WORLD 092221

coolvt

The World
World Publications
Barre-Montpelier, VT

National Hunting and Fishing (NHF) Day

nhfday@wondersofwildlife.org

SEPTEMBER 25, 2021

See Page 32 In This Week’s WORLD

CN VN’ V N

Vol. 50, No. 20 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916 September 22, 2021

www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com

Parent, Public Health &

Education Leaders Call on

Governor Scott, Administration

to Implement Universal

Mask Mandate In Schools

and Indoor Settings

page 3

COVID-19 Cases in

20-Something Vermonters

Exceeds 6,000. Here’s Why

It Is Likely to Go Higher

page 4

SEPTEMBER BRIDAL

DIRECTORY

page 15

CELEBRATION SERIES

An Evening With

Tom Rush

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT

TO THE WORLD

Everything Pets

page 17-21

Vermont’s ‘Operation Game

Thief’ Helps Catch Poachers

page 30

“Tom was not only one of my early

heroes, but also one of my main

- James Taylor

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IN MEMORIUM

Dave Molloy Remembering Tela Molloy

Today the world lost

a Wonderful human

being, Heaven gained

a Beautiful Angel!

As I sit here with

tears running down

my face in an attempt

to fulfill my young

bride of 41 years request

to tell the world

that Tela Jayne, feels

she has had the most wonderful life!

This past week was hard on Te, but gave us

time to reflect on the years e had together.

We reminisced about our friends, past and

present, our families and our friends we call

family. We feel so blessed ith our daugh

ters, Casey and Nicole and how much joy

they have brought into our lives. Without all

of this, Te felt her life would not have been

as complete.

Te said; “Of course she had a lot of unfinished

business,all though she did make a

short list for me), she has no regrets! She went

on to say; “That she was fortunate enough to

have had a relationship that both of us had the

same goals. “ive life to its fullest and take

a few chances!”

This next line I was instructed not to

change it or alter it in any ay, so here it is.

I was “Funny”! Bob and I were funny, Jeff

and I were funny, some of you other people

and ere funny......but, “ WA F”

eres the thing. ou all ould think it, but

ould be the one to say it Ok lets be hon

est, some of you ouldnt be thinking of it

because, “O AE OT F”

Te had a ay of being straight forard.

She would tell people the way it was even if

it ruffled feathers. n the end think she as

respected for it.

The second instruction I was given which I

think I already fail at was not to write a long

winded post, but we are talking about “Tela”,

so no ill rap this up.

Te was the Best wife, partner, mother and

friend anybody could ever hope for. We ere

together for almost 6 years, ts been an Out

standing un Tela as one of the most fun

loving, life living person you could have ever

met.

As e all kno our lives ill go on. ill

only speak on behalf of our daughters and

myself that a void has been created ith Tes

absence here on earth, but her memories will

fill that void over time.

The Molloy family ishes you all ove,

appiness, and ealth in that order. Please

live your lives to the fullest as Te feels she

has done!

There are events planned at the end of

this month to honor and celebrate Tela. am

calling it “Telas Weekend”

- Dave Molloy

Lindsay Carpenter Remembering Tela Molloy

My Aunt Tela lost her courageous 11 year

battle with cancer today; and when I say courageous

I mean she fought tooth and nail to

live every day like it as her last. ut you

kno hat Thats actually ho she lived

every day of her life even before cancer.

She was the most authentic, unapologetically

honest, caring, giving, thoughtful and

most loving person ever. d be lying if said

• • •

she didnt scare me as a kid she totally did.

She put me in my place always, but always

with encouragement to do better and be better.

What admire most is the life she and

my ncle Dave made ith their to girls.

They always had their family unit and we all

came after that. aim to replicate that in my

life no ith my husband and boys. aim to

laugh every single day. aim to live every

moment of my life even hen it sucks and

aim to do this in my aunt Tela aynes honor.

Because there was no one like her and there

never ill be. love you Aunt Te. Thanks for

loving on me and my brother. Thanks for all

lifes lessons and thanks for making obby

McFerrins “Dont orry be happy” come on

my Pandora hile cherished the photos and

memories have of you. our smile, laugh,

and love ill live on forever in all of us. ll

miss you alays and love you forever.

- Lindsay Carpenter

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page 2 The WORLD September 22, 2021

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Parent, Public Health & Education Leaders

Call on Governor Scott, Administration to

Implement Universal Mask Mandate In

Schools and Indoor Settings

Anne Sosin, policy fellow at the Nelson

A. Rockefeller Center at Dartmouth College;

Libby Bonesteel, Superintendent of Schools

for Montpelier Roxbury; Dr. Brian Ricca, Superintendent

of Schools for Saint Johnsbury

District; and Kate Larose, Canaan parent,

held a press conference on Tuesday calling

on Governor Scott and his administration to

adhere to the CDC guidelines and implement

universal mask mandates in all schools and

indoor settings in areas of substantial or high

transmission to protect Vermont children and

create the conditions for them to be in school

safely.

Speakers noted that Governor Scott and his

administration have skirted CDC guidance

and in doing so have not created conditions

for a safe and stable start to the school year.

They pointed to recent data from the Vermont

Department of Health which has shown a dramatic

rise in Covid-19 infections, including

among children, many of whom aren’t likely

to be eligible for vaccinations until 2022. Additionally,

across the U.S., the highly-transmissible

Delta variant has led to record high

child hospitalizations, with more than 2500

child hospitalizations each week.

“Governor Scott must prioritize the health

and education of Vermont children,” said

Anne Sosin, public health researcher. “Data

from the AAP show that the state has the

highest cumulative percentage of cases in

children, and children ages six to eleven have

the highest rate of infection in the state. Returning

children safely to classrooms should

be the central goal of the public health response.”

Superintendents spoke about their calls for

clear guidance and protocols from Governor

Scott and his administration, and about how

those calls went unanswered.

“I feel a very visceral, professional responsibility

to maintain an environment that is

incredibly safe for children who are coming

back and don’t even have the opportunity to

get vaccinated,” said Brian Ricca, Superintendent

of Schools for Saint Johnsbury. “The

bottom line is that I can not say that Governor

Scott and the administration have done every

• • •

10-Digit Dialing Coming to Vermont

Vermont residents in the 802 area code will be required to

dial 10 digits (area code + phone number) for all local calls

starting Oct. 24, 2021. On and after this date, local calls dialed

with only seven digits may not be completed, and a recording

may inform customers that your call cannot be completed as

dialed. The recording will ask customers to please hang up and

redial with 10 digits.

TDS Telecom (TDS®) is alerting its customers in Vermont

about the upcoming changes.

Before Oct. 24, customers should reprogram automatic dialing

equipment and other devices now programmed with seven

digits. Residents and businesses should check with security or

alarm companies to make sure their systems are programmed

to handle the new 10-digit dialing pattern.

Products that will need to be changed to 10-digits could include:

life safety systems, VoIP and Private Branch Exchange

(PBX) systems, electronic telephone sets, auto-dial systems,

multi-line key systems, fax machines, internet dial-up numbers,

alarm and security systems, gates, speed dialers, call

forwarding settings, and voicemail services. All such devices

will need to be reprogrammed with 10-digits by Oct. 24, 2021.

Residents and businesses should also check their business

stationery or advertising materials to ensure the area code is

included.

This new change to 10-digit dialing will prevent people

from calling the new 9-8-8 emergency phone line by mistake.

Beginning July 16, 2022, dialing 9-8-8 will connect people

to the National Suicide Prevention and Mental Health Crisis

Lifeline, as proposed by the Federal Communications Commission

(FCC). The FCC hopes that a shorter, easy-to-remember

number ill more efficiently provide people ith help

when they need it most. However, until July 16, 2022, people

should continue to call 1-800-273-TALK to reach the Lifeline.

In an emergency that requires immediate assistance from

the police, fire department, or ambulance, dialing is still

the number customers should use.

Important things to note

• Your phone number and area code will remain the same.

• The price for both local and long-distance calling will not

change for TDS customers.

• Long-distance calls will still be made by dialing 1 + area

code + phone number.

• Make sure anything that uses or displays your phone number,

or the phone numbers of others is updated to include the

area code. This could include any of the following: business

stationery and marketing materials, home security systems,

contact lists, voicemail services, fax machines, and life safety

systems.

If you have any questions regarding any information provided

in this notice, call 1-888-CALL-TDS or visit www.tdstelecom.com.

You can also visit the FCC website at https://

www.fcc.gov/suicide-prevention-hotline.

thing they can to protect Vermont children.

My message to them: You can do more, we

are asking for more, find a ay to do it.”

“The lack of guidance from the administration

ahead of the school year has been a

significant challenge for my community this

year,” said Libby Bonesteel, Superintendent

of Schools for Montpelier Roxbury. “Vaccines

are important, we know that, but they

aren’t going to prevent transmission and shutting

down schools.”

Kate Larose, a parent in Canaan, spoke

about how Governor Scott’s failure has left

her child and other children in her community

behind.

“When asked why the administration didn’t

issue a statewide mandate, Governor Scott replied

that since the only district not masking

at this moment is Canaan, ‘we’re quibbling

about nothing,’’’ she said. “The health and

well-being of my child and other children

around the state are not ‘nothing.’ Good leadership

and governance in this moment calls

for the provision of safe learning and community

environments for all children through a

statewide mandate.”

Alliance for a Better Vermont is a 501c4

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future for Vermont.

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page 4 The WORLD September 22, 2021

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COVID-19 Cases in 20-Something Vermonters

Exceeds 6,000. Here’s Why It Is Likely to Go Higher

By CompassVermont.com

“I don’t live with my grandma, but if I did,

I would have probably gotten it, just for her

sake.”

“It” is the COVID-19 vaccination shot, and

that was a quote in a recent New York Times

article titled Why Young Adults Are Among

the Biggest Barriers to Mass Immunity.

While Governor Phil Scott and his administration

have led Vermont to the top of the

pack with their handling of the COVID-19

pandemic, the most significant outlier in

helping them check all the boxes is adults between

the age of 20 and 29.

In each age category, Vermonters who have

received at least one vaccine shot range from

72% to 99%, the 20 - 29 group sticks out at

61%, although still ahead of the national average

of 57%. According to the Vermont Department

of Health’s daily update of COVID

data, the 20 - 29 group has now surpassed

6,000 people.

A September 5th article in Forbes provides

some insights into this group’s mindset and

the vaccination-hesitant population in general.

21% OF 18-29 YEAR-OLDS SAY THEY

WILL NEVER BE VACCINATED

According to polling from the Kaiser Family

Foundation, this age group also has the

lowest percentage of adults who’ve received

at least one vaccine dose (57%). (Only 41%

of parents of kids ages 12 to 17 say their child

has received at least one dose.)

This age group is followed closely by 30-

49 year-olds, 19% of whom say they will

never be vaccinated, and 58% report at least

one dose.

18% OF MEN SAY THEY WILL NEVER

GET A SHOT

A gender gap in vaccine uptake has

emerged and persisted in recent months, according

to Kaiser. Fewer women say they will

refuse the shot—10%—and are much more

likely (71%) to report being vaccinated than

men (63%).

According to data collected by the CDC,

which covers around 90% of shots given,

53% of recipients are women and 47% men.

This statistic is hardly a shocker from the

crowd who also resists seat belts. According

to the CDC, adults age, 18-34 are almost 10%

less likely to wear a seat belt than adults 35

years or older. Men are 10% less likely to

wear seat belts than women.

Three other essential statistics emerged

from the Kaiser study.

75% OF ADULTS REFUSING VACCINA-

TION ARE SKEPTICAL OF BOTH CO-

The Vermont Department of Taxes has

begun issuing refunds to eligible taxpayers

who received unemployment insurance benefits

last year and electronically filed their

2020 Vermont Individual Income Tax Returns

prior to the federal unemployment tax exclusion

passed earlier this year. These taxpayers

can expect to see direct deposits or paper

checks in the coming days or weeks without

the need to file an amended return.

The American Rescue Plan Act of 2021

(ARPA) excluded up to $10,200 in unemployment

compensation for individual taxpayers

($20,400 for married, filing jointly)

for taxpayers with modified Adjusted Gross

Incomes of less than $150,000. The

Department identified over 22,000 total eligible

taxpayers who filed their Vermont

returns prior to ARPA’s passage and is adjusting

most of those tax returns to reflect the

correct taxable amount of unemployment

compensation and Vermont tax.

• • •

VID AND ITS VACCINES

According to Kaiser polling, the vast majority—90%—of

this group say they are not

worried about getting sick from Covid-19 and

are less convinced the vaccines work.

Those with no plans to get vaccinated also

distrust companies making vaccines (17%)

and against vaccines more generally (12%).

36% OF ADULTS ON THE VACCINE

FENCE ARE MOSTLY WORRIED

ABOUT SIDE EFFECTS

According to polling by Morning Consult,

concerns about side effects were consistently

the top concern for different groups open to

taking the vaccine.

Fears the vaccines moved through clinical

trials too quickly was another top concern,

reported by 31% surveyed.

22% OF UNVACCINATED ADULTS

DON’T THINK VACCINES PREVENT

DYING FROM COVID-19

14% of unvaccinated people believe the

shots are minimally effective at preventing

death from COVID-19, and 19% say they

do nothing to prevent serious illness, hospitalization,

or becoming infected if exposed,

according to polling by Kaiser. Only 2% of

vaccinated adults hold similar opinions.

According to a recent U.K. study, vaccines

drastically lower the odds of severe illness,

hospitalization, and death among the few

vaccinated people infected with COVID-19.

ANOTHER TAKE ON THE RESIS-

TANCE

Vermont continues to lead the COVID-19

battle, but these factors suggest that little

more ground is to gain from the 20-somethings.

However, another voice contends that a

significant reason 0somethings arent get

ting vaccinated is that they aren’t receiving

the right message on the right platform.

One quote stood out in an April article in

Slate, contending that no one speaks to Gen

Zer’s in their language.

“There isn’t anything that is consumable

and/or targeted at our demographic,” said

Gabrielle Kalisz, a 22-year-old who lives in

Washington, D.C., and who has been vaccinated.

“All the messaging online … isn’t

targeted toward our age group; it doesn’t

explain why, if you’re a healthy 19-year-old,

you should get this vaccine.”

CompassVermont.Com is an independent

publication founded by a native Vermonter,

providing non-editorial news and stories presented

in concert with the culture, mindset,

and values of the Green Mountain State.

Vermont Department of Taxes Issues Refunds

to Unemployment Benefit Recipients

Taxpayers are eligible for an automatic

adjustment if:

• Their Adjusted Gross Income (minus unemployment

benefits) is less than $150,000

• They received UI benefits in 2020

• They filed electronically before April 1st

• They did not take the UI benefits exclusion

on their Vermont return

Taxpayers who did not already take the

exclusion will need to amend their return if:

• They filed by paper

• The exclusion makes them newly eligible

for tax credits like the Earned Income Tax

Credit

• The Department is unable to determine the

impact of the exclusion for a taxpayer. The

Department is planning to contact these taxpayers

directly.

For more information, please visit tax.vermont.gov/coronavirus/unemployment-exclusion-adjustments.


SBA Increases COVID-19

EIDL Cap to $2 Million

On September 9, 2021, Administrator Isabella Casillas

Guzman announced the following major enhancements to the

COVID Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program.

• Increasing the COVID EIDL Cap. The SBA will lift the

COVID EIDL cap from $500,000 to $2 million. Loan funds

can be used for any normal operating expenses and working

capital, including payroll, purchasing equipment, and paying

debt.

• Implementation of a Deferred Payment Period. The SBA

will ensure small business owners will not have to begin

COVID EIDL repayment until two years after loan origination

so that they can get through the pandemic without having

to worry about making ends meet.

• Establishment of a 30-Day Exclusivity Window. To

ensure main street businesses have additional time to access

these funds, the SBA will implement a 30-day exclusivity

window of approving and disbursing funds for loans of

$500,000 or less. Approval and disbursement of loans over

$500,000 will begin after the 30-day period.

• Expansion of Eligible Use of Funds. COVID EIDL funds

will now be eligible to prepay commercial debt and make payments

on federal business debt.

• Simplification of Affiliation Requirements. To ease the

COVID EIDL application process for small businesses, the

SBA has established more simplified affiliation requirements

to model those of the Restaurant Revitalization Fund.

To learn about eligibility and application requirements and

how to apply, visit sba.gov/eidl. The last day that applications

may be received is December 31, 2021.

• • •

Life vs. Liquor:

The Average

Vermonter

Would Give Up

Two Years of

Their Life to

Keep Drinking

• One-third would give up caffeine

for life, if they can continue

drinking alcohol.

• 30% admit they ignore studies

warning about alcohol health

risks.

Science and Sobriety:

There are many behaviors and

habits we’ve developed and

continue despite studies having

proven that they have adverse

health complications – from

smoking cigarettes and drinking

too much coffee, to the overconsumption

of processed food and

skimping on exercise. A recent

major study found that drinking

any amount of alcohol has a

negative impact on the brain and

is linked to increased risk of

developing more cancers than

previously thought. However,

many people continue to drink

despite knowing that it could

take years off their lives as evidenced

by a recent 3,700-person

survey conducted by Alcohol.

org a leading provider of alcohol

addiction treatment resources.

The survey discovered that

nearly a third (30%) of respondents

admit they ignore frequent

studies that warn of the health

risks of alcohol. And despite

many studies cautioning that

alcohol can take years off consumers’

lives, the average

Vermont drinker would even be

willing to give up two years of

their life if it meant they could

continue to drink!

Perhaps due to clever marketing,

the survey also found that

more than a third (37%) of

drinkers believe craft beer is

healthier than regular commercial

beer, despite many craft

beers containing a higher ABV.

The more alcohol a beer contains,

the more calories it will

likely contain and if you’re consuming

it frequently, it may create

a dent in a healthy lifestyle.

Almost half of respondents

also believe moderate consumption

of alcohol has health benefits,

despite studies showing

otherwise. 31% wrongly

believed it can actually increase

life expectancy. A further 15%

thought it prevented you from

catching a common cold, and

8% even believed it lowers the

risk of diabetes.

The survey by Alcohol.org

also uncovered that a staggering

89% think wine is the alcohol

that has the greatest health benefits

– is this because it is made

from fruit?!

Lastly, if given the choice

between giving up coffee or giving

up alcohol for the rest of

their lives, more than a third

(37%) would give up their

morning joe every single day for

the sake of being able to drink

alcohol.

Congress Must Include Long Term Care In Infrastructure Package

Congress has an opportunity to prioritize our seniors and

their caregivers by including long term care in the bipartisan

infrastructure package. While nursing homes and assisted living

communities will soon receive much-needed resources

from the Provider Relief Fund, longer-term investments from

the federal government are necessary to help improve quality

of care.

Long term care facilities are facing economic and workforce

challenges that threaten access to care. Across the country,

nursing homes are losing workers, and providers are

struggling to fill vacant roles. The Wall Street Journal recently

reported:

“Nursing homes have a long-term care problem: 18 months

after the crisis began, their staff are shrinking.

“While employment in nearly every occupation has been

recovering from the shock of the pandemic, the number of

people working in nursing homes and other long-term care

facilities has continued to drop, according to federal data.”

The impact of this labor crisis is making news at the local

level:

• The Idaho Press reports that workforce challenges are resulting

in nursing homes being unable to admit new residents.

Troy Bell, president and CEO of TanaBell Health Services,

which operates nine long term care facilities in Idaho, said the

staffing crisis is the worst he’s seen in his nearly two-decade

career.

• In Maine, a significant staffing shortage is one of the causes

of a recently announced closure of a rural facility near

Augusta. In a report by WMTW-TV (ABC-Portland, ME),

Angela Westhoff, president and CEO of the Maine Health

Care Association, said, “If you can’t staff your building and

maintain appropriate staffing levels it makes it really challenging

to stay open and viable.” She fears more nursing

homes could close, especially in rural areas.

• In an op-ed in Tulsa World, Diakonos Group Owner and

CEO Scott Pilgrim writes about how staffing challenges led to

the devastating closure of one of his nursing homes in

Medford, Oklahoma.

Many long term care facilities face dire financial situations,

leaving them without the resources to hire more workers or

make other necessary improvements. Chronic Medicaid

underfunding left many nursing homes struggling to break

even long before the pandemic began. But now, the industry

is facing an economic crisis due to the ongoing costs of fighting

the virus. More than half of nursing homes and nearly half

of assisted living communities are operating at a loss, and

only one-quarter are confident they will last one year or more.

An estimated 1,800 facilities could close over the course of

the pandemic without help.

With most residents relying on Medicaid or Medicare to

pay for their care, government support is essential in strengthening

the long term care industry. With proper funding,

facilities can continue to improve residents’ quality of life.

AHCA and LeadingAge’s comprehensive reform package, the

Care For Our Seniors Act, includes immediate and long-term

strategies to address Medicaid underfunding for nursing

homes, as well as other reforms that will help boost the workforce,

modernize physical structures, and enhance infection

control procedures.

Long term care residents and caregivers cannot do this alone.

We must take the lessons we’ve learned from the pandemic and

ensure that the industry is prepared for the future, especially

with a growing elderly population. Congress must allocate

funding in the infrastructure package to nursing homes and

assisted living communities across the country, so providers can

continue to deliver quality care to their residents.

September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 5


Sept. 29 Twin Valley Senior Center 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Oct. 7 Northfield Senior Center 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Oct. 18 Waitsfield United Church 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

of Christ

Oct. 20 Barre Auditorium 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Oct. 20 Williamstown United 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Federated Church

Oct. 23 Barre Auditorium 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Oct. 25 Waterbury Senior Center 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Nov. 1 Montpelier Senior Center 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Nov. 2 Barre Auditorium 10:00 am - 11:30 am

Fall Fundraiser For

*Community Kitchen*

With your help, this new commercial kitchen will

support valuable programs designed to better

address the severe food insecurity issues right here

in Central Vermont.

So far, the support from our community has been

overwhelming and heartfelt. We have raised $156,111

towards our $300,000 goal. Over halfway home!

Thanks to a generous “matching donation” of

$25,000 we have this opportunity to raise a total of

$50,000 with your help.

Double The Impact Of Your Gift

DONATE TODAY

Online at HeddingChurch.org/kitchen

All donations small or large are appreciated.

Checks can be mailed to:

Hedding United Methodist Church

40 Washington St., Barre, VT 05641

c/o Community Kitchen Fund

ADVERTISEMENT SPONSORED BY:

“No person was ever honored for what he earned.

Honor has been the reward for what he gave.”

Calvin Coolidge, 30th U.S. President

Birthplace - Plymouth Notch, VT

page 6 The WORLD September 22, 2021

Montshire Museum of Science and The

Family Place Awarded Grant to Launch

STEM Learning Initiative to Support

Local Families

The Montshire Museum of Science and The

Family Place have been awarded a grant from

the Institute of Museum and Library Services

(IMLS) to launch a new education initiative,

STEM Learning Together: Strengthening

a System of Support for Young Families.

Through this three-year program, both partner

organizations will support the education and

well-being of two generations within families

(parents and their young children) through

science programs that help meet participants’

education goals, and provide meaningful

engagement in STEM, worksite job training,

and empowering experiences that will

prepare participants for parenthood and the

workplace.

STEM Learning Together helps to advance

the educational goals of both organizations,

and expands The Family Place’s existing program,

Families Learning Together, which is

designed to support young parents, typically

ages 15–25, raising young children in adverse

situations. Participants generally reside

in Windsor County, Vermont, and Grafton

County, New Hampshire.

The STEM Learning Together program was

conceptualized and tested over the past year

in a pilot collaboration between the Montshire

and The Family Place. In this partnership, a

Montshire Science Educator joined The Family

Place support team to provide science and

math instruction toward participants’ learning

goals. The team also includes certified educa

tors, a clinical mental health counselor, case

managers, a registered nurse, home visitors,

and certified child care providers.

The $170,000 IMLS grant will be used to

strengthen and expand the existing system

of support, and to reinforce and facilitate

participants’ engagement in STEM learning.

Research has shown that connecting STEM

engagement experiences to other opportunities

that intentionally encourage youth participation

can increase the impact of STEM

programming.

The STEM Learning Together partnership

will include:

• Science & Math Instruction: The Montshire

will continue to provide math and science instruction

to directly support participants’ high

school achievement and eventual graduation.

• Family Programming: Leveraging the museum’s

strength as expert designers and facilitators

of science learning for family audiences,

the Montshire and The Family Place will develop

and facilitate a monthly STEM learning

program designed for families who receive

services from The Family Place.

• Workplace Readiness: The Montshire will

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pants will receive high-quality training and

experience designed to develop job skills and

workplace readiness. Working with expert

Science Educators, participants will receive

one-on-one mentoring to support skill development

in science communication and customer

service.

Cross-Organizational Professional Development:

Throughout the project, staff from

the Montshire and The Family Place will

participate in quarterly professional development

workshops to build knowledge, skill,

and shared understanding about key issues

and topics facing local children, youth, and

families experiencing adverse situations. This

will allow both organizations to better serve

program participants, and to better meet the

evolving needs of the community overall.

As the leading provider of informal science

learning in the bi-state region of Vermont and

New Hampshire, the Montshire seeks to enrich

the lives of the whole family through its

mission to awaken and encourage a lifelong

interest in science through exhibits and programming

dedicated to hands-on discovery

and education for people of all ages.

“I am thrilled that we have an opportunity

to deepen our partnership with The Family

Place and increase our impact in the community,”

said Jennifer Rickards, Acting Executive

Director of the Montshire. “By engaging

these young families in science, we can spark

a lifelong interest in learning that will support

their development both personally and professionally.”

The Family Place is one of fifteen Parent

Child Centers (PCCs) in Vermont that work to

provide prevention and early intervention services

and support to families with young children

in the immediate region. These services

support positive relationships, strengthen

core life skills, and promote enduring healthy

growth, behavior, and economic stability.

“I’m excited to move forward with this project,

which will provide families with learning

resources and opportunities for growth,” said

ancy loomfield, Eecutive Director of The

Family Place. “The IMLS grant, along with

the generous support of our community, has

made this collaboration possible. And we’re

so grateful for it!”

Together, through their efforts in the STEM

Learning Together program, both partner organizations

are fulfilling their missions, hile

impacting the community in a significant and

lasting way. STEM Learning Together will

run from September 1, 2021 to August 31,

2024.

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Clemmons Family Farm ED Lydia Clemmons

to Receive the 2021 Con Hogan Award

The Vermont Community Foundation and

the organizing committee for the Con Hogan

Award for Creative, Entrepreneurial

Community Leadership are pleased to

announce that Lydia Clemmons, PhD, MPH

will be honored with this year’s award. Dr.

Clemmons is President and Executive

Director of the Clemmons Family Farm in

Charlotte.

Established by a group of Con’s colleagues

in 2015, the annual award recognizes his life

work by honoring a community leader who

shares his vision of a better Vermont and

seizes the responsibility for making that

vision a reality. The awardee shows deep

community involvement, generosity, enthusiasm,

a collaborative approach, and a focus on

data and measurable outcomes in their work.

Dr. Clemmons and her four siblings grew

up on the 148-acre Charlotte farm her parents

purchased in 1962, after her father, a pathologist,

started a job at the University of Vermont.

Her mother joined the medical center as a

nurse anesthetist. At the same time, the couple

worked on the farm, instilling in their

children a deep respect for farming and manual

labor. As African Americans, they also

wanted to create a haven for their children

and other African Americans, many of whom

were artists and scholars, in a predominantly

white state. The farm welcomed members of

the community as well, providing, from the

1960s through the 1980s, a dynamic showcase

celebrating African American music and

art.

Dr. Clemmons left Vermont after high

school to attend Stanford University in

California. Initially she wanted to be a physician

like her father. But after completing her

pre-medical studies, she joined the Peace

Corps and worked as a public health volunteer

in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

She fell in love with the Congolese people,

cultures, and art and built a 35-year career in

public health, living and working in more

than 20 African countries. She returned to the

U.S. to obtain new data and analysis tools to

take back to her work abroad, and now holds

a Master of Public Health in international

health from the University of Michigan and a

PhD in medical anthropology from the

University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Clemmons returned to Vermont in 2013

to help her parents plan for the future of their

farm, one of just 0.4 percent of U.S. farms

that remain in Black hands. In 2017, under

her leadership, the Clemmons Family Farm

won the prestigious National Creative

Placemaking Award from ArtPlace America.

In 2019 it became a nonprofit organization.

According to its website, “the Clemmons

Family Farm mobilizes the power of African

American and African diaspora history, art,

culture, and people to build a loving and supportive

multicultural community in

Vermont—and to both conserve and preserve

the physical farm as an African American

owned land and cultural heritage asset for

future generations.”

Currently, the Clemmons Family Farm has

two major programs. The “Windows to a

Multicultural World” program brings African

American and African diaspora history, art,

and culture to Vermont’s K-12 students, parents,

and teachers, with a focus on joy and

resilience. The “Beneath Our Skin COVID-

19 Storytelling Project,” funded by the

Vermont Department of Health, collects stories

and artwork by 100 Black Vermonters

and 50 health care providers about their

COVID-19 vaccination experiences. The

Clemmons Family Farm will share some of

the stories with the public and also provide

the health department with findings and recommendations

based on insights gained

through the storytelling project, to improve

the state’s vaccination services.

The Con Hogan Award selection committee

chose Dr. Clemmons in large part because

of her work, like that of her parents, to provide

an empowering platform for Black artists

and share Black culture and heritage with

the Vermont community. Says Committee

Chair Scott Johnson: “Clemmons has connected

art and public health to improve people’s

wellbeing throughout her career, and we

are fortunate that she is bringing that vision

and experience to her work in Vermont.”

The $15,000 award, to be used however the

recipient chooses, will be presented at a virtual

ceremony on Wednesday, October 6, at

noon. Visit vermontcf.org/ConHogan for

more information about the award and to

register for the ceremony.

Members of the Con Hogan Award committee

are Will Belongia, Paul Cillo, Steve

Dale, Scott Johnson, Ellen Kahler, Jane

Kimble, Dr. Etan Nasreddin-Longo, Jericho

Parms, Arnold Isidore Thomas, and Diana

Wahle.

The Vermont Community Foundation

inspires giving and brings people and resources

together to make a difference in Vermont.

A family of hundreds of funds and foundations,

we provide the advice, investment

vehicles, and back-office expertise that make

it easy for the people who care about Vermont

to find and fund the causes they love.

The heart of the Community Foundation’s

work is closing the opportunity gap—the

divide that leaves too many Vermonters struggling

to get ahead, no matter how hard they

work. We are aligning our time, energy, and

discretionary resources on efforts that provide

access to early care and learning, pathways to

college and career training, support for youth

and families, and community and economic

vitality. We envision Vermont at its best—

where everyone has the opportunity to build a

bright, secure future.

Visit vermontcf.org or call 802-388-3355

for more information.

Novel Educational Design Search Launched

to Memorialize Children of the Holocaust

The Vermont Holocaust Memorial

VTM, a nonprofit organization orking

to advance Holocaust and genocide education

throughout the state, is excited to announce

a search for student design proposals

for a Holocaust Monument and Garden. Once

complete, the monument will serve to educate

generations of Vermonters about the immeasurable

losses of that era and the consequences

of bigotry and hate, while teaching lessons

of acceptance, resilience, and inclusion.

This monument ill be the first of its kind

in Vermont. The call for proposals is expected

to run through December 15, 2021.

The design search is open to students

studying architecture, art, design, or similar

career interests. During the call for proposals,

prospective participants can register, assess

design elements, and query VTHM monument

committee members.

A detailed prospectus for the monument

has already been accepted and circulated by

professors in architecture and design at several

Vermont universities. “Educating these

Vermont university students and faculty about

the history and intention of the memorial,”

said VTHM President Debora Steinerman,

“has itself advanced the organization’s educational

mission.”

According to Steinerman, “This permanent

outdoor homage, dedicated to the 1.5 million

children who perished in the Holocaust, will

be established as Vermonts first, olocaust

monument. For purposes of design submissions,

it is our hope that this will be sited in

Stowe, at a central location that can provide

classrooms and other relevant facilities. Other

sites are also being considered.”

The proposed monument was inspired by

VTHM’s ‘Leaf Project’. “In Vermont, trees

• • •

dominate and populate our landscape — no

two trees, or leaves, are alike,” says Steinerman.

“Each tree may stand alone — but together

they create a forest. And, like leaves on

trees, every young life lost during the Holocaust

was unique. Imagine the unlimited contributions

from those 1.5 million child victims

had they survived.”

The monument design should help the public

learn about this genocidal historic event.

VTM hopes the final design ill inspire

its visitors and give cause for contemplation

and remembrance. Proposed designs will be

reviewed by a committee consisting of family

members of Holocaust survivors, as well

Vermont artists and educators.

Donations in support of Vermont’s Commemorative

Holocaust Monument are requested

and may be submitted via VTHM’s

dedicated website page.

Monument Design Proposal Review Process

Prospectus details are available on the

“Commemorative Monument” website page:

https://www.holocaustmemorial-vt.org/

commemorative-monument. Monument committee

members will be available during the

process for questions and would be happy to

meet with students while they present their

design responses to this call. A link where

students can upload their submissions will be

provided upon request. Deadline for designs

is Wednesday, December 15, 2021. Please

send all questions, critique, and submission

link requests to: info@holocaustmemorial-vt.

org.

VTHM hopes to complete this singular

Garden for Learning and Monument for Remembering

by the end of 2022.

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September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 7


Grange Gala for

Gardeners and Gleaners!

All are welcome to the East Hardwick Harvest Festival,

Saturday September 25th, from 11 a.m. - 3p.m., at Caledonia

Grange #9, 88 East Church Street in East Hardwick village.

We’ll have free chili and cornbread lunch, make-your-own

doughnuts, community apple cider pressing, music on the

porch, and a carrot contest (prizes awarded for biggest, funniest,

and tastiest). Bring your own apples, and a container to

bring home cider.

Admission is free and the event will be held outside (under

tents in the case of rain). Donations welcome to support future

programming.

Info at easthardwickgrange@gmail.com and 472-8987.

This event is sponsored by Caledonia Grange #9 and the

Small Farm Guild.

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page 8 The WORLD September 22, 2021

PUBLIC LIBRARY

Ainsworth

Public Library

Williamstown

Look for us on Facebook: Ainsworth Public Library

802-433-5887

library@williamstownvt.org

www.ainsworthpubliclibrary.org

2338 VT RTE 14 Williamstown, VT

Curbside: M: 10-5:30pm, TH 10-4pm

Appointments: M: 10-5:30pm, TH 10-4pm

Open Days: T: 2-7pm, W: 11-6, FR: 2-7pm SA: 10-2

Phase 4.5 of Library Opening

Please check our website for details regarding what we are

offering for services. www.Ainsworthpubliclibrary.org We are

offering a variety of services M 10-5:30pm & W 11-6pm, TH

10-4pm appointment and curbside. Appointments are limited

to 6 people in the building at one time. You can sign up ahead

of time by email, phone or FB messenger. Open Days no

6 Washington Street

Barre, VT 05641

Phone: (802) 476-7550

www.aldrichpubliclibrary.org

Fall Festival Book Sale

The Friends of the Aldrich Public Library still have so

many books stored here and there that they weren’t able to put

them all out for the past two sales. And donations keep coming

in! The Friends will be having another sale in conjunction

with the Barre Fall Festival on Friday, October 1, from 11 a.m.

to 6 p.m., and on Saturday, October 2, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.,

in the Milne Room of the library at 6 Washington St., Barre.

The Friends have thousands of books and media for all

ages, with hardcover adult books costing $1, paperbacks ranging

from $0.50 to $1, DVDs and other media at $0.50, and all

children’s items $0.25. Please wear a mask. Due to the rise in

COVID cases locally, we may need to restrict the number of

people shopping at one time in order to encourage social distancing.

Please bring a bag(s) to stock up on some good reading,

listening, and viewing!

This will be the Friends’ last sale until next spring. As

always, we invite anyone interested in becoming a Friend of

the Library to join us in the Milne Room at 4:00 p.m. on the

last Tuesday of each month.

General Information

Library patrons are able to come inside the building for

book browsing and select programming from 11 a.m. to 6

p.m. on weekdays and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays.

Masks are required inside the building at this time. Curbside

Pickup is still available upon request.

Computers, study tables, and access to the library’s copier

are available by appointment. Make an appointment online at

www.aldrichpubliclibrary.org or call the library at (802) 476-

7550 during open hours.

Holiday Closings

The Aldrich Public Library will be closed on Monday,

Jeudevine

Memorial Library

Hardwick

Jeudevine September Book

Discussion

Jeudevine Library will hold a discussion on The Dutch

House by Ann Patchett on Thursday, Sept. 30 at 5:15 p.m.

“On the most basic level, The Dutch House is a book about

two people piecing together the fragments of their youth …

Maeve and Danny’s childhood has a fairytale quality, as if

a place to connect, inspire and learn

28 N Main St., Waterbury, VT 05676

(802) 244-7036

• • •

• • •

• • •

appointment necessary: T 2-7pm, F 2-7pm, SA 10-2pm. Mask

required.

Dragon Hunter Sign Up for Youth

We are hiding 20 dragon eggs and one Super dragon egg on

Saturday, September 25 in Williamstown. Find an egg and

bring it to the library to receive a prize. If you find the SUPER

egg it is a SUPER PRIZE a beautiful dragon puppet. FREE

Ages 3 and up. Sign up to be a Dragon Hunter through the

library website.

September is National Library Card Month

September is National Library card month. Do you have a

free library card? A library card gives you access to books,

audios, movies, +300 online courses, free access to ebooks

and audio books online, park passes that get you in free to

parks around the state, and more. Contact us to get your free

card today.

Trunk or Treat

Our Annual Trunk or Treat Event will be Saturday, October

30th from 3-5pm. Contact us to decorate a vehicle ($10 a car)

or to donate candy to the cause. We will follow Covid restrictions

as we did last year. All proceeds benefit the library for

the purchase of books.

October 11, in observance of Indigenous People’s Day.

During our closings, you can still access e-books, audiobooks,

and other digital resources at www.aldrichpubliclibrary.org.

For Everyone

Knit Together Fiber Arts Group

Tuesday, September 21 at 1 p.m. at the Aldrich Public

Library

This is a very informal “sit, chat, and craft” group. All ages

and levels of experience are welcome! Share your knitting

creations from home and try some Japanese-style knitting at

the library!

Friends of the Aldrich Public Library Fall Festival Book

Sale

Friday, October 1 from 11-6 in the Milne Room

Saturday, October 2 from 10-1 in the Milne Room

Thousands of gently used books, audio-books, DVDs, and

more for all ages at rock bottom prices! Please bring a bag(s)

to haul your goodies home. Most hard cover adult fiction and

nonfiction will be $1, and children’s items are always $0.25.

There will be plenty of paperbacks ranging in price from $1

to $0.50, depending on their size.

For Adults

Senior Day: Comedian Carrie Rae

Wednesday, October 6, at 1:30 p.m. in the Milne Room

Join Stand-Up Comedian, Carrie Rae, and friends for an

afternoon of laughter and fun. This group of comedians performs

regularly all over the state of Vermont. They find

delight in entertaining audiences of all backgrounds and

believe laughter is the best medicine, especially after the

rough year we have had! Please join us in the Milne Room

where masks are required (we’ll meet on the library lawn if

the weather permits). Refreshments will be served.

For Kids

Story Hour

Every Monday at 10:30 a.m. in Currier Park

Join Mr. Ian in Currier Park for a socially distanced storytime!

If it rains, storytime will be under a tent on the library

lawn. Registration is not required for this event. Mr. Ian also

uploads a virtual storytime every Tuesday on the Katherine

Paterson YouTube Page.

Cinderella and Hansel & Gretel were mixed together. They

grow up in a wealthy household but lose everything, their

mother is presumed to be dead, Andrea plays the role of the

evil stepmother, and their stepsisters Nora and Bright are

brought in and given preferential treatment. Like Hansel &

Gretel, Maeve and Danny are forced to lean on each other

and, as adults, are trying to pick up the pieces of their childhood

and find a way back home.”— Jennifer Marie Lin at

https://the-bibliofile.com/dutch-house/.

The book was a NY Times 2019 Notable book. There is a

lot to discuss and it should make a rousing book discussion

selection! Check-out copies of the book now! For more information

call 472-5948 or email: jeudevinelibrary@hardwickvt.

org.

Waterbury Public Library Receives National Grant For

Small And Rural Libraries

$3,000 Grant Will Help the Library Work to Foster Greater

Understanding of New Americans

The Waterbury Public Library has been selected as one of

300 libraries to participate in Libraries Transforming

Communities: Focus on Small and Rural Libraries, an

American Library Association (ALA) initiative that helps

library workers better serve small and rural communities.

The competitive award comes with a $3,000 grant that will

help the library reach out to New Americans and foster

greater communication. “We are so proud to be chosen for this

amazing opportunity,” says Adult Program Coordinator, Judi

Byron. “This grant will allow our library foster a greater

understanding of New Americans and their challenges, and

discover the richness found in one another’s stories.”

As part of the grant, Byron will take an online course in

how to lead conversations, a skill vital to library work today.

The library plans to host three “conversations,” with the first

being a book discussion based on Laila Lalami’s provocative

novel, The Other Americans, a mystery, love story, and family-saga

rolled into a fine chronicle of immigration and its

discontents. Secondly, poet, writer, and activist Rajnii Eddins

shares his poetry and discusses how our stories can be used to

confront racism and other injustices, affirm diversity and

equity, and initiate community dialogue. Finally, the community

can hear about the life and experience of refugees and

asylum seekers in Central Vermont. All three programs will

run on successive Tuesdays in October at 6:30 beginning

October 5th with the book discussion. Books are available

now to check out and keep. A copy of the audiobook is available

on OverDrive (Libby.)

Along with these conversations, the library has also purchased

two Chromebooks, and two Wi-Fi hotspots to lend to

patrons in an effort to provide crucial internet access to community

members.

“This is an important topic for our community,” says

Byron. “With refugees fleeing Afghanistan and other war-torn

countries, the time is now to have these conversations.”

VTDigger has reported on Governor Scott’s willingness to

open our doors to refugees, and has stressed the importance of

diversity in Vermont.

If you are interested in getting involved or taking part in the

conversation, please contact Judi Byron at judi@waterburypubliclibrary.com

or visit www.waterburypubliclibrary.com

for more information.

Since 2014, ALA’s Libraries Transforming Communities

initiative has re-imagined the role libraries play in supporting

communities. Libraries of all types have utilized free dialogue

and deliberation training and resources to lead community and

campus forums; take part in anti-violence activities; provide a

space for residents to come together and discuss challenging

topics; and have productive conversations with civic leaders,

library trustees and staff.

“Libraries Transforming Communities: Focus on Small

and Rural Libraries is an initiative of the American Library

Association (ALA) in collaboration with the Association for

Rural and Small Libraries (ARSL).”


Trash Tramps: Strength in Numbers & Spiffy in Vests!

Anne Ferguson reports: “Here is part of our group – 9 out

of 14 – after our return on Tuesday, September 14, displaying

some of our collection from the hour we were out and about.

We are so lucky to have so many wonderful Tramps caring for

our city and planet.” As they lined up prior to heading out,

staff admired their new safety vests purchased with a Trash

Tramps supplies grant from Central VT Solid Waste

Management District. Thank you, CVSWMD and Trash

Tramps! Trash Tramps go out together each Tuesday and meet

in MSAC Courtyard at 58 Barre St. 1:45pm. Email saddleshoes2@gmail.com

to get on the notification list.

FEAST Veggie Fiesta: You are Invited to Volunteer in the

Kitchen!

Montpelier’s FEAST Farm has grown above and beyond,

and we’re seeking volunteers to help process the beautiful

Celebrate with Shidaa Projects and First Congregational Church of Berlin

Shidaa Projects and the First Congregational Church of

Berlin (FCCB) invite you to a free “Celebration of Community

and Diversity” on Saturday Sept. 25th from 3 to 5 p.m. on

the grounds of FCC at 0 cott ill oad in erlin, VT. n

case of rain, the celebration will be held on Sunday Sept. 26th

at the same time and the same location.

hidaa Proects nc. is a 50c3 nonprofit organization focused

on sharing West African Culture through dance, drumming

and cultural education. Like our name, which means

“gratefulness” in the Ghanaian language, our goal is to share

our appreciation of community and diversity by bringing together

drummers, dancers, and performers across multi-racial

lines in a joyous celebration of this beautiful time of year and

the wonderful communities in which we live.

Shidaa Projects is joined in this celebration by guest artists

Akwaaba Dance Ensemble, based in New Hampshire. The

Akwaaba Dance Ensemble brings together a group of professional

West African drummers and dancers with many years

of experience in Ghana, United Kingdom, and USA. The Akwaaba

Ensemble’s energetic and engaging performances will

collaborate with the host artists Shidaa Projects, Inc to perform

Ghanian Highlife and other rhythms from West Africa.

The First Congregational Church of Berlin has had a special

relationship with the larger Berlin community ever since its

founding in 1798. Our church grounds, including the VanDerreen

Labyrinth, are open to everyone. Our church buildings

Chandler Center for the Art Hosts New Publication: Vermont Almanac

n December 00, Vermont elcomed a uniue and significant

annual publication to its life, Vermont Almanac, a book

fully dedicated to the rural aspects of life in the Green Mountain

state. The publication, all 288 pages of it, honors and

celebrates such topics as Vermont’s farms, forests, wildlife,

plants, butterflies, maple syrup industry, eather, and much

more. The publication also includes stories about the many

Vermonters whose lives are dedicated to the protection and

maintenance of those many defining features of life in Vermont—from

cow farmers and those who compost for a living

to growers of heirloom tomatoes, High Mowing Seeds, strawberries,

Christmas trees and more. Additional details about the

publication are available at: www.vermontalmanac.org .

n celebration of the first Almanac volume, as ell as in

anticipation of future volumes that will be released each

year, Chandler Center for the Arts in andolph, on October

2nd, will host: Vermont Almanac: Stories Told From & For

the andan evening of readings by ten of the many dozens

of authors featured in the first volume, accompanied by live

music by the band Turnip Trucka fivepiece acousticroots

• • •

The Montpelier Community

Gospel Choir In Person

The Montpelier Community Gospel Choir (MCGC) began

their first live season since March 00. After a year and a

half of an online oom format, they are thrilled to finally be

orking together in person again. Their first rehearsal ent as

planned with protocols in place.

They are planning on a December concert that will either

be in-person or live-streamed. At the concert the MCGC will

debut an original composition, I Find The World, which grew

out of the pandemic experience.

Changes abound. n the spring of 0, ohn arrison, beloved

music director of 27 years, will be stepping down. The

choir is in the process of looking for a new director. They have

updated their website vtgospel.com, which features video

clips of past performances as well as their entire December

0 concert.

• • •

• • •

produce to use it this fall and winter in our FEAST Senior

Meals. oin us for .5 hours, enoy kitchen camaraderie and

a special Mediterranean lunch prepared for you by our lead

kitchen volunteer, a chef from Tunisia! Volunteer Fiestas take

place in our beautiful Kitchen (58 Barre St, Montpelier) on

Tuesdays and Fridays from 30 30pm. f you are interested,

please VP ith your available dates by calling

262-6288 or emailing feast@montpelier-vt.org.

Fall Adult Class Registration Underway!

38 classes begin in-person and online the week of September

27. See our newsletter, https://www.montpelier-vt.org/751/

Classes, stop by or call 223-2518 for details! Featured classes

include Film Appreciation ith ick Winston, Opera

Appreciation ith Erik ielsen, Pastels ith eneane unn,

Great Decisions Current Events, Moving for Parkinson’s &

Other euroMovement Challenges, and a ne lo am

Drop-in group for Music-making. Plus all the old favorites

like many yoga levels, Bone Builders, Tai Chi, Qigong,

Writing, several Art options and more!

Slow Jam Drop-in Group for Music-making, with experienced

musicians at MAC Community oom ieekly

Thursdays, starts /30 600 00pm Open to public Age

uggested donation 5 per session.

The purpose of the lo am format is to get players familiar

with the jam protocols associated with traditional and

Celtic music as well as build confidence to participate in other

jams. The session will start with a short instruction followed

by playing familiar tunes at a slower than normal tempo and

focus on playing by ear once the key of the song is announced.

All acoustic instruments, ages and levels of playing are welcome

(no amplification please). These sessions focus on fun

and learning and are meant for beginning and intermediate

level players with some basic familiarity with their instruments

and will not include in-depth instrument instruction. No

one is turned aay for inability to contribute. egistration

encouraged, not necessary. https://www.montpelier-vt.

org/751/Classes.

We’re open! Stay Informed about MSAC:

To subscribe to our free weekly e-letter, email msac@

montpeliervt.org. egularly updated announcements and

events are available at: https://www.montpelier-vt.org/1128/

pecialEvents. Call our office ith uestions at 35

SEE OUR AD

ON PAGE 23

are an important resource for community events. The church

and steeple, in its classic New England style, is an iconic feature

of the Berlin landscape, a visible symbol of the mutual

support for one another that is so important in our community.

For more information about Shidaa Projects Inc., visit Shidaa.com,

our Facebook page at hidaa Proects nc., call 0

498-5987 or email withheather@yahoo.com.

For more information about First Congregational Church of

Berlin see our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/

pages/category/eligiousOrganization/FirstCongregational

Church-of-Berlin-336491369778762/.

band that plays a mi of bluegrass, sing, gypsy azz, old folk,

and country music. The band’s members, who hail from Tunbridge,

oyalton, and Corinth, include Andy Mueller fiddle,

mandolin, guitar, Peter OConnor mandolin, udy uddell

(guitar, harmonica), Brian Carroll (double bass, guitar), and

Dave ichard guitar, bass.

Proected photographs on the stage from the first volume

will accompany the evening. An extensive farmers’ market

with vendors, who will supply food, drink, and numerous artful

items from across the state, will be held in several locations

in Chandler prior to the events in the main hall, during

intermission, and afterward. The evening’s joyful events begin

at 700 p.m. Admission is “Pay hat you can.” Chandlers

new policy is universal masking for all present in the hall with

the exception of each individual speaker on the stage. The hall

ill sociallydistance ticketed groups and may reuire proof

of vaccination status or a negative Covid test within the prior

72 hours for adults.

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September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 9


Homer R. Fitts

BARRE – Homer Robert

Fitts, 94, of Barre, passed

away Aug. 30, 2021, at the

Central Vermont Medical Center after

months of declining health. He is survived

by his family and friends, and there

will be many memories from his long and

fulfilling life. orn in arre on Oct. 3,

1926, he was the son of Harold W. and

Alice (Downing) Fitts. He attended Barre

Schools graduating from Spaulding High

School in 1944. After graduation, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy

for the last two years of World War II, before returning home

to ork in the family business The omer Fitts Co.. On Oct.

8, 1948, he married Elsie Riddel, of Graniteville. They made

their home in arre before moving to Orange, California, for

a short time. In 1960 the family moved back to Barre where he

would help run the family business for the next 26 years. After

his retirement they moved to their house on the lake at Joe’s

Pond in West Danville. He grew to love Joe’s Pond and its

people. The friendships he made on the pond as well as those

throughout the surrounding area, were some of his best. After

Elsie’s death in 2005 he remained at Joe’s Pond struggling

with life and his health until a wonderful person brought a new

faith and meaning into his life. On ept. , 00, he married

Margaret Lajeunesse Guilmette at Saint Monica’s Church in

Barre. Margaret and her family brought him much joy and

happiness in his later years as a husband, brother-in-law, stepfather,

grandfather, and great-grandfather. He loved all of you

and thanks each of you for your special moments. Homer’s

love for Barre and its people were most evident in his civic

and social involvement over the years. He was a member of

the Barre Rotary, Barre Jaycees, Barre Merchants Bureau,

Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce and Central Vermont

Hospital Board to name a few. He enjoyed the fellowship at

the Mutuo Soccorso Club, Barre Elks Lodge #1535, American

Legion Post #10, Canadian Club and Granite Lodge #35. He

was very active in York & Scottish Rites and enjoyed his 67

years within Mount Sinai Temple #3, which culminated with

him becoming potentate in 1977. As much as Homer loved his

times in Barre and at Joe’s Pond, he also enjoyed his many

trips to the southern Maine Coast (Moody Beach & Wells for

lobster stew and fried clams) where he summered growing up

at the Fitts family beach home. Homer is survived by a son,

Douglas Fitts, and his wife, Christie, of Murrells Inlet, SC;

daughter, Ellen Cooper and her husband, Cliff, of Burlington

and a son-in-law, Eric Martin, of Salt Lake City, Utah; his

grandchildren and their families, Michael Fitts, and his wife,

Andrea, of Trophy Club, Texas, Karen Madigan and her husband

Denny, of Essex Junction; David Cooper and his wife

Abby, of Boston, Massachusetts; Jeffrey Cooper and his wife

Casey, of Boston, Massachusetts; Kallie and Kipp Martin, of

Salt Lake City, Utah; his great-grandchildren Mackenzie and

Jameson Madigan and Ella Cooper. Homer was predeceased

by his wife of 57 years Elsie (Riddel) Fitts; his daughter Susan

(Fitts) Martin; second wife of 9 years Margaret (Lajeunesse)

Guilmette-Fitts; his brothers Wendell Fitts, Stanley Fitts; his

sister Barbara (Fitts) Corrigan and many more family members

and friends. Our Dad left behind family, friends and many

memories, but he wanted you to know how much you meant

to him in making his life so special. It is with much regret, in

these difficult times, that there ill be no calling hours nor

funeral service. A private family graveside funeral will be held

at time of internment at the Wilson Cemetery in Websterville.

At Homer’s request, contributions in his memory may be made

to your favorite charity. Arrangements are in the care of the Pruneau–Polli

Funeral Home, 58 Summer St. in Barre. Family

owned and operated. Those wishing to send online condolences

may do so at: www.pruneaupollifuneralhome.com.

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HWF_World2colx5.indd 4

11/20/10 10:03:12 AM

page 10 The WORLD September 22, 2021

Gerard Merrill Jacques

GERARD MERRILL JACQUES who

lived in Montpelier, VT passed away unexpectedly

on Friday, September 10,

2021. He was born on May 8, 1945 in

Barre, VT to Dorothy Demas Jacques and

Gerard A. Jacques.

Gerard lived in Barre in his younger

years with his parents and siblings. He

attended Peacham Academy after the

death of his father. Then graduated from

Spaulding High School, which was followed by college courses

in art studies.

Gerard, aka Jack, Jackie, or Jerry, traveled the country selling

his brass jewelry, unique lamps, and sculptures and lived

in various places including e Orleans and Florida during

his travels.

He was a lover of both music and art, and was quite the artist

working in a variety of mediums.

He also attended both Woodstock 69 and Woodstock 94,

while wisely avoiding Woodstock 99.

One of his many professions included ork as a stone cutter

at Rouleau Granite Shed in Barre, VT, and was an original antique

fanatic who co-owned Miscellaneous Antiques Shoppe

in the 1990s and continued to his death searching for those

unique interesting items. He dealt in cars over his adult lifetime,

loving the old models and sports cars along with many

other types of vehicles. He could tell you what make, model,

and year an old car was that would pass on the road without

fail. He was the original wheeler dealer.

Over many years he and his former ife Doris cleared land

and built a cabin in Williamstown, VT, where he spent a great

deal of time enjoying over the years, which was deeded to his

three children: Thomas, Jackson, and Morgan.

He leaves behind his former wife Doris A. Blouin and her

husband Kevin Marlier; three children: Thomas M. and his

wife Stacie M. Jacques of Barre, VT, Jackson V. and Jennifer

K. Jacques of Barre, Vt, Morgan D. Jacques and her partner

Ethan artolomeo, and from a previous marriage Olaf ed

ding and Jacqueline Pridemore, and his evil cat Killer. He also

leaves behind grandchildren Carlin L. Z. Jacques, Zavier A. R.

Bartolomeo, Magnolia R. Jacques, Alexandra Pridemore, and

Kenneth McCracken, as well as great grandchildren, nieces,

nephews, in-laws, and cousins.

He is predeceased by his parents Dorothy Demas Jacques

Belanger and Gerard Arthur Jacques, brother Vincent “Butch”

Jacques, sister Lorraine Comi, uncles and aunts, along with

a brother-in-law he cared a great deal for, Steve Cook who

called him Skippy. May they party together again.

n lieu of floers, donations may be made to Wheels for

Warmth, Central Vermont Humane Society, Montpelier Food

Bank, or to the family (Thomas, Jackson, or Morgan Jacques)

to cover expenses.

A celebration of life will be planned for a later date. Contact

the family (Doris, Thomas, Jackson, or Morgan) for more

information or visit awrfh.com where service information will

be updated and you may also share your memories.

Richard Michael Kemp

AE TOW, VT ichard Michael

Kemp, 71, of Barre Town passed away on

Thursday, September 9, 2021 at the Central

Vermont Medical Center.

He was born in Portland Maine on

April 22, 1950 to Richard & Mary (Flaherty)

Kemp. His family moved to VT

when Dick was in 6th grade. He later

graduated from Montpelier High School

and Champlain College.

Dick was an exceptional athlete in

every sport, ith baseball being his first love. From ittle

League thru high school, Dick was known as an outstanding

catcher, a great hitter and a strong team leader. He was on

the MHS State Championship team and received a contract to

play for the Cincinnati Reds in his senior year. Dick is remembered

at the Country Club of Barre as the guy with a smile, a

gracious word for all and a very good golfer. He enjoyed and

supported youth sports, coaching many teams when his children

played. The Yankees, the Cowboys and the Bruins also

had many years of his support, thru the good seasons and the

bad! Dick was also on the Boards of the CVSA youth hockey

and the VT Mountaineers.

Dick followed in his father’s footsteps as an Insurance professional.

He joined the Concord Group Insurance Company

in February of 1989. Early in his career with the company,

he developed into an important part of the company’s leadership

team, becoming the Vermont Claims Branch Manager,

Assistant Secretary of Concord General Mutual Insurance

Company and Assistant Vice President of Green Mountain

and Vermont Accident Insurance Companies. In addition to

his leadership, Dick served as the company’s representative

to the Vermont Association of Domestic Insurance Companies

and was a member of the Vermont Claims Association. Dick

retired on April 29, 2016 after 27 years of dedicated service.

Dick is survived by his wife of 48 years, Kathleen; a daughter,

Stacey and her beloved Newfoundlands, Penalope and

Callie a nephe, Daniel Griffith and his ife essie and a

niece, Carrie Margolis and her husband, Joe. He is predeceased

by his son, ristopher and a sister, udy Griffith.

Calling hours were held from 6-8:00 p.m. on Tuesday, September

14, 2021. Dick requested not to have funeral services

due to Covid. He asks that you choose how to celebrate his life

in a safe environment with friends and loved ones, and that

you share your memorable stories with his family.

n lieu of floers, memorial contributions may be sent to

The Kris Kemp Scholarship, 13 Buena Vista Circle, Barre, VT

05641 or to the charity of your choice.

We wish to thank all those devoted doctors and nurses in

ICU and the Central Vermont Medical Center. Dick was so

thankful for each and every one of you. You were his family

and took such good care of him. You went above and beyond

and we appreciate you so much.

Those wishing to express online condolences may do so at

www.guareandsons.com.

Lucille LaPerle

The Lord opened his arms to welcome

Lucille M. LaPerle, 83 of Barre, Vermont

when she passed away on September 11,

2021.

Born in Barre, Vermont on May 28,

1938, she was the daughter of the late

John and Yvonne Couture.

Lucille was a graduate of Sacred Heart

in Newport, Vermont.

On April , 5, she married the love

of her life Maurice A. LaPerle in St. Sylvester

Catholic Church in Graniteville.

After their marriage they made their home in East Montpelier

for nearly 50 years where they raised their four children.

Lucille retired from The Country House Restaurant and the

cleaning business that she and Maurice started.

Among her interests were her family, baking, cooking, knitting

and playing cards (Canasta).

Lucille loved her family and she had a strong faith and connection

with the Lord. She enjoyed her winters down south in

Myrtle Beach.

Survivors include children, Gary J. LaPerle and wife Elizabeth,

of East Barre; Jodi-Lyn LaPerle and companion, John

Stewart of Montpelier. She is also survived by grandchildren,

Travis J. LaPerle and wife, Jaycie LaPerle; Justin M. LaPerle

and companion, Hailee Holt, and Amanda Lyn Brown. She

also was just welcomed by her great-granddaughter, Blayke

LaPerle, who was born on September 5th and she held her the

evening of her passing.

She is also survived by her sisters and brother, Claudette

Riendeau; Norman Couture and his wife Danielle; Joanne Jerome

and many nieces and nephews.

She was predeceased by her parents, John and Yvonne Couture;

her husband, Maurice A. LaPerle and children; Alan (Pit)

M. LaPerle and Mark E. LaPerle, also, her brother Maurice

Couture and his wife Claire and brother, Roger Couture.

The service will be held on Saturday, September 25th at

10:00 a.m. at the New Life Assembly Church in Barre Town.

Lucille will be laid to rest following the service in the Plain-

Mont Cemetery in East Montpelier, Vermont with her husband

and two children.

Contributions in Lucille’s memory may be made to New

ife Assembly Church at PO o 56, arre, VT 056.

Tela Jayne Molloy

Tela Jayne Molloy, 64, of Berlin, VT left

this world, having lived the best life, on

Tuesday, September 14th at her home

with her loving husband by her side. Tela

was born in Berlin, VT on April 30, 1957,

to Wayne and Edith (Stewart). She graduated

from U-32 and shortly after met her

best friend, husband, and soulmate (who

she admittedly claimed to have stalked

until he said “yes”). Clearly, that was the

right move as Tela and David just celebrated

their 41st wedding anniversary.

They have two daughters, Casey and Nicole, who were Tela’s

pride and joy and who she was most proud of. Tela was the

epitome of living life to the fullest. he filled her days at

Camp David in Island Pond, playing card games (and winning

was of utmost importance), boating and snowmobiling. She

enjoyed going to garage sales, searching for bargains/good

deals, spending time with family and friends, being the life of

the party, and taking advantage of every second of the day.

Tela was patriotic, dedicated to her family and friends and

there was never a dull moment while in her presence. Tela had

faith right up to her last days on Earth. Cancer may have

shortened her life but it didn’t take an ounce of her spirit.

Tela leaves behind her husband David Molloy; daughter

Casey Davis and her husband Clark; daughter Nicole; sister

Sue Markham and nieces Linda Willett, Debra Morgan, Kimberly

Noury; and nephew Jason Stewart and was predeceased

by her parents Wayne and Edith and brothers Richard and

Robert Stewart.

Tela is this year’s recipient of the Annual Ladies Ride for

Breast Cancer which will be held on Saturday, September 25th

starting at Gustos at 9 a.m. with festivities after the ride. A

Celebration of Life will be held to honor her memory at the

Barre Elks on Sunday, September 26th at 12:00. In lieu of

floers please donate to the First Congregational Church of

Berlin UCC.

Online condolences may be left at .guareandsons.com.

Rose Marie Orr (McMillion)

AE, VT ose Marie Orr McMil

lion), a loving mom, daughter and friend

passed away unexpectedly at UVM Medical

Center on September 13, 2021.

Rose was born on July 10, 1967 in

Rochester, NY. She spent most of her

life in Vermont. After high school, Rose

worked at the Lobster Pot as a waitress

for a few years. She then spent the rest of

her career working as a bartender at many

different local bars in central Vermont.

Rose was a very loved and well known person. Her kids

and grandchildren were her life. Her passions were to make

art and crafts, garden and to spend time with her grandchildren.

Rose could make anything you could ever imagine out

of some dried floers and glitter. er creativity as out of this

orld. he absolutely loved to garden and plant her floers.

She would have people stop by and ask to take pictures of her

floers because she had the absolute most beautiful gardens.

he as most proud of her sunfloers. ose had to cats she

left behind that she loved so deeply, Puppy (Zeek) and Zoe

Zoe (Zoey). She always had a soft spot for cats, but her bond

with these two was like no other. She gave them a loving home

and spoiled them with more catnip and cat treats than any cat

could ever imagine. She spent lots of time with her grandchildren.

It was probably her favorite thing in the world to do. She

would bring them to the beach and playgrounds, take them to

get ice cream and so much more. Anything she could do to put

smiles on those little girls’ faces she would. Anyone who met

Rose, knew she was one of a kind. She had a heart of gold and

continued on next page

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11/20/10 10:03:12 AM


2

OBITUARIES continued from previous page

was always willing to help anyone out. Rose had a beautiful,

wild, free and stubborn soul, right up to the very end. Rose

will be forever, so deeply missed but never forgotten.

She is survived by her mother and father, Linda and Durward

Lamb of East Montpelier, VT; her sister and her husband

Michelle and William Casson of Bristol, VT; her life partner,

Adam Parry of arre, VT her oldest daughter, her fianc, and

granddaughter, Brittney Raymond, Victor Finley and Audrey-

ose Frost of East Montpelier VT her middle daughter, fi

anc, and youngest granddaughter, Mallory aymondMcMil

lion, Brett Woods and Camilla Brouillette of West Berlin, VT

and last but not least, her youngest and only son Justin Orr of

Barre, VT. She is also survived by numerous uncles, aunts,

and cousins.

A celebration of life will be held at 12 p.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday,

September 25, 2021 at Wrightsville beach in Middlesex

VT.

Those wishing to express online condolences may do so at

www.guareandsons.com.

ANITA E. ADAMS — A service in memory of Anita Adams

was held on Sept. 18, 2021, at the Bethany Church UCC, 115

Main St., Montpelier, Vermont, at 1 p.m. Ms. Adams passed

peacefully on Dec. 21, 2020, of natural causes. Her greatest

joys in life were her family, of whom she celebrated many

generations, and her wonderful church community.

ROBERT STEVEN BRACE, 61, of Duxbury,

Vermont, passed away quickly and unexpectedly

on Aug. 5, 2021. Robert Brace was an amazing,

prolific and accomplished man obert as a

freedom fighter. obert ould alays remind

everyone that despite the weather, despite the

troubles of the world, and despite whatever may

be challenging them, that it is a beautiful day and you are doing

a good job. A life celebration will be held on Sept. 25 at 2

p.m. at the Waterbury Congregational Church on 8 North

Main St., Waterbury, Vermont. All friends, family and colleagues

are welcome to come (preferably in Hawaiian or cowboy

shirts). Masks are required for attendance. If you would

like to attend the ceremony but are unable, a live stream will

be available at the folloing link .aterburyucc.com/

brace. n lieu of floers, pleases consider making a donation

to the oberts eautiful Day Fund, a nonprofit being estab

lished in Robert’s name to provide grants to people who experience

disabilities in order to help them have one of Robert’s

famous beautiful days gofundme.com/robertsbeautifulday

foundation.

PATRICIA LOIS CELLA, of Peabody, Massachusetts,

formerly of Westford, Massachusetts,

passed away peacefully at age 89 on Sept.

9, 2021, after a long illness. Born in Barre, Vermont,

she was the daughter of the late Olga (Bianchi)

and Romeo Alfred Cella. Pat was predeceased

by her only sibling, Clarice Best.

Survivors include Clarice’s husband, Robins Best, and a cousin,

Marian Fontecha, both of Vermont; and her beloved “Ya-

Ya Sisters,” Terri Orr, Eileen Terrio and Francie Richey; along

with her many dear friends. Her funeral Mass was celebrated

on Friday, Sept. 17, 2021 in the Chapel at Brooksby Village,

Peabody. Interment will be held privately in the family plot in

Hope Cemetery, Barre, Vermont. Memorial donations in Pat’s

name may be made to the Brooksby Village Resident Care

Fund, 300 Brooksby Village Drive, Peabody, MA 01960. Arrangements

have been entrusted to the care of the Blake

Chelmsford Funeral Home, 24 Worthen St., Chelmsford. For

online condolences, please visit chelmsfordfuneralhome.com.

BETTY LORRAINE (RAYMOND)

FITZGERALD, 87, passed away in the comfort

of her home with her family on Sunday, Sept.

12, 2021. Born in 1934 in Sheldon, Vermont,

Betty was the daughter of the late James and Eulah

(Arel) Raymond. Betty was predeceased by

her husband, Kenneth Landon Fitzgerald, whom

she married on Nov. 3, 1956. Betty is survived by her children,

grandchildren, siblings and extended family. A Mass and

Christian Burial was celebrated from St. Andrew’s Catholic

Church in Waterbury (109 Main St., Waterbury, VT 05656) on

Monday, Sept. 20, at 2 p.m. There will be no calling hours. A

private interment followed in Holy Cross Cemetery with the

family. n lieu of floers, memorial gifts ould be appreciated

to Central Vermont Home Health and Hospice, 600 Granger

Road, Barre, Vermont. Arrangements are provided by the Perkins-Parker

Funeral Home in Waterbury. To send online condolences,

please go to .perkinsparker.com.

KRISTI LEA (EASTMAN) GARNER, 54,

died on Sunday, May 23, 2021. Kristi was born

on Oct. 16, 1966, in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, to

Joan (Stearns) and Vernold “Cutplug” Eastman.

She was a graduate of Blue Mountain Union,

Class of 1984. After relocating to Roxbury, Vermont,

she met and married Charles Garner. Like

her father, she had a serious sweet tooth and loved to play

cards and dice. Kristi was always on the hunt at yard sales and

thrift shops, treasuring the art of finding a good deal. he is

survived by her daughter, siblings, and extended family. A

graveside service was held Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2021, at 2 p.m.,

in the Pinehurst Cemetery, South Ryegate, Vermont. For more

information or to offer an online condolence, please visit

www.rickerfh.com. Ricker Funeral Home & Cremation Care

of Woodsville is in charge of arrangements.

THERESE HIGGINS — A funeral Mass for

Therese Higgins, who died on April 9, 2021, was

celebrated 11 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021,

at St. Augustine’s Church in Montpelier. An informal

reception followed at the Pool Pavilion,

located behind the Montpelier City Pool. Following

the reception, her remains were interred

in the Jeffersonville Cemetery.

LINDA J. INGERSOLL, 77, died Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021,

at Genesis Health and Rehab in Berlin. A full obituary will be

published at a later date. Arrangements are by Pruneau-Polli

Funeral Home in Barre.

JOSEPH JAMELE — An open house to honor and recognize

the life of Joe Jamele, who died on Jan. 13, 2021, was

held Saturday, Sept. 18, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at 112 Ladd

oad, arre/Orange, Vermont.

STUART J. “SARGE” KENNE-

DY, formerly of Montpelier, died at

his home in Why, Arizona, on Aug.

24, 2021. Born on July 28, 1943, he was the son

of the late James and Stella (Beaton) Kennedy.

Stuart grew up in the Rockbridge area of Moretown,

Vermont. He graduated from Waterbury

High in 1962. Shortly after graduating, he joined

the U.S. Air Force. Stuart married Linda Jerome in 1972. They

divorced several years later. He leaves his son, his sisters, as

well as many friends and extended family.

DORA E. LOVELY, 90, of Lovely Road,

passed away on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021, at her

home. Born Feb. 18, 1931, in Barre, she was the

daughter of Robert and Mary Ann (LaForest)

Dodge. Dora attended Barre City schools. On

Aug. 13, 1947, she married Robert Lovely in

Plainfield. urvivors include her daughter,

grandchildren and extended family. The graveside service to

honor and celebrate her life was held on Friday, Sept. 17,

0, at p.m. in the PlainMont Cemetery in Plainfield. n

lieu of floers, memorial contributions may be made to Cen

tral Vermont Home Health and Hospice, 600 Granger Road,

Barre, VT 05641. Arrangements are by Hooker Whitcomb Funeral

Home, 7 Academy St., Barre. For a memorial guestbook,

please visit www.hookerwhitcomb.com.

MICAH L. MARTZKE, 49, of Vermont Route

14 died surrounded and held by his loved ones

on Wednesday, September 15, 2021, at 5 in the

morning at the University of Vermont Medical

Center in Burlington. Born June 4, 1972, in Shawano,

Wisconsin, he was the son of Steven and

Debra (Backhaus) Martzke. On June 23, 2000,

he married Sabrina Wintrone at Centennial Lutheran Church

in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He was at home outdoors or at his

cabin hunting, fishing, fourheeling, snomobiling, playing

cards with his family, eating pudgie pies and grilling. Survivors

include his wife, children, granddaughter, parents and

extended family. The service to honor and celebrate his life

was held on Saturday, September 18, 2021, at Christ the Redeemer

Lutheran Church, 46 Warner Road, Barre. Burial will

be held in haano, Wisconsin at a later date. n lieu of flo

ers, memorial contributions may be made to Christ the Redeemer

Lutheran Church. Arrangements are by Hooker Whitcomb

Funeral Home, 7 Academy Street, Barre. For a

memorial guestbook, please visit www.hookerwhitcomb.com.

JOHNNY (JONATHAN ELLIS) MORRIS,

of Montpelier, fle aay free on ept. 3, 0,

in the wee dark hours just as the day began. After

a three-and-a-half-year journey with brain cancer,

and just three days after his 42nd birthday,

Johnny died at home in his sleep, with his loving

wife nestled in beside him. Born Aug. 31, 1979,

in anticoke Territory/alisbury, Maryland, ohnny moved to

Abenaki Territory/central Vermont to attend EC in 00. e

was and is deeply loved, and his rich legacy will live on

through his music, beautifully crafted woodwork, and in the

hearts and minds of his wife and dear friend, Lindsay Armstrong;

his amazing children, parents and extended family. A

memorial and celebration of Johnny’s life will be held at a

later date. n lieu of floers, please share your courageous vul

nerability with one another and truly appreciate those you

love. f you feel called to support ohnnys children ith a fi

nancial gift, donations can be made here https//gofund.

me/6bd6f0f. Online condolences may be left at .guare

andsons.com.

SHAYNA MAE SANBORN passed away at

her home on Aug. 23, 2021. Born on Jan. 4,

1989, she was the daughter of Kenneth Sanborn

and Joan (Beede) Brown. Shayna is survived by

her father and mother; her children, and extended

family. There are no calling hours. There will

be a graveside service held in the Plain-Mont

Cemetery on Sept. 25, 2021, at 11 a.m. A celebration of life

will follow at a later date of the families choosing. Pruneau-

Polli Funeral Home, 58 Summer St. in Barre, assisted the family.

Those ishing to send online condolences may do so at

www.pruneaupollifuneralhome.com.

JOYCE SMYKAL — The funeral service for Joyce Smykal,

89, who died in February 2020, will be 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept.

25, 2021, at Kingston Funeral Home, 35 Slate Ave., Northfield,

here calling hours begin at noon prior to the service.

FREDERICK CARL VIENS, 83, of Waitsfield,

Vermont, passed away at the Central Vermont

Medical Center on Wednesday, Sept. 8,

2021, with his family by his side. Fred was born

on Nov. 27, 1937, at the Marble Farm (a cousin’s

home) on Marble Hill in Fayston, Vermont. He

met Shirley Fiske, who was destined to be his

future wife. Fred and Shirley were married on New Year’s Eve

1960. Fred leaves behind his wife of 61 years, Shirley, his

sons, grandchildren and extended family. A funeral service

will be held on Sunday, Sept. 26, 2021, at 1 p.m. in a tent next

to the Waitsfield nited Church of Christ on Main treet in

Waitsfield. The service ill be folloed by a reception and

then interment in the North Fayston Cemetery on North

Fayston Road. The family respectfully requests that attendees

ear face masks. n lieu of floers, donations may be made in

Fred’s memory to the Central Vermont Humane Society

https//centralvermonthumane.org/ or the Mad iver Valley

Community Fund https//mrvcommunityfund.org/. Arrange

ments are in the care of the Perkins-Parker Funeral Home and

Cremation Service in Waterbury. To send online condolences,

please visit www.perkinsparker.com.

MARIAN M. (RAMSDEN) WAGNER, 78,

passed away at home in Shelburne, Vermont, on

Aug. 24, 2021. She was born Marian Marie

Ramsden on April 21, 1943, in Oceanside, Long

Island, New York. She is survived by her siblings,

children, grandchildren and extended family.

Donations in Marian’s memory may be made

to the Children’s Literacy Foundation (CLiF) or the Vermont

Chapter of the American Guild of Organists. Condolences

may be sent in care of Heidi Ames and Liz King, 104 Sterling

View South, Elmore, VT 05661. Services will be announced at

a later date.

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CONSTRUCTION UPDATE

I-89 Bridges 37S and 38S Berlin

TRAFFIC IMPACT: Flaggers will be present on Route 62 throughout the

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Motorists will encounter a lane reduction in the Northbound and

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• • •

Pupil Weighting Study Task Force

For over 20 years, the majority of school districts in

Vermont have been denied their fair share of education funds,

and their constitutional right to equitable educational opportunity.

That’s because the formula the state uses to distribute

education funds does not accurately calculate the costs of

educating low-income, rural, English language learners and

small school students. UVM and Rutgers University published

a nationally acclaimed report in 2019 that identified

this problem and made specific, empirically derived recommendations

to fix it. It’s been nearly two years since the legislature

received this report that they themselves commissioned,

yet here we are, still trying to convince the legislature

to follow the science and data and adopt these recommendations.

As a parent, Board member in the Marlboro School district,

and member of The Coalition for Vermont Student

Equity, I firmly believe the only real resolution to the equity

in school funding issue is implementation of the proper

weights in the formula as recommended by UVM and

Rutgers. The inequity that has existed within rural, small

schools, impoverished and English language learning communities

these last 25 years is a stain on Vermont’s educational

reputation. Unfortunately, I hear repeated discussion of

fixing the issue by adding more money into the education

fund and creating categorical aid, targeted at certain populations

for certain purposes. To me that is a grave error in the

making – Vermont is fundraising just fine – the problem is

about distributing the funds we have raised and making that

distribution equitable to ensure the cost of educating children

is shared and that the tax rate is as close to even as possible

throughout Vermont.

Equity is about fairness and impartiality. Fairness is easy to

understand: Neighboring districts shouldn’t have more educational

resources than any other and vice versa. That’s fair.

We all pay our fair share and aim to support our schools

appropriately. The trouble with trying to fix this issue by

using categorical aid is the impartiality factor. Categorical aid

Go Ahead; Think for Yourself

By Deb Paul

Sept. 26 through Oct. 2 is Banned Books Week, devoted to

celebrating the freedom to read what you want. Banned Book

week draws attention to censorship efforts that continue to

this day. This is an annual event celebrating the freedom to

read and its purpose, but of course it is to celebrate the freedom

to read what you want.

Don’t take your freedom to read for granted. There are

people eager to tell libraries and schools what they should

make available for us to read and what they should keep away

from us. In plain English, that’s called censorship. No other

word applies. And there is no place for it in American society.

Books are challenged for a variety of reasons: religious

• • •

• • •

But Isn’t Quitting for Losers?

By G. E. Shuman

I

put a new app on my phone a

while ago. It’s one of those

that is supposed to help you,

more precisely, help me, keep

track of weight, calorie intake and exercise regimens.

(Exercise regimens … Ya, sure.) I don’t

exactly know why I would want to do all of

that, but evidently it might help me lose the

20 extra pounds I accumulated while hibernating

last year, so I downloaded the app.

Anyway, I grabbed the app and was soon

very impressed by one part of it; that was

the weight tracker, which, at first, seemed

pretty cool. The tracker makes a graph of your

(I mean my) progress as I drop those terrible, guilty

pounds. What I envisioned was the displaying of something

resembling a downward-sloping Vermont hill as my disgusting-fat

weight-loss progress continued over the weeks and

months. Unfortunately, that is not the envisioning I seem to be

producing. My graph looks like a fairly smooth road, maybe

somewhere in ultra-flat Florida, with a few potholes and speed

bumps here and there, although, actually, there are no potholes

in Florida, so there’s that. So far, as far as that app is concerned,

I’m a little disappointed.

The other ‘helpful’ area on the app is where you put into it

everything you put into your mouth, and it then counts the

calories for you.

Gee … how much simpler could it get than that? This all

works well in theory, but I’m here to tell you that some days,

you, I mean I, just cannot count calories. The app doesn’t tell

you how to input the ingredients in a Chinese restaurant buffet,

to say nothing of calculating the calories in that extra

cheese you always order on your pizza. Those things are just

parts of the great unknown. Also, nowhere at all does it mention

how many slabs of homemade lasagna there actually are

in a serving. That lack of information is just ridiculous. Then

there is the problem of remembering to input the results every

single time you innocently walk through the kitchen and end

is NOT impartial. Categorical aid defines and classifies people

– that is not a healthy nor impartial way to ensure fairness.

Additionally, categorical aid is just that - a band aid. The only

true equity would be something impartial. And the question

there is: do we know what is impartial? Yes, we do. Numbers

are impartial. Formulas are dispassionate. A number does its

job and a formula ensures all distributions go where intended.

The use of categorical aid is dangerous for resolving this

problem because it sees differing personalities enter the conversation

each legislative session and potentially tweak and

modify language.

One such example of these modifications can be seen when

the small schools grant definition began to change under the

Act 46 process to allow only 12 schools to receive aid from

the previous 100. Who was changing that definition of a

small school? How? Why? For this reason you can see that it

is easy for a legislator or state board official to change the

definition of a Vermont region but it is less so with the term

poverty, rurality, or non-native speaker. These are established

terms and the numbers should speak for themselves now and

into the future as populations shift and change. Marlboro

today will not be Marlboro in 25 years. The same can be said

for any other district in Vermont.

Therefore, let the numbers do the work of being impartial.

Categorical aid can be weakened over time as it has for other

programs, and we will be right back here having the same

conversation. While I trust our current legislators to make the

right decision on categorical aid, I would urge you to start

thinking about the legislators who will succeed you. Will they

have the same conscience? The same understanding? The

same classifications? Please contact your legislators and urge

them to reject categorical aid as a resolution. It’s not a permanent

fix.

Douglas Korb

Marlboro VT

Marlboro School Board Member

Member of the Coalition for Vermont Student Equity

belief, concern about profanity or slang or sexual content. But

in all cases, the challenge the attempt to ban a book from

public access involves someone saying he or she has the right

to tell others what they cannot read. We can’t accept that.

We recognize that parents may not consider all books

appropriate for children. As long as parents apply their standards

and moral viewpoints to their own children, we applaud

their efforts at working to instill their values in their offspring.

Remember, even when books are assigned in school,

parents can ask that their child be excused if they find the

material offensive.

It is when others decide their standards must apply to all

continued on next page

up at the refrigerator door. Geez!

Some things are just not as easy to

accomplish as they are advertised to be.

For instance, with mine or any other diet

app, there’s always the problem of correctly

counting the calories in something

like a handful of potato chips.

Wouldn’t that all depend on

just how big the hand is?

Duhhh? When dieting, are

we just supposed to stop

EATING potato chips? And

isn’t it better to grab all the

chips you can with that hand,

so you don’t have to take two

handfuls? Seems pretty elementary

to me. When you think about it, all this counting and

recording can become just impossible, and believe me, all my

counting so far hasn’t done much to change that weight

graph.

On the different, but somehow related subject of self-care,

let me share that I’m not much for the idea of that at all.

Seriously, I think most of that self-care stuff is just an excuse

for being self-ISH. My parents walked a mile to school in

foot-deep snowstorms, uphill both ways, without complaining.

My wife and I raised our kids before the term self-care

was even a thing, or deemed ‘needed’, but that’s all stuff for

another column.

Yes, dietary-wise, I may seem to you to be a bit self-careless,

but let’s just say that I do try to control myself somewhat,

and, at least as far as food is concerned, I can pretty

much resist anything except temptation.

I guess diets, like exercise bikes, only work if you stay on

them, which is a bit disappointing for someone like me. Bad

habits, as in the over-eating of things like chips and frenchfries,

are what I need to quit. But now I’m confused. Think

about it. Isn’t quitting for losers?


Forced Innovation Helps Small Businesses Survive & Thrive

September 13-17 was National Small Business Week .

Even though we are fortunate in Vermont to hold small businesses

in high esteem most every day, I believe this year it’s

even more important to shine a light on these businesses and

celebrate their hard work to sustain Vermonters throughout

this pandemic. Afterall, some were shut down for 14 to 18

months. As a result, some have been forced to alter their

operations and sadly we have lost some to permanent shut

down. Those that remain today continue to find great challenge

in hiring staff to operate the business to meet customer

expectations, and yet other businesses have grown and

expanded. How? Creativity. Grit. Forced Innovation.

For many businesses that have survived, it required creativity,

innovation, doubling down on their work ethic, and moving

out of their comfort zone. Due to the government ordered

shutdown, social distancing and the wearing of face masks,

many small businesses have had to invest their time and

energy into social media like never before. This investment

provided them a channel of communication to maintain a

relationship with their existing customers, while trying to

reach new ones.

The Vermont Retail Grocers Association (VRGA) has

many members who attain superstar status in how they have

negotiated the transition from brick-and-mortar storefronts to

a new online presence effectively. Witnessing firsthand how

our members are adapting their business models and turning

to digital tools has been incredibly impressive. Many have

leaned into the use of social media to communicate with customers,

brighten our days, and communicate pertinent information

to community members.

Take for example the many country stores around the state

that took to Facebook to provide daily updates of the availability

of products in stock. Lisai’s Chester Market, now

Smitty’s Chester Market, made sure to share daily what food

products and other necessities were in stock and out of stock.

They also gave shout-outs to hard working staff responsible

for keeping the store open through this incredibly trying year.

Their posts at first were mostly out of necessity, but they also

created a sense of community when we couldn’t bring folks

together face to face.

Take a look at how Bailey Road in Montpelier utilized

Facebook Live and Instagram. Owner Sarah DeFelice quickly

learned she had to enhance her social media presence to

ensure her women’s clothing inventory didn’t lay stagnant

and her boutique would survive. Bailey Road did qualify for

a small amount of funds ($9,000) through the Paycheck

Protection Program (PPP), but because of Sarah’s hustle and

drive, Bailey Road’s sales only declined by 43%, which certainly

is significant, however she says without her use of

social media her loss in sales would have been much greater.

In order to qualify for CARES Act assistance Bailey Road

would have had to have a loss of at least 50%,Because of

Sarah’s tenacity, the business, consequently or not, did not

qualify for nearly $40,000 in additional financial assistance.

I enjoy celebrating small businesses, but I’m especially

excited to celebrate Small Businesses Week this week;

because it helps me highlight the challenges and victories my

members experienced. Pandemic or no pandemic, the small

businesses across Vermont are quick to think outside the box

when facing a hurdle head on.

I hope you’ll get out and celebrate your local small businesses

this week and, in the weeks, and months ahead.

They’ve worked so hard in these challenging times to fulfill

your needs. Please stop into your local businesses and tell

them how much you appreciate them and how happy you are

that they are still here. It’s going to take a long time to get

through this economic recovery, who knows when we will be

able to claim victory.

About Erin Sigrist and Vermont Retail Grocers Association

Erin Sigrist serves as the president of the Vermont Retail

Grocers Association (VRGA), the leading resource for retailers

and grocers in Vermont. Erin is a seasoned policy advocate

who has successfully testified before the Vermont Legislature

to affect critical policy issues and has worked closely with

State Agency leaders to impact regulatory protocols. She is

responsible for executing the vision of the VRGA board of

Directors through membership outreach and development.

PUBLIC NOTICE

BULLETIN BOARD

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

Washington Unit

PROBATE DIVISION

Docket No.: 21-PR-04366

In re ESTATE of:

PAULINE KEENE

Notice To Creditors

To the Creditors of:

PAULINE KEENE

late of Berlin, Vermont.

I have been appointed to administer

this estate. All creditors having claims

against the decedent or the estate must

present their claims in writing within

four months of the first publication

of this notice. The claim must be

presented to me at the address listed

below with a copy sent to the Court.

The claim may be barred forever if

it is not presented within the four (4)

month period.

Dated: September 15, 2021

Signed: Gary D. McQuesten, Fiduciary

Gary D. McQuesten, Executor

P.O. Box 625

Barre, VT 05641

Phone: (802) 476-4181

Email: vdmlaw@vdmlaw.com

Name of Publication: The WORLD

Publication Date: September 22, 2021

Vermont Superior Court

Washington Unit, Probate Division

65 State Street

Montpelier, VT 05602

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

Washington Unit

PROBATE DIVISION

Docket No.: 21-PR-04453

RE: ESTATE OF

LILLIAN MARY MAGOON

Notice To Creditors

To the creditors of

Lillian Mary Magoon

Late of Worcester, Vermont

I have been appointed to administer

this estate. All creditors having

claims against the decedent or the

estate must present their claims in

writing within four (4) months of the

first publication of this notice. The

claim must be presented to me at

the address listed below with a copy

sent to the Court. The claim will be

barred forever if it is not presented

within the four (4) month period.

Dated: September 16, 2021

Signed: Wanda Magoon

Executor/Administrator:

Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 115

Worcester, VT 05682

Phone: 808-229-5473

Email: LamellWLL@aol.com

Name of Publication: The WORLD

Publication Date: September 22, 2021

Address of Probate Court:

Vermont Superior Court

65 State Street

Montpelier, VT 05602

• • •

Think for Yourself continued from previous page

Vertigo (1958)

★★★★

Our culture has some slightly misguided ideas about

abusive relationships.

Make no mistake, there are countless abusive relationships

and marriages out there – millions and millions.

But if you watch TV and movies, you might think that abusers

plan their abuse – that most abusers are master manipulators,

strategic gas-lighters, and diabolical sociopaths.

If only that were true. If abusers were actually mustachetwirling

villains, it would be easy to spot them and avoid

them.

But many abusive men are regular guys; they are decent at

life but horrible at relationships. The damage, the unhappiness,

the insecurity that cause abuse are hidden below the

surface.

Alfred Hitchcock is an overrated director, but “Vertigo” is

his best film. It took guts to explore the dark and uncomfortable

topic of emotional abuse. And it took serious artistic

vision to cast Jimmy Stewart – Mr. Smith, George Baily – as

an abuser.

“Vertigo”’s plot is contrived and far-fetched. A rich friend

hires detective Scotty Ferguson (Stewart) to follow his wife

and unravel a supernatural mystery. The rich guy’s wife,

Madeleine, is possessed by the spirit of a tormented Spanish

woman who committed suicide at age 26.

Scotty falls in love with Madeleine, even as he watches

helplessly as history repeats itself.

• • •

• • •

• • •

children or all library patrons or students that’s censorship

once again.

Imagine if you didn’t have the right to select your books if

the books available were only those allowed by governmentsanctioned

censors.

Questions you should ask as you think about your experienced

in reading a “banned” book; did it make me think?

There are some people hope that never happens.

Some books contain different or offensive viewpoints, and

that’s okay. The simple solution, don’t read the book. Open

access to the expression of ideas, even those out of the mainstream

is important; it makes you think for yourself. That’s

why newspapers cherish press freedom, and why our country’s

founders enshrined it in the Constitution. In honor of

Banned Books Week, do something to celebrate your right to

think for yourself. Read a book. Any book you want.

The freedom to read is as important as the freedom to

speak. This would also include papers this is how we get different

perspectives-views-ideas on issues. Hold tight your

freedoms before you lose them one at a time.

Things go from weird to disturbingly weird in the final act.

Scotty finds a shopgirl named Judy who looks like his departed

love. He talks Judy into going out with him. Then he pressures

her into changing her hair and dressing like Madeleine.

“Vertigo” is a must-see classic because of Hitchcock’s honest

exploration of emotional abuse.

The way Scotty bullies and manipulates Judy is ugly and

uncomfortable to watch. But he never views himself as an

abuser or a bad guy. In Scotty’s entitled mind, he is inspired

by love and fulfillment.

I have nothing but admiration for Jimmy Stewart. He pulled

a Leonardo DiCaprio – using his wholesome heartthrob image

to make his dark characters even more troubling.

In “Vertigo,” Hitchcock asks the upsetting question: if

Jimmy Stewart can be an obsessive, troubled abuser, who’s to

say that your man can’t be, too?

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

Washington Unit

Docket No.: 21-PR-03652

In re ESTATE of

Karen Ann Oelschlaeger

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

To the Creditors of:

KAREN ANN

OELSCHLAEGER,

late of Montpelier, Vermont

I have been appointed to administer

this estate. All creditors having

claims against the decedent or the

estate must present their claims in

writing within four (4) months of

the first publication of this notice.

The claim must be presented to me

at the address listed below with a

copy sent to the Court. The claim

may be barred forever if it is not

presented within the four (4) month

period.

Signed: Eric Oelschlaeger,

c/o Claudia I. Pringles, Esq.

32 Main St. 370

Montpelier, VT 05602

Phone: (802) 223-0600

Email: cpringles@pringleslaw.com

Name of Publication: The World

Publication Date: Sept. 22, 2021

Vermont Superior Court-

Washington Unit (Probate Div.)

65 State St.

Montpelier, VT 05602

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

Washington Unit

Docket No.: 21-PR-00457

In re ESTATE of

Marjorie Joanne Power

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

To the Creditors of:

MARJORIE JOANNE POWER,

late of Montpelier, Vermont

I have been appointed to administer

this estate. All creditors having

claims against the decedent or the

estate must present their claims in

writing within four (4) months of

the first publication of this notice.

The claim must be presented to me

at the address listed below with a

copy sent to the Court. The claim

may be barred forever if it is not

presented within the four (4) month

period.

Signed: Rebecca Power,

c/o Claudia I. Pringles, Esq.

32 Main St, #370

Montpelier, VT 05602

Phone: (802) 223-0600

Email: cpringles@pringleslaw.com

Name of Publication: The World

Publication Date: Sept. 22, 2021

Vermont Superior Court-

Washington Unit (Probate Div.)

65 State St.

Montpelier, VT 05602

PUBLIC NOTICE

TOWN OF

BERLIN

Road Closure

The Town of Berlin would like to inform you

that Crosstown Road will be closed for all traffic,

pedestrians, and bicycles for reconstruction work

from 27 September thru 1 October 2021.

Time of closure will be from 7AM 27 September to

1 October until work is completed.

Signs will be posted.

You will need to use an alternate route

during this period.

Thank you for your understanding while we do this

required work.

September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 13


Congratulations

The winner of

the 45th annual

Corvette Club of Vermont

0 raffle has been chosen.

Congratulations to

Jamie Laquerre

of Montpelier, VT ho

took home this stunning car

provided by

Cody Chevrolet.

Happy 92nd

Birthday

Edith

Chatot

9-28-2021

Celebrate Edith

Chatot’s birthday

with her by sending

a card to:

Menig Nursing Home

215 Tom Wicker Lane

Randolph Ctr., VT 05061

Central Vermont Medical Center

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS

The following birth announcements were submitted by Central Vermont Medical Center

on Sept. 11, 2021. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to CVMC.

A daughter, Lana A. Casper, was born on 9/5/21 to Leilani

(Rojas) and Andrew Casper of Northfield.

A daughter, Blayke Renee LaPerle, was born on 9/5/21 to

Jaycie and Travis LaPerle of East Barre.

A daughter, Ayryal Lorine Paton-Brown, was born on 9/9/21

to Brandi Haynes and Steven Brown of Orange.

Happy Birthday!

FROM

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone

special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the

names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a

FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to

buy. Just send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o

BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302—Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your

name, address & phone number for prize notification.

SEPT. 10

Richard Gould, 65, Barre

SEPT. 14

Brett McNaulty, 32, Graniteville

SEPT. 22

Carol Scott, 41, Barre

SEPT. 25

Bob Felch, 65

SEPT. 26

Jill Williams, 65, Brookfield

SEPT. 24

Tyler Comstock, 39, Orange

SEPT. 26

William Hodge, 90, Topsham

Aeletha Kelly, Barre

SEPT. 28

Camden Tatro, 17, Middlesex

This Week’s Cake Winner:

William Hodge, 90, Topsham

CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT)

at 479-9078 and ask for the Bakery Department

by Thursday, September 23 to arrange for cake pick-up.

PRICE CHOPPER

“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake

403 U.S. Rt. 302—Berlin

Barre, VT 05641

Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will

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prior to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

BIRTHDATE ___________________________________________

NAME ________________________________________________

AGE (this birthday) ______________________________________

ADDRESS ________________________________________________

PHONE__________________________________ _____________

page 14 The WORLD September 22, 2021

Gifford Medical Center

BIRTH

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The following birth announcements were submitted by Gifford Medical Center on

September 12, 2021. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to Gifford.

A girl, Analeigh Celeste Fox was born August 31, 2021 to

Emily (Baer) Fox and Timothy Fox of Woodstock

A girl, Penelope (Poppy) Jane Healy was born September 3,

2021 to Christina Healy and Brandon Healy of Montpelier

A boy, Gavin Michael Minsky was born September 4, 2021 to

Nicole (Chow) Minsky and Corey Minsky of Barre

A girl, Rosalyn Robin Gilbert was born September 5, 2021 to

Stephanie Henderson and André Gilbert of Williamstown

SURPRISE!

80th Birthday

Card Shower

Jim Trombley

Oct. 5, 2021

Share A Memory

269 Windywood Road

Barre, VT 05641

Happy

Anniversary

Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts and The WORLD would like to help you wish

a special couple a Happy Anniversary. Just send their name, address & wedding

anniversary date. Each week we publish the names, plus we’ll have a

monthly winner for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses at Forget Me Not Flowers

& Gifts, 214 N. Main Street, Barre. No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send

anniversary names two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to: The WORLD,

c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please

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Forget Me Not

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214 N. Main St., Barre • 476-6700

Mon.-Fri. 9-6 | Sat. 9-1

We belong to the Flower Shop Network!

www.forgetmenotflowers.barre.com

Please Send Us Your Anniversaries

And Be Automatically Registered To Win A 1/2 Dozen Wrapped,

Red Roses From Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts

SEPT. 22

Joyce & Paul Liberman, 69 years, Williamstown

SEPT. 23

Brad & Marcia Hudson, 26 Years, Plainfield

SEPT. 27

Adam & Elizabeth King, 13 years, Plainfield

FORGET ME NOT FLOWERS & GIFTS

“HAPPY ANNIVERSARY”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD

c/o Happy Anniversary

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

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ANNIVERSARY

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Untitled

By Charlie Knowlton

Morning mist over Molly`s,

a late August gold haze.

Crossing hayfields of Danville,

Cabot`s meadows and maze.

A spoon dips the honey,

apple cinnamon rolls,

sippy straw in a backpack,

empty cereal bowls.

Red leaf in the maple,

a yellowing white birch,

pot pies in the oven,

Thursday night at the church.

Blue ribbon Bessie,

the taste of fried dough,

bloomin` onions in Tunbridge,

4 H best of show.

Pink holly hocks have risen

soon the purple mums bloom,

and there`ll be frost on the butternut,

under full harvest moon.

Graduation

Timothy R Barre

Graduation –

A time not to be feared

But a time to cherish

Graduation –

Places you in that elite of most;

Passing lives behind

Taking steps forward

Your future beckons…

Graduation –

Friends you’ve made;

Some will last

Some you’ll never hear from again…

It’s all part of growing up.

Graduation –

A part of life that allows you to bloom

Into a better person –

Shaping you not too soon…

Learning by mistakes being made

Wisdom follows in it’s wake…

Graduation –

A celebratory time for you

Congratulations are in store

Don’t forget that only you

Can make your life what you adore.

And finally….graduation -

A time to move on

And face those fears

Breathing life into all your tears

Ponder not upon

What has been done -

But what you’ll accomplish in your life

-

Walking tall and proud

A smile goes a long way within a

crowd.

• • •

Wedding

Announcement

/0/0 in artlett, e

ampshire. ebecca ynn

oe Tomaszeski of

Tremont treet, arre VT

056 married George Glen

oe of Tremont treet,

Barre VT 05641.

ARIES (March 21 to April

19) Decisions involving

your finances might seem

to be foolproof. But they

could have underlying

risks you should know

about. Don’t act on anything until all the facts are in.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Keep that keen Bovine

mind focused on your financial situation as it begins to

undergo some changes. Consider your money moves care

fully. Avoid impulsive investments.

GEM May to une 0 oull need to adust some

of your financial plans no that things are changing more

quickly than you expected. All the facts you need haven’t

yet emerged, so move cautiously.

CACE une to uly Personal and professional

relationships dominate this period. Try to keep things un

complicated to avoid misunderstandings that can cause

problems don the line.

LEO (July 23 to August 22) That elusive goal you’d been

hoping to claim is still ust out of reach. ut something else

has come along that could prove ust as desirable, if only

you ould take the time to check it out.

VGO August 3 to eptember This is a good time

to get aay for some muchneeded rest and relaation.

You’ll return refreshed and ready to take on the workplace

challenge that awaits you.

A eptember 3 to October Confidence gros

as you ork your ay through some knotty situations.

Watch out for distractions from ellmeaning supporters

that could slow things down.

COPO October 3 to ovember Consider spend

ing more time contemplating the possibilities of an offer

before opting to accept or reect it. ut once you make a

decision, act on it.

AGTTA ovember to December oure in

a very strong position this week to tie up loose ends in as

many areas as possible. omeone close to you has advice

you might ant to heed.

CAPCO December to anuary Congratula

tions. This is the week you’ve been waiting for: After a

period of sudden stops and fitful starts, your plans can no

move ahead ith no significant disruptions.

AQA anuary 0 to February oure in an e

ceptionally strong position this eek to make decisions on

many stillunresolved matters, especially those involving

close personal relationships.

PCE February to March 0 The ne moon starts

this eek off ith some positive movement in several ar

eas. A special person becomes a partner in at least one of

the maor plans youll be orking on.

BORN THIS WEEK: You work hard and get things done.

You also inspire others to do their best. You would do well

heading up a maor corporation.

c 0 ing Features ynd., nc.


SEPTEMBER BRIDAL DIRECTORY | THE WORLD

Alternatives To Engagement Rings

Engagement rings are often sizable

investments. Money magazine

reports the average engagement

ring costs around $5,800. An

engagement ring symbolizes the

start of a lifelong commitment and

may even set the tone for a couple’s

wedding day.

Jewelry styles are personal, and grooms-to-be should carefully

research their significant others preferences in terms of

precious metals, colors and gemstones. Even though tradition

holds that a diamond gemstone is classic for engagement

rings, these precious stones are not the only options. In fact,

before World War II, just 10 percent of proposals involved diamond

engagement rings. That number jumped to 80 percent

by 1990. However, many modern couples now lean toward

other offerings not only for the uniqueness they provide, but

also for the potential cost savings.

Those seeking something unique can embrace these engagement

ring options.

• Amethyst: This vibrant, lavender-hued stone can be

breathtaking when cut the correct way. Purple shades have

long been associated ith royalty, making an amethyst fitting

for such an occasion as special as an engagement. Because

amethysts, which are less expensive than diamonds, are a

seven on the Mohs scale for gemstone hardness, they can be

very durable.

• Knot rings: These rings do not have a center stone. Rather,

theyre designed to be a tied knot or infinity symbol. These

rings can be particularly sentimental as they represent true,

unbroken love.

Opal Gemstones, like floers, have been assigned certain

meanings. Tying the engagement ring to one of them can

infuse more symbolism into the relationship. Opal, for

example, represents love, passion, creativity, spontaneity,

and inspiration. Those traits seem tailor-made for surprise

proposals.

• Sapphire: While sapphire stones often are blue, they can

also be yellow, green, pink, and white. Sapphires are the

third hardest mineral. A white sapphire can be the perfect

diamond replacement.

Garnet or ruby ed is the definitive color of love. A

• • •

Valentines Day proposal can be made even more special by

presenting an engagement ring with a red gemstone.

• Moissanite: The jewelry source Brilliant Earth says moissanite

is a gemstone first discovered in 3 by enri Mois

san in a meteorite that fell to earth. It is remarkably similar

to a diamond in appearance and strength. Moissanite also has

heightened brilliance, with a refractive index higher than that

of a diamond.

Couples have many beautiful alternatives to diamonds that

they can explore when shopping for engagement rings.

Tips For A Successful Marriage Proposal

People ready to “pop the question” may

wonder about the right way to initiate an

engagement proposal. Because a marriage

proposal is such a memorable moment in

a couples’ lives together, those doing the

proposing often go to great lengths to

ensure things go smoothly. While there is no

proposal playbook, these guidelines can assist

those ready to take the leap.

Add a personal touch. ts easy to get caught up in mak

ing a marriage proposal a spectacle or something worthy of a

social media post. But taking a sweetheart back to a special

place that recalls a significant moment can set the backdrop

for a memorable proposal. ncorporating the place you first

met or a special song into the proposal can make it that

much more personal and meaningful.

• Embrace the old fashioned. It may be romantic to step

back in time and followed the traditions of yesteryear.

Show respect to future in-laws by speaking to them about

intentions to propose and ask for their blessings. Get down

on bended knee hen asking for a seethearts hand. uch

gestures add up to meaningful expressions of love.

• Consider timing. A person may be so excited to propose

that he or she fails to consider how the other person in the

relationship is feeling. If that person is overwhelmed by

work projects or stressed about upcoming events, consider

waiting to propose at a more relaxed time.

• Enlist help from others. It can be a challenge to keep

your excitement hidden while collecting information about

a future spouses likes and dislikes. Ask friends and close

family members to be your accomplices so that information

can be gathered without generating suspicion. This can be

especially helpful hen finding the perfect ring.

• Keep it simple. The more complex a proposal, the more

opportunities for things to go wrong. Simplicity, even if it

means keeping the proposal to yourself until the question

has been popped, can make for an extra special moment.

Marriage proposals happen every day. With humor, confidence

and a heart full of love, popping the uestion can be

a success.

J

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September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 15


Everything

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE WORLD

Pets

There are some rules you need to follow when visiting a

dog park, to make sure people and dogs stay safe.

1. The most important health and safety precaution you can

take before visiting a dog park is to be sure your dog is up to

date on shots. Some dog parks will require you to write your

pets rabies vaccine identification number on a registration

form before entering.

2. Your dog should know to come when called and respond

to its name before visiting the dog park. Be sure these basic

training goals are met before venturing out.

3. Your dog should be properly socialized before being

exposed to other dogs in an off-leash setting. If your dog is

nely adopted, first introduce the dog to friends and neigh

bors’ dogs and see how it goes before hitting the dog park.

. e prepared to find your dog in case it manages to escape

the park.

5. Pick up after your dog immediately when he eliminates.

No exceptions. This means you should be prepared with

plenty of bags and dispose of them in provided trash cans.

6. Don’t bring food with you. This includes your own food

and treats for your pup. ou ill uickly find yourself sur

rounded by hungry dogs, who might jump or bite to try to get

the food.

7. Keep your dog’s collar on and its leash with you. If your

dog gets out of hand or does not obey commands, leash the

dog immediately.

f its your first visit to a dog park, keep in mind that your

dog might be guarded while on the leash. This is because it

might feel trapped and unable to escape if an aggressive dog

should approach. Unleash the dog as soon as possible after

entering the park to give it a chance to get its bearings and

get comfortable off the leash

Dog Park Etiquette

Visiting a dog park can be a great way to exercise and socialize your dog. There aren’t many public places

where dogs are allowed off leash, so take advantage of being able to allow your dog to run free.

Symptoms Pet Have Allergies

And What’s Behind Them

Allergies can vary in severity and cause various symptoms. According to the

Mayo Clinic, allergies occur when the immune system reacts to a foreign

substance by producing antibodies. These antibodies identify a particular

allergen as harmful, even when it isn’t. Allergies can cause reactions in the

skin, breathing passages and digestive system.

Thousands of people experience allergies

to foods, pets and environmental factors.

Pets also can be susceptible to allergies.

Allergies can be found in cats and dogs, according

to PetMD. They also may be present

in other animals. People who notice their

companion animals scratching, chewing or

licking themselves more than normal may

find their pets have allergies. ome pets may

experience gastrointestinal issues as well.

The pet care information site Pet Cube

says common allergens for pets can include:

• pollen from trees, grass and weeds

• food ingredients

• dust mites

• prescription medications

fleas

flea/tick control products

• cleaning products

While their human friends may get runny

noses or coughs from allergies, symptoms

of allergies in cats and dogs tend to take the

form of skin irritation, otherwise known as

allergic dermatitis. Pet parents should look

for the presence of red and irritated skin, hair

loss, hot spots, and rashes or hives, in addition

to extensive itching or obsessive licking.

Flea allergies are one of the most common

sources of allergies for pets. The bite of just

one or to fleas per eek is enough to cause

a reaction. A pet gnawing just at the base of

the tail may be suffering from fleas, although

other areas may be affected, advises PetMD.

Seasonal and environmental allergies or

allergies to foods can result in face rubbing

and licking, especially the paws. Skin or ear

infections also may occur.

Pets also may be allergic to one another.

According to veterinarian Dr. Robert Trimble,

co-founder of the San Francisco-based

Fuzzy Pet Health, says he’s heard of dogs

being allergic to cats and vice versa.

The American Kennel Club urges pet

parents to seek help if their pets seem to be

itchy all the time. Allowing a pet to scratch

or lick for extended periods of time may

lead to skin infections with bacteria or yeast.

While all allergies cannot be tested, elimination

diets and other techniques may help

pinpoint sources of allergies. It is essential to

speak with a vet to determine how to relieve

allergies to help pets feel more comfortable.

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September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 17


EVERYTHING PETS | THE WORLD

Hamster Health Issues

Hamsters are relatively easy pets to keep, but they are susceptible to

some health problems that you might come across.

Here is a rundown of the ailments hamsters can face and

how to spot them.

WET TAIL

A hamster who is having diarrhea could have Wet Tail, a

bacterial infection that could be fatal if it’s not treated immediately.

Wet Tail can be brought on by the stress of adjusting

to a new home, changes in diet, an overcrowded cage,

extreme temperatures or being kept in a cage that’s not kept

clean. Look out for bedding that’s soiled more quickly than

usual and a stench coming from the hamster’s cage. These

are the warning signs, and your hamster should see the vet

immediately. While it could be innocuous diarrhea caused by

overfeeding vegetables, it could be more serious, according to

Pet Assure.

CONSTIPATION

A range of issues from poor diet to parasites to eating

bedding can cause a hamster to become constipated. It also

could be a sign of intussusception, a condition in which the

intestines fold in on themselves. If your hamster is constipated,

you will notice extremely hard stool and you may see the

hamster straining to defecate. See your veterinarian immediately

to rule out a serious condition.

CANCERS AND TUMORS

Hamsters are susceptible to cancers and tumors, particularly

lymphoma and tumors in their organs. Symptoms to

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• • •

Become a Groomer

If you’re looking to work with pets on a daily basis, becoming a groomer might be for you.

In general, people are spending more on their pets than

ever. In 2020 alone, pet owners spent $103.6 billion, according

to the American Pet Products Association.

This means all kinds of obs in the animal care field are in

demand.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics said in 2019 that employment

for animal care and service workers was projected

to grow 22% through 2029, adding more than 75,000 jobs,

which is much faster growth than the average for all occupations.

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Most groomers have a high school diploma or equivalent.

They may learn the trade on the job, under the guidance of

an experienced groomer, or attend a grooming school, according

to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Experience with

animals is preferred.

The National Dog Groomers Association of America

certifies groomers as “master groomers” after they complete

written and hands-on testing in grooming various classes of

dogs.

WHERE THEY WORK

Groomers may own their own grooming shop or work

be on the lookout for are low energy, weight loss or loss of

appetite, abdominal pain, patches of hair loss, skin inflamma

tion or a lump. Some tumors may be benign, while others can

signify cancer that can spread throughout the hamster’s body.

Getting treatment early will help improve the prognosis.

HAIR AND SKIN PROBLEMS

Some hair and skin problems are common in hamsters.

They include fleas and lice, mange, mites and ringorm.

While some hair loss can be normal, especially in older hamsters,

you should be concerned if you see dry, crusty patches

of skin, reddened skin or lesions on the skin, or if you see the

animal scratching.

An abscess is another that can form on a hamster’s skin,

according to The Spruce Pets. An abscess can begin with cuts

or scratches on the skin, or inside the hamster’s cheek, and

progress to a pusfilled pocket. f the hamsters cheeks seem

perpetually full, check for an abscess.

RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS

Hamsters can catch a cold, which you will notice by

lack of activity and the ears being held back. There may be

discharge from the nose. The hamster’s fur may get dull, and

you may hear the hamster sniffle or sneeze. ou should clean

and disinfect your hamster’s cage, and put in new bedding,

after it has a cold. To prevent colds, keep the hamster’s cage

warm and clean, and don’t handle it when you have a cold, as

you can pass your cold to your hamster.

in an existing shop with other groomers. Another option

that has been increasing in popularity is to operate a mobile

grooming van, which goes to customers to provide grooming

services on-site. Start-up capital can be expensive for this

type of business, as you ill need a specialized van outfitted

with equipment needed to wash, dry, trim and otherwise accommodate

dogs.

Some groomers cater to the dog show circuit, which

requires a lot of travel.

TOOLS FOR SUCCESS

The BLS lists the following qualities that will make someone

well suited for animal care jobs.

• Compassion and patience when dealing with animals and

their owners.

• Customer service skills to help pet owners meet their pet’s

needs.

• Attention to detail for maintaining records and monitoring

changes in animals’ behavior.

• Physical stamina. Grooming is a physical job which requires

kneeling, lifting and bending.

• Reliability to care for animals on schedule and in a timely

manner.

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page 18 The WORLD September 22, 2021


EVERYTHING PETS | THE WORLD

Puppy Milestones

Raising a puppy can be challenging and rewarding. There will be many milestones along the way.

The most important jobs you must do while raising a

growing puppy are to train and socialize the puppy with other

dogs.

Small breeds will stop growing at 6 to 8 months, while

larger dogs could continue growing until 18 months. All the

while, your puppy will change and grow.

Here is a list of developmental milestones your pup may

pass as it grows, according to Eukanuba and Rover.com.

Two months. This is a good time to begin potty training

and be sure your puppy gets the vaccinations it needs.

Three months. Your puppy will begin to chase items, such

as a ball or its tail, and will begin to recognize its own name.

You can also begin introducing your dog to other dogs, provided

it has all its vaccinations.

Four months. At this age, a puppy will respond to the command

“come.” It may begin to lose its milk teeth.

Six months. Puppies will begin to play fetch and can learn

simple commands, such as “sit,” “stay,” “heel” and “down.”

Puppies should be spayed or neutered by this age.

Seven months. Your puppy will lose its milk teeth and its

adult teeth will come in.

Eight months. Your puppy should be able to go 8 hours

between bathroom breaks.

Nine to 12 months. Your puppy may begin to test your

limits, much like teenagers do. They may have a short attention

span and disobey commands and exhibit destructive

behaviors. Continue socializing and training.

One year. Celebrate your dog’s birthday and all the progress

you’ve made together. Keep up the hard work of training

and socializing.

Eighteen months. At this age, your dog may be sexually

mature and will be approaching social maturity.

• • •

How to Choose a Pet Sitter

Hiring a pet sitter can be a more economical choice than a kennel if you have multiple dogs.

If your pet struggles with behavior or social behavior

issues, or is distressed when left at a kennel, a pet sitter also

might be a good option.

When you’re ready to hire a pet sitter, there are some

things to keep in mind to make sure you get a good fit for

your pet.

1. Read reviews. Many websites have sprung up to help

people find pet sitters, but you might ant to your vet to ask

for recommendations first. f you do choose a sitter online,

focus not ust on revies but on any verification or certifications

offered by the website based on their past experiences

with a sitter. Ask for contact info of previous clients you can

contact for a reference.

2. Check for bonding and insurance to help protect you in

case an accident happens on your property.

3. Ask what kind of training and experience the sitter has.

deally the sitter ill have some basic pet first aid training

and knowledge of pet health and safety.

4. Schedule a visit. Notice how the sitter gets along with

your pet and how your pet responds.

5. Ask which services are included. Will they feed your pet

or administer medication? Will they commit to timely visits

with nice, long walks?

6. Ask how often the sitter will update you on your pet’s

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status. This might be daily or a couple of times throughout

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7. Insist on a written contract that lays out the services provided

and the fees, and how and when the fees will be paid.

Your sitter also should ask lots of questions about the pet’s

needs and daily routine, to be sure he can continue those

routines while you’re away.

If the sitter has not been vetted by a third party, consider

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September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 19


EVERYTHING PETS | THE WORLD

Cat Litter Box Issues

It can be frustrating when a previously housebroken cat begins eliminating

outside the litter box or having other elimination problems.

ome cats can become finicky about their litter, the cleanliness

of the box or having to share a litter box. Often, however,

these problems are caused not simply by bad behavior

but by an underlying health issue. In fact, for a handful of

diseases and disorders, changes in elimination patterns can be

the first clue that something is rong.

FIRST STEPS

When your pet first begins having a litter bo issue, check

for simple issues first. These include too fe litter boes you

should have one on each level of the house), locating the

litter box in a place where the cat doesn’t feel safe or have

privacy, or a change in litter or litter box.

f you can eliminate these issues that ould be easy to fi,

then you can move on to medical possibilities.

HEALTH ALERT

A handful of medical issues can cause cats to eschew the

litter box or eliminate in inappropriate places. Some possibilities

are a disease or disorder, or age-related changes that are

normal for aging cats. Here is a run-down of the possibilities,

according to Spruce Pets.

Diabetes or kidney disease. A cat may produce more urine

than usual and either not be able to get to the litter box in

time, or causing the litter to need changing sooner than usual.

Arthritis. A cat who is experiencing pain from arthritis

might not be able to climb stairs to reach a litter box or climb

into a covered litter box.

rinary tract infections. nfections can cause pain hile

urinating, which can cause a cat to change its litter box

habits.

Painful paws. Any condition that causes pain a cat’s paws

can make it difficult for the cat to alk on its usual litter.

Dementia. Cats experiencing dementia might forget where

the litter box is or how to use it.

Separation anxiety. If you’re gone for longer than usual, a

cat might experience separation anxiety or stress, which can

cause elimination problems.

A trip to the vet might be warranted to get a handle on the

health issues related to litter box issues and get started with

treatment.

• • •

Green Mountain Dog Club is Hosting a Fast

CAT Fun Run; So Why Aren’t Cats Invited?

Brewer’s Yeast and

Pet Allergies

DEA PAW COE read an

article that says brewer’s yeast is

safe for cats and dogs. I disagree. I

found several more articles online

that say pets can be allergic to

brewer’s yeast. What do you say

about that Carla , via email

page 20 The WORLD September 22, 2021

By CompassVermont.com

If you pay a visit to Dac Rowe Field in Waterbury on September

26, you are going to see a lot of dogs participating in a

Fast CAT Fun Run and absolutely no cats.

That’s because the term Fast CAT is a term trademarked by

the American Kennel Club (AKC), and it stands for Coursing

Ability Test. Here is how the AKC describes it.

Dogs do not compete against each other (as opposed to

Field Trials where winners are chosen). Instead, each dog runs

individually and chases after an artificial lure on either anywhere

from a 300- or 600-yard long course. Your dog must

finish in less than minutes and minutes, respectively.

Because the course is for beginners, it is set up with safety

in mind, as we recognize that many of the dogs are new to

the sport and might not possess the agility of an experienced

sighthound. Therefore, dogs only earn a pass/fail, and the

maimum time is not meant to be difficult to achieve.

On the 26th in Waterbury, the event includes three heats, so

dogs and owners don’t have to stand around too long, as the

event will last about six hours.

Members and non-members of the Green Mountain Dog

Club are welcome to enter by registering in advance and paying

a fee of 0.00.

According to the AKC, “Although it is a relatively new

sport, its popularity has spread like ildfire. o onder. According

to one AC official, “The Fast CAT provides a terrific

opportunity to introduce ne participants to the orld of

AKC sports as one of the few events where all that is needed

to compete is a dog’s natural instincts.”

Details: GMDC FastCAT Fun Trial

Event by Green Mountain Dog Club

Open to the Public

eptember 6, 0, Dac oe Field, Waterbury

Just for fun! Would you like to see how fast your pup can run?

We will hold 3 heats during the day so no one has to hang

around all day for multiple runs. Each dog may run up to 3

times in their heat.

TE COT 0.00/DOG/. Each dog should have

TWO ADE.

eats 3000, 3000, 30300

To enter, please email ripanco@aol.com with your name,

phone number, dog’s name, age, breed as well as what heat

you would like to have and the number of runs for your dog/s.

We will take payment of cash or check make out to GMDC

the day of the trial.

Be sure to use the Winooski St entrance to Dac Rowe Field

Covid protocols will be enforced including masks and social

distancing.

CompassVermont.Com is an independent publication

founded by a native Vermonter, providing non-editorial news

and stories presented in concert with the culture, mindset, and

values of the Green Mountain State.

DEA CAA Pet oners should alays research

and evaluate the risks of any supplement for their pets.

reers yeast is a mainstay for oners trying to find a

natural flea control treatment, and others sear that its

blend of B vitamins makes their pets healthier.

It has been found that brewer’s yeast created for

humans often contains ingredients like garlic and onions

that are downright toxic to pets. Owners should purchase

only brewer’s yeast formulated for dogs or cats, as

PetMD notes (www.petmd.com/dog/nutrition/brewersyeastdogsunderstandingbenefitsandrisks.

Here are some other tips for picking the right brewer’s

yeast:

-- Give only the amount recommended for your pet’s

size.

-- Brewer’s yeast that has been “de-bittered” lacks

chromium, a mineral that helps regulate blood sugar in

humans but hasn’t been studied in dogs.

-- Read the label carefully: Some brewer’s yeast for

pets contains garlic, which can be toxic, especially for

smaller pets.

-- Consider a brewer’s yeast that includes omega-3

oils for added benefits.

-- This supplement can add up to 80 calories to your

pet’s meal. It can also cause excess gas.

Some pets really are allergic to the yeast itself, though.

Avoid giving brewer’s yeast to dogs with known yeast

allergy, who have digestive illnesses like colitis, or who

are immunocompromised. Always monitor your pet for

new behaviors or symptoms after giving them any new

supplement.

Send your questions, tips or comments to ask@

pawscorner.com.

c 0 ing Features ynd., nc.


22nd Annual Bristol Harvest Festival Coming September 25th

The Bristol Harvest Festival kicks off its 22nd year on Saturday,

September 25th. The day’s activities, sponsored by the

Addison County Chamber of Commerce and hosted by the

Bristol Recreation Department and Bristol Core, is a celebration

of the town and community to be enjoyed by all ages.

Activities on Saturday, September 25th take place between

10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The day includes a great lineup of

local musicians playing at the bandstand every hour throughout

the day, including:

• 10:00 a.m.: Bob Recupero

• 11:00 a.m.: Rick Ceballos & Lausanne Allen

• 12:00 p.m.: Whiskey & Wine

• 1:00 p.m.: Greg Ryan

• 2:00 p.m.: Nate Gusakov

• 3:00 p.m.: Atom and the Orbits

From 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. the Town Green is also the

site of more than 50 crafters and vendors booths offering fine

handcrafts, locally made products, food and more. The Food

Court will include Mediterranean Mix, All Star Tacos, Foster

& Sons Fine Foods, Richard Lansing and Rainbow Ice.

32 ND Annual

Harvest Supper

Friday, Sept. 24

at Christ Covenant

Church (A.C.C.)

Creamery Street, Marshfi eld

Menu: Meat loaf, mashed

potatoes, green beans, sweet

corn, cole slaw, pickles, dinner

rolls, apple cider, apple pie

Seatings at 5:15 & 6:45

Adults $12, 12 & under $6

Carryouts $12.00 each

*4 Door Prizes at each seating*

*Handmade Quilt Raffl e*

Reservations: 426-3744

or 426-2122

All proceeds to benefi t

Christ Covenant School (A.C.C.)

Art on Main, a Bristol arts cooperative, with have their

annual silent auction of artwork on the green, a major fundraiser

for this nonprofit. The Cub couts ill have informa

tion available at Holley Hall. And new this year, the Bristol

Core partnership has organized a Moose Scavenger hunt at

Main t. businesses. Find the moose around ton, fill your

card, and you’ll be entered into a drawing for great prizes.

Also, Main St. businesses will have sidewalk sales going on

throughout the day.

For a full schedule of events, visit the event website at BristolHarvestFest.com.

For more information call 802-388-7951

or email info@addisoncounty.com.

Bristol Harvest Festival wouldn’t be possible without the

generous support of its sponsors: All entertainment this year

is sponsored by Bristol Park Dental. Other sponsors include

Bristol Works, Cousino Financial Services, Casella Waste

Management, Waitsfield Champlain Valley Telecom,

Champlain Valley Plumbing & Heating and Silver Maple

Construction.

AUTUMN OUTINGS | FALL 2021

WILLIAMSTOWN

CHICKEN PIE SUPPER

Thursday, October 14

Williamstown Masonic Lodge

Eat-In Seatings 5:00 & 7:00PM

Take Out 5:45-6:45PM

PRICE FOR

$13.00 per person

DINNER

Benefits WUCS

Reservations Only 802-433-5382

All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.

com or mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S.

Route 302, Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00 p.m.,

Thursday preceding publication. The Ongoing section is for

free/low cost/non-profit community events.

Ongoing Events

ONLINE IN VERMONT-Shepherd of the Hills Welcomes

Zoom Worshipers Please join us on Sunday mornings at 9:30.

Visit us on the web at montpelierlutheran.org for the link to our

Zoom service and the bulletin for worship. There’s always room

for folks to come and worship.

Divorce and Separated Support Group This group meets the

first Monday of each month from 7:00 - 8:00 on Zoom. For more

information and to get the Zoom link, email DSGvtnh@gmail.

com.

Connection Peer Support Group This group will occur on the

1st and 3rd Tuesday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM on

Zoom. This new peer support group will complement the Monday

night and Thursday afternoon support groups. People can visit

https://namivt.org/support/peer-support-groups/ for more information.

Nurturing Skills for Families in Recovery Meets weekly online

on Mondays from 1:00 –2:30 PM. For information and to join a

group contact Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Circle of Parents in Recovery Meets weekly online on Thursdays

from 3:00-4:30 PM. For information and to join a group contact

Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Circle of Parents for Grandparents Meets weekly online on

Thursdays from 4:00-5:00 PM beginning. For information and to

join a group contact Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Seven Stars Arts Center All-Comers Virtually Slow Jam will

be starting back up monthly on second Thursday evenings 6:30-

8PM! Traditional dance tunes at relaxed, accessible pace.

BYOBeverages and snacks! Free, with a recommended donation

of $10-15. All ages, levels and instruments welcome! The Zoom

link will be sent out to folks that RSVP “maybe” or “yes” by

email: resonance.vermont@gmail.com.

Mood Disorders Support Group: Now online via Zoom. Peer &

professionally led support for people coping with mood disorders

such as depression, bipolar disorder, seasonal affective disorder,

postpartum depression, dysthymia, etc. We share our experience,

strength and hope to support each other on our mental health

journey. Wed. 4 - 5 PM. There is no fee. For more information and

meeting code, contact Rosanne at 802-917-1959 or rosanne@

rosanne.info.

Weatherization Wednesdays at noon. We’ll answer your questions

via Zoom and Facebook Live every Wednesday at noon,

when we present a new topic in weatherization. Get a chance to

win smart thermostats and other prizes. More info and to register:

https://buttonupvermont.org/event.

The Montpelier First Church of Christ, Scientist, is conducting

its Sunday (10:30am) and Wednesday (7:30pm) services on Zoom

for the foreseeable future. You are invited to join us using this

URL: https://zoom.us/j/306295907 or calling 1-646-876-9923

and then keying the meeting ID code: 306 295 907#

continued on next page

NOW OPEN

THURSDAYS - SUNDAYS 11AM-8PM

2678 River Street, Bethel (2.6 mi. on VT Rt. 107)

802-234-9400 www.toziersrestaurant.com

LIBERTY

ORCHARD

“Pick Your Own”

Apples

OPENING THURSDAY, SEPT. 23

West St., Brookfield

Short, Easy-To-Pick Trees

Dwayne

& Ginny

Brees

Mon.-Thurs. 1PM to 5PM

Fri.-Sun. 10AM to 5PM

802-276-3161

www.libertyorchardvt.net

Vermont Technical College

Randolph Center, Vermont

ORCHARD HOURS

Fri., Sat. & Sun.

9 am - 4 pm

Weather permitting

~Syrup~

Pick

Your

Own

Apples

September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 21


The Heart of Vermont BNI Chapter meets weekly via Zoom

for Central Vermont business networking. Meetings are held each

Friday from 8am to 9:30am, and visitors are welcome. For information

or a reservation to attend, please contact Kristin Dearborn

at 802-223-3425. Kristin.dearborn@edwardjones.com.

The Washington County Democrats (Vermont) invite you to

‘like’ or ‘follow’ us on Facebook, and/or send an email to County

Chair, Linda Gravell (washcountydemsvt@gmail.com) to receive

monthly announcements and meeting reminders. We meet on

Zoom on the Third Monday of each month at 5:30 p.m. All

Democrats living in Washington County, Vermont are welcome to

participate.

The Unitarian Church of Montpelier welcomes all to visit

http://www.ucmvt.org and to join weekly Sunday Worship

Services online at 10:00 a.m. on Zoom or Facebook. We welcome

all as we build a loving community to nurture each person’s

spiritual journey, serve human need, and protect the Earth, our

home. Services led by Rev. Joan Javier-Duval, Minister, or Verdis

L. Robinson, Ministerial Intern.

BARRE- Weekly Business Networking in Central Vermont,

Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, 33 Stewart Ln.

8AM-9:30AM. Thurs. Free. Info: mike@eternitymarketing.com.

Church of God of Prophecy Sunday Service at 10:30 am. All

are welcome. Pastor Jeffrey Kelley. (814) 428-2696. Also daily

Facebook devotionals.

Sons of the American Legion Squadron #10 Meetings, Barre

Legion Post #10, 320 N. Main St. 3rd Thurs. of each month. 6PM.

The American Legion Barre Post 10, Regular Post

Membership Meetings. Barre Post 10, 320 Main St., third Thurs.

of each month, 6PM.

Central VT Adult Basic Education, Free classes. Pre-GED and

high school diploma prep classes at Barre Learning Center, 46

Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588.

Central Vermont Woodcarving Group, Free instruction projects

for all abilities. Barre Congregational Church, Mon. 1-4pm.

479-9563.

Heart of Vermont Quilt Guild, meets 3rd Tues. of the month at

First Presbyterian Church, Seminary St. 5:30-7:30PM.

Additional Recycling Collection Center, Open for collection

Mon., Wed., Fri. 11:30-5:30PM, 3rd Sat. 9AM-1PM. 540 N.

Main St., Barre. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable

items.

Medicare & You, Have questions? We have answers. Central

Vermont Council on Aging, 59 N. Main St., Suite 200, 2nd & 4th

Tues. of the month. Call 479-0531 to register.

Central Vermont Business Builders, Community National

Bank, 1st & 3rd Tues., 8-9AM. Info: 777-5419.

Weekly Storytime, Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main St.,

Sat., 10:30AM. Info. 476-3114.

Vermont Modelers Club, Building and flying model airplanes

year-round. Info: 485-7144.

Community Breakfast, First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer

St., 3rd Sun. FREE, 7:30-9AM. 476-3966.

Italian American Heritage

WEDNESDAY

Early Birds 6PM

REGULAR

BINGO 7PM

~Refreshments~

MUTUO

CLUB

20 BECKLEY ST.

BARRE 476-8173

LOCATED AT

~ Tamales

~ Chimichangas

~ Burritos

Thomas Farm & Garden

~ Tacos

~ Enchiladas

~ Enfrijoladas

Giffords Ice Cream

THE AMERICAN

LEGION

BARRE POST 10

320 NORTH MAIN ST.

BARRE, VT

SEPT. 25 7-11PM

Welcome Back

CONTAGIOUS

$6.00 COVER

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 21 & OVER

For information, call the Post at

479-9058

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

AND NOW

WE DELIVER!

Order

Online!

~ Molletes

~ Picadas

& More!

OUR MENU

New Hours: Tues.-Wed. 11-3, Thurs.-Sat. 11-7, Closed Sun. & Mon.

535 US Rt. 302-Berlin (formerly Legares), Barre

802-622-0453

arandas-mexican-cuisine.square.site

page 22 The WORLD September 22, 2021

Governor Phil Scott Announces Opening of Another

Section of the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail

Governor Phil Scott and the Vermont Agency of

Transportation (AOT) announced the opening of an additional

6.3 miles of the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail (LVRT)

between Sheldon and Highgate. This section of trail begins

at the intersection of the LVRT and the Missisquoi Valley

Rail Trail and extends westerly approximately 6.3 miles to

its intersection with Gore Road in Highgate Center. This

new section of the LVRT is now open to the public.

“Outdoor recreation is key to Vermont’s economy and

quality of life, and this new section of trail offers exciting

new opportunities,” said Governor Scott. “There is no better

time than now to get outside and enjoy all the Green

Mountain State has to offer, and I hope many Vermonters

and visitors get the chance to enjoy the benefits of the

Lamoille Valley Rail Trail.”

With the completion of this section, there is now a 12.6-

mile segment that starts at the intersection of the LVRT and

Bridge Street in Sheldon and extends westerly to its intersection

with South River Road in Swanton.

The Vermont Association of Snow Travelers (VAST) had

previously completed approximately 33 miles of trail.

Funding was 80% federal dollars through AOT, with the

remaining amount from town assistance, private donations,

and VAST’s own investment. Governor Scott’s proposal for

funding to accelerate the completion of the LVRT was

approved in 2020. The Governor’s FY2021 budget allocated

a total of $2.8 million and was matched by $11.3 million in

federal funds for the construction of the LVRT. Since August

2020, AOT has expanded the trail to include 45 miles of

completed trail for public use.

“The completion of this 93-mile recreational trail in the

fall of 2022 will stimulate tourism opportunities for

Vermonters and visitors to our state,” said Transportation

Secretary Joe Flynn. “The business and community development

opportunities are limited only by the imagination of

Vermont entrepreneurs and the creative communities that

the trail traverses. We are excited to work with the broad

array of stakeholders in coming months as we launch a strategic

management planning process to assure that maximum

benefit is derived from the investments in developing this

recreational and transportation resource.”

Construction of the LVRT will be accelerated during the

next two construction seasons as AOT builds the remaining

Circle of Parents, Confidential support group for parents and

caregivers. Tues. evenings. Info: 229-5724.

Mothers of Preschoolers, Monthly get-togethers for crafts,

refreshments, etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.

Alcoholics Anonymous, Meetings in Barre, daily; call 802-229-

5100 for latest times & locations; www.aavt.org.

Al-Anon Family Groups Turning Point, 489 North Main St. Use

back door of parking lot. Older children friendly. Sat 5-6pm. Info:

vermontalanonalateen.org.

Hedding LIVE KARAOKE United WITH Methodist Activities & Meetings, 40

Washington St., 476-8156. Choir: Thurs. 7PM; Community

Service LEVI

& Food Shelf Hours: Weds & Thurs. 3-5PM.

Turning Point Recovery Center, 489 N. Main St. Safe and supportive

place for individuals/families in or seeking substance

abuse recovery. Open Mon/Tue/Thur: 10AM-5PM; Wed/Fri:

10AM-9PM; Sat: 6PM-9PM. For info and programs, call 479-

7373.

Green Mountain Spirit Chapter, National women bikers club.

2nd Wed. Info: grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.

Grief & Bereavement Support Group, Central Vermont Home

Health and Hospice office, 600 Granger Road. This group is open

to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one. Mondays

4-5:30 Wed. 10-11:30AM, Meeting via Zoom. 6 consecutive sessions.

Free. Info: 223-1878.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Barre City Police, 15

Fourth St., 476-6613. Get rid of old or unused meds.

Granite City Grocery Volunteers, every 3rd Wed./month at

6PM at The Quarry Kitchen & Spirits, second floor. Info: gaylepoinsette@gmail.com.

Granite City Grocery’s Board Meeting, every 2nd Tuesday at

6PM. Open to public.

Small Group Bible Studies sponsored by VT Christian Radio

WJPL-LP 92.1 FM. In the Aldrich Public Library upstairs conference

room, 6 Washington St. Thursdays at 6PM. All are welcome.

Savvy Speakers Toastmasters International is an educational

club where people learn and practice how to speak with confidence

in a fun and supportive environment. Meetings held 1st and

3rd Tuesday of the month 6-7:30 p.m. at Capstone Community

Action, 20 Gable Place, Barre, VT 05641 Please call Margaret

Ferguson 802-476-0908 or MLFerguson2002@yahoo.com

Memorable Times Cafe Third Wednesday of each month from

1:30 to 3 p.m. at the VT History Center, 60 Washington St. A

relaxed social time for people living with mild to moderate

memory loss and their care partners. Come enjoy stories, memories,

music and community. Free, refreshments provided.

Sponsored by Central VT Council on Aging and the ABLE

Library. 802-476-2681 for more information.

BERLIN- Tuesday Night Drumming Sessions at the 1st

Congregational Church of Berlin. Sept. 21 - Nov. 9th, 6:30-

7:45PM. Learn the art of drumming West African Style. $80 for 8

sessions or $11 per drop-in session. Info: shidaaprojects@gmail.

com or call Jordan 498-5987.

Contra Dance *Dances are canceled for now. Check www.capitalcitygrange.org/dancing/contradancing

or email cdu.tim@

gmail.com for updates* No experience and no partner needed. All

dances are taught plus an introductory session at 7:45. Everyone

welcome! The dance takes place at the Capital City Grange Hall,

6612 Rt 12, 1 mile south of Montpelier. Please bring clean, softsoled

shoes. Admission is $10 adults, $5 kids and low income,

$15 dance supporters. Questions? Call Tim Swartz at 802-225-

8921, visit: http://capitalcitygrange.org/dancing/contradancing.

Every 1st, 3rd, and 5th Saturday year round.

49 miles of trail. The remaining work includes three segments

of trail and a major bridge. Construction of the bridge

is scheduled to begin during this construction season. The

remaining segments of trail are scheduled to be advertised

and awarded through October 2021 and included below in

order of the anticipated advertised date:

• West Danville to Hardwick (17.85 miles) starting at the

intersection with Channel Drive and extending westerly to

the intersection with Maple Street

• Cambridge to Sheldon (18.37 miles) starting at the intersection

with VT Route 109 and extending westerly to the

intersection with Bridge Street

• Hardwick to Morrisville (12.44 miles) starting at the intersection

with North Main Street and extending westerly to

the intersection with VT Route 15A

The trail is anticipated to be completed by the end of fall

2022. When the 93-mile trail is completed, the LVRT will be

the longest rail trail in New England.

To receive construction updates and project announcements,

sign up here: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/

Qzb2hbT or email adally@vhb.com.

For more information, visit https://vtrans.vermont.gov/

highway/local-projects/lvrt.

Family Support Groups empower and educate family members

and close friends of individuals with persistent mental health challenges.

All groups are led by trained individuals who have a family

member living with a mental health condition and understand

the same challenges you are experiencing. Central Vermont

Medical Center. Group meets 4th Monday each month.

BETHEL- YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program, United

Church of Bethel, Church St. Thurs., 11AM-12PM. Free. Info:

728-7714.

BROOKFIELD- Mothers of Preschoolers, Meal and childcare

provided. New Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fri., 6PM.

Info: 276-3022.

CABOT- Fiddle Lessons with Katie Trautz: Mon., Info: 279-

2236; Dungeons & Dragons, Fri., 3-5:30PM. All at Cabot

Library, 563-2721.

CALAIS- Men’s & Women’s Bible Study Groups, County

Road, Wed., 7PM. Info: 485-7577.

CHELSEA- Chronic Conditions Support Group, Chelsea

Senior Center, in the United Church of Chelsea, 13 North

Common. Free. Fri. 8:30-11AM. Info:728-7714.

DUXBURY- Duxbury - Green Mountain Community Alliance

Church Worship Service on Sundays at 9:30 a.m. 4987 VT

Route 100. 244-6463 or Pastor Paul Collins at 917-3639. Also

Bible Studies on Mondays and Tuesdays.

E. HARDWICK- Bible Study, Touch of Grace Assembly of God

Church, Tues. 10AM; Bible study; Wed. Youth Group, 5PM dinner,

6PM activity. Info: 472-5550.

EAST MONTPELIER- FREE Zumba-like Fitness Dance for

Women 18+, East Montpelier Elementary, Sundays, 4-5PM. Info:

zabundancejoy@gmail.com.

Men’s Ministry, Crossroads Christian Church. Mon. 7-9PM.

Men’s Breakfast: 2nd Sat., 8AM. Sun. Service: 9:30-11AM. Info:

476-8536.

Twin Valley Senior Center, 4583 U.S. Rte 2. Open Mon., Weds.,

Fri., 9AM-2PM. For class listing & info: 223-3322.

Walk-Through Wednesday Open House at Orchard Valley

Waldorf School, Grace Farm Campus 2290 VT Rt. 14N, 8:30-

9:30am. Join us on the first Wednesday of each month for an

introductory visit to the OVWS grades school from 8:30-10:30

a.m. Campus tour and Q&A. Contact enrollment@ovws.org or

call 456-7400 with questions. Please register by noon the day

prior to the Walk-Through.

GROTON- YA Book Club, 3rd Mon., 6:30PM; Book Discussion

Group: 4th Mon., 7PM; Crafts & Conversation, Wed., 1-3PM.

Round Robin Storytime for kids age 0-5: Tues., 10AM. All at

Groton Public Library. Info: 584-3358.

HARDWICK- Caregiver Support Group, Agency on Aging,

rear entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs. 229-0308 x306.

Peace & Justice Coalition, G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg (old firehouse),

Tues., 7PM. Info: 533-2296.

Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs.,

6-8:30PM. Registration/info: 472-5229.

MARSHFIELD- Playgroup, Twinfield Preschool, Mon., 8:15-

9:45AM (except when school is not in session).

MONTPELIER- Circle of Recovery Mondays and Fridays

10am-11am at Another Way, 125 Barre Street. 802-229-0920.

Confidential space to receive support for recovery in all of its

forms.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Sunday School welcomes

children for Sunday school to learn how to feel close to God

everyday. 10:30AM. 223-2477.

continued on next page


Free Coffee House Potluck, 1st Fri. at the Trinity Methodist

Church. 7PM-9PM.

Vermont College of Fine Arts Friday Night Reading Series,

Cafe Anna, 1st floor of College Hall, 36 College St. 5:30-7:30PM.

Free snacks.

Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup, North Branch Nature Center.

Mon. 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 229-6206.

Montpelier Kiwanis Club, Tues., 6PM. at The Steak House. All

are welcome. Info: 229-6973.

Onion River Exchange Tool Library, 46 Barre St. Over 85

tools. Wed., 10AM-2PM, Thurs., 10AM-2PM.

Friday Night Group, Open to all LGBTQ youth ages 13-22.

Pizza and social time, facilitated by adults from Outright VT.

Unitarian Church, 2nd & 4th Fri., 6:30-8PM. Info: 223-7035.

Meditation, Mon. 1PM.; Intro to Yoga, Tues. 4PM; Consults,

Fri. 11AM. Free classes, limits apply. Fusion Studio, 56 East State

St. Info: 272-8923.

Celiac Support Group, Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., 2nd Wed.,

4-5PM. Info: 598-9206.

A Course in Miracles, at Christ Episcopal Church, 64 State St.,

each Tues., 7-8PM. Info: 622-4516.

Parent’s Group & Meet-Up, Connect with local parents to share

advice and info. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes Rm., 1st Mon.,

10-11:30AM. Info: mamasayszine@gmail.com.

Families Anonymous For families or friends who have issues

with addiction, alcohol and/or mental illness. Bethany Church,

2nd floor youth room, Mon., 7-8PM. Info: 229-6219.

Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights, Need help w/a bike

repair? Come to the volunteer-run community bike shop. 89 Barre

St., Wed. 4-6PM and Fri. 12-4PM. Info: freeridemontpelier.org.

Free Community Meals, Mon: Unitarian Church, 11AM-1PM;

Tues: Bethany Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Wed: Christ Church,

11AM-12:30PM; Thurs: Trinity Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Fri: St.

Augustine Church, 11AM-12:30PM; Last Sun., Bethany Church,

4:30-6:30PM.

Calico County Quilters, All skill levels welcome. 2nd Sat. Sept.

through June, 1-3PM. Location info: 244-7001.

Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA), Bethany Church basement,

Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 229-9036.

CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group, Childcare not available.

Woodbury College, 2nd Tues., 5:30-7:30PM. Info: 498-5928.

Resurrection Baptist Church Weekly Events, 144 Elm St. Sun.,

9:45AM. Bible Study; 11AM. Worship Service; Wed., 7PM.

Prayer Meeting.

Good Beginnings of Central VT, 174 River St. Drop-In hours at

the Nest. 1st floor Weds/Thurs/Fri., 9AM-3PM. Babywearers of

Central Vermont meet upstairs, 4th Mon., 5:45-7:45PM & 2nd

Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 595-7953. Breastfeeding support:

3rd Thurs., 9:30- 11:30AM; Nursing Beyond a Year: 3rd Fri.,

9:30-11:30AM (802-879-3000).

Al-Anon, Trinity Methodist Church, Main St., Sun., 6:15-

7:30PM. Info:1-866-972-5266.

Al-Anon, Bethany Church basement, 115 Main St., Tues. &

Thurs. 12-1PM, Wed. 7-8PM. Info: 1-866-972-5266.

SL AA, 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship problems.

Bethany Church, Wed., 5PM. Info: 249-6825.

Survivors of Incest Anonymous, Bethany Church parlor, 115

Main St., Mon., 5PM. Please call first: 229-9036 or 454-8402.

Brain Injury Support Group, Unitarian Church, 3rd Thurs.,

1:30-2:30PM. Info: 1-877-856-1772.

Playgroups: Dads & Kids, Thurs., 6-7:30PM & Sat., 9:30-

11AM, at Family Center of Washington County. Held during

school year only.

Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer Support, for

patients and caregivers. Info: 1-800-652-5064.

Christian Meditation, Christ Church, Mon., 12-1PM.

Mood Disorders Support Group, 149 State St., last entryway,

first floor. Peer and professionally led support for people coping

with mental illness. Wed. 4-5PM. Free. Info: 917-1959.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Montpelier Police, 1 Pitkin

Court, 223-3445 at Washington County Sheriff, 10 Elm St., 223-

3001. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent safe

disposal sites.

Community Song Circle, Center for Arts and Learning, 46 Barre

St. 1st Sun. except July/Aug., 6-8PM. Info: vtcommunitysing@

gmail.com.

Suicide Grief Support Group - for anyone who has lost a loved

one to suicide. Meets the second Monday of each month, 6:00-

7:30. Please contact Michele Delaney at 802-223-4752 for intake

screening and location.

Flat Track Roller Derby, Montpelier Rec Center, 55 Barre St.

Sunday afternoons - email for practice times. 18+, all genders

welcome, no experience necessary, please bring a mouthguard -

all other gear provided. First practice free then $30/month. Will

resume after COVID pandemic. Info:vtderbytcr@gmail.com.

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Recovery

Mondays at 4:00. Contact Cindy Wells, Family Support Programs

Coordinator, at 802-498-0611 or cwells@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Skills for Families Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10:00.

Contact Cindy Wells, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at

802-498-0611 or cwells@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Skills for Families Mondays at 10:00 Contact

Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-

498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Recovery

Tuesdays at 11:00. Contact Amber Menard, Family Support

Programs Coordinator at 802-552-4274 or amenard@pcavt.org)

Nurturing Skills for Families Thursdays at 5:30. Contact Cindy

Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608

or catkins@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Fathers Program Mondays at 5:30. Contact Amber

Menard, Family Support Programs Coordinator at 802-552-4274

or amenard@pcavt.org.

Circle for Foster & Adoptive Families Thursdays at 5:00.

Contact Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs Coordinator,

at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org).

Circle for Kinship & Guardianship Families Thursdays at 8:00

PM. Contact Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs

Coordinator, at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org.

Circle of Parents open to all. Thursdays at 10:00; Contact Cindy

Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608

or catkins@pcavt.org.

Circle of Parents in Recovery Tuesdays at 5:30; Contact Cindy

Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608

or catkins@pcavt.org. Contact the program manager or call

1-800-CHILDREN

MORETOWN- Mad River Chorale. Rehearsals at Harwood

Union H.S., Mon., 7-9PM. Info: 496-2048.

MORRISVILLE- “The Role of Power, Authority & Control in

Groups” Monthly Meeting, Morristown Centennial Library, 20

Lower Main St. 1st Tues. 5:30PM-7PM. Info: gerette@dreamhavenvt.com.

Overeaters Anonymous, 12-step program for people who identify

as overeaters, compulsive eaters, food addicts, anorexics,

bulimics, etc. All welcome; no dues or fees. Info re: place & time:

863-2655.

River Arts Events, Photo Co-op Drop-in 3rd Thurs., 6PM-8PM.

$5 suggested donation. Poetry Clinic Drop-in 1st & 3rd Tues.,

6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

NORTHFIELD- Bingo, Northfield Senior Center. Mon., 4PM.

Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program, Ages 12-18. Edward F Knapp

State Airport Passenger Terminal, Tues, 6-8:30PM. Info: info.

vt033@vtcap.org.

Clogging & Irish Step Lessons, w/Green Mountain Cloggers,

ages 8-78. Sun., 5-8PM. Info: 522-2935.

Playgroup, United Church of Northfield. Wed., 9:30-11AM. Held

only when school in session. Info: 262-3292 x113.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Northfield Police, 110

Wall St., 485-9181. Get rid of old or unused.

PLAINFIELD- Community Supper Support Group, Grace

United Methodist Church. 4th Tues., 6PM-7PM. Info: michaelbix@gmail.com.

Cardio Funk Class. At the Community Center. Fri., 5-6PM. Info:

email shannonkellymovement@gmail.com.

Cutler Memorial Library Activities, Classic Book Club: 1st

Mon., 6PM; Tuesday Night Knitters (except 1st Tues.). Info:

454-8504.

Diabetes Discussion & Support Group, Everyone welcome.

The Health Center conf. room, 3rd Thurs., 1:30PM. Info:322-

6600.

RANDOLPH- Health Support Groups, Maple Leaf Room at

Gifford Medical Center. Tobacco Cessation Program regularly

offers four-week “Quit in Person” group sessions. Info: 728-7714.

Caregiver Support Group, Gifford Medical Center. 2-3PM.

Meets 2nd Wed. of the month. Info: 728-7781.

Diabetes Management Program, Kingwood Health Center

(lower level conf. room), 1422 VT Route 66. Thurs., 10-12:30PM.

Six week program for people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes.

Info/register: 728-7714.

New Business Forum, Vermont Tech Enterprise Center, 1540 VT

Rte 66, 2nd Weds., 11:30AM-1PM. Info: 728-9101.

Cancer Support Group, Gifford Conference Ctr, 2nd Tues.,

9:30-11AM. Info:728-2270.

Storytime. Kimball Library. Wed., 11AM, ages 2-5; Toddlertime,

Fri., 10:30AM; Gathering for handwork, 2nd & 4th Mon.,

6PM.

Pregnancy and Post-Partum Support Group - For those struggling

with anxiety or depression related to pregnancy, Gifford

Health Care is here to help. Every Tuesday from 1:30 p.m. – 3:00

p.m., in the conference room at Gifford Medical Center. If you

have questions or would like to enroll, email ESchleif@giffordhealthcare.org,

SRoberts@giffordhealthcare.org or call Sarah

Roberts at 728-2372.

WAITSFIELD- Community Acupuncture Night, Free assessment

and treatment. Donations welcome. Three Moons Wellness,

859 Old County Rd., 2nd fl., last Weds., 4-7PM. RSVP: 272-

3690.

WARREN- Knit & Play, Warren Public Library. Bring your kids

and your projects. All levels. Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM.

WASHINGTON- Central VT ATV Club, Washington Fire

Station, 3rd Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 224-6889.

Calef Mem. Library Activities, Art and Adventure w/ April:

3rd Sat., 1PM; Storytime: Mon., 11AM; Tech Help Drop-In:

Sat., 10AM-2PM. Info: 883-2343.

WATERBURY- Waterbury Public Library Activities, Preschool

Story Time: Thurs., 10AM. Baby and Toddler Story Time: Mon.,

10AM. Crafts: Tues., 3-4PM. Info: 244-7036.

WATERBURY CTR- Bible Study Group, Waterbury Ctr. Grange.

Sun., 5-6PM. Bring bible, coffee provided. Info: 498-4565.

WEBSTERVILLE- Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs,

Barretown Police, 149 Websterville Rd., 479-0508. Get rid of old

or unused meds.

WEST TOPSHAM- Bible Study, New Hope Methodist Church,

2 Gendron Rd. Wed., 6:30PM.

WILLIAMSTOWN- Farmers/Craft Market every Saturday 9 to

noon through September, the Roadhouse parking lot 110 Business

Center Road.

WORCESTER- Knitting Night, The Wool Shed, Tues., 6:30-

8:30PM.

Thursday, September 23

RANDOLPH- Catapult Entertainment Dance Company The

renowned dance troupe mesmerizes audiences by creating shadow

puppetry with their entire bodies. 1:30PM at the Chandler Center

for the Arts. Visit the Chandler website, www.chandler-arts.org,

for more info. Tickets are $10.

Friday, September 24

MONTPELIER- Pedals for Progress Bike & Sewing Machine

Collection. 3:30 to 7:00 p.m. at the National Life parking lot (1

National Life Dr.). Your old bike or sewing machine can change

someone’s life. A donation of $15 is requested with each item to

help with shipping. Facebook: PedalsforProgressVT.

NORTHFIELD- Barry Bender presented by The American

Legion Post 63. Singer, songwriter, folk rock - 7 p.m. No cover.

Open to the pubic. Friday Night Grill open from 5 to 7 p.m.

RANDOLPH- Catapult Entertainment Dance Company The

renowned dance troupe mesmerizes audiences by creating shadow

puppetry with their entire bodies. 7PM at the Chandler Center for

continued on next page

CLOSED FOR

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Open Every Day 5am – 9pm

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September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 23


BARRE- Notable Sculptors of Barre Gray Granite August 17 to

October 31, 2021 (Tuesday through Saturday 10am to 4pm). At the

Vermont Granite Museum. The Vermont Granite Museum is excited to

be hosting a photography exhibit entitled “Notable sculptors of Barre

Gray Granite” by Nan Carle Beauregard of Morrisville, Vermont. The

exhibit focuses on six Vermont sculptors. For information: Scott A.

McLaughlin, Executive Director 802-476-4605, director@vtgranitemuseum.org.

Art Rocks! August 17 to October 31, 2021 (Tuesday through Saturday

10am to 4pm). At the Vermont Granite Museum. The Vermont Granite

Museum is excited to be hosting a paintings and photography exhibit

entitled “Art Rocks” by 15 members of The Paletteers of Vermont. For

information: Scott A. McLaughlin, Executive Director 802-476-4605,

director@vtgranitemuseum.org.

Studio Place Arts Presents Four Art Installations. Rock Solid XXI,

Moves by Austin Furtak-Cole, Crafted Narratives by Rob Millard-

Mendez and In the Current by Gail Skudera. 201 N Main St. For more

info, visit: www.studioplacearts.com. Sept. 15 - Oct. 30 with an art

social Sept. 23 5-6:30PM.

CALAIS- 20/20 Hindsight September 10 - October 10, visitors can

safely view works on the grounds of the Kents’ Corner State Historic

Site at 7 Old West Church Road. We invite you to enjoy original sculpture,

installations, assemblages and the written word by a group of

contemporary Vermont artists who explore historic trades and technology

in new and surprising ways. Check kentscorner.org for updated

information or contact thekentmuseum@gmail.com. Opening celebration

Sept. 11, 3-5PM.

GREENSBORO- Still Life - Life, Still – Through October 15 at the

Gallery at the Highland Center for the Arts. Wednesday - Sunday, noon

to 4pm. Look closely at how five artists look closely. During Covid,

photographer Mary Ellen Bartley, and painters Kate Emlen, Tucker

Nichols, Jon Redmond and Margaret Sparrow, slow down, take notice,

and skillfully, beautifully, capture the moment. For information: highlandartsvt.org.

HARDWICK- 1111 Copper Nails: Bread & Puppet Calendar Prints

– A 36-Year Retrospective Dual Location Exhibition in Hardwick,

Vermont. When: April – summer 2021. Where: exhibition in 2 fully

accessible & covid-safe mask-required locations (also by appointment).

(1) The Hardwick Inn, 4 S Main Street, exhibit on all 3 Floors, 8-6,

Mon-Sat. (2) Front Seat Coffee, 101 S Main Street, B&P Calendars &

Art for Sale, 8-2, Mon-Fri.

MANCHESTER- What Remains | Scattered Memories Germanborn,

Shushan NY-based artist Katrin Waite is the next artist to be featured

in a solo show at Ellenbogen Gallery. Presenting paintings created

over six years, from 2014 to present, will open to the public on Saturday,

July 25th at 11:00 AM. On Friday, July 24th at 4:00 PM, “Eg. Live:

Virtual Vernissage” on Facebook will feature host Elizabeth Spadea in

discussion with the artist and doscent-tour of the exhibition. Info: email

at ellenbogengallery@gmail.com or by calling (802) 768-8498.

MIDDLEBURY- Pride 1983 The Vermont Folklife Center and the

Pride Center of Vermont announce the opening of our new exhibit, Pride

1983, at the Vermont Folklife Center’s Vision & Voice Gallery, 88 Main

Street, Middlebury, VT. The exhibit will run from September 8, 2021

through March 25, 2022. Gallery hours are Wednesday-Friday from

11am-4pm. Through interviews with organizers, photographs and

scanned images of historic documents Pride 1983 explores the origins

and lasting legacies of Vermont’s first Pride March on June 25, 1983 in

Burlington.

MONTPELIER- Fragmented Glances; A Retrospective by Delia

Robinson One body of work has never been exhibited in Delia

Robinson’s long art career A painter, clay whistle maker and Crankie

Theater performer of old ballads, Robinson has painted occasional

“Retrospective Paintings” over thirty years, creating a sort of visual

summary of where one stands at a given time in life. Eight of these

works will be on display through September. City Hall is open weekdays

from 8:00 am to 4:30 pm.

Cheryl Betz: On the Periphery Through the month of September,

Front member Cheryl Betz will exhibit mixed-media paintings from

five different series begun during the pandemic. Betz’s work reflects her

interest in the shifting, impermanent nature of form, perception, and

thought, and in all that lies on the periphery of our understanding.

The opening reception will be Friday, September 3rd, 4-7pm. The

gallery is open every Friday 4-7 and Saturday and Sunday 11-5. The

Front info@thefront.com, 802.552.0877, 6 Barre Street. Runs

through September 26.

The Front presents Daryl Burtnett: Respite a solo show of recent

work by the Front member artist. Burtnett’s mixed media works on

paper and canvas draw inspiration from the marks, textures and

imprints time leaves on things and on us. Respite brings together

work from the past several months, sharing works that have brought

solace in these fraught times. Daryl Burtnett: Respite runs March

5th through November 29th 2021. The Front is open Saturdays and

Sundays 11-2, and Daryl welcomes showings by appointment. Join

us for Daryl’s artist talk via zoom on March 18th at 7:00pm; email

info@thefrontvt.com to rsvp.

NORTHFIELD- Liquid Mind: Abstractions by Jennifer Bryan, an

exhibition featuring a colorful selection of abstract paintings by

Norwich alumna Jennifer Bryan ’05, with an opening reception from 5

to 7 p.m. on Friday, June 4.

The Colors of September presented by ART, etc., featuring neon

abstract paintings of Rachi Farrow and wearable art creations by Judie

Desrochers. This exhibit is timely, highlighting climate crisis issues,

global warming and clothing to welcome the cooler months. The Colors

of September will be on view for the month of September.

STOWE- Meleko Mokgosi: Scripto-Visual June 17 - November 13,

2021. Meleko Mokgosi’s large-scale, figurative, and often text-based

works engage history painting and cinematic tropes to uncover notions

of colonialism, democracy, and liberation across African history. Join us

for the opening with an artist talk and Q&A at 5pm on Thursday, June

17. Open to the public; masks are required.

Landscapes & Inscapes: the work of Adolf & Virginia Dehn Adolf

Dehn Adolf & Virgina Dehn were a vital part of the vibrant arts community

in post-war New York. Adolf’s figurative landscapes in watercolor

from the 30s, 40s, and 50s evoke times gone by. Opening reception,

June 25th, 5-7. June 19 through October 10, hours by appointmentonly

anytime, text 802-777-2713.

Exposed 2021 will highlight artists who focus on current political and

social constructs/issues/systems through the relationship of language,

sculpture, and installation; language as culturally specific, ideological,

controversial, challenging, identifying, uniting, and separating. The

works question or identify the disparate ways of communication. July

10 - October 23, 2021. At the Current, 90 Pond Street.

WAITSFIELD- The Bill Brauer Retrospective celebrates the career

of this nationally recognized Vermont artist with an exhibition of drawing,

paintings and etchings not publicly shown before. A native New

Yorker, Bill Brauer has lived and worked in Vermont for the past 40

years. Brauer received an individual grant from The Vermont Arts

Council in 1976 and it was shortly thereafter that he switched his focus

from printmaking to painting. Brauer’s painting has gone through many

changes over the years. Always figurative, always evocative and frequently

sensual, he strove to be a Renaissance painter while employing

contemporary design and color concepts. At the Festival Gallery, 5031

Main St. August 13 to October 11, 2021.

31st annual Green Mountain Photo Show presented by Mad River

Valley Arts. Exhibition of outstanding photographs by amateur and

professional photographers. Showcasing traditional to abstract, black

and white to color photographs, the show fills the Red Barn Galleries at

Lareau Farm. The show also illustrates the various approaches to the

photographic image made possible by recent technical advances in

creating the photo image and in the printing processes. Large scale,

wall-size images are also on display. The Green Mountain Photo Show

has images to please even the most discriminating viewer. Hours for

viewing are Thursday and Friday from 4:00 to 9:00 pm and Saturday

and Sunday from noon to 9:00 pm. The show is a free event with children

welcome. Sept 11 to Oct 12, 2021.

page 24 The WORLD September 22, 2021

the Arts. Visit the Chandler website, www.chandler-arts.org, for

more info. Tickets are $10.

Saturday, September 25

BERLIN- West African Drumming and Dance Performance

Shidaa Projects, Inc. invites you to a free, outdoor performance

celebrating community and diversity. Shidaa Projects and guest

artist Akwaaba Dance Ensemble will provide a high energy,

engaging performance on the back lawn of the First Congregational

Church of Berlin. Bring a picnic, a blanket and your dancing

shoes to enjoy the fun. Find more information at our FaceBook

page: Shidaa Projects, Inc.

CVTV CHANNEL 194

Wednesday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00AM - Community Bulletin

7:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

9:00AM - Barre City Council

12:00PM - Barre City Council

3:00PM - Barre City Council

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Williamstown Select

10:00PM - Williamstown Select

Thursday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Williamstown Select

9:00AM - Williamstown Select

12:00PM - Williamstown Select

2:00PM - Community Bulletin

3:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

10:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

Friday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Sunday, September 26

CALAIS- Words Out Loud Featuring Benjamin Aleshire and

Martin Philip. Book sales and signings and a chance to meet the

authors will follow the readings. Masks required indoors.

Donations suggested. 3:00 p.m. at the Old West Church, 758 Old

West Church Road.

GREENSBORO- The Perils of Mr. Punch, Episode #58: That’s

the Story of My Life presented by Modern Times Theater. At the

Highland Center for the Arts, 3:00 PM. Reserve your free tickets

at highlandartsvt.org.

Friday, October 1

CABOT- Cabot Turkey Dinner Local turkey served with all the

trimmings and homemade desserts. 5 pm – 6:30 pm, Take-out

Only. $10. Cabot United Church, Main St. 563-2715.

Saturday, October 2

TUNBRIDGE- Blessing of the Animals. Pets and their families

and friends are invited to the Tunbridge Church Parish House

Lawn at 11 a.m. Pastor Rev. Jenny Cook will bless the animals.

Commemorative St. Francis medals for participants.

Refreshments. For information: thetunbridgechurch@gmail.com,

802-693-0098.

Sunday, October 3

ONLINE- Pandemic Passings: a Work and Play Shop

4-5:30pm. Sliding scale sonations appreciated: $10-25. We will

explore the landscape of our Covid time, individually and collectively.

Simple, if not easy, questions will be asked and the

responses may be written, drawn, painted, danced, sung, spoken…the

expressive medium is up to you. If you have questions

or concerns about Zoom, or the content of the sessions, please

email Tracy for assistance: infopassingproject@gmail.com.

Register at: https://www.passingproject.org/.

Wednesday, October 6

ONLINE- Writer to Writer Reading – Francisco Cantú and

Emilio Carrero, a paired reading and conversation between two

Latino writers. Presented by Vermont Studio Center. 7PM. Find

more information on all of Virtual VSC’s offerings on the VSC

online events calendar: https://vermontstudiocenter.org/eventscalendar.

ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA

• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedules subject to change without notice.

ORCA Media Channel 1075

Public Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, Sep 22

6:00a Vermont Land Trust

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Vermont Humanities Council

10:00a Moccasin Tracks

11:00a Bill Doyle on VT Issues

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Ideas For The Future Of Vermont

3:00p Wednesday Night Live

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Octagon St. Laveau

6:30p Celluloid Mirror

7:00p Vermont Suffrage Centennial Alliance:

Hard Won, Not Done: Voting Matters

9:00p Annette Gordon-Reed: On Juneteenth

11:00p Bear Pond Books Events

Thursday, Sep 23

6:00a Standing Trees Vermont

7:30a Octagon St. Laveau

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Patriot Rally 8/21/2021

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Bear Pond Books Events

2:30p Kellogg-Hubbard Library

4:30p The Music Zone with Pitz Quattrone

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p David Pakman Show

7:00p Unadilla Theatre - Waiting for Godot

10:00p Senior Moments

11:00p The Peoples Law School

Friday, Sep 24

6:00a Senior Moments

7:00a Good Mental Health

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Abled and on Air

10:00a All Things LGBTQ

11:00a Talking About Movies

11:30a Celluloid Mirror

12:00p Brunch with Bernie

1:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

2:00p Unadilla Theatre - Waiting for Godot

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Capital City Rock Camp

7:00p Moccasin Tracks

8:00p Gay USA

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Barre Unified Union School

9:00AM - Barre Unified Union School

12:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

3:00PM - Barre Town Select

5:30PM - Community Bulletin

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre Town Select

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Saturday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Barre Town Select

9:00AM - Barre Town Select

12:00PM - Barre Town Select

3:00PM - Community Bulletin

4:00PM - 7:00PM - State House

Programming

7:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Sunday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

CHARTER COMMUNICATIONS OF BARRE

ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

CVTV Channel 192 • BARRE, VT

Wednesday - Art and Music

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - Art and Music Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - Art and Music Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - Art and Music Programs

Thursday - International and Multicultural

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - International and Multicultural

Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - International and Multicultural

Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - International and Multicultural

Programs

Friday - Local Vermont and Conversation

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also

be viewed online at cvtv723.org

6:00AM - 7:00PM - Church Services

Monday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00AM - State House Programming

9:00AM - State House Programming

12:00PM - State House Programming

3:00PM - Plainfield Select

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Plainfield Select

10:00PM - Plainfield Select

Tuesday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Plainfield Select

9:00AM - Plainfield Select

12:00PM - Plainfield Select

3:00PM to 5:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre City Council “Live”

10:00PM - Barre City Council

9:00p Standing Trees Vermont

10:30p St. Laveau's World Cinema

11:00p Vermont Humanities Council

Saturday, Sep 25

6:00a Annette Gordon-Reed: On Juneteenth

7:30a The Music Zone with Pitz Quattrone

8:00a Wednesday Night Live

10:00a Ideas For The Future Of Vermont

12:00p Senior Moments

2:00p The Peoples Law School

4:00p St. Laveau's World Cinema

4:30p Roman Catholic Mass

5:00p Washington Baptist Church

6:00p Good Mental Health

7:00p Dr. John Campbell

8:00p All Things LGBTQ

9:00p Banter and Beans/Vote for Vermont

10:30p Betty St. Laveau's House of Horror

Sunday, Sep 26

6:00a Senator Bernie Sanders Virtual Town

Hall on Climate Crisis

7:30a St. Laveau's World Cinema

8:00a Bear Pond Books Events

9:30a Washington Baptist Church

10:30a Roman Catholic Mass

11:00a Capital City Rock Camp

12:00p Patriot Rally 8/21/2021

2:30p Annette Gordon-Reed: On Juneteenth

4:00p Vermont Humanities Council

5:00p Banter and Beans/Vote for Vermont

6:00p Dr. John Campbell

7:00p Good Mental Health

8:00p The Music Zone with Pitz Quattrone

8:30p Abled and on Air

9:30p Octagon St. Laveau

10:00p Kellogg-Hubbard Library

Monday, Sep 27

6:00a Kellogg-Hubbard Library

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Banter and Beans/Vote for Vermont

10:00a The Peoples Law School

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Vermont Suffrage Centennial Alliance:

Hard Won, Not Done: Voting Matters

3:30p Vermont Land Trust

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Moccasin Tracks

7:00p Patriot Rally 8/21/2021

“All schedules are subject to

change, please call us

with questions - 479-1075.”

Saturday - Education and Nature

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Barre Congregational Church

8:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

9:00AM - 6:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 10:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

10:00PM - Local Sports

11:00PM - 12:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

Sunday - Church Services and Spirituality

6:00AM - 2:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

2:00PM - New England Cooks

3:00PM - 7:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

7:00PM - 12:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

Monday - Science

6:00AM - 3:00PM - Science Programs

3:00PM - Local Sports

4:00AM - 6:00PM - Science Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00AM - 12:00PM - Science Programs

Tuesday - History

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - History Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent

Global News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - History Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest

8:00PM - 12:00PM - History Programs

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org

9:30p Ideas For The Future Of Vermont

11:00p Senator Bernie Sanders Virtual Town

Hall on Climate Crisis

Tuesday, Sep 28

6:00a Vermont Suffrage Centennial Alliance:

Hard Won, Not Done: Voting Matters

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Unadilla Theatre - Waiting for Godot

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p All Things LGBTQ

2:00p Bread and Puppet Theater

3:00p Abled to Cook

3:30p Senator Bernie Sanders Virtual Town

Hall on Climate Crisis

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Abled and on Air

7:00p Vermont Land Trust

8:30p Celluloid Mirror

9:00p Wednesday Night Live

11:00p Capital City Rock Camp

ORCA Media Channel 1095

Education Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, Sep 22

12:00p North Branch Nature Center

2:00p First Wednesdays

4:00p HANDS in the Dirt

6:30p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

Thursday, Sep 23

12:00p Harwood Unified

4:00p North Branch Nature Center

8:00p Washington Central Union School

Board

Friday, Sep 24

12:00p Washington Central Union School

Board

3:00p GMALL Lectures

10:30p Game of the Week

Saturday, Sep 25

12:00p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

3:00p North Branch Nature Center

5:00p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

District

9:30p Vermont State Colleges Board of

Trustees

Sunday, Sep 26

www.pointfm.com

12:00p Orange Southwest School District

2:00p Randolph TCC School Board

7:00p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

Monday, Sep 27

12:00p White River Valley Supervisory

Union

2:30p White River Unified District Board

5:30p Randolph TCC School Board

6:30p VT State Board of Education

Tuesday, Sep 28

12:00p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

District

4:30p Orange Southwest School District

6:30p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

8:30p White River Valley Supervisory

Union

10:30p White River Unified District Board

ORCA Media Channel 1085

Government Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wed, Sep 22

6:00a Bethel Selectboard

8:30a Rochester Selectboard

11:00a Press Conference

12:30p Moretown Selectboard

2:30p Central Vermont Fiber

4:30p Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

6:30p Montpelier City Council LIVE

11:30p Vermont Community Broadband

Board

Thu, Sep 23

6:00a Middlesex Selectboard

8:30a Montpelier Social and Economic

Justice Advisory Committee

10:00a Calais Selectboard

1:30p Central Vermont Public Safety

Authority

4:00p Central Vermont Fiber

6:00p Waterbury Selectboard

10:00p Press Conference

Fri, Sep 24

6:00a Berlin Selectboard

7:30a Berlin Development Review Board

10:00a Vermont State House

1:00p Green Mountain Care Board

8:00p Rochester Selectboard

9:30p Randolph Selectboard

Sat, Sep 25

6:00a Cannabis Control Board

11:00a Press Conference

1:00p Randolph Selectboard

3:30p Vermont State House

6:30p Calais Selectboard

9:30p Green Mountain Care Board

Sun, Sep 26

6:00a Waterbury Selectboard

9:30a Berlin Selectboard

11:00a Berlin Development Review Board

1:30p Montpelier Social and Economic

Justice Advisory Committee

3:00p Montpelier Planning Commission

5:00p Montpelier Design Review

Committee

6:30p Montpelier Development Review

Board

9:30p Montpelier City Council

Mon, Sep 27

6:00a Moretown Selectboard

8:00a Middlesex Selectboard

12:00p Press Conference

1:30p Bethel Selectboard

4:00p Montpelier Social and Economic

Justice Advisory Committee

5:30p Montpelier Planning Commission

LIVE

8:30p Cannabis Control Board

Tue, Sep 28

6:00a Vermont Community Broadband

Board

10:00a Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

12:00p Press Conference

1:30p Vermont State House

5:30p Montpelier Design Review

Committee

7:00p Montpelier Development Review

Board

10:00p Central Vermont Public Safety

Authority

Community Media (802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net/schedules


CLASSIFIEDS

DEADLINE: MONDAY 10:00AM

DISPLAY ADS THURSDAY AT 5:00PM

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • Fax 802-479-7916 Email: sales@vt-world.com

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

PART-TIME / FILL-IN BAR-

TENDER Needed. Apply in

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call the ATTORNEY

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earning potential claims

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HEALTH CARE

Attention oxygen therapy users!

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of full 24/7 oxygen delivery.

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kit. Call 877-929-9587.

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HEALTH CARE

DO YOU HAVE CHRONIC

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you have insurance, you may

qualify for the perfect brace at

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LOOKING FOR A MIRACLE /

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re ect the typical experiences

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you can lose weight effortlessly.

TIP: Clues to fraudulent

ads include words like:

“breakthrough,”effortless,”

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your time and money call the

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Screenings can provide peace

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WANT A CURE-ALL?

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on promises of a “money back

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key words such as “exclusive

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more information on health related

products or services, call

the ATTONEY GENEAL’S

CONSUMER ASSISTANCE

PROGRAM at 1-800-649-

2424, or consult a health care

provider.

FREE ITEMS

$ A1-CASH PAID

Pending the Market

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

FOR INFO, 802-522-4279.

FREE “BEWARE OF THE

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Learn More about the

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TOP PRICE PAID for Your

Complete Junk Cars and

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continued on next page

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Equal Opportunity Employer

Equal Opportunity Employer

September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 25


Technical Sales Representative

Super Thin Saws

Super Thin Saws, located in Waterbury, Vermont is the designer and

manufacturer of high quality, precision tools used in the high-volume

production cutting of wood, plastic, and foam materials. Super Thin Saws

provides good pay, excellent benefits, training, and working environment.

Position Purpose and Main Responsibilities:

To contribute to the sustainable growth of Super Thin Saws (STS) through

the offerings of value-added cutting tool solutions by:

• Managing existing customers’ needs via phone, email, and occasional

site visits.

• Build sales growth by assisting in developing new accounts, and

identifying new sales related opportunities;

• Listen to the customers’ needs and communicate information back to the

engineering team;

• Develop, prepare, and deliver quotes per customer requirements.

• Work with our sales and manufacturing teams to provide the best sales

and service support in the industry.

If you would like a challenging and rewarding career with the Opportunity

to grow in the woodworking industry and are interested in discussing the

opportunity to Join our growing company, please forward your resume to:

bookkeeping@superthinsaws.com

Sears Hometown Sales & Service

Berlin, VT

Great Pay, bonuses & commissions,

wonderful work environment,

a growing company.

Sales experience preferred but

willing to train the right person.

479-2541 or

email office@tpmsvt.com

HOMETOWN

PRICES VALID WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4 THRU SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2020

UP TO 25% OFF POWER LAWN & GARDEN

MONTPELIER ROXBURY

PUBLIC SCHOOLS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

CUSTODIANS

Montpelier Roxbury Public Schools has two openings for

Dual second stage 212cc shift custodians. For further information about

24-in. snowthrower

• these Electric start positions, or for questions about the application

• Steel chute

• process, 3 year limited warrantyplease contact Tom Allen,

150cc

Custodial

Briggs & Stratton

Supervisor,

ITEM

at

# 07111699

tomal@mpsvt.org.

CLOSEOUT

While Quantities Last

SAVE $150

$749 88

OR • High Rear Wheels

32 36 /WK. INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANTS

LEASE PER WEEK

ITEM # 07137461

Montpelier Roxbury Public Schools has multiple openings

for full-time Instructional Assistants, must be HQP. Please

contact Heather Michaud, HR Coordinator, at 225-

8682 for further information, or apply online at www.

schoolspring.com.

STORES

625EXi engine

• Ready Start

• Side discharge, mulch and bag

KITCHEN 70% OFFMANAGER, ONE-YEAR 35% OFF POSITION

Craftsman Montpelier 42-pc. Roxbury Public Schools is looking for a longterm

socket wrench substitute set Kitchen miter saw stand Manager for Montpelier High

SAVE $70 Craftsman Universal SAVE $50

bit

ITEM # 00916491 $89

School for the 2021-2022 school year. 99

30% OFF

ITEM # 00999941 $29 99

SALE

SALE

The position is eight

hours per day when school is in session, with a competitive

salary

NO

and

CREDIT

benefits. Prior

REQUIRED

food service experience is

preferred. LEASE Please IT. LOVE contact IT. Jim OWN Birmingham, IT. SM

Food Service

Director, at 225-8016 for further information, or apply

online at www.schoolspring.com.

**IMPORTANT DEFERRED INTEREST PROMOTIONAL DETAILS (when offered): No interest if paid in full within the promotional period. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within the promotional period. With credit approval, for qualifying purchases

made on a Shop Your Way or Sears credit card (Sears Commercial One® accounts excluded). Sears Home Improvement Account SM valid on installed sales only. Offer valid for consumer accounts in good standing and is subject to change without notice. May not be combined with any other promotional offer. Shop

FOOD SERVICE ASSISTANTS

Montpelier Roxbury Public Schools has multiple openings

for Food Service Assistants. Positions are 5.75 or 4.0 hours

per day when school is in session. This is a great opportunity

to work part-time with school hours. Prior food service

experience is great but not necessary, we are willing to

train the right candidates. Please contact Jim Birmingham,

Food Service Director, at 225-8016 for further information,

or apply online at www.schoolspring.com.

Your Way or Sears credit card: As of 09/01/2020, APR for purchases: Variable 7.24% -25.24% or non-variable 5.00% -26.49%. Minimum interest charge: up to $2. See card agreement for details, including the APRs and fees applicable to you. †Purchase requirement less coupons, discounts and reward certificates

and does not include tax, installation, shipping or fees, and must be made in a single transaction. For online transactions you must select the Savings offer or Special Financing offer on the payment page in checkout. See store or sears.com for details. APPLIANCE OFFERS: (1,**) Bosch®, Whirlpool®, KitchenAid®,

Maytag®, Amana®, LG®, Samsung®, Frigidaire and Electrolux appliances limited to 10% off. Offers exclude Hot Buys, Super Hot Buys, Special Purchases GE®, GE Profile, GE Café, clearance, closeouts and Everyday Great Price items. See store for additional exclusions. Offers good thru 11/14/20. *10% off select home

appliance purchases of $599† or more with qualifying Shop Your Way or Sears credit card** OR NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 18 MONTHS** on select home appliance purchases of $999† or more with a qualifying Shop Your Way or Sears credit card*. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase

date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 18 months. Offer valid thru 11/14/2020. OR NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 12 MONTHS** On select sitewide* purchases of $299† or more with a qualifying Shop Your Way or Sears credit card. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if

the purchase balance is not paid in full within 12 months. Offer valid thru 1/29/2022. See above for Important Special Financing/Deferred Interest Details. LEASING DETAILS: This is a lease transaction. The lease has a 5-month minimum term [“Initial Term”]. Must be at least 18 years old and income requirements

apply. Qualifying merchandise of at least $199 is required to enter into a lease at Sears Authorized Hometown Stores, LLC. Excludes non-durable goods. No security deposit required. Lease requires consumer to make first payment at lease signing, plus 19 weekly (offered online only) lease payments, 9 biweekly

lease payments or 4 monthly lease payments. After fulfilling the Initial Term, you may: (1) continue to lease by making periodic payments in accordance with the terms of the lease agreement; (2) exercise a purchase option per the terms of the lease agreement (not available in NJ, VT, WI, or WV); or (3) return

the leased items to WhyNotLeaseIt. For example, leased item(s) with lease amount of $600 with a weekly lease payment schedule (offered online only) would require $60 first lease payment followed by 19 weekly payments of approximately $25.26 plus tax, or a biweekly lease payment schedule would require

$60 first lease payment followed by 9 biweekly payments of approximately $53.33 plus tax, or a monthly lease payment schedule would require $120 first lease payment followed by 4 monthly payments of approximately $105.00 plus tax, with total cost to lease the item(s) for the Initial Term of $540.00 plus tax.

TEMPOE, LLC dba WhyNotLeaseIt® is an independent service provider of the LEASE IT program and not an affiliate or licensee of Sears Authorized Hometown Stores, LLC or its affiliates.

Sears Hometown Stores may be independently operated by authorized dealers of Sears Authorized Hometown Stores, LLC or by authorized franchisees of Sears Home Appliance Showrooms, LLC. The SEARS mark is a service mark of Sears Brands, LLC.

NOW HIRING

SUBSTITUTES for

TEACHERS, NURSES, INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANTS,

CUSTODIANS, FOOD SERVICE STAFF & CROSSING

GUARDS NEEDED

Individuals are sought to serve as temporary employees

for the 2021-2022 school year. Appropriate background

check required. Applications available at the Office of the

Superintendent, 5 High School Drive, Unit #1, Montpelier,

Vermont.

MONTPELIER HIGH SCHOOL

Softball: JV Coach

Boys’ Ultimate Frisbee: JV Coach

Boys’ Ultimate Frisbee: Varsity Coach

Girls’ Ultimate Frisbee: Varsity Coach

MAIN STREET MIDDLE SCHOOL

Nordic Ski Coach

Girls’ Basketball: Grade 7 Coach

Girls’ Basketball: Grade 8 Coach

Boys’ Basketball: Grade 7 Coach

Interested candidates are asked to send a letter of interest

and resumé to Matt Link, Athletic Director, Montpelier

High School, 5 High School Drive, Montpelier, Vermont

05602.

EOE

page 26 The WORLD September 22, 2021

26% OFF

SAVE $100

25

$279 NOW HIRING

99 OR

10 10 /WK.

cu. ft. ‡

LEASE PER WEEK

25-cu. ft.† capacity

refrigerator

CASHIER with some deli experience

• • Gallon TuckAway Sized Door Bins

FULL TIME - BOTTLE shelf to

• SpaceSaver fit tall items

ice system CLERKS

General International $12.00/hr. to $14.00/hr.

®

ITEM # 04651335

10-in. sliding

SAVE $760

compound miter sawApply by phone $1399 call 802-249-8390 or

ITEM # 00950456

REG. 2159.99

SAVE $80 Email: gmmmbev@gmail.com

$179 99

OR

fingerprint resistant 63 11 /WK.

SALE

M&M

LEASE PER WEEK

35% OFF

Make first payment of $60 today when you choose

biweekly payment schedule or pay $120 today when

you choose monthly payment schedule.

NEW LEASE See below for details.

REDEMPTION CENTER • HARDWICK

$

60 TODAY

STARTS A

CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED:

COSTUME JEWELRY

HIGHEST PRICES PAID IN

CASH. Ask For Walter, Call

802-485-6185

Wants to purchase minerals

and other oil and gas interests.

Send details to P.O. Box

13557 Denver, CO 80201

ANTIQUES/

COLLECTIBLES/

RESTORATION

ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLES,

Old, New and in between

Call 802-272-1820/802-461-

6441

Last Time Around Antiques

114 No. Main St. Barre.

802-476-8830

MISCELLANEOUS

!! OLD GUITARS WANTED!!

GIBSON, FENDER, MARTIN,

Etc. 1930’s to 1980’s. TO

DOLLAR PAID. CALL TOLL

FREE 1-866-433-8277.

On all appliances: Colors, connectors, ice maker hook-up and installation extra. †Total capacity. (1) Advertised savings range from 5%-35%. Exclusions apply. See The Details section. See store for additional exclusions. Offers good thru 11/14/20. (**) Exclusions apply. See The Details section. See store for additional exclusions. Offers good thru

11/14/20. For Shop Your Way members in participating locations. Local curbside delivery. Additional fees may apply. See store for details. Advertised savings range from 5%-25%. Offer excludes Everyday Great Price items, clearance, closeouts, accessories, attachments, generators and snow throwers.

Offer good thru 11/14/20. Subject to lease approval, total cost to lease for a 5-mo. lease agreement is $60 due at lease signing plus taxes, followed by 19 weekly payments of the per week amount shown by the item. For your options at the end of the 5-mo. agreement, see the “LEASING DETAILS” below. Lease prices shown are valid on the

sale prices shown for the duration of this advertisement.

WANTED MISCELLANEOUS MISCELLANEOUS MISCELLANEOUS

TEXT 'DUNKIN'

TO (804) 294-2963

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& professional installs. Senior

& Military Discounts available.

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months free premium movie

channels! Free next day installation!

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DEALING WITH WATER

DAMAGE requires immediate

action. Local professionals

that respond immediately.

Nationwide and 24/7. No Mold

Calls. 1-800-506-3367

DIRECTV Now. No Satellite.

$40 / mo 65 Channels. Stream

news, live events, sports & on

demand titles. No contract /

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on ALL Devices. Call today!

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forever! LeafFilter, most advanced

debris-blocking gutter

protection. Schedule free estimate.

15% off Purchase. 10%

Senior & Military Discounts.

Call 1-855-995-2490

GENERAC STANDBY GEN-

ERATORS provide backup

power during utility power outages

so your home and family

stay safe and comfortable.

Prepare now. Free 7-year extended

warranty ($695 value).

Request a free quote today!

Call for additional terms and

conditions. 1-877-378-1582

GENERAC Standby Generators.

The weather is increasingly

unpredictable. Be prepared

for power outages. Free

7-year extended warranty

($695 value!) Schedule Free

in-home assessment. 1-844-

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HOME BREAK-INS take less

than 0 SECONDS. Don’t

wait! Protect your family, your

home, your assets NOW for

as little as 70a day! Call 866-

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5TH WHEEL HITCH draw tite Smart HD DVR Included, Free INVENTORS-FREE INFOR-

$250 obo. UP Husky TO35% Tool OFF Boxgood

condition APPLIANCES fi ts full 1 size tions apply. Promo Expires your product idea developed

Voice Remote. Some Restric-

MATION PACKAGE Have

pickup truck, $100. Lawn Roller

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ber Pine / Cedar. 10% All OFF lengths * ELIMINATE GUTTER

& Sizes, Make APPLIANCES

an offer. 802- CLEANING FOREVER! Leaf- 1-855-380-5976 for a Free

$599† or more with qualifying Shop Your Way or Sears credit card.

229-4314

Filter, the most advanced debris-blocking

gutter protection. idea for a free consultation.

Starter Guide. Submit your

**

OR

AT&T Internet. Starting 18 MONTH at $40

FINANCING

Schedule a FREE LeafFliter

/ month w/12-mo **

ON APPLIANCE

agmt.

PURCHASES

1

$999

TB † OR MORE

of estimate today. 15% off Entire

Purchase. 10% Senior & White-glove service from

**

LONG DISTANCE Moving:

with qualifying Shop Your Way or Sears credit card.

data / mo. Ask how to bundle &

OR

SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions Military Discounts. Call 1-855- America’s top movers. ully

apply. 1-888-796-8850

FREE DELIVERY

ON APPLIANCES $499 † OR MORE

723-0883

insured and bonded. Let us

with qualifying Shop Your Way or Sears credit card. take the stress out of your out

**

of state move. Free quotes!

Call: 855-606-2752

LOVINGTON STONEWARE

DISHES, Idlewild pattern, 8

place settings plus extras,

over 60 pieces, $40. 802-223-

7818

METAL STAND UP BOB

SLED, for snowmobile or dog

team, $100. 4 foot all weather

guard aluminum storage box

for truck bed, water tight and

lockable $150. Bradford 802-

222-4309

New authors wanted! Page

Publishing will help self-publish

your book. Free author

submission kit! Limited offer!

866-951-7214.

POOL TABLE for sale, regulation

size, slate bed, 3-1”

units, width ’8” Length 8’”

leathered pockets. Cue balls +

rack, box of chalk, cue sticks,

antique Brunswick cue rack.

$850 obo call 802-479-9431

STAY IN YOUR HOME Longer

with an American Standard

Walk-In Bathtub. Receive up

to $1,500 off, including a free

toilet, and a lifetime warranty

on the tub

and installation. Call us at

1-866-945-3783 or visit www.

walkintubquote.com /

pennysaver

The Generac PWRcell solar

plus battery storage system.

Save money, reduce reliance

on grid, prepare for outages

& power your home. Full installation

services. $0 Down

Financing option. Request

free no obligation quote.

1-855-270-3785.

Update your home with beautiful

new blinds & shades.

Free in-home estimates make

it convenient to shop from

home. Professional installation.

Top quality — Made in

the USA. Free consultation:

877-212-7578. Ask about our

specials!

WE CAN remove bankruptcies,

judgments, liens, and

ad loans from your credit fi le

forever! The Federal Trade

Commission says companies

that promise to scrub your

credit report of accurate negative

information for a fee are

lying. Under FEDERAL law,

accurate negative information

can be reported for up to

seven years, and some bankruptcies

for up to 10 years.

Learn about managing credit

and debt at ftc.gov / credit. A

message from The World and

the FTC.

continued on next page

CONSTRUCTION HELP WANTED

Large Barre Town housing

development seeks additional crews

to expand production

Framers- framing crews for single

family and duplex homes

Roofers - asphalt shinle roofin

Siding Contractors - vinyl siding,

PVC trim

Drywall Installers - hangers/tapers

Contact Windy Wood Housing

802-249-8251

Now Hiring For

$

13/hr.

starting

Full & PT

Cashier & Pizza/Deli

apply at

careers.globalp.com

at Jiffy Mart

366 E. Montpelier Road

next to Agway on Rte. 2, Montpelier


GARAGE SALES FLEA MARKETS

BERLIN 9/25 9-3pm only

78 Applewood Dr. Director

chairs, surf board,

couch chair table rugs, 4

thule racks, fishing equipment,

mech reloader, table

saw some tools, LG Dog

crate, animal heater, hammock

stand, egg incubater,

squeezo and propane heater.

LAST CHANCE

SATURDAY, 9/25, 9-3

Blow Out Sale 12-3!

All remaining items by donation.

124 Winch View,

Northfield.

MISCELLANEOUS

WESLEY FINANCIAL Group,

LLC: Timeshare Cancellation

Experts. Over $50,000,000 in

timeshare debt and fees canceled

in 2019. Get free informational

package and learn

how to get rid of your timeshare!

Free Consultations.

Over 450 positive reviews.

Call 855-428-7954

HOME

APPLIANCES

WE SELL

REFURBISHED

APPLIANCES

LOW, LOW PRICES!

WE OFFER SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

for Your Mower, Snow Blowers, Lawn Tractors, Etc.

EQUIPMENT MAY BE DROPPED OFF AT OUR STORE

7 Days A Week. Call 479-2541 for More Details

Husqvarna, Craftsman, PoulanPro, MTD Yard Machines

and most other brands

Owned & Operated by Dave & Lu Thomas

1598 US Route 302 Berlin,

Barre, VT 802-479-2541

FURNITURE

PAINTED AMISH DESK; Floral

Scene design green w/

brown trim, 1 drawer, size;

3’42”H x 2’29”W x 1’19”D.

$300. 802-595-8289

STORAGE

A STORAGE PLACE

Williamstown

Route 64.

802-505-1921

WINTER STORAGE

CAR, BOAT,

MOTORCYCLE, ETC.

$75.00 month

802-223-1123

LAST SALE of the Season!

Saturday 9-5 & Sunday 9-4.

We are having a large sale:

Housewares, Some Halloween,

Christmas and Easter

items, cement mixer, come

along / chain hoist, larger

carbide drill bits, and camping

gear plus so much more.

140 Middle Road, Barre.

The SNACK SHACK

Last Sale of the Season

Fri, Sat, Sun

9-4

Lots of Stuff left,

Come On Down!

515 North Main Street,

Barre.

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

Learn more about

the REAL Vermont

Land Trust

Google:

“The Demise of

Don Joslin”

Narrated by

Charley Burbank

(802) 454-8561

ASHLEY — TYPE WOOD

STOVE, $375. obo. 802-229-

5173

BEWARE OF The Vermont

Land Trust. You shake hands

with them be sure to count

your fi ngers when you are

done. 802-454-8561.

DAVE’S LOGGING &

FIREWOOD

Green & Seasoned

802-454-1062

FIREWOOD All Hardwood

cut, split and delivered in

Montpelier and Barre. Green

$245 / cord. 802-485-8525 or

1-800-707-8427

FIREWOOD

Split & Delivered

Green $220 / Cord

Seasoned $240 / Cord

All Ash $220 / Cord

Paul Poulin

802-883-5563

GET READY Vermont Land

Trust, Hell’s Coming and

Charley’s Coming with Them.

ROUND OAK #18 WOOD-

STOVE, good functional heater,

$500. 802-223-7818

ST. CROIX WOOD Pellet

Stove, Power Auger cost

$2000 New, Asking $ 400.00.

802-461-6441

CUSTODIAN 2ND SHIFT POSITION

Barre Unified Union School District is seeking custodians for

BCEMS. Second shift starts 3:00 PM - 11:30 PM during the

school year and 7:00 AM - 3:30 PM during summer.

Candidates must:

- Be able to perform unassisted physical labor/activities, lifting,

bending, standing, climbing and walking.

- Work effectively and respectfully with the public.

- Understand and carry out oral and written directions.

- Maintain cooperative working relationships.

- Demonstrate sensitivity to, and respect for, a diverse population.

- Pass a background and fingerprint check.

- Background in commercial cleaning preferred.

Starting wage is $17.14/hr plus differential shift pay. Benefits

include health and dental insurance, retirement, paid sick time,

vacation and personal leave.

Interested candidates are invited to apply online at buusd.org/

district/employment or submit a letter of interest, resume, and

three references to:

Jamie Evans - Facilities Director, jevanbsu@buusd.org

CLASSIFIEDS

HOMESTEAD ANTIQUES

OPEN Saturday & Sunday

September 25th & 26th. 10-

3pm. Last sale of the Season!

Map Quest -30 Jensen

Road, Barre. Items for sale:

Griswold skillets, quilts, antique

chairs, vintage kitchen

utensils, Mid-century

couch, cookie jars, tables,

mirrors, area rugs, oak

swivel chairs, dove-tail boxes,

farm tools, bird baths,

costume jewelry, stands,

crocks, porch posts, vases,

insulators, dressers,

mid-century kitchen tables,

large butcher block, cane

collection, and much more.

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

1943 2N FORD TRACTOR

Beautifully Restored $2,900.

MAPLE SAP BUCKETS W/

Cover & Spout $3.00 per set.

Telephone 802-229-0205

5 GALLON PAILS W/Covers

$1.00 each.

The Barrel Man

802-439-5519

5TH WHEEL HITCH draw tite

$250 obo. Husky Tool Boxgood

condition fi ts full size

pickup truck, $100. Lawn Roller

$40. Rough Sawed Lumber

Pine / Cedar. All lengths

& Sizes, Make an offer. 802-

229-4314

ARE YOU TIRED OF

THE COLOR WHITE OR

GREEN

We have the answer.

12 colors of landscape stone

for your yard projects.

We Deliver

Landscape Stones of Vermont

Black Rock Coal

East Montpelier

802-223-4385

1-800-639-3197

landscapestonesofvermont.

com

FOOD GRADE Barrels totes,

We have over 700 in stock

from 2 1/2Gal — 275 Gal totes.

Call for Info; Bicknell Barrels

The Barrel Man

802-439-5519.

NUBIAN BILLIE GOAT 11/2

yrs old, well behaved, no

horns, $200 / obo. 802-439-

3147

ORGANIC GRASS FED

BEEF $3.00 LB HANGING.

You cut & Wrap. 802-839-

0409

continued on next page

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

802-505-3859

802-505-3859

or email: lpdtrafficcontrol@gmail.com

DSD MERCHANDISER

Vermont Market Area

Seeking

Flaggers

$

18/HR.

Will Certify. Willing to train.

Please call:

Cabot Creamery, the makers of the World’s Best Cheddar, has a full-time salaried Direct

Store Delivery (DSD) Merchandiser position available. The selected candidate will be

responsible for merchandising Cabot products on assigned sales routes and in various chain

and independent stores. The selected candidate will have Wednesdays and Sundays off,

and will be issued a company leased vehicle to use for business purposes.

Position requires working freight deliveries from the back dock to the main dairy case,

including but not limited to, breaking down pallets of freight, stocking items to the sales

floor, and organizing any “back stock” that remains. Preferred applicants have previous

retail / dairy products sales and merchandising experience at multiple locations. Candidates

should be neat in appearance and professional in conduct, able to effectively self-manage

their time to complete tasks and assignments, and able to regularly lift cases weighing

up to 70 lbs. Good reading and math skills are a plus. Qualified candidates must have

a clean driving record over the last three years and will be required to complete and pass

pre-placement processes, to include drug screening, standard physical and background

check. Position requires a high school diploma or GED.

Cabot offers a competitive starting salary and a comprehensive benefit package, to include

pension plan. Apply online to jobs@cabotcheese.com, or mail your resume with cover

letter to:

Cabot Creamery Administrative Office

Attn: Human Resources

193 Home Farm Way

Waitsfield, VT 05673

EOE M/F/D/V

We’re Hiring

Work within the community you love!

If you enjoy helping others in a dynamic retail environment, we

want you to be part of our team. Hunger Mountain Co-op offers

employees a union environment with a comprehensive benefits

package that includes:

• competitive wages and employee gain share program

• medical, dental, and vision coverage for full-and

part-time employees

• company-paid life insurance

• 401K retirement plan

• paid time off

• a discount on Co-op purchases

Do you have a flexible schedule and want

some extra income?

The Co-op hires substitute employees to cover absences.

Substitutes earn an hourly wage, accrue paid time off, and receive

the employee discount.

For more information and to apply,

visit hungermountain.coop/employment

Hunger Mountain Co-op is an equal opportunity employer. Women, minorities,

people with disabilities, veterans, and members of the LGBTQ+ community are

encouraged to apply. Hourly employees are represented by UE Local 255.

623 Stone Cutters Way, Montpelier, VT

(802) 223-8000 • hungermountain.coop

September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 27


CLASSIFIEDS

NOW HERE’S A TIP

By JoAnn Derson

* If you need to pick up small shards of

glass, use a cotton ball that’s been moistened,

or a slice of white bread (insides

only) wadded up.

* Glass and chrome will shine if you clean them with newspaper.

You can mist the paper with water first, but not too

much. Rub ... and the shine comes right out, plus no streaks

or lint!

* “Use purified water in your coffeemaker to lengthen its

life. Water deposits build up and affect both the flavor and

function of your machine. They can be cleaned, but it’s much

better if you use purified drinking water from a jug. It makes

it very easy to fill the machine, too.” -- M.E. in Wyoming

* “Purchase colorful laundry baskets for each child in your

home. In the evening, you can have the child find all his or

her stray items, put them in the basket and then put them

away. In our house, the kids also use their basket to hold

anything they need for school the next day -- backpack, coats

and outerwear, even boots. We stack the baskets by the door,

and nothing gets left behind.” -- P.W. in Missouri

* When you are frying up ground beef, add a tablespoon or

two of water. It will help the excess grease to pull away from

the meat, making it easier to drain off.

* “To speed the healing of bruises, try eating pineapple.

Drink lots of water, too. I play contact sports, and this has

always helped me.” -- R.E. in Missouri

(c) 2021 King Features Synd., Inc.

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

$A1-CASH PAID

Pending the Market

CARS, TRUCKS

For More Info, 802-522-4279

AFFORDABLE TRASH SER-

VICES & RECYCLING, Commercial

/ Residential. Also metal

recycling, brush removal.

Contact Steve (802)595-3445

or trashsrv4u@hotmail.com or

www.trashserv4u.com

Ask about cash discount.

ALL WAYS

LANDSCAPING

Lawn Mowing,

Rototilling,

Painting &

Repairs

CALL THE BEST

802-223-6363

DEPENDABLE LAWN mowing

starting at $35 within 10

miles of Barre Free Estimate

Bob Morin 802-522-9753

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

DmFURNACE

MAN

•Oil Furnace Tune-Ups

•Cleanings •Repairs

•Installations

Fully Licensed & Insured

Reasonable Rates

Call Daryl

802-249-2814

DOES YOUR home need a

good exterior cleaning? High

Pressure, Pressure Washing.

FREE ESTIMATES Call 802-

461-8422 / 802-461-6441.

ELEVATION ELECTRIC

LICENSED and INSURED

Free Estimate

802-224-6647

FULL QUALITY

TREE SERVICE

Removal & Full Tree Services,

Stump Grinding, Hedge and

Shrubs trimming, for free estimates

call Randy 802-479-

3403/802-249-7164 35+ years

experience, Fully Insured.

FURNITURE REPAIR, Antique

Restorations, William

Morrison, Craftsman Since

1980. morrisonwindsors.com

802-522-2929

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

AL’S TASH

EST. 93’

*Full Service Drive thru Trash

Drop Saturday’s

*Residential / Commercial

*Scrap Metal

*Construction Debris

Hauling Services & Trailer

Drop-off’s days a week.

Best & Most competitive rates

in the area! Located in E.

Montpelier.

“Your trash is our business”

Call / Text Paul @

802-595-4383

PROFESSIONAL WINDOW

CLEANING

done in Barre / Montpelier

area. Free Estimates. Call Joe

802-229-6527

TREE SERVICE

Hazardous tree removal /

Clean up, Lot clearing / Selective

falling, Viewing improvement

/ Emergency storm

damage for residential or

commercial, Fully insured /

Senior discounts.

Floyd Beede

802-433-1118

Williamstown, VT

E-mail

us!

Classified & Display

ADS

Now Placing Your

Classified Or Display Ad

Is Even Easier!

Our E-mail address is

sales@vt-world.com

Please include contact

person & payment info

( Only)

479-2582 or

1-800-639-9753

SERVICE

DIRECTORY

TRUCK FOR HIRE!

In Need Of A

Pickup Truck And

Helping Hand?

• Hauling

• Dump Run

• Landlords,

Residential

Clean-outs

Call Us!

Tom Moore

T&T Truck For Hire

Montpelier

802-224-1360

GREENSBORO • RANDOLPH • BARRE

Business Technology & Cyber-Security Services

Located in the historic Hangar Building

1970 Vermont Rt. 14 South 802.223.4448

East Montpelier, VT 05651

rbtechvt.com

MONTPELIER • PLAINFIELD • MARSHFIELD

Fully

Insured

FREE

ESTIMATES

802-563-2015

or Cell: 802-279-0317

"WE DO IT ALL"

Book Now For The 2022 Season!

Residential & Commercial

NOW ACCEPTING

* We Return All Phone Calls *

EMP & EPA

CERTIFIED

THAYER

ROOFING - ALL KINDS

PAINTING • CONSTRUCTION

OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE!

ST. JOHNSBURY • CABOT • MORRISVILLE

WATERBURY • NORTHFIELD • STOWE

BUILDING GARAGES

FROM FLOOR TO ROOF

Starting At $ 14,000

24 x 24 garage, 6” concrete floors with steel

rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.

Garages to your specifications, any size.

House Framing & Addition Work

Call 802-296-1522 • Ask for Ray

RANDY’S HEATING SERVICES

Get your furnace

cleaned, repaired

or replaced!

Sales & Services

TOYO On Demand

Water Heaters

Miller Furnace

System 2000 Boilers

Thermopride Furnaces

Service & Installation

Call Randy Duprey

Certified Oil & Propane Heating Technician

Insured & Licensed • Over 20 yrs. experience

802-498-8062

reduprey@gmail.com

Since 1974

SERVICES

802-223-6577

407 BARRE ST. MONTPELIER

Professional

Carpet/Upholstery

Cleaning & Maintenance

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

or your money back.

www.MontpelierCarpetCleaning.com

G. M. Bowen

Excavating Contractor Inc.

2510 Bliss Road, East Calais, VT

(802) 456-7049 (802) 793-0895

Residential & Commercial

Site Prep, Water, Septic, Ponds, Land Clearing, Grading, Hauling

GREG’S

PAINTING & STAINING

• Handpaint or Spray

• Metal Roof Painting

• Interior/Exterior

• Guarantee

• Free Estimates

• Reasonable Low Rates

• Neat, Quality Work

• References • Insured

Call 802-479-2733

gpdpainting@aol.com EPA, RRP, EMP Certified

Full Service Plumbing, Heating, Air & Electric

FULLY LICENSED AND INSURED

24-HOUR

EMERGENCY

SERVICE

LLOYD

HOME SERVICE

Your Residential Service Experts

(802) 426-2092

www.lloydplumbingandheating.com

page 28 The WORLD September 22, 2021


AUTOMOTIVE

CAMPERS &

MOTORHOMES

1984 WINNEBAGO Chiefton

26 ft, in great shape. 1 ton

Chevrolet Frame duel rear

wheels, 454 V8, 68,000 miles,

runs very good engine and

transmission tight can send

pictures as requested. $6500

/ obo. 802-279-5248

MOTORCYCLES/

ATVS

CRUISE INTO Fall with a

2003 Yamaha V-Star 1100cc

2 cycle Motorcycle silver with

chrome / leather, low mileage.

$209 fi rm. Harland, Orange,

VT. (802) 439-5607.

TRUCKS/VANS/

JEEPS/ACCESS.

2010 CHEVOLET SILVEA-

DO 1500 $14,995 East Barre

Auto Sales 802-476-5370 or

866-928-9370 or TEXT 1ESZ

TO 27414

2011 JEEP PATRIOT $6,995

East Barre Auto Sales (866)

928-9370 OR 802-476-5370

For more details TEXT 0R9U

TO 27414

2011 SUBARU OUTBACK

$9,995 East Barre Auto Sales

802-479-5370 OR 866-928-

9370 For more details TEXT

2X46 TO 27414

201 CHEVOLET EI-

NOX $16,995 East Barre

Auto Sales 802-476-5370 or

866-928-9370 or Text 35DU

to 27414

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

$ A1-CASH AID

Pending the Market

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

802-522-4279.

1989 CHEVOLET CO-

VETTE $13,995 East Barre

Auto Sales 802-476-5370 or

866-928-9370 or Text 0YPY

to 27414

CASH O CAS We uy all

cars unk, high-end, totaledit

doesn’t matter Get free

towing and same day cash

NEWE MODELS too Call

844-813-0213

Donate Your Car to Veterans

Today Help and Support our

Veterans. Fast — FREE pick

up. 100% tax deductible. Call

1-800-245-0398.

ERASE BAD CREDIT FOR-

EVE

Credit repair companies make

false claims and promises to

erase a trail of unpaid bills or

late payments from your credit

report. However, only time can

erase negative, but accurate

credit information. In addition,

federal law forbids credit repair

companies from collecting

money before they provide

their service. TIP: If you have

questions about your credit

history or you want to know

how to get a free copy of your

credit report call the ATTOR-

NEY GENEAL’S CONSM-

ER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

at 1-800-49-2424. Don’t

send any money to a credit repair

company until you check

it out.

NEW & SED TIES ALL

SIZES, Used Rims,

Call week days.

802-883-5506

Hunter Heavy Duty

ALIGNMENTS

McLEODS

SPRING & CHASSIS

For All

Sizes

of RVs

Trucks,

Trailers &

Buses

“Your Truck

Chassis

Specialists”

32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641 • 1-802-476-4971

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL

TOMORROW WHAT YOU

CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582 800-639-9753

Central Vermont’s Newspaper

CLASSIFIEDS

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, Vermont 05641

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

JUST GOOD

AUTOS

296 East Montpelier Rd • Rt. 14 North - Barre

802-479-0140

2012 FORD ESCAPE LMT

Auto., PW, PL, AC, sunroof,

1 owner, low miles

$8,495

2012 CHEV. MALIBU 2LT

Auto., PW, PL, AC, Low Miles

$6,495

2011 FORD FOCUS SE

Auto., PW, PL, AC,

low miles, 75K

$5,995

2011 CHEV. MALIBU LT

Auto., PW, PL, AC, low miles,

one owner

$6,495

1973 MERCURY COUGAR

XR7 CONVERTIBLE

351 Cleveland-Cobra Jet Motor,

Auto., PW, cruise, tilt, low miles

$11,995

EXTENDED WARRANTIES AVAILABLE

JUST GOOD

AUTOS

Trades Welcome

Prices Negotiable

Just a Sample of Many

Just Good Autos!

REACHING

OVER

23,000

READERS

WEEKLY

Montpelier, Barre,

Northfield, Hardwick

Waterbury &

Surrounding Towns

Always Good News

BIGGEST

CIRCULATION

EACH WEEK!

403 U.S. Rt. 302-Berlin • Barre, Vt 05641-2274

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • Fax: 802-479-7916

e-mail: sales@vt-world.com or editor@vt-world.com

September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 29


YOKOHAMA GOODYEAR MICHELIN PIRELLI

FIRESTONE GENERAL UNIROYAL NOKIAN

New & Good Used Tires

Passenger, Performance & Lt. Truck

PRESTON’S

SEPTEMBER SAVINGS

LUBE, OIL & FILTER

CHANGE

• Up to 5 qts.Standard

Motor Oil

• Genuine Factory OIl Filter

• Multi-Point Inspection

• Top off All Fluids

TIRE

CHANGEOVERS

Mounted & Computer Balanced

YOUR TIRES OR OURS

WE DO FLAT REPAIR

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

Mon. - Fri. 8:30-4:30 • Saturday 8:30-1:00

Closed Sunday

FRED BUDZYN

TIRE

Corner No. Main &

Seminary Sts., Barre

479-1819

CALL FOR PRICES

ONLY AT PRESTON’S KIA

$34 95

Plus

Tax

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON ONLY AT

PRESTON’S KIA. Please present coupon at vehicle

write-up. Offer good thru 9/30/21

DISCOUNT TO

15 % OFF

- May not be combined with

any other offer

Please present coupon at

vehicle write-up.

WE DO

FLAT

REPAIR

WE

ACCEPT

EBT

WRANGLER HANKOOK COOPER

ALL SIZES BF GOODRICH GENERAL

• Most cars &

light trucks

• Inspection only,

repairs extra

• May not be combined

with any other offer

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES & MODELS

You Don’t Have To Purchase Your Vehicle Here To Take Advantage Of Our Quality Service!

page 30 The WORLD September 22, 2021

AUTOMOTIVE

VERMONT STATE

INSPECTION

51 GALLISON HILL RD.

MONTPELIER, VT

VERMONT

INSPECTION

$39 95

10

DUE

Plus

Tax

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON ONLY AT

PRESTON’S KIA. Please present coupon at vehicle

write-up. Offer good thru 9/30/21

BUY 3 TIRES $ 1

GET THE 4TH FOR

Eligible Tires Only • May not be

combined with any other offer.

See Service Advisor for Details

Offer good thru 9/30/21.

Central Vermont

Fun Runs

Sept.14,2021

Two Miles

Female:

Ages-14 to 29

Grace Acosta 16:52

Four Miles

Female:

Ages- 30 to 39

Keely Koenig 30:42

Ages- 60 to 69

Dot Martin 38:53

Donna Smyers 38:53

Male:

Ages- 30 to 39

Mark Evans 30:30

Ages-40 to 49

Jeff Hope 30:30

Mark Seltzer 31:04

Ages-50 to 59

Peter Luyckx

Dan Renfro 37:38

Sal Acosta 38:53

Ages -60 to 69

John Martin 28:29

Tim Noonan 31:39

Tom Mowatt 31:04

Ages-70 to 79

John Valentine 38:53

Six Miles

Female:

Ages 40 to 49

Natalie Gentry 50:46

Fun runs of two ,four and six miles are

held every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. from

May into October.The meeting place

is on the bike path just beyond the

Montpelier High School track.

VEHICLES

ONLY

MEMBER

DISCOUNT

SAVE10 % OFF

Maximum $50. May not be combined with any other offer

TIRES

Best Prices In Town

AVAILABLE AT CAPITOL

$

40 OFF

CITY KIA

WHEN YOU BUY A SET OF 4

ELIGIBLE ON ALL VEHICLES

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON AT PRESTON’S KIA. Please present coupon at vehicle write-up. Offer good thru 9/30/21

MONDAY-FRIDAY 7-5

SATURDAY 8-Noon

Service & Parts

802-262-2030

Vermont’s ‘Operation Game Thief’

Helps Catch Poachers

Vermont State Game Wardens are asking

Vermonters with information about fish and

wildlife crimes to submit them through the

Operation Game Thief program.

Operation Game Thief (OGT) is a joint

nonprofit program sponsored by the Vermont

Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs and administered

by the Vermont Fish & Wildlife

Department. The program provides a way for

people to help protect the state’s fish and

wildlife by reporting law violators at 1-800-

75ALERT (1-800-752-5378). The toll-free

hotline is available 24 hours a day, seven days

a week, 365 days a year to report violations.

Rewards are paid for information leading to

arrests.

Vermont is lucky to have dedicated wardens

patrolling our fields, forests and waterways,

but their numbers are limited,” said

Vermont Youth Waterfowl Hunting, Sept. 25-26

A youngster’s first hunt can mark the The youth hunter must have a Vermont

beginning of a lifelong passion for the outdoors

and a commitment to wildlife conserva-

an unarmed adult, 18 years of age or older,

hunting license and must be accompanied by

tion. There is no finer time to begin this who also has a Vermont hunting license.

journey than during Vermont’s upcoming Youths 16 and 17 years of age must have state

youth waterfowl hunting weekend on and federal duck stamps. All youth hunters

September 25 and 26.

must also register with the Harvest

“Vermont’s youth waterfowl hunting weekend

helps ensure that young hunters get the they hunt. This can be done on Vermont Fish

Information Program (HIP) in each state that

quality training and experiences they need for and Wildlife’s website or by calling toll-free

lifelong participation,” said Fish and Wildlife 1-877-306-7091. The adult may not hunt

Commissioner Louis Porter. “By design, the waterfowl or carry a firearm while accompanying

the youth when the youth is hunting

youth weekend hunt reinforces the route of

initiation that is critical in recruitment – waterfowl.

learning from an experienced adult role Ducks and geese may be taken by youth

model.”

hunters on September 25 and 26 according to

On September 25 and 26, hunters 17 years the bag limits set in the 2021-2022 Syllabus

of age or younger may hunt ducks and geese of State and Federal Hunting Regulations for

in the Lake Champlain and Interior Vermont Migratory Birds in Vermont, available from

waterfowl hunting zones. The age requirement

is 15 and under in the Connecticut file from www.vtfishandwildlife.com under

Vermont post offices and as a downloadable

River zone.

Hunt – Waterfowl.

• • •

Vermont Grouse and Woodcock Hunting Starts Sept. 25

A quiet walk down a hidden woods road, have occurred. Ruffed grouse also frequent

bright fall foliage coloring the canopy overhead

and the crisp, cool air of an early morn-

fond of the apples they find under wild apple

the same habitat, and they are particularly

ing – these are just some of the elements of a trees.

great Vermont upland gamebird hunting All migratory game bird (woodcock, common

snipe, ducks, and geese) hunters must

experience. Hoping to see the dramatic flush

of a grouse or woodcock is, of course, another

reason hunters try to get out into Vermont Program (H.I.P.) in each state they hunt. You

also be registered with the Harvest Information

woodlands in the fall.

can register on Vermont Fish and Wildlife

Vermont’s hunting season for ruffed grouse

Department’s website or call toll-free 1-877-

or “partridge,” is September 25 - December

306-7091. After providing some basic information,

you will receive your annual H.I.P.

31 this year. The daily limit is four grouse

with a possession limit of eight.

The Vermont woodcock hunting season is

registration number, which is then recorded

September 25 - November 8. The daily limit

on your hunting license.

is three woodcock with a possession limit of For more information on hunting in

9. New this year, the season starts in conjunction

with the traditional small game season Hunting & Trapping Guide and Syllabus of

Vermont, be sure to get a copy of the 2021

opener.

State and Federal Hunting Regulations for

Woodcock are often found in alders along Migratory Game Birds in Vermont available

brooks and near beaver ponds as well as in free from license agents statewide and from

new-growth small timber where old fields are the Vermont Fish and Wildlife website www.

reverting to forest or recent timber harvests vtfishandwildlife.com.

• • •

Muzzleloader Antlerless Deer Permit Winners Announced

Deer hunters who applied for a Vermont

muzzleloader season antlerless deer permit by

the August 4 deadline can now go to the

Vermont Fish and Wildlife website (www.

vtfishandwildlife.com) to see if they won a

permit.

Fish and Wildlife announced the winners

on September 14, after conducting a randomized

computer drawing. Permit winners are

listed in two categories: regular lottery winners

and landowners. Landowners who apply

for a landowner antlerless permit are prohibited

by law from posting their land against

hunting.

“Hunters can go to our website to find out

if they are recipients of a muzzleloader season

antlerless permit,” said Fish and Wildlife

Commissioner Louis Porter. “Knowing early

if they’ve won, will help them plan their hunting

this fall.”

“They can follow a link on our home page

to go to the listing of permit winners.”

Permit recipients will need to reprint their

licenses which have been reformatted to

include their antlerless permits. Paper “post

card” permits will not be sent in regular mail.

Antlerless permits were available for 19 of

Vermont’s 21 Wildlife Management Units

and may be used during the muzzleloader

seasons on October 28-31 (antlerless hunting

• • •

Col. Jason Batchelder. “Operation Game

Thief is a great way for Vermonters to assist

in reducing fish and wildlife violations by

providing tips and information. We’re asking

people to call with details such as names and

descriptions of perpetrators, and descriptions

and plate numbers of vehicles whenever possible.”

“Poachers steal the opportunity for others

to legally hunt and fish and may create an

unfairly negative impression of hunting and

fishing with the general public,” said Col.

Batchelder. “They may also target threatened,

endangered, or nongame species. We appreciate

this partnership with the Vermont

Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs to help us

catch and prosecute poachers through

Operation Game Thief.”

by permit only) and December 4-12.

“Yearling antler beam diameters, fawn

weights and other physical condition measures

are declining or are below optimal levels

in many areas, indicating that deer have

exceeded the level their habitat can support

long-term,” said Nick Fortin, Fish and

Wildlife’s deer project leader. “No population

growth is expected in 2021, however,

deer populations in 7 WMUs will be above

their respective population objectives. The

goal is to reduce deer populations in those

areas while stabilizing populations in other

areas.”

“Harvesting antlerless deer affords

Vermont hunters the chance to secure locally

sourced food for their families. It also helps

the department balance the deer population

with the available habitat.”

Permits are still available in WMUs F1-F2-

K-N-O and Q because not enough people

applied for them in the lottery. These permits

may be purchased beginning September 15

on a first come, first served basis through

license agents, district Fish and Wildlife

offices and on www.vtfishandwildlife.com.

Fish and Wildlife urges hunters to review

the 2021 Deer Season Guide also available

their website home page.


REAL ESTATE

WANTED TO RENT/

SHARE/BUY

WILLIAMSTOWN: Share a

cozy, country home w/ active,

senior gentleman. Help

with cooking, occasional

transportation. companionship

& household help in exchange

for no rent ( possible

utility share). Private BA. Pet

considered. 802-863-5625 or

HomeShareVermont.org for

application. Interview, refs, bg

check req. EHO

WINDY TOWN

WINDY WOOD – BARRE TOWN

“A common interest community”

“A common interest community”

VIEW HOMES BEING BUILT SUNDAYS 1 PM – 3 PM

SHOWN BY BY APPOINTMENT

ANYTIME

CALL 802-249-8251 OR 802-734-1920

CALL 802-249-8251 OR 802-734-1920

One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, full basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

Single family homes priced from $267,000 and Duplex homes priced from $229,000

One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, full

basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile on Hill Street, left onto

Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into Windy Wood.

Single family homes priced from $335,000

and Duplex homes priced from $269,000

Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile

on Hill Street, left onto Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into

Windy Wood.

BECKLEY HILL MEADOWS

BARRE TOWN

Single family & duplex

ranch style homes

Call for Pricing

Brand new, energy effi cient homes on private or

shared lots. Two or three bedroom, two baths,

full basement, covered porch, attached two car

garage on town paved road. Town sewer and

water. No association fees!

APARTMENTS

ROOMS/HOUSES

FOR RENT

RULE OF THUMB......

Describe your property,

not the “appropriate” buyer or

renter, not the landlord,

not the neighbors.

Just describe the property and

you’ll almost always oey the

law.

WILLIAMSTOWN 2 BED-

ROOM HOUSE includes

heat, hot water, rubbish and

snow removal, non-smoking,

No Dogs, Lease & Security

deposit, $1400 / mo. 802-433-

5832

VACATION

RENTALS/SALES

Warm Weather is Year Round

in Aruba. The Water is safe,

and the dining is fantastic.

Walk out to the beach. 3-bedroom

weeks available. Sleeps

8. Email: carolaction@aol.

com for more information.

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

AFFORDABLE

APARTMENTS

WITH HEAT

MANSFIELD LANE CONDOMINIUMS

BERLIN

TownHOUSE UNITS AVAILABLE

$284,500

Brand new, energy-effi cient condos in the

heart of Central Vermont. Two bedroom plus

den, 2 bathrooms, basement garage. Quick

access to Montpelier, I-89 and more!

Monthly association fee ONLY $220!

802-229-2721

www.fecteauhomes.com

HOMES

WORRIED ABOUT

FORECLOSURE?

Having trouble paying your

mortgage? The Federal Trade

Commission says don’t pay

any fees in advance to people

who promise to protect

your home from foreclosure.

Report them to the FTC, the

nation’s consumer protection

agency. For more information,

call 1-877-FTC-HELP or click

on ftc.gov. A message from

The World and the FTC.

INCLUDED

Highgate

Apartments

located in Barre, is currently accepting applications

for our 1, 2 & 3 bedroom apartments waiting lists.

Hardwood floors, fresh paint, modern kitchen & baths, yard space,

ample closets, & washer/dryer hook-ups. Laundry room on site.

Rent includes heat/hot water, 24-hour emergency maintenance,

parking, snow removal, & trash removal. Income limits apply.

To request an application, call 476-8645 or stop by the on-site

rental office at 73 Highgate Drive, #121, Barre, VT.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this

newspaper is subject to the fair housing

act which makes it illegal to advertise

“any preference, limitation or discrimination

based on race, color, religion,

sex, handicap, familial status or

national origin, or an intention, to make

any such preference, limitation or discrimination.”

Additionally, Vermont’s Fair Housing

and Public Accomodations Act prohibits

advertising that indicates any preference,

limitation or discrimination based

on age, marital status, sexual orientation

or receipt of public assistance.

This newspaper will not knowingly

accept any advertising for real estate

which is in violation of the law. Our

readers are hereby informed that all

dwellings advertised in this newspaper

are available on an equal opportunity

basis.

To file a complaint of discrimination,

call the Vermont Human Rights

Commisson toll-free at 1-800-416-2010

(voice & TTY) or call HUD toll

free at 1-800-669-9777 (voice)

or 1-800-927-9275 (TTY).

Open House

Sat., Sept. 25 • 12pm to 2pm

89 Cherrywood Drive, Barre

bedroos baths plus x office addition.

itchen ith pantry closet aster suite ith alk

in closet ne bathroo vanities etted tub alkin

shoer skylihts and standin sea roof. torae

shed deck and enclosed do fence. . acre lot.

$220,000

Tina Golon, Broker

98 S. Main St., Waterbury, VT 05676

tina@VTREGroup.com

802-244-4500 | 802-522-9216 cell

© 2020 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of

BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway

HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America,

Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.

Downtown Barre Commercial Building

$125,000!

reain of ovin your office or retail business

into your on buildin on ain treet in onton

arre eres a rare chance to buy a anaeable

unit level eneral coercial buildin in the

center of it all torefront plus a x clear

span retailoffice space plus half bath kitchenette

utility roo office ork area and rear entry fro

unicipal parkin lot and private parkin space

ih ceilins reat lihtin recent central heatin

plant plus A. hat an opportunity

Lori P. Holt, Broker

317 River Street | Montpelier, VT 05602

LoriHolt@VTREGroup.com

802-223-6302 x1 | 802-793-6223 cell | 802-223-3284 fax

© 2020 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of

BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway

HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America,

Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.

Barre Unified Union S

120 yers Street, Barre, T 0541

The students of the CVCC Building Trades Program are building

a Tiny House this year!

If you are looking to purchase a tiny house, our building trades

program, in conjunction with our electrical and plumbing and

heating programs, is looking to build that house for you!

The cost of the house is materials plus 18% fee. (Cost depends

upon required materials, type and design of home). You may

purchase a kit in advance for students to put together or provide

blueprints with your request submission.

To secure a contract with us, we require purchase of a kit or a

non-refundable down payment of $5,000. Full payment is required

prior to the house leaving the premises.

Additional information may be obtained by contacting Jody

Emerson, CVCC Director, at (802) 476-6237 Ext. 1138.

Receiving proposals now! Mail to the address above, c/o Lisa

Perreault, Business Manager. The BUUSD reserves the right to

accept or reject any proposal in the interest of the school district.

September 22, 2021 The WORLD page 31


Snowplows

SALES & SERVICE

We Repair All Snowplow Brands

McLEODS

SPRING & CHASSIS

“Your Truck Chassis Specialists”

32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT

1-802-476-4971

AMM

WAREHOUSE

GREAT SELECTION

WAREHOUSE PRICES

GUNS - AMMO

MILITARY SURPLUS

“WE ALSO BUY GUNS”

EXPERT ON GUNS & AMMO

323 E. Montpelier Rd., Barre, Vt

www.vtammowarehouse.com

802-498-5292

Barre Fish & Game

Club, Inc.

SHOWROOM

OPEN MON.-SAT.

SERVICE

DEPARTMENT

476-4724

1365 US Rt. 302

Barre-Montpelier Rd.

1-866-410-3571

midstatedodge.com

Serving the

Central Vermont Community

•HUNTER EDUCATION

•YOUTH PROGRAMS

•AND MORE

Gun Club Road • Barre

barrefishandgameclub.com

Poulin Auto

Sales, Inc.

VERMONT’S

TRUCKSTORE

We’re here to serve you!

Route 302

East Barre Road, Barre,

SERVICE: Mon.-Fri. 8-5

SALES: Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8 -4

www.poulinautosales.com

SERVICE DIRECT

HOTLINE 479-8961

WE'VE GOT THE PERFECT

SILVERADO FOR YOU!

www.codychevrolet.com

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD 802-223-6337

For all your hunting

& fishing needs

•Firearms •Bows

•Crossbows

•Muzzle Loaders

•VT-NH-ME-NY

Licenses

•VT Reporting

Station

R&L ARCHERY

Inc.

802-479-9151

70 Smith St.

Barre, Vermont

www.RLarchery.com

VALSANGIACOMO, DETORA

& MCQUESTEN, P.C.

•Personal Injury Cases

•Civil Litigation

•DUI

•Auto Accidents

•Criminal Defense

172 NO MAIN ST

BARRE, VT 05641

(802) 476-4181 • WWW.VDMLAW.COM

SANDY’S

Distributor of A.R. Sandri Products

PLUS...QUICK LUBE

Complete Automotive Repair

The Only Full-Service

Station on the

Barre-Montpelier Rd.

Self-Serve or

Full-Service

SAME PRICE!

Rt 302 • Barre-Montpelier Rd.

476-9984

VERMONT TIRE

802-229-4941

229-4941

SEPTEMBER 25, 2021

National Hunting and Fishing (NHF) Day brings together

sportsmen and women to celebrate the rich tradition of

hunting, target shooting and fi shing with national, state,

regional and local organizations hosting related events.

Launched in 1971 by Congress, NHF Day has consistently

recognized hunters and anglers for their leadership in

wildlife and conservation. NHF Day is observed and

celebrated the fourth Saturday in September every year.

nhfday@wondersofwildlife.org

NATIONAL HUNTING AND FISHING DAY TIMELINE

2000 Congressional action

Congress passed the Conservation and Reinvestment Act

(CARA). The bill allocated $50 million a year from the U.S.

Fish and Wildlife Service budget to the states, requiring each

one to have a plan for wildlife conservation.

1937 Raise my taxes?

Congress passed the Pittman-Robertson

Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act (P-R

Act), which taxed some hunting equipment

to provide revenue for wildlife restoration

projects.

HOT OR COLD DRINK

HEADQUARTERS

Sandwiches & Treats, Too!

Montpelier 223-0928

Berlin 622-0250

Barre 622-0730

Main St., Williamstown, VT

Chris Dessureau

• Full Service • Used Cars

Station

• In-House

• VT State Financing

Inspection

802-455-2200

cell (802)279-3709

www.grnmtnauto.com

Vermont Travelers’

Service Center

STORE • DELI

INFORMATION

BEER CAVE

CLEAN

FACILITIES

Vermont

Liquor

Stores

Conveniently located off

Exit 7 of I-89 - Berlin, VT

Other locations throughout

Central Vermont

Discoverer M+S

1880s

page 32 The WORLD September 22, 2021

Join the club

Clubs such as the League of American

Sportsmen and the Audubon Society were

established to promote conservation.

greenmountainpayments.com

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