2014 turn on Season 6?

Not much changed…RuPaul still

didn’t talk to me. This time, it was

due to Covid restrictions. That was

actually the biggest difference: they

were very strict about following

Covid guidelines. It was a fun idea

I had, and the executive producers

were willing to go along with it. Little

did I know it would involve six Covid

tests, driving 260 miles round-trip

from my house in Palm Springs, and

spending an entire day on set for 30

seconds of air time.

During Covid lockdown, you

became a podcaster. How do you

enjoy doing it, and is it something

you can find time to keep up with

now that live drag has returned?

I didn’t think it was something I

would enjoy, so I turned down offers

to do a podcast for years. Then

during lockdown, I figured I might as

well give it a try since I didn’t have

much else to do. It turned out to be a

lot of fun. What worked for me was

not having any specific format. It

was just me chatting with incredibly

talented people who I admire and

find interesting. Sadly, I’ve had to

take a break from it, though. It’s very

time consuming for me, so I had to

put it on the back burner while I work

on my tour and other projects at the

moment. I’m hoping to bring it back

in a video format once things settle

down a little next year.

Also, you were part of a hilarious

scripted audio production, Hot

White Heist, co-starring the likes

of Bowen Yang and Cynthia Nixon.

I’m guessing, like with most voice

work, you recorded your scenes

without costars?

When Alan Cumming calls, you say

“YES.” I was lucky enough to record

my lines with Bowen Yang through

Zoom, so it made my jerking off

scenes much easier.


Lots of RuGirls become the face

of cosmetic products, but you’re

one of the few that is selling a

makeup remover—the Bianca

Remover is a top selling product

on Amazon! Given that you’re

known for your gorgeously

accentuated eyes, I’m guessing

that the makeup removal

process at the end of the night is

something you are an expert on.

No one could ever compete with

my beauty, and I’ll never reveal my

secrets. But lots of bitches need

to do something about their ugly

mugs, so I wanted to contribute to

the community by helping them get

rid of them.

On Point With:


Lol! Back to performing: Between the two

Hurricane Bianca films and your recent

West End run in Everybody’s Talking

About Jamie, you’re an experienced actor.

Do you have interest in playing non-drag

roles…maybe even drama?

Only in porn. I had all my content recorded

and ready to upload. That’s what started

the downfall of OnlyFans.

Jamie is coming to the big and small

screen. Your fans would have loved to see

you starring in this adaptation.

Well–spoiler alert–I make a small cameo

in the film as an art teacher named Miss

Haylock. I don’t know why they decided

to go with an Academy Award nominated

actor [Richard E. Grant] instead of me to

play Hugo/Loco Chanelle, but at least I got

a part. I attended two screenings of the film,

and it’s great! I’m anxious for everyone to

see it. It’ll be released on Amazon Prime

Video on September 17.

Lots of your fellow Drag Race alums

complain about online negativity from

fans and interactions with the franchise

or production that went wrong. I

don’t recall many times when you’ve

complained about that stuff. It seems you

can handle whatever comes your way.

Should all these RuGirls just be quiet and

grateful for their fame and opportunity

they got from the show or do you get

where some of them are coming from?

I treat fellow Drag Race alums like my

family: I don’t talk to them and don’t pay

attention to anything they say, because

none of it matters to me.

I still don’t get exactly what Kameron

Michaels was carrying on about regarding

that recent “lip sync assassin” Charli XCX

performance, do you?

All I’m going to say is no one can top MY lip

sync assassin performance. PERIOD.

You’re California-based now, but you

return often enough to your previous

home base of NYC. We always brag in

New York that we have the best, most

versatile (lol), hardest working queens.

Do you think that still holds up?

Back in the day, NYC was the only place

where you could see top drag queens,

but the drag scene has evolved so much

(in large part due to Drag Race) that you

can find some really amazing drag queens

all across the U.S. and the world now. In

fact, there was a gorgeous one working

security at the airport today. She got a little

too personal scanning me with that wand,

though.


You’re still the most prolific and busy

drag standup comic in the world right

now.

Busiest? I’ve been sitting at home for 18

months!

Is joke writing something you’ve always

been good at or have improv and being

“in the moment” always been the guiding

forces in your live shows?

I prefer talking about what’s in front of me

and just going wherever the moment and

observations take me. But you need more

than that for a 75-90 minute show for a

seated audience in a theater, so I need to

have some scripted material in there. Also,

you never know what the audience will be

like, so you need to have some material to

fall back on.

Do you think hecklers at your shows

these days just want that thrill of the

“public Bianca clapback?”

Hecklers can be very tricky. Some are fun

and give me fuel to work with, but many

of them think they’re funny and don’t

know when to shut up. The latter can risk

annoying me and the rest of the audience…

but that’s why Lady Bunny works security

for me. She just sits on their face to shut

them up.

I know everyone always asks you about

standup and today’s PC “censorship” and

the fear of being cancelled, but I kind of

feel like it would be so dumb to attack

you for insult comedy when that’s been

your brand all along. Do you think most

people understand that?

The people who come to see my shows

get it. That’s what they come to see and

those are the only ones I’m worried about

pleasing.

At long last, starting in September, you

are going back on the road in America

for the Unsanitized comedy tour. Putting

all that material together and planning

all the tour stops seems like such a

massive undertaking. Are you itching to

get back out there or maybe dreading it

a little?

Always itching, never dreading. I’m always

grateful getting to work and I’m certainly

looking forward to it after being home for

so long with this pandemic. I’m extremely

lucky to get to do what I do. You’ll never

hear me complain about it. I leave that up

to those other queens on Twitter.

I’m guessing by the title of the show–and

your tendency towards topical content–

that you’ll have some Covid material.

Are you blown away by anti-vaxxers

and their conspiracy theories or are you

unsurprised that that’s a thing?

Am I surprised there are idiots in the

world? NO.

Unsanitized comes to New York at

the newly christened Palladium Times

Square (formerly RAD) on September 17,

October 14 and October 15.

Oh, is that the name of the theater this

week? It was the Playstation Theater the

last time I was there. In case it changes

again in the next couple of weeks, tickets

are available at [my site], lol!

Lol! And then on October 27,

Unsanitized will be at the Hackensack

Meridian Health Theatre in Red Bank,

New Jersey. Tell us more about the show

and what we can expect.

I always say expect the unexpected at my

shows. Every show is different, even from

one night to the next. I have an outline for

the show and have some scripted material,

but a large part of my show is talking about

people in the audience: giving them advice,

answering their questions, reading them,

etc. Every audience is different, so every

show is different to an extent.

After this American leg of the tour,

what’s next for you?

I’ll be traveling to the UK to reprise my

role in Everybody’s Talking About Jamie

for a UK tour of the musical for a couple

months and then going back to L.A. with

the company for a five week run, which will

be the American premiere of the musical.

Then I continue my Unsanitized comedy

tour in Canada, Mexico, South America,

Europe, South Africa, Israel, Asia, Australia,

and New Zealand.

Finally, a random question: Will the Sex

& The City reboot be watchable without

Kim Cattrall?

I’m surprised you thought it was watchable

the first time. No shade. Just facts. You

didn’t really expect a nice answer from me,

did you?

Lol, thanks so much, Bianca, and have an

amazing tour!

Read full interview on Thotyssey.com | Follow Bianca at www.thebiancadelrio.com


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healthcare provider right away if you

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part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “teacolored”

urine, light-colored stools, loss

of appetite for several days or longer,

nausea, or stomach-area pain.

The most common side effects of

BIKTARVY in clinical studies were

diarrhea (6%), nausea (6%), and

headache (5%).

These are not all the possible side effects

of BIKTARVY. Tell your healthcare provider

right away if you have any new symptoms

while taking BIKTARVY.

You are encouraged to report negative

side effects of prescription drugs to the

FDA. Visit www.FDA.gov/medwatch or

call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Your healthcare provider will need to

do tests to monitor your health before

and during treatment with BIKTARVY.

Continued on next page.

Please see Important Facts, including important warnings, continued on the

next page and at BIKTARVY.com.


REAL BIKTARVY

PATIENTS

ZACH

D’EVA

HUGO

CHAD

NIKKI

DIMITRI

Meet a few of the extraordinary people who take BIKTARVY.

Watch their stories at BIKTARVY.com

Featured patients compensated by Gilead.

IMPORTANT FACTS FOR BIKTARVY® (CONTINUED)

BEFORE TAKING BIKTARVY

Tell your healthcare provider if you:

Have or have had any kidney or liver

problems, including hepatitis infection.

Have any other health problems.

Are pregnant or plan to become

pregnant. It is not known if BIKTARVY

can harm your unborn baby. Tell your

healthcare provider if you become

pregnant while taking BIKTARVY.

Are breastfeeding (nursing) or plan to

breastfeed. Do not breastfeed. HIV-1 can

be passed to the baby in breast milk.

Tell your healthcare provider about all

the medicines you take:

Keep a list that includes all prescription

and over-the-counter medicines,

antacids, laxatives, vitamins, and herbal

supplements, and show it to your

healthcare provider and pharmacist.

BIKTARVY and other medicines

may affect each other. Ask your

healthcare provider and pharmacist

about medicines that interact with

BIKTARVY, and ask if it is safe to

take BIKTARVY with all your

other medicines.

HOW TO TAKE BIKTARVY

Take BIKTARVY 1 time each day with or

without food.

GET MORE INFORMATION

This is only a brief summary of important

information about BIKTARVY. Talk to

your healthcare provider or pharmacist

to learn more.

Go to BIKTARVY.com or call

1-800-GILEAD-5

If you need help paying for your

medicine, visit BIKTARVY.com for

program information.

Please see Important Facts,

including important warnings,

above and at BIKTARVY.com.

BIKTARVY, the BIKTARVY Logo, GILEAD, the GILEAD Logo, KEEP ASPIRING, and LOVE WHAT’S

INSIDE are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc., or its related companies. Version date: February 2021

© 2021 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. BVYC0413 04/21





BY JIM SILVESTRI

On Point

With:

KENNI JAVON

You will never forget your

“DickAppointment” when Kenni

Javon’s in town–that “medium ghetto”

kiki he created is an underground

favorite of queer POC across the city

and will soon have a new home.

Interview >>>

Thotyssey: Hello Kenni!

You’ve certainly kept busy

this summer. But what

are your thoughts on our

current Covid situation?

Should we prepare to

go back to lockdown,

or maybe a proof of

vaccination at the door will

suffice?

It’s so much. To be honest,

I’m a little on the timid side.

I’m only going out if I’m

required, i.e., a booking.

Vaccination at the door

is cute, but a lot of the

vaccinated people have

tested positive…so I almost

think they should put us back

on lockdown. I might take

the month of September

off, depending on the Covid

numbers.

So where are you from and

what were your creative

interests while growing up?

I’m from

Canton, Ohio

and I spent

high school

and my early

adult years

in Columbus.

I moved to

New York

six years ago

as a stylist

assistant/

intern. I’ve

always loved fashion, clothes,

and nightlife.

Tell us how your party

“DickAppointment” came

about.

I wanted to create a raunchy,

fun, safe place for black and

brown queers. I consider

myself to be “medium

ghetto”. I grew tired of

hearing and feeling the

same vibe everywhere–it’s

either techno, Spanish, or

something else I don’t always

want to listen to. I had to

change that and do it for the

“medium ghetto” people like

myself! A lot of the people

who are out here on the

scene aren’t from here. They

came from small ghettos or

urban areas, and somehow

it’s like a majority of black

people share an upbringing.

When did you become a

DJ?

After I started

DickAppointment. I had

a sound in my head that I

wanted played, and I couldn’t

express that or have anyone

else play that sound, so I took

matters into my own hands

and became a DJ.

Wow! What’s your favorite

song to play now at DA?

That would be “Pull Up” by

Priceless Scott. I came across

the song on someone’s

Instagram story in the

background and had to

find it. The chorus of the

song goes, “I came here for

a DickAppointment, not a

disappointment.” I fell in love!

It’s so fitting for the parties,

and on brand. Sometimes

I’ll just loop that for a good

minute, to remind the girls

they’re at DickAppointment.

Where and when

might we get our next

DickAppointment?

Lol, I can’t say. It’s a secret.

But we’re off to somewhere

bigger and more exclusive!

It’s gonna be a gag.

Can’t wait! To close: Rapper

DaBaby apologized for

his bizarre and offensive

comments. Should we

forgive him?

FUCK HIM! He didn’t

apologize, his publicist

apologized…and it still didn’t

work.

Thanks, Kenni!

Read full interview on Thotyssey.com | Follow Kenni Javon @kennijavon



BY JOHN STEIN

Sweet

Sound of

Summer

Cheyenne Elliott

Bares Her Soul

in “Sugarcane”

Summer may be nearing its end,

but not if Cheyenne Elliott has

anything to do with it! The rising

R&B star brings in the sweet, sultry

sounds of the sunny season in

“Sugarcane,” her new acoustic

single that explores the evolution

of love in a relationship.

“Couples often take detours from

each other as they go about their

daily lives,” says Elliott from her

Connecticut home. “It’s important

for partners who may have grown

apart to reconnect and give their

union one more try, because

sometimes, though they have

grown and matured separately,

the core of their relationship hasn’t

changed and their love remains.”

Cheyenne Elliott co-wrote

“Sugarcane” with Lisa Gressett

and co-produced the song with

Gary “GC” Cheung and Joseph

“Mr. Hit Record” Lopez. Its music

video, directed by Tony K, was

shot in Las Vegas and echoes the

single’s warmth and comfort. It is

available on YouTube.


“The message of “Sugarcane” is

that what is meant to be can truly

come full circle,” Elliott continues.

“Real love does not diminish.”

Cheyenne Elliott was born into a

world of song. Her grandmother

is five-time Grammy Award

winner Dionne Warwick, and her

family includes the late Whitney

Houston, Cissy Houston, the

late Dee Dee Warwick, retired

opera diva Leontyne Price and

hit music producer Damon

Elliott. Even her father, David

Elliott, is an accomplished

vocalist and songwriter who cowrote

Luther Vandross’ Grammy

Award winning hit, “Here and

Now.”

She describes her favorite music

as alternative R&B and soul

with Sade, Snoh Aalegra, and,

of course, members of her own

family, as influences. “I love

powerful females in the music

industry who aren’t afraid to

expose their passion and pain in

their music.”

Cheyenne Elliott has released

several successful singles,

including a cover of Sam Smith’s

“Too Good at Goodbyes”

(released via Republic Records,

as performed on the FOX TV

show, The Four) and “With You”

(its remix charted on the Top 20 of

the Billboard Dance Chart).

“I am feeling blessed to finally

be able to share my soul with the

world,” Cheyenne Elliott says. She

plans to release an EP and more

singles in the fall.

For more information, follow Cheyenne

Elliott @ thecheyelliott. Fans can also

text Cheyenne directly at 917.719.0905


week in pictures >> BY WILSONMODELS / wilsonmodels.blogspot.com

LADY LIBERTY @ THE Q

TRISH @ 3 DOLLAR BILL


getoutmag.com week in pictures

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FIGHTING FOR MORE

THAN EQUALITY

An interview with Cathy Renna (She/her/hers)

National LGBTQ Task Force Communications Director

BY ANTHONY T. EATON

decades, the Task Force would

play an instrumental role in

establishing a new narrative in

the fight for equality.

In 1973, when I was six, most

states had sodomy laws,

homosexuality was considered

a mental illness and it was not

uncommon for youth who came

out to be institutionalized. In

October 1973, Dr. Howard

Brown, Martin Duberman,

Barbara Gittings, Ron Gold,

Frank Kameny, Nathalie Rockhill,

and Bruce Voeller founded the

National Gay Task Force, today

known as the National LGBTQ

Task Force. Over the next four

Back then, I had no concept of

the struggles and barriers that

the community I would one day

become part of had to face.

Over the years, I would come

to understand the fight for

equality and develop a great

appreciation for the individuals

and organizations that have

fought so hard for what we

have today. So it was a great

pleasure to ask Cathy Renna,

National LGBTQ Task Force

Communications Director, some

questions about her long-time

involvement in the fight for

LGBTQ+ equality and the Task

Force.

Having both come out in the

early/mid-1980s, we share

that time as a reference point

for what it was like for our

community. On coming out,

Cathy said she was “very

blessed to have an incredibly

supportive family and circle of

friends and community in New

York and Italy.”


Cathy shared the fact that for

someone who was a pretty shy

teenager, she feels it’s a miracle

to have evolved into someone

working in media and the public

eye. The willingness to be visible

and fight shows fearlessness;

however, she knows the value

of time spent on self-care and

growth, and her work is driven

by passion and hope, not anger.

Cathy’s work can be described

in many ways, but it is primarily

education and activism, and her

goal is to create change, make

our community less abstract to

the larger culture, and change

hearts and minds--for all of us.

Cathy has been at the forefront

of some of our community’s

greatest wins regarding equality,

including marriage equality, the

repeal of DADT, and educating

the public about our diverse

community through the media

and storytelling,

“This is not a ‘job’ for me, but a

vocation, and I cherish the fact

that I have had the chance to be

part of history and change. I am

most proud of seeing the end

result.”

In the early 1980s, as was true

of the decades preceding it,

activism often took the form of

a protest or march. While those

methods remain the same, the

advent of social media and our

ability to instantly connect has

changed the way we interact,

communicate, and organize.

Cathy’s work and dedication to

the community certainly make

her a role model. When I asked

her if there was anyone she

viewed as a role model, some of

her choices included pioneers

like Barbara Gittings and Frank

Kameny, Barbara Smith, and

Monica Roberts. There also were

more radical activists in groups

like Queer Nation and ACT-UP.

Like our own community, her role

models are incredibly diverse.

“Some folks have been critical to

my learning how to navigate the

media and political landscapes--

individuals who were thrust into

the public eye for many reasons.

These include Judy and Dennis

Shepard, the parents of Matthew

Shepard, and the young trans

and non-binary activists I work

with today who are standing

up for themselves and our

community.”

In the 1990s, Cathy worked for

the watchdog group GLAAD.

That’s where she grew up

as an activist. Her mission

has remained the same: fair,

accurate, inclusive media

representation of the diverse

LGBTQ+ community. Her local

and national media work and

acting as a spokesperson who

regularly speaks on LGBTQ

issues have prepared her for

where she is now.

The Task Force--an organization

Cathy’s worked with for years--

has a commitment to diversity,

progressive and intersectional

work, and a radical accessibility

that aligns with Cathy’s values. “It

is a political and personal home

for me.”


As Communications Director

for the Task Force, she

oversees the internal and

external communications

and works to make visible

the extraordinary activism of

the staff and programs. From

policy and field work to their

Creating Change conference,

she amplifies the voices of

their leadership, in particular

the executive director, Kierra

Johnson.

“The National LGBTQ Task

Force advances full freedom,

justice, and equality for

LGBTQ people by building

a future where everyone can

be free to be their entire

selves in every aspect of their

lives. Today, despite all the

progress we’ve made to end

discrimination, millions of

LGBTQ people face barriers

in every aspect of their lives:

in housing, employment,

health care, retirement, and

basic human rights.”

The National LGBTQ Task

Force is the country’s oldest

national LGBTQ advocacy

group. To learn more about

the Task Force, what they

do, and how you can get

involved, visit their website

and follow them on social

media.

www.thetaskforce.org

www.twitter.com/thetaskforce

www.facebook.com/thetaskforce

www.instagram.com/thetaskforce

www.youtube.com/thetaskforce

PUBLISHER MICHAEL TODD

MIKE@GETOUTMAG.COM

DESIGN AGOTA CORREA

AGOTA@GETOUTMAG.COM

CELEBRITY INTERVIEWER EILEEN SHAPIRO

@EILEENSHAPIRO3

NYC’S NIGHTLIFE AWARD WINNING BLOGGER/

WRITER & INTERVIEWER JIM SILVESTRI

NIGHTLIFE PHOTOGRAPHER WILSONMODELS

JEASO86@HOTMAIL.COM

The publications of MJT/GOOTH ENTERTAINMENT, getoutmag.com or any

other related print or Web publications or social media accounts, their images,

quotations or articles should not be construed to be an indication of the sexual

orientation of anyone portrayed therein.

All Content © Copyright 2019

MJT/GOOTH ENTERTAINMENT

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BY JIM SILVESTRI

On Point

With:

MEL INCARNATE

Interview >>>

Thotyssey: You’ve been

super busy lately, hosting

and guest starring in shows

while promoting music. Is it

fun to be busy after all that

lockdown boredom?

Mel Incarnate: Oh my God,

hell, yes. I’m super grateful

for being busy right now.

I’m a triple Capricorn, so

that’s kind of my tea. I’m

also in the earlier stages

of transitioning, so that

also comes with its ups and

downs.

So, where are you from

originally and what

were your interests

while growing up in

regards to music, fashion,

performance, etc?

I’m originally from

Birmingham Alabama. So,

a lot of my early influences

with music were Christian

An exciting new recording artist and

live performer emerging from Brooklyn

nightlife, Mel Incarnate is keeping

a brand of excitement and edgy

excellence in the family.

and country

music, as my

parents were

southern

Christians.

Being the

faggot that I

am, I sniffed

out the girliest

pop I could

possibly find

on LimeWire:

Britney Spears,

Kesha, anything

slutty and fun.

Another great

Brooklyn queen, Charlene

Incarnate, is actually your

biological sister. Were

you a support system for

each other when you were

growing up in that religious

household?

Honestly, the environment

we grew up in catered to

nothing but fear. We were

raised in a pressure cooker

of homophobia, so we really

did not get along until we

found ourselves separately.

Did you just recently begin

recording music?

I am a Covid tranny and a

Covid artist. I found myself

in the pandemic, and I found

a way to express myself

through immense isolation.

I began writing around

November 2020, and since

then have written and

recorded seven songs, so it’s

a fairly new moment.

I’m really enjoying your

latest single “About

Fashion,” which is a little

bit about style but largely

about all the beautiful

flaws and traits that make

us unique! How did that

song come to you?

I was on my way to a photo

shoot, and the photographer

asked me, “Who are you

wearing for the shoot?”

And it really pissed me off,

because I hate that tone of

the fashion industry. And I

didn’t have the money to buy

a cute look because I had

just spent money on getting

filler in my face. And I was

so heated from it, I wrote a

full song. I expanded on that

idea and was like, everything

that I’m ashamed of is my

fashion. I was realizing that

I’m just gonna have to own

everything about myself and

be my own cheerleader.

What’s coming up for you?

I have a music video coming

out around Bushwig, I have

a single coming out mid-

September and another

in early October and then

I’m dropping my EP around

Halloween.

What advice could you

give to all the queer kids

out there who are stuck in

homes like where you grew

up?

Listen to that part of yourself

that wants to break free and

wants to get out. Let that

carry you into a new life

whenever that opportunity

comes. You will know.

Read full interview on Thotyssey.com | Follow Mel Incarnate on IG @melincarnate



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