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James Anderson and other members of the Lynnfield Fire Department salute the American flag as it is lowered to

half mast during a ceremony at Lynnfield Commons commemorating the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

First responders honored

on 20th anniversary of 9/11

by anne marie tobin

A large crowd turned out

Saturday morning on the

Town Common at the annual

First Responders Day observance

and town barbeque to

honor first responders and

commemorate the 20th anniversary

of the 9/11 terrorist

attacks.

“Today we pause to remember

once again how ordinary

human beings living

their ordinary lives reacted

with extraordinary heroism

and the tragic impact of that

day was experienced by us

here in Lynnfield,” Select

Board Chair Dick Dalton

said.

Town Administrator Rob

Dolan opened the program,

noting that even 20 years

later many people are still

angry about what happened

that day but the town is

united in turning those feelings

in a positive direction.

“In Lynnfield, we are

trying to redirect those feelings

to feelings of appreciation

and respect and feelings

of thanksgiving for our first

responders of the Lynnfield

Police Department and the

Lynnfield Fire Department,”

Dolan said. “I can honestly

say that I have never met a

more committed, professional,

and capable group of

men and women than those

two departments.”

“Today we pause to remember

that moment of

horror and to pray for those

left scarred by those terrible

events,” Rev. Robert Bacon

9/11, PAGE 2

PHOTO | ASSOCIATED PRESS

John Wilson leaves the John Joseph

Moakley Federal Courthouse Monday.

Father

has the

Varsity

Blues

by tréa Lavery

BOSTON — The first trial in the

Operation Varsity Blues cases associated

with the 2019 college admissions

scandal began in federal court Monday

for Lynnfield parent John B. Wilson.

Members of the jury heard opening

statements in the trial of Wilson and his

co-defendant, Gamal Abdelaziz, both of

whom are accused of paying money to

college admissions counselor William

“Rick” Singer to have their children

falsely admitted to prestigious colleges.

According to the prosecution, Wilson

allegedly paid Singer $220,000 to have

his son admitted to the University of

Southern California (USC) as a water

polo recruit, as well as $1.5 million to

VARSITY BLUES, PAGE 3

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2

First responders honored

9/11

From page 1

of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church

said in the opening prayer.

Bacon thanked the town’s

first responders “for the generous

gift of themselves that

they offer to each of us every

day all in their power to keep us

safe from harm.”

Fire Chief Glenn Davis

called department members to

attention for a symbolic toll of

a bell, and the American and

POW/MIA flags were lowered

to half staff. Boy Scouts Troop

48 and a group of Cub Scouts

presented colors, while a group

of Girls Scouts led the Pledge of

Allegiance.

A highlight of the ceremony

was the performance of

Lynnfield resident and Boston

Anthem singer Todd Angilly,

who sang the national anthem

and “God Bless America.”

“That still sends chills down

your spine,” Dolan said.

Dalton recalled the lives of the

two 9/11 victims from Lynnfield

― resident Garnet “Ace” Bailey

and native Sean Patrick Lynch.

Bailey, who won two Stanley

Cups with the Bruins, was on his

way to Los Angeles on United

Airlines Flight 175 for a scouting

trip on Sept. 11. He died at the

age of 53 after the plane crashed

into the south tower of the World

Trade Center.

Lynch attended Huckleberry

Hill School and graduated from

St. John’s Prep and Boston

College. He had just been promoted

to senior vice president

of equity trading at Cantor

Fitzgerald where he had an

office on the 104th floor of

the north tower. He was only

34 years old when American

Airlines Flight 175 was deliberately

flown into the building.

Every one of the 658 Cantor

Pre-Schoolers

Love

Fitzgerald employees at work

that day perished.

“Ace’s personality was larger

than life and he had the ability

to light up a room like no one

I had ever seen,” Dalton said.

“(Sean) was a young man who

was positioned for a long and

successful career in finance.

More importantly, he was remembered

by friends as a special

young man.”

Davis said the terrorist attacks

were a “severe blow” to

the nation.

“Twenty years later the

memory of those events may be

fading for many Americans, but

for those of us who spend our

lives in service of others ― be

it in the fire service, law enforcement,

emergency medical

services or the military ― the

memories of the terrorist attacks

that took so many lives

remains fresh.”

Davis recalled the story of

FDNY Battalion Chief Joseph

Pfeifer, who was the first on the

scene in the north tower after it

was hit, giving orders to firefighters

as they arrived. That

group included his brother, Lt.

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

ITEM PHOTO | PAULA MULLER

Kat Whitcomb places a stone she painted to honor the memory

of Garnet Bailey, a resident who died on 9/11 when his plane

struck the south tower in New York City.

Kevin Pfeifer of Engine 33.

“He ordered that lieutenant to

take his crew to the 70th floor of

the burning tower to help evacuate

people,” Davis said. “The

entire crew died that day and

he never saw his brother again.

This is the meaning of sacrifice,

selflessness and service.”

Acting Police Chief Nick

Secatore said Sept. 11 changed

the nation and the world.

“The impact continues to this

day. We are here today to ensure

that all of us, including future

generations, never forgets.”

Davis said every firefighter

experiences a distinct and dire

feeling a few times in a career.

“It’s the feeling of arriving at

a scene of an incident and your

sixth sense kicks in and says

‘this one is going to be bad and

you might not make it home,’”

Davis said. “I have no doubt

that the men and women who

responded to the World Trade

Center that day had that feeling

as they got off their fire apparatuses

and stepped out of their

police cruisers. They had that

feeling, yet they went ahead

anyway.”

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A Healthy Lynnfield

discusses trends at

community meeting

By Katelyn sahagian

Quiet chatter filled the Old

Town Meeting House as members

of A Healthy Lynnfield

gathered for the first time since

the pandemic.

“I love that buzz of conversation,”

said Substance Abuse

Prevention Coordinator Peg

Sallade. “That’s community and

that’s what we’re all about.”

A Healthy Lynnfield hosted

Matthew Peiken, director for the

greater Lynn area at Children’s

Friend & Family Services, a division

of the Justice Resource

Institute, to speak to the board

members about trends in addiction,

abuse, and mental health.

Over the pandemic, Peiken

said there was a near doubling

increase of alcohol and opiate

abuse. Peiken said a main

reason people have turned to

substances is to help alleviate

some of the stress and anxiety

surrounding COVID-19.

“Substance abuse works well

until it doesn’t,” said Peiken.

“What it does is provide an immediate

sense of relief, but it

doesn’t allow for other, healthy

coping skills.”

Another trend Peiken said

was concerning to him was

the underreporting of domestic

abuse against children during

the pandemic. He said that, due

to counselors being unable to go

into homes, as well as children

learning remotely, there were

significantly fewer chances to

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catch warning signs of domestic

violence.

“As much as I like telehealth,

it’s not the same,” Peiken said.

“I can’t have a child pull me

aside and speak confidentiality.”

Peiken said that, in addition

to seeing trends in substance

abuse and domestic violence

rising, children are struggling

with mental health.

According to the CDC, nationally,

students have reported

there has been a 27 percent

increase in having trouble

studying and focusing, a 19 percent

increase in anxiety, an 18

percent increase in difficulties

sleeping too much or too little,

a 15 percent increase in struggling

with eating too much or

too little, and an 11 percent increase

in headaches.

“Sometimes the pandemic is

too big for them to understand

so they focus on little things,”

Peiken said. “The logical

thinking isn’t happening.”

Now, with schools opening

back up to in-person learning,

Peiken says that there will be a

lot of changes for students. He

said that he feels teachers will

be able to handle it.

“As we get back to a community,

it’ll be super hard

and you’ll be super busy,”

Peiken said, addressing School

Committee Member Jamie

Hayman. “There is a loss socially

and a need to build that

back up.”

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

have his twin daughters admitted

to Harvard and Stanford

universities.

Michael Kendall, attorney for

Wilson, claimed Monday that

Wilson believed the payments

were legitimate donations

to Singer’s foundation, Key

Worldwide Foundation, and

that he had been “bamboozled”

by Singer. Because Wilson did

not know the money was being

used for bribes, Kendall said, he

was innocent of the conspiracy

charges he is being tried for.

“Mr. Singer never said the

donation was a bribe. He said

exactly the opposite. It was an

accepted fundraising program,”

Kendall said.

Assistant U.S. Attorney

Leslie Wright said in her

opening statement that Wilson

paid Singer to create a false

profile for his son, John Wilson

Jr., embellishing his accomplishments

as a member of his

high-school water polo team in

order to gain admission to USC.

Singer called this approach

the “side door” to admissions.

Wright also alleged that Wilson

later agreed to pay Singer to

go through the process again,

having his twin daughters admitted

as athletes in sports they

did not play.

“You will hear Singer tell

Wilson that he could not get

both of his daughters into

Stanford because the sailing

coach, he had to recruit some

real sailors … so that Stanford

would not catch on,” Wright

told the jury. “You will hear

defendant John Wilson actually

laugh in response to that.”

Kendall disputed this, saying

that while Singer did send the

falsified profile to Wilson by

email, there was no evidence

that Wilson ever even opened

the email attachment or knew

that the profile was inaccurate.

Wilson’s son did join the

water polo team at USC as a

“red shirt,” or a player who

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

Varsity Blues trial begins for local father

VARSITY BLUES

From page 1

attended practices but did not

play, one of 13 such players

in that year’s freshman class.

He left the team after his first

season because of a concussion.

Wright did acknowledge that

Singer was not always forthcoming

with the parents involved

in the scheme, noting

that he did not tell the parents

that he kept a large chunk of

their money for himself, or

told them that the money was

going to the schools’ athletics

programs when it was actually

going directly to his contacts.

However, she said, Singer was

clear with the parents that their

money was directly going to

securing a spot at their targeted

school, and provided money-back

guarantees if the admission

was rescinded.

“Whichever way the money

flowed, Singer made clear to

the parents that, in exchange for

their payments, the coach or athletic

department insider would

secure an athletic recruitment

slot for their children, which

Lynnfield firefighters join Ida

recovery assistance teams in Louisiana

BY ANNE MARIE TOBIN

The Lynnfield Fire Department

has joined two other

Massachusetts communities in

assisting the Hurricane Ida relief

efforts in Louisiana.

Capt. Kevin Muti, Firefighter/

Paramedic Jeffrey Fiorentino

and Firefighter/EMT Andrew

Nardone and eight members of

the Dalton and Carlisle fire departments

arrived in Baton Rouge

late Wednesday. The group met

up Tuesday in Lee at 5 a.m. to

make the 23-hour trek south.

Fire Chief Glenn Davis said

the group reported they encountered

countless numbers

of washed-out roads, sinkholes

and downed power lines as the

caravan inched close to its destination,

making traveling extremely

challenging.

“The area is still very much

hard hit even now,” Davis said.

“It’s clear that traveling is still a

challenge and many people are

still without power, so this is very

much still a serious problem for

many of the folks who live there.”

The assistance comes on

the heels of a request from

the Emergency Management

Assistance Compact (EMAC), the

national emergency-management

mutual aid system that facilitates

state-to-state disaster assistance.

“EMAC reached out to the fire

chiefs looking for assistance from

firefighters who have their own

suppression gear, which includes

their SCUBA breathing apparatus,”

Davis said. “The response from our

department was very strong with

several people volunteering to go,

but we could only take three.”

Davis said the group, which

will be deployed in Louisiana

for a total of 14 days, checked

in with FEMA authorities upon

arrival in Baton Rouge over the

weekend. They were then deployed

to Thibodaux, a city in

and the parish seat of, Lafourche

Parish, about an hour away.

Davis said the group may be deployed

in other locations as well.

The group’s next stop is scheduled

to be at local fire stations to

assist with repairs and staffing

needs, handling incoming calls

for service that may include anything

from medical aid to structure

fire suppression.

“It’s one of the most damaged

areas and some of these

departments have been working

24/7,” said Davis. “Many of

these people have damaged and

lost homes, so this will allow

them to tend to those needs.”

“This crew will be able to

provide services in support of

those local first responders, so

they can get some rest,” says

Louisiana State Fire Marshal

H. “Butch” Browning.

Gov. Charlie Baker said the

volunteer effort is vital in providing

essential services which

were severely compromised as

a result of the storm.

“On behalf of the residents

of the commonwealth, I commend

these firefighters, their

families, and their departments

for answering the call to help

the people of Louisiana recover

from the impacts of Hurricane

Ida,” said Baker. “These firefighters

will use their training

and expertise to deliver essential

support to Louisianians rebuilding

their communities.”

“Massachusetts firefighters

know the value of mutual aid,

whether it comes across municipal

borders or state lines,”

said State Fire Marshal Peter J.

Ostroskey. “When people need

help, the fire service always

takes the call. Our counterparts

in Louisiana are confronting

high temperatures, power and

resource shortages, the fire and

health risks associated with increased

generator usage, and

concerns about their own families.

Firefighting is a physically

and mentally demanding job

even under the best conditions,

so we know the challenges

they’re facing right now.”

Massachusetts is one of 21

states sending aid to Louisiana

under EMAC, which functions

as the nation’s all-hazards mutual

aid system to coordinate

the provision of certain emergency

management assets.

would effectively guarantee

their admission,” Wright said.

Attorneys for Abdelaziz, a

Las Vegas casino executive,

made separate opening arguments

from Wilson’s attorneys,

but similarly denied that he was

aware that his payments were

being used as bribes. Abdelaziz

is accused of allegedly paying

Singer to have his daughter,

Sabrina, admitted to USC as a

basketball player, despite the

fact that she stopped playing the

sport during high school.

Prosecutors also began direct

examination Monday of witness

Bruce Isackson. Isackson

pleaded guilty in 2019 for his

involvement in the scheme,

in which he and his wife,

Davina, paid $600,000 to have

their daughters admitted to

University of California - Los

Angeles and USC, both by submitting

false athletic profiles

and having his youngest daughter’s

ACT score changed.

Isackson told the court that he

knew that the money he gave to

Singer’s foundation was in exchange

for getting his children

falsely admitted to the schools,

and that without those payments,

he did not believe they

would have been admitted.

Examination of Isackson will

resume Tuesday. The trial is expected

to last a few weeks.

Singer pleaded guilty but has

not yet been sentenced. He cooperated

with the FBI and IRS

investigation, agreeing to record

phone calls and conversations

with many of the parents

involved. Singer will not testify

in the trial.

More than 40 people have

been charged in the case, including

parents and coaches.

In May, Wilson filed a lawsuit

in Essex Superior Court against

Netflix and the producers of

the documentary “Operation

Varsity Blues: The College

Admissions Scandal” over his

family’s portrayal in the film.

Lynnfield Art Guild

hopes to hit all-time

record membership

BY KATELYN SAHAGIAN

The Lynnfield Art Guild

(LAG) is calling all amateur

artists excited to learn new techniques,

show off their work, and

join a community of creators.

“COVID-19 has disrupted

a lot of our plans, but we are

excited to be back,” said Beth

Aaronson, LAG’s public-relations

coordinator.

The guild is currently

pushing for more members; in

June, LAG hosted two concerts

aimed at increasing membership.

Aaronson, who is also on

the membership team, said that

the guild’s goal for this year is

to increase by 25 more members.

Membership renews in

September and new member

sign-up begins in June.

“We feel we’ve been a successful

organization now for 64

years,” Aaronson said.

The Lynnfield Art Guild was

first started in 1984 by 10 amateur

artists. Within their first

year, the guild had grown to 100

people. Now, the guild has 110

members, some of which are individual

artist memberships or

family memberships.

Aaronson said that increasing

membership of the guild to 135

will be the highest they’ve ever

had as an entity.

The LAG also holds two

judged shows each year ― one

in November and one in May

― and both are free and open to

the public. Only guild members

can display their artwork at the

shows.

Joining the guild gives artists

the chance to show their work

not only at the judged shows,

but also at the Lynnfield Library

and some of the banks in town.

The first demonstration of the

year by the Lynnfield Art Guild

will be on September 16. The

demonstration will be by Janet

Schwartz on her pastel technique.

The event starts at 6:30

and will be held over Zoom.

“It’s delightful to still be successful

and serve the Lynnfield

community,” Anderson said.


4

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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MONDAY 9/06

Complaints

A report of an unwanted

person at 6:06 p.m. Monday at

253 Walnut St. A caller reported

an unknown person at the door

was harassing them. Joseph

Daniel Oliva, 34, of 175 Walnut

St., was issued a summons for

annoying telephone calls and

criminal harassment.

A disturbance was reported

at 9:49 p.m. Monday

on Candlewood Road. A caller

reported kids were running

around the neighborhood.

Police reported youths were

by Kristin reed for the

weeKly news

Many of my clients have been

asking about hydration lately.

“Am I drinking enough water?”

“Should I drink more?” “I

don’t want my kids to get dehydrated.”

Staying hydrated is a hot topic

especially this time of year!

These warm days can put us at

risk for dehydration and we may

need to do more than just drink

water.

Proper hydration, called “cellular

hydration” means having

adequate fluids present in your

body for all of our cells to work

their magic. This depends on

many factors, including getting

the right amount of electrolytes,

which are minerals that regulate

fluid balance and many other vital

body functions.

Many people drink plenty of

water but don’t replenish electrolytes,

leaving them at risk for

electrolyte imbalances or deficiencies,

which can cause symptoms

like headaches, cramps,

fatigue, weakness, and cravings

playing manhunt and there was

no problem.

FRIDAY 9/10

Complaints

A report of a gang disturbance

at 10:08 p.m. Friday at Jordan

Park on Wildewood Drive. A

caller reported a loud group of

youths at the park. Police reported

a parent was picking up

a carload of kids.

A disturbance was reported at

11:32 p.m. Friday at Michael’s

Landing at 2 S Broadway. A

caller reported several motor

vehicles parked out back were

(our bodies way of trying to get

us to consume more of these

electrolytes). Additionally, nursing

mothers are often low on

electrolytes, and studies show

that optimizing electrolytes can

also improve milk supply.

Electrolytes are found in the

food we eat, but many people

don’t get enough with their typical

diet (especially with consuming

a lot of highly-processed

foods).

Magnesium, sodium, and

potassium are three of the most

helpful. Here’s the breakdown:

600mg of magnesium

5000 mg of sodium

4700 mg of potassium

Studies show that these are

the recommended amounts that

our bodies need each day to

function at its best. To meet these

daily needs (which many of us

don’t) and support hydration, I

always recommend including a

variety of real, whole foods that

are nutrient dense in your diet

each day to ensure you’re getting

sufficient amounts.

Foods high in magnesium: almonds,

pumpkin seeds, spinach,

playing very loud music. Police

checked the area and were unable

to locate.

MONDAY 9/13

Theft

A report of an attempted theft

of a motor vehicle at 2:52 a.m.

Monday at 900 Lynnfield St. A

caller reported she found her car

doors open and lights on. She

thought she saw someone in her

car. Police reported the car was

over packed and it was not possible

for someone to be hiding in

the vehicle; nothing was missing

from the vehicle.

Hydration is H2-oh-so important

sunflower seeds, dark chocolate.

Foods high in potassium:

avocado, salmon, lentils, beans,

sweet potatoes, tomatoes

In terms of sodium, real,

whole foods are naturally low

in sodium. Therefore, we have

to supplement with salting our

foods. I recommend an unrefined

salt because it is organically

rich in minerals.

If you need to fill in the gaps

with your diet, I recommend

supplementing with electrolytes.

Unflavored, sugar-free electrolyte

powder is available to

mix in water, or you can make

your own. Making sure we are

getting these essential electrolytes,

allows each of our body

systems to function optimally,

which improves our overall

health and well-being!

Lynnfield resident Kristen

Reed, RN, BSN, BA, HNBC,

is a multiple award-winning,

board-certified Holistic Registered

Nurse and National Certified

Holistic Health Coach. She

is the founder and CEO at Nursing

Your Way to Wellness, LLC.

Fall into Wellness 5-Day Reset

by Kristin reed for the

weeKly news

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 5

The Night of Hope is back

by anne marie tobin

color of recovery, at school or at

Medical Association, which re-

TOM was founded after

purple bows, flags, and lights,

After a one-year pause due

to the pandemic, Lynnfield’s

Night of Hope is back.

The Think of Michael

Foundation (TOM) and A

Healthy Lynnfield (AHL) announced

that the Third Annual

Night of Hope event in observance

of National Recovery

Month will be held on Sunday,

Sept. 26 at 6 p.m.

This year’s event begins at

Lynnfield Middle School. From

there, participants will march

your place of business. People

can also celebrate by putting a

purple bow on your door or a

purple light in your window on

Sept. 26

According to the Centers for

Disease Control and Prevention,

as of June 2020, 13 percent of

Americans reported starting

or increasing substance use as

a way of coping with stress or

emotions related to COVID-

19. The trend has continued,

according to the American

ported that more than 40 U.S.

states have seen increases in

opioid-related mortality along

with ongoing concerns for those

with substance use disorders.

Massachusetts has made many

gains in addressing the opioid

crisis with telehealth and online

recovery support, but with the

challenges brought on by the

COVID pandemic, it is even

more important to ensure that

prevention and access to treatment

remain a priority.

Michael Dalton, who died of an

opioid overdose in 2018.

“This observance is a reminder

that treatment is effective.

People can and do recover,”

said Carmela Dalton of the

Think of Michael Foundation

and mother of Michael. “It

also serves to help reduce the

stigma and misconceptions that

cloud public understanding of

mental health and substance

use disorders. When you see

the common decorated with

remember someone you know

with positivity.”

Masks will be available at

the event and organizers will

follow all current COVID

guidelines that may be in place

on September 26, 2021.

For event information contact

Dalton at cmdalton@thinkofmichael.org

or Peg Sallade of

A Healthy Lynnfield, at salladem@lynnfield.k12.ma.us

to the Town Common for the

main ceremony.

Bridge Recovery Center

of Malden Program Director

Kerriann Caccavaro will be the

guest speaker.

State Sen. Brendan Crighton

and state Rep. Bradley Jones

will also be in attendance. A

brief blessing by local clergy

will close the night.

National Recovery Month

encourages communities across

the country to hold local events

to celebrate people’s stories of

recovery.

TOM and AHL hope to

bring the community together

to recognize that Lynnfield is

not immune to the impact of

the opioid crisis. This event

highlights the tough road that

people facing recovery from

substance use disorder face

every day.

Those who are unable to attend

in person can show their

support for National Recovery

Month by wearing purple, the

Contact the

reporter,

Tell us your

stories,

We Want To

Hear From You!

atobin

@essexmediagroup.com


6

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

Religious News

Ave Maria Parish

Ave Maria Parish is a Catholic

community of faith comprising

two worship sites in Lynnfield:

Our Lady of the Assumption

Church located at 758 Salem

Street and Saint Maria Goretti

Church located at 112 Chestnut

Street.

Fully-vaccinated people are no

longer required to wear masks or

socially distance in our churches.

All non-vaccinated and partially-vaccinated

people are advised

to continue to wear masks. If you

wish to continue to practice social

distancing, designated pews in

both churches have been reserved.

Pre-registration for Masses is no

longer required.

Our Mass schedule is as

follows:

WEEKEND MASS SCHEDULE

4PM on Saturday at OLA

7:30AM on Sunday at OLA

9:30AM on Sunday at SMG

11AM on Sunday at OLA

DAILY MASS SCHEDULE

OLA - 9am on Mondays,

Wednesdays, and Fridays

SMG - 9am on Tuesdays and

Thursdays

Centre Congregational Church

5 Summer St., Lynnfield

781-334-3050

www.centre-church.org

F a c e b o o k . c o m /

CentreChurchUCC

office@centre-church.org

YouTube.com/c/

centrecongregationalchurch/

In the Centre since 1720, Centre

Church is an open and affirming

congregation of the

United Church of Christ. No

matter who you are or where you

are on your life’s journey, you are

welcome at Centre Church.

Our worship services are held

at 10 a.m. every Sunday morning.

Our summer services are in the

air-conditioned chapel. All worshippers

are asked to wear a mask

while indoors for worship until

further notice. Following the service,

we gather on the front lawn

for fellowship.

Our pastor, the Rev. Nancy

Rottman, and our Director of Faith

Formation, Ms. Larainne Wilson,

strive to provide inspiring, downto-earth

messages for people of

all ages that are applicable to everyday

life.

We are committed to providing

children a warm, safe, and inclusive

environment. We will be offering

a summer program for children

called “Compassion Camp.”

The overall theme is Be Loved,

Be Kind, Be You.

Messiah Lutheran Church

708 Lowell St., Lynnfield

(corner of Lowell & Chestnut)

is currently open for in-person

worship Sunday morning at 9:30

am (summer hours). Worship

services will also be streamed

live on Facebook. Like us

on Facebook: facebook.com/

Messiah-Lutheran-Church

Worship times: Sunday mornings

at 9:30 am, Sunday evening

devotion on Facebook Live at 6:30

pm, Wednesday evening Prayer

time at 7:01 pm on Facebook Live.

Messiah Lutheran Church is

served by Rev. Dr. Jeremy Pekari,

A SPECIAL OFFER TO OUR READERS!

SAVE UP TO 25 %

ON TICKETS TO THE 2021

AMERICA’S

OLDEST

FOUNDED 1818

Friday, Oct. 1 - Monday, Oct. 11, 2021

Pick up your discounted Topsfield Fair tickets for:

$

12.00 EACH*

Deadline: Friday, Sept. 24 / CASH ONLY!

*Ticketssold at fair entrance are $15.

Tickets available Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Get your tickets at

and Rev. David Brezina.

Temple Emmanuel/Wakefield

September/October Events:

September 16 - Yom Kippur,

Thursday Morning at 9:30 AM,

Hybrid; Mincha/Nei’ilah - Hybrid

at 6:45 PM. Break fast on your

own

September 17 - Jewish

Meditation Circle, Friday Evening

at 7:30 PM, Hybrid

September 18 - Shabbat

Morning Celebration, Saturday

Morning at 9:30 AM, Hybrid

September 19 - Return

Sanctuary to normal use and set

up Sukkah, Sunday Morning at

9:30 AM

September 20 - Erev Sukkot

Family Celebration, Monday

Evening at 7:00 PM, Hybrid

September 21 - Sukkot First

Day Celebration, Tuesday

Morning at 9:30 AM, Hybrid

September 24 - Erev Shabbat

Celebration, Friday Evening at

7:30 PM, Hybrid

September 25 - Shabbat at

Breakheart, Saturday Morning at

9:30 AM

September 27 - Erev Shemini

Atzeret (no service)

September 28 - Shemini Atzeret

Service with Yizkor, Tuesday

Morning at 9:30 AM, Hybrid

September 28 - Simcha Torah

Family Celebration, Tuesday

Evening at 7:00 PM, Hybrid

October 1 - Erev Shabbat

Celebration, Friday Evening at

7:30 PM, Hybrid

October 2 - Shabbat Morning

Celebration including Torah

Study with Rabbi Greg, Saturday

o

Morning at 9:30 AM, Hybrid

October 3 - Dismantle Sukkah,

Sunday Morning at 9:30 AM

October 3 - Sisterhood Kick-Off

Brunch, Sunday morning at 11:00

AM. See the Temple Website

to RSVP and more information.

October 3 - Temple Reads:

The Yellow Bird Sings, Sunday

Evening at 7:00 PM, Hybrid. For

more information, see the Temple

Website.

October 5 - House & Grounds

Committee Meeting, Tuesday

Evening at 6:45 PM

October 5 - Ritual Committee

Meeting, Tuesday Evening at 7:30

PM

For more information about

Temple Emmanuel, a member

of the Jewish Reconstructionist

Communities, call 781-245-1886

or see our Facebook page or website

at www.WakefieldTemple.

org.

Request service links to

the Zoom streaming: info@

WakefieldTemple.org

Wakefield-Lynnfield United

Methodist Church

Peace, Hope & Virtual Hugs

Deb Willis Bry, cell:

“Anytime we have

a problem or a

question, we know

who to ask. We are

very appreciative

of AFCNS!”

Sandra,

Caregiver to

Daughter, Kim

781-521-9726

Office Assistant, Wakefield-

Lynnfield United Methodist

Church

Assistant Coordinator, Greater

Boston Project Linus

Wakefield-Lynnfield United

Methodist Church, 273 Vernon

St., Wakefield, Mass., 01880

Church Office: 781-245-1359,

Parsonage: 781-245-0338 Email:

WLUMC272@gmail.com

www.facebook.com/

methodistchurchwakefield

www.instagram.com/

methodistchurchwakefield

*A Project Linus Blanket

Drop-Off Location*

www.bostonprojectlinus.com

The Church of Jesus Christ of

Latter-day Saints

400 Essex St., Lynnfield

www.churchofjesuschrist.org

(781) 334-5586

Bishop Aaron Udy

Missionaries: 978-896-9434

Sacrament meeting: 10 a.m.

Sunday School/Youth/Children

Class: 11 a.m.

Youth Night: Wednesdays at 7

p.m.

Visitors Welcome!

Dr. Geoffrey A. Talbot, 87

11/15/1933 - 5/27/2021

MELROSE - Dr. Geoffrey A. Talbot,

87, of Lynnfield, died on Thursday

May 27, 2021 at Melrose-Wakefield

Hospital, following a brief illness.

Dr. Talbot spent his last days

in the very hospital that not too

long ago celebrated his 50 plus

years being on the staff. Dr. Talbot

will not only be remembered as a

skilled urologist, but as a truly generous

and caring individual who

always tried to offer his help. From

his time as a doctor in the Navy

aboard the USS Wasp, to a urology

practice in Melrose and Stoneham

that spanned half a century, he

never lost the desire to try to help

others. Dr. Talbot is survived by his

three sons Alan, Christopher and

Chandler as well as his first wife

Jeanne and second wife Sharon.

Service Information: Services

Private

100 Munroe St., Lynns

Look for the Topsfield Fair program in our Sept. 30 edition.

978-281-2612

AdultFosterCareNS.com


SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 7

Tapping into

Senior Programs

senior connections

For the Weekly NeWs

LYNN — One result of the

global pandemic and its longterm

isolation is the need to find

innovative ways through which

people can stay connected.

One such effort includes a

new tool that Greater Lynn

Senior Services (GLSS), which

serves town residents, is piloting

called Uniper — a device

that plugs into your television

set, along with a small camera

which perches on top, enabling

one-on-one communication

with case managers, healthcare

providers, counselors, family

and friends.

“The COVID-19 pandemic

pretty much destroyed the limited

social connections that

many older people or adults

living with disabilities already

experience,” said Kathryn C.

Burns, GLSS’ chief executive

officer. “Research shows that

isolation, particularly long-term

isolation, has a very negative effect

on people’s overall health,

significantly contributing to

premature death from all causes

and increasing a person’s risk of

diseases like dementia.”

Uniper loads an individual’s

contacts into its device,

allowing for immediate virtual

connection.

“This is really the primary

reason we chose Uniper over

the many other platforms we

reviewed,” said Valerie Parker

Callahan, director of planning

and development. “We view

it first and foremost as a communications

tool to help people

better manage their health

and well-being, with Uniper’s

built-in programming as a secondary

— but very helpful

— add-on to reduce social isolation

and promote stronger

connections with the wider

community.”

It is easy to use with a simple

remote that allows people to

quickly transition from Uniper

back to television programming.

“Many platforms that allow

for virtual connection require a

computer, tablet or smartphone,

which many older people do not

have and might be uncomfortable

using,” Parker Callahan

noted. “But Uniper only requires

a TV, which most people

already have and use regularly.”

Uniper’s existing content includes

access to hundreds of

videos — travel, arts and culture,

music and educational

programs, as well as “live” programming

that includes exercise

and other classes, peer-led

discussion groups, support

groups and more — which are

available throughout the day

and scheduled by Uniper.

GLSS is developing its own

content, which will be available

to users through a separate

channel, and is also working on

developing some live programming,

too.

“We envision, for example,

that our Wellness Pathways fall

prevention and health self-management

workshops will be offered

over the Uniper platform,

as well as group and individual

counseling through our Mobile

Mental Health and Family

Caregiver Support programs

in a private, HIPAA-compliant

setting,” Parker Callahan said,

“This would be in addition to

virtual case manager visits with

GLSS consumers.”

UniperCare is an innovative,

Israeli-based company with a

West Coast U.S. hub. Its programming

is starting to pop

up all around the country, but

GLSS is its first Massachusettsbased

customer.

One of the Uniper’s unique

features is the work they

have been doing with Jewish

Federation of North America,

connecting Holocaust survivors,

their descendants and

people of Jewish faith with tailored

supports and group meetings,

bringing together people

from all across the country in

celebration of some Jewish

holidays during the pandemic.

They plan to continue this programming

moving forward.

Uniper also offers a lot of content

in Russian and Spanish.

GLSS is initially hoping

to sign up 100 people age 60

and older or adults living with

disabilities in its service area

of Lynn, Lynnfield, Nahant,

Saugus and Swampscott for

the free one-year service. The

product will be reevaluated

after a year and could last beyond

that, depending on its results

and continued interest on

the part of funders.

Uniper offers training and

a helpline to troubleshoot any

issues users encounter. The program

is supported by funding

from the Administration for

Community Living as well

as funding through the Older

American Act administered

through the Massachusetts

Executive Office of Elder

Affairs, and a grant from

Beverly and Addison Gilbert

Hospitals, operated by Beth

Israel Lahey Health.

Interested individuals can

contact Andrew Wallace,

GLSS’ Title III Planner, at 781-

477-6702 or email awallace@

glss.net. More information can

be found at www.glss.net.

The Lynnfield Senior Center

is open and offering the following

programs. Our new poetry

workshop with Richard will

be on Tuesdays at 10am. This

workshop is for those who write

poetry and want to share their

writings with others and those

that would like to learn more

about writing poetry. Tai Chi

with Nicanor returns on Tuesday,

September 21 at 9:30. Our

Rooted in

Your Health

PILGRIM REHABILITATION

& SKILLED NURSING

We want to hear

from you!

Send us a letter at

editor@weeklynews.net.

Letters should be no more

than 300 words.

Our team of clinical professionals get you home feeling

healthier and stronger following an illness or surgery. You at

your best! We are proud to offer high quality rehabilitative

care through our Steps to Strength Program including:

PHYSICAL, OCCUPATIONAL & SPEECH THERAPY

IV THERAPY • WOUND CARE

You can trust in us for your care,

call 978-532-0303

Parkinson’s Fitness class meets

every Friday at 10am. Come

and strengthen your body, balance,

and movement. Our Diabetes

Academy will meet on

Thursday, September 30 at

12:30. This will be an informal

meeting; please join us. For

questions and to sign up, call

Elaine at 781-598-1078. Masks

are required for all programs at

the senior center.

Looking for a house?

Check the real estate section!

96 Forest Street • Peabody, MA 01960

www.pilgrimrehab.org


8

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

To the editor:

I was 95 years old on September

10.

My beautiful bride Mildred

(Boyle) and I will have been

married for seventy years on

October 10, 2021.

I love Lynnfield.

I have lived here peacefully

for 65 years, and I want everyone

to know I have cherished

every minute of it.

After serving in the Navy

during World War II, I returned

to my family home in Melrose

and pursued the girl of my

dreams. After many proposals

of marriage, Mildred finally

agreed to marry me. When her

parents Milton and Etta Boyle

moved here, we decided to follow.

I had begun my career as a

movie producer, lecturer and

historian, and recognized that

travel, with long periods of absence,

was in my future.

I moved my young family

here to 278 Lowell Street in

1956 in order to have my wife

nearer to her parents and my

three sons near to their grandparents

living just across the

meadow at 1060 Main St. I believed

my wife Mildred and my

three sons George, Clifton, and

Mark would have more opportunity,

and family was all-important

to me then as it is now.

My family needed stability

and that became known to us as

‘Living in Lynnfield’.

I have watched this town

grow from about 6000 residents

to what it is today. I have

watched the demise of the

Cleary Co. Greenhouses on the

corner of Lowell and Main; the

Town Office Buildings and Library

undergoing so many additions.

We watched the Center

Street School become a community-living

property benefiting

seniors and the recognition

that we need to provide living

assistance for our elderly.

I have seen the Summer

Street School built and the high

school become a reality. The

old junior high school is now

the middle school and I am

proud of the fact we were advocates

for its re-invention. The

modifications at the town center

have been, and continue to

be remarkable. In South Lynnfield,

MarketStreet has brought

new people and new energy to a

once-small town.

Lynnfield continues to grow

as I look on.

Not all the adjustment to living

here has been without pain.

The necessary rising of the Vietnam

Memorial at Commons

and the demise of the Worthen’s

Grocery Market brings back

many recollections. The loss of

our downtown pharmacy ― a

sudden tragedy ― and the current

hollowness of the “center

marketplace” are sad to see, but

I choose to look upon the “new”

downtown with hopeful anticipation.

The recent pandemic and its

dreary processes, and the stresses

of environmental change

looming overhead present many

new challenges to residents.

As you now know, at 95

years I am coming to the last of

my days; as they say I am ‘a bit

long in the tooth’. I am an eyewitness

to abrupt and demanding

diversions. I have no room

in my heart for even one negative

thought.

I pledge to you that I am

hopeful for the future. I urge

you to be a community-orientated

citizen, to meet the challenges

we face by involving

yourself.

There is a welcoming place

where we continue to widen

our horizons, yet also respect

the foundations that have made

possible the many pathways

that lay before us.

Continuing tradition, recognizing

the mistakes of history

and persistently looking to a

new beginning; these are the

ideals I pray my great-grandchildren

strive towards.

Lynnfield is the right place

to pursue a quest for individuality,

diversity, acceptance, and

inclusivity.

I urge all that live here to

recognize the gift bestowed

upon them.

I believe the residents of

Lynnfield are fortunate.

In Lynnfield we fight the

same battles all communities

must engage, we face many

challenges but we are a community

that has stayed together

through the ages; I have witnessed

it!

Provided God and the Spirits

give grace to allow it, I hope to

one day meet every inhabitant

of our fine village.

Lynnfield, our hidden jewel

just 15 miles north of Boston, is

where I am glad to have lived

and raised my family.

Thank you for the neighborhood!

Peace,

George W Perkins II

Author, producer, lecturer,

and historian

Friends of Library

accepting used books

For the Weekly NeWs

The Friends of the Lynnfield

Library has announced it

is accepting donations of used

books for the Lynnfield Library’s

annual used book sale.

Bagged donations should be

brought to the library’s circulation

desk. The following items

will not be accepted: small,

mass-market paperbacks; textbooks;

encyclopedias; computer

manuals; games; or puzzles.

The book sale will be held

on Saturday, Oct. 16. For more

information about the sale,

please contact the library at

781-334-5411 or 781-334-

6404.

Upcoming blood drive

For the Weekly NeWs

The next Lynnfield community

blood drive will take place

in the hall at St. Maria Goretti

Church, 112 Chestnut St., Lynnfield,

MA.

WHEN: Friday, September

24th from 1 - 6 pm.

Please call 1-800-RED-

CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or

visit redcrossblood.org and

enter “Lynnfield” to make an

appointment

Maximize your blood donation;

help more patients. If

you are an eligible type O-, B-,

or A- donor, consider making

a Power Red donation. Red

blood cells are the most commonly

transfused blood component.

LMG Casino Night is Oct. 1

For the Weekly NeWs

The Lynnfield Moms

Group (LMG) will host its annual

Casino Night fundraiser

at Spinelli’s of Lynnfield, 10

Newbury St., Peabody on Friday,

Oct. 1 at 7 p.m. The event

benefits Lynnfield Parks and

the LMG Family Fund. Tickets

are $100 per person and $150

per couple. Tickets include

“Funny Money” casino cash,

heavy hors d’oeuvres and access

to live auctions, basket

raffles and the LMG Balloon

Raffle. There will be a DJ, a

cash bar and signature cocktails.

This year’s theme is The

Great Gatsby/Roaring 20’s.

Gatsby-style attire is requested.

The best-dressed “Dapper

and Flapper” will receive a

prize. The first 25 registrants

will receive 25 complimentary

raffle tickets valued at $30.

COVID-19 guidelines will

be strictly observed. Outdoor

space is available. For tickets

or more information, search

“LMG Casino Night Fundraiser”

on Eventbrite.com

To the editor:

Over the past few years

there has been much advocacy

for the false narrative of white

privilege. Facebook pages,

such as “Lynnfield4Love”

promote this through their adult

book list.

Based on the titles, 65

percent of the books were

promoting the white privilege

narrative, which is divisive racism.

In a newspaper article, our

town administrator, Rob Dolan,

was quoted as saying that

the town would “reconvene

talks with the Lynnfield4Love

group.”

I then learned of the “equity

audit” that our School Committee

was pursuing. This suggested

that our School Committee

was implementing a curriculum

of critical race theory and the

1619 Project.

The School Committee publicly

denied this, and they were

technically correct because

these programs are not currently

part of the curriculum.

The committee contracted

with The Equity Process, a

company which was formed

for the expressed purpose of

conducting this equity audit.

They claim they are pursuing a

policy of diversity, equity and

inclusion.

Diversity by itself is not a

bad thing, but merit should be

the deciding factor. Diversity

should not be an objective.

Likewise, equity — equality

of outcome — should not be a

goal. The true metric is equality

of opportunity. Equity at best

leads to mediocrity. Equality of

opportunity will ultimately lead

to inclusion.

So, what will the outcome

of this audit be? I am certain

that they will find racism under

every rock. What will be their

remedy? Likely it will be the

false “history” of The 1619

Project and the divisiveness

of critical race theory, which

fractures the community into

two classes — oppressors and

oppressed based entirely on

race. This is the definition of

racism.

What about the “nose of

the camel” fable? You may

remember the fable tells the

story of an Arab and his camel

on a cold desert night. Out of

pity, the Arab permits his camel

to poke his nose into the tent

for warmth.

As the night wears on, the

camel keeps worming his way

further into the tent, and by

morning he is in the tent and

the Arab is out in the cold.

Beware, this equity audit is the

nose of the camel.

Cecil C. Ogren

Lynnfield United

A TRADITION OF TRUST, CARING & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1952

Service to all faiths

Complete Pre-Need Planning

Medicaid Approved Trust &

Insurance Plans

19 YALE AVE.,

WAKEFIELD, MASS.

Spacious Modern Facilities

Ample Private Parking

Handicapped Accessible

Area Code 781

245-3550 • 334-9966

Conveniently Located off Exit 39 (North Ave.) Rt. 128

Have a story to share?

Need a question answered?

contactus@essexmedia.group


SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 9

Sports

PHOTOS | SPENSER HASAK

Lynnfield senior captain Mekhi Peters lets out a yell after coming up with a defensive stop during a win over Saugus Friday night at Lynnfield Stadium.

Aerial attack lifts Lynnfield over Saugus in opener

Nick Razzaboni completed 12-of-18 passes for 127 yards and a

touchdown Friday night.

FOOTBALL

By Sam Minton

The Lynnfield Pioneers

showed off its aerial prowess

Friday night, using the passing

game to defeat the Saugus

Sachems 28-0 at Pioneer

Stadium.

Lynnfield head coach Pat

Lamusta called Friday’s win

an icebreaker that was well-deserved

after a long summer.

“It was important for the

players to see that their hard

work was going to pay off with

a victory like that,” he said.

“Really pleased with the execution

on defense, (and) on offense.

There’s some little things we

need to clean up moving forward

but overall the enthusiasm, the

excitement, they played with intensity

and that’s what we want.”

After both sides went three and

out to start the game, Lynnfield

drained some clock, driving

down the field thanks to their

passing game. Nick Razzaboni

completed five of his six passes

for 33 yards on the drive, but

James Sharkey ran the ball into

the end zone for the first touchdown

of the night.

Saugus tried to respond with

the ground game, which gave

captain Mark MacEachern a

steady diet of carries, but unfortunately

they were unable to get

past midfield. Things got even

worse as a snap on the punt went

over the punter’s head. On the

next play, captain Spencer Riley

pounded it home to give the

Pioneers a 14-0 lead.

Lynnfield started their first

drive of the second quarter

and didn’t leave the field empty-handed

for a third time. A 37-

yard touchdown pass caught by

Robert Marley gave the Pioneers

a three-touchdown lead.

Razzaboni had a great game

under center for Lynnfield. He

completed 12-of-18 passes for

127 yards and a touchdown. He

threw some dimes and showed

impressive arm strength; his

head coach was happy with his

performance.

“He’s been awesome,” said

Lamusta. “He’s a junior stepping

into the quarterback role

so he has to learn quickly and

he’s definitely showing some

leadership; he’s showing some

creativity. We give him a lot of

leeway to make calls at the line.

I’m really pleased with Nick’s

leadership and how he’s taken

on the role and learned so fast.”

Unfortunately for Saugus, the

second half started just like the

first with the Sachems going

three and out. The team was unable

to get anything going on the

ground and fumbled the snap on

a third down. Lynnfield junior

Charlie Capachietti made them

pay by breaking out for a 62-

yard run to put the Pioneers up

28-0

After the game, Saugus head

coach Steve Cummings tipped

his hat to the Pioneers, saying

they played a great game in his

eyes. With the Sachems having

a younger team, Cummings

stressed that it will take some

time for his side to show their

potential.

“We got some young guys that

are just going to get better, better,

and better with the more stuff

that they see,” Cummings said.

Lynnfield (1-0) has a full week

off before hosting Ipswich on

Sept. 24 (7).


10

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

THURSDAY

Golf

St. Mary’s at Bishop Fenwick (3)

Girls Soccer

Bishop Fenwick at Danvers (6:30)

Field Hockey

Rockport at Lynnfield (3)

Volleyball

St. Mary’s at Austin Prep (5)

Arlington Catholic at Bishop Fenwick (5:30)

FRIDAY

Football

St. Mary’s at Bellingham (6:30)

Masconomet at Peabody (7)

Boys Soccer

Hamilton-Wenham at Bishop Fenwick (3:30)

Masconomet at Peabody (4)

Girls Soccer

St. Mary’s at Malden Catholic (3:30)

Peabody at Masconomet (4)

Field Hockey

Everett at Peabody (4)

Volleyball

Bishop Fenwick at Masconomet (4)

Swampscott at Peabody (5:30)

SATURDAY

Football

Bishop Fenwick at Arlington Catholic (6)

Girls Soccer

Essex Tech at Lynnfield (10)

Newburyport at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Cross Country

St. Mary’s at CCL Relays (10)

Bishop Fenwick at McNiff Relays (10)

MONDAY

Golf

Masconomet at Peabody (4)

Boys Soccer

Lynnfield at Hamilton-Wenham (3:45)

Bishop Fenwick at St. Mary’s (5:30)

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULE

Girls Soccer

Hamilton-Wenham at Lynnfield (3:45)

St. Mary’s at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Field Hockey

Gloucester at Peabody (4)

Volleyball

Peabody at Swampscott (5:30)

TUESDAY

Golf

Austin Prep at Bishop Fenwick (3)

Ipswich at Lynnfield (3)

Peabody at Marblehead (3:45)

Boys Soccer

Peabody at Swampscott (4)

Girls Soccer

Swampscott at Peabody (4)

Field Hockey

Lynnfield at Hamilton-Wenham (3:45)

Bishop Fenwick at Austin Prep (4)

Volleyball

Bishop Fenwick at St. Mary’s (5:30)

Masconomet at Lynnfield (5:30)

Cross Country

Bishop Fenwick at Matignon (4)

WEDNESDAY

Golf

Bishop Fenwick at Bishop Feehan (3)

Lynnfield at Essex Tech (3)

Boys Soccer

Austin Prep at Bishop Fenwick (3:30)

Newburyport at Lynnfield (4:15)

Girls Soccer

Lynnfield at Newburyport (3:45)

Austin Prep at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Field Hockey

Peabody at Danvers (5:30)

Volleyball

Peabody at Masconomet (5:30)

Cross Country

Masconomet at Peabody (4)

COURTESY PHOTO | TAMMY MCMANAWAY

Lynnfield native and Endicott College quarterback Clayton

Marengi has been named the Commonwealth Coast Conference

Rookie of the Week.

Marengi named CCC

Rookie of the Week

By Mike Alongi

Lynnfield native and Endicott

sophomore quarterback Clayton

Marengi has been named the

Commonwealth Coast (CCC)

Football Offensive Rookie of

the Week, as announced by the

league office Monday afternoon.

Last Friday night against WPI,

Marengi was under center for

some key moments in Endicott’s

28-21 come-from-behind victory

over the Engineers.

In the fourth quarter, Marengi

orchestrated a drive that culminated

in a 32-yard touchdown

pass to tie the game. With

Marengi in at quarterback and the

run-pass-option threat looming,

the Gulls offense was able to put

together a game-winning drive.

Marengi chucked the ball deep

in the left corner of the end zone

targeting Shane Aylward for an

immaculate, high-flying 32-yard

touchdown grab over a WPI defender

to tie the score at 21-21

with 2:44 left in the game.

With just 20 seconds remaining

in regulation, Endicott’s John

Kenney punched one in from the

six-yard line after appearing to be

stuffed behind the line of scrimmage

giving the Gulls the 28-21

advantage.

Overall, Marengi went 2-for-5

in passing attempts for 37 yards

and added two rushes for 47

yards.

Monday’s announcement

marks Marengi’s first career

CCC Football weekly award.

Endicott (2-0) travels to

Catholic (1-1) on Saturday (12).

FILE PHOTO

Lynnfield native and St. Mary’s senior Sean Mathers scored 20 points in a loss to Bishop Fenwick

last Tuesday.

Mathers, St. Mary’s fall to rival

Bishop Fenwick on home course

GOLF

By Mike Alongi

Last Tuesday’s bout between

the Bishop Fenwick and St.

Mary’s golf teams was about

as close as it could get, with the

match eventually needing to be

decided by a tiebreaker.

After the two teams remained

tied 137-137 with the top seven

scores counted, the tiebreaking

eighth player — Fenwick’s

Mike Carter — beat his opponent

13-11 to give the Crusaders

a 150-148 victory at Gannon

Municipal Golf Course.

“This was probably our best

week of preparation for a match

that I can remember,” said

Fenwick coach Jim McHugh.

“Our guys were ready, they

played well and they just kept

fighting. It was a back-andforth

match the whole way and

we made our share of mistakes,

but we still played well enough

to win.”

Fenwick team captains

Connor Cunningham and Tony

Novack both had big days on

the course, with Cunningham

taking home 33 points and

Novack earning 31.

“It’s always good when you

get your top two guys really performing

well,” said McHugh.

“It took a lot of pressure off of

our younger guys.”

Senior Aidan Emmerich

was the leading player for the

Spartans, shooting even-par and

finishing with 36 points. Fellow

senior and Lynnfield native

Sean Mathers added 20 points

in the loss.

“Overall it was a nice day

to be out there, but most of

our lineup didn’t perform the

way we needed it to,” said St.

Mary’s coach Jay Fiste. “It was

great to have such a close match

so some of our younger guys

could get their feet wet, and this

showed them that they really

need to be on point if they want

to beat good teams.”

St. Mary’s (0-1) has a quick

turnaround with a match on

the road at Arlington Catholic

Wednesday (3) at Winchester

Country Club.

“This match was a good

learning experience for our

young team, and we’re hoping

that the guys saw what they

needed to do out there,” said

Fiste. “We’re off to a tough

course against a team that is always

good and plays us tough,

so we’ll need to be better if we

want to get a win.”

Fenwick (1-1) travels

to Archbishop Williams

Wednesday (3) for a match at

Granite Links Golf Club.

“We still have a fairly young

team, so getting a win like

this will hopefully give us

some good momentum,” said

McHugh. “We’re still not putting

great, and we have some

areas we need to improve in,

but we’ve got plenty of time to

keep working.”


SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 11

Lynnfield football opens season with a victory

PHOTOS | Spenser Hasak

The Lynnfield football team explodes through its banner before the Pioneers’ season-opening game against Saugus Friday night at Lynnfield Stadium.

Lynnfield’s Joey Cucciniello gets tackled by Saugus’ Max Anajjar.

Spencer Riley takes the ball up the middle during Friday’s

game.

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Nick Marcinowski, left, and James Sharkey celebrate a touchdown.


SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

have his twin daughters admitted

to Harvard and Stanford

universities.

Michael Kendall, attorney for

Wilson, claimed Monday that

Wilson believed the payments

were legitimate donations

to Singer’s foundation, Key

Worldwide Foundation, and

that he had been “bamboozled”

by Singer. Because Wilson did

not know the money was being

used for bribes, Kendall said, he

was innocent of the conspiracy

charges he is being tried for.

“Mr. Singer never said the

donation was a bribe. He said

exactly the opposite. It was an

accepted fundraising program,”

Kendall said.

Assistant U.S. Attorney

Leslie Wright said in her

opening statement that Wilson

paid Singer to create a false

profile for his son, John Wilson

Jr., embellishing his accomplishments

as a member of his

high-school water polo team in

order to gain admission to USC.

Singer called this approach

the “side door” to admissions.

Wright also alleged that Wilson

later agreed to pay Singer to

go through the process again,

having his twin daughters admitted

as athletes in sports they

did not play.

“You will hear Singer tell

Wilson that he could not get

both of his daughters into

Stanford because the sailing

coach, he had to recruit some

real sailors … so that Stanford

would not catch on,” Wright

told the jury. “You will hear

defendant John Wilson actually

laugh in response to that.”

Kendall disputed this, saying

that while Singer did send the

falsified profile to Wilson by

email, there was no evidence

that Wilson ever even opened

the email attachment or knew

that the profile was inaccurate.

Wilson’s son did join the

water polo team at USC as a

“red shirt,” or a player who

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

Varsity Blues trial begins for local father

VARSITY BLUES

From page 1

attended practices but did not

play, one of 13 such players

in that year’s freshman class.

He left the team after his first

season because of a concussion.

Wright did acknowledge that

Singer was not always forthcoming

with the parents involved

in the scheme, noting

that he did not tell the parents

that he kept a large chunk of

their money for himself, or

told them that the money was

going to the schools’ athletics

programs when it was actually

going directly to his contacts.

However, she said, Singer was

clear with the parents that their

money was directly going to

securing a spot at their targeted

school, and provided money-back

guarantees if the admission

was rescinded.

“Whichever way the money

flowed, Singer made clear to

the parents that, in exchange for

their payments, the coach or athletic

department insider would

secure an athletic recruitment

slot for their children, which

Lynnfield firefighters join Ida

recovery assistance teams in Louisiana

BY ANNE MARIE TOBIN

The Lynnfield Fire Department

has joined two other

Massachusetts communities in

assisting the Hurricane Ida relief

efforts in Louisiana.

Capt. Kevin Muti, Firefighter/

Paramedic Jeffrey Fiorentino

and Firefighter/EMT Andrew

Nardone and eight members of

the Dalton and Carlisle fire departments

arrived in Baton Rouge

late Wednesday. The group met

up Tuesday in Lee at 5 a.m. to

make the 23-hour trek south.

Fire Chief Glenn Davis said

the group reported they encountered

countless numbers

of washed-out roads, sinkholes

and downed power lines as the

caravan inched close to its destination,

making traveling extremely

challenging.

“The area is still very much

hard hit even now,” Davis said.

“It’s clear that traveling is still a

challenge and many people are

still without power, so this is very

much still a serious problem for

many of the folks who live there.”

The assistance comes on

the heels of a request from

the Emergency Management

Assistance Compact (EMAC), the

national emergency-management

mutual aid system that facilitates

state-to-state disaster assistance.

“EMAC reached out to the fire

chiefs looking for assistance from

firefighters who have their own

suppression gear, which includes

their SCUBA breathing apparatus,”

Davis said. “The response from our

department was very strong with

several people volunteering to go,

but we could only take three.”

Davis said the group, which

will be deployed in Louisiana

for a total of 14 days, checked

in with FEMA authorities upon

arrival in Baton Rouge over the

weekend. They were then deployed

to Thibodaux, a city in

and the parish seat of, Lafourche

Parish, about an hour away.

Davis said the group may be deployed

in other locations as well.

The group’s next stop is scheduled

to be at local fire stations to

assist with repairs and staffing

needs, handling incoming calls

for service that may include anything

from medical aid to structure

fire suppression.

“It’s one of the most damaged

areas and some of these

departments have been working

24/7,” said Davis. “Many of

these people have damaged and

lost homes, so this will allow

them to tend to those needs.”

“This crew will be able to

provide services in support of

those local first responders, so

they can get some rest,” says

Louisiana State Fire Marshal

H. “Butch” Browning.

Gov. Charlie Baker said the

volunteer effort is vital in providing

essential services which

were severely compromised as

a result of the storm.

“On behalf of the residents

of the commonwealth, I commend

these firefighters, their

families, and their departments

for answering the call to help

the people of Louisiana recover

from the impacts of Hurricane

Ida,” said Baker. “These firefighters

will use their training

and expertise to deliver essential

support to Louisianians rebuilding

their communities.”

“Massachusetts firefighters

know the value of mutual aid,

whether it comes across municipal

borders or state lines,”

said State Fire Marshal Peter J.

Ostroskey. “When people need

help, the fire service always

takes the call. Our counterparts

in Louisiana are confronting

high temperatures, power and

resource shortages, the fire and

health risks associated with increased

generator usage, and

concerns about their own families.

Firefighting is a physically

and mentally demanding job

even under the best conditions,

so we know the challenges

they’re facing right now.”

Massachusetts is one of 21

states sending aid to Louisiana

under EMAC, which functions

as the nation’s all-hazards mutual

aid system to coordinate

the provision of certain emergency

management assets.

would effectively guarantee

their admission,” Wright said.

Attorneys for Abdelaziz, a

Las Vegas casino executive,

made separate opening arguments

from Wilson’s attorneys,

but similarly denied that he was

aware that his payments were

being used as bribes. Abdelaziz

is accused of allegedly paying

Singer to have his daughter,

Sabrina, admitted to USC as a

basketball player, despite the

fact that she stopped playing the

sport during high school.

Prosecutors also began direct

examination Monday of witness

Bruce Isackson. Isackson

pleaded guilty in 2019 for his

involvement in the scheme,

in which he and his wife,

Davina, paid $600,000 to have

their daughters admitted to

University of California - Los

Angeles and USC, both by submitting

false athletic profiles

and having his youngest daughter’s

ACT score changed.

Isackson told the court that he

knew that the money he gave to

Singer’s foundation was in exchange

for getting his children

falsely admitted to the schools,

and that without those payments,

he did not believe they

would have been admitted.

Examination of Isackson will

resume Tuesday. The trial is expected

to last a few weeks.

Singer pleaded guilty but has

not yet been sentenced. He cooperated

with the FBI and IRS

investigation, agreeing to record

phone calls and conversations

with many of the parents

involved. Singer will not testify

in the trial.

More than 40 people have

been charged in the case, including

parents and coaches.

In May, Wilson filed a lawsuit

in Essex Superior Court against

Netflix and the producers of

the documentary “Operation

Varsity Blues: The College

Admissions Scandal” over his

family’s portrayal in the film.

Lynnfield Art Guild

hopes to hit all-time

record membership

BY KATELYN SAHAGIAN

The Lynnfield Art Guild

(LAG) is calling all amateur

artists excited to learn new techniques,

show off their work, and

join a community of creators.

“COVID-19 has disrupted

a lot of our plans, but we are

excited to be back,” said Beth

Aaronson, LAG’s public-relations

coordinator.

The guild is currently

pushing for more members; in

June, LAG hosted two concerts

aimed at increasing membership.

Aaronson, who is also on

the membership team, said that

the guild’s goal for this year is

to increase by 25 more members.

Membership renews in

September and new member

sign-up begins in June.

“We feel we’ve been a successful

organization now for 64

years,” Aaronson said.

The Lynnfield Art Guild was

first started in 1984 by 10 amateur

artists. Within their first

year, the guild had grown to 100

people. Now, the guild has 110

members, some of which are individual

artist memberships or

family memberships.

Aaronson said that increasing

membership of the guild to 135

will be the highest they’ve ever

had as an entity.

The LAG also holds two

judged shows each year ― one

in November and one in May

― and both are free and open to

the public. Only guild members

can display their artwork at the

shows.

Joining the guild gives artists

the chance to show their work

not only at the judged shows,

but also at the Lynnfield Library

and some of the banks in town.

The first demonstration of the

year by the Lynnfield Art Guild

will be on September 16. The

demonstration will be by Janet

Schwartz on her pastel technique.

The event starts at 6:30

and will be held over Zoom.

“It’s delightful to still be successful

and serve the Lynnfield

community,” Anderson said.


SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 13

Cornhole tournament is Oct. 1

The Friends of Lynnfield

Recreation will be hosting its 3rd

Annual Cornhole Tournament

Friday, October 1 from 6-11 p.m.

at MarketStreet Lynnfield’s On

the Green. The event promises

to be a fun-filled adult night out

while helping support Lynnfield

Recreation’s mission of enriching the

lives of Lynnfield residents through

abundant quality programs, events,

fields, and facilities.

The field is limited to 64 teams

of two at a cost of $100 per team.

Spectators are welcome at a cost of

$25 per person. There will be a beer

garden and DJ. The event is limited

to adults ages 21 & over.

Participants are encouraged

to dress in their “Hoedown

Throwdown” gear and be prepared

to take on last year’s champion team,

OFF THE COB (Steve George and

Bob Mandile).

Sponsorship opportunities are still

available. Donations are welcome,

just click the donation button on

the ticket page to donate. For more

information, or to purchase tickets,

become a sponsor, or make a donation,

search “3rd Annual Friends

of Lynnfield Recreation Cornhole

Tournament” on Eventbrite.

In partnership with Townscape,

The Friends of Lynnfield Recreation

was established to raise funds to help

support and defray the expenses

of the recreational activities and

events sponsored by the Lynnfield

Recreation Commission.

Have a story? We Let love us to know! hear from Contact you. the Editor,

Write to the Editor,

tjourgensen@essexmediagroup.com

tgrillo@essexmediagroup.com

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WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

A walk through Partridge Island

In conjunction with the

Tree Committee’s “Lynnfield

through the Lens”

photo-submission contest,

the Committee organized

a walk to Partridge

Island with local photographer

Greg Pronevitz.

Pronevitz instructed the

participant-photographers

on how to best

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The Partridge Island trail

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 15

Lynnfield girls soccer team

cleans up in fundraiser

PHOTOS | JAKOB MENENDEZ

Michael Bunar, the dad of girls soccer captain Samantha Bunar, stands on the side of the road in

Lynnfield holding a sign promoting the girls’ soccer carwash fundraiser.

Ava Gamache, a player for the Lynnfield Girls Soccer team

dresses in a unicorn head and tutu while washing cars for the

team’s fundraiser.

Ava Gamache, right, smacks together two soapy sponges, splashing her two teammates with

foam during the Lynnfield Girls Soccer carwash fundraiser.

Members of the Lynnfield Girls Soccer team dry off a car during their car washing fundraiser,

which raised over $2,000 for the team.

Jeff Veglia and his daughter Lexi, one of the captains of the

Lynnfield Girls Soccer team, stand on the side of the road

prompting cars to get a car wash during their fundraiser.


16

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

LAG artists on display

The Lynnfield Art Guild, founded in 1984 by 10 local artists, has since blossomed into a

110-member strong organization — and counting. For their yearly membership drive, LAG

member Beth Aaronson says their goal is 135 members, the most in guild history. LAG will

also be hosting a live demonstration of pastels by member Janet Schwartz at 6:30pm on

9/16. The event is free to attend, open to the public, and will be held via Zoom.

Peter Cain. “Barn At Dusk.” Pastel.

Patricia O’Connor. “Monet’s Garden.” Watercolor.

Mary Connor. “Tea Time.” Pastel.

Anne Mullen. “Mellow Yellow.” Watercolor.

Home of the Week

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meticulously appointed living spaces complete with a

grand double foyer, an elegant fireplace, a large dining

room fit for entertaining, and a library.

You’ll be blown away by the gourmet chef’s kitchen with

large butlers pantry and a breakfast area overlooking the

grand backyard and deck. On the upper level, you’ll be

delighted by a grand primary suite, four generous ensuite

bedrooms, laundry room, a breakfast stairway and a third

level game room.

The lower level walk-out basement is fully loaded with an

exercise room, sound proof movie theatre room, access to

the heated seven car garage,

and much more.

Call Nikki for a free market

analysis of your home today.

Nikki Martin

781.710.1440

nikki.martin@compass.com

nikkimartinsells.com

The Nikki Martin Team is a team of real estate agents affiliated with Compass,

a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws.

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