DesignNJ_OctNov2021_DigitalIssue

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Our October/November issue featuring home offices and a range of other beautiful projects is arriving in mailboxes this week. We are making this complete issue available in digital format to inspire and inform homeowners across the state. If you are interested in subscribing to the print edition, visit www.designnewjersey.com/subscribe.

NEW JERSEY’S HOME & DESIGN MAGAZINE October/November 2021

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Contents

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2021

PHOTO BY MARCO RICCA

PHOTO BY TOM GRIMES

38

PHOTO BY CARA FITZPATRICK POLIZZI

30

42

features

style new jersey

30

ARCHITECTURE/BUILD

Michael Scro, Mary FitzPatrick

Scro and Ioana Curovic of

Z+ Architects take on the

challenges of a slimmerthan-standard

lot with

flooding issues to design a

Modern Farmhouse-style

home that’s family friendly

and barrier free.

38

WORK FLOW

Designers Yelena Gerts, Lori

Levin and Alma Russo each

create an above-and-beyond

home office that combines

beauty, comfort and function

while also complementing

the design aesthetic of the

rest of the home. Work never

looked so good.

42

PAST FORWARD

The historic Davis House in

Lawrenceville, formerly a

student boarding house and

residence of Pulitzer Prizewinning

author Thornton

Wilder, gets an update that’s

sensitive to its pedigree in

the capable hands of

designer Deborah Leamann.

52

HIGHLIGHTING HISTORY

Daria Boutle of Verona-based

Daria B Designs reinvigorates

a stately 1929 Tudor-style

home in Essex County to

accommodate modern

sensibilities while honoring

its historical charm. The goal:

make the home feel airy,

warm, bright and inviting.

19 SHOP

| Home Office Innovations.

22 CONVERSATIONS WITH KATE

| Staircases: Step by Step

24 GOOD READS

| The Iconic American House

also in this issue

14 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LETTER

64 DESIGN RESOURCES

on the cover

Clean-lined furniture and a dramatically dark palette keep the focus on the original leaded-glass windows in the living room of this

Tudor-style home. Design, Daria Boutle; design/build, Lyons McConnell; photo, Julie Blackstock. See “Highlighting History,” page 52.

designnewjersey.com 13


editorinchief | LETTER

Many of us were thrown into

work-from-home mode last year

regardless of whether we were prepared.

Those with dedicated home offices had the advantage, of course, but everyone else

quickly caught up by unearthing that unused desk in the basement, staking claim

to a crafting table or simply spreading out computer equipment and paper files in

the dining room. By the end of last year, 78 percent of us felt we had “adequate”

space for working from home, according to the Pew Research Center.

As the requirement or option to work from home continues, however, some of

us are realizing that adequate is not the same as optimal. Like me, you’ve probably

had to answer some questions. Do you prefer to work while sitting or standing at

a desk? Is your chair ergonomically sound, providing support as well as comfort?

Does the room have general and task lighting to supplement daylight on cloudy

days or when you’re still working at sunset? Can you close the door for privacy?

Do you have enough storage for your files and supplies and enough workspace so

you don’t feel squeezed?

In this issue, we visit three home offices that take all of these factors into consideration—and

add megawatt style as well. Associate Editor Meg Fox spoke with

the designers of all three offices to gather details for “Work Flow,” beginning on page 38. Meg also curated a selection of

appropriate furnishings (“Home Office Innovations,” 19).

Also in this issue, you’ll find the stories of a Modern Farmhouse in Bergen County that Z+ Architects designed to be

family friendly and barrier free (“User-Friendly,” 30); a former residence of author Thornton Wilder in Lawrenceville

that designer Deborah Leamann updated with sensitivity to its history (“Past Forward,” 42); and our cover story featuring

an Essex County Tudor-style home that designer Daria Boutle brought into the 21st century while maintaining its

striking period details (“Highlighting History,” 52).

Our series on social media expert Kate Rumson’s construction project in central New Jersey takes a look at staircases

(“Step by Step,” 22), while the Good Reads department reviews a new book featuring 50 of the most recognizable homes

designed in the United States since the beginning of the 20th century (“The Iconic American House,” 24).

After a busy day in the office—whether it’s at home or at your workplace—we hope you will relax and enjoy the

stories of how each of these homeowners fashioned a more comfortable, functional and stylish place to work and live.

REN MILLER, EDITOR IN CHIEF

rmiller@designnewjersey.com

14 October/November 2021


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follownewjersey | ONLINE

Beyond Print

PHOTO BY RYAN BROWN

PHOTO BY STUDIO A IMAGES

Newlyweds James Dever and Emily Haas

(inset) favor a cozy, Scandinavian Modern

aesthetic for their Hoboken condo.

The soaring 15-foot glass-enclosed entrance to the Javits Center

captured the energy and excitement of the in-person NY NOW show.

WEB EXCLUSIVE

DESIGNNEWJERSEY.COM

What inspires the interior design of your home?

For Emily Haas and James Dever and their

designer, Antoinette Allande Anderson, it was music. Specifically,

the couple’s wedding song, “This Must Be the Place.” The lyrics

— along with other activities on their wedding day—helped

Allande to understand her clients’ personalities and lifestyle. Scan

the QR code to read this web exclusive: “Music Is the Muse.”

RESOURCE DIRECTORY

DESIGNNEWJERSEY.COM/RD

New Jersey consumers turn to the Design NJ Resource Directory

for all their home decorating and remodeling needs. This trusted

comprehensive database includes hundreds of

local suppliers, designers, architects, builders and

design professionals. To be included in our 2022

Directory, scan the QR code to go directly to the

listing form.

AROUND TOWN

NY NOW

Associate Editor Meg Fox was excited to be out and about scouting

new products for our annual Holiday Gift Guide at NY NOW, a

biannual trade show featuring home accents. It was the first inperson

event to be hosted at the newly expanded Jacob K. Javits

Center since its reopening. Design NJ will highlight our favorite

finds in our upcoming December 2020/January 2021 issue.

NOT A SUBSCRIBER?

DESIGNNEWJERSEY.COM/SUBSCRIBE

In a study (by Schumacher and Statista), interior design magazines

were cited as the biggest source of design inspiration. Visit our

subscription page to subscribe or give the gift of design ideas.

follow us

designnewjersey.com 17


stylenewjersey

CURATED FOR THE GARDEN STATE HOME

Home Office Innovations

New introductions from High Point Market respond to the evolving needs

of the home office. Whether you have a dedicated space or one that multifunctions,

consider these stylish solutions that put the fun in functional

BY MEG FOX

1

designnewjersey.com 19


stylenewjersey | SHOP

2

3

6

5

4

7

1 | With clean lines and a striking mix of materials and

finishes, the Julian Collection from Mitchell Gold +

Bob Williams adds one-of-a-kind character to a

workspace. Beautifully figured veneer features a rich

seared-oak finish, black metal frame and light satin

brass accents for a look that is both organic and

modern. Desk, $2,527; bookcase, $2,127; Ada Arm

Dining Chair, $1,287. Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams in

Paramus or MGBWHome.com.

2 | Gabby’s large Jasper desk was crafted for ultimate

function while keeping a keen focus on design. With

abundant storage options in the form of shelves and

drawers, the desk is suitable for floating in a room.

For pricing and a dealer locator, GabbyHome.com.

3 | The distinctive Honnold Writing Desk from Hickory

Chair’s Pearson Collection was inspired by the late

architect Douglas Honnold, who was considered a

master of Hollywood Moderne. The lines of this

walnut desk reflect his signature design elements,

including thin bar-style golden brass pulls, mitered

corners and continuous horizontal fluting that wraps

the exterior. Other features consist of a pop-up

power station with two USB ports and two AC ports.

$7,485. HickoryChair.com.

4 | Transitional in styling, the Arya Swivel Tilt Chair

from Hancock & Moore features a split seam in back

with added lumbar support. Shown with a polished

aluminum base featuring a pneumatic lift. $3,855.

Stickley Furniture|Mattress in East Hanover, White

House Luxe in Fairfield or HancockAndMoore.com.

5 | Hekman’s Custom Lift Desk (#28480) is both stylish

and ergonomic with four programmable height

settings. The desktop and drawers are offered in a

choice of wood finishes, and the overall variable

height is 28 to 54 inches. For pricing and a dealer

locator, Hekman.com.

6 | The Touhy office chair—part of Bernhardt’s

Workspace Collection—has an upholstered seat and

back with antiqued nickel nail-head trim around the

seat. The exposed wood is white oak in a pewter

finish. The chair has a five-prong swivel metal base

with tilt and height adjustment. Shown in a gray vinyl

fabric. $970. Brielle Furniture Interiors in Sea Girt;

Design Hub Home in Millburn and Westfield; select

Raymour & Flanigan locations; or Bernhardt.com.

7 | Universal Furniture adds custom-upholstered

chairs to its “Work From Home” program. Haven is a

short, barrel-back, full-swivel chair that’s available

20 October/November 2021


9

8

11

10

with a channel-tufted or tight back. The chair, which

has a 5-foot base on casters and pneumatic height

adjustment, can be special ordered in any of 400+

fabrics and 50 leathers. Starts at $1,510; shown in a

Tier 9 fabric at $2,000. UniversalFurniture.com.

8 | Sligh’s Cranbrook Writing Desk takes inspiration

from a midcentury design with canted legs and a

case structure suspended below the writing surface

by metal posts in a champagne finish. The desk

features cathedral walnut on the privacy panel in the

front and on the drawers in the back. A lift lid on the

flat-cut walnut top reveals two USB ports. $3,149.

Lexington.com.

9 | Hooker Furniture’s Melange Zola Writing Desk

features a geometric pattern of elm, maple and black

walnut veneers in gray-toned finishes. It sits atop

metal legs and has contemporary acrylic hardware.

Starts at $1,199. HookerFurniture.com.

10 | Providing maximum storage for all your work

needs, the elegant Cosby desk from Worlds Away

marries style and functionality. The fresh matte white

lacquer case floats atop four polished brass legs.

Accented with brass and acrylic pendant hardware.

$2,939. Complete Interiors in Avalon, Schwartz

Design Showroom in Metuchen (to the trade),

Whimsicality in Spring Lake or Worlds-Away.com.

11 | This clever sit-or-stand desk from Riverside’s

Perspectives Collection has two work surfaces, one

30 inches high and one 38 inches high. The top

surface swivels out to make a taller surface, allowing

you to stand and work, while the lower surface is

conducive to sitting. The swivel is 360 degrees so it

can be used left or right, and the drawers are passthrough.

When not in use, the desk surfaces can be

closed so they are on top of each other for compact

storage. Available in Umber or Casual Taupe. For

pricing and dealer locator, Riverside-Furniture.com.

12 | Bradington-Young’s Elanora chair—from the

company’s “Home Office By Design” line —offers

the ability to customize the design in more than

400 options of fabric, leather and base color

combinations. Starting fabric, $1,100. Starting

leather, $1,499. Bradington-Young.com.

12

designnewjersey.com 21


stylenewjersey | CONVERSATIONS WITH KATE

TRADITION WITH A TWIST | Kate Rumson stands beside

the staircase being installed in her new home. She will

pair a classic wood handrail with edgier metal balusters.

A DESIGN STATEMENT | The rendering at far right shows

how the staircase will look when completed, making an

elegant, welcoming statement in the foyer.

Step by Step

MAKE YOUR STAIRCASE

MORE THAN UTILITARIAN

INTERVIEW BY REN MILLER

The staircase gets little thought in many homes, but it’s too big

and offers too many options to make a design statement to be

ignored. For some guidance, we checked in with Kate Rumson,

the founder and creative director of The Real Houses of Instagram

(@the_real@houses_of_ig). Kate is building a home in central New

Jersey, a project that Design NJ has been following in this column.

Below are her thoughts on staircases.

REN: A staircase is one of the most prominent architectural features and should

make a statement about the style of a home. What statement will yours make?

KATE: That is very true! Today the possibilities to create a staircase that

reflects our individual style are endless. My staircase will have a timeless but

current feel. The overall design will suggest that, although I certainly draw

inspiration from current trends and influences, my overall aesthetic is

rooted in traditional design principles.

REN: You will have one staircase between the main and upper levels, even

though many homes the size of yours (4,400 square feet) have two. How did

you arrive at that decision?

KATE: To me, having two staircases felt excessive and unnecessary. I

wanted my home to be designed in a way that would not require a

second staircase for convenience, even with 4,400 square feet of living

space. My architect and I designed the floor plan around one staircase

right in the middle of the house so it’s easily accessible from every room.

REN: Where to start when thinking of renovating or building a new staircase?

KATE: Staircases are complicated. Materials, parts and building-code requirements

all need to be discussed, understood and taken into consideration

before starting the process. I recommend scheduling an in-home consultation

with a company that specializes in staircases so they can point out options and

nuances that would be important to consider in your specific situation.

22 October/November 2021


REN: Did you choose metal or wood balusters and handrails?

KATE: I knew I wanted the staircase to have a traditional wooden

handrail—I love the look and how it feels to the touch, but deciding on

the material and shape of the balusters wasn’t as easy. I’m a fan of both—

wood and metal balusters—and after thinking about it for a few months,

I ended up choosing metal for an edgier look.

REN: What style of newel posts did you choose, and how does that decision

play into the design of your home as a whole?

KATE: I love staircases with soft curves so I never adapted to the new

trend of box newel posts and square-edge treads that are very common

now in newly constructed homes. It seems like many interior designers,

architects and builders now consider square newel posts to be more

current in styling, but I find turned newels and volutes timeless and

much more elegant.

REN: Where is a good place to shop for staircase parts?

KATE: All of my staircase parts are from L.J. Smith (ljsmith.com)—they

specialize in staircases and make everything from stair treads and risers to

balusters and handrails. Their website is a great resource to see all the possibilities

with different wood species, shapes, materials and sizes.

REN: Will you leave the staircase bare or install a runner?

KATE: I definitely plan to install a runner. I have cats now and know

how much they would enjoy having a textured rug under their paws

when running up and down the staircase. I’ve never had stair runners

before, but having pets changes how we approach the design of our

homes. Now my Sophie and Luna are top of mind with every house

design decision. DNJ

For contact information, page 64

designnewjersey.com 23


stylenewjersey | GOOD READS

COURTESY OF THAMES & HUDSON

The Iconic

American House

Learn the stories behind 50 of the most important,

timeless and recognizable homes designed in the

United States since the beginning of the 20 th century

REVIEW BY REN MILLER | BOOK BY DOMINIC BRADBURY | PHOTOS BY RICHARD POWERS

Drive through most neighborhoods and you will see houses that

are mostly boxes, some pretty and others not so much, some

with simple lines and others with nooks, crannies and appendages. Many

are representative of different historical periods; others defy categorization.

This latter category includes architectural masterpieces that are celebrated

for their innovation and influence on the field of residential

design. Fifty prime examples are featured in The Iconic American House:

Architectural Masterworks Since 1900, written by Dominic Bradbury,

photographed by Richard Powers, published by Thames & Hudson and

available in the United States through W.W. Norton & Co.

“The houses in this book chart a journey across America and across

time, embracing many different aesthetics and expressions of form,”

Bradbury writes in his introduction. “Yet they are all iconic houses,

meaning that they have an influence and resonance that goes well

beyond the original brief and artistic conception. They are shining landmarks

within an American architectural dreamland—one that is full

of life, drama and invention.”

The author credits the country’s founding pioneering spirit and an

openness to newcomers and their ideas for the creation of some of the

most important and influential houses in the world: “There was a

constant willingness to experiment and innovate, which helped to

secure America’s prominent position on the architectural map and send

its fresh ideas back into the wider world.”

The 320-page book has no homes in New Jersey, however, six are in

New York and five are in Pennsylvania, many of those within a day’s

drive of the Garden State. Readers will find works by famed architects

such as Philip Johnson, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, George Nakashima,

Richard Neutra and Frank Lloyd Wright. Here’s a sampling.

24 October/November 2021


In the living area, boulders push upward through the flagstones next to the fireplace; fitted sofas reduce the amount of free-floating furniture.

FALLINGWATER

Mill Run, Pennsylvania

Frank Lloyd Wright 1939

Fallingwater is perhaps one of the most photographed 20 th century

homes. Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) designed Fallingwater in 1939

to cantilever over a stream in rural Mill Run, Pennsylvania. His client was

Edgar Kaufmann, a wealthy Pittsburgh department-store owner and

patron of the arts. Then in his 60s, Wright was busy with commissions,

and Kaufmann grew impatient waiting to see designs for the house.

“Wright told his client that they were done and ready to be viewed, even

though he had yet to put pen to paper,” Bradbury writes. “In just two

hours, he famously sketched out what was already in his mind and

presented the drawings to Kaufmann, who was delighted.”

The house was built using reinforced concrete slabs to cantilever

sections over the stream, and that allowed Wright to create horizontal

bands of glass that connect the house to the surrounding woodlands.

Concerns about building with reinforced concrete, a practice then in its

infancy, led to some tension between Kaufmann and Wright. Kaufmann

also requested additional features, including a pool. “The addition of extra

steelwork also compromised the structure, leading to problems that eventually

required considerable repair works by the Western Pennsylvania

Conservancy in 2002.”

Now fully restored and open for tours, Fallingwater is the “fullest expression

of Wright’s version of contextual, organic architecture, developed in

response to the particular qualities and conditions of the site, setting and

surroundings,” Bradbury writes. Most people know the home from photos

of the exterior, but Bradbury takes you inside for a sense of how the Kaufmann’s

lived in it.

designnewjersey.com 25


stylenewjersey | GOOD READS

The open and universal space within the house is divided into zones by the arrangement of the furniture, including designs by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

GLASS HOUSE

New Canaan, Connecticut

Philip Johnson, 1949

Open-concept living and large windows—so popular in recent years —

are not new, as evidenced by the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut.

Architect Philip Johnson (1906-2005) designed the steel-framed

house with a flat roof and glass walls in 1949 as part of a compound of

buildings that he cheekily called a “diary of an eccentric architect.” The

Glass House is “a modernist belvedere for appreciating the natural world

and the changing seasons,” Bradbury writes.

The house is one large room except for a circular brick drum that floats

within the steel and glass rectangle and holds a small bathroom and a fireplace

facing the main seating area. The “rooms” are defined by Johnson’s

careful placement of furniture: a seating area in the center facing an open

vista flanked by a dining area and bar/kitchenette on one side and a

bedroom-study on the other. The circular drum and a half-height

wardrobe provide a degree of privacy for the bedroom. “Each element in

the space is curated and controlled, including a painting on an easel by

Nicolas Poussin and a sculpture by Elie Nadelman,” Bradbury writes.

The author notes the design owes much to the work of Bauhaus master

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), whose Farnsworth House also

appears in the book. Mies also designed much of the furniture that Johnson

used in the Glass House. Johnson left the house to the National Trust

for Historic Preservation, which offers tours.

26 October/November 2021


The curving roof line creates a double-height space to the front, with framed views across the treetops; this part of the studio serves as a gallery.

NAKASHIMA FARMSTEAD

& CONOID STUDIO

New Hope, Pennsylvania

George Nakashima, 1959

Known more for his handmade wood furniture, George Nakashima

(1905-1990) began his career as an architect. He was born in Washington

and earned degrees in architecture from the University of Washington

and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before eventually

moving to Japan and working with Antonin Raymond, an Americanborn

architect. Both men later returned to the United States. In 1943,

Raymond sponsored the release of Nakashima and his family from an

internment camp during World War II and brought him to a farm in

New Hope, Pennsylvania, where he worked as a farmhand and also had

time to design and make furniture.

After the war, Nakashima continued to make furniture, including a

collection for Hans Knoll. He purchased land nearby and, from 1947 to

1975, developed a series of innovative buildings with Japanese and American

influences. “In 1959, he designed the Conoid Studio, one of the most

adventurous buildings…[It] was an opportunity for Nakashima to

explore his love of shell structures. The timber floors, paper window

screens and Noguchi lanterns give the space a highly organic feel and act

as a foil to the concrete roof,” Bradbury writes.

Nakashima’s daughter Mira, an architect and designer herself, continues to

operate the company her father started, Nakashima Woodworkers. “I love the

Conoid Studio especially,” she told Bradbury. “You get a real sense of what’s

going on outside, which is what traditional Japanese architecture is all about.

You keep hold of the outside as part of your scenery when you are inside.”

designnewjersey.com 27


stylenewjersey | GOOD READS

The clamshell surface of the building was made with

poured concrete, which was then coated in a protective

layer of synthetic rubber.

SCULPTURED HOUSE

Golden, Colorado

Charles Deaton, 1965

When humans first orbited the earth in the early 1960s, a fascination

with space exploration and new ways of looking at old customs led to

forward-looking advancements in many areas, including architecture. The

Sculptured House in Golden, Colorado, is a prime symbol of a wave of

sinuous buildings that drew inspiration from nature. Designed by architect

Charles Deaton (1921-1996) and built between 1963 and 1965, the

Sculptured House “turned its back on the strict, linear modernity of the

International Style and embraced free-flowing curves

and fluid lines,” Bradbury writes. “‘People aren’t

square, so why should they live in squares?’ [Deaton]

wrote in Art in America magazine in the mid-1960s.”

The house, Deaton’s only residential design, takes

the form of a clamshell sitting on a plinth, with one

side cracked open to view the treetops from atop

Genesee Mountain. Steel supporting rods tie the

pediment to the bedrock. The pediment then

supports the clamshell structure, which is made of

steel mesh cage coated in concrete and finished with

synthetic rubber mixed with white pigment and

ground walnut shells. Construction was so expensive

that the interiors remained unfinished, and the

Denton family was never able to move in. His daughter,

Charlee, and her husband, Nick Antonopoulos,

also an architect, finished the house for a new owner.

“The crowning glory is an interconnected sequence

of living spaces that connect with both the open

views and an elevated terrace via a curving wall of

floor-to-ceiling glass,” Bradbury writes. The home, now on the U.S.

National Register of Historic Places, may look familiar. It was featured in

Woody Allen’s 1973 sci-fi comedy Sleeper, set 200 years into the future.

……

The Iconic American House also features many other homes built since

1900, each with its own pedigree, each with its own fascinating background.

The book includes brief biographies of the people who designed

the homes and a list of the 21 homes that are open for public tours.

Whether you are a design aficionado, industry professional or someone

who dreams of building a hard-to-categorize house of your own, this

book will provide hours of interesting reading—and dreaming. The

Iconic American House: Architectural Masterworks since 1900, $65,

wwnorton.com. DNJ

28 October/November 2021


It’s more than a house—it’s a community, a neighborhood, a place

to plant your roots. When you’re ready to settle down, but aren’t

willing to settle, put your trust in a New Jersey Realtor ® to guide

you home.

BUY A HOME. GAIN A COMMUNITY.

LEARN MORE AT


stylenewjersey | EXPERT ADVICE

ARCHITECTURE | BUILD

User-Friendly

A custom-built home in Bergen County

is big, bright and barrier-free

‘The

house needed to live large,” architect Michael Scro says of

this Bergen County home, “rising to the demands of a growing

family that hosts frequent gatherings while remaining cozy and

welcoming. Additionally, it had to incorporate universal design and

accommodate family members with mobility issues.”

Scro, LEED AP, a member of the American Institute of Architects and

a principal of Z+ Architects in Allendale, handled the architectural

design for the project. Mary FitzPatrick Scro, AIA, LEED AP, also a

principal and interior designer at Z + Interiors, and Ioana Curovic,

NCDIQ, collaborated on the interiors.

DESIGN NJ: What was the scope of the project?

MICHAEL SCRO: The original ranch-style residence was dilapidated.

Because of the steep slope on the property, the home had suffered chronic

water damage; the structure needed to be demolished. To resolve the

water-penetration issues, we used various water-control techniques —

30 October/November 2021


INTERVIEW BY MARIROSE KRALL | PHOTOS BY CARA FITZPATRICK POLIZZI

ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN BY Z+ ARCHITECTS | CONSTRUCTION BY MESSINEO BUILDERS

MICHAEL SCRO

AIA, LEED AP

Z+ Architects

Allendale

201-785-8855

ZPlusArchitects.com

MARY FITZPATRICK-SCRO

AIA, LEED AP

Z+ Architects, Z+ Interiors

Allendale

201-785-8855

ZPlusArchitects.com

IOANA CUROVIC

NCDIQ

Z+ Interiors

Allendale

201-785-8855

ZPlusArchitects.com

including seepage pits and perimeter drainage systems—to control

runoff. We also incorporated low retaining walls and groundcover plantings

to direct and absorb rainfall.

As far as the residence itself, the new home needed to house the

clients’ immediate family and accommodate longer-term stays by

parents and guests while meeting the needs of an extended-family

member who requires barrier-free access to a private suite and all of the

living spaces.

The exterior of the home features farmhouse-style hallmarks, such as steeply pitched

gable rooflines and white clapboard siding, along with more modern elements, such

as shed dormers and abundant windows.

“The client specifically wanted to avoid large expanses of masonry in the form of

brick or stone,” architect Michael Scro says, “so accents were used in a limited fashion,

largely to add practicality, durability and lower maintenance where the house meets

the ground plane.”

designnewjersey.com 31


stylenewjersey | EXPERT ADVICE

Gables at varying heights and black-trimmed windows contribute to the

striking look of the rear façade.

Portions of the exterior are clad in white wainscot panels to complement

and add interest to the home’s traditional clapboard siding.

DNJ: You call this style Modern Farmhouse. What do you consider the modern

architectural elements used here and what are the farmhouse elements?

M. SCRO: The modern architectural elements include shed dormers, the

configuration and arrangement of windows, an expansive use of glass (at

times without mullions) in larger quantities and concentration than is typical

on a classic farmhouse, and refined, clean panels of wainscot exterior

trim. The classic farmhouse elements are the steeply pitched gable rooflines,

the white clapboard siding, the stone accents, and two-over-two grille

patterns, both in the square and the tall/thin windows. Timeless features,

32 October/November 2021


such as a front porch with a standing-seam metal roof and refined, square

columns, play off more modern details at the rear covered entertaining area.

DNJ: What were some of the challenges of this project? How did you deal

with them?

M. SCRO: The lot is very deep but relatively narrow so the design challenge

was to fit the guest suite into the first-floor layout along with a kitchen,

dining room, great room, mudroom, private office and support spaces.

The deeper the house became to accommodate the desired spaces, the

A side façade features an array of windows bringing natural light

into the stairwell on sunny days and creating a dramatic effect in the

evenings when lit from within.

designnewjersey.com 33


stylenewjersey | EXPERT ADVICE

34 October/November 2021


The kitchen was configured with wide pathways

for barrier-free access. The black borders around

the windows repeat the aesthetic of the home’s

exterior. Additional black elements—including

the countertops and cabinet hardware —create

a striking contrast against the simplicity of the

white cabinets.

darker the center would be. This was the exact opposite of our clients’ goal,

which was to maximize glass and natural light in the living spaces.

To address this issue, we shifted the garage forward to allow for a

narrower house. Ample amounts of glass along with a generous ceiling

height also help to maximize the play of natural light inside. And by

shifting the main stair so it is adjacent to the foyer rather than within it,

we allowed for a better view and light penetration from the front to the

back of the house.

DNJ: What accessibility accommodations did you make?

M. SCRO: We have a great deal of experience integrating universal-design

concepts while steering clear of its often-institutional calling cards. We

eschewed an exterior ramp and railings in favor of a single step at the rear

entry off the kitchen that can be navigated, with assistance, by a specialneeds

individual. The preference was to avoid an elevator and locate the

guest suite on the main living level, further integrating special-needs

guests into a natural flow between their private spaces and the family’s

adjacent social areas.

MARY FITZPATRICK SCRO: Widened hallways, archways and doorways,

along with numerous pocket or barn doors, accommodate barrier-free

navigation. In the guest suite, a roll-in shower with a linear trench

drain—and without the traditional curb to step over—enhances the

ease of entering and using the shower. In addition, we protected hightraffic

areas and wall corners on the first floor with shiplap and other

durable, low-maintenance materials to avoid more institutional acrylic

drywall corner protection.

DNJ: What elements of the interior design reinforce the Modern Farmhouse

style of this home?

IOANA CUROVIC: Shiplap siding on the interior accent walls provides relief

from the general field of materials, much like the wainscot panels on the

designnewjersey.com 35


stylenewjersey | EXPERT ADVICE

36 October/November 2021


CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT | The high ceiling in the

great room adds to the spacious feel of the home.

Pocket doors, shown open and partially closed,

ensure accessibility.

The white and black palette in the accessible guest

bathroom mimics the colors on the home’s exterior.

The guest bathroom features a curbless shower with

a linear trench drain.

clapboard siding outside. In the bathrooms, the

clean, crisp white millwork and plumbing fixtures

with dark, punchy accents echo the white siding

with black windows on the exterior. White oak

floors soften the palette and reiterate the look of

the warm, lighter roofing shingles. These elements

allow the interior to both inspire, and react to,

the exterior of the home.

DNJ: How would you describe the overall project?

M. SCRO: The house represents a fresh take on a

transitional Farmhouse style, yet is immediately

recognizable and familiar in the residential lexicon.

It fits effortlessly into the neighborhood and

context, which was a goal of the young couple as

they envisioned a future home that would be a

welcomed neighbor to the established homes in

the area. DNJ

SOURCES Overall: architecture and interior design,

Z+ Architects in Allendale; builder, Messineo Builders

in Wyckoff. Exterior: HardiePlank ® and HardiePanel ®

siding, James Hardie Building Products; Timberline ®

roofing, GAF Materials Corp. in Parsippany; windows,

Andersen; fireplace doors, Acucraft. Kitchen: wall

color, “Baby’s Breath” by Benjamin Moore; window

trim color, “Black” by Benjamin Moore; flooring,

Mercier; cabinetry and range hood, Dutch Wood LLC;

cabinet hardware, Top Knobs in Branchburg; Cygnus

black granite countertops, Dente Trading Co. Inc. in

Cedar Grove, fabricated by Classic Marble & Tile in

Little Ferry; “20th C. Library Sconces” over windows,

RH; range, Viking Range Corp.; faucet, Brizo through

Hardware Designs in Fairfield. Hallway and Family

Room: wall color, “Super White” by Benjamin Moore;

custom pocket door, Messineo Builders Inc.; sofa,

Crate & Barrel; artwork over fireplace, Russ Rubin.

Accessible Bathroom: wall color, “Pelican Grey” by

Benjamin Moore; shiplap color, “Blackjack” by

Ben jamin Moore; “Dark Flow Waterfall” shower wall

tile, Lea Ceramiche through John P. Fischer Tiles Inc.

in Hawthorne; “Diesel” hard leather floor tile, Iris

Ceramica through John P. Fischer Tiles Inc.; sink and

shower faucets and showerhead, Hansgrohe USA

through Hardware Designs; “English Pub” light above

mirror, Lamps Plus.

For contact information, page 64

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designnewjersey.com 37


Work Flow

WRITTEN BY MEG FOX

With the surge in the number of people working remotely, the home office has never worked harder. These

highly coveted workspaces have also spurred a renewed emphasis on their design and how well they function,

motivate or inspire. We share three spaces that have earned their keep in unique, personal, high-style ways.

Dark and Handsome

PHOTOS BY MARCO RICCA

DESIGN COLLABORATION BY THE HOMEOWNER,

DESIGNER YELENA GERTS & CARPENTER GEORGE O’REILLY

Inspiration for the husband’s office started with the Colts Neck home’s original

architectural blueprint, which is framed and displayed in the center of custom

built-ins. “He wanted a very masculine and contemporary space,” interior

designer Yelena Gerts says. The designer consulted with the owners on the office and

other main living areas of the home (see “Everyday Elegance,” Design NJ, December

2019/January 2020, page 75). To offset the light and bright areas of the rest of the

home and give the office a modern gentleman’s vibe, the owners chose a saturated charcoal/blue-black

paint scheme, says Gerts, an allied member of the American Society of

Interior Designers and principal of House of Style & Design in Holmdel. The crisp

38 October/November 2021


“The office was a fun

project because it gave

me the opportunity to

incorporate a darker

color into the house,”

which is otherwise light

and bright, the wife says.

Built-ins house a

motorized television

that disappears when

not in use. Chevronpatterned

drapes add

a finishing touch to the

gentlemen’s club feel.

white geometric ceiling treatment—built by George O’Reilly of George

O’Reilly Carpentry in Jackson—also commands attention. “We didn’t

have a sketch for the ceiling,” the wife notes. “George would build small

examples for me and then we just came up with the design.”

Another of her favorite features is a motorized television lift that can be

raised and lowered in the cabinet without detracting from the overall design.

“I don’t like how TVs look on the wall,” and the lift mechanism “gave me

the wall space to display the architectural drawing of the house,” she says. A

printing company replicated the drawing on black paper with white ink—

a color combo that “fit so well” in the room, she says. Though the office was

designed with her husband in mind, “I’m finding myself working in there

more than he does,” the wife says. So do their children, who favor it as a

quiet study zone. “I’m so happy with how the room turned out.”

SOURCES interior design, collaboration by the homeowner, House of Style &

Design in Holmdel and George O’Reilly Carpentry in Jackson; all millwork, George

O’Reilly Carpentry; table and chairs, RH; chandelier, Williams-Sonoma Inc.;

chevron-patterned window treatment fabric, Brunschwig & Fils; paint, “Baby Seal

Black” by Benjamin Moore.

designnewjersey.com 39


“The white lacquered worktable was chosen to complement the color and

materials of the custom wall unit,” designer Lori Levine says.

It Takes Two

PHOTO BY JAY ROSENBLATT

INTERIOR DESIGN BY LORI LEVINE, ASSOCIATE ASID

This office resides in an elegant circa-1901 Victorian home in

Morris County. The space served as the formal living room

before the interior was reconfigured into an open floor plan

to accommodate today’s more contemporary lifestyle, says interior

designer Lori Levine, an associate member of the American Society of

Interior Designers and principal of Lori Levine Interiors in Basking

Ridge. Having worked on other areas of the home, Levine had a good

feel for her clients’ aesthetic. “One of the homeowners is in the tech

field, so I knew that clean and uncluttered would resonate with him,”

she says. In addition, “I like to mix old with new while still honoring

the history of the home.”

Before working from home was the norm, “my clients had jobs that

required both of them to have a home office,” Levine says. A doublesided,

non-traditional partners desk was created so they would have the

option to use either side separately or together. The desk lifts hydraulically

and can be programmed for individual height preferences. One side

has a treadmill for those long Zoom meetings; the other has a chair that

can be adjusted based on the height of the desk.

A custom wall unit allows for plenty of storage while the open center

showcases personal items. “The owners have an extensive contemporary

art collection,” Levine says. “The piece we displayed over the fireplace

draws you into the room and is a wonderful juxtaposition to the existing

traditional fireplace.”

SOURCES interior design, Lori Levine Interiors in Basking Ridge; custom wall

unit and hydraulic desk, Dean Zisa of Sage Design Studio in Chester; worktable,

Roberta Schilling Collection (T); leather chairs, GJ Styles (T); hydraulic desk chair,

Knoll; artwork, homeowners.

T= To the trade

40 October/November 2021


Dressed for Success

“We wanted the dark hue of the cabinetry to extend around the room so we painted

all millwork the same color,” designer Alma Russo says. The addition of a large-scale

dimensional butterfly design above the desk anchors the homeowners’ collection of

butterfly prints hung together for impact.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER DELANEY

INTERIOR DESIGN BY ALMA RUSSO, ALLIED ASID, AFFILIATE IDS

Mary and Art Guerrera’s home office in the Navesink

section of Middletown Township is visible right off

the front entry. As a result, it had to be beautiful,

functional and related to the coastal feel in the rest of the house (see “Blue

Streak,” Design NJ, December 2020/January 2021, page 48), says Alma

Russo, an allied member of the American Society of Interior Designers and

principal of AR Interiors in Holmdel.

The space is showcased behind transitional three-panel glass doors

that welcome sunlight and views. Cerused oak guest chairs with their

“shutter” backs are also inviting and airy, Russo says. Other design

elements deliver the handsome, cozy feel the homeowners wanted:

Regent stripe gray flannel wallpaper from Ralph Lauren that mimics

men’s suiting, a plaid window treatment and saturated dark gray builtin

cabinetry.

A challenging soffit became a design opportunity. “We created a tray

ceiling based on the one soffit and wrapped it in crown molding, which

became a lovely architectural element,” Russo says. Built-ins were

designed for maximum efficiency with ample storage and open shelving

to showcase accessories. DNJ

SOURCE interior design, AR Interiors LLC in Holmdel; custom built-ins, Viscon

Builders LLC in Little Silver; cabinetry, Yorktowne Cabinetry; library sconces, Visual

Comfort; Regent stripe gray flannel wallpaper, Ralph Lauren Home; window

treatment fabric, Duralee.

designnewjersey.com 41


WRITTEN BY MEG FOX | PHOTOS BY TOM GRIMES | INTERIOR DESIGN BY DEBORAH LEAMANN

In the entrance hall (just beyond the doorway), a vintage English chest is juxtaposed with modern art, creating a tension between old and new. The

lantern-style chandelier is a modern interpretation of a classic form, interior designer Deborah Leamann notes. Original walnut pocket doors lead to the

drawing room in the foreground. Across the hall is the formal living room.

42 October/November 2021


Past Forward

A HISTORIC HOME HONORS ITS PLACE IN HISTORY AND

CRAFTS A NEW NARRATIVE IN CLASSIC FORM

When a professional couple and their two sons

relocated to Lawrenceville, they welcomed the

“almost no” commute to nearby jobs and

schools, the walking distance into town and

the accessible bike trails from their newly purchased property: a circa 1828

structure, known as the Davis House, that came with all its charms and

quirks. For the record, three-time Pulitzer Prize winning author Thornton

The classic Greek Revival-style

home —built circa 1828—is

listed on the historic register.

If doorknockers could talk: This

brass lion has seen guests coming

and going for nearly two

centuries.

designnewjersey.com 43


Plaster wall surfaces and authentic, character-rich details — archways, columns, fluted casings and pine floors — were preserved and carefully restored. The 1970s-era X bench in

the entrance hall is reupholstered in a fun leopard print from Anna French. The full-length mirror is from the same period.

Original French doors lead from the drawing room to the remodeled kitchen and adjoining breakfast area.

Wilder really did sleep there (see “Storied Past” on the facing page).

Though owning an old home was long on the homeowners’ wish list,

this one came with some surprises—and nightmares: unlevel floors,

lack of a cohesive floor plan, a variety of ill-conceived updates and, in

some cases, no updates at all. Interior doors, with their mishmash of

doorknobs, were also falling off their hinges, interior designer Deborah

Leamann recalls.

The designer, well known for her love of older homes, came highly

recommended to the couple, who sought to restore and revamp the interior

for modern living. “I had just come off the renovation of an 1882 Victorian

home, so I was in gear to grab the wheel and take charge,” says Leamann,

principal of Pennington-based Deborah Leamann Interior Design.

The groundwork was set to remove the bad and restore the good. “We

knew we would keep and restore the steam radiators, pine floors, Ionic

column-style fireplace mantels, rope-operated windows” and other features

unique to the house, Leamann says. Leaded-glass transom windows and

panel wall details “were a few of the details I wanted to celebrate and showcase,”

she says. “Being authentic to the house was critical for me while at

the same time releasing it into the 21st century.”

Leamann worked within the existing footprint with help from Gordon

Mitchell of Mitchell’s Woodworking & Designs in Westhampton and

general contractor Douglas Fesmire of Fesmire Bros. Builders in Titusville.

She completely reimagined the house, reassigning rooms and drafting a

plan to fulfill the owners’ request for a new kitchen, butler’s pantry and

powder room. “Although these spaces didn’t exist, I took a huge

[unneeded] bathroom with a Jacuzzi in it and created the butler’s pantry

and powder room—both with classic forms,” Leamann says. Hallmark

design elements such as fluted case openings with rosettes, raised panels,

mosaic tiles and wainscoting honor the integrity of the house. “By offering

classic design elements with modern functionality, I have allowed the

Davis House to tell a new story.”

……

The largest challenge was the uneven floors, Leamann says. “I am not

speaking of off level—more like 2-inch step-ups, 2-inch step-downs. It

was such a trip hazard.” A back staircase was removed and rebuilt so the

floors could be the same height.

The kitchen? “It was a gut job [with] beyond-quirky cupboards” and

other deficiencies, she says. An I-beam had to be installed between the

44 October/November 2021


Storied Past

The Lawrenceville home, as seen in this 1830s rendering,

operated for a time as a boarding house for female

seminary students when Reverend R.H. Davis served as

principal. It’s been known as the Davis House ever since.

In the early 1900s, it housed male students from the

Lawrenceville School before becoming a private

residence around 1941.

When American playwright and novelist Thornton Wilder

arrived at the Lawrenceville School in 1921 as a French

instructor, he served as assistant housemaster at the Davis

House for four years. During his Lawrenceville tenure,

Wilder published The Trumpet Shall Sound, The Cabala and

The Bridge of San Luis Rey, a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel,

which he reportedly wrote while living in the home.

Antique books and other

artifacts fill the newly

installed custom

bookcases around the

perimeter of the drawing

room—a multi func -

tional space used for

reading, entertaining,

piano playing and more.

Ionic column-style

fireplace mantels—here

and elsewhere in the

home —were restored

to their former glory.

designnewjersey.com 45


46 October/November 2021

The renovated kitchen and

breakfast area —crafted in familiar

forms and harmonious proportions

that respect the character of place

— accommodates the needs of a

modern family. The original

fireplace remains intact. “Who

wouldn’t love a fireplace in their

kitchen?” Leamann asks. “It really

is the focal point of the room.”


Custom cabinets are painted in Benjamin

Moore’s “Cloud White.” The countertops are

natural quartzite. Prefab wood flooring from a

prior remodel was replaced with the same

pine boards found elsewhere in the home.

Existing track lighting also got the heave-ho in

favor of classic fixtures —all on dimmers —to

set the desired ambience. “We did not use any

recessed lighting,” Leamann notes.

kitchen and breakfast area, making venting the range tricky, she says.

Fortunately, “I had a great team and expert problem solvers.”

The new kitchen and breakfast area, fitted with off-white custom cabinetry

and quartzite countertops, is clean, classic and highly functional.

“Due to the unusual layout, I had to break the areas into zones, but I think

that’s part of the charm,” Leamann says. Kitchen functions were extended

into the breakfast area, which houses a wall oven, microwave and additional

pantry storage; cabinetry on the opposite side of the room holds a coffee

bar and wine cooler. Prefab wood floors were replaced with the same pine

found elsewhere in the home, Leamann notes. A fireplace also remained

intact. “Who wouldn’t love a fireplace in their kitchen?” she asks. Retaining

the steam radiators and original windows was “icing on the cake.”

……

During the renovation and restoration, “we took away the bad track

lighting and DIY built-ins and kept the good,” Leamann says. “Lighting

is paramount in creating a mood in a home.” She supplemented task lighting

with stylish and classic chandeliers, sconces and pendants—all set on

dimmers. Plastic toggle switches were swapped for reproduction pushbutton

switches with mother-of-pearl inlay—“something you would

expect to see in a house of this age,” she says. Other thoughtful improve-

designnewjersey.com 47


The breakfast area contains a wall oven, microwave

(neither pictured) and additional pantry storage. A

coffee bar on the opposite side of the room

contains a wine cooler (not pictured).

ments involved replacing any vinyl 1980s windows with proper divided

lights. She also exchanged formerly mismatched doorknobs and hinges

with carefully curated period hardware.

Walnut pocket doors, which were original to the home, lead to the

drawing room just off the entrance hall. The drawing room is a multifunctional

space that’s now used for reading, entertaining or practicing the

piano. New custom bookcases with library lighting add character and

function along with a variety of accessories and antique books from various

estate sales or from the designer’s own collection. Like the walnut pocket

doors, the Ionic column fireplace mantel—newly restored and freshly

painted—maintains its place in history.

Leamann’s philosophy for designing a historic home? “Keep the foundation

simple,” she says. “Light-colored paints with a tonal value keep the

complexion of the home fresh while allowing the architectural elements

to shine through.” Blending in antiques, she adds, “creates the authenticity

and sensibility you would expect in a historic home.” Incorporating

contemporary art and accessories keeps the interior fresh, “creating that

transition from old to new.” DNJ

EDITOR’S NOTE: View “before” photos, the floor plan and additional tidbits

from this project in the digital version of the story at designnewjersey.com.

SOURCES Overall: interior design, Deborah Leamann Interior Design in Pennington;

general contractor, Fesmire Bros. Builders in Titusville; architect, Inside

Architecture LLC in Titusville; custom cabinetry and millwork, Mitchell’s Woodworking

& Designs in Westhampton. Entrance Hall: English chest and mirror, Umbrella

Home Décor in Hopewell; modern art, A Touch of the Past Antiques in

Lambertville; accessories, Antiquities; leopard print on bench and wallpaper,

Anna French/Thibaut; lantern chandelier, Circa Lighting; wall color, “Dove White”

by Benjamin Moore. Drawing Room: custom bookcases, designed by Deborah

Leamann Interior Design and built by Mitchell’s Woodworking & Designs; bookcase

lights, Circa Lighting; bookcase paint, “Dove White” by Benjamin Moore;

48 October/November 2021


The butler’s pantry—along

with an adjacent powder

room and coat closet—was

carved from an oversized and

outdated full bathroom. A

mosaic marble backsplash,

black absolute granite

counter top and finely crafted

cabinetry and millwork

harmonize with the rest of the

home’s time-honored touches.

designnewjersey.com 49


Design...Reimagined

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many lifestyles

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Visit our showroom or call for a

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design@ arinterior.com

973.625.8950

M-F 10-5 & Sat 11-5

27 E. Main Street, Denville, NJ

www.arinterior.com

www.arinteriordenville.com

Designs by Lori Driscoll

The new powder room blends traditional features with

a playful tiger print wallpaper from Anna French.

21 PHEASANT LANE, SCOTCH PLAINS

7 BEDROOMS | 6.1 BATHS | OFFERED AT $2,395,000

ONE OF A KIND home on a private lane. 19+ rooms including sunken living room, family room & office, each with fireplace. Gourmet

kitchen with expansive center island, Caesarstone countertops, SS appliances & breakfast room. Gorgeous 1st floor primary bedroom

with fireplace & luxurious bath boasting Jacuzzi tub, his/her WICs & private commode. Additional 1st floor bedroom with private bath.

2nd floor offers 5 additional bedrooms, 3 full baths, step-down bonus room & additional laundry area. Expansive lower level featuring

a home theater, game room, rec room with bar, exercise room & full bath. The resort-like grounds include a deck, patio, in-ground salt

water pool and 4 car attached garage. This spectacular home is not to be missed!

wall color, “Bone White” by Benjamin Moore; contemporary

art above fireplace, Umbrella Home Décor;

fabric on fireside chairs, F. Schumacher & Co.; fabric

on Roman shades, Cowtan & Tout; assorted accessories,

Deborah Leamann Interior Design; rug, homeowners.

Kitchen: custom cabinetry, Mitchell’s Woodworking

& Design; cabinet paint, “Cloud White” by

Benjamin Moore; chandelier over island, Vaughan Designs;

quartzite countertops (Taj Mahal), Stone Tech

Fabrication in Trenton; all tile selections, A Step in

Stone in Hopewell; Sub-Zero/Wolf appliances, H&H

Appliance Center in East Windsor; stools, Palecek;

pressed flower prints from 1895 and other assorted

vintage art, etchings and accessories, A Touch of the

Past Antiques. Breakfast Area: table and chairs, homeowners;

pendants, Worlds Away; Parsons chairs reupholstery

fabric, F. Schumacher & Co., wood frame

chair reupholstery fabric, Stout; sheer café curtain

fabric, Romo. Butler’s Pantry: Carrera mosaic tile backsplash,

A Step in Stone; black absolute granite countertop,

Stone Tech Fabrication; star-like pendant,

Worlds Away; ceiling wallpaper, Sister Parish; window

seat cushion fabric, Stout; toile pillow fabric, Clarence

House. Powder Room: custom vanity and wainscoting,

Mitchell’s Woodworking & Designs; faucet, Kohler Pinstripe;

hardware, Emtek; mirror, Carvers’ Guild through

Deborah Leamann Interior Design; basket-weave mosaic

floor tile, A Step in Stone; wallpaper, Anna

French/Thibaut; light fixture, Circa Lighting.

For contact information, page 64

50 October/November 2021


Celebrating Over 103 Years

Serving Northern NJ

• Custom Design

• New Construction • Renovation

• Service • Maintenance

Div. of V. Lehmann Construction Co. Inc.

NJ Home Improvement Contractor Reg. #13VH02492300

Contact Us

For Your New Pool Safety Cover

644 Wyckoff Ave. Mahwah, NJ 07430

201.327.0428

www.lehmannpools.com

designnewjersey.com 51


Ivy climbs the home’s

limestone façade, bringing

the carved front door into

sharp focus. Other plantings

include Bada Bing® scarlet

and Whopper® rose greenleaf

begonias, Cathedral

Series deep blue salvia,

Serena® blue angelonia,

Sonic® Red New Guinea

impatiens and coleus.


WRITTEN BY MARIROSE KRALL

INTERIOR DESIGN BY DARIA BOUTLE

DESIGN/BUILD BY LYONS MCCONNELL

PHOTOS BY JULIE BLACKSTOCK

Highlighting

History

A TUDOR-STYLE HOME GETS AN UPDATE

THAT HONORS ITS ORIGINS


54 October/November 2021


The home boasts

beautiful woodwork,

including trim above

the living room door

and dentil molding in

the foyer. The

hardwood flooring in

the hallway replaced

the home’s original

slate flooring. “The

slate felt very cold and

dark,” designer Daria

Boutle says. “The white

oak in a herringbone

pattern feels warmer

and more inviting.”

Uncomplicated

furnishings in the

living room keep the

focus on the original

paneling and leadedglass

windows.

The stately 1929 home in Essex County is a classic

example of Tudor design, with beautiful leaded-glass

windows and ornamental woodwork. The owners prized the striking

period details, but felt the home was a bit somber and dark. While a

moody aesthetic may have been on-brand for Henry VIII, it wasn’t

going to work for this 21st-century family. “They previously lived in a

new-build, open-plan home, so this was architecturally very different

from what they were used to,” designer Daria Boutle says. “They

wanted to make this home feel airy and warm, bright and inviting.”

“One of the main challenges was to give the home a better overall

flow,” says Boutle, founder of Daria B Designs in Verona. To address

the circulation issues, the homeowners enlisted Morristown-based

designnewjersey.com 55


Cabinets in a custom white tone keep the mood light in the kitchen, while walnut accents, such as the range hood trim

and open shelving, relate to the walnut floors elsewhere in the home. “Though the kitchen feels more contemporary,

we wanted it to flow beautifully with the other spaces in the house,” Boutle says.

56 October/November 2021


The original kitchen was not functional, Boutle says. “The layout was really strange. It didn’t have good circulation

at all.” A new island brings practical workspace, and a new opening to the dining room improves traffic flow.

designnewjersey.com 57


Lyons McConnell. The architecture and construction firm reconfigured

the layout of the house, updating rooms and creating a more open plan,

always mindful of the pedigree of the residence. “It was very important to

the homeowners to keep the character of the home and to retain as many

original features as possible,” Boutle says.

To that end, existing doors were preserved and the lead windows were

upgraded to improve their efficiency. In addition, the designer notes, “we

retained the majority of the oversized wood detailing, such as paneling and

decorative moldings.” Elements that couldn’t be saved were replaced with

historically appropriate alternatives. “Repairing some of the original locks

on the doors was just not feasible,” the designer says. “So we sourced

vintage pieces.”

……

Accommodating modern sensibilities while retaining the home’s vintage

charm required a bit of decorative dexterity. “Even though we wanted to

make some spaces more contemporary, we still tried to choose colors and

58 October/November 2021


finishes that went with the house,” says Boutle, who had the walls painted

in a warm palette of white and off-white tones. “This creates a juxtaposition

with the dark wood elements,” she says. “It was important to create a

clean palette to really appreciate the original elements such as windows,

doors and woodwork.”

For the fixtures and furniture, Boutle “chose furnishings that did not fight

with the more ornate original elements of the home.” In the living room,

which features both floor-to-ceiling paneling and leaded windows, “We

In the primary bathroom, the clients chose unlacquered brass vanities, inspired by

similar fixtures seen while they were guests at the Greenwich Hotel in New York City.

The window treatments in the primary bathroom can be opened and closed with

the press of a button.

A mural above the fireplace in a child’s room brings the drama. “Since the home is

quite grand, we decided to make a bold statement with the striking wallpaper mural,”

the designer says.

designnewjersey.com 59


The children’s bathroom features clean-lined stone and metal.

added streamlined furniture and pieces that felt more open and light to balance the

heaviness of the woodwork. I feel that simple lines work well in ornate homes like

this. The two styles are not conflicting with each other.”

The designer gave the woodwork in a child’s bedroom—an elaborately carved

fireplace surround—a coat of black paint. The new, dark tone accentuates the

richness of the carving and, Boutle notes, helps “to make that space feel bolder,

crisper and more fun.” Also adding exuberance to the room is a dramatic mural

60 October/November 2021


above the fireplace depicting a sailing ship reminiscent

of those in the Tudor navy.

Though the kitchen has thoroughly modern

amenities, it still features components that coordinate

with vintage elements in the home.

Boutle says she “wanted to make sure the new

finishes felt authentic and somewhat dis -

tressed.” Wrought iron pendants above the

island add rustic charm and white bronze cabinet

hardware was chosen specifically because it

would develop a patina. “It has changed beautifully

over time,” she adds.

“Changing beautifully” is what this project was

all about—evolving to meet the needs of the

present while acknowledging the best parts of the

past. Boutle says her clients “were phenomenal.

They were so kind and easygoing. Together we

created a home that is light, inviting and practical

for their family, yet still preserves the character of

the property.” DNJ

908-322-8270


closetfactory.com

the art of organization

SOURCES: Overall: interior design, Daria B Designs in

Verona; architecture and construction, Lyons Mc-

Connell in Morristown; landscaping, Martin O’Boyle

Landscaping in Bloomfield. Foyer: wall color; “Barely

There” by Benjamin Moore; “Bobbin” table, White

House Luxe in Fairfield; “Morris” medium lantern light

fixture, Visual Comfort & Co. through West Essex

Lighting in West Caldwell. Living Room: “Enlighten”

carpet in color “Ocean Mist,” Stanton Carpet (Antrim)

through The Carpet Mill in East Hanover; sofa, Century

Furniture through White House Luxe; throw pillow on

sofa, Etsy Shop; “Surrey Twist” side table, KingsHaven

through West Essex Lighting; coffee table, White

House Luxe; leather pouf next to side table, Lee Industries

through White House Luxe. Kitchen: wall tile and

countertop, Dente Trading in Cedar Grove; cabinetry,

Ezmat Inc. in Paterson; cabinet hardware, Ashley Norton

in Pompton Plains; “Foussana” gray high-honed

floor tile, Artistic Tile in Secaucus; “Julia” wallmounted

articulated pot filler with metal cross handle

in pewter, Waterworks; stools at island, Zin Home in

Hoboken; “FitzJames” light fixtures over island, Currey

& Co. through West Essex Lighting; wall color, “Barely

There” by Benjamin Moore. Primary Bathroom: wall

color, “White OC151” by Benjamin Moore; “Renaissance”

console with unlacquered brass legs, Stone Forest;

mirror, Bespoke; sconces next to mirror, RH; wall

and floor tile, Artistic Tile; “Florenza” bathtub, Crosswater

London; bath faucet, Sigma; sconce above

chaise lounge, RH; window treatment, Smith & Noble.

Fireplace Room: wall color, “White OC151” by Benjamin

Moore; chair, Serena & Lilly in Summit; window

treatments, Smith & Noble: mural above fireplace,

“High Seas” from Rebel Walls. Kids’ Bathroom: wall

color, “White OC151” by Benjamin Moore; wall tile,

Artistic Tile; “Hudson” metal powder washstand,

“Rivet” medicine cabinet and sconce above mirror, RH;

“Metropole” faucet, Newport Brass.

For contact information, page 64



©2021 Closet Factory. All rights reserved.

IT’S ABOUT YOU.

Fiori Interior Design creates highly personal spaces that inspire your authentic self.

201.848.9797 • info@fioriinteriordesign.com • fioriinteriordesign.com

Terri Fiori, Allied ASID

designnewjersey.com 61


Custom Fabricators Serving the Tri-State Area

1304 S. Roller Road | Ocean NJ 07712

732.695.2400 | ACDCUSTOMGRANITE.com

Like Us on Facebook! www.facebook.com/pages/ACD-Custom-Granite/224730577580850

Details make the difference!

Photo by Peter Rymwid

Interior Decisions, Inc.

Florham Park, NJ

973.765.9013

Allied Member of ASID, NJ CID

21ID000022

Interiors by:

^tÜÄt gÜ|ÇvtÇxÄÄÉ

intdecinc@aol.com | interiordecisions.com

ASID Design Excellence Award Winner

62 October/November 2021


facetoface | MEET MICHAEL WALLACE

“Personalized customer service is what sets

84 Lumber apart. ”

PHOTOS BY BRANDI GROOMS PHOTOGRAPHY

– MICHAEL WALLACE

Meet

Michael

Wallace

GENERAL MANAGER

84 LUMBER

MANAHAWKIN, NJ

Michael Wallace’s day starts at dawn. As General Manager of 84 Lumber’s

Manahawkin store, he needs to be on-site early to go over the day’s goals with

his team. 84 Lumber is the nation’s leading privately-held supplier of building

materials, and that kind of success requires hard work and commitment. It also

takes impressive logistical skills. “We run multiple delivery trucks daily,” Michael

says. “The pieces are constantly moving; it’s important that we’re extremely

organized and focused, with a clear plan.”

While planning is important, so is responsiveness to customer needs. “We

form partnerships with each of our customers,” Michael explains. “I have a really

extraordinary crew. We get ahead of any issues.” Those issues grew exponentially

over the past year and a half, but Michael and his team responded to industry

changes swiftly and effectively. “We’re mindful of our customers’ struggles and

stressors; we serve them with honesty, empathy and adaptability. That kind of

personalized customer service sets 84 Lumber apart.”

In addition to supplying building materials, 84 Lumber Manahawkin specializes

in windows, doors and trim. Michael’s team of experienced associates can help with

services ranging anywhere from building a new deck and replacing windows to

building beach front properties.

“It’s rewarding to be a part of the 84 Lumber team,” Michael says. “We’re

helping people build their first home or that beach house they’ve always wanted.

“It’s fun helping people achieve their dreams.”

Contact Michael at Michael.Wallace@84lumber.com, (609) 597-8400 or

visit 84lumber.com

A SPECIAL PROMOTION 63


design resources

A guide to contacting

suppliers, companies and

design professionals

mentioned in this issue.

84 Lumber

800-664-1984

See Ad on Page 63

A Step in Stone

609-333-0610

astepinstone.com

A Touch of the Past Antiques

609-460-4638

atouchofthepastantiques.net

A&R Interiors

973-625-8950

arinterior.com

See Ad on Page 50

ACD Custom Granite

732-695-2400

acdcustomgranite.com

See Ad on Page 62

Acucraft

866-597-1063

acucraft.com

Andersen Corp.

800-426-4261

andersenwindows.com

See Ad on Page 15

Antiquities

610-688-4077

antiquitieswayne.com

AR Interiors LLC

732-740-5885

Ashley Norton

800-393-1098

ashleynorton.com

ASID - NJ Chapter

732-787-5981

nj.asid.org

See Ad on Page 62

BDI

703-803-6900

bdiusa.com

Benjamin Moore & Co.

855-724-6802

benjaminmoore.com

Bernhardt

bernhardt.com

BeSPOKE by Luigi Gentile

212-371-7107

bespokebylg.com

Bradington-Young

704-435-5881

bradington-young.com

Brielle Furniture Interiors

732-282-0030

briellefurniture.com

Brizo

877-345-2749

brizo.com

Brunschwig & Fils Inc.

800-538-1880

brunschwig.com

By Design Landscapes Inc.

732-901-5566

bydesignland.com

See Ad On Page 6

California Closets

800-274-6754

californiaclosets.com

See Ad on Page 11

Cassina (New York Showroom)

212-245-2121

cassina.com

Century Furniture Co.

800-852-5552

centuryfurniture.com

Circa Lighting Showroom

877-762-2323

circalighting.com

Clarence House

800-221-4704

clarencehouse.com

Classic Marble & Tile

201-440-8848

classicmarbletile.com

Closet Factory

908-322-8270

closetfactory.com

See Ad on Page 61

Complete Interiors

609-368-6390

completeinteriors.net

Cowtan & Tout

212-647-6900

cowtan.com

Crate & Barrel

800-967-6696

crateandbarrel.com

Crown Select

603-542-3399

crownselect.com

See Ad on Page BC

Currey & Co.

877-768-6428

curreyandcompany.com

Daria B Designs

973-870-7996

dariabdesigns.com

Deborah Leamann

Interior Design

609-737-3330

deborahleamanninterior.com

See Ad on Page 18

Dente Trading Co. Inc.

973-857-4050

dentetrading.com

Design Hub Home

973-258-0000

designhubhome.com

Distinctively Outdoors

973-828-1288

distinctivelyoutdoors.com

See Ad on IFC-1

Duralee Fabrics & Fine Furniture

800-275-3872

duralee.com

Dutch Wood LLC

717-933-5133

dutchwoodcabinets.com

Elephant in the Room Design

609-454-3378

elephantintheroomdesign.com

See Ad on Page 60

Emtek Products

800-356-2741

emtek.com

Etsy.com

800-328-5933

etsy.com

Ezmat

973-616-8871

ezmatinc.com

Fesmire Bros. Builders

609-730-9793

fesmirebrosbuilders.com

Fiori Interior Design LLC

201-848-9797

fioriinteriordesign.com

See Ad on Page 61

Flemington Department Store

888-229-2963

flemingtondepartmentstore.com

See Ad on Page 4

Frank Webb Home

frankwebb.com

See Ad on Page 9

Gabby

888-868-4267

gabbyhome.com

GAF Materials Corp.

877-423-7663/gaf.com

Garden Cottage

Fairfield: 973-227-1010

Morristown: 973-425-0949

gardencottage.com

See Ad on Page 51

General Plumbing Supply

800-225-5477

generalplumbingsupply.net

See Ad on Page 7

George O’Reilly Carpentry

732-614-3929

GJ Styles

336-431-9775

gjstyles.com

H&H Appliance

609-426-1111

hhappliance.com

Hancock & Moore

828-495-8235

hancockandmoore.com

Hansgrohe USA

800-334-0455

hansgrohe-usa.com

Hardware Designs Inc.

973-808-0266

hardware-designs.com

Hekman Furniture

616-748-2660

hekman.com

Hickory Chair Co.

828-324-1801

hickorychair.com

Home Trimwork

609-206-8621

hometrimwork.com

See Ad on Page 16

Hooker Furniture

276-656-3335

hookerfurniture.com

House of Style & Design

917-584-7559

houseofstyleinteriors.com

HVD Interior Design

732-252-9900

hvdesigngroup.com

See Ad on Page 10

Inside Architecture LLC

609-737-4353

insidearchitecture.com

Interior Decisions Inc.

973-765-9013

interiordecisions.com

See Ad on Page 62

Iris Ceramica

irisceramica.com

Isoldi Collection-Coldwell Banker

908-787-5990

theisoldicollection.com

See Ad on Page 50

James Hardie Building Products

888-542-7343

jameshardie.com

John P. Fischer Tiles Inc.

973-427-7870

johnpfischertile.com

KingsHaven

844-546-4799

kingshaven.com

Knoll

800-343-5665

knoll.com

Kohler Co.

800-456-4537

kohler.com

Lamps Plus

800-782-1967

lampsplus.com

Lea Ceramiche

leaceramiche.com

Lee Industries

800-892-7150

leeindustries.com

Lehmann Pools & Spas

201-327-0428

lehmannpools.com

See Ad on Page 51

Lexington Home Brands

800-614-4663

lexington.com

Livex Lighting

800-761-8056

livexlighting.com

See Ad on Page IBC

Lori Levine Interiors

908-604-9099

lorilevineinteriors.com

Lyons McConnell

973-998-4111

lyonsmcconnell.com

Martin O’Boyle Landcaping

973-743-3820

oboylelandscaping.com

Mercier

866-448-1785

mercier-wood-flooring.com

Messineo Builders

201-560-0699

messineobuilders.com

Metropolitan Window Fashions

877-722-1100

windowfashions.com

See Ad on Page 10

Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams

201-639-0370

mgbwhome.com

Mitchell’s Woodworking & Designs

609-261-7500

mitchellswoodworking.com

New Jersey Gravel & Sand Co.

732-938-5252

njgravelsand.com

See Ad on Page 8

New Jersey Realtors

newjersey.realestate/roots

See Ad on Page 29

Newport Brass

949-417-5207/newportbrass.com

Palecek Furniture

212-287-0063/palecek.com

PMI International Stone Importers

732-303-1887

pmirock.com

See Ad on Page 12

Ralph Lauren Home Collection

888-475-7674

ralphlaurenhome.com

Raymour & Flanigan

315-453-2542

raymourflanigan.com

Rebel Walls

rebelwalls.com

RH

800-762-1005/rh.com

Riverside Furniture

479-785-4560

riverside-furniture.com

Roberta Schilling Inc.

305-477-7786/rscollection.com

Rug Mall

732-566-3082

therugmall.com

See Ad on Page 37

Russ Rubin

russrubin.us

Sage Design Studio LLC

908-879-7272

sagedesign.com

Schumacher

800-523-1200

fschumacher.com

Schwartz Design Showroom

732-205-0291

schwartzdesignshowroom.com

Serena & Lily

866-597-2742

serenaandlily.com

Sigma

760-598-5895/sigmafaucet.com

Sister Parish

800-970-3366

sisterparishdesign.com

Smith & Noble

800-560-0027

smithandnoble.com

Stanton Carpet

800-452-4474

stantoncarpet.com

Stickley

Stickley.com/to-the-trade

See Ad on Page 2

Stickley Furniture | Mattress

862-701-3551

shopstickley.com

Stone Forest

888-682-2987/stoneforest.com

Stone Tech Fabrication

609-984-8818

stonetechmarble.com

Stout Brothers Fabrics and

Accessories

800-523-2592/estout.com

IFC - Inside Front Cover

Sub-Zero Wolf and Cove

888-671-9376

subzero-wolf.com

See Ad on Page 3

The Carpet Mill

973-577-4072

ecarpetmill.com

Thibaut

thibautdesign.com

Top Knobs

800-499-9095

topknobs.com

Umbrella Home Decor

609-466-2800

umbrelladecor.com

Universal Furniture Inc.

336-822-8888

universalfurniture.com

Vaughan Designs

212-319-7070

vaughandesigns.com

Viking Range Corp.

888-845-4641

vikingrange.com

Viscon Builders

732-933-7770

visconbuilders.com

Visual Comfort & Co.

212-725-2500

visualcomfort.com

Waterworks

800-899-6757

waterworks.com

Watts Water Technologies

978-873-5688

watts.com

See Ad on Page 5

West Essex Lighting

973-228-0400

westessexlighting.com

Whimsicality

732-449-9337

White House Luxe

973-575-8317

whluxe.com

Williams-Sonoma Home

877-812-6235

williams-sonoma.com

WL Kitchen and Home

973-773-7475

wlkitchenandhome.com

See Ad on Page 37

Worlds Away

901-529-0844

worlds-away.com

Yorktowne Cabinetry

800-777-0065

yorktownecabinetry.com

Z+ Architects

201-785-8855

zplusarchitects.com

Zin Home

201-795-3448/zinhome.com

IBC - Inside Back Cover BC - Back Cover

Design NJ makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of Design

Resources but cannot guarantee it. The information is provided in

good faith.

64 October/November 2021


Crown Select

by

A whole new line of custom built

inset cabinetry with the impeccable

Crown Point fit and finish.

Handcrafted in New Hampshire

and available direct, nationwide

www.crownselect.com


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