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NETJETS US VOLUME 15 2021

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ART ON THE VINE

The grape and the

grand come together

HUDSON REBORN

New York’s happy

and happening valley

A SENSE OF WELLNESS

Advice, apps, and more

for mindfulness matters

CHEF’S ODYSSEY

Daniel Boulud on

reinventing classics

THE NEXT STEP

One man’s quest

to travel to space


TAKING OFF

AS WE HEAD INTO FALL—a time that can be very busy at home and at work—all

of us at NetJets are rededicating ourselves to the idea of renewal.

We look forward to sharing with you some of the amazing features that our

editorial team put together. As hectic as this year has been for those of you

reading this, we all know how important it is to take a moment and reflect.

Perhaps that means you are taking a well-deserved trip to a favorite destination with your

family or finding time to begin that hobby you always said you never had time for. Or

maybe you are looking for ways to incorporate wellness into your everyday routine, as so

many of us are these days.

Our editors took an expansive look at all things running in the summer issue, and this

fall they investigate how e-bikes are allowing cyclists of different abilities the opportunity to

ride together for more meaningful experiences and exercise.

They find inspiration by visiting the French apple brandy region of Calvados where two

elements—craft spirits and cider—collide to produce a seasonal liquor for the senses.

Then they report from the Hudson Valley, where there are freshly unveiled hostelries,

restaurants, and attractions popping up in every conceivable corner.

Some of my favorites in this issue are the lifestyle features, where you’ll read about

Alaska native John Shoffner, who is training to fly Axiom’s Ax-2 mission for an eight-day

stay on the International Space Station; and the team connects with William Chase to hear

what’s next for the Herefordshire, UK-based entrepreneur. Finally, we bring you all the

latest in NetJets news, travel tips, and information about our partners.

We hope you enjoy this edition of the magazine and wish you safe travels wherever they

may take you.

Only NetJets!

Adam Johnson

Chairman and CEO

C O N T R I B U T O R S

BILL KNOTT

The London-based

restaurateur and

food writer gets a

glimpse into the

world of Daniel

Boulud, the

towering creative

mind behind the

reinvention of a

Manhattan icon,

Le Pavillon, in

Updating the

Classics (page 64).

ELISA VALLATA

For Fit For a Queen

(page 60), the

Italian stylist and

fashion expert

has selected and

arranged some

of this season’s

most spectacular

jewels against

the backdrop of a

beautifully crafted

chessboard from

Purling London.

LARRY OLMSTED

An award-winning

golf author, the

American looks

at the legacy of

legendary course

designer Donald

Ross and gets an

insight into The

Glorious Restoration

(page 32) that’s

taken place at

North Carolina’s

Southern Pines.

JIM CLARKE

The well-traveled

wine and spirits

specialist ventures

from his New

York home to a

fascinating part of

France to catch up

on the developments

in Calvados and

discovers the Spirit

of Normandy (page

68) is enjoying its

time in the spotlight.

JOHN McNAMARA

Always eager for

assistance, the

managing editor

of NetJets, The

Magazine evaluates

the latest e-bikes

on the market and

how they ease travel

around town and

country—and do

so with style—in

Power to the Pedal

(page 48).

This symbol throughout the magazine denotes the nearest airport served by NetJets to the

story’s subject, with approximate distances in miles where applicable.

4 NetJets


CONTENTS

THROUGH THE MIST

“Massless Clouds Between

Sculpture and Life,” by

teamLab, page 74.

6

NetJets


36 42 64

THE BIOFUEL EQUATION

NetJets’ support of

sustainable aviation fuel is

a pointer to the future

pages 10-13

INTOXICATING BEAUTY

Vineyards are now cultural

showcases as art and wine

prove a perfect blend

pages 36-41

ALL THE RIGHT MOVES

The season’s most alluring

jewels shine against a

chessboard backdrop

pages 60-63

IN THE NEWS

A hideaway in North

Carolina, Rolls-Royce

advances, and more

pages 14-22

ALL IN THE MIND

A comprehensive guide

to taking charge of your

mental well-being

pages 42-47

NEW YORK DARLING

Daniel Boulud’s latest

venture in the Big Apple is

an old classic reimagined

pages 64-67

© TEAMLAB / COURTESY OF PACE GALLERY, SHAWN CORRIGAN, DIANA HIRSCH / ISTOCK, THOMAS SCHAUER

NETJETS UPDATE

Travel concierges, fall travel,

staff in profi le, and hiring the

best pilots in the industry

pages 24-27

SPACE 2021

John Shoffner’s adventurepacked

life is to have an

extraterrestrial twist

pages 28-31

RESURRECTING ROSS

The revered golf course

designer’s Southern Pines

classic gets another start

pages 32-34

MOTOR ON

The increasing popularity

of e-bikes is producing a

plethora of exciting options

pages 48-51

UPSTATE UPGRADE

The Hudson Valley is in

bloom as new openings

add to its timeless charm

pages 52-59

A TASTE OF CALVADOS

Normandy’s local spirit is

being elevated by a fresh

generation of producers

pages 68-73

RETHINKING THE GALLERY

Miami’s Superblue offers

a very different type of

artistic experience

pages 74-81

THE LAST WORD

Entrepreneur William

Chase on how he enjoys

the finer things in life

page 82

NetJets

7


NETJETS, THE MAGAZINE

FALL 2021

FRONT COVER

Aerial view of the fall

colours of Tuscany.

(See page 36, for art in

vineyards in Italy, France,

and beyond.)

Image by Gábor Nagy

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Thomas Midulla

EDITOR

Farhad Heydari

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Anne Plamann

PHOTO DIRECTOR

Martin Kreuzer

ART DIRECTOR

Anja Eichinger

MANAGING EDITOR

John McNamara

SENIOR EDITOR

Brian Noone

STAFF WRITER

Claudia Whiteus

CHIEF SUB-EDITOR

Vicki Reeve

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Albert Keller

SEPARATION

Jennifer Wiesner

WRITERS, CONTRIBUTORS,

PHOTOGRAPHERS, AND

ILLUSTRATORS

Jim Clarke, Bill Knott, Jen

Murphy, Larry Olmsted, Julian

Rentzsch, Thomas Schauer,

Josh Sims, Elisa Vallata,

Jeremy Wayne, Xavier Young

Published by JI Experience

GmbH Hanns-Seidel-Platz 5

81737 Munich, Germany

GROUP PUBLISHER

Christian Schwalbach

Michael Klotz (Associate)

ADVERTISING SALES

U.S.

Jill Stone

jstone@bluegroupmedia.com

Eric Davis

edavis@bluegroupmedia.com

EUROPE

Katherine Galligan

katherine@metropolist.co.uk

Vishal Raguvanshi

vishal@metropolist.co.uk

NetJets, The Magazine is

the offi cial title for Owners

of NetJets in the U.S.

NetJets, The Magazine

is published quarterly by

JI Experience GmbH on

behalf of NetJets Inc.

NetJets Inc.

4151 Bridgeway Avenue

Columbus, Ohio 43219,

USA

netjets.com

+1 614 338 8091

Copyright © 2021

by JI Experience GmbH. All rights

reserved. Reproduction in whole or

in part without the express written

permission of the publisher is strictly

prohibited. The publisher, NetJets

Inc., and its subsidiaries or affi liated

companies assume no responsibility

for errors and omissions and are

not responsible for unsolicited

manuscripts, photographs, or artwork.

Views expressed are not necessarily

those of the publisher or NetJets Inc.

Information is correct at time of

going to press.

8 NetJets


ENJOY RESPONSIBLY Imported by Casamigos Spirits Company, White Plains, NY, Casamigos Tequila & Mezcal, 40% Alc./Vol.


GOODWILL

Fuel of the Future

Key in reducing carbon emissions, biofuels present

a bridge to a sustainable future for NetJets—and

for the aviation industry as a whole. // By Josh Sims

ISTOCK

“THE FACT IS THAT, right now and for the

foreseeable future, sustainable aviation

fuel is the best option for sustainability in

aviation,” says Bradley Ferrell who, in his

role as NetJets’ Executive Vice President

for Administrative Services, is keen to raise

awareness of a biofuel that is already making

a significant difference within the industry.

As sustainability becomes ever-more

important, with new innovations across every

industry, what’s perhaps most remarkable

about sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) is that it

is already a proven technology, a biofuel made

out of everything from used cooking oil to nonfood

crops, from urban or agricultural waste

to algae, which can be blended with standard

aviation fuel in order to reduce the life-cycle

emissions by up to 80%, depending on how

the SAF is made and sourced.

By the CI, or carbon intensity, standard

applied by the GREET model (greenhouse

gases, regulated emissions and energy

use in transportation), Jet A—that’s

conventional aviation fuel—scores 89, while

SAF scores just 37.

For the moment, SAF, which undergoes

10 NetJets


NETJETS AND

ROLLS-ROYCE MOTOR CARS

DELIVERING LUXURY IN-FLIGHT

AND ON THE GROUND

An extraordinary partnership between NetJets and Rolls-Royce Motor Cars –

one of the finest symbols of pure luxury – allows our owners to take advantage

of one-of-a-kind experiences from their doorstep.

Owners who purchase a vehicle will receive a special gift and have access

to Whispers, an ultra-exclusive club open only to members. Connect with

a network of illustrious individuals. Contemplate a curated collection of

exceptional experiences – hand picked for your convenience. And hear

the latest chapters in the Rolls-Royce story before anyone else.

To learn more about the partnership with Rolls-Royce Motor Cars,

please contact clientservicesna@rolls-roycemotorcarsna.com

©Copyright Rolls-Royce Motor Cars NA, LLC 2021. The Rolls-Royce name and logo are registered trademarks.


GOODWILL

the same necessary safety certification as

any aviation fuel, accounts for less than one

percent of all airlines’ fuel consumption. But

it is a game changer, and this percentage is

set to grow across the globe. This is the case,

not least, because several countries have set

blending mandates for sustainable aviation

fuels, with the Netherlands, for example,

stating that 14 percent of its aviation fuel must

be sustainable by 2030.

“In time, the likes of electrically powered

aircraft—which for the time being haven’t

solved the issue of limited range—will become

a bigger part of the sustainability picture,”

explains Ferrell. “But what makes sustainable

aviation fuel so important is that you don’t

have to change the specifications of the aircraft

or their engines to use it. As the technology

is refined over coming years, the fuel is only

going to become more efficient to produce. And

the more SAF is adopted, the more prices will

be driven down more in line with Jet A.”

That’s why NetJets is getting ahead of the

curve in becoming not just a buyer of SAF—

in 2020 it purchased three million gallons

of it in partnership with global aeronautical

services network Signature Flight Support—

but also the first private aviation company

to go as far as taking a stake in the actual

production of SAF.

NETJETS HAS MADE a sizable investment in SAF

developer WasteFuel, committing both to

buy 100 million gallons of its fuel over the

next decade—“that’s a substantial portion of

our annual fuel usage under any scenario,”

stresses Ferrell —as well as partnering with

the company in the development and building

of biorefineries.

The first, in Manila, will come on line

within four years, which is a fairly quick

pace, given the need to acquire land and

build infrastructure, and the logistics of what

is a hugely complex system. The plan then

is to import its SAF into Los Angeles, in time

perhaps using ships powered by sustainable

marine fuels, so that the carbon reduction

is maintained from end to end of the supply

chain. The biggest hurdles to SAF’s uptake

right now are its comparative expense and the

fact that supply is limited.

“THAT’S WHY WE invested in WasteFuel,”

explains Ferrell. “Yes it gives us a competitive

advantage over the availability of SAF,

but the primary goal for us has been to drive

better prices by putting our own money in at

the front end, and because the more

biorefineries there are the easier the global

supply of SAF will become too.” That

means it’s something good not just for

NetJets, but for the wider aviation industry

too. “Of course,” Ferrell continues,

“it’s also the chance to be part of a new

growth business.”

Ferrell stresses that as a leader in the

aviation industry —and as a business that’s

been carbon neutral in Europe for a decade

now—it’s important NetJets encourages

relevant action on important issues.

“The fact is that when it comes to

reducing aviation’s carbon footprint, SAF is

the way to go,” says Ferrell. “And it’s going to

play a major role in the promotion of aviation

in the future too, building acceptance of

the idea that, yes, you can travel the world

without compromising on a commitment to

protecting the planet.”

12 NetJets


CLEAR SKIES AHEAD

Sustainable aviation fuel

is the way forward for a

greener future.

SHUTTERSTOCK

“In time, the likes of electrically powered

aircraft will become a bigger part of the

sustainability picture.”

NetJets

13


THE SMART GUIDE

A North Carolinian getaway, travel accessories,

mouthwatering spirits, Rolls-Royce-plus, and more—

herewith the best, the boldest, and the brightest.

SOUTHERN

COMFORT

The team behind Blackberry

Farm resort has breathed

new life into a beloved

North Carolina retreat.

FOR WELL OVER a century,

High Hampton has been the

annual vacation getaway

for generations of Southern

families. Tucked away in the

heart of North Carolina’s Blue

Ridge Mountains, 90 minutes

southwest of Asheville,

the historic resort oozes

childhood camp nostalgia

with its private 35-acre

lake, miles of hiking trails,

and bark-sided cottages.

Set across more than 1,400

acres near the Nantahala

National Forest, the property

is reminiscent of Adirondack

Great Camps and the National

Park lodges of the 1930s.

Long a Southern secret,

the inn is gaining national

attention after the team

behind Tennessee’s acclaimed

culinary retreat Blackberry

Farm recently helped oversee

a complete property refresh.

A National Register of

Historic Places designation

meant the Blackberry Farm

design team had to work

closely with the North Carolina

Historic Preservation Office to

update and enlarge the 12 inn

rooms, 40 cottage rooms, two

freestanding cottages, and rustic

log cabin. Much of the original

antique furniture was cleverly

repurposed (doors have found

new lives as coffee tables) and

stylish design touches include

bright vintage kantha quilts and

botanical-print cushions and

drapes. Longtime guests are

thrilled with modern updates like

spa-worthy bathrooms, central

heating, and soundproof walls.

The biggest improvement—

no surprise—is the food. A

run-of-the-mill dinner buffet has

been replaced with a high-touch

multicourse dining experience

inspired by Blackberry Farm.

Locally sourced dishes such

as green garlic gnocchi with

fava beans and preserved

lemon, and poached farm egg

with wilted pea tendrils and

country ham are served in

the reimagined Dining Room,

which looks out over Rock

Mountain. Be sure to save room

for decadent Southern desserts

like the chocolate cake with

caramel buttercream. The more

relaxed Tavern serves gussiedup

versions of comfort foods

like pizza and burgers for lunch.

There are plenty of

opportunities to work up an

appetite in the fresh Appalachian

air. Fall is prime time to explore

the 15 miles of trails, lined with

brilliantly hued maples, black

birches, and yellow poplars.

Golfers can tee off at the new

Tom Fazio-designed course.

And tennis and pickleball

courts have been added to

complement lake activities like

kayak and canoeing. Doing

absolutely nothing is also highly

acceptable: Parasol-topped

daybeds on the lawn and a

new six-room spa might even

encourage you to embrace a

long, lazy day.

highhampton.com

RUSTIC RESPITE

High Hampton embodies

the best of North Carolinian

rural hospitality.

© HIGH HAMPTON

ASHEVILLE REGIONAL AIRPORT: 49 miles

14 NetJets


WHEN THEY ASK WHERE YOU’RE FROM.

THE WORLD

Each day aboard The World, you awaken in the most remarkable home you will ever own.

As one of the few international adventurers who live this incomparable lifestyle, you explore

each continent and sail every sea surrounded by unrivaled anticipatory luxury service on

the planet’s largest private residential yacht.

Learn more about ownership opportunities. aboardtheworld.com | +1 954 538 8449


THE SMART GUIDE

Club Corner

Spirits of great distinction, making

cocktails with class and art in a glass.

2

3 4

5 6

7

8

9

1

ALL IMAGES COURTESY THE COMPANIES

1 THE BROLLACH A tribute to the Craft Irish Whiskey founder Jay Bradley’s late father, just 661 bottles of rare double-distilled, single malt whiskey have been released.

craftirishwhiskey.com // 2 TALES OF THE MACALLAN VOLUME I Distilled in 1950 and bottled in 2021, this is a homage to Captain John Grant, the inspiration behind Macallan,

whose story is told in an accompanying book. themacallan.com // 3 BENROMACH 40 YEARS OLD The Speyside distillery has released just over 1,000 bottles of this rare single

malt that has spent four decades maturing in Oloroso sherry casks. benromach.com // 4 BOWMORE 27 YEARS OLD Part of the Timeless Series, the whiskymaker from Islay has its

distinguished product housed in a distinctive display box with a decorative hourglass. bowmore.com // 5 GLENLIVET 2004 Independent bottler Gordon & MacPhail has added three

new single malts from the Moray mainstay to its Connoisseurs Choice range, including this 16 year old, aged in refill bourbon barrels. gordonandmacphail.com // 6 THE MACALLAN

A NIGHT ON EARTH IN SCOTLAND A single malt with which to bring in the New Year, the Speyside distillery honors aspects of Caledonia’s most treasured evening of celebration.

themacallan.com // 7 HIGHLAND PARK CASK STRENGTH The second release in the “straight from the cask’ series is whisky in its purest form, with no water added after maturation,

delivering a robust and intense flavor. highlandparkwhisky.com // 8 VECCHIA ROMAGNA RISERVA ANNIVERSARIO A blend of five different casks and a product of 200 years of

expertise, this Italian brandy comes in individually numbered crystal decanters. vecchiaromagna.it // 9 THE YAMAZAKI 25 A novel mix of single malt whiskies, marks a new direction

for the collectable Japanese brand, led by the fifth-generation chief blender Shinji Fukuyo. suntory.com

SHAKE IT

ALL ABOUT

Mixology comes home as

Italian design firm Alessi has

teamed up with world-renowned

mixologist Oscar Quagliarini to

create five different stainless

steel mixing kits, including North

Tide, left, which comprises

cocktail measure, bottle opener,

ice bucket, and ice tongs, along

with an “870” shaker designed

by Luigi Massoni and Carlo

Mazzeri in the 1950s. alessi.com

ARTISTIC TOUCH French cognac brand Rome De Bellegarde

continues to reinvent its luxe liquor, including a release of

150 decanters designed by Iranian artist Ghass Rouzkhosh.

romedebellegarde.com

16 NetJets


Corcoran has a

new latitude.

There’s a new name in real estate in the British Virgin Islands.

OIL NUT BAY | VIRGIN GORDA | +1.284.393.1017 | CORCORAN.COM/BVI

©2021 Corcoran Group LLC. All rights reserved. Corcoran® and the Corcoran Logo are registered service marks owned by Corcoran Group LLC. Corcoran Group LLC fully

supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each franchise is independently owned and operated.


THE SMART GUIDE

Always moving, Rolls-Royce has never been

busier as it finds handsome ways to a new

spin to its classic cars.

OPENING UP

The Rolls-Royce

Boat Tail shows off

its cantilever trunk.

© ROLLS-ROYCE

Making of

a Marque

IT’S A SIGN OF THE standing

of Rolls-Royce that as

spectacular as its recent

models have been—think

of its “baby Roller” Ghost

model from last year, or the

attention-grabbing Black

Badge limited edition from

earlier this year—it’s not just

the big releases that really

make the marque. And so

Rolls-Royce’s innovators are

ever looking at different ways

to enhance the experience

of owning the world’s most

iconic automobile.

Nautical Nous

Inspired by J-class yachts,

the Rolls-Royce Boat Tail—of

which just three have been

made so far—does little to

hide its seafaring roots, but

the grand tourer, a product of

the company’s coachbuilding

workshop, has some secrets

within the undoubtedly

sleek design. At the touch

of a button the rear of the

car opens in a cantilever

movement—supposedly

inspired by Spanish architect

Santiago Calatrava. The

bounty is within, as the

trunk contains a champagne

chest, two bottles of Armand

de Brignac vintage cuvée,

caviar, and blinis. For perfect

moments of relaxation, two

cocktail tables open on

either side of the deck, with

accompanying picnic stools.

A Matter of Time

The Boat Tail is also home

to one of the most stunning

collaborations that Rolls-

Royce has been involved

in—with Swiss watchmakers

Bovet 1822. What appear

to be an unusual two

clocks in the fascia of

the Boat Tail, are, in fact,

removable watches. The

pair of reversible tourbillon

timepieces are both designed

to be worn on the wrist, used

as a table clock, pendant, or

pocket timepiece, when they

don’t take their place in the

dashboard. Both watches

have specially designed

18K white gold cases and

feature matching front dials

with the same Caleidolegno

18 NetJets


veneer found on the aft deck of

Boat Tail itself. The gentleman’s

timepiece is highly polished;

the lady’s is ornately engraved

then filled with blue lacquer,

with great effort—and teamwork

between Rolls-Royce and

Bovet—to get a precise color

match between this lacquer and

that of the car.

Escape to the Country

Rolls-Royce’s bespoke services

have also stepped up a gear

recently, epitomized by the

Cullinan, its take on the SUV.

At the heart of its “Celebration

of Sporting and Country

Pursuits,” the Cullinan has a

range of options for enhancing

a trip out of the city including

the Recreation Module, a

© ROLLS-ROYCE

motorized drawer cassette that

appears at the touch of the

button, offering the perfect

paraphernalia for a day out.

And Bags More…

Proving that it is about more

than the motors, Rolls-Royce

also has a luxury luggage

range to complement its

cars—a range that has

recently taken a different

turn with the Black Badge

variant to its Escapism range.

Comprising a 48hr weekender,

24hr weekender, holdall, tote

bag, and organizer pouch,

the leather collection reflects

the “darker, edgier personas”

of the Black Badge cars —the

Cullinan, Wraith, and Dawn.

rolls-roycemotorcars.com

IN BLOOM

FOR HIS FIRST MUSEUM exhibition in France, the

one-time enfant terrible of British art Damien

Hirst has opted for the rather calming subject

of cherry blossoms. The Fondation Cartier

pour l’art contemporain hosts 30 large format

paintings. It’s an intriguing mix of master and

subject, but as Hirst explains, “The cherry

blossoms are about beauty and life and death.

They’re extreme—there’s something almost tacky

about them. Like Jackson Pollock twisted by

love.” All 107 paintings in the series, which took

the artist three years to complete, are available

in an accompanying book. Until 2 Jan 2022;

fondationcartier.com

© ROLLS-ROYCE

DRIVE TIME

Bovet 1822’s timepiece

for the Boat Tail;

above: the Cullinan’s

Recreation Module.

© DAMIEN HIRST AND SCIENCE LTD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, DACS 2020

NetJets

19


THE SMART GUIDE

At the Wheel

Whether it’s taking to the open road or enjoying a guided tour, the

options for exploration are increasingly decadent.

SPORT BUT NOT

AS WE KNOW IT

ALL ABOUT

THE STYLE

© ARES

IF THE MILWAUKEE manufacturer of iconic motorcycles

has a particular reputation, then Harley-Davidson is

doing much to change that—and its latest release

certainly does challenge preconceptions. The

Sportster S is certainly different to what has come

before it, both as an HD bike and in the sportster

genre. Visually, there is no doubting this is a very

modern bike, but the devil is in the detail, in this case

a new engine (a Revolution Max 1250T V-Twin) and a

flurry of technical innovations. Sport, Road, and Rain

riding modes lead the way, while a sat-nav screen and

smartphone integrations follow. Performance-wise, it

is also a step up on previous iterations—and a bike

that truly shows its best on wide-open roads. harleydavidson.com

IT’S NO LONGER ENOUGH for high-end hotels and

entertainment venues to simply ferry their guests

around in ordinary vehicles—something special is

required. That’s why the Billionaire Life, whose portfolio

includes properties in Porto Cervo, Dubai, Monaco,

and Riyadh, has teamed up with Ares, the Italian

coachbuilder, which has delivered a fleet of individually

built ARES for Land Rover Defender Spec 1.2

Cabriolets. Each of these vehicles sports a remarkable

level of customization with features hand-crafted in

Ares’ Modena atelier. Every one of the Defenders’ livery

and style mirrors the color palettes and trims of the

various venues (such as Cipriani in Monaco, above)

and will offer a bespoke VIP service to Billionaire Life’s

guests. aresdesign.com

CLUTCH STUDIOS

VISION VIRTUOSITY

MARK COCKSEDGE

Iconic designer Marc Newson has joined forces with

Austrian crystal expert Swarovski to produce the CL Curio

7x21, light and compact binoculars that promise a higher

level of intensity and clarity. swarovski.com

20 NetJets


If you’re sipping Tito’s,


THE SMART GUIDE

On the Move

Travel in style with luggage and accessories that

prove function and form need not be strangers.

THE GAME

IS AFOOT

FOLLOWING ITS BELGIAN FOUNDER Georges Nagelmacker’s

dream of Orient Express being more than a way of

getting from A to Z, the Steam Dream collection of

travel objects is a series of accessories from the famed

company that elevates the travel experience. As the

remarkable interiors of the carriages are adorned

with fi ne marquetry and exceptional gold work, so

the creations of 18 craft houses and designers are

designed by singular talents and honed to perfection.

Among those contributing to the collection are such

diverse companies as Danish electronics company

Bang & Olufsen, French malletier Au Départ, Smythson,

London-based purveyors of high-end stationery, and

Hector Saxe, the Parisian creators of unique designer

games, whose mahjong trunk is pictured here.

orient-express.com

QUITE THE

CARRY-ONS

New world, new luggage—a pair of the

fi nest case makers has released exceptional

luggage for the modern traveler. The 19

Degree international expandable 4-wheeled

carry-on from TUMI (tumi.com;

below left) is made from recycled

polycarbonate. Carl Friedrik’s

Carry-On (carlfriedrik.com, right)

features large zip compartments

and compression straps to keep

essentials in order.

ALL IMAGES COURTESY THE COMPANIES

METAL MAGIC

Available in either silver (left) or black, the latest Rimowa

Personal Cross-body Clutch Bag, with a removable

leather strap, features two open compartments, a zipped

pocket, three slots for cards, and updates the previous

polycarbonate model to aluminum. rimowa.com

22 NetJets


Riviera living redefined

on the shores of Boka Bay.

BRANDED RESIDENCES AVAILABLE TO OWN

Discover an exclusive collection of 3 and 4 bedroom beachfront

villas, with an ultra-chic resort destination on your doorstep.

portonovi.com


NOTES FROM NETJETS

Latest happenings, onboard updates,

and companywide news and profiles.

PIECE OF PARADISE

A LaCure property on

Turks and Caicos.

© LACURE

THE BENEFITS OF A TRAVEL CONCIERGE

When you’re ready to plan a much-needed vacation, a quick romantic getaway, or an oceanic adventure,

NetJets has partnerships to help you coordinate every aspect of your trip. As a NetJets Owner, you have

access to our partnership with LaCure, a luxury travel concierge whose travel experts plan and execute the

vacation of your dreams. By using LaCure, you gain access to personal contacts for booking and concierge

services from expert staff, as well as special property offerings, selectively hand-picked and uniquely

suited for private jet landings. Email netjets@lacure.com for additional details.

EXPERIENCE NETJETS

ENCOUNTERS

IN ADDITION TO providing a luxurious experience in the skies, we also

offer our Owners opportunities for unique experiences through NetJets

Encounters. By partnering with other like-minded luxury brands, we

give our Owners an array of unparalleled travel opportunities. Whether

you want special access to the world’s finest resorts, most scenic

golf courses, or luxury sports cars, we have a partnership for every

lifestyle. You’ll find all of our partnerships and the benefits offered on

the NetJets Owner Portal.

TRINETTE REED

24 NetJets


NETJETS BY THE NUMBERS

NETJETS PILOTS

NetJets pilots accrue, on average

8 TIMES THE INDUSTRY STANDARD

of flight hours over the course of their careers

JULIAN RENTZSCH

Our pilots average

16+ YEARS

working for NetJets

INSIDE TRACK

PATRICK

GALLAGHER

President, Sales,

Marketing and Service

WHEN DID YOU START AT NETJETS?

I started with Marquis Jet and was the

Executive Vice President of Sales when

it was acquired by NetJets in late 2010.

At that time, I was asked to lead and bring

together the two sales organizations. In

the years that followed, I got the opportunity

to work with our Marketing and Owner

Services departments as well.

WHAT DOES YOUR NORMAL DAY

CONSIST OF?

No two days are the same. I try to divide

my time between our teams and our clients,

staying close to the front lines of our

business. There was no such thing as

“normal” over the past 18 months. When

COVID-19 spread worldwide, we had to

determine how to successfully survive a

pandemic with 10% of our typical fl ight

volume. Within a few months, we had

record interest in our services. It became

more important than ever to keep both our

customers and our teams informed.

We plan to hire

300+ NEW PILOTS

by the end of 2021

We hired

93 PILOTS

after our initial 2021

Pilot Career Day

NetJets employs

3,000+ PILOTS

worldwide

Our new pilots average

6,200 FLIGHT HOURS

of experience before joining NetJets

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE

YOU FACE IN YOUR ROLE?

Staying disciplined and maintaining focus

on the long-term view. It is so important

to not overreact to near-term stimuli and

to stay true to our business model. We

must never sacrifi ce the core values of

NetJets to take advantage of near-term

growth opportunity.

KURT ISWARIENKO

NetJets

25


NOTES FROM NETJETS

THE BRANDS OF

NETJETS INC.

SEASONAL

TIPS FOR

TRAVEL

© NETJETS

NetJets is one of several brands under Berkshire

Hathaway which all share the high standards for

safety, comfort, and service that you have come

to expect when flying with NetJets. From personal

security to aircraft brokerage, these companies offer

an array of services to meet the needs of the most

discerning travelers.

Fall can be a lovely time to travel,

with views of the changing leaves

from the skies above. Whether

you’re traveling to see your favorite

football team compete or to visit

family and friends for the holidays,

consider these suggestions when

making your autumn travel plans:

EXECUTIVE JET

MANAGEMENT

FOR 40+ YEARS, Executive Jet Management (EJM) has been the largest

aircraft management and charter company in the world, providing aircraft

management and charter services with a keen focus on safety and

reliability. Its aircraft management services allow customers to enjoy the

convenience and luxury of private jet ownership without the complexities of

the day-to-day operations. EJM’s charter solutions offer private jets one trip

at a time for those who travel less frequently.

QS PARTNERS

QS PARTNERS PROVIDES a full range of aircraft brokerage, acquisition,

and transition services to help individuals and businesses manage

transactions of wholly owned aircraft. Aiming to be the No. 1

broker in the world, and offering full consultations focused on the

unique and specific needs of each client, it creates solutions with

the smallest details considered.

QS SECURITY SERVICES

NETJETS HAS ALWAYS prioritized safety and understands that security is

not always a one-size-fits-all solution. QS Security Services customizes

additional personal safety and security services to perfectly suit the

unique travel requirements of each individual Owner. It offers security

drivers for ground transfer, armed protection agents, personalized

travel security briefs, and more.

Choose off-peak travel days:

Thanksgiving weekend has

the highest travel numbers of

the entire year. Travel earlier in

November to avoid the crowds

and potential delays and to gain

more quality time with your

family or fellow travelers.

Explore resorts outside the ski

season: Some of the country’s

most popular ski resorts have

gorgeous views and discounted

rates in the fall.

Discover off-season

destinations: Southern states

and beaches are much less

crowded outside the summer

months.

Consider state and national

parks: Enjoy the protected

beauty, wildlife, and free

family fun.

26 NetJets


JULIAN RENTZSCH

CREWMEMBERS IN PROFILE

PEGGY CARNAHAN

Captain

MY FIRST EXPOSURE TO FLYING WAS …

the Air Force Academy. I was in the fi rst

class to include women and took advantage

of orientation fl ights—even though women

weren’t allowed to be pilots. My senior year, that

changed, and I soloed in the Academy’s fl ight

screening program.

THE BEST PART OF FLYING IS … viewing

the world from above. I fi nd cloud formations

especially fascinating. I take pictures of airports

from the sky and post them on Facebook for

friends and colleagues to guess the airport. It’s

been a lot of fun.

BEFORE JOINING THE NETJETS TEAM,

I WAS …in the Air Force for 20 years. After

that, I fl ew an MD-80 as a First Offi cer for

American Airlines for 3.5 years until I was

furloughed. Then, I came to NetJets and

stayed even after American Airlines invited

me back.

THE ONE DAY AT NETJETS I WON’T

FORGET WAS … when I was able to give our

passengers a view of a missile launch from Cape

Canaveral. One of our Owner’s guests was in

her mid-90s, and I can still remember how she

clapped when she saw it. Thinking about all the

wonders she must have seen throughout her

long life and how I got to help add to that list

always makes me smile.

ONE THING OWNERS PROBABLY WOULDN’T

GUESS ABOUT ME IS … I used to teach online

master’s degree courses on leadership for the

Air Force.

ON MY DAYS OFF … my husband and I run a

Black Angus cattle farm, with 14 rescued cats

and a pot-bellied pig named Maxwell. I also

work on the Women Military Aviators’ board of

directors, where I oversee communications.

WITHIN THE NEXT TEN YEARS, I WOULD

LIKE TO … retire! I want to travel to places I’ve

only seen from the air. I also want to dedicate

more of my time to Women Military Aviators and

record more of the oral history from the women

aviators of my generation.

MY BEST ADVICE FOR STAYING SANE ACROSS

TIME ZONES IS … exercise. A short stint on the

treadmill helps clear your head, shakes out the

kinks from being in the pilot seat, and improves

quality of sleep. It’s also very important to

hydrate, eat nutritiously, and respect your

physical limits.

NetJets

27


OWNER’S PROFILE

REACHING

FOR

THE STARS

With boundless energy and a savvy tactical

approach, John Shoffner is hoping to become one

of the fi rst private citizens on the International

Space Station—and to be productive while he’s

there. // By Josh Sims

JOHN SHOFFNER CANNOT FLY an airship. “Gliders,

hang gliders, airplanes, seaplanes, warplanes, and

jets,” says Shoffner, ticking off those craft he has

learned to pilot. “But somehow I missed airships.”

One might be tempted to nip in with

“spaceship” too, but Shoffner has that covered as

well. The businessman, racing driver, and NetJets

regular has recently started training with private

space company Axiom Space with a view to

rocketing to the International Space Station (ISS)

on a SpaceX ship in the latter part of next year.

“I’ve always been interested in those activities

that involve calculated risk, that involve a

challenge you have to prepare for, that make

you feel uncomfortable, that have an element of

danger to them,” says Shoffner, who, driving for

his own champion J2-Racing team, once totalled

his new Porsche 911 on a corner at Germany’s

famed Nürburgring, fl ipping it over and over and

yet somehow coming out largely unscathed.

“That just showed me what you can go through

with good preparation and equipment. In fact,

when I woke up in hospital I was ready to race

again and did so the following week—though

not in that car,” he adds with a laugh. “When

[my wife and I] took up racing cars, neither of us

had even driven sports cars before. We stopped

skydiving because it was starting to get boring.

Put it this way: We’re not exactly golf fans.”

Unless, perhaps, it’s the kind played by

astronaut Alan Shepard on the moon. Then

Shoffner might be tempted. Indeed, getting

into space will be the fulfi llment of a lifetime’s

ambition, even if it’s a counterintuitive adventure

to go on, it might seem, for someone who’s

also fascinated by the idea of maxing out his

lifespan by keeping up with the latest science

in nutrition, sleep, and lifestyle. He grew up

through the bold ambitions and amazing

achievements of the Space Race between

the U.S. and Soviet Union, and always had a

fascination for equipment with plenty of lights

and switches, with rockets and the stars.

“I was sure I’d go into space some day—I

was just never sure how—so it’s been amazing

that the advent of private spacefl ight and the

gradual maturing of that market now allows

that to be possible,” says Shoffner, who made

his money building Dura-Line, a Kentuckybased

company that pioneered and patented

fi ber-optic cable installation technologies,

before retiring in 1996.

© AXIOM SPACE

28 NetJets


NEXT STOP: SPACE

Shoffner and Peggy Whitson, who

will command the flight to the ISS, in

Axiom’s zero gravity chamber.

NetJets

29


OWNER’S PROFILE

ALL IMAGES COURTESY JOHN SHOFFNER

ADRENALINE HIGHS

Shoffner has embraced

risk-taking activities from the

skies to the water—and is

now aiming for loftier heights.

“The first time I heard about it I [counted

myself] in,” he says. “I’m not a window-shopper.

If I have no interest in owning something I don’t

go into the shop. But I enquired about the ISS

trip, the answer was right for me, and then I

knew I was going. Space isn’t going anywhere,

but I want to be one of the first [private citizens

to go]. In five years people will be going into

space for the weekend but I want to go when it’s

difficult, not when it’s easy.”

OF COURSE, it would be easy to dismiss this all

as the ultimate joyride of someone with the

funds to pay their way. (Axiom isn’t talking

money, but SpaceX charges NASA around

US$55M for a ticket to the ISS.) Two other

billionaires have signed up for Axiom flights

to the ISS too. What makes Shoffner’s flight

crucially different, though—at least compared to,

say, that of Dennis Tito, the first space tourist,

20 years ago—is that he will be the pilot,

traveling alongside revered astronaut and NASA

veteran Peggy Whitson as commander.

“As a passenger I’d likely not have gone,” says

Shoffner, who, far from finding it an inconvenience,

seems thrilled by the fact that NASA now requires

that anyone going to the ISS undergoes full

astronaut training, the space station being, after

all, a government-owned research facility, not an

orbiting hotel. “I don’t want to go on a trip like this

just to take a bunch of selfies. I want to be useful

up there. It would just be way too much money for

it to be just for the fun of it.”

That’s why Shoffner will be helping to conduct

experiments during his eight-day stay on the

station, specifically those involving singlecell

genomic methods for 10x Genomics, a

Californian bio-tech company in which he’s also

an investor. To date, scientific work in this field

hasn’t been attempted on the ISS, so it was of

interest to NASA. That Shoffner has bought his

ticket is likely the only way 10x would be able

to get to conduct this research in a micro-gravity

environment—and get the results back quickly—

so that’s a huge bonus for it as well. It helps to

fund the likes of Axiom too, in its mission to build

the next space station, seeing as the ISS will soon

be decommissioned. And, naturally, it satisfies

Shoffner personally.

“Sure, I get to go on a cool trip,” says the

man whose slowest speed is white-water

kayaking or cross-country cycling (that is, across

the entire country). “I get to do something

challenging for me. But also to do something

good for mankind more broadly in the process.”

But that’s getting ahead of ourselves, Shoffner

concedes. He has to undergo all the training

first. NASA isn’t cutting any slack either. There

will, he says, be weeks and weeks of classroom

study before he spends the same time inside

a spaceship mock-up learning the controls in

practice. He notes that because they are now

highly automated, piloting such a craft is more

akin to being, as he puts it, “a high-function

systems manager.” But not everything is

automated. “There’s a lot to take in, right down to

how to use the toilet,” he chuckles. “I’m anxious

to get the training started.”

He certainly expects others like him

to follow—and he concedes that there is

something of a Wild West flavor to the

privatization of spaceflight that can divide

opinion. Is the idea of spaceflight trivialized by

allowing film directors to take actors into space

to shoot a movie scene? Or by allowing people

to be able to win tickets for spaceflights in TV

competitions? Both are currently on the cards.

In fact, the competition winner may be flying

with Shoffner and Whitson.

“It’s all still early, and people are still trying to

30 NetJets


work [this new world of private spaceflight] out.

It’s like the early days of aviation, in the 1920s

and 1930s. There was airmail and then cargo,

but when passenger routes were first proposed

people scoffed,” says Shoffner. “Even the military

thought aeroplanes were silly at first. But over

time the value of such advances came to be seen,

and improvements in technology and increased

availability pushes prices down. I think the public

is still skewed towards scepticism: There are so

many major problems on Earth that need solving

it’s easy to say that the cost of space travel would

be better put to other uses. But things have to

shift slowly.”

INDEED, with NASA increasingly seeing itself

as more a spaceflight customer and not as a

spaceflight provider, Shoffner argues that the

willingness of private individuals like him to

spend a lot of money in order to, in part at least,

fulfill an understandable childhood fantasy will

in the coming years prove vital to the next space

race. That’s space’s commercialization. And, from

the human perspective, its expansion.

“Right now, getting into space is expensive

enough that people who do it have to take the

decision very seriously. You have to think about

the value your money is providing,” explains

Shoffner. “But space is only going to become

more and more available to people with different

objectives. Some people will just want to go, as

I do, while also wanting to do something useful

with my time up there too.

“But I believe that it’s also important that

humanity makes progress in space,” he adds.

“Listen to Elon Musk and he argues that for our

long-term survival it’s important we think of

ourselves as an inter-planetary species. But also

because there are [scientific research] things

we can do in space that you can’t do on Earth.

And private people like me going into space is

another way of promoting awareness of space,

of catching attention in the way mine was as a

seven year old.”

That’s also why Shoffner is developing

a STEM (science, technology, engineering,

and mathematics) program for the school he

attended, in the hope that more of an emphasis

of science and tech—“education is too generic,”

he suggests—will foster an interest in working in

the space sector, a career he would have pursued

himself if he had been nudged in the right

direction earlier.

Still, better late than never, as he may say to

himself as the countdown runs out and engine

ignition fires up. After all, he’ll likely touch down

as a changed man. As so many astronauts have

found, spaceflight can be a profound experience.

Shoffner says he hopes it doesn’t make him

cry, but he does expect to be changed by being

able to see for himself the fragility of the planet,

protected only by its thin curl of atmosphere.

“I hope to come back wanting to look for ways

to do some good in the world, without going

to the top of the mountain and sitting crosslegged

for the rest of my life,” laughs the man

who, one imagines, would find sitting still rather

intolerable. “I hope to come back less resource

hungry and less consumerist. Really, just less of

an asshole. And that has to be a good thing.”

“I believe that it’s also

important that humanity

makes progress in space.”

NetJets

31


TEEING OFF

GREEN AND PLEASANT

Treelined fairways of

Southern Pines, now ready

to challenge golfers once again.

THE GLORIOUS

RESTORATION

© SOUTHERN PINES GOLF CLUB

A long-neglected Donald Ross-designed course in

North Carolina has finally come back into play—and

it’s a gem. // By Larry Olmsted

32 NetJets


IN 1899 DONALD ROSS left his native Scotland

and job as greenskeeper at the famed Royal

Dornoch Golf Club to make a new life in the

United States. Just a year later he found himself

at the newly opened Pinehurst Resort in North

Carolina—the nation’s very first purposebuilt

golf destination. Ross famously designed

the first four (of what are now nine) 18-hole

courses, including the revered venue No. 2,

which has hosted, among others, the U.S.

Open, PGA Championship and Ryder Cup.

In the next half-century Ross designed roughly

400 more courses in the U.S. and Canada,

including celebrated tracks like Seminole, East

Lake, Oak Hill, and The Broadmoor, but he

lived the rest of his life alongside the fairways

of Pinehurst. As a result, he also created

several very notable courses in the neighboring

town of Southern Pines, including seven-time

USGA Championship venue Pine Needles and

Mid Pines, both Top 100 U.S. rated layouts.

Now, 73 years after his death, Ross has

posthumously given avid golfers a big reason to

celebrate. Southern Pines Golf & Country Club,

one of the least known—but very best—of his

works, has risen from the dead, and after a

meticulous and historically accurate renovation

by Ross specialist Kyle Franz, it is open to the

public for the first time in over a century. Built in

1906, Southern Pines is one of the oldest of more

than three dozen courses in this concise region

rightfully called the Home of American Golf, and

it immediately becomes a must-play on par with

nearby Nos. 2 and 4 and its resort siblings—

making it, along with the twin Pine Needles

and Mid Pines, adjacent and under combined

ownership, the only resort in the world with three

classic Ross layouts in their original routings.

Southern Pines offers the stunning signature

green complexes that made Ross one of the

greatest architects in the history of golf, but

this is just the start. While 2 and 4 are flat

and wide open, speckled with stands of sparse

trees, Southern Pines occupies a much more

interesting site of rolling hills, ridges, and

forest. The first holes set the tone, with one

playing substantially downhill to a fairway

narrowing like an arrowhead as bunkers on

either side grow progressively closer, followed

by a gorgeous par-five that plays up and over

NetJets

33


TEEING OFF

a semi-blind ridge to a rewarding reveal of the

green complex below. The magical feel that is

Donald Ross at his best comes shining through,

accentuated by a piece of land much different

and more varied than many of his layouts.

“It works around a big valley with a lot of

side hills and a lot of up and over where you

can get a big run out from good tee shots,”

said Franz. “We are trying to restore it to the

Ross period of 1915 to the 1920s. I think of

it like The Beatles and “Sgt. Pepper.” Styles

changed, and Ross had more wild stuff in his

early designs of this era—forced carries, even

a blind bunker—but then he got more into the

finesse he is now known for. What we are trying

to do is center in on a different period, and this

is his oldest here after No 2.” Mid Pines and

Pine Needles were built in 1921 and 1928,

respectively, making Southern Pines the wild

child of the trio. “It gives people a chance to

play a different period in Ross’s life. Here his

early work had forced carries over native areas.”

ROSS GOT SO CREATIVE he added a 19th hole, but

not the typical post-round one-shotter used to

settle ties. The Lost Hole was a par-three set

in the middle of the non-returning loop that

allowed golfers to play across from four to 15

for nine holes. It disappeared years ago and,

using the original Ross drawings, Franz has not

only recreated it, but added an element visiting

MASTER PLAN

Kyle Franz’s design for the

restoration of the course

has come to fruition.

golfers will likely never have the opportunity to

experience anywhere else, a sand putting green.

In the early 20th century agronomy

limitations and the local climate hampered the

winter grass growth that was needed to keep the

greens in shape, which meant that for nearly

three decades the oldest Ross courses had

putting surfaces that were a compacted mix of

native sand, clay, and gravel. Franz built two

greens on the Lost Hole, one grass and one

sand, allowing golfers to choose whether to play

to the 21st century or travel backwards in time.

The course was long privately owned by the

local Elks Club as an amenity for members but

was underused and had fallen into disrepair. It

was sold to Mid-Pines/Pine Needles, and Franz

spent 18 months on the restoration, adding a

grass putting course outside the clubhouse, also

due for an overhaul, and rebuilding the range with

Toptracer shot-tracking technology. The course

has just reopened in all its glory and is hidden in

a residential section of Southern Pines, just a few

minutes from the adjacent resorts it belongs to.

No. 2, No. 4, Mid Pines, and Pine Needles

were all extensively and successfully restored in

recent years by Coore & Crenshaw, Gil Hanse,

and Franz, and there are no more hidden Ross

gems to unearth after Southern Pines. As Franz

notes, “This is the last great Ross restoration

here with all 18 holes where they were.” Or

in this case, 19. southernpinesgolfclub.com

34 NetJets


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CULTURAL CACHE

A REFINED

PAIRING

LOST IN ART

Gao Weigang’s “Maze,”

2017, at the Donum Estate,

Sonoma, California.

36 NetJets


Vineyards have become showcases not only for the viticulturist’s

art but also for museum-quality artworks and exhibitions that are

increasingly taking center stage. // By Brian Noone

ART OPENINGS ARE INCOMPLETE without wine: It stimulates

conversation, of course, but the slow pleasures of sipping are

also a good match for the equally slow pleasures of reflecting on

a painting or a sculpture. You can’t—or at least you shouldn’t—

rush a glass of good wine any more than you hurry through an

interesting art exhibition. Not if your palate is sufficiently refined.

Museums have long understood this connection as well. It’s why

the wonderfully muralled restaurant at Tate Britain in London has

one of the city’s best wine lists, and why Odette, the three-Michelinstarred

dining destination at the National Gallery of Singapore, has

some 700 varieties in its cellar. Connoisseurs rarely appreciate just

one aspect of the world—and the opportunity to mix several sublime

things with each other is what makes for truly memorable occasions.

So there is an elegant simplicity about reversing the norm and

bringing art to the vineyards instead. Increasingly, this is just what

viticulturists around the globe are doing, turning the geometric

beauty of their repeating rows of vines into a stunning backdrop

for artworks of distinction—pieces that might otherwise be

found in an urban museum and are drawing culture vultures to

the countryside for a truly slow experience, of both art and wine.

ROBERT BERG

NetJets

37


CULTURAL CACHE

ITALIAN WORKS

From left: “Protect Me

Everywhere,” 2012, by Valerio

Berruti at Ceretto; “red

nerve,” 2019, by Miroslaw

Balka at Castello di Ama.

MARINA SPIRONETTI

ALESSANDRO MOGGI

The placement of art in vineyards is a relatively recent

phenomenon, largely because enotourism itself is relatively new.

For centuries, wine lovers, even the most ardent, were as unlikely to

visit the grapes as they were to try catching a beluga in the Caspian

Sea or visiting the dairy that made a particularly piquant cheese.

AS IN SO MUCH of the modern wine world, Robert Mondavi played

a role in turning vineyards into destinations. His efforts in getting

Californians to venture north to Napa kickstarted the concept—and

not just in the American West. In France, for instance, people didn’t

visit vineyards, in part because the négociant model gave merchants

full control of distribution, which meant that in some cases you couldn’t

buy the wine directly from the grower even if you knocked on the door.

Standing in the splendid isolation of the Peyrassol (peyrassol.

com) estate in Provence today, with views of the rolling hills and

distant mountains, kissed by the breezes wafting up from the

Mediterranean, you wonder why it took us so long to make vineyards

visitable. The estate dates back to the 13th century and still produces

standout rosés, but its leading appeal at the moment is its phenomenal

sculpture garden, superb permanent indoor exhibition, and current

temporary solo show given over to Anish Kapoor. Just up the road,

on the other side of Aix-en-Provence, Château La Coste (chateaula-coste.com)

has taken the art-and-wine destination to the next

level: Museum-quality exhibitions are joined by a sculpture garden of

marvels as well as two restaurants led by celebrated chefs—Hélène

Darroze and Francis Mallmann—and a 28-suite hotel and spa.

Across the Italian border, in Piedmont, Ceretto (ceretto.com)

was a pioneer in modern winemaking in the region—the singlevineyard

barolos are a must-try—and it was also the first to bring

artists to the region for site-specific creations. Third-generation

vigneron Bruno Ceretto invited British artist David Tremlett to

paint the Chapel of Santa Maria delle Grazie, the first of his many

Art in vineyards is a relatively recent

phenomenon, largely because

enotourism itself is relatively new.

38 NetJets


CHRISTOPHE GOUSSARD

commissions in the region, in 1999. Other internationally known

artists made their way to Ceretto and the region in his wake, from Sol

LeWitt to Marina Abramović, and now Piedmont has taken a place

beside Provence as the leading wine and art pairings in the world.

Towns like Alba and winemakers such as La Raia (la-raia.it) have

invited artists to make permanent installations, while Lunetta11

(lunetta11.com) is a standalone gallery in the hamlet of Mombarcaro

started by Eva Menzio, former director of the Marlborough

Monaco gallery, to cater to the growing demand in the region.

IT WAS ALSO in 1999 that Castello di Ama (castellodiama.

com) in Chianti began its collaboration with Galleria Continua,

bringing prominent contemporary artists to live on the terroir

and construct works inspired by the setting. The first creation,

“L’Albero di Ama,” by Michelangelo Pistoletto, has been joined by

works from Anish Kapoor in 2004, Louise Bourgeois in 2009,

Lee Ufan in 2016, among many other artists, which have created

a lasting showcase that has since been joined by five suites,

a convivial restaurant, and an atelier featuring local artisans.

In California, the Robert Mondavi Winery (robertmondaviwinery.

com) remains an art destination—including the Welcoming

Muse sculpture that has greeted visitors for more than four

decades—but other vineyards have taken the concept of on-site

art to dizzying heights. Donum (thedonumestate.com) in Sonoma

boasts a remarkable—and growing—collection of site-specific

sculptures by artists such as Ai Weiwei, Danh Vo, and Doug

Aitken that is among the leading sculpture parks in America.

The Hess Collection (hesscollection.com), meanwhile, is one

of the premier art collections in the world, with pieces assembled

over 50 years by Swiss winemaker and philanthropist Donald

Hess. Less than a quarter of the collection—which includes

works by Francis Bacon, Georg Baselitz, Frank Stella, and Anselm

HOME COMFORT

Sun Yuan and Peng Yu’s

“Teenager, Teenager,” 2011,

at Peyrassol.

NetJets

39


© MONA

CULTURAL CACHE

Kiefer —is on display at the winery atop Mount Veeder in Napa.

More of Hess’s collection can be seen at another winery: Bodega

Colomé (bodegacolome.com) in the Andes, the oldest continuously

producing winery in Argentina and one of the world’s highest vineyards

at 7,500 feet above sea level. The on-site James Turrell Museum is a

truly remarkable showcase of the artist’s immersive light installations—

in a building Hess worked with Turrell himself to design—as well as a

number of drawings and other works by the artist in Hess’s collection.

IN RECENT YEARS, South Africa’s picture-perfect valleys surrounding

Stellenbosch and Franschhoek have emerged as a relatively

compact centre for both world-class wine and African art. There

are Hess’s fingerprints here, too—he built the still thriving gallery

at Glen Carlou (glencarlou.com) before selling the property in

2016—but Cape Town’s emergence on the global art scene, led

by the city’s MOCAA, has spurred wineries across the region

to showcase art from all over the continent. Grande Provence

(gpgallery.co.za) hosts a gallery that focuses on South African

artists, while Cavalli Estate (cavalliestate.com) features both a

gallery and a residency program. Jeweler Laurence Graff’s personal

collection is on display at Delaire (delaire.co.za), a testament to

the history and quality of African artists. La Motte (la-motte.com)

similarly features the collection of its owner, Hanneli Rupert-

Koegelenberg, but here the art is more global in scope, with a

recent exhibition featuring works by figures as diverse as Picasso,

German Käthe Kollwitz and experimental Israeli artist Yaacov Agam.

Australia’s expansive vineyards are taking part, too, led by

Pt Leo Estate (ptleoestate.com.au) in Victoria, which features

pieces by blockbuster artists scattered across the grounds.

Elsewhere in the Antipodes, the sculpture garden at Brick

Bay (brickbaysculpture.co.nz) in New Zealand showcases

leading local contemporary artists, while in Tasmania,

the iconoclastic Museum of Old and New Art (mona.net.

au) was built on the Moorilla (moorilla.com.au) estate,

making for a permanent multisensory pairing like no other.

Aesthetes seeking pedigree should naturally turn back

toward France—and the southwest in particular. Malromé

(malrome.com) was the summer home of the Toulouse-

Lautrec family, and today pieces by its most prominent artistic

member, Henri, are on display, in combination with changing

contemporary exhibitions—best enjoyed with a glass of the

bordeaux in hand made from the surrounding 106-acre terroir.

Finally, at the venerable Château Mouton Rothschild (chateaumouton-rothschild.com),

the art exists not just for atmosphere:

Since 1945, the winery has commissioned an artist to draw a

label for it, and the originals are on display. There’s a Francis

Bacon from 1990, a Niki de Saint Phalle from 1997, as well

as works from Dalí, Miró, Chagall, Picasso, and Warhol. It’s a

remarkable collection from a remarkable winemaker—and evidence

of yet another reason why wine and art go together so well.

DOWN UNDER

Siloam—the tunnels leading

to the underground galleries

at MONA in Tasmania.

40 NetJets


© DELAIRE GRAFF ESTATE

TRUE BELIEF

One of Anton Smit’s “Faith”

sculptures at Delaire.

NetJets

41


LIVING WELL

MIND

OVER

MATTER

Perspectives, practices, and gadgets that demonstrate

how being rooted in the present can help us take charge

of our future. // By Jen Murphy

AS THE WORLD STARTS TO REEMERGE from lockdown, there are

different and new challenges to face. Controlling how we react

to changing situations is ever-more vital and we can do so by

adopting a mindfulness practice. The terms mindfulness often

evokes images of a Buddhist monk meditating in stillness for

hours on end. “I don’t even like to use the term mindfulness or

meditation because they scare people away,” says Monique Tello,

co-director of the Healthy Lifestyle Program at Massachusetts

General Hospital in Boston. “Being mindful is as simple as being

aware of what you are doing throughout the day. It encourages

you to be present in the moment and ignore distractions.”

We live in a world of distractions, so paying attention to the

present moment takes practice. But studies have shown that by

cultivating mindfulness, you can improve your mental and physical

wellness through reduced stress, anxiety, and depression. Being

aware of what is happening in the present moment allows us

to observe the emotions that arise and choose how we react to

those emotions, says Jacob Mirsky, a consultation physician at

Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine, also in Boston.

While meditation is one formal form of mindfulness (and don’t

worry, there are apps to help you get started) it’s far from the

only one, says Dr. Mirsky. We can choose to eat, walk, and even

scroll through our social media feeds more mindfully throughout

the day. “If we can learn to recognize when a stressful thought

or emotion comes up it allows us the opportunity to develop

healthy coping mechanisms like walking around the block or

calling a friend,” he says. “And when we learn our stress triggers,

we can create a strategy for avoiding them in the first place.”

42 NetJets


JULIAN RENTZSCH

DIANA HIRSCH / ISTOCK

MINDFUL RETREATS

In conversation with Amy Cherry-Abitbol, CEO &

co-founder of Shou Sugi Ban House—and its new,

more intimate sister property Shou Sugi Ban Inn—

an integrative wellness retreat in the Hamptons.

WHAT IS YOUR DEFINITION OF

MINDFULNESS?

Mindfulness is being present and

aware of your physical state, immediate

surroundings, thoughts, and feelings,

and not focusing on the past or future.

HOW DOES MINDFULNESS PLAY

INTO THE SHOU SUGI BAN HOUSE

RETREAT EXPERIENCE?

To me, mindfulness is an important

part of the overall experience, but it

should be one element of our holistic

approach that includes wellness and

spirituality. Throughout each day we

weave simple acts of ritual into the

experience. Mornings at Shou Sugi Ban

House begin with a meditation and yoga

with gentle stretching followed by our

signature plant-forward breakfast. At the

end of each day, our house-made herbal

seasonal soaks are placed in each guest

studio, to encourage a nightly bath to

induce a restful sleep. We pay close

attention to the natural cadence of the

day and allow people to find the rest

and relaxation they need during their

stay with us.

CAN YOU HIGHLIGHT SOME OF

THE PROGRAMS FROM YOUR

RESIDENT EXPERTS?

Our programming is based upon both

ancient rituals and state-of-the-art

wellness practices. In addition to special

collaborations with extraordinary minds,

we also offer sessions with our resident

experts and healers for individualized

experiences that bring specific awareness

to mind, body, and spirit. Some of our

most popular guided offerings include an

intuitive painting workshop where you

are guided to express yourself through

art, and heart opening led by sensuality

mentor Juliet Lippman.

WELLNESS WAS ONCE RELEGATED TO

EXERCISE AND DIET, BUT YOU TAKE

A MUCH MORE HOLISTIC APPROACH.

CAN YOU SPEAK TO WHY THAT IS

IMPORTANT FOR OVERALL HEALTH?

I believe that self-care, movement,

mindfulness, and clean-eating combined

with sustainable practices create a more

positive and powerful impact upon our

physical and mental health as well as the

environment. Our multipronged approach

sets us apart and underscores how these

intentional practices and rituals work

synergistically for optimal wellness and

full-body health.

MANY PEOPLE ARE STRUGGLING

WITH STRESS AND ANXIETY FROM

THE PANDEMIC. WHAT OFFERINGS

DO YOU HAVE AT THE RETREAT THAT

MIGHT HELP THEM?

The pandemic has underscored that

wellness in its many forms is more

important now than ever before. Our

programs have always been designed

to enhance mindfulness, and many of

our guests were already coming to us

to combat grief, stress, and anxiety. For

stress and anxiety relief, I suggest our

radical self-care workshop, which explores

the four pillars of self-care through group

sharing and meditation. Our breathwork

release workshop helps get rid of stagnant

energy and physical blocks that are often

inaccessible to our logical minds through

breathing exercises.

DOES MINDFULNESS HAVE TO BE A

STILL AND SEDENTARY ACT OR CAN IT

BE PRACTICED WITH MOVEMENT?

My favorite type of moving meditation

is a morning walk on the beach. I find

it to be a great way to clear my head

and start the day and I approach it as

a moving meditation—paying attention

to each breath, taking in the air, the

sounds, the sand between the toes, and

the physical sensation of each footstep.

Focusing on one element at a time, and

watching your breath, calms the nervous

system and can bring increased focus to

your surroundings. You can apply this

same approach to other situations and

rituals during your day, such as sipping

your morning coffee or tea, and taking

the time to appreciate and focus on each

element—the warmth of the mug, the

aroma, the taste. shousugibanhouse.com

TAKE HOME TIPS

STANDING MEDITATION: Stand

with feet hip-width apart and parallel.

Gently shift your weight back and forth

from the right to the left foot. Notice the

movement, but mostly, notice that tiny

instant when you’re perfectly balanced

between two feet. Try to “catch” that

moment and then, gradually, come to

stillness there. This is great to try if

you’re waiting in a line.

STEPPING MEDITATION: Every

time you pass from one room to the

other, at the office, at home, at a

restaurant, step with the right foot. This

mindful moment is a wonderful check-in

with yourself, wherever you are.

NetJets

43


LIVING WELL

END-OF-DAY NAMASTE

Four yoga poses to unwind from the workday.

WORK-RELATED STRESS can be a major contributor to health problems

such as poor sleep quality and high blood pressure. If you find

yourself still worrying about the office long after you’ve finished work

try adopting a yoga practice to help you unwind and reset. Studies

have shown that connecting breath to movement lowers levels of

cortisol, the hormone associated with the stress response. And

according to the National Institutes of Health, scientific evidence

shows that yoga supports stress management, mindfulness, mental

health, weight loss, healthy eating, and quality sleep. You don’t have

to be flexible, get sweaty, or carve out 90 minutes to reap the benefits.

Studies have shown that just 20 minutes of yoga can rewire the brain

and help bring clarity and focus. The following four beginner-friendly

poses will help you slow down the body and mind at day’s end.

1

1 CAT-COW POSE

How: Start on hands and knees. On an inhale, drop your belly towards the mat and lift

your chin and chest as you gaze up to the ceiling. On an exhale, draw your belly up to

your spine as you round your back toward the ceiling. Allow your head to drop toward

the floor. Alternate between poses.

Benefit: Coordinating movement between poses with your breath relieves stress and

calms the mind.

2 COBRA POSE

How: Lie face down with your legs extended behind you. The tops of your feet should

rest on the mat and your feet will be a few inches apart. Place your hands under your

shoulders and hug your elbows to your sides. On an inhale, slowly lift your head and

chest off the ground. Draw your shoulders back and press down through your thighs

and feet. Exhale and lower down.

Benefit: This energizing backbend reduces fatigue and stress while stretching the

spine and opening the chest and shoulders.

3 LEGS-UP-THE-WALL POSE

How: Sit with your right side against the wall. Turn your body to the right and bring your

legs straight up the wall, using your hands for balance. Your butt should be against the

wall. Use your hands to lower your back to the floor and lie down with your arms open by

your sides, palms facing up. Close your eyes and breathe slowly for five minutes.

Benefit: This inverted pose calms the nervous system and helps bring on a deep state

of relaxation.

4 RECLINED BOUND ANGLE POSE

How: Start seated with your knees bent out to the sides and heels drawn inward, soles

of the feet touching. If this is uncomfortable you can place pillows beneath your thighs

for support. Use your hands to lean backward and lower your back, shoulders, and

head to the floor. Rest the arms by your sides, palms facing up. Close your eyes and

breathe slowly for five minutes.

Benefit: A reclined hip opener, this pose helps reduce stress and anxiety.

2

4

3

J U S T B R E A T H E

Four mindful breathing techniques you can do anywhere.

We breathe 24 hours a day, usually without

thinking twice about such an innate act. But

monitoring and regulating our inhalations and

exhalations throughout the day can have huge

value. The next time you are stuck in traffic,

frustrated with your children, or stressed before

a big meeting, check in with your breath. Are

you holding it? Breathing rapidly? Mindful

breathing can help anchor us to the present

and prevent stress or anxiety from taking

over. According to an article in the Scientific

American, daily breathing exercises can help

counter the accumulation of even minor physical

tension associated with stress. When you feel

overwhelmed at any point of your day, use one

of these four breathing techniques to help calm

your central nervous system and help refocus

your mind.

2-4 BREATHING

This is a form of paced breathing when your

exhale is longer than your inhale. Start by

inhaling slowly through your nose for a count of

2 seconds, allowing your chest and lower belly to

expand. Then exhale slowly through your mouth

for a count of 4 seconds. You can slowly work

your way up to a 3- or 4-second inhale and 5- or

6-second exhale. If you lose concentration, try

using a free paced breathing app such as Breathe

for iPhone or Paced Breathing for Android.

4-4-8 BREATHING

Breathe through your nose for a count of 4,

allowing the lower belly to expand. Hold your

breath for a count of 4. Exhale through your

mouth for a count of 8. Immediately inhale for a

count of 4 through the nose, repeating the entire

technique three to four times in a row.

ALTERNATE NOSTRIL BREATHING

In Sanskrit, this technique is known as nadi

shodhan pranayama, which translates to subtle

energy clearing breathing technique. Yogis have

used it for centuries to calm and focus the mind.

Sit in a comfortable position with a tall spine.

Place your left hand on your thigh, palm up. Bring

your right up to your nose and use your right

thumb to close your right nostril. Inhale through

your left nostril. Now close the left nostril with

your left index and middle finger. Open the right

nostril and exhale. Inhale through the right nostril

and then close this nostril. Open the left nostril

and exhale. Inhale through the right nostril and

then close this nostril. Remember to always

inhale through the same nostril you just exhaled

through. Repeat five to ten rounds.

DEEP BREATHING

Also known as belly breathing or diaphragmatic

breathing, this technique helps activate the

body’s rest and digest response. Sit comfortably

with one hand on the chest and the other on the

belly. Inhale deeply through the nose. Ensure the

diaphragm rather than the chest inflates with air.

The hand on your chest should remain still and

the one on your belly should rise. Exhale slowly

through the mouth. Repeat for one minute.

44 NetJets


The Power of Daily Affirmations

Turn negative self-talk into positive motivation.

Being mindful of

the words we use

to talk to ourselves

can have a major

impact on our mood,

and subsequently,

our actions, says

Patricia Deldin, a

professor of psychology

and psychiatry at

the University of

Michigan, Ann Arbor.

We’re in constant

dialogue all day long

with ourselves. Take

note of how many

times a day you use

negative words and

make a concerted

effort to replace them

with kinder, more

encouraging words,

like “could” instead

of “should” or “can”

instead of “can’t”. Dr.

Deldin, who is the CEO

of the mental-wellness

program Mood

Lifters, says if you’re

feeling depressed,

stressed or down, try

to repeat positive selfaffirmations

to adjust

your mood. Remember

it’s not “Monday is

a stressful day,” it’s

“Monday is going to be

a great day.”

G A D G E T S T O H E L P F O C U S T H E M I N D

If you find your thoughts racing nonstop, try using one of these high-tech devices to help you master a quieter mind.

Muse 2

This slim meditation headband works in tandem with Muse’s

free mobile app to provide real-time feedback on your heart rate,

brain activity, and breathing. When your mind is calm you hear

calm sounds, like lapping waves. When your mind is active, the

waves start to crash and grow louder, signaling you to refocus.

choosemuse.com

Melomind Headset

Reminiscent of Bose Noise Cancelling Headphones, this device

uses electroencephalographic technology to help you deal with

stress and anxiety. Calming nature-based soundscapes, such as

tropical birds chirping, calm the brain and an accompanying app

allows you to monitor when you reach a state of deep relaxation.

melomind.com

S8 Pegasi II Light Therapy Glasses

If you’re a frequent flyer and struggle with jet lag, wearing

these glasses for just 30 minutes a day can help reset your

circadian rhythms. NASA technology was used to create lenses

that generate wavelengths of light that stimulate the area of

the brain that regulates the release of cortisol and melatonin.

The result: improved sleep quality. sleep8.uk

Aromeo Sense

A combination of aroma, light, and sound therapy helps you

fall into a deep slumber instantaneously. And a combination

of sunrise simulation light, a symphony of chirping birds, and

invigorating aromas helps you wake in the morning. Focusintensifying

sensory effects, like alertness-boosting soft white

light, can help you stay focused all day. aromeodiffuser.com

NetJets

45


LIVING WELL

S I X A P P S F O R D E C O M P R E S S I N G

When you’re going to have screen time, make it with one of these meditation-based apps.

Calm

Downloaded more than 50

million times, this app has

features like Sleep Stories

narrated by actor Matthew

McConaughey and guided

body scans.

Headspace

This app’s tagline is, “Gym

membership for the mind.”

Friendly animations help

remove the intimidation

factor for newbies and

helpful how-tos go beyond

meditation and tackle

topics like how to deal

with a panic attack.

Aura

The customization

capabilities of this

app have earned it the

nickname the Spotify of

mindfulness. If you’re

short on time, the

30-second stress busters

and 3-minute personalized

meditations are easy to

slot into your day.

Simple Habit

If the thought of sitting

quietly is overwhelming,

this app is for you. All

you need is just five

minutes to achieve inner

calm. Meditations are

downloadable so you

can easily access them

on a flight or during your

commute.

Inscape

In addition to having

staple offerings like

guided meditations and

calming soundscapes,

this app helps you destress

based on real-life

anxieties such as

dating troubles or

overcoming fears.

STRESS-FREE

VACATION PLANNING

With so much uncertainty around travel,

specialists are more relevant than ever.

TRAVEL HAS NEVER BEEN more complicated. With borders opening and

then re-closing and testing protocols constantly changing it’s hard

even to know where to go, let alone what you’re able to do once you

arrive. Here, Brooke Lavery, a partner at luxury travel consultancy

Local Foreigner (localforeigner.com), shares fi ve reasons why

establishing a relationship with a bespoke travel specialist can help

take the stress out of pandemic travel.

1. SAVE TIME

Travel advisers protect your time during the planning process and

on your vacation. You could devote hours to researching and crossreferencing

your own itinerary just to use your precious vacation time

as a testing ground for those discoveries. Or you can work with a

professional you trust, who can design an itinerary to your taste and

preference based on years of experience and dozens of other client

experiences in that destination.

2. BEEN THERE, DONE THAT

Work with a travel professional and you eliminate the guesswork in

travel planning. Your expert has not only been to the destination,

they’ve thoroughly scouted the hotels, eaten in the restaurants, and

have local connections.

3. NAVIGATING THE PROTOCOLS

With each country dictating and changing their COVID-19 policies at

a moment’s notice, travel is more overwhelming than ever. Outsource

the stress of this to a travel professional who specializes in high-touch

service and has the bandwidth to ensure details aren’t overlooked.

JULIAN RENTZSCH

Ten Percent Happier

A beginner-friendly app

with 350-plus guided

meditations and access to

personalized meditation

coaches who quickly

respond to your queries.

4. PROBLEM-SOLVING

In the event something doesn’t go as anticipated on the ground, who

will you call for help? The best travel advisers are problem-solvers with

the best local connections—no waiting on the phone for hours to talk to

a real human.

5. FEELS GOOD TO BE A VIP

When you check in to a hotel, do you want to wait in line or be

greeted personally by the general manager or hotel owner? Have you

experienced a hotel room stocked with your favorite drinks and snacks?

Do you want to stroll through the Louvre with the masses, or explore the

underground closed-to-public workshops with a curator before visiting a

few of the museum’s highlights? Being connected on the ground creates

an entirely different travel experience, and a star travel adviser can

facilitate those connections.

46 NetJets


WE ARE

WHAT

WE EAT

WE’RE ALL GUILTY of scarfing down a sandwich at our

desk or devouring a pint of Ben & Jerry’s while zoning

out to the latest episode of “White Lotus.” When

mindless meals and snacks become part of your

routine, pounds start to pack on. No matter how much

you exercise, good nutrition is a crucial piece of the

weight-loss puzzle. Instead of adopting fad diets, try

paying more attention to what you put in your mouth

and why. Studies have shown that the practice of

mindful eating not only helps with weight loss, but,

additionally, it can help you embrace long-term habits

dealing with food cravings and portion control.

H O W T O B E I N T H E

M O M E N T A T M E A L S

Experts at Harvard Medical School share tips and

tricks for adopting more mindful eating habits.

• Set your kitchen timer to 20 minutes, and take

that time to eat a normal-sized meal.

• Try eating with your non-dominant hand; if

you’re a righty, hold your fork in your left hand

when lifting food to your mouth.

• Use chopsticks if you don’t normally use them.

• Eat silently for five minutes, thinking about what

it took to produce that meal, from the sun’s rays

to the farmer to the grocer to the cook.

• Take small bites and chew well.

• Before opening the fridge or cabinet, take a

breath and ask yourself, “Am I really hungry?”

Do something else, like reading or going on a

short walk.

• Avoid eating with distractions like the television.

• Avoid working meals where you eat at your desk

or in front of your computer.

• Avoid eating on the go when you are driving or

commuting.

• Start a food log and write down what triggers

binge eating and how certain foods make you

feel. Do they make you lethargic? Give you more

energy?

• Track your food choices on an app like

MyFitnessPal or EatRightNow.

P A N D E M I C P E T S

De-stressing your animal companion.

The pandemic created a boom in

pet adoptions. According to The

Humane Society of the United States,

requests for pet fostering spiked by

90 percent. Whether you’re a new pet

parent or longtime dog or cat owner,

the pandemic gave you more time

than ever to bond with your furry

loved one. As we start to travel again,

it’s normal for both owners and pets

to experience separation anxiety.

NetJets has seen a significant

increase in pets flying with owners

in the past year, with 24,000

animals joining their owners in

2020. Whether you’re bringing your

favorite feline travel buddy in the air

for the first time in months or leaving

your new pandemic pup in your villa

alone, the ASPCA suggests these tips

for keeping you and your pet calm.

1. Honor Routine

If you’re on vacation, try to mimic

your pets daily schedule at home.

2. Withdraw Slowly

A sudden decrease in time with

your pet can be difficult for both of

you. Make sure you practice shorter

periods of alone time before a big

trip where you’ll be apart for longer

stretches.

3. New Distractions

Change up your dog or cat toys to

help keep them novel when traveling.

Interactive toys or healthy chews can

help keep your pet engaged when

you’re gone.

4. Background Noise

Leave soothing music or the TV on in

your hotel room or villa for auditory

and visual stimulation.

5. Hire a Pro

Many hotels and villas offer petsitting

services so you can rest

assured your buddy is getting looked

after while you’re out for a round of

golf or catching a sunset surf session

at the beach.

NetJets

47


ON THE MOVE

POWER TO

THE PEDAL

The e-bike revolution has many spokes to its

wheels—equality, efficiency, and élan among them.

// By John McNamara

CLIMB TIME

The lightweight Angell

bike, designed by

Frenchman Ora Ïto.

48 NetJets


POWERED UP

From top: Serial 1’s Rush/Cty Step-

Thru; the Greyp e-SUV T5.

IT’S RARE A NEW TECHNOLOGY receives universal approval—

remember the ill-fated Segway?—but as increasing production

and sales demonstrate, e-bikes have managed to garner fans

across the full spectrum of cyclists. At the most basic level, the

battery-powered two-wheelers provide a leveling out effect,

allowing less able riders, including those of a certain age, to keep

pace with faster partners and to explore more adventurous trails

and experiences. Urban governments, too, have welcomed the

development of the e-bike as an alternative mode of transport

to help reduce pollution in city centers. Perhaps best of all, the

opportunities afforded by this relatively nascent form of transport

have piqued the minds of creative types around the world,

leading both to new cycling innovations—different materials

for the frame, belt drives replacing the cumbersome chain, and

integrated controls through apps—as well as to eye-catching new

designs. Be they tough trekkers or city slickers, the e-bikes of today

represent remarkable displays of forward-thinking imagination.

A leader in the this revolution is Seattle-based Rad Power Bikes

(radpowerbikes.com), which between April 2019 and 2020 enjoyed

a 297% rise in sales and was named as one of the 2021 TIME100

Most Influential Companies. Its latest model, the RadRover 6

Plus, exemplifies its ingenuity, with the fat-tired bike featuring an

upgraded user interface and a 750w custom-made hub motor that,

among other advantages, makes hill climbing much, much easier.

Another American mainstay making e-bikes a success is Trek

(trekbikes.com), a venerable name in the pedal-power market that

has effortlessly turned its hand to the modern version. Ease of use and

comfort are features of its award-winning Domane series, shown by

NetJets

49


ON THE MOVE

PRETTY IN GREY

Cowboy 3 offers

simple efficiency.

one of its most recent iterations, The Domane LT+, that really feels

and rides like a conventional bike, and can indeed be converted

to one with the removal of the lightweight Fazua drivepack (battery

and motor). But doing so misses out on the impressive capabilities

of one of the smoothest e-bikes on the streets—and the trails thanks

to the IsoSpeed technology that absorbs the bumps of rough terrain.

RATHER MORE OF A new kid on the block, Croatia’s Greyp (greyp.

com) shows the same innovative approach to two wheels as its

sister company Rimac does to electric supercars. It has entered the

trekking end of the market with the Greyp e-SUV T5, a bike that

is a perfectly respectable option for a city commute but more than

capable of taking on an Alpine jaunt. In a change from its previous

models, the T5 frame is made from aluminum, which is more

flexible than carbon, but it is the bike’s accessories that make it

stand out. The 700Wh battery is on the large side for a trekking

bike and allows the T5 a range of 62 miles, while a top speed of

15.5mph is currently being upgraded for the U.S. market. Greyp’s

next project is a city bike due next year and hotly anticipated.

If electric car and bike makers seem an obvious overlap, the world

of e-bikes throws up some more unusual bedfellows. Take MODMO

(modmo.io), the brainchild of Irishman Jack O’Sullivan, whose quest

ALL IMAGES COURTESY THE COMPANIES

ALL-ROUND EFFORT

Clockwise from top: Trek’s Domane

LT+; the Paul Teutul Jr.-designed

PJD-E; MODMO’s Saigon+.

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If electric car and bike makers seem an

obvious overlap, the world of e-bikes throws

up some more unusual bedfellows.

to find the ideal location to produce his zero-emission e-bike took him

to Vietnam. The result is the aptly named MODMO Saigon+, which

boasts an incredible 125-mile range on a single charge and features a

Gates Carbon Drive System, claimed to be almost maintenance free.

Another cross-continent collaboration has seen Ruff Cycles

(ruff-cycles.com), based in Regensburg, Germany, team up

with Californian Paul Teutul Jr., renowned for his motorcycle

designs and his appearances on the U.S. reality show “American

Chopper.” The PJD-E combines the best of American design and

German engineering, creating a range of bikes that aims to put the

rock’n’roll into the market. The aesthetics of Ruff’s bikes, headed

by The Ruffian, is more motorcycle cool, but the tech, including

Bosch batteries, is very much the latest in e-bike innovation.

TEUTUL JR. IS NOT THE only motorcycling aficionado to see the potential

of the bicycle, and there is no bigger name straddling both genres than

Harley-Davidson. Under its subsidiary Serial 1 (serial1.com), the

iconic brand has produced a series of e-bikes with a particular eye on

the urban cyclist, including the Rush/Cty Step-Thru, which along with

the proprietary H-D battery has four ride modes—Eco, Tour, Sport,

and Boost—and a walk-assist function. It also benefits from the Step-

Thru, the simplest of design features, which allows the rider to quickly

mount and dismount, especially useful on crowded urban streets.

For all these flamboyant versions of the e-bike, there is also a

demand for the more classical look—one that allows the cyclist who

needs a bit of assistance to blend in with the crowd. French firm Angell

(angell.bike) turned to designer Ora Ïto to create a bike with a sleek

and stylish frame that camouflages an array of smart tech, including

an integrated GPS with vibrating handlebars to indicate directions

and security features include anti-theft alarm and light. Meanwhile,

Belgian firm Cowboy’s 3 and 4 (cowboy.com) are perfect examples of

how form and function can come together in an elegant and compact

package. Featuring a battery built into the seat tube and an app that,

among other things, synchronizes with the in-built GPS, the Cowboy

4 also offers intuitive speed adjustment and wireless phone charging.

In the U.S., e-bike sales rose 116% from $8.3m in February

2019 to $18m a year later—and many producers ran low on

stock last summer. It’s the sort of success that ensures creative

companies will continue to produce ever-more inventive versions

of the timeless two-wheeled treasure for many years to come.

MOTORING ON

From top: The RadRover 6 Plus;

the Ruffian Black Redwall.

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ON LOCATION

ALL ABOUT

UPSTATE

With new and noteworthy openings proliferating

across the Hudson Valley, its charming towns, hamlets

and estates prove the enduring appeal of the Empire

State—and not just as an escape from New York City.

// By Jeremy Wayne

52 NetJets


RIVER HIGH

The Hudson Valley in

all its fall glory.

IAN POLEY

EXTENDING 150 MILES north from the tip of

Manhattan all the way up to Albany, the Hudson

Valley seems to have it all. Its namesake river is

surrounded by a narrow corridor of hills, dales,

forests, wetlands, and open pasture as it weaves

between a preponderance of small towns and

villages and magnificent, historic houses and

estates. It’s no wonder TIME magazine described

it as one of the world’s great places for 2021.

The renaissance of the river-towns themselves—

Hudson, Beacon, Cold Spring, Peekskill, and

Poughkeepsie, to name but a few—had begun

before the pandemic, but COVID-19, in a sense,

has been kind to the Hudson Valley. Bolstered by

the great pandemic exodus from New York City

and the larger towns of the tristate area, an influx

of city folk has moved in, among them artists,

musicians, creatives, style-makers, designers,

artisans, and craftsmen of every description,

and the sense of optimism is unmistakable.

Towns like Nyack, Irvington, Millbrook, Kingston,

and Dobbs Ferry—already gaining traction in the

“great places to relocate to” stakes pre-COVID—are

now firmly on the map of cool. And all over the Valley,

from Kingston, New York, to Kent, Connecticut,

from Woodstock to Wappingers Falls, new specialty

shops are opening, galleries and event spaces are

launching, performance art is popping up, and

restaurants and bars—new, nearly new and even

some old-established well-beloveds—are starting

up or reawakening with a palpable new energy.

Yet for all its buzz and all its newfound

trendiness, the valley retains an ancient,

almost spiritual allure. Heavily forested, with

great swathes of land still vastly undeveloped

and astonishing in their natural beauty,

this bucolic region offers the best of both

worlds—pockets of urban sophistication

combined with a simpler, less stressful life.

WHERE TO STAY

Where not so long ago you had to make the

stark choice between a faceless Hilton or

Marriott, or a “mom and pop” B&B with strict

house rules and iffy plumbing, in the past few

years the number of characterful, comfortable

independent places to stay has surged.

The times they are most definitely a changin’

at small hotels like The Dylan (thehoteldylan.

com), the very cool hotel in Woodstock where

seasoned hoteliers Cortney and Robert Novogratz

have spiffed up a dilapidated old motel and created

a psychedelic tribute to the 1960s. And while

each room is named for a rock legend and comes

complete with a Crosley record player and a great

selection of vinyl, the Novogratzes never make

the mistake of letting style win out over comfort.

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ON LOCATION

JANE BEILES

If music and cool colors are the vibe in

Woodstock, across the scenic Ashokan reservoir—

ten miles from Woodstock as the crow flies—

silence is the allure at Hutton Brickyards

(huttonbrickyards.com). A 73-acre former

industrial site that reopened this year after a major

renovation, this “camp” for adults offers a variety

of luxury cabins—spare in design but with a sexy,

minimalist aesthetic—right on the Hudson itself.

There are spa sheds for massages and facials;

archery and croquet are available on the lawn;

and added to all this is an exceptional indooroutdoor

restaurant where ex-Balthazar New York

chef Dan Silverman cooks—mostly over wood.

JANE BEILES

© FRIDMAN GALLERY

NICOLE FRANZEN

THE CONTRAST COULD HARDLY be greater between

bucolic Hutton and sleepy Kingston, and its

lively neighbor across the river, Rhinebeck.

This long-established river-town has always

had a clutch of decent hotels and restaurants,

but the bar has been recently raised with the

launch of Mirbeau Inn & Spa (rhinebeck.

mirbeau.com), a thoroughly indulgent new

family-owned retreat, with a superb health and

wellness program and a restaurant, Willow, with

an appetizing New American menu, overseen

by Charlie Palmer of New York’s Aureole fame.

The approach is a bit more old fashioned

at Troutbeck (troutbeck.com), albeit with a

© THE ARMOUR-STINER OCTAGON HOUSE

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FRANCINE ZASLOW

© THE AMSTERDAM RHINEBECK

© AUTOGRAPH COLLECTION

strikingly contemporary face—namely, design

and decoration by internationally acclaimed

designer Alexandra Champalimaud, mother of

Troutbeck’s owner, Anthony Champalimaud. (She

has recently done The Carlyle in New York and

Hotel Bel-Air in Los Angeles). The former home

of the poet-naturalist Myron Benton, whose circle

of friends included (Troutbeck visitors) Emerson

and Thoreau, and later home to poet and botanist

Joel Spingarn, this beautiful house—set on a 250-

acre estate, complete with swimming pool, tennis

courts, and wellness barns—still resonates with

political and literary history and has become home

to a hip young crowd. They love it for its laidback

charm and excellent restaurant, under the baton of

chef Gabe McMackin, for whom “farm-to-table” is

not merely a catchphrase but means exactly that.

ALL ON THE HUDSON

Clockwise, from top left: Hutton

Brickyards; The Maker; fare from The

Amsterdam; The Opus Westchester;

Glenmere Mansion; the house at

Troutbeck; Feast & Floret restaurant; the

Armour-Stiner Octagon House; the River

Pavilion at Hutton Brickyards; Fridman

Gallery; Troutbeck’s wellness barns.

© FEAST & FLORET

© GLENMERE MANSION

PAUL BARBERA

HEADING SOUTHWEST, about an hour’s drive down

the Valley, brings you to the town of Beacon.

Once an industrial hub, choked with factory

fumes, Beacon is enjoying a remarkable rebirth,

with good schools, terrific shops and restaurants

and a handful of independent luxe hotels, among

them the utterly charming, 23-room Roundhouse

(roundhousebeacon.com). At the former textile

factory and later the H. N. Swift machine shop,

where the first lawnmowers in America were

reputedly manufactured, owner and Long Islandto-Beacon

transplant Bob McAlpine, of the

McAlpine Construction Company fame, has

managed to create a welcoming hotel within the

curved walls, while respecting the building’s

integrity. Brick, reclaimed wood, and many other

salvageable parts of the original property meld

together to make a homogeneous and rather

beautiful whole, while the thrilling view of the

Fishkill Creek waterfall adds yet another dimension.

Continuing down to Peekskill, not so long ago

a fairly dodgy, down-at-heel river-town, it’s hard

to miss The Abbey Inn & Spa (theabbeyinn.

com)—a magnificent, newly converted convent

high up on the town’s Fort Hill, with spectacular

river views. The Mother Superior’s circular, paneled

office is now the Apropos bar; the nuns’ refectory

is the restaurant (along with the added Hudson

Room); and the church and chapel, complete

with stained–glass windows and glorious period

detail, are both breathtaking event spaces. A series

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ON LOCATION

of pictures from the top floor down tells the story

of the Hudson, from its source in the Adirondack

Park all the way to Manhattan and the Atlantic.

Cross the river itself, a relative trickle at this

point, via quaint Bear Mountain Bridge, and

half an hour’s drive west brings you to Chester,

and Glenmere (glenmeremansion.com). This

Italianate mansion, a Relais & Châteaux property, is

a stunner. It has been lovingly restored by writer and

realtor Alan Stenberg and his partner, orthopedic

surgeon Daniel DeSimone, who saw the crumbling,

neglected mansion when they were driving to lunch

one day and knew they had to buy it. Set deep in

the farmlands of the Lower Hudson Valley, with

its sumptuous public rooms, ornate library, formal

gardens, pool, and loggia, Glenmere is a dream of

good living. And the bartender surely mixes the best

dry martini between New York City and Montreal.

In White Plains, meanwhile, the county seat

and commercial hub of Westchester, where the bar

and restaurant scene has been burgeoning for some

time, the very swish Ritz-Carlton hotel has morphed

into The Opus Westchester (theopuswestchester.

com) and is much happier in its new skin. Part

of Marriott’s Autograph collection, complete with

indoor pool, steam room, and fitness center,

while hardly small or charming, Opus makes

perfect sense as a base to explore the region, or

if you are flying into or out of the extremely handy,

soon-to-be-expanded Westchester County Airport.

And all the way to the north, in hip and

happening Hudson-on-Hudson—not so long ago a

rough-and-tumble river-town where venturing out

after dark might have given you pause— without

a doubt The Maker (themaker.com) is making

its mark. A sumptuous house full of vintage

furniture and beautiful antiques, this exquisite

small hotel’s pool and gardens would not look

out of place in Provence. But with everything

sourced locally and brought together by Hudson

Valley artisans and craftsmen, it is in fact a

celebration of the region and American to the core.

WHERE TO EAT AND DRINK

With its abundance of high-quality local produce—

meat, dairy, and vegetables—coupled with

great butchers, cheese- and bread-makers, and

micro-breweries, the Hudson Valley is a veritable

cornucopia. But the great produce, sold in markets

and merrily sent further afield, hasn’t always

translated into local restaurants of any note.

Happily, that’s all history now. At spots like

Hudson Hil’s Cafe (hudsonhils.com) in Cold

Spring—where property prices in the last year

have soared and a recent search showed only two

active listings in the town—the vibe is casual and

easy-going. But menus, predicated on local and

organic ingredients, like house-cured salmon with

local eggs, or Hudson Valley grass-fed beefburger,

say, have a real resonance with the area and the

land. For a terrific sense of what’s going on in the

Hudson Valley generally, Beacon’s Hudson Valley

Food Hall & Market (@HVFoodHall), showcases

a variety of local chefs, and in addition to the

food and produce stalls, houses The Roosevelt

bar, which offers cocktails made with local

distilled spirits. There are eat-in outlets within

the food hall, too, including the cheerful Momo

Valley (momovalley.com), which is not strictly

local but its Nepalese dumplings and steamed,

pasture-raised chicken are irresistible nonetheless.

OVER IN POUGHKEEPSIE, a key Hudson town and

one which feels newly energized, Culinary Institute

of America-grad Charlie Webb, one of a new

generation of Poughkipsters, is delighting locals with

his distinctive Detroit pizza at Hudson & Packard

(hudsonandpackard.com). He uses locally

sourced ingredients wherever he can and the line,

which frequently runs along the street for his pizza

pies, is all the proof you need of taste and quality.

Just two doors away—and after some considerable

delay, now slated to open this fall—is The Academy

(theacademyhvny.com), a specialty coffee

shop, food hall, brewery, and fresh food market,

bringing further food-and-drink luster to the town.

Just below the Hudson’s widest point, at

Haverstraw, lies Tarrytown, home to a smattering

of historic houses, like Washington Irving’s former

home, Sunnyside, and Jay Gould’s Lyndhurst

estate (think railroads and Western Union). It’s

also home to the recently opened Goosefeather

(goosefeatherny.com), a small but perfectly

formed Cantonese restaurant, occupying a set of

rooms on the first floor of the imposing, mid-19thcentury

King Mansion, exquisitely decorated with

many original antiques and lit almost entirely with

candles at night. Four miles further on, at the Metro

North railroad station in Dobbs Ferry, another

characterful restaurant also respects the past—

well, actually, revels in it. The recently opened

Hudson Social (hudsonsocial.com) occupies a

Victorian-era ticket office between the railroad tracks

and the river, and its sublime burrata, generous

salads, and brunch-option ham, cheese and egg

sandwich are already earning it legions of fans.

Across the valley, in Bedford Hills, a South

Asian sizzler has come to sometimes staid

horse country, in the form of Dinh Dinh Kitchen

(dinhdinhkitchen.com), where Westchester native

Brian Candee offers what he calls a “Southeast

menu with an American core”—cue crispy

Korean chicken with fries, and peanut noodle

bowl with glass noodles and Napa cabbage.

SCOTT HEANEY / ISTOCK

56 NetJets


For all its buzz and all its newfound

trendiness, the valley retains an

ancient, almost spiritual allure.

SPANNING NATURE

Bear Mountain Bridge,

a notable landmark

on the river.

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ON LOCATION

Back in Dutchess County, meanwhile, there

are universal plaudits for The Amsterdam, in

Rhinebeck (lovetheamsterdam.com), a pareddown,

blond wood, minimalist restaurant offering

New American fare that focuses on the very best

local produce. Wonderful cheeses and charcuterie,

a hearty shakshuka, and a local take on chicken

paillard are all standouts. Up in Hudson, where

restaurants both before and during the pandemic

seemed to open and close in the blink of an eye,

Feast & Floret (feastandfloret.com), an eatery

whimsically situated within a flower shop, with

an evolved, mainly Tuscan menu—dishes prinked

with locally tinctured honey and salts—looks like

a keeper. And not far away, with probably the best

cheese selection in the Hudson Valley, along with

home-made pasta and prepared dishes to go, the

newly expanded Talbott & Arding (talbottandarding.

com) now offers indoor seating for the first time.

WHERE TO SHOP

You don’t go to the Hudson Valley for the

shopping. Or rather, you didn’t. All that’s changed

now. Where not so long ago, local shopping

meant fusty antiques shops open only three

days a week, or bijou indies selling macramé

plant holders and scented candles, in recent

years the bar has been raised stratospherically.

Amenia, in Dutchess County, is hot right now

and nowhere’s hotter than RiverTown Trade

(rivertowntradeshop.com), with its bespoke beauty

products, zingy china, all-natural totes, rockstar

photos in frames, and COVID-minded accessories.

“I love the romance of entering a space and being

transported,” says co-owner Samuel Gold, who

managed the retail outlets for Ian Schrager hotels

and Mandarin Oriental. The original branch of homedecoration

store Hammertown (shop.hammertown.

com) has been around for some 30 years in Pine

Plains, but its beautiful new satellite stores in

Rhinebeck and Great Barrington, Massachusetts,

keep punters coming back for more: There’s

kitchen ware, tableware, furniture, hand-printed

scarves, and jewelry, much of it by local designers.

Peekskill’s Bucko! (buckoshop.com),

meanwhile, in the town’s striking Flatiron Building,

is the place for gorgeous baby clothes, as well

as a small but super-stylish collection of casuals

for mom and dad. If it’s a one-off handbag or

beautiful jewelry you’re after, head to Millbrook

and the Kieselstein-Cord gallery (kieselsteincord.com),

where you’ll find Barry Kieselstein-

Cord’s now iconic bags and handmade jewelry in

the redesigned gallery space. His pieces (many

of which are on public view at the Metropolitan

Museum of Art) are always showstoppers.

IN FRANCOPHILE LARCHMONT—a wealthy outer

suburb and commuter town for New York City at

the base of the Valley in southern Westchester,

much favored by the expat French community

—the shopping has always been a cut above,

but even here the bar has been raised lately.

Marmoucha shags, Berber baskets, boujad prayer

rugs and heady, Mexican Nopalera soap (made

from cactus flowers) are just some of the tempting

goods to look out for at The Souk at Maisonette

(maisonetteshoppe.com). While in the town,

stock up on one-of-a-kind, handmade greetings

cards, many designed by local artists, at the

pint-sized Write On! (writeonwestchester.com).

If Larchmont has a French flavor, it was the large

expat British community of posh Mount Kisco, 25

miles to the north, that drew local resident and

British former musician Drew Hodgson and his wife,

Leigh, to bravely open The Hamlet (thehamletny.

com) at the height of the pandemic. (“For Brits

who couldn’t get back to the UK,” says Drew.)

Located in a former bank, this is a captivating

specialty store for all things British—jams,

relishes, crisps (of course), Cadbury chocolate,

tea, meat pies—plus an amazing collection of

ISTOCK

DIFFERENT FACES

From top: The Italianate

Glenmere mansion; along

the tree-lined banks of

the Hudson; inside the

Kieselstein-Cord gallery.

58 NetJets


than 25 regional artists, as well as workshops,

monthly open mic, and a panoply of other events.

© KIESELSTEIN-CORD

vinyl, including David Bowie, Radiohead, and

Roxy Music, housed in the bank’s original vault.

Serious and playful art, too, has made major

inroads into the region, as city dwellers have

drifted northward, and artists and gallery owners

have moved or expanded their galleries to meet

the new demand and fill wall-space. Up in

Beacon, in Iliya Fridman’s first outpost of his

well-known Lower East Side Fridman Gallery

(fridmangallery.com), the ambitious line-up

includes ten shows over the coming months.

Opened in April 2021, in the heart of Hudson,

Shakespeare’s Fulcrum (shakespearesfulcrum.

com) is a “self-curating gallery dedicated to

change,” essentially a five-year pop-up, although

patron Valerie Monroe Shakespeare’s concept

originated almost 30 years ago in a space beneath

the Guggenheim Museum in New York. Down in

Millerton, meantime, Geary (geary.nyc) is another

Lower East Side gallery which has spread its wings

to the Hudson Valley, where it represents new

artists as well as established ones in mid-career.

Poughkeepsie doesn’t want to be left out

either. Recent gallery openings include Queen

City 15 (queencity15.com), a member-run space

showcasing working artists, and Clinton Street

Studio (@clintonstreetstudiopk), another artistrun

workspace and gallery. And in close-by Hyde

Park—the historic home and estate of Franklin

Delano Roosevelt—at the Artists’ Collective of

Hyde Park (artistscollectiveofhydepark.com) you’ll

find year-round changing art shows from more

KIM SARGENT

WHAT TO DO

With its meadows, wetlands, forests, and waterfalls

—along with more than 700 trails to suit every

level of skill and endurance—the Hudson Valley

is a hiker’s paradise. At Wonder Lake (parks.

ny.gov), converted from a 1920s summer home,

you will never tire of the Highlands trail, which is

continually expanding, and will eventually extend

200 miles across four states, from the Connecticut

border to the Delaware River. The first segment

starts in Putman County. For hiking neophytes,

the recently opened Vlei Marsh trail, near

Rhinebeck, is a relatively gentle, 1.5-mile nature

walk offering superb views of the marshland.

If a formal garden appeals to you more than

rugged natural beauty, head to the Beatrix

Farrand Garden at the Bellefield Mansion

(beatrixfarrandgardenhydepark.org) on the

grounds of the FDR historic home at Hyde Park.

The garden has recently been painstakingly and

faithfully restored and is now open to the public.

In Irvington, and still in private hands, the

Armour-Stiner Octagon House (armourstiner.com)

is the world’s only domed octagonal house. Both

the structure and its garden have been restored to

their 1872 former glory, and both are now open

for small weekend tours, which must be booked

in advance. Last but not least, diagonally across

the river, in Nyack, the Edward Hopper House

Museum & Study Center (edwardhopperhouse.

org) has reopened following a long closure,

and is celebrating its 50th anniversary with a

year-long program of events and shows. They

include an exhibition of the artist’s caricatures

and one celebrating the life of his wife and

muse, the American painter Josephine Nivison.

HUDSON VALLEY REGIONAL AIRPORT AND WESTCHESTER

COUNTY AIRPORT ARE THE MAIN AIRPORTS SERVICING

THE AREA–FOR MORE SPECIFIC INFORMATION ON THE

BEST AIRPORT FOR YOUR NEEDS, PLEASE CONTACT YOUR

NETJETS REPRESENTATIVE.

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GAME OF GEMS

The season’s most alluring jewelery creations make all the right

moves. // Photography by Xavier Young Production by Elisa Vallata

FIT FOR

A QUEEN

60 NetJets


Above:

Facing page, from

left to right:

GRAFF white gold

necklace set with

rubies and diamonds

DAVID MORRIS white and

yellow gold Boreas

earrings set with white

and yellow diamonds.

CHOPARD white gold

Precious Lace earrings

set with emeralds and

diamonds VAN CLEEF &

ARPELS white gold Lotus

Between the Finger ring

set with diamonds

PRAGNELL platinum

Manhattan ring set with

rubies and diamonds

DAVID MORRIS white

gold ring set with one

black opal, diamonds,

sapphires, white opals,

and Paraiba tourmalines.

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GAME OF GEMS

From the top,

counterclockwise:

BOODLES platinum

bracelet set with

aquamarines, beryls,

kunzite, morganite, and

white diamonds

VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

white gold Lotus pendant

clip, set with diamonds

CARTIER white gold Les

Berlingots de Cartier ring,

set with blue chalcedony

and diamonds CHOPARD

white gold L’Heure

du Diamant ruby and

diamond-set pendant

with chain necklace

VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

white gold Olympia

necklace set with

diamonds CHOPARD

platinum and rose gold

Temptations earrings set

with orange sapphires,

tsavorites, rubies,

amethysts, and

diamonds ADLER white

gold Brocéliande ring set

with one pink cultured

pearl and diamonds.

62 NetJets


From top right,

clockwise:

BOGHOSSIAN white gold ring set

with a Zambian emerald, seed

pearl beads, and diamonds

FABIO SALINI white gold ring

set with one blue sapphire and

diamonds GARRARD white gold

Jewelled Vault ring set with rubies

and diamonds

BOODLES platinum and yellow

gold Scroll ring set with one

yellow-orange diamond and

white diamonds

PURLING LONDON Stone Chess

Black v White alabaster board,

with 34 Italian alabaster chess

pieces featuring natural veining,

and the Purling logo embossed

in 18kt gold on Italian nappa

leather felts.

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GOURMET SCENE

OLD AND NEW

Daniel Boulud’s Le

Pavillon perfectly

encapsulates a

modern take on

traditional French

cuisine.

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Always bustling with creativity, chef Daniel Boulud is at his best

in remaking the Manhattan icon Le Pavillon. // By Bill Knott

Photography by Thomas Schauer

UPDATING

THE

CLASSICS

ON 19 MAY THIS YEAR, after many months of restrictions,

restaurants in New York City were allowed to open their doors

once more. On the same day, one restaurant—Le Pavillon,

on the second floor of the ambitious new One Vanderbilt

skyscraper in Midtown—opened its doors for the very first time.

Speaking at the ribbon-cutting ceremony, Bill de Blasio,

Mayor of New York City, paid tribute to Marc Holliday,

chairman and CEO of SL Green Realty, the building’s owners

“for believing in the people of New York City and investing in

them,” and to Tim and Nina Zagat, founders of the eponymous

restaurant guide, for their continued promotion of the city.

But his most fulsome praise was reserved for Daniel Boulud,

chef, restaurateur, and the culinary mastermind behind Le Pavillon.

“Daniel, New York City has always loved you,” he proclaimed. “This

is a symbol of New York City coming back, right here, right now.”

De Blasio went on to reference the original Le Pavillon, which

opened for the World’s Fair in 1939 and continued as a bastion—

for a while, New York’s only bastion—of classic French cooking

until 1972, acknowledging Boulud’s homage to the original,

but saluting the chef’s determination to reinvent. It managed, he

thought, to encapsulate the spirit of New York: “Amazing history that

we honor, but a place where we always create something new.”

Recalling the event, Boulud sounds a little uncomfortable

with what he calls “the hoopla of celebration,” but he

appreciates de Blasio’s central point. “If I am known

for anything, it is the modern interpretation of classics.”

One dish on the menu at Le Pavillon is a case in point.

“I asked Jacques Pépin [the veteran French chef, writer, and

TV presenter, who worked at the original Le Pavillon in the

late 1950s] what he remembered from the menu, and he

said that the most celebrated dish was poulet au champagne.

SEA BLISS

Halibut, Martha’s Vineyard shiitake,

consommé, cabbage, and barley

from Le Pavillon.

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GOURMET SCENE

“The classic French version is poached chicken with a sauce made

with cream and champagne, but Le Pavillon changed it to rotisserie

chicken served with its jus and a champagne sabayon. We have

brought back the rotisserie, but now the champagne sauce is foamed

in a siphon, taking out the egg yolks and making it much lighter.”

It is, however, one of only a handful of meat dishes on Le

Pavillon’s extensive menu. Seafood and vegetables share the

limelight, and Boulud is happy to see diners “having a seafood

dish each, and ordering vegetables to share.” Grilled avocado,

for instance, is served with bulgur wheat, kale, harissa, and

Boulud’s sophisticated, fines herbes take on green goddess

sauce. “In classic French bistro cooking,” he says, “vegetables

are often just a garnish, a sprig of watercress or corn salad,

perhaps. At Le Pavillon, we let them take center stage.”

And Cornelius Vanderbilt, the founding father of Grand Central,

is honored with an oyster, redressing the balance, as Boulud—

slightly tongue-in-cheek—says, with fellow magnate John D.

Rockefeller. The version at Le Pavillon is filled with oyster chowder

and shredded seaweed, topped with a hazelnut gratin, and

Boulud expects them to be a permanent fixture on his menu.

THE OPENING OF LE PAVILLON marks what Boulud hopes is “the end

of the rollercoaster,” a hugely traumatic year-and-a-bit for New

York’s hospitality business. Thinking back to the start of lockdown

in March last year, Boulud recalls his feelings at the time. “It is

one thing to lose the opportunity to be with your customers, but

quite another to lose your staff. That was even more devastating.

“So many of our staff had been with us for decades

— they had shown great loyalty, and we always took

care of them. Suddenly, we couldn’t.” A payroll of

800 employees was reduced to single figures overnight.

Boulud did what he could, paying many staff for weeks

afterwards, until they could claim benefits. “Some of them were

particularly hard hit, some lost family members to the virus.

“We put three staff members on the company’s board. Together

with our HR director and our director of operations, they allocated

funds to the neediest. Thanks to the generosity of friends and

customers, and some Zoom classes I did for corporate clients,

we managed to raise $750,000. And we made sure that staff

didn’t lose their health insurance, which was really important.”

The second phase was launched in cooperation with Marc

Holliday and SL Green: As well as One Vanderbilt, the realty

company owns a dozen or so other properties in Manhattan and

it is the landlord for many of the city’s restaurants. The Food1st

initiative brought back many staff into kitchens to cook meals both

for first responders and for vulnerable populations throughout the

city. Boulud tips his toque to SL Green: “Not many landlords, in

that situation, would say, ‘I’ll pay you to cook meals for the city.’ ”

Boulud reopened his downtown prep kitchen and, in

partnership with World Central Kitchen and Citymeals on

Wheels, they started cooking and distributing food to those most

in need. By August this year, they had served 627,000 meals.

He also made the decision, when rules were relaxed, to

open a sidewalk restaurant at Daniel, his Upper East Side

flagship. “We had to close Café Boulud when the owners of the

hotel we were in went bankrupt, so we brought in tables and

chairs from there and tried to recreate a kind of fantasy South

of France garden. We had never done it before, but it went

very well.” As winter approached, he had bungalows built,

complete with foam insulation, music systems, and heaters.

“Inside, when we could open for limited numbers, we called

Hermès, who very kindly gave us wallpapers and fabrics, and

we screened each table with trees and flowers. Thankfully, we

don’t need the dozen or so 11-foot panels we used anymore,

so we have cut them down to 9.5 foot and sent them to the

studios of some young American artists. We will sell them to

benefit Citymeals on Wheels. I hope I can afford to buy one!”

Daniel closed for eight weeks in summer for refurbishments

originally slated for 2019. Meanwhile, Boulud is looking for a

new Café Boulud site and planning the reopening of Boulud

Sud, at Lincoln Center, and db Bistro Moderne in Midtown.

He is optimistic for the future. “I look out from Le Pavillon to

42nd Street, and the open-topped tourist buses that run every

45 minutes are packed, which is a great sign. And I’m looking

forward to taking my son to basketball games again: He loves it.”

The Knicks? “And the Nets too,” he says, quickly. Boulud is far

too canny an operator to alienate the Brooklyn basketball fans.

In August, he managed to escape to France for a few days

with his family; passing through Paris, he and his wife Katherine

went for dinner at Michel and Sébastien Bras’s new restaurant

La Halle aux Grains. Bras père is revered as one of the founding

fathers of modern French cooking, and his Laguiole restaurant

in the southern French countryside is one of the country’s most

famous: “I love Michel, I have known him for many years.”

THE RESTAURANT IS on the third floor of the newly renovated

Bourse de Commerce, owned by François Pinault, who—as well

as owning many luxury brands and thousands of contemporary

artworks, many on display at the Bourse’s gallery—is the owner

of Château Latour, and a loyal customer of Boulud’s in New York.

The price of the Latour was too rich even for Boulud’s

blood. “But I knew I had to order Latour, because of

François. So I ordered its second wine, Forts de Latour,

which was delicious and very reasonably priced.

“It is a beautiful restaurant. The interior is very modern,

industrial-chic, designed by the Bouroullec brothers, but

when we had dinner, my wife was facing inwards and I

was looking out of the window, at the corner of the Saint-

Eustache church, and the canopy of Au Pied de Cochon.”

Au Pied de Cochon is a legendary Parisian brasserie that, until

the pandemic, had not closed its doors since 1947. Once again, it

is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. “I looked at the neon

sign, and I thought, ‘Well, if we’re still hungry after this, we could

always go over the road for a pig’s trotter!’” Daniel Boulud may

be famous for embracing the present and looking to the future,

but he still likes to keep one eye on the past. lepavillonnyc.com

ALL ABOUT ALFRESCO

A garden table at Le Pavillon,

the New York icon that Daniel

Boulud has reimagined.

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“Vegetables are often just a garnish.

At Le Pavillon, we let them take center stage.”

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TASTING NOTES

There’s more than meets the eye in calvados, the

apple-based brandy from the northwest corner

of France with a new generation of custodians.

// By Jim Clarke

FRANCK PRIGNET/LE FIGARO MAGAZINE/LAIF

SPIRIT OF

NORMANDY

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DAVID MORGANTI

ON TAP

Jean-Luc Fossey, cellar

master at Père Magloire;

facing page: Inside the

Roger Groult distillery.

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TASTING NOTES

PITY THE FRENCHMAN with no vineyards in his

département—unless he has apples instead. That’s

the fate of Normandy, the region memorialized by

Impressionists where the cliffs and beaches give way to

gentle hills that are green and damp but rarely hot, so

growing wine grapes has never really been an option.

And so was born calvados, the third and sometimes

forgotten brandy of France, which, unlike cognac or

armagnac, is made from apples, and tastes like it.

“A mix of terroir, weather, and a lot of apple varieties—

around 300,” are what make Calvados special, according

to Jean-Roger Groult of Roger Groult (calvados-groult.

com), the fifth-generation producer in Saint-Cyr-du-

Ronceray, who says his ancestor Pierre started distillation

between 1850 and 1860. “He used to produce for

[the] family and sell to neighbors,” before demand

increased and he won his first gold medal in 1893.

Even today, those 300 pomme varieties, sharp

and all but inedible, wouldn’t befit a tarte tatin. “They

are very different than eating apples and do not

grow in many places,” says 42-year-old Guillaume

Drouin at Christian Drouin (calvados-drouin.com) in

Pont-l’Évêque, a village best known for its delicious

square-shaped cheese. Drouin, whose half-timbered

estate is open for visits, grows 20 of those varieties,

divided into four categories: tart, bitter, bittersweet,

and sweet. Every calvados is a blend of these

types, made into a cider, then distilled and aged.

FRANCK PRIGNET/LE FIGARO MAGAZINE/LAIF

DAVID MORGANTI

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FRANCK PRIGNET/LE FIGARO MAGAZINE/LAIF (2)

From the smallest orchards, like Michel Huard’s

(calvadoshuard.com) 37-acre parcel, where cows roam

beneath the trees’ high-trained branches amid a tableau

of decaying moss- and ivy-covered granite castles and

farmhouses, to the largest, Boulard (calvados-boulard.

com), these purveyors look positively petite when

compared to their outsized cognac counterparts. And yet,

many of them use the same terms as that grape-based

brandy on their labels: Fine, VSOP, and XO, for example.

“We try to make blends the same every year,” says

Drouin. “The work on vintages is different. Each year

shows a unique personality which evolves with time

spent in [the] cask.” That diversity is reflected in the

glass: Younger calvados, such as the Boulard VSOP, is

redolent of fresh ripe apples with a hint of vanilla, while

a more mature blend such as Groult’s Age d’Or is richer

and more complex, with spice and caramel notes. Older

vintages keep that complexity but grow more delicate

and elegant, sometimes showing surprising aromas like

green olive and brown butter, as in Drouin’s 1939 bottling.

These expressions of the apple are regulated, as

are production areas, of which the best known and

most revered is Calvados Pays d’Auge, between Caen

and Rouen, where, according to Drouin, the resulting

elixir is “rounder and milder, rich and long,” notably

because it’s double-distilled. Pays d’Auge is also home

to an avant-garde collective who have banded together

to create Esprit Calvados (esprit-calvados.com), an

association of five family-owned estates. “We started

in 2008 from the will of some producers with the

same ‘DNA,’ to show that there is a young generation

APPLE HIGH

The new generation of calvados makers

is led by the likes of Richard Prével of

Boulard, left, which has the largest

orchards in the region.

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BENOIT DECOUT / REA / LAIF

TASTING NOTES

CORE FAMILY

Sister-and-brother

team Anne-Pamy and

the late Jerome Dupont

were at the heart of the

calvados renaissance.

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interested in calvados production and pursuing the

tradition and bringing some fresh and open ideas at the

same time,” explained Jerome Dupont to me a few years

ago. As head of the stately Domaine Dupont (calvadosdupont.com),

he did so much to push the new modern

image of calvados before his untimely death in 2018.

The aforementioned Groult, Dupont, and Drouin

are all members of Esprit Calvados, as is Le Père Jules

(calvados-leperejules.com), which is based in Saint-

Désir and which bottles 10, 20, and even 40-yearold

blends in its atmospheric cellars, and Pierre Huet

(calvados-huet.com), which still has a 1935 vintage

calvados for sale at its highly regarded domaine on the

Route du Cidre in the charmed village of Cambremer.

While Pays d’Auge, closest to Normandy’s historic

beaches, gets much of the attention, there is another

region, Calvados Domfrontais, which adds to the stylistic

diversity. Drouin calls these single-distilled brandies

“more straightforward, more acidic, vibrant, and lively,”

a character brought out further by the inclusion of

pears—at least 30%. Two exemplars of this appellation

are producers Lauriston (calvados-lauriston.com) and

Père Magloire (calvados-pere-magloire.com) whose

fruity and more subtle calvados work well as aperitifs

or in cocktails. Regardless of where they are cultivated,

“the apple aromas create the flavorful typicity of

calvados compared to other brown spirits,” Dupont once

said. “And this is one of the main reasons why calvados

lovers are so faithful.” Leave it to a Frenchman to

inject a bit of romance into the intoxicating equation.

WHERE TO STAY

Deauville has been a resort town for Parisians for

decades; its Hotel Normandy Barrière (hotelsbarriere.

com) is a classic, near the beach with a casino

attached. For a quieter time, head outside of town to

Les Manoirs de Tourgéville (lesmanoirstourgeville.

com), set among the area’s golf courses and stud

farms, or to Les Manoirs des Portes de Deauville

(portesdedeauville.com), where the nine cottages

are surrounded by six acres of blissful calm. In

historic Honfleur, Hôtel Saint-Delis (hotel-saintdelis.fr)

offers nine chic rooms and some remarkable

restaurants in easy reach. But to really get into the

heart of Calvados, head to Château de la Pommeraye

(chateaudelapommeraye.com), set in the countryside

inside a renovated 12th-century castle.

WHERE TO EAT

Normandy is known for its dairy; try the Michelinstarred

Le Pavé d’Auge (pavedauge.com) in Beuvronen-Auge

for some classic cream- and cheese-centered

dishes. Inside the casino in Deauville, Le Ciro’s

Barrière (casinosbarriere.com) makes the most of the

seaside location with a great seafood menu as well as

a superb list of calvados for afterward, or for a more

modern take on local, seasonal ingredients, try Caen’s

A Contre Sens (acontresenscaen.fr).

A TASTE OF THE PAST, TODAY

The popularity of the “third” French

brandy may be increasing but it remains

true to its traditions.

CLAES LOFGREN / WINEPICTURES.COM

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INSIDE LOOK

A KIND

OF MAGIC

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An immersive art experience like no other, the new

Superblue in Miami further cements the city’s leading

role in the contemporary art world.

© TEAMLAB, COURTESY OF PACE GALLERY

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INSIDE LOOK

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ANDREA MORA

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INSIDE LOOK

TRULY IMMERSIVE

As stunning cultural experiences go, it’s hard to top Superblue, the new art space in

Miami that has quickly become a local, and global, sensation. It’s the brainchild of

Marc Glimcher, president and CEO of Pace Gallery, and former Pace London president

Mollie Dent-Brocklehurst. While the new venture is separate from Pace—one of the

world’s leading private galleries, with locations in New York, London, Hong Kong,

Seoul, and several other cities—the concept is much the same: A platform for artists

to express their visions. The primary difference here is scale. Superblue is housed in

a renovated warehouse a few blocks west of Wynwood that measures 50,000 square

foot (the White House in Washington, D.C., for comparison, is about 55,000 square

foot). Ceilings stretch to 30-foot high, and it’s easy to feel lost in the artists’ creations—

which is precisely the point. The opening show features installations by just two artists

and a collective, and the gallery’s directors foresee an ever-evolving program that

involves not only large-scale projects, but also ones that involve all five senses and are

interactive. Economically, Superblue differs from Pace as well: Superblue funds artists

to create the works and then pays royalties based on ticket sales. Plans are in place for

additional Superblue sites across the U.S. and the world, but for now this first location

has slotted into Miami’s flourishing art scene exceptionally well: Art aficionados looking

to decompress from the immersive experience can simply cross the street and wander

around the Rubell Museum, one of the largest private collections of contemporary art

in America. It’s a compelling proposition—and, perhaps, a model for what’s to come in

cities around the world. superblue.com

PAGE 74-75

A visitor explores “Massless

Clouds Between Sculpture

and Life,” a 2020 work by

teamLab in the “Every Wall

is a Door” exhibition at

Superblue Miami, 2021.

PAGE 76-77

Es Devlin’s “Forest of Us,”

2021.

FACING PAGE

Artist Devlin takes a photo

of herself in her installation

“Forest of Us.”

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ES DEVLIN

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ANDREA MORA

INSIDE LOOK

THIS PAGE

Es Devlin is reflected multiple

times in her installation “Forest

of Us,” 2021.

FACING PAGE

Visitors explore “Meadow,” 2017,

a work by DRIFT.

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ORIOL TARRIDAS

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THE LAST WORD

WILLIAM CHASE

The farming entrepreneur on how he enjoys some rare downtime

TRAVEL

Sun worshipper or thrill-seeker?

I want to get more into sailing,

so I have to go and physically

take a break. I quite enjoy skiing

too, because it’s good to go and

do something rather than just let

the day pass by. So, I’d say I’m

probably more of a thrill-seeker.

I’d like to buy an Oyster yacht

and sail around the Med—and

in couple of years travel a lot

further. I’m into sailing because it

is a challenge.

ACCOMMODATION

Grandes dames, luxe design, or

eminently private? If I’m going

to stay somewhere briefly, I

really look for boutique hotels.

My favorite at the moment is

in Palma, Mallorca, called Can

Bordoy. It’s not ostentatious, it’s

very understated and privately

owned—and the food ... it’s all

about the food. They’re really into

healthy, healthy lifestyles.

ARTS

Still life or live performance? I love

museums, and that whole collecting

culture from wherever you are. On my

travels, I would say I’ve enjoyed more

things in places like Turkey and more

remote places. My first experience

in Turkey was going through these

different-era Roman sites, and they

weren’t protected at all—they just

asked you to stand back from the

mosaics. Tel Aviv is a beautiful

place—it’s phenomenal how much

culture there is there.

TRANSPORT

Fast lane or cruise control? I’ve got

a lot of old Land Rovers and steam

engines, but I’d love a Lamborghini

Miura—the first supercar ever made.

It’s not the actual car but the magic all

around it. I love very old Ferraris, but I

don’t like the new ones.

FUTURE PLANS

Expansion plans or build on what you

have? I love building a brand. After

crisps (Tyrrells) and spirits (Chase Gin

& Vodka), my new project, Willy’s

ACV is about live food, probiotics, and

fermenting. We’re trying to educate

people on the benefits of healthy live

food and a healthy diet. willysacv.com

FOOD

Top names or hidden gems?

Everybody’s now looking for

those hidden gems. And they

want some of the fun, something

that’s very typical, and very

honest. Everybody wants home

ferments and homemade,

healthy food. And I think the

best place to go is obviously in

all these traditional places where

they’ve been doing the same for

years and years.

ARCHITECTURE

Classical or modern? I’m a

classical fan—I like old stone.

I like character and the magic

in buildings. Once something’s

had years and years of oldstone

character and charm,

you can’t lose that. We’ve got

a 16th-century house I live in

in Herefordshire. And when we

developed that—it hadn’t been

touched for many years—we

wanted to preserve that feel.

JULIAN RENTZSCH

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Tiger’s Eye

Anchored • Rooted

Balanced • Determined

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