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NETJETS EU VOLUME 15 2021

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ART ON THE VINE

The grape and the

grand come together

SOMERSET BLOOMS

England’s green and

very pleasant county

A SENSE OF WELLNESS

Advice, apps and more

for mindfulness matters

THE CHEF’S ODYSSEY

Daniel Boulud on

reinventing classics

NEXT STEPS

One man’s quest

to travel to space


TAKING OFF

AS THE AUTUMN LEAVES START TO TURN, we all at NetJets are rededicating

ourselves to the idea of renewal.

That starts with our best selves: the premise of being present, centered and

mindful, all topics which we explore in great detail starting on page 42. But

we don’t stop there. On the heels (no pun intended) of our expansive look of

all things running in the summer issue, this autumn we investigate how e-bikes are allowing

cyclists the opportunity to ride together for more meaningful experiences and exercise.

We are also recommitting ourselves to a pair of travel themes that are at the heart of this

magazine: the exploration of the topical and the timeless. In this issue, we visit the French

apple brandy region of Calvados where the potent milieu conspires to produce a delectable

spirit unlike any other. We also report from the English county of Somerset, where the elite

are now flocking to discover a raft of freshly unveiled hostelries, restaurants and attractions

that are popping up in every conceivable corner.

Beyond our travel and lifestyle features, we visit Alaska native John Shoffner, who

is training to fly Axiom’s Ax-2 mission for an eight-day stay on the International Space

Station; we check in with William Chase to hear what’s next for the Herefordshire-based

entrepreneur; and we head to Columbus to spend a few minutes with Patrick Gallagher,

President of Sales, Marketing and Service at NetJets.

We hope you enjoy this edition of the magazine and wish you safe travels wherever they

may take you.

– All of Us at NetJets

C O N T R I B U T O R S

BILL KNOTT

The London-based

restaurateur and

food writer gets a

glimpse into the

world of Daniel

Boulud, the

towering creative

mind behind the

reinvention of a

Manhattan icon,

Le Pavillon, in

Updating the

Classics (page 64).

ELISA VALLATA

For Fit For a Queen

(page 60), the

Italian stylist and

fashion expert

has selected and

arranged some

of this season’s

most spectacular

jewels against

the backdrop of a

beautifully crafted

chessboard from

Purling London.

CATHERINE

FAIRWEATHER

A native of

England’s West

Country, the travel

writer examines

things close to

home in Suddenly

Somerset (page

52), profiling

a county that

rivals the beauty

of its Cotswolds

neighbours.

JIM CLARKE

The well-travelled

wine and spirits

specialist ventures

from his New

York home to a

fascinating part of

France to catch up

on the developments

in Calvados and

discovers the Spirit

of Normandy (page

68) is enjoying its

time in the spotlight.

JOHN McNAMARA

Always eager for

assistance, the

managing editor

of NetJets, The

Magazine evaluates

the latest e-bikes

on the market and

how they ease travel

around town and

country – and do

so with style – in

Power to the Pedal

(page 48).

This symbol throughout the magazine denotes the nearest airport served by NetJets to the

story’s subject, with approximate distances in miles and kilometres where applicable.

4 NetJets


CONTENTS

CENTRE OF ATTENTION

Untitled, 2011, by

Urs Fischer, page 74

6

NetJets


36 42 64

DREAM FOUNDATION

Seriously ill children

benefit from the work of

Rays of Sunshine

pages 10-13

INTOXICATING BEAUTY

Vineyards are now cultural

showcases as art and wine

prove a perfect blend

pages 36-41

ALL THE RIGHT MOVES

The season’s most alluring

jewels shine against a

chessboard backdrop

pages 60-63

IN THE NEWS

A hideaway in central Italy,

Rolls-Royce advances,

desirable drinks and more

pages 14-23

ALL IN THE MIND

A comprehensive guide

to taking charge of your

mental well-being

pages 42-47

NEW YORK DARLING

Daniel Boulud’s latest

venture in the Big Apple is

an old classic reimagined

pages 64-67

NETJETS UPDATE

The benefi ts of biofuel,

exceptional accommodation

and staff in profi le

pages 24-27

MOTOR ON

The increasing popularity

of e-bikes is producing a

plethora of exciting options

pages 48-51

A TASTE OF CALVADOS

A fresh generation of

producers is elevating

Normandy’s local spirit

pages 68-73

STEFAN ALTENBURGER, SHAWN CORRIGAN, DIANA HIRSCH / ISTOCK, THOMAS SCHAUER

SPACE 2021

John Shoffner’s adventurepacked

life is to have an

extraterrestrial twist

pages 28-31

IBERIA IN PLAY

Golf in Spain and Portugal

is getting a boast from new

courses and resorts

pages 32-35

SOMERSET SWINGS

The West Country charmer

epitomises the English

countryside idyll

pages 52-59

PARIS PRESENT

The Bourse de Commerce

is home to a spectacular

art collection

pages 74-81

THE LAST WORD

Entrepreneur William

Chase on how he enjoys

the finer things in life

page 82

NetJets

7


NETJETS, THE MAGAZINE

FRONT COVER

Aerial view of the fall

colours of Tuscany.

(See page 36, for art in

vineyards in Italy, France,

and beyond.)

Image by Gábor Nagy

AUTUMN 2021 // VOLUME 15

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Thomas Midulla

EDITOR

Farhad Heydari

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Anne Plamann

PHOTO DIRECTOR

Martin Kreuzer

ART DIRECTOR

Anja Eichinger

MANAGING EDITOR

John McNamara

SENIOR EDITOR

Brian Noone

STAFF WRITER

Claudia Whiteus

CHIEF SUB-EDITOR

Vicki Reeve

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Albert Keller

SEPARATION

Jennifer Wiesner

WRITERS, CONTRIBUTORS,

PHOTOGRAPHERS AND

ILLUSTRATORS

Jim Clarke, Catherine

Fairweather, Bill Knott, Jen

Murphy, Julian Rentzsch,

Thomas Schauer, Josh Sims,

Elisa Vallata, Claire Wrathall,

Xavier Young

Published by JI Experience

GmbH Hanns-Seidel-Platz 5

81737 Munich, Germany

Published by JI Experience

GmbH Hanns-Seidel-Platz 5

81737 Munich, Germany

GROUP PUBLISHER

Christian Schwalbach

Michael Klotz (Associate)

ADVERTISING SALES

Katherine Galligan

katherine@metropolist.co.uk

Vishal Raguvanshi

vishal@metropolist.co.uk

NetJets, The Magazine is the offi cial

title for Owners of NetJets in Europe.

NetJets, The Magazine is published

quarterly by JI Experience GmbH on

behalf of NetJets Management Ltd.

NetJets Management Ltd

5 Young Street

London, W8 5EH England,

United Kingdom

netjets.com

+44 (0)20 7361 9600

Copyright © 2021

by JI Experience GmbH. All rights

reserved. Reproduction in whole or

in part without the express written

permission of the publisher is strictly

prohibited. The publisher, NetJets

Inc., and its subsidiaries or affi liated

companies assume no responsibility

for errors and omissions and are

not responsible for unsolicited

manuscripts, photographs, or artwork.

Views expressed are not necessarily

those of the publisher or NetJets Inc.

Information is correct at time of

going to press.

8 NetJets


WHEN THEY ASK WHERE YOU’RE FROM.

THE WORLD

Each day aboard The World, you awaken in the most remarkable home you will ever own.

As one of the few international adventurers who live this incomparable lifestyle, you explore

each continent and sail every sea surrounded by unrivaled anticipatory luxury service on

the planet’s largest private residential yacht.

Learn more about ownership opportunities. aboardtheworld.com | +44 20 7572 1231


GOODWILL

Fulfilling Dreams

From seeing the Loch Ness Monster to a day as a

firefighter, Rays of Sunshine brings joy to the lives

of seriously ill children // By Claire Wrathall

KEITH MEATHERINGHAM

SCAN THE CALENDAR OF auctions due to be

held at Christie’s in London during the week

of Frieze Art Fair, and among the big-ticket

post-war and contemporary art sales, there’s

an unexpected addition: a fundraiser featuring

works donated by many of the same blue-chip

artists, but – unlike most lots – never previously

offered for sale. They will be sold in aid of Rays

of Sunshine, a UK nonprofit whose remit is

to “grant wishes” to 3- to 18-year-olds with

serious, degenerative or life-limiting illnesses.

The last time the charity organised an

auction, it persuaded artists of the calibre of

Rana Begum, Sir Peter Blake, Ian Davenport,

Tracey Emin, Barry Flanagan, Howard

Hodgkin, Kate MccGwire, Grayson Perry (a

glazed ceramic sculpture of a cat, cheekily

entitled I Love You Super Rich Person),

Richard Long, Julian Opie and Marc Quinn

to consign works, 68 lots in total that raised

almost £750,000 in what the art trade calls a

white-glove sale – a rare event when everything

offered is sold. This year’s edition promises to do

better still.

“The work we’ve been getting is really top

quality,” says Richard Burston, chair of the

charity’s executive committee and the driving

force behind the auction, reeling off a list of

international figures who have donated works,

among them Marina Abramović, Hurvin Anderson,

Helaine Blumenfeld, Tony Cragg, Antony Gormley,

Sheila Hicks, Damien Hirst, George Shaw, Bernar

Venet and Edmund de Waal, many of whom are

artists whose work he collects.

“I love to support great living artists, some of

whom I’ve got to know. There’s no better way

to support the arts,” he explains, continuing to

spill names. “Barnaby Barford has given us a

really fantastic sculpture,” he says of the artist

best known for his towering installation in the

10 NetJets


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GOODWILL

Victoria & Albert Museum’s ceramics gallery.

He also mentions the figurative painter Caroline

Walker; the Zambian-born painter Jonathan

Wateridge; and Lucy Williams, whose intricate

works assembled from multiple layers of

meticulously cut and arranged paper redefine

the concept of collage. “I hate to single out

individuals because everyone who’s given us

a work is a hero in my eyes. Artists are always

so incredibly positive, or the ones I’ve met

anyway. They’re probably more philanthropic

than any other group of people.” As, he hastens

to add, are the “tremendous committee of

dealers who have really gone in to bat for us.

We’ve been busy!”

Of course, a fundraising auction is about

more than just the art on offer. Burston first

came across Rays of Sunshine more than a

decade ago when a friend alerted him to a

no-longer-extant website called Buy Once Give

Twice through which charities could raise funds

by auctioning items and experiences. The BBC

news anchor Fiona Bruce had offered a tour of

the corporation’s newsroom and “a discussion

on how the news is made” in aid of the charity.

Burston bid for it, won it and spent a “really

interesting afternoon at the BBC. She was

incredibly gracious,” he adds.

Intrigued by the charity he had found

himself supporting, Burston mentioned that

he’d like to meet its CEO. An introduction was

made. And gradually he became more involved

in its work. In 2012, for example, he used his

contacts to enable “a lovely young girl, who

was a gymnast and had a brain tumour”, to

go to the Olympics and watch the women’s

gymnastics. Not just that, but some of the team

then came to the box she was watching from.

“Her parents were nurses at Addenbrooke’s

Hospital in Cambridge, and I spent the day

with them all,” he says. “They were all really

inspirational in terms of their bravery and

courage. She had a fantastic time, and her

parents had a great day with her, but she sadly

passed away a few weeks later. I attended her

funeral and talked at some length with her

parents and realised that what we did as a

charity had a real impact on families because

they retain these incredibly positive memories

of the experience.”

Listen to the stories of the children that Rays

of Sunshine exists to help, and it is impossible

not to be moved. Sometimes their wishes are

modest: they might want an iPhone, an iPad,

COURTESY RAYS OF SUNSHINE

TOP GEAR

Joe Lunn’s bike ride raised

more than £15,000 for the

charity that helped him

achieve his NFL dream

STANDING PROUD

George Shaw’s Painted Love,

2021, one of the pieces in Rays

of Sunshine’s auction

a laptop for gaming or to meet a celebrity. But

others, despite their predicament, dream big.

Not that anything seems to faze the “wish

granters”, who manage to make about 700

a year come true. They actually receive twice

as many requests, and through ward wishes,

activity days, and parties bringing together

families, touch the lives of around 20,000

children and their families each year.

One child longed to meet a real-life

mermaid. The team at Rays of Sunshine found

one for her. (At least it looked like a mermaid.)

“No matter what the future holds, we will

always have the memories of seeing her run

towards the mermaid and the look on her

face,” said her mother afterwards.

Yet more incredibly, they managed to

grant another five-year-old’s wish to see

the Loch Ness Monster. Eight weeks after a

seven-month stay in hospital being treated

for leukaemia, he and his parents travelled to

Scotland, set out on a boat and, through his

binoculars, glimpsed it. “I got to see her! She

was green and scaly, a bit like a dinosaur, but

friendly,” he said. (And you thought she was

mythical!)

ONLY MARGINALLY less complicated to set up

was the wish granted to a little girl who went

12 NetJets


for a spin – at speed – in a Lamborghini sprayed

shocking pink for the occasion and driven by

Richard Hammond, co-presenter of Amazon’s

The Grand Tour. “It was a wonderful thing

for her,” says Burston. “And it gave so much

pleasure to her family too, to all of those who

loved her. She passed away soon afterwards.

But they still watch the video.”

No less poignant are the wishes granted to

children who just want to grow up and have a

career – as a zookeeper or an Underground driver

or a firefighter. One was given the chance to

experience life as a member of British Airways’

cabin crew, looking every bit the part in her smart

Julien Macdonald-designed uniform. Another, this

time an aspiring ballerina, realised her ambition

to step on to the stage of London’s Royal Opera

House with a member of the Royal Ballet.

It takes a staff of 29 and a cohort of 200

volunteers as well as dozens of supporters and

celebrity ambassadors (among them footballers

Dele Alli and Mesut Özil, Olympian gymnast Louis

Smith, chef Gordon Ramsay, musicians Pixie Lott

and Olly Murs and acts such as Little Mix and

One Direction) to make the magic happen. But

granting wishes to individual children is not all

the charity does. It caters to groups as well, for

which it hosts parties. And sometimes wishes

are granted to whole wards, benefiting dozens of

children through the creation of indoor gardens or

sensory rooms, or simply enabling the hospital to

buy specialist equipment.

KEEP ON SMILING

Rays of Sunshine’s efforts will

continue to raise the spirit of

seriously ill children

As the parent of one wish grantee put it,

“We’ll never ever be able to thank you enough

for what you did for [our son], what you did

for all of us. You’re as important to us as the

surgeon who saved his life, the oncologist who

keeps him well, the radiologist who monitors

him and the nurses who care for him.”

Another mother talks of the

“immeasurable” joy and support the charity

brought her teenage son, Joe Lunn, during

his struggle with metastatic synovial

sarcoma, a very rare and deadly soft-tissue

cancer. A huge NFL fan, Joe longed to meet

the New York Giants, to walk out on to the

field of the MetLife Stadium with them and

toss the coin to determine who kicked first.

Rays of Sunshine granted his wish. And

Joe went on to reciprocate by cycling 160km

in aid of it, raising more than £15,000. “He

was so passionate about it, just an incredible

advocate,” says Burston. “And I got to know

him and his family quite well.” Indeed, Joe

should have been speaking at this autumn’s

auction, but sadly he did not survive the

summer. “He fought so hard,” Burston adds.

“He was a real fighter. He’s what inspires me.

I’ll be thinking of him on the day.”

Rays of Sunshine Art Auction at Christie’s

London and globally on christies.com,

16 October 2021

raysofsunshine.org.uk

KEITH MEATHERINGHAM

NetJets

13


THE SMART GUIDE

Ultimate relaxation near Rome, travel accessories,

mouthwatering spirits, Rolls-Royce-plus and more –

herewith the best, the boldest and the brightest

SYBARITIC

ESCAPE

Italy’s new immersive

wellness destination Palazzo

Fiuggi hits all the right notes,

from tech-savvy treatments to

superlative cuisine

TYSON SADLO

ADD YET ANOTHER fully

immersive, purpose-built and

high-echelon European wellness

and medical retreat to the

expansive list of distinguished

offerings already available

to sybarites and spa-hounds

across the Continent. The latest

is Palazzo Fiuggi: a handsome

6,000sq m facility situated on

an 8.5ha estate an hour outside

Rome in the hilltop spa town

that bears its name.

Conferred with curative

mineral waters since the Middle

Ages (Michelangelo and Pope

Boniface VIII are among those

who imbibed them, though not

at the same time), some guests

at the just-opened Palazzo Fiuggi

may simply wish to indulge

in the myriad relaxing hydro

therapies within the Thalasso

pools, circuits and hammams,

while enjoying a verdant estate

dotted with gardens, woodlands

and a lake, 700m above sea

level, where the rarefied air adds

to the sense of vitality.

Others, however, will want

to avail themselves of cuttingedge

knowledge as well as the

latest wellness and medical

devices available, including the

highest range of MRI technology,

infrared technology for brain

health and sleep, retinal

scanning and an endless range

of diagnostic testing. “Palazzo

Fiuggi was created by a team of

international experts who have

developed scientifically backed

and innovative protocols to aid

a full recovery of health and

wellbeing,” says its founder,

Lorenzo Giannuzzi, who is also

the chief executive of Sardinia’s

Forte Village Resort, already a

well-established name in the

world of hospitality.

To that end, guests can

expect five different bespoke

programmes to treat body,

mind and soul after an initial

consultation and diagnostic

assessment, created by a

team of expert scientists,

doctors, dietitians and trainers.

This results in a 360-degree

approach for a suite of medical

services, wellness treatments

and holistic therapies over a

number of days, including

specialised detox and weight

regimens and the already

HIGH TIMES

Palazzo Fiuggi pairs

the latest technology

– including the

Icaros virtual reality

fitness machine,

left – with classic

Italian hospitality

popular Immuno Boost

programme with its bioenergetic

and toxaemia scans and

prescribed treatments to help

increase vital energy, strengthen

immunity and achieve optimum

long-term health.

And while guests will

be in the care of leading

scientists and medics during

their multiday stay, it won’t

be a hardship: alongside an

eatery from three-Michelin-star

chef Heinz Beck, there are

54 immaculately decorated

bedrooms, a further 47

expansive suites as well as

the commodious 1,000sq

m private villa, which is set

within its private park for

bedding down. Add to the mix

myriad picturesque public

areas (think libraries, salas, tea

rooms and terraces with views

of the Ernici mountains), not

to mention a private cinema

and a clubby billiard room,

it’s leaving Palazzo Fiuggi that

may end up being the most

difficult part of the experience.

palazzofiuggi.com

TYSON SADLO

ROME CIAMPINO AIRPORT: 47miles/75km

14 NetJets


MORE THAN

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THE SMART GUIDE

Club Corner

Spirits of great distinction, making

cocktails with class and art in a glass

2

3 4

5 6

7

8

9

1

ALL IMAGES COURTESY THE COMPANIES

1 THE BROLLACH A tribute to the Craft Irish Whiskey founder Jay Bradley’s late father, just 661 bottles of rare double-distilled, single malt whiskey have been released.

craftirishwhiskey.com // 2 TALES OF THE MACALLAN VOLUME I Distilled in 1950 and bottled in 2021, this is a homage to Captain John Grant, the inspiration behind Macallan,

whose story is told in an accompanying book. themacallan.com // 3 BENROMACH 40 YEARS OLD The Speyside distillery has released just over 1,000 bottles of this rare single

malt that has spent four decades maturing in Oloroso sherry casks. benromach.com // 4 BOWMORE 27 YEARS OLD Part of the Timeless Series, the whiskymaker from Islay has its

distinguished product housed in a distinctive display box with a decorative hourglass. bowmore.com // 5 GLENLIVET 2004 Independent bottler Gordon & MacPhail has added three

new single malts from the Moray mainstay to its Connoisseurs Choice range, including this 16 year old, aged in refill bourbon barrels. gordonandmacphail.com // 6 THE MACALLAN

A NIGHT ON EARTH IN SCOTLAND A single malt with which to bring in the New Year, the Speyside distillery honours aspects of Caledonia’s most treasured evening of celebration.

themacallan.com // 7 HIGHLAND PARK CASK STRENGTH The second release in the “straight from the cask’ series is whisky in its purest form, with no water added after maturation,

delivering a robust and intense flavour. highlandparkwhisky.com // 8 VECCHIA ROMAGNA RISERVA ANNIVERSARIO A blend of five different casks and a product of 200 years of

expertise, this Italian brandy comes in individually numbered crystal decanters. vecchiaromagna.it // 9 THE YAMAZAKI 25 A novel mix of single malt whiskies, marks a new direction

for the collectable Japanese brand, led by the fifth-generation chief blender Shinji Fukuyo. suntory.com

SHAKE IT

ALL ABOUT

Mixology comes home as

Italian design firm Alessi has

teamed up with world-renowned

mixologist Oscar Quagliarini to

create five different stainless

steel mixing kits, including North

Tide, left, which comprises

cocktail measure, bottle opener,

ice bucket and ice tongs, along

with an “870” shaker designed

by Luigi Massoni and Carlo

Mazzeri in the 1950s. alessi.com

ARTISTIC TOUCH French cognac brand Rome De Bellegarde

continues to reinvent its luxe liquor, including a release of

150 decanters designed by Iranian artist Ghass Rouzkhosh.

romedebellegarde.com

16 NetJets


Triptych Bankside

At the heart of

London’s Southbank

A highly sought-after address where

the capital’s pulse is continually at your

fingertips. Borough Market, Tate Modern

and Shakespeare’s Globe is your

neighbourhood, with breathtaking views

across the River Thames and the City.

Comprising studios, 1-4 bed apartments

and penthouses, residents will enjoy an

uncompromising selection of five-star

hotel style services and amenities, as well

as landscaped gardens.

Show apartments to view in September

Prices from £720,000

Contact us to book a viewing or a

virtual tour +44 (0)20 7293 0175

triptychbankside.com

CGI is indicative only.

Price correct at time of going to print.


THE SMART GUIDE

Always moving, Rolls-Royce has never been

busier as it finds handsome ways to put a

new spin to its classic cars

OPENING UP

The Rolls-Royce

Boat Tail shows off

its cantilever trunk

© ROLLS-ROYCE

Evolution of

a Marque

IT’S A SIGN OF THE standing

of Rolls-Royce that as

spectacular as its recent

models have been – think

of its “baby Roller” Ghost

model from last year, or the

attention-grabbing Black

Badge limited edition from

earlier this one – it’s not just

the big releases that really

make the marque. And so

Rolls-Royce’s innovators are

ever looking at different ways

to enhance the experience

of owning the world’s most

iconic automobile.

Nautical Nous

Inspired by J-class yachts,

the Rolls-Royce Boat Tail – of

which just three have been

made so far – does little to

hide its seafaring roots, but

the grand tourer, a product of

the company’s coachbuilding

workshop, has some secrets

within the undoubtedly

sleek design. At the touch

of a button the rear of the

car opens in a cantilever

movement – supposedly

inspired by Spanish architect

Santiago Calatrava. The

bounty is within, as the

trunk contains a champagne

chest, two bottles of Armand

de Brignac vintage cuvée,

caviar, and blinis. For perfect

moments of relaxation, two

cocktail tables open on

either side of the deck, with

accompanying picnic stools.

A Matter of Time

The Boat Tail is also home

to one of the most stunning

collaborations that Rolls-

Royce has been involved

in – with Swiss watchmakers

Bovet 1822. What appear

to be an unusual two

clocks in the fascia of

the Boat Tail, are, in fact,

removable watches. The

pair of reversible tourbillon

timepieces are both designed

to be worn on the wrist, used

as a table clock, pendant, or

pocket timepiece, when they

don’t take their place in the

dashboard. Both watches

have specially designed

18K white gold cases and

feature matching front dials

with the same Caleidolegno

18 NetJets


veneer found on the aft deck of

Boat Tail itself. The gentleman’s

timepiece is highly polished;

the lady’s is ornately engraved

then filled with blue lacquer,

with great effort – and teamwork

between Rolls-Royce and Bovet

– to get a precise colour match

between this lacquer and that of

the car.

Escape to the Country

Rolls-Royce’s bespoke services

have also stepped up a gear

recently, epitomised by the

Cullinan, its take on the SUV. At

the heart of its “Celebration of

Sporting and Country Pursuits”,

the Cullinan has a range of

options for enhancing a trip out of

the city including the Recreation

© ROLLS-ROYCE

Module, a motorised drawer

cassette that appears at the touch

of the button, offering the perfect

paraphernalia for a day out.

And Bags More…

Proving that it is about more

than the motors, Rolls-Royce

also has a luxury luggage range

to complement its cars – a

range that has recently taken

a different turn with the Black

Badge variant to its Escapism

range. Comprising a 48hr

weekender, 24hr weekender,

holdall, tote bag and organiser

pouch, the leather collection

reflects the “darker, edgier

personas” of the Black Badge

cars – the Cullinan, Wraith and

Dawn. rolls-roycemotorcars.com

IN BLOOM

FOR HIS FIRST MUSEUM exhibition in France, the

one-time enfant terrible of British art Damien

Hirst has opted for the rather calming subject

of cherry blossoms. The Fondation Cartier

pour l’art contemporain hosts 30 large format

paintings. It’s an intriguing mix of master and

subject, but as Hirst explains, “The cherry

blossoms are about beauty and life and death.

They’re extreme – there’s something almost

tacky about them. Like Jackson Pollock twisted

by love.” All 107 paintings in the series, which

took the artist three years to complete, are

available in an accompanying book. Until 2 Jan

2022; fondationcartier.com

© ROLLS-ROYCE

DRIVE TIME

Bovet 1822’s timepiece

for the Boat Tail;

above: the Cullinan’s

Recreation Module

© DAMIEN HIRST AND SCIENCE LTD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, DACS 2020

NetJets

19


THE SMART GUIDE

At the Wheel

Whether it’s taking to the open road or enjoying a guided tour, the

options for exploration are increasingly decadent

SPORT BUT NOT

AS WE KNOW IT

ALL ABOUT

THE STYLE

© ARES

IF THE MILWAUKEE manufacturer of iconic motorcycles

has a particular reputation, then Harley-Davidson is

doing much to change that – and its latest release

certainly does challenge preconceptions. The

Sportster S is certainly different to what has come

before it, both as an HD bike and in the sportster

genre. Visually, there is no doubting this is a very

modern bike, but the devil is in the detail, in this case

a new engine (a Revolution Max 1250T V-Twin) and a

flurry of technical innovations. Sport, Road and Rain

riding modes lead the way, while a sat-nav screen and

smartphone integrations follow. Performance-wise, it is

also a step up on previous iterations – and a bike that

truly shows its best on wide-open roads.

harley-davidson.com

IT’S NO LONGER ENOUGH for high-end hotels and

entertainment venues to simply ferry their guests

around in ordinary vehicles – something special is

required. That’s why Billionaire Life, whose portfolio

includes properties in Porto Cervo, Dubai, Monaco

and Riyadh, has teamed up with Ares, the Italian

coachbuilder, which has delivered a fleet of individually

built ARES for Land Rover Defender Spec 1.2

Cabriolets. Each of these vehicles sports a remarkable

level of customisation with features hand-crafted in

Ares’ Modena atelier. Every one of the Defenders’ livery

and style mirrors the colour palettes and trims of the

various venues (such as Cipriani in Monaco, above)

and will offer a bespoke VIP service to Billionaire Life’s

guests. aresdesign.com

CLUTCH STUDIOS

VISION VIRTUOSITY

MARK COCKSEDGE

Iconic designer Marc Newson has joined forces with

Austrian crystal expert Swarovski to produce the CL Curio

7x21, light and compact binoculars that promise a higher

level of intensity and clarity. swarovski.com

20 NetJets


Natural

Wonder

The appreciation of the precious

fleeting essence of time and

nature’s changing beauty from

season to season is a particularly

Japanese concept which lies at

the heart of Grand Seiko’s latest

creation.

Handcrafted by the finest

Japanese watchmaking artisans,

the Grand Seiko Mishaka is

a masterpiece; its carefully

selected green garnets and

tapered baguette diamonds

delicately and precisely set in

18ct white gold.

The Mishaka is powered by

the brand’s iconic Spring Drive

calibre 9R01 which delivers

a level of precision that no

traditional mechanical watch can

match. Twenty years on, it has

become recognised as one of the

most significant developments

in the recent history of fine

watchmaking.

Its design is inspired by the

Mishaka pond – close to Grand

Seiko’s elite Micro Artist studio

– which is a magical place where

the still waters reflect the beauty

of the changing nature of time,

with infinite shades of green.

Just fifteen Mishaka watches

will be created, sold exclusively

within flagship Grand Seiko

boutiques around the world,

including London’s Knightsbridge

boutique, where private viewings

can be arranged for this limitededition

masterpiece.


THE SMART GUIDE

On the Move

Travel in style with luggage and accessories that

prove function and form need not be strangers

THE GAME

IS AFOOT

FOLLOWING ITS BELGIAN FOUNDER Georges Nagelmacker’s

dream of Orient Express being more than a way of

getting from A to Z, the Steam Dream collection of

travel objects is a series of accessories from the famed

company that elevates the travel experience. As the

remarkable interiors of the carriages are adorned

with fi ne marquetry and exceptional gold work, so

the creations of 18 craft houses and designers are

designed by singular talents and honed to perfection.

Among those contributing to the collection are such

diverse companies as Danish electronics company

Bang & Olufsen, French malletier Au Départ, Smythson,

London-based purveyors of high-end stationery, and

Hector Saxe, the Parisian creators of unique designer

games, whose mahjong trunk is pictured here.

orient-express.com

QUITE THE

CARRY-ONS

New world, new luggage – a pair of the

fi nest case makers has released exceptional

luggage for the modern traveller. The 19

Degree international expandable 4-wheeled

carry-on from TUMI (tumi.com;

below left) is made from recycled

polycarbonate. Carl Friedrik’s

Carry-On (carlfriedrik.com, right)

features large zip compartments

and compression straps to keep

essentials in order.

ALL IMAGES COURTESY THE COMPANIES

METAL MAGIC

Available in either silver (left) or black, the latest Rimowa

Personal Cross-body Clutch Bag, with a removable

leather strap, features two open compartments, a zipped

pocket, three slots for cards, and updates the previous

polycarbonate model to aluminium. rimowa.com

22 NetJets


Aesop’s Fabulous

The Australian botanical firm is prolific in

creating all-round body-care products

FRAGRANCE

MATTERS

FRENCH PHILOSOPHER Michel Foucault’s concept

of heterotopia – a sense of worlds within

worlds where things are strangely different

– informs Australian botanical brand Aesop’s

latest trio of fragances. The Othertopias blur

the boundaries of real and unreal, here and

there. Comprising Erémia, Miraceti and Karst,

each fragrance is created to evoke images of

otherworldy experiences within our own realm.

The herbaceous Karst recalls the sea’s grasp of

the land, the more woody Miraceti is a tribute

to perilous adventures on the water, while the

citrusy Erémia conjures up an image of a city

ravaged by nature, with rain pouring off the

concrete. Scientifi c knowledge joins the artistic

freedom allowed to creative partner Barnabé

Fillion to produce fragrances that go beyond just

the simple sense of smell. aesop.com

PLAYING

STRAIGHT

Aesop’s Tame Hair Serum helps

to keep frizzy hair under control

– a particularly handy trick when

on the move. A blend of essential

oils – including petitgrain,

bergamot rind, patchouli and

jasmine –imparts a fresh citrus

and floral aroma, while the

formulation is enhanced with

panthenol and hydrolysed oats

that hydrate and nurture the hair.

GELLING IT

TOGETHER

A successor to the ultra-popular

Wild Lime Hair Polish, Aesop’s

new formulation for Sculpt Hair

Polish promises a non-sticky

shaping product, which offers

hold, definition and wet-look

finish. It was a long process to

improve on the original concept.

“We are extremely proud of

the result of our painstaking

efforts,” says Dr Kate Forbes,

Aesop’s director of innovation, of

a product that raises the bar in

haircare.

© AESOP

© TALA

SPORTING CHANCE

Available in shadow black and tornada grey, British

brand Tala’s six-piece SkinLuxe collection exemplifi es the

company’s commitment to quality activewear made from

sustainable sources. wearetala.com

NetJets

23


NOTES FROM NETJETS

Latest happenings, accommodation opportunities,

and companywide news and profiles

ON REFLECTION

Farnborough Airport’s

forward-looking nature

complements NetJets’ views

© FARNBOROUGH AIRPORT

FEATS AND FEASTS IN FARNBOROUGH

PERFECTLY POSITIONED in the south of England, within easy reach of London, Farnborough Airport is a vital hub for NetJets flights

in and out of the area, yet it is also one that mirrors NetJets’ principles and desire for a greener world. The first business aviation

airport to be awarded carbon neutral status in 2018, since July it has been able to offer sustainable aviation fuel (SAF, see facing

page) to all aircraft using the airport. Farnborough has also been innovating in other ways with the new On Air Café offering

premium takeaway meals to visitors to the airport. It’s elegantly designed with dark grey tones, oak panelling, reclaimed wooden

bookcases and contrasting fabrics and will not just provide peace and respite for customers but also offer an opportunity to support

local businesses and producers using high-quality goods.

24 NetJets


INSIDE TRACK

PATRICK

GALLAGHER

President, Sales,

Marketing and Service

WHEN DID YOU START AT NETJETS?

I started with Marquis Jet and was the

Executive Vice President of Sales when

it was acquired by NetJets in late 2010.

At that time, I was asked to lead and bring

together the two sales organisations. In

the years that followed, I got the opportunity

to work with our Marketing and Owner

Services departments as well.

JULIAN RENTZSCH

“Right now and for

the foreseeable future,

sustainable aviation

fuel is the best option

for sustainability

in aviation”

Bradley Ferrell, NetJets Executive Vice President for

Administrative Services

WHAT DOES YOUR NORMAL DAY

CONSIST OF?

No two days are the same. I try to divide

my time between our teams and our clients,

staying close to the front lines of our

business. There was no such thing as

“normal” over the past 18 months. When

COVID-19 spread worldwide, we had to

determine how to successfully survive a

pandemic with 10% of our typical fl ight

volume. Within a few months, we had

record interest in our services. It became

more important than ever to keep both our

customers and our teams informed.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE

YOU FACE IN YOUR ROLE?

Staying disciplined and maintaining focus

on the long-term view. It is so important

to not overreact to near-term stimuli and

to stay true to our business model. We

must never sacrifi ce the core values of

NetJets to take advantage of near-term

growth opportunity.

FUEL SOLUTION

ALREADY A PROVEN TECHNOLOGY sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) is a

biofuel made out of anything from used cooking oil to nonfood crops,

from urban or agricultural waste to algae, which can be blended with

standard aviation fuel in order to reduce the life-cycle emissions by up

to 80%, depending on how the SAF is made and sourced. “What makes

sustainable aviation fuel so important is that you don’t have to change the

specifi cations of the aircraft or their engines to use it. As the technology is

refi ned over coming years, the fuel is only going to become more effi cient

to produce,” says Bradley Ferrell, NetJets’ Executive Vice President for

Administrative Services.

NetJets is getting ahead of the curve in becoming not just a buyer of SAF

– in 2020 it purchased three million gallons of it in partnership with global

aeronautical services network Signature Flight Support – but also the fi rst

private aviation company to go as far as taking a stake in the actual

production of SAF, making a sizable investment in SAF developer WasteFuel.

NetJets is committed to buying 100 million gallons of its fuel over the next

decade – “that’s a substantial portion of our annual fuel usage under any

scenario,” stresses Ferrell.

ISTOCK

NetJets

25


NOTES FROM NETJETS

With its curated cluster of some of the

finest villas and properties around the

world, NetJets partner Le Collectionist

offers perfect destinations for Owners

SLICES OF PARADISE

A selection of superlative

Le Collectionist properties

FRANCESCO & ROBERTA RASTRELLI

© LE COLLECTIONIST

© LE COLLECTIONIST

TAILOR-MADE BLISS

MORE THAN SIMPLY providing

just a luxury property for the

perfect stay, Le Collectionist

creates once-in-a-lifetime

experiences. The Francebased

company, founded by

three friends – Max Aniort,

Olivier Cahané and Eliott

Cohen-Skalli – sources

properties around Europe,

spreading out from a base that

began in the South of France,

but now incorporates much

more, including some of the

finest properties in the Alps

for winter adventures. Villas

from Portugal, Italy, Greece, to

Spain, Croatia and Switzerland

– as well as further-flung

properties in Morocco and the

Caribbean – are the building

blocks for a business that relies

as much on the old-fashioned

idea of personal service. From

an emphasis on dealing with

potential clients over the

phone rather than the faceless

world of cyberspace, to having

on-site teams to smooth the

experience as the holiday goes

on, all is catered for.

While one thing remains

constant – the quality of the

property – Le Collectionist

aims to tailor very individual

getaways, depending on a

client’s whims. From the

basics like airport transfers,

grocery delivery and a personal

chef, to the more niche –

cocktail classes and a massage

therapist – the aim is to have

all bases covered, ensuring the

client has a perfectly relaxing

time and, perhaps, allowing

thoughts to turn to the greater

adventures that can be had

beyond the confines of the luxe

accommodation.

And here, Le Collectionist

continues to excel, with

truly authentic experiences.

For example, the culinary

minded can indulge in a

gourmet version of fondue in

a Courchevel yurt, or sample

a true Marseille bouillabaisse

in a fisherman’s cabin.The

more adventurous can explore

Comporta in Portugal on

horseback or follow in footsteps

of Napoleon in Pays-Basque –

in a Citroën 2CV. And the everinquisitive

can gain intimate

insights into a perfumier’s art

or the hand-rolling of cigars in a

Tuscan factory.

Simply put, Le Collectionist

aims to tailor-make dream

holidays – and has all the

resources to do just that.

lecollectionist.com

26 NetJets


JULIAN RENTZSCH

ONE THING OWNERS PROBABLY WOULDN’T

GUESS ABOUT ME IS … that my genuine

care for their general wellbeing and best service

possible comes not from my training or job

requirements, but from my heart.

CREWMEMBERS IN PROFILE

DARIA NAPIERALA

Cabin Crew

MY FIRST EXPOSURE TO FLYING WAS …

on a family holiday when I was 16, and it was

magical. Suddenly, the world seemed so small

and yet so big. While up in the clouds, I could

dream like never before.

THE BEST PART OF FLYING IS … the

freedom – the ability to learn, to experience

and to live through incredible adventures

around our beautiful planet. You get to know

different cultures, ways of being, of thinking, of

perceiving life itself.

BEFORE JOINING THE NETJETS TEAM,

I WAS … already certain that fl ying would be

my lifelong love affair.

THE ONE DAY AT NETJETS I WON’T

FORGET WAS … of course, my fi rst one, as a

new exciting chapter in my life’s journey was

just beginning.

ON MY DAYS OFF … I spend time with

my loved ones from whom I am away for a

substantial amount of time throughout the year.

WITHIN THE NEXT YEAR, I WOULD LIKE TO

… see the world coming together again. Moving

forward, fi nding some peace and harmony once

more. After a hard year, full of fear, uncertainty,

many restrictions and a dramatic change in our

way of living, the ability to do anything at any

moment wasn’t possible any more. Hopefully, for

all of us, we will appreciate more what we used

to take for granted.

MY BEST ADVICE FOR STAYING SANE ACROSS

TIME ZONES IS … to adjust your sleeping

patterns, while listening to your own body’s

needs. Make sure to stay hydrated, eat properly

and, most importantly, stay relentlessly positive

regardless of the diffi culties that may come up.

MY PROUDEST MOMENT AS A CREW

MEMBER WAS … an incident where I and two

other crew members saved a life while in the air.

When a passenger had a heart attack, I started

resuscitation while the others brought the

defibrillator. The passenger was conscious before

we landed and was safely escorted to hospital.

NetJets

27


OWNER’S PROFILE

REACHING

FOR

THE STARS

With boundless energy and a savvy tactical

approach, John Shoffner is hoping to become one

of the fi rst private citizens on the International

Space Station – and to be productive while he’s

there // By Josh Sims

JOHN SHOFFNER CANNOT FLY an airship. “Gliders,

hang gliders, airplanes, seaplanes, warplanes and

jets,” says Shoffner, ticking off those craft he has

learned to pilot. “But somehow I missed airships.”

One might be tempted to nip in with

“spaceship” too, but Shoffner has that covered as

well. The businessman, racing driver and NetJets

regular has recently started training with private

space company Axiom Space with a view to

rocketing to the International Space Station (ISS)

on a SpaceX ship in the latter part of next year.

“I’ve always been interested in those activities

that involve calculated risk, that involve a

challenge you have to prepare for, that make

you feel uncomfortable, that have an element of

danger to them,” says Shoffner, who, driving for

his own champion J2-Racing team, once totalled

his new Porsche 911 on a corner at Germany’s

famed Nürburgring, fl ipping it over and over and

yet somehow coming out largely unscathed.

“That just showed me what you can go through

with good preparation and equipment. In fact,

when I woke up in hospital I was ready to race

again and did so the following week – though

not in that car,” he adds with a laugh. “When

[my wife and I] took up racing cars, neither of us

had even driven sports cars before. We stopped

skydiving because it was starting to get boring.

Put it this way: we’re not exactly golf fans.”

Unless, perhaps, it’s the kind played by

astronaut Alan Shepard on the moon. Then

Shoffner might be tempted. Indeed, getting

into space will be the fulfi llment of a lifetime’s

ambition, even if it’s a counterintuitive adventure

to go on, it might seem, for someone who’s

also fascinated by the idea of maxing out his

lifespan by keeping up with the latest science in

nutrition, sleep and lifestyle. He grew up through

the bold ambitions and amazing achievements

of the Space Race between the US and Soviet

Union, and always had a fascination for

equipment with plenty of lights and switches,

with rockets and the stars.

“I was sure I’d go into space some day – I

was just never sure how – so it’s been amazing

that the advent of private spacefl ight and the

gradual maturing of that market now allows

that to be possible,” says Shoffner, who made

his money building Dura-Line, a Kentuckybased

company that pioneered and patented

fi bre-optic cable installation technologies,

before retiring in 1996.

© AXIOM SPACE

28 NetJets


NEXT STOP: SPACE

Shoffner and Peggy Whitson, who

will command the flight to the ISS, in

Axiom’s zero gravity chamber

NetJets

29


OWNER’S PROFILE

ALL IMAGES COURTESY JOHN SHOFFNER

ADRENALINE HIGHS

Shoffner has embraced

risk-taking activities from the

skies to the water – and is

now aiming for loftier heights

“The first time I heard about it I [counted

myself] in,” he says. “I’m not a window-shopper.

If I have no interest in owning something I don’t

go into the shop. But I enquired about the ISS

trip, the answer was right for me, and then I

knew I was going. Space isn’t going anywhere,

but I want to be one of the first [private citizens

to go]. In five years people will be going into

space for the weekend but I want to go when it’s

difficult, not when it’s easy.”

OF COURSE, it would be easy to dismiss this all

as the ultimate joyride of someone with the

funds to pay their way. (Axiom isn’t talking

money, but SpaceX charges NASA around

US$55M for a ticket to the ISS.) Two other

billionaires have signed up for Axiom flights

to the ISS too. What makes Shoffner’s flight

crucially different, though – at least compared

to, say, that of Dennis Tito, the first space

tourist, 20 years ago – is that he will be the

pilot, travelling alongside revered astronaut and

NASA veteran Peggy Whitson as commander.

“As a passenger I’d likely not have gone,” says

Shoffner, who, far from finding it an inconvenience,

seems thrilled by the fact that NASA now requires

that anyone going to the ISS undergoes full

astronaut training, the space station being, after

all, a government-owned research facility, not an

orbiting hotel. “I don’t want to go on a trip like this

just to take a bunch of selfies. I want to be useful

up there. It would just be way too much money for

it to be just for the fun of it.”

That’s why Shoffner will be helping to conduct

experiments during his eight-day stay on the

station, specifically those involving singlecell

genomic methods for 10x Genomics, a

Californian bio-tech company in which he’s also

an investor. To date, scientific work in this field

hasn’t been attempted on the ISS, so it was of

interest to NASA. That Shoffner has bought his

ticket is likely the only way 10x would be able

to get to conduct this research in a micro-gravity

environment – and get the results back quickly –

so that’s a huge bonus for it as well. It helps to

fund the likes of Axiom too, in its mission to build

the next space station, seeing as the ISS will soon

be decommissioned. And, naturally, it satisfies

Shoffner personally.

“Sure, I get to go on a cool trip,” says the

man whose slowest speed is white-water

kayaking or cross-country cycling (that is, across

the entire country). “I get to do something

challenging for me. But also to do something

good for mankind more broadly in the process.”

But that’s getting ahead of ourselves, Shoffner

concedes. He has to undergo all the training

first. NASA isn’t cutting any slack either. There

will, he says, be weeks and weeks of classroom

study before he spends the same time inside

a spaceship mock-up learning the controls in

practice. He notes that because they are now

highly automated, piloting such a craft is more

akin to being, as he puts it, “a high-function

systems manager”. But not everything is

automated. “There’s a lot to take in, right down to

how to use the toilet,” he chuckles. “I’m anxious

to get the training started.”

He certainly expects others like him to follow

– and he concedes that there is something

of a Wild West flavour to the privatisation of

spaceflight that can divide opinion. Is the

idea of spaceflight trivialised by allowing film

directors to take actors into space to shoot

a movie scene? Or by allowing people to

be able to win tickets for spaceflights in TV

competitions? Both are currently on the cards.

In fact, the competition winner may be flying

with Shoffner and Whitson.

“It’s all still early, and people are still trying to

30 NetJets


work [this new world of private spaceflight] out.

It’s like the early days of aviation, in the 1920s

and 1930s. There was airmail and then cargo,

but when passenger routes were first proposed

people scoffed,” says Shoffner. “Even the military

thought aeroplanes were silly at first. But over

time the value of such advances came to be seen,

and improvements in technology and increased

availability pushes prices down. I think the public

is still skewed towards scepticism: There are so

many major problems on Earth that need solving

it’s easy to say that the cost of space travel would

be better put to other uses. But things have to

shift slowly.”

INDEED, with NASA increasingly seeing itself

as more a spaceflight customer and not as a

spaceflight provider, Shoffner argues that the

willingness of private individuals like him to

spend a lot of money in order to, in part at least,

fulfill an understandable childhood fantasy will

in the coming years prove vital to the next space

race. That’s space’s commercialisation. And, from

the human perspective, its expansion.

“Right now, getting into space is expensive

enough that people who do it have to take the

decision very seriously. You have to think about

the value your money is providing,” explains

Shoffner. “But space is only going to become

more and more available to people with different

objectives. Some people will just want to go, as

I do, while also wanting to do something useful

with my time up there too.

“But I believe that it’s also important that

humanity makes progress in space,” he adds.

“Listen to Elon Musk and he argues that for our

long-term survival it’s important we think of

ourselves as an inter-planetary species. But also

because there are [scientific research] things

we can do in space that you can’t do on Earth.

And private people like me going into space is

another way of promoting awareness of space,

of catching attention in the way mine was as a

seven year old.”

That’s also why Shoffner is developing a

STEM (science, technology, engineering, and

mathematics) programme for the school he

attended, in the hope that more of an emphasis

of science and tech – “education is too generic,”

he suggests – will foster an interest in working in

the space sector, a career he would have pursued

himself if he had been nudged in the right

direction earlier.

Still, better late than never, as he may say to

himself as the countdown runs out and engine

ignition fires up. After all, he’ll likely touch down

as a changed man. As so many astronauts have

found, spaceflight can be a profound experience.

Shoffner says he hopes it doesn’t make him

cry, but he does expect to be changed by being

able to see for himself the fragility of the planet,

protected only by its thin curl of atmosphere.

“I hope to come back wanting to look for ways

to do some good in the world, without going

to the top of the mountain and sitting crosslegged

for the rest of my life,” laughs the man

who, one imagines, would find sitting still rather

intolerable. “I hope to come back less resource

hungry and less consumerist. Really, just less of

an asshole. And that has to be a good thing.”

“I believe that it’s also

important that humanity

makes progress in space”

NetJets

31


TEEING OFF

UNDER THE

IBERIAN SUN

From the Atlantic to the Mediterranean, world-class

golf courses are proliferating across Portugal and Spain

// By Farhad Heydari

STEVE CARR

32 NetJets


AN ODE TO THE ALGARVE

The tree-lined Ombria

Resort, an inland

alternative to the region’s

many coastal courses

SPECKLED WITH NO fewer than 420 courses

and lavished with more than 300 days of

sunshine annually, it’s no wonder that the

Iberian Peninsula continues to retain its crown

as the undisputed epicentre of Continental

golf, especially for weather-weary northern

Europeans. And regardless of whether you’re

heading to the Algarve or to one of the Costas,

you are unlikely to stumble across a track that is

anything less than bonsai-perfect.

Indeed, thanks to variations in topography,

vegetation and architectural approach, golf in

Spain and Portugal offers 36-holes-a-day-types

an endless variety of experiences across a tableau

where, after a long hibernation, new layouts are

once again starting to sprout up alongside a raft

of new developments and refurbishments.

NetJets

33


VASCO CELIO

TEEING OFF

The most recent debut dates back four years,

where an hour north of Lisbon on Portugal’s

emerging Silver Coast, Cynthia Dye’s 6,403m

West Cliffs (westcliffs.com) came to fruition after

a 14-year gestation period. Luckily, we won’t have

to wait that long for the next launch. Scheduled to

open in the spring of next year, a former fruit farm

in a lush ancient river valley a half-hour’s drive from

the Algarvian capital, Faro, is being transformed into

the Ombria Resort (ombria.com). Surrounded by

hillsides and dotted with indigenous plants and trees,

the course is the brainchild of veteran Portuguese

architect Jorge Santana da Silva, who has routed the

par-70 course around mature oaks to offer a contrast

to most of the layouts in the area, many of which

are found on the coastal plain. When completed, the

resort will feature a Viceroy hotel with 76 rooms and

suites and 65 residences set amid hectares of citrus

groves and fig and carob trees.

Another highly anticipated launch is that of

Comporta Dunes (comporta.biz), which is finally

taking shape after a six-year hiatus. Designed

by the noted Oregon-based, Scottish architect

David McLay-Kidd – who has been involved with

SEA AND LAND

Below: CostaTerra Golf &

Ocean Club; facing page: the

view to the clubhouse at SO/

Sotogrande

the project since 2007 and has courses such as

Bandon Dunes, Queenwood and the Castle Course

at St Andrews to his name – it will open in the

summer of 2022 on “virgin dunes that go on for

miles and miles”, on the Alentejo coast, about

an hour’s drive from Lisbon, as a par-71. It will

doubtless join the conversation as one of the

premier experiences on the European continent.

THE SAME IS true with CostaTerra Golf & Ocean

Club (costaterraclub.com), the brainchild of Mike

Meldman, a California businessman and realestate

developer who has built a glittering roster

of residential communities in resort areas such

as Idaho, Los Cabos and the Bahamas. Like his

other properties that exemplify the trend towards

utopian second- (or third-) home enclaves, this

one on Portugal’s “Blue Coast”, already home to a

roster of A-listers, should attract boldfaced names,

who’ll be enticed by the prospect of living along

one of the last stretches of untouched Atlantic

Coast in Southern Europe, in the countryside

between Comporta and Melides. Spread over

292 hectares, it will feature 300 cottages, villas

and residences, its own vineyard, an expansive

equestrian centre and the only Tom Fazio-designed

course in mainland Europe, set to open in spring.

One resort that needs little introduction, Quinta

do Lago (quintadolago.com), has also been busy

burnishing its appeal, by giving its much-loved and

original South Course an 18-month, €7 million

upgrade. In addition to resurfacing fairways,

approaches, greens, collars and tees with a hybrid

type of Bermuda grass, no fewer than 48 bunkers

have been given extra TLC, while some have been

relocated to favour the modern game, among

other improvements. Like the other two 18-hole

championship courses on site – the North Course

and Laranjal – the 6,500-metre long South Course

wends its way among umbrella pines, lakes and

wildflowers in the 809ha Ria Formosa Natural Park.

Meanwhile, outside Madrid, a new course

by architects Marco Martin and Blake Stirling is

taking shape at the 550ha LaFinca Golf Los Lagos

(lafincagolf.es) development. The centrepiece

of another exclusive residential community, the

6,480m course has been fashioned by moving

more than a million cubic metres of earth in order

to create gentle gradients and undulations, providing

remarkable golfing vistas. And while 96% of trees

found on the site have been preserved, more than

1,200 pine trees have also been planted.

Elsewhere, a pair of must-know names are adding

enhancements and refinements to their distinguished

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© LA RESERVA CLUB SOTOGRANDE

set of offerings. PGA Catalunya (pgacatalunya.

com) in Girona, Spain, has recently unveiled a

long-awaited €5 million wellness centre with nine

treatment rooms, a gym and yoga studios, as well

as thermal and water facilities set among areas that

reflect gardens, forest clearings and waterfalls.

Over in Andalucía, SO/ Sotogrande (so-sotogrande.

com) comes courtesy of the Accor hotel group and

will be the avant-garde brand’s first opening in

Spain and its first resort in Europe. “The new hotel

is a significant development for us,” said Marc

Topiol, chairman of Sotogrande SA, of the 152-

room property, complete with six restaurants and

bars and an expansive wellness centre. “It provides

guests with a window into our curated world here

in Sotogrande and elevates our overall quality of

experience even further, ensuring that those who

make or wish to make Sotogrande their permanent

or co-primary home, have even greater amenities

from which to benefit.”

Perhaps the most anticipated project over the course

of the next two years is the long-awaited development

of the South Course at Monte Rei Golf & Country Club

(monte-rei.com) in the eastern Algarve. Designed, like

its sister North Course, by Jack Nicklaus, “the South

Course will have many similar features – great trees,

wonderful topography, beautiful vistas – and has the

potential to be another sensational course,” said the

18-time major winner. Ground-breaking for the par-

72, 6,755-metre-long course is scheduled for spring

of 2022 and once complete, it will offer panoramic

views of the Serra do Caldeirão mountains to the north

and the Atlantic Ocean to the south. It’s an idyllic

setting – and one that perfectly represents the beauty,

charisma and world-class variation available across

the picture-perfect Iberian courses.

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35


CULTURAL CACHE

A REFINED

PAIRING

LOST IN ART

Gao Weigang’s Maze,

2017, at the Donum Estate,

Sonoma, California

36 NetJets


Vineyards have become showcases not only for the viticulturist’s

art but also for museum-quality artworks and exhibitions that are

increasingly taking center stage // By Brian Noone

ART OPENINGS ARE INCOMPLETE without wine: it stimulates

conversation, of course, but the slow pleasures of sipping are

also a good match for the equally slow pleasures of reflecting on

a painting or a sculpture. You can’t – or at least you shouldn’t

– rush a glass of good wine any more than you hurry through an

interesting art exhibition. Not if your palate is sufficiently refined.

Museums have long understood this connection as well. It’s why

the wonderfully muralled restaurant at Tate Britain in London has

one of the city’s best wine lists, and why Odette, the three-Michelinstarred

dining destination at the National Gallery of Singapore, has

some 700 varieties in its cellar. Connoisseurs rarely appreciate just

one aspect of the world – and the opportunity to mix several sublime

things with each other is what makes for truly memorable occasions.

So there is an elegant simplicity about reversing the norm and

bringing art to the vineyards instead. Increasingly, this is just what

viticulturists around the globe are doing, turning the geometric

beauty of their repeating rows of vines into a stunning backdrop

for artworks of distinction – pieces that might otherwise be found

in an urban museum and are drawing culture vultures to the

countryside for a truly slow experience, of both art and wine.

ROBERT BERG

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37


CULTURAL CACHE

ITALIAN WORKS

From left: Protect Me

Everywhere, 2012, by Valerio

Berruti at Ceretto; red nerve,

2019, by Miroslaw Balka at

Castello di Ama

MARINA SPIRONETTI

ALESSANDRO MOGGI

The placement of art in vineyards is a relatively recent

phenomenon, largely because oenotourism itself is relatively new.

For centuries, wine lovers, even the most ardent, were as unlikely to

visit the grapes as they were to try catching a beluga in the Caspian

Sea or visiting the dairy that made a particularly piquant cheese.

AS IN SO MUCH of the modern wine world, Robert Mondavi played

a role in turning vineyards into destinations. His efforts in getting

Californians to venture north to Napa kickstarted the concept – and

not just in the American West. In France, for instance, people didn’t

visit vineyards, in part because the négociant model gave merchants

full control of distribution, which meant that in some cases you couldn’t

buy the wine directly from the grower even if you knocked on the door.

Standing in the splendid isolation of the Peyrassol (peyrassol.

com) estate in Provence today, with views of the rolling hills and

distant mountains, kissed by the breezes wafting up from the

Mediterranean, you wonder why it took us so long to make vineyards

visitable. the estate dates back to the 13th century and still produces

standout rosés, but its leading appeal at the moment is its phenomenal

sculpture garden, superb permanent indoor exhibition and current

temporary solo show given over to Anish Kapoor. Just up the road,

on the other side of Aix-en-Provence, Château La Coste (chateaula-coste.com)

has taken the art-and-wine destination to the next

level: museum-quality exhibitions are joined by a sculpture garden of

marvels as well as two restaurants led by celebrated chefs – Hélène

Darroze and Francis Mallmann – and a 28-suite hotel and spa.

Across the Italian border, in Piedmont, Ceretto (ceretto.

com) was a pioneer in modern winemaking in the region – the

single-vineyard barolos are a must-try – and it was also the first

to bring artists to the region for site-specific creations. Thirdgeneration

vigneron Bruno Ceretto invited British artist David

Tremlett to paint the Chapel of Santa Maria delle Grazie, the

Art in vineyards is a relatively recent

phenomenon, largely because

enotourism itself is relatively new

38 NetJets


CHRISTOPHE GOUSSARD

first of his many commissions in the region, in 1999. Other

internationally known artists made their way to Ceretto and

the region in his wake, from Sol LeWitt to Marina Abramović,

and now Piedmont has taken a place beside Provence as the

leading wine and art pairings in the world. Towns like Alba and

winemakers such as La Raia (la-raia.it) have invited artists to

make permanent installations, while Lunetta11 (lunetta11.

com) is a standalone gallery in the hamlet of Mombarcaro

started by Eva Menzio, former director of the Marlborough

Monaco gallery, to cater to the growing demand in the region.

IT WAS ALSO in 1999 that Castello di Ama (castellodiama.

com) in Chianti began its collaboration with Galleria Continua,

bringing prominent contemporary artists to live on the terroir

and construct works inspired by the setting. The first creation,

L’Albero di Ama, by Michelangelo Pistoletto, has been joined by

works from Anish Kapoor in 2004, Louise Bourgeois in 2009,

Lee Ufan in 2016, among many other artists, which have created

a lasting showcase that has since been joined by five suites,

a convivial restaurant and an atelier featuring local artisans.

In California, the Robert Mondavi Winery (robertmondaviwinery.

com) remains an art destination – including the Welcoming Muse

sculpture that has greeted visitors for more than four decades

– but other vineyards have taken the concept of on-site art to

dizzying heights. Donum (thedonumestate.com) in Sonoma

boasts a remarkable – and growing – collection of site-specific

sculptures by artists such as Ai Weiwei, Danh Vo and Doug

Aitken, which is among the leading sculpture parks in America.

The Hess Collection (hesscollection.com), meanwhile, is one

of the premier art collections in the world, with pieces assembled

over 50 years by Swiss winemaker and philanthropist Donald

Hess. Less than a quarter of the collection – which includes

HOME COMFORT

Sun Yuan and Peng Yu’s

Teenager, Teenager, 2011,

at Peyrassol

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39


© MONA

CULTURAL CACHE

works by Francis Bacon, Georg Baselitz, Frank Stella and Anselm

Kiefer – is on display at the winery atop Mount Veeder in Napa.

More of Hess’s collection can be seen at another winery:

Bodega Colomé (bodegacolome.com) in the Andes, the oldest

continuously producing winery in Argentina and one of the world’s

highest vineyards at nearly 2,300 metres above sea level. The

on-site James Turrell Museum is a truly remarkable showcase

of the artist’s immersive light installations – in a building Hess

worked with Turrell himself to design – as well as a number

of drawings and other works by the artist in Hess’s collection.

IN RECENT YEARS, South Africa’s picture-perfect valleys surrounding

Stellenbosch and Franschhoek have emerged as a relatively

compact centre for both world-class wine and African art. There

are Hess’s fingerprints here, too – he built the still thriving gallery at

Glen Carlou (glencarlou.com) before selling the property in 2016

– but Cape Town’s emergence on the global art scene, led by the

city’s MOCAA, has spurred wineries across the region to showcase

art from all over the continent. Grande Provence (gpgallery.co.za)

hosts a gallery that focuses on South African artists, while Cavalli

Estate (cavalliestate.com) features both a gallery and a residency

programme. Jeweller Laurence Graff’s personal collection is

on display at Delaire (delaire.co.za), a testament to the history

and quality of African artists. La Motte (la-motte.com) similarly

features the collection of its owner, Hanneli Rupert-Koegelenberg,

but here the art is more global in scope, with a recent exhibition

featuring works by figures as diverse as Picasso, German

Käthe Kollwitz and experimental Israeli artist Yaacov Agam.

Australia’s expansive vineyards are taking part, too, led by

Pt Leo Estate (ptleoestate.com.au) in Victoria, which features

pieces by blockbuster artists scattered across the grounds.

Elsewhere in the Antipodes, the sculpture garden at Brick

Bay (brickbaysculpture.co.nz) in New Zealand showcases

leading local contemporary artists, while in Tasmania,

the iconoclastic Museum of Old and New Art (mona.net.

au) was built on the Moorilla (moorilla.com.au) estate,

making for a permanent multisensory pairing like no other.

Aesthetes seeking pedigree should naturally turn back

toward France – and the southwest in particular. Malromé

(malrome.com) was the summer home of the Toulouse-

Lautrec family, and today pieces by its most prominent

artistic member, Henri, are on display, in combination with

changing contemporary exhibitions – best enjoyed with a glass

of the bordeaux in hand made from the surrounding terroir.

Finally, at the venerable Château Mouton Rothschild (chateaumouton-rothschild.com),

the art exists not just for atmosphere:

Since 1945, the winery has commissioned an artist to draw a

label for it, and the originals are on display. There’s a Francis

Bacon from 1990, a Niki de Saint Phalle from 1997, as well

as works from Dalí, Miró, Chagall, Picasso and Warhol. It’s a

remarkable collection from a remarkable winemaker—and evidence

of yet another reason why wine and art go together so well.

DOWN UNDER

Siloam – the tunnels leading

to the underground galleries

at MONA in Tasmania

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© DELAIRE GRAFF ESTATE

TRUE BELIEF

One of Anton Smit’s Faith

sculptures at Delaire

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41


LIVING WELL

MIND

OVER

MATTER

Perspectives, practices and gadgets that demonstrate

how being rooted in the present can help us take charge

of our future // By Jen Murphy

AS THE WORLD STARTS TO REEMERGE from lockdown, there are

different and new challenges to face. Controlling how we react

to changing situations is ever-more vital and we can do so by

adopting a mindfulness practice. The terms mindfulness often

evokes images of a Buddhist monk meditating in stillness for

hours on end. “I don’t even like to use the term mindfulness or

meditation because they scare people away,” says Monique Tello,

co-director of the Healthy Lifestyle Program at Massachusetts

General Hospital in Boston. “Being mindful is as simple as being

aware of what you are doing throughout the day. It encourages

you to be present in the moment and ignore distractions.”

We live in a world of distractions, so paying attention to the

present moment takes practice. But studies have shown that by

cultivating mindfulness, you can improve your mental and physical

wellness through reduced stress, anxiety and depression. Being

aware of what is happening in the present moment allows us

to observe the emotions that arise and choose how we react to

those emotions, says Jacob Mirsky, a consultation physician at

Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine, also in Boston.

While meditation is one formal form of mindfulness (and don’t

worry, there are apps to help you get started) it’s far from the

only one, says Dr Mirsky. We can choose to eat, walk and even

scroll through our social media feeds more mindfully throughout

the day. “If we can learn to recognise when a stressful thought

or emotion comes up it allows us the opportunity to develop

healthy coping mechanisms like walking around the block or

calling a friend,” he says. “And when we learn our stress triggers,

we can create a strategy for avoiding them in the first place.”

42 NetJets


DIANA HIRSCH / ISTOCK

MINDFUL RETREATS

In conversation with Rachel Rose, a yoga and

mindfulness expert at SHA Wellness Clinic, a

health and wellbeing retreat in Alicante, Spain

WHAT IS YOUR DEFINITION

OF MINDFULNESS?

Mindfulness is a collection of

techniques that teaches us to be fully

present in the present moment.

HOW DOES MINDFULNESS

PLAY INTO THE SHA WELLNESS

EXPERIENCE?

Mindfulness is an important

component of the SHA Wellness

experience because it is a key skill

for life itself. Mind and body practices

bridge the gap between what is

happening in our lives and how we

think about what is happening in our

lives. As we say, you can’t always

change your circumstances, but you

can always change the way you think

about them.

The guests I see at SHA often

have power, privilege and money,

but struggle to find the joy in life.

Mindfulness trains them to sit quietly

and observe the here and now, often

bringing a whole new appreciation for

their circumstances. Gratitude is the

cornerstone of happiness, and deep

relaxation leaves room for gratitude to

blossom in the heart and in the mind.

WELLNESS WAS ONCE RELEGATED

TO EXERCISE AND DIET, BUT YOU

TAKE A MUCH MORE HOLISTIC

APPROACH. CAN YOU SPEAK TO

WHY THAT IS IMPORTANT FOR

OVERALL HEALTH?

It’s not what you do, it’s the way that

you do it. Mindfulness implies stress

reduction. The body can be toned, and

the diet honed, but if the mind is out

of control, none of it matters. Thinking

causes emotions, and emotions provoke

actions, but actions have consequences.

We must learn how to think correctly

to enjoy all that we have while not

worrying about that which we don’t.

Mindfulness helps us to find simple

pleasure constantly and everywhere

– flowers, sunsets, smiles. The SHA

philosophy is to be the best you

possible. A quiet mind allows us to find

that best version of ourselves by finding

inner peace.

MANY PEOPLE ARE STRUGGLING

WITH STRESS AND ANXIETY FROM

THE PANDEMIC. WHAT OFFERINGS

DO YOU HAVE AT THE RETREAT THAT

MIGHT HELP THEM?

The pandemic has taken both a

physical and a psychological toll on

all of us and in response SHA recently

introduced a post-COVID program.

We are aware that between 10% and

30% of people infected with COVID-19

suffer, after acute infection, long-lasting

or persistent symptoms such as brain

JULIAN RENTZSCH

fog or anxiety from 14 days to 16 weeks

after recovery. This is known as “Post-

COVID Syndrome”. With the objective of

overcoming these consequences of the

disease, the scientific committee of SHA

Wellness Clinic has created the Post-

COVID Medical Unit to specifically treat

persistent symptoms or sequelae through

an integrative point of view. Weight gain

and alcohol misuse are also common,

even for people who never had the virus

but lived through lockdown and all its

associated closures and cancellations.

Each person is different, so each

programme takes a personalised, holistic

and integrated approach.

DOES MINDFULNESS HAVE TO BE A

STILL AND SEDENTARY ACT OR CAN IT

BE PRACTISED WITH MOVEMENT?

At SHA, we teach mindful walking. This

can include paying close attention to our

surroundings while walking, even if we

are in the city. Take time to see the beauty

around you, the colour of the shadows,

a flowering plant, or even the way a leaf

moves with the breeze. Counting and

watching the breath is also a form of

mindful walking. Even when we are doing

an intense sport we can watch the breath

mindfully. One fun mindfulness technique

is to challenge your capacity to breathe

only through the nose. Catch the moment

you start to gulp air with your mouth,

then reduce the intensity of whatever

you’re doing until you can keep the pace

breathing only through the nose.

shawellnessclinic.com

TAKE HOME TIPS

STANDING MEDITATION:

Stand with feet hip-width apart and

parallel. Gently shift your weight back

and forth from the right to the left

foot. Notice the movement, but mostly,

notice that tiny instant when you’re

perfectly balanced between two feet.

Try to “catch” that moment and then,

gradually, come to stillness there. This is

great to try if you’re waiting in a line.

STEPPING MEDITATION: Every

time you pass from one room to the

other, at the office, at home, at a

restaurant, step with the right foot. This

mindful moment is a wonderful check-in

with yourself, wherever you are.

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43


LIVING WELL

END-OF-DAY NAMASTE

Four yoga poses to unwind from the workday

WORK-RELATED STRESS can be a major contributor to health problems

such as poor sleep quality and high blood pressure. If you find yourself

still worrying about the office long after you’ve finished work try

adopting a yoga practice to help you unwind and reset. Studies have

shown that connecting breath to movement lowers levels of cortisol,

the hormone associated with the stress response. And according to the

National Institutes of Health in the US, scientific evidence shows that

yoga supports stress management, mindfulness, mental health, weight

loss, healthy eating and quality sleep. You don’t have to be flexible,

get sweaty, or carve out 90 minutes to reap the benefits. Studies have

shown that just 20 minutes of yoga can rewire the brain and help bring

clarity and focus. The following beginner-friendly poses will help you

slow down the body and mind at day’s end.

1

1 CAT-COW POSE

How: Start on hands and knees. On an inhale, drop your belly towards the mat and lift

your chin and chest as you gaze up to the ceiling. On an exhale, draw your belly up to

your spine as you round your back toward the ceiling. Allow your head to drop toward

the floor. Alternate between poses.

Benefit: Coordinating movement between poses with your breath relieves stress and

calms the mind.

2 COBRA POSE

How: Lie face down with your legs extended behind you. The tops of your feet should

rest on the mat and your feet will be a few inches apart. Place your hands under your

shoulders and hug your elbows to your sides. On an inhale, slowly lift your head and

chest off the ground. Draw your shoulders back and press down through your thighs

and feet. Exhale and lower down.

Benefit: This energising backbend reduces fatigue and stress while stretching the

spine and opening the chest and shoulders.

3 LEGS-UP-THE-WALL POSE

How: Sit with your right side against the wall. Turn your body to the right and bring your

legs straight up the wall, using your hands for balance. Your butt should be against the

wall. Use your hands to lower your back to the floor and lie down with your arms open by

your sides, palms facing up. Close your eyes and breathe slowly for five minutes.

Benefit: This inverted pose calms the nervous system and helps bring on a deep state

of relaxation.

4 RECLINED BOUND ANGLE POSE

How: Start seated with your knees bent out to the sides and heels drawn inward, soles

of the feet touching. If this is uncomfortable you can place pillows beneath your thighs

for support. Use your hands to lean backward and lower your back, shoulders and

head to the floor. Rest the arms by your sides, palms facing up. Close your eyes and

breathe slowly for five minutes.

Benefit: A reclined hip opener, this pose helps reduce stress and anxiety.

2

4

3

J U S T B R E A T H E

Four mindful breathing techniques you can do anywhere

We breathe 24 hours a day, usually without

thinking twice about such an innate act. But

monitoring and regulating our inhalations and

exhalations throughout the day can have huge

value. The next time you are stuck in traffic,

frustrated with your children, or stressed before

a big meeting, check in with your breath. Are

you holding it? Breathing rapidly? Mindful

breathing can help anchor us to the present

and prevent stress or anxiety from taking

over. According to an article in the Scientific

American, daily breathing exercises can help

counter the accumulation of even minor physical

tension associated with stress. When you feel

overwhelmed at any point of your day, use one

of these four breathing techniques to help calm

your central nervous system and help refocus

your mind.

2-4 BREATHING

This is a form of paced breathing when your

exhale is longer than your inhale. Start by

inhaling slowly through your nose for a count of

2 seconds, allowing your chest and lower belly to

expand. Then exhale slowly through your mouth

for a count of 4 seconds. You can slowly work

your way up to a 3- or 4-second inhale and 5- or

6-second exhale. If you lose concentration, try

using a free paced breathing app such as Breathe

for iPhone or Paced Breathing for Android.

4-4-8 BREATHING

Breathe through your nose for a count of 4,

allowing the lower belly to expand. Hold your

breath for a count of 4. Exhale through your

mouth for a count of 8. Immediately inhale for a

count of 4 through the nose, repeating the entire

technique three to four times in a row.

ALTERNATE NOSTRIL BREATHING

In Sanskrit, this technique is known as nadi

shodhan pranayama, which translates to subtle

energy clearing breathing technique. Yogis have

used it for centuries to calm and focus the mind.

Sit in a comfortable position with a tall spine.

Place your left hand on your thigh, palm up. Bring

your right up to your nose and use your right

thumb to close your right nostril. Inhale through

your left nostril. Now close the left nostril with

your left index and middle finger. Open the right

nostril and exhale. Inhale through the right nostril

and then close this nostril. Open the left nostril

and exhale. Inhale through the right nostril and

then close this nostril. Remember to always

inhale through the same nostril you just exhaled

through. Repeat five to ten rounds.

DEEP BREATHING

Also known as belly breathing or diaphragmatic

breathing, this technique helps activate the

body’s rest and digest response. Sit comfortably

with one hand on the chest and the other on the

belly. Inhale deeply through the nose. Ensure the

diaphragm rather than the chest inflates with air.

The hand on your chest should remain still and

the one on your belly should rise. Exhale slowly

through the mouth. Repeat for one minute.

44 NetJets


The Power of Daily Affirmations

Turn negative self-talk into positive motivation

Being mindful of

the words we use

to talk to ourselves

can have a major

impact on our mood,

and subsequently,

our actions, says

Patricia Deldin, a

professor of psychology

and psychiatry at

the University of

Michigan, Ann Arbor.

We’re in constant

dialogue all day long

with ourselves. Take

note of how many

times a day you use

negative words and

make a concerted

effort to replace them

with kinder, more

encouraging words,

like “could” instead

of “should” or “can”

instead of “can’t”. Dr

Deldin, who is the CEO

of the mental-wellness

programme Mood

Lifters, says if you’re

feeling depressed,

stressed or down, try

to repeat positive selfaffirmations

to adjust

your mood. Remember

it’s not “Monday is

a stressful day”, it’s

“Monday is going to be

a great day”.

G A D G E T S T O H E L P F O C U S T H E M I N D

If you find your thoughts racing nonstop, try using one of these high-tech devices to help you master a quieter mind.

Muse 2

This slim meditation headband works in tandem with Muse’s

free mobile app to provide real-time feedback on your heart rate,

brain activity and breathing. When your mind is calm you hear

calm sounds, like lapping waves. When your mind is active, the

waves start to crash and grow louder, signalling you to refocus.

choosemuse.com

Melomind Headset

Reminiscent of Bose Noise Cancelling Headphones, this device

uses electroencephalographic technology to help you deal with

stress and anxiety. Calming nature-based soundscapes, such as

tropical birds chirping, calm the brain and an accompanying app

allows you to monitor when you reach a state of deep relaxation.

melomind.com

S8 Pegasi II Light Therapy Glasses

If you’re a frequent flyer and struggle with jet lag, wearing

these glasses for just 30 minutes a day can help reset your

circadian rhythms. NASA technology was used to create lenses

that generate wavelengths of light that stimulate the area of

the brain that regulates the release of cortisol and melatonin.

The result: improved sleep quality. sleep8.uk

Aromeo Sense

A combination of aroma, light and sound therapy helps you

fall into a deep slumber instantaneously. And a combination

of sunrise simulation light, a symphony of chirping birds and

invigorating aromas helps you wake in the morning. Focusintensifying

sensory effects, like alertness-boosting soft white

light, can help you stay focused all day. aromeodiffuser.com

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45


LIVING WELL

S I X A P P S F O R D E C O M P R E S S I N G

When you’re going to have screen time, make it with one of these meditation-based apps

Calm

Downloaded more than 50

million times, this app has

features like Sleep Stories

narrated by actor Matthew

McConaughey and guided

body scans.

Headspace

This app’s tagline is, “Gym

membership for the mind”.

Friendly animations help

remove the intimidation

factor for newbies and

helpful how-tos go beyond

meditation and tackle

topics like how to deal with

a panic attack.

Aura

The customisation

capabilities of this

app have earned it the

nickname the Spotify of

mindfulness. If you’re

short on time, the

30-second stress busters

and 3-minute personalised

meditations are easy to

slot into your day.

Simple Habit

If the thought of sitting

quietly is overwhelming,

this app is for you. All

you need is just five

minutes to achieve inner

calm. Meditations are

downloadable so you

can easily access them

on a flight or during your

commute.

Inscape

In addition to having

staple offerings like

guided meditations and

calming soundscapes,

this app helps you destress

based on real-life

anxieties such as

dating troubles or

overcoming fears.

STRESS-FREE

VACATION PLANNING

With so much uncertainty around travel,

specialists are more relevant than ever

TRAVEL HAS NEVER BEEN more complicated. With borders opening and

then re-closing and testing protocols constantly changing it’s hard

even to know where to go, let alone what you’re able to do once you

arrive. Here, Brooke Lavery, a partner at luxury travel consultancy

Local Foreigner (localforeigner.com), shares fi ve reasons why

establishing a relationship with a bespoke travel specialist can help

take the stress out of pandemic travel.

1. SAVE TIME

Travel advisers protect your time during the planning process and

on your vacation. You could devote hours to researching and crossreferencing

your own itinerary just to use your precious vacation time

as a testing ground for those discoveries. Or you can work with a

professional you trust, who can design an itinerary to your taste and

preference based on years of experience and dozens of other client

experiences in that destination.

2. BEEN THERE, DONE THAT

Work with a travel professional and you eliminate the guesswork in

travel planning. Your expert has not only been to the destination,

they’ve thoroughly scouted the hotels, eaten in the restaurants and have

local connections.

3. NAVIGATING THE PROTOCOLS

With each country dictating and changing their COVID-19 policies at

a moment’s notice, travel is more overwhelming than ever. Outsource

the stress of this to a travel professional who specialises in high-touch

service and has the bandwidth to ensure details aren’t overlooked.

JULIAN RENTZSCH

Ten Percent Happier

A beginner-friendly app

with 350-plus guided

meditations and access to

personalised meditation

coaches who quickly

respond to your queries.

4. PROBLEM-SOLVING

In the event something doesn’t go as anticipated on the ground, who

will you call for help? The best travel advisers are problem-solvers with

the best local connections – no waiting on the phone for hours to talk to

a real human.

5. FEELS GOOD TO BE A VIP

When you check in to a hotel, do you want to wait in line or be

greeted personally by the general manager or hotel owner? Have

you experienced a hotel room stocked with your favourite drinks and

snacks? Do you want to stroll through the Louvre with the masses, or

explore the underground closed-to-public workshops with a curator

before visiting a few of the museum’s highlights? Being connected on

the ground creates an entirely different travel experience, and a star

travel adviser can facilitate those connections.

46 NetJets


WE ARE

WHAT

WE EAT

WE’RE ALL GUILTY of scarfing down a sandwich at

our desk or devouring a pint of Ben & Jerry’s while

zoning out to the latest episode of White Lotus. When

mindless meals and snacks become part of your

routine, pounds start to pack on. No matter how much

you exercise, good nutrition is a crucial piece of the

weight-loss puzzle. Instead of adopting fad diets, try

paying more attention to what you put in your mouth

and why. Studies have shown that the practice of

mindful eating not only helps with weight loss, but,

additionally, it can help you embrace long-term habits

dealing with food cravings and portion control.

H O W T O B E I N T H E

M O M E N T A T M E A L S

Experts at Harvard Medical School share tips and

tricks for adopting more mindful eating habits.

• Set your kitchen timer to 20 minutes, and take

that time to eat a normal-sized meal.

• Try eating with your non-dominant hand; if

you’re a righty, hold your fork in your left hand

when lifting food to your mouth.

• Use chopsticks if you don’t normally use them.

• Eat silently for five minutes, thinking about what

it took to produce that meal, from the sun’s rays

to the farmer to the grocer to the cook.

• Take small bites and chew well.

• Before opening the fridge or cabinet, take a

breath and ask yourself, “Am I really hungry?”

Do something else, like reading or going on a

short walk.

• Avoid eating with distractions like the television.

• Avoid working meals where you eat at your desk

or in front of your computer.

• Avoid eating on the go when you are driving or

commuting.

• Start a food log and write down what triggers

binge eating and how certain foods make you

feel. Do they make you lethargic? Give you more

energy?

• Track your food choices on an app like

MyFitnessPal or EatRightNow.

P A N D E M I C P E T S

De-stressing your animal companion

The pandemic created a boom in pet

adoptions. According to The Humane

Society of the United States, requests

for pet fostering spiked by 90 percent.

Whether you’re a new pet parent

or longtime dog or cat owner, the

pandemic gave you more time than

ever to bond with your furry loved one.

As we start to travel again, it’s normal

for both owners and pets to experience

separation anxiety. NetJets has seen a

significant increase in pets flying with

owners in the past year, with 24,000

animals joining their owners in

2020. Whether you’re bringing your

favourite feline travel buddy in the air

for the first time in months or leaving

your new pandemic pup in your villa

alone, the ASPCA suggests these tips

for keeping you and your pet calm.

1. Honour Routine

If you’re on vacation, try to mimic

your pets daily schedule at home.

2. Withdraw Slowly

A sudden decrease in time with

your pet can be difficult for both of

you. Make sure you practise shorter

periods of alone time before a big

trip where you’ll be apart for longer

stretches.

3. New Distractions

Change up your dog or cat toys to

help keep them novel when travelling.

Interactive toys or healthy chews can

help keep your pet engaged when

you’re gone.

4. Background Noise

Leave soothing music or the TV on in

your hotel room or villa for auditory

and visual stimulation.

5. Hire a Pro

Many hotels and villas offer petsitting

services so you can rest

assured your buddy is getting looked

after while you’re out for a round of

golf or catching a sunset surf session

at the beach.

NetJets

47


ON THE MOVE

POWER TO

THE PEDAL

The e-bike revolution has many spokes to its

wheels – equality, efficiency and élan among them

// By John McNamara

CLIMB TIME

The lightweight Angell

bike, designed by

Frenchman Ora Ïto

48 NetJets


POWERED UP

From top: Serial 1’s Rush/Cty Step-

Thru; the Greyp e-SUV T5

IT’S RARE A NEW TECHNOLOGY receives universal approval –

remember the ill-fated Segway? – but as increasing production

and sales demonstrate, e-bikes have managed to garner fans

across the full spectrum of cyclists. At the most basic level, the

battery-powered two-wheelers provide a levelling out effect,

allowing less able riders, including those of a certain age, to keep

pace with faster partners and to explore more adventurous trails

and experiences. Urban governments, too, have welcomed the

development of the e-bike as an alternative mode of transport

to help reduce pollution in city centres. Perhaps best of all, the

opportunities afforded by this relatively nascent form of transport

have piqued the minds of creative types around the world, leading

both to new cycling innovations – different materials for the

frame, belt drives replacing the cumbersome chain and integrated

controls through apps – as well as to eye-catching new designs.

Be they tough trekkers or city slickers, the e-bikes of today

represent remarkable displays of forward-thinking imagination.

A leader in the this revolution is Seattle-based Rad Power Bikes

(radpowerbikes.com), which between April 2019 and 2020 enjoyed

a 297% rise in sales and was named as one of the 2021 TIME100

Most Influential Companies. Its latest model, the RadRover 6

Plus, exemplifies its ingenuity, with the fat-tired bike featuring an

upgraded user interface and a 750w custom-made hub motor that,

among other advantages, makes hill climbing much, much easier.

Another American mainstay making e-bikes a success is Trek

(trekbikes.com), a venerable name in the pedal-power market that

has effortlessly turned its hand to the modern version. Ease of use and

comfort are features of its award-winning Domane series, shown by

NetJets

49


ON THE MOVE

PRETTY IN GREY

Cowboy 3 offers

simple efficiency

one of its most recent iterations, The Domane LT+, that really feels

and rides like a conventional bike, and can indeed be converted

to one with the removal of the lightweight Fazua drivepack (battery

and motor). But doing so misses out on the impressive capabilities

of one of the smoothest e-bikes on the streets – and the trails thanks

to the IsoSpeed technology that absorbs the bumps of rough terrain.

RATHER MORE OF A new kid on the block, Croatia’s Greyp (greyp.

com) shows the same innovative approach to two wheels as its

sister company Rimac does to electric supercars. It has entered

the trekking end of the market with the Greyp e-SUV T5, a bike

that is a perfectly respectable option for a city commute but more

than capable of taking on an Alpine jaunt. In a change from its

previous models, the T5 frame is made from aluminium, which

is more flexible than carbon, but it is the bike’s accessories that

make it stand out. The 700Wh battery is on the large side for a

trekking bike and allows the T5 a range of 100 kilometres, while a

top speed of 25kph is currently being upgraded for the US market.

Greyp’s next project is a city bike due next year and hotly anticipated.

If electric car and bike makers seem an obvious overlap, the world

of e-bikes throws up some more unusual bedfellows. Take MODMO

(modmo.io), the brainchild of Irishman Jack O’Sullivan, whose quest

ALL IMAGES COURTESY THE COMPANIES

ALL-ROUND EFFORT

Clockwise from top: Trek’s Domane

LT+; the Paul Teutul Jr.-designed

PJD-E; MODMO’s Saigon+

50 NetJets


If electric car and bike makers seem an

obvious overlap, the world of e-bikes throws

up some more unusual bedfellows.

to find the ideal location to produce his zero-emission e-bike took him

to Vietnam. The result is the aptly named MODMO Saigon+, which

boasts an incredible 200km range on a single charge and features a

Gates Carbon Drive System, claimed to be almost maintenance free.

Another cross-continent collaboration has seen Ruff Cycles

(ruff-cycles.com), based in Regensburg, Germany, team up with

Californian Paul Teutul Jr, renowned for his motorcycle designs

and his appearances on the US reality show American Chopper.

The PJD-E combines the best of American design and German

engineering, creating a range of bikes that aims to put the

rock’n’roll into the market. The aesthetics of Ruff’s bikes, headed

by The Ruffian, is more motorcycle cool, but the tech, including

Bosch batteries, is very much the latest in e-bike innovation.

TEUTUL JR IS NOT THE only motorcycling aficionado to see the potential

of the bicycle, and there is no bigger name straddling both genres

than Harley-Davidson. Under its subsidiary Serial 1 (serial1.com),

the iconic brand has produced a series of e-bikes with a particular eye

on the urban cyclist, including the Rush/Cty Step-Thru, which along

with the proprietary H-D battery has four ride modes – Eco, Tour, Sport

and Boost – and a walk-assist function. It also benefits from the Step-

Thru, the simplest of design features, which allows the rider to quickly

mount and dismount, especially useful on crowded urban streets.

For all these flamboyant versions of the e-bike, there is also a

demand for the more classical look – one that allows the cyclist who

needs a bit of assistance to blend in with the crowd. French firm Angell

(angell.bike) turned to designer Ora Ïto to create a bike with a sleek

and stylish frame that camouflages an array of smart tech, including

an integrated GPS with vibrating handlebars to indicate directions

and security features include anti-theft alarm and light. Meanwhile,

Belgian firm Cowboy’s 3 and 4 (cowboy.com) are perfect examples of

how form and function can come together in an elegant and compact

package. Featuring a battery built into the seat tube and an app that,

among other things, synchronises with the in-built GPS, the Cowboy

4 also offers intuitive speed adjustment and wireless phone charging.

In the U.S., e-bike sales rose 116% from $8.3m in February

2019 to $18m a year later – and many producers ran low on

stock last summer. It’s the sort of success that ensures creative

companies will continue to produce ever-more inventive versions

of the timeless two-wheeled treasure for many years to come.

MOTORING ON

From top: the RadRover 6 Plus;

the Ruffian Black Redwall

NetJets

51


© LUCKNAM PARK

ON LOCATION

SUDDENLY

SOMERSET

52 NetJets


WINDING WAY

The road through

Cheddar Gorge,

one of Somerset’s

most famous

attractions; facing

page: Georgian grande

dame Lucknam Park

THOMAS TUCKER / UNSPLASH

From Bath to Bruton, the best of England is on display in Somerset. A

local guide takes us on a journey through a county newly enlivened by

a spate of striking hotels, farm-to-table restaurants and a flourishing

artisan scene // By Catherine Fairweather

NetJets

53


ON LOCATION

THIS IS THE GREEN and pleasant England of

dreams: a patchwork of small fields crossstitched

with hedgerows of hawthorn and hazel,

rinsed by Bristol Channel mists and mizzle. The

land rises and falls gently, tucks around the lap

and bosomy shelf of the Mendips that spreads

from Somerset’s great city, Bath, in the north, to

the newly popular, pretty hotspots of Frome and

Bruton in the southeast, then rolling westward

to the Quantocks, to Exeter and Exmoor beyond.

These newly christened honeypot-towns have old

bones, ancient even in the Domesday Book of

1086. For the many poets, artists and writers who

have been drawn to, and put down roots here, in

Somerset, including TS Eliot and John Steinbeck,

that palpable sense of the past and peace – “a real

thing, thick as stone, and feelable,” wrote Steinbeck

– as well as the ideal of pastoral life, embedded in

community and landscape, is an important lure.

Married to this sense of layered history is a

quality of peace, manna from heaven for restless

millennials and lockdown-weary Londoners.

Simultaneously, five-star hotels have sprung

up, with kitchen gardens attached or allotments

that impart the kind of kudos formerly reserved

for infinity pools or spas. Once derelict pubs in

this cheese and cider county are repurposed

as polished guesthouses and inns, farm shops

proliferate with skinny almond lattes and

cavolo nero ago-go, to soothe, and attract, a

new crowd of urban sophisticates to the sticks.

WHERE TO SLEEP, EAT, DRINK

AND BE MERRY

It has long vanished, that quaint insularity of

Somerset. What was once a forgotten corner

of the country, bypassed by holidaymakers

and second-home owners racing down to

Cornwall, is today a unique nexus of creative

and cosmopolitan talent. And there is no better

showcase for this talent than Number One Bruton

(numberonebruton.com), a hotel which opened

just before the first lockdown, formerly a hardware

store and blacksmith’s beloved by Steinbeck. Now

owned by a Somerset family of diplomats and

literati, it is an atmospheric jumble of rooms. One

wing, the old Forge, dates back to the 12th century

when it was part of an inn for pilgrims en route

to Glastonbury Tor. The communal rooms are

decorated with mementos gifted to the family by

some of Somerset’s celebrated residents; there are

photographs, landscapes of the nearby Levels by

Don McCullin, installations by Candace Bahouth, a

staircase mural painted as a gift by Kaffe Fassett and

a crazy, rainbow-coloured armchair upholstered by

celebrated leather-man Bill Amberg and jeweller to

the stars Solange Azagury – who prowls the high

street with a beady eye for overlooked “finds”.

© THE NEWT IN SOMERSET

ISTOCK

© NUMBER ONE BRUTON

54 NetJets


There’s a deli and wine bar next door owned by

the hotel’s Michelin-starred chef: the appropriately

named Merlin (Labron-Johnson), who can conjure

magic out of marrows and a humble mash. Where

once even a cucumber was a rarity on the high

street, it is miraculous to find vegetables like oca,

samphire and shiitake headlining the menu at

his starred restaurant Osip (osiprestaurant.com)

sourced locally, or in the kitchen gardens, which

are Labron-Johnson’s passion. His mozzarella

is from Somerset buffalo; there are the rosé

vintages from vineyards near Glastonbury; truffles

are foraged in the outlying woodland. The apple

brandy, the locals like to say, is as good as any

calvados, this one produced on the Somerset

Levels by the Temperley family, whose aged cider is

also famous, and whose Cider Bus is perhaps the

hub of the Glastonbury Festival site. Unsurprisingly,

daughter Alice Temperley’s fashion label, inspired

by the mystical county of her birth, has relocated,

last year, to a historic Victorian industrial building

in nearby Ilminster, complete with workshops,

retail floors, and, of course, the requisite cider bar.

The heart of Somerset as an epicurean Eden

is undoubtedly the kitchen garden, such as the

Duke of Somerset’s new pub, The Bradley Hare

SOMERSET SIGHTS

Glastonbury Tor at sunset; facing

page: inside Number One Bruton

NetJets

55


ON LOCATION

The appetite for cultural self-improvement

has been fanned by the pandemic

(thebradleyhare.co.uk). Some 15 minutes

out of Bruton, it borders the duchal estate,

the old taphouse rejuvenated as a glamorous

bolthole with canopy beds, a cricket pitch,

skittles alley and the best cocktail menu (try

the rhubarb sour) this side of Stonehenge.

Teals (teals.co.uk) is another place polishing

its community halo and sustainability credentials

– a farm shop that’s so much more than an A303

pitstop for a lunch or an apple. The only stop on the

main road artery to Cornwall and the South offering

electric car charging posts, it makes an effort to ban

plastic, is almost entirely solar powered, and offers

an open field for stretching legs and jogging the

dog. But since this is the dairy and cheddar heartland

of England, a visit and tasting at the nearby, awardwinning

Westcombe Dairy (westcombedairy.

com) near Batcombe is on the must-do list. Here,

Tina the Turner is the resident robot who turns

the giant cheese wheels, although the production

process uses age-old traditions in the adjoining

vast clay cave. There’s the craft Wild Beer brewery

on site as well as the family-produced Brickell’s

ice cream churned without additives. Rhubarb

crumble and cinnamon toast are winning flavours

made from the sourdough produced in the bakery

of At the Chapel (atthechapel.co.uk) in Bruton.

INDEED, At the Chapel, the beautiful Grade-II

listed 17th-century building on Bruton’s high

street, can lay claim not just to cinnamon toast ice

cream, but as a restaurant, bar, hotel and cultural

hub, it put the old Saxon town on the map some

15 years ago. It is a hive of activity and events,

a place where you are likely to encounter local

celebrities like impresario Cameron Mackintosh,

film director Joe Wright, ballet dancer Carlos

Acosta and broadcaster Mariella Frostrup taking the

podium in the club room and terrace downstairs.

The appetite for cultural self-improvement has

been fanned by the pandemic. Evidently, in an

uncertain time a nostalgic yearning for nature and

the security that tradition brings, has also led to an

increase in demand for backcountry skills. These

are highlights of the Durslade Farm experience

at Hauser & Wirth’s (hauserwirth.com) gallery

flagship with bar and restaurant, studios, farm

shop and an art-filled ancient farmhouse to rent

– featured as a backdrop in the film Chocolat with

Johnny Depp and Juliette Binoche. The Roth Bar

& Grill’s “Unhooked” fishing days with their chef

Steve Horrell are oversubscribed. Or there are

courses for open-fire cooking, spoon-whittling

and foraging, alongside experimental printmaking

and drawing workshops with HW artists.

To stand on your head in the spaceship structure

of the Radić Pavilion that looks out over the

famous Piet Oudolf grasslands during a £5 pilates

session is novel and good-value, to say the least.

SIMILARLY, IT IS the rural-life experiences on offer

at The Newt (thenewtinsomerset.com), outside

Bruton, rather than the thread counts of the linen, that

have caught the collective imagination. A recently

opened hotel estate with shops, restaurants, a spa,

farm museum and two hotel buildings across 324

hectares, it has turned the humble apple and the

cider-making process, which is deeply embedded

in the county’s DNA and psyche, into a showpiece.

There is a state-of-the-art “cyder” press, an apple

tree maze at the garden’s core, with a replanting

of 26 hectares of orchard producing over 70

varieties of apples. While the grounds have been

nipped and tucked to a degree that is perhaps at

odds with the laidback, unbuttoned Somerset vibe,

there can be no doubt that as far as hospitality

goes, this hotel really sets the luxury bar with

a guest experience that begins (for a price)

at Paddington Station in London, on a first-class train

carriage with linen-wrapped hamper for breakfast.

Where The Newt is manicured and slick with

picture-perfect snaps in mind, Lucknam Park

(lucknampark.co.uk), outside Bath – another

Georgian grande dame, sitting similarly sedately

in its rolling 200ha park – has a kind of oldschool

elegant insouciance that doesn’t mind dog

hairs on the fading chintz and considers a scratch

mark on the brown furniture a badge of the English

TOWN IN COUNTRY

London’s famed Soho House

has a rural presence in

Babbington House

TINA HILLIER

56 NetJets


ON LOCATION

The thermal waters that filter through the

limestone of the Mendips as rain, bubble up

at 46 degrees centigrade

lived-in look (never mind that the owners are Greek

shipping magnates). You can even bring your

labrador or thoroughbred along for the weekend

break. The old-fashioned romantic scented gardens

and towering box-hedge walkways are girdled by

a ha-ha, the indoor-outdoor pool is firelit at night

and the beech tree drive was long enough to hide

RAF Spitfires in World War II. It offers customised

access to some of the most important landmarks

in Bath, like the Holburne Museum (holburne.

org), popularised as Lady Danbury’s palace in the

Bridgerton Netflix series. A short drive away, it has

brilliant exhibition spaces and a shop of original

goodies, including Christmas Frida Kahlo effigies for

the tree. In the adjoining Sydney Gardens you have

access to the Kennet and Avon canal for paddleboard

hire at Original Wild (originalwild.com).

THE HIGH-SPIRITED, modern-day Bridgerton vibe

continues to be channelled at Babington House

(sohohouse.com), although these days the

hedonistic excess is less unbridled around the baize

pool table – which is also no longer purple. This

lovely 18th-century manor house, the original Soho

House country club outpost, is some 20 minutes in

the other direction from Bath where you are spoilt

for choice when it comes to comfortable Georgian

country hotels. Its architectural counterpart, The

Pig – Near Bath (thepighotel.com), also sits as

comfortably as a teacup in a saucer in its rural

landscape, although the latter is more Beatrix Potter

cute than Bridgerton high-jinx; the Peter Rabbitstyle

potting shed restaurant comes complete

with shelves of pickled treats from the estate orchard.

WHAT TO DO

Of course, the hot springs of Bath are its raison

d’être, giving it status “as the first pleasure resort in

the kingdom”, thanks to Beau Nash in the 1700s.

The thermal waters that filter through the limestone

of the Mendips as rain, bubble up at 46 degrees

centigrade, an elixir for liver and skin. Cross Bath

(thermaebathspa.com), in a beautiful Regency

building, can be booked for exclusive use for up to

10 friends under an open roof. You can still drink

the curative waters at the Pump Room where Beau

Nash was fond of posting a list of rules designed

to keep the riff-raff out. No hats or aprons for

women, no boots or spurs for men. How he would

have blanched at the anoraks and backpacks of

today. But it’s hard for anything to sully the innate

elegance of this city, as you realise, strolling

through The Royal Crescent and Circus area. The

latter was built according to a masonic system

of symbols by architect John Wood, the Elder. If

you stand in the clump of trees in the Circus and

clap, the echo is a druidic marker like the serpents,

anchors and acorns above the front doors.

The two residential crescents are connected

by Brock Street, which is on a ley line aligned to

Stonehenge. Ley lines, those imagined channels of

earth energy, are a theme of the British Pilgrimage

Trust’s (britishpilgrimage.org) day walks around

Bath, taking you along ancient byways to secret

places, sacred oaks and swimming spots such as

at Warleigh Weir or near Iford Manor (ifordmanor.

co.uk) famous for its Italianate gardens, designed

by Harold Peto and a location for the film The

Secret Garden with Colin Firth. The cloister is a

backdrop for summer opera and the revamped

three-bedroom Rowley Cottage, which makes

a charming rental. Or go solo and walk the easy

10km signposted Skyline loop above Bath past

18th-century follies like Sham Castle and the

open fields of Widcombe and bluebell wood at

Smallcombe. Prior Park (nationaltrust.org) is under

repair this year, but the estate with its Palladian

Bridge epitomises the reinterpretation of the

classical that was the blueprint for the city of Bath.

WHERE TO SHOP

Behind the flawless façade the city presents to the

world, Bath has a refreshingly individual, creative

mindset best discovered browsing the city side

streets, with their independent boutiques and

artisanal sole traders. Escaping escalating London

rents, independents have migrated here: Graham

and Green and 8 Holland Street for furniture and

GROWING ITS OWN

The kitchen gardens at

The Newt outside Bruton

DOOKPHOTO

58


SIGHTS FOR THE SENSES

Left: watercress risotto

from At the Chapel; below:

the gardens at Iford Manor

furnishings, Francis Gallery, inspired by Donald

Judd’s 101 Spring Street, offers a minimalist eye

for objets d’art in a classical setting. Bibliophiles

are in for a treat: Toppings is in bigger premises

in a former Quaker Meeting house on York Street,

and Mr B’s Emporium has a library concierge and

a pot of tea always on the go to help browsers feel

welcome. Winston Churchill thought it was a mark

of a true gentleman to shop at Paxton & Whitfield

(paxtonandwhitfield.co.uk), purveyor of cheeses,

as old as the city itself. The cheddars are best tasted

atop a dry Bath Oliver cracker, the same colour as

the local stone. For undiscovered fashion labels

and indie magazines try Found near Pulteney

Bridge or The Loft, a lifestyle store offering ethically

sourced craftsmanship unique to the locale.

On the edge of the Mendips, the town of Frome

puts bells and whistles on Bath’s bohemian

hat. This non-conformist town has recently been

lauded for its community spirit and Compassion

Project that have helped alleviate loneliness

and brought down hospital admissions. The

medieval cobbled streets offer a unique artisan

experience with vintage emporiums alongside

share shops, co-working spaces and communal

© AT THE CHAPEL

fridges. Get the vibe at Rye Bakery in a split

level revamped church, and on postcard pretty

Catherine Hill, where Deadly is the Female sells

1950s-style dresses once worn by Nigella

Lawson, opposite the longest-serving shop selling

Airfix model kits, a similarly charming throwback.

Back in Bruton, the high street has also

seen a recent spate of retail outlets selling

heritage and craftsmanship, the most recent

being Cabbages & Roses, the brainchild of a

former Voguette, Christina Strutt. At the launch

party, for instance, there was an expensive tartan

C&R coat that is Anne of Green Gables meets

Siouxsie Sioux, a look, with bovver boots, that

is somewhere between granny chic and cottage

core. It evidently strikes a chord in the heart of

glam-rock crowds who descend on the medieval

alleyways or bartons, the packhorse bridges,

the narrow pavements of the Saxon town, and

colonise this airy retail space for the weekend.

MARIANNE CARTWRIGHT-HIGNETT

BRISTOL AIRPORT TO BATH:

19miles/31km; BRISTOL AIRPORT TO

FROME: 29miles/47km; YEOVILTON

AIRPORT TO BRUTON: 13miles/21km

NetJets

59


GAME OF GEMS

The season’s most alluring jewellery creations make all the right

moves // Photography by Xavier Young Production by Elisa Vallata

FIT FOR

A QUEEN

60 NetJets


Above:

Facing page, from

left to right:

GRAFF white gold

necklace set with

rubies and diamonds

DAVID MORRIS white and

yellow gold Boreas

earrings set with white

and yellow diamonds

CHOPARD white gold

Precious Lace earrings

set with emeralds and

diamonds VAN CLEEF &

ARPELS white gold Lotus

Between the Finger ring

set with diamonds

PRAGNELL platinum

Manhattan ring set with

rubies and diamonds

DAVID MORRIS white

gold ring set with one

black opal, diamonds,

sapphires, white opals

and Paraiba tourmalines

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GAME OF GEMS

From the top, anticlockwise:

BOODLES platinum

bracelet set with

aquamarines, beryls,

kunzite, morganite and

white diamonds

VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

white gold Lotus pendant

clip, set with diamonds

CARTIER white gold Les

Berlingots de Cartier ring,

set with blue chalcedony

and diamonds CHOPARD

white gold L’Heure

du Diamant ruby and

diamond-set pendant

with chain necklace

VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

white gold Olympia

necklace set with

diamonds CHOPARD

platinum and rose gold

Temptations earrings set

with orange sapphires,

tsavorites, rubies,

amethysts and

diamonds ADLER white

gold Brocéliande ring set

with one pink cultured

pearl and diamonds

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From top right,

clockwise:

BOGHOSSIAN white gold ring set

with a Zambian emerald, seed

pearl beads and diamonds

FABIO SALINI white gold ring

set with one blue sapphire and

diamonds GARRARD white gold

Jewelled Vault ring set with rubies

and diamonds

BOODLES platinum and yellow

gold Scroll ring set with one

yellow-orange diamond and

white diamonds

PURLING LONDON Stone Chess

Black v White alabaster board,

with 34 Italian alabaster chess

pieces featuring natural veining,

and the Purling logo embossed

in 18kt gold on Italian nappa

leather felts

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GOURMET SCENE

OLD AND NEW

Daniel Boulud’s Le

Pavillon perfectly

encapsulates a

modern take on

traditional French

cuisine

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Always bustling with creativity, chef Daniel Boulud is at his best

in remaking the Manhattan icon Le Pavillon // By Bill Knott

Photography by Thomas Schauer

UPDATING

THE

CLASSICS

ON 19 MAY THIS YEAR, after many months of restrictions,

restaurants in New York City were allowed to open their doors

once more. On the same day, one restaurant – Le Pavillon,

on the second floor of the ambitious new One Vanderbilt

skyscraper in Midtown – opened its doors for the very first time.

Speaking at the ribbon-cutting ceremony, Bill de Blasio,

Mayor of New York City, paid tribute to Marc Holliday,

chairman and CEO of SL Green Realty, the building’s owners

“for believing in the people of New York City and investing in

them,” and to Tim and Nina Zagat, founders of the eponymous

restaurant guide, for their continued promotion of the city.

But his most fulsome praise was reserved for Daniel Boulud,

chef, restaurateur and the culinary mastermind behind Le Pavillon.

“Daniel, New York City has always loved you,” he proclaimed. “This

is a symbol of New York City coming back, right here, right now.”

De Blasio went on to reference the original Le Pavillon, which

opened for the World’s Fair in 1939 and continued as a bastion

– for a while, New York’s only bastion – of classic French cooking

until 1972, acknowledging Boulud’s homage to the original,

but saluting the chef’s determination to reinvent. It managed, he

thought, to encapsulate the spirit of New York: “Amazing history that

we honour, but a place where we always create something new.”

Recalling the event, Boulud sounds a little uncomfortable

with what he calls “the hoopla of celebration,” but he

appreciates de Blasio’s central point. “If I am known

for anything, it is the modern interpretation of classics.”

One dish on the menu at Le Pavillon is a case in point. “I

asked Jacques Pépin [the veteran French chef, writer and TV

presenter, who worked at the original Le Pavillon in the late

1950s] what he remembered from the menu, and he said

that the most celebrated dish was poulet au champagne.

SEA BLISS

Halibut, Martha’s Vineyard shiitake,

consommé, cabbage and barley

from Le Pavillon

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GOURMET SCENE

“The classic French version is poached chicken with a sauce made

with cream and champagne, but Le Pavillon changed it to rotisserie

chicken served with its jus and a champagne sabayon. We have

brought back the rotisserie, but now the champagne sauce is foamed

in a siphon, taking out the egg yolks and making it much lighter.”

It is, however, one of only a handful of meat dishes on Le

Pavillon’s extensive menu. Seafood and vegetables share the

limelight, and Boulud is happy to see diners “having a seafood

dish each, and ordering vegetables to share”. Grilled avocado,

for instance, is served with bulgur wheat, kale, harissa and

Boulud’s sophisticated, fines herbes take on green goddess

sauce. “In classic French bistro cooking,” he says, “vegetables

are often just a garnish, a sprig of watercress or corn salad,

perhaps. At Le Pavillon, we let them take centre stage.”

And Cornelius Vanderbilt, the founding father of Grand

Central, is honoured with an oyster, redressing the balance, as

Boulud – slightly tongue-in-cheek – says, with fellow magnate

John D Rockefeller. The version at Le Pavillon is filled with oyster

chowder and shredded seaweed, topped with a hazelnut gratin,

and Boulud expects them to be a permanent fixture on his menu.

THE OPENING OF LE PAVILLON marks what Boulud hopes is “the end

of the rollercoaster”, a hugely traumatic year-and-a-bit for New

York’s hospitality business. Thinking back to the start of lockdown

in March last year, Boulud recalls his feelings at the time. “It is

one thing to lose the opportunity to be with your customers, but

quite another to lose your staff. That was even more devastating.

“So many of our staff had been with us for decades

– they had shown great loyalty, and we always took

care of them. Suddenly, we couldn’t.” A payroll of

800 employees was reduced to single figures overnight.

Boulud did what he could, paying many staff for weeks

afterwards, until they could claim benefits. “Some of them were

particularly hard hit, some lost family members to the virus.

“We put three staff members on the company’s board. Together

with our HR director and our director of operations, they allocated

funds to the neediest. Thanks to the generosity of friends and

customers, and some Zoom classes I did for corporate clients,

we managed to raise $750,000. And we made sure that staff

didn’t lose their health insurance, which was really important.”

The second phase was launched in cooperation with Marc

Holliday and SL Green: as well as One Vanderbilt, the realty

company owns a dozen or so other properties in Manhattan and

it is the landlord for many of the city’s restaurants. The Food1st

initiative brought back many staff into kitchens to cook meals both

for first responders and for vulnerable populations throughout the

city. Boulud tips his toque to SL Green: “Not many landlords, in

that situation, would say, ‘I’ll pay you to cook meals for the city.’ ”

Boulud reopened his downtown prep kitchen and, in

partnership with World Central Kitchen and Citymeals on

Wheels, they started cooking and distributing food to those most

in need. By August this year, they had served 627,000 meals.

He also made the decision, when rules were relaxed, to

open a sidewalk restaurant at Daniel, his Upper East Side

flagship. “We had to close Café Boulud when the owners of the

hotel we were in went bankrupt, so we brought in tables and

chairs from there and tried to recreate a kind of fantasy South

of France garden. We had never done it before, but it went

very well.” As winter approached, he had bungalows built,

complete with foam insulation, music systems and heaters.

“Inside, when we could open for limited numbers, we called

Hermès, who very kindly gave us wallpapers and fabrics, and

we screened each table with trees and flowers. Thankfully, we

don’t need the dozen or so 3.3m panels we used anymore,

so we have cut them down to 2.9m and sent them to the

studios of some young American artists. We will sell them to

benefit Citymeals on Wheels. I hope I can afford to buy one!”

Daniel closed for eight weeks in summer for refurbishments

originally slated for 2019. Meanwhile, Boulud is looking for a

new Café Boulud site and planning the reopening of Boulud

Sud, at Lincoln Center, and db Bistro Moderne in Midtown.

He is optimistic for the future. “I look out from Le Pavillon to

42nd Street, and the open-topped tourist buses that run every

45 minutes are packed, which is a great sign. And I’m looking

forward to taking my son to basketball games again: he loves it.”

The Knicks? “And the Nets too,” he says, quickly. Boulud is far

too canny an operator to alienate the Brooklyn basketball fans.

In August, he managed to escape to France for a few days

with his family; passing through Paris, he and his wife Katherine

went for dinner at Michel and Sébastien Bras’s new restaurant

La Halle aux Grains. Bras père is revered as one of the founding

fathers of modern French cooking, and his Laguiole restaurant

in the southern French countryside is one of the country’s most

famous: “I love Michel, I have known him for many years.”

THE RESTAURANT IS on the third floor of the newly renovated Bourse

de Commerce (see page 74), owned by François Pinault, who – as

well as owning many luxury brands and thousands of contemporary

artworks, many on display at the Bourse’s gallery – is the owner

of Château Latour, and a loyal customer of Boulud’s in New York.

The price of the Latour was too rich even for Boulud’s

blood. “But I knew I had to order Latour, because of

François. So I ordered its second wine, Forts de Latour,

which was delicious and very reasonably priced.

“It is a beautiful restaurant. The interior is very modern,

industrial-chic, designed by the Bouroullec brothers, but

when we had dinner, my wife was facing inwards and I

was looking out of the window, at the corner of the Saint-

Eustache church, and the canopy of Au Pied de Cochon.”

Au Pied de Cochon is a legendary Parisian brasserie that, until

the pandemic, had not closed its doors since 1947. Once again, it

is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. “I looked at the neon

sign, and I thought, ‘Well, if we’re still hungry after this, we could

always go over the road for a pig’s trotter!’” Daniel Boulud may

be famous for embracing the present and looking to the future,

but he still likes to keep one eye on the past. lepavillonnyc.com

ALL ABOUT ALFRESCO

A garden table at Le Pavillon,

the New York icon that Daniel

Boulud has reimagined

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“Vegetables are often just a garnish.

At Le Pavillon, we let them take centre stage”

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TASTING NOTES

There’s more than meets the eye in calvados, the

apple-based brandy from the northwest corner

of France with a new generation of custodians

// By Jim Clarke

FRANCK PRIGNET/LE FIGARO MAGAZINE/LAIF

SPIRIT OF

NORMANDY

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DAVID MORGANTI

ON TAP

Jean-Luc Fossey, cellar

master at Père Magloire;

facing page: Inside the

Roger Groult distillery

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TASTING NOTES

PITY THE FRENCHMAN with no vineyards in his

département – unless he has apples instead. That’s

the fate of Normandy, the region memorialised by

Impressionists where the cliffs and beaches give way to

gentle hills that are green and damp but rarely hot, so

growing wine grapes has never really been an option.

And so was born calvados, the third and sometimes

forgotten brandy of France, which, unlike cognac or

armagnac, is made from apples, and tastes like it.

“A mix of terroir, weather and a lot of apple varieties –

around 300,” are what make Calvados special, according

to Jean-Roger Groult of Roger Groult (calvados-groult.

com), the fifth-generation producer in Saint-Cyr-du-

Ronceray, who says his ancestor Pierre started distillation

between 1850 and 1860. “He used to produce for

[the] family and sell to neighbours,” before demand

increased and he won his first gold medal in 1893.

Even today, those 300 pomme varieties, sharp

and all but inedible, wouldn’t befit a tarte tatin. “They

are very different than eating apples and do not

grow in many places,” says 42-year-old Guillaume

Drouin at Christian Drouin (calvados-drouin.com) in

Pont-l’Évêque, a village best known for its delicious

square-shaped cheese. Drouin, whose half-timbered

estate is open for visits, grows 20 of those varieties,

divided into four categories: tart, bitter, bittersweet

and sweet. Every calvados is a blend of these

types, made into a cider, then distilled and aged.

FRANCK PRIGNET/LE FIGARO MAGAZINE/LAIF

DAVID MORGANTI

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FRANCK PRIGNET/LE FIGARO MAGAZINE/LAIF (2)

From the smallest orchards, like Michel Huard’s

(calvadoshuard.com) 15ha parcel, where cows roam

beneath the trees’ high-trained branches amid a tableau

of decaying moss- and ivy-covered granite castles and

farmhouses, to the largest, Boulard (calvados-boulard.

com), these purveyors look positively petite when

compared to their outsized cognac counterparts. And yet,

many of them use the same terms as that grape-based

brandy on their labels: Fine, VSOP and XO, for example.

“We try to make blends the same every year,” says

Drouin. “The work on vintages is different. Each year

shows a unique personality which evolves with time

spent in [the] cask.” That diversity is reflected in the

glass: younger calvados, such as the Boulard VSOP, is

redolent of fresh ripe apples with a hint of vanilla, while

a more mature blend such as Groult’s Age d’Or is richer

and more complex, with spice and caramel notes. Older

vintages keep that complexity but grow more delicate

and elegant, sometimes showing surprising aromas like

green olive and brown butter, as in Drouin’s 1939 bottling.

These expressions of the apple are regulated, as

are production areas, of which the best known and

most revered is Calvados Pays d’Auge, between Caen

and Rouen, where, according to Drouin, the resulting

elixir is “rounder and milder, rich and long,” notably

because it’s double-distilled. Pays d’Auge is also home

to an avant-garde collective who have banded together

to create Esprit Calvados (esprit-calvados.com), an

association of five family-owned estates. “We started

in 2008 from the will of some producers with the

same ‘DNA,’ to show that there is a young generation

APPLE HIGH

The new generation of calvados makers

is led by the likes of Richard Prével of

Boulard, left, which has the largest

orchards in the region

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BENOIT DECOUT / REA / LAIF

TASTING NOTES

CORE FAMILY

Sister-and-brother

team Anne-Pamy and

the late Jerome Dupont

were at the heart of the

calvados renaissance

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interested in calvados production and pursuing the

tradition and bringing some fresh and open ideas at the

same time,” explained Jerome Dupont to me a few years

ago. As head of the stately Domaine Dupont (calvadosdupont.com),

he did so much to push the new modern

image of calvados before his untimely death in 2018.

The aforementioned Groult, Dupont and Drouin are

all members of Esprit Calvados, as is Le Père Jules

(calvados-leperejules.com), which is based in Saint-

Désir and which bottles 10, 20, and even 40-yearold

blends in its atmospheric cellars, and Pierre Huet

(calvados-huet.com), which still has a 1935 vintage

calvados for sale at its highly regarded domaine on the

Route du Cidre in the charmed village of Cambremer.

While Pays d’Auge, closest to Normandy’s historic

beaches, gets much of the attention, there is another

region, Calvados Domfrontais, which adds to the stylistic

diversity. Drouin calls these single-distilled brandies

“more straightforward, more acidic, vibrant and lively,”

a character brought out further by the inclusion of pears

– at least 30%. Two exemplars of this appellation are

producers Lauriston (calvados-lauriston.com) and Père

Magloire (calvados-pere-magloire.com) whose fruity

and more subtle calvados work well as aperitifs or in

cocktails. Regardless of where they are cultivated, “the

apple aromas create the flavourful typicity of calvados

compared to other brown spirits,” Dupont once said.

“And this is one of the main reasons why calvados

lovers are so faithful.” Leave it to a Frenchman to

inject a bit of romance into the intoxicating equation.

WHERE TO STAY

Deauville has been a resort town for Parisians for

decades; its Hotel Normandy Barrière (hotelsbarriere.

com) is a classic, near the beach with a casino

attached. For a quieter time, head outside of town to

Les Manoirs de Tourgéville (lesmanoirstourgeville.

com), set among the area’s golf courses and stud

farms, or to Les Manoirs des Portes de Deauville

(portesdedeauville.com), where the nine cottages are

surrounded by a couple of hectares of blissful calm.

In historic Honfleur, Hôtel Saint-Delis (hotel-saintdelis.fr)

offers nine chic rooms and some remarkable

restaurants in easy reach. But to really get into the

heart of Calvados, head to Château de la Pommeraye

(chateaudelapommeraye.com), set in the countryside

inside a renovated 12th-century castle.

WHERE TO EAT

Normandy is known for its dairy; try the Michelinstarred

Le Pavé d’Auge (pavedauge.com) in Beuvronen-Auge

for some classic cream- and cheese-centred

dishes. Inside the casino in Deauville, Le Ciro’s

Barrière (casinosbarriere.com) makes the most of the

seaside location with a great seafood menu as well as

a superb list of calvados for afterward, or for a more

modern take on local, seasonal ingredients, try Caen’s

A Contre Sens (acontresenscaen.fr).

A TASTE OF THE PAST, TODAY

The popularity of the “third” French

brandy may be increasing but it remains

true to its traditions

CLAES LOFGREN / WINEPICTURES.COM

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73


INSIDE LOOK

PR

OF

PARIS

IDE

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The new Bourse de

Commerce stages

contemporary

art from François

Pinault’s collection in

a breathtaking space

rich with history

MARC DOMAGE

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75


INSIDE LOOK

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AURÉLIEN MOLE

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77


INSIDE LOOK

ACROSS THE

CENTURIES

The most talked-about new museum in Paris is an architectural masterstroke in the

heart of the First Arrondissement, a few steps from both the Louvre and the Pompidou

Centre. Showcasing works from the one-of-a-kind contemporary art collection

assembled by François Pinault, the billionaire founder of luxury conglomerate Kering

and Groupe Artémis, the Bourse de Commerce is rich with history: originally the site

of a hôtel particulier for Catherine de Medici, it became a grain exchange in the 1700s

and a stock exchange in the 1800s. Now, under the deft hand of Japanese architect

Tadao Ando, its latest incarnation includes a 32.9m-diameter, three-tiered concrete

cylinder that sits in the building’s grand rotunda – a structure that is removable after

the museum’s 50-year lease expires and which is left open to view the 19th-century

frescoes that have been restored beneath the dome. These paintings depict colonial

scenes, largely focused on the triumph of the French, which the museum curators

have cleverly problematised with installations and art works that respond directly to

racism and colonialism, including works by prominent Black American artists Kerry

James Marshall and David Hammons. Pinault’s collection is anything but traditional:

he embraces provocative pieces, and the more than 10,000 works, by nearly 400

different artists, offer ample opportunities for a range of compelling exhibitions,

examples of which are already on display at his Venice galleries, Palazzo Grassi and

Punta della Dogana, both of which are also Ando-led modernisations of listed edifices.

The museum opened in May, a year later than anticipated, and will feature multiple

overlapping exhibitions all year round. pinaultcollection.com

PAGE 74-75

A 19th-century fresco adorns

the rotunda at the heart of

the Bourse de Commerce,

with Tadao Ando’s new

concrete structure below

PAGE 76-77

Some of the nearly 30

pieces on display by

African-American artist

David Hammons

FACING PAGE

Paintings by Martin

Kippenberger and Florian

Kewer are in dialogue with

sculptures by Thomas

Schütte in one installation

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AURÉLIEN MOLE

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79


ALL IMAGES BY AURÉLIEN MOLE

INSIDE LOOK

ABOVE, CLOCKWISE

FROM TOP

The Ground, 2019, Tarek Atoui;

Tatiana Trouvé’s The Guardian,

2020; Central Park West, 1990,

David Hammons; Gander’s I...

I... I, 2019

FACING PAGE

Bertrand Lavier’s Teddy B, 2020

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AURÉLIEN MOLE

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81


THE LAST WORD

WILLIAM CHASE

The farming entrepreneur on how he enjoys some rare downtime

TRAVEL

Sun worshipper or thrill-seeker?

I want to get more into sailing,

so I have to go and physically

take a break. I quite enjoy skiing

too, because it’s good to go and

do something rather than just let

the day pass by. So, I’d say I’m

probably more of a thrill-seeker.

I’d like to buy an Oyster yacht

and sail around the Med – and

in couple of years travel a lot

further. I’m into sailing because it

is a challenge.

ACCOMMODATION

Grandes dames, luxe design or

eminently private? If I’m going

to stay somewhere briefly, I

really look for boutique hotels.

My favourite at the moment is

in Palma, Mallorca, called Can

Bordoy. It’s not ostentatious, it’s

very understated and privately

owned – and the food ... it’s all

about the food. They’re really into

healthy, healthy lifestyles.

ARTS

Still life or live performance? I love

museums, and that whole collecting

culture from wherever you are. On

my travels, I would say I’ve enjoyed

more things like in places like Turkey

and more remote places. My first

experience in Turkey was going

through these different-era Roman

sites, and they weren’t protected at

all – they just asked you to stand

back from the mosaics. Tel Aviv is a

beautiful place – it’s phenomenal how

much culture there is there.

TRANSPORT

Fast lane or cruise control? I’ve got

a lot of old Land Rovers and steam

engines, but I’d love a Lamborghini

Miura – the first supercar ever made.

It’s not the actual car but the magic all

around it. I love very old Ferraris, but I

don’t like the new ones.

FUTURE PLANS

Expansion plans or build on what you

have? I love building a brand. After

crisps (Tyrrells) and spirits (Chase Gin

& Vodka), my new project, Willy’s

ACV is about live food, probiotics and

fermenting. We’re trying to educate

people on the benefits of healthy live

food and a healthy diet. willysacv.com

FOOD

Top names or hidden gems?

Everybody’s now looking for

those hidden gems. And they

want some of the fun, something

that’s very typical, and very

honest. Everybody wants home

ferments and homemade,

healthy food. And I think the

best place to go is obviously in

all these traditional places where

they’ve been doing the same for

years and years.

ARCHITECTURE

Classical or modern? I’m a

classical fan – I like old stone.

I like character and the magic

in buildings. Once something’s

had years and years of oldstone

character and charm,

you can’t lose that. We’ve got

a 16th-century house I live in

in Herefordshire. And when we

developed that – it hadn’t been

touched for many years – we

wanted to preserve that feel.

JULIAN RENTZSCH

82 NetJets


when others see a

HOUSE

we see a

WORK

of

ART

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