PWN093021

essexmediagroup

The #1 Selling Real

Estate Brokerage in

Peabody*

NEW LISTING! NEW PRICE

FOR SALE

FOR SALE SOLD

READING

$369,000

LYNNFIELD

$874,900

ROWLEY

$1,235,000

WEST PEABODY

$899,900

LYNNFIELD

*MLS PIN 1/1/18 - 12/31/2018

Louise

Bova-Touchette

617-605-0555

Evelyn Rockas

617-256-8500

Rossetti/Poti Team

781-718-4662

PEABODY

Joyce Cucchiara

978-808-1597

Gale Rawding

617-784-9995

WEEKLY NEWS

WOBURN, MA

PERMIT #168

PAID

U.S. POSTAGE

ECRWSSEDDM

PRSRT STD

SEPTEMBER 30, 2021 • VOL. 60, NO. 39

SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1957

16 PAGES • ONE DOLLAR

Olio scores partial win with Council

By Katelyn Sahagian

Hours extended for event venue on Main Street

PEABODY — It was

the tale of two businesses

Thursday night at the

Peabody City Council

meeting: One group received

near-immediate acceptance

for all it set out to do, while

the other applicants faced

nearly two hours of debate

and deliberation from councilors

before some of their

special-permit requests were

approved.

Two Washington St., the

Bell Inn & Tavern project

proposed by developer Ed

Greeley and Farm Group

Realty, sailed through its

special-permit approval with

compliments from councilors;

only minor concerns

were cited about handicap

accessibility and parking.

On the other hand, Olio,

the event space owned

by Sarah Narcus and her

mother, Ellen Basch, had

to fight to simplify hours, a

requested condition of their

special permit that was primarily

aimed at condensing

the time spent cleaning up

the venue with the time they

can pack up the event.

“Every day, all day, my

mom and I think about this

downtown; all the work

we do is on behalf of this

downtown’s improvement,”

Narcus said during the special-permit

hearing, which

was continued from a previous

council meeting.

Ultimately, after two hours

of debate, Olio’s owners

PHOTO | KATELYN SAHAGIAN

Sarah Narcus, center left, and her mother, Ellen Basch, center right, explain the chart

they made describing Olio’s current hours to Councilor-at-Large Anne Manning-

Martin, left, and Ward 5 Councilor Joel Saslaw, right.

only received approval for a

portion of the special-permit

changes that they were

seeking.

The City Council voted

unanimously to give Olio an

extra 30 minutes of operating

time on Thursday nights and

to make Sunday morning operating

hours start at 8 a.m.

The owners also received an

extra hour in the morning for

deliveries on Sunday and the

ability to load and unload

event materials until midnight

on Thursdays. They

also received the ability to

use the back doors of Olio

for special entrances for

brides, grooms, and guests

of honor.

The atmosphere at the City

Council meeting was calmer

and more conversational

than two weeks ago — when

the special-permit hearing

began — as the councilors

discussed the different roads

forward for Olio’s special

permit.

“I appreciate business and

everything you’ve done,”

said Councilor-at-Large Tom

Rossignoll. “We all want a

thriving downtown, but the

question is how do we get

there?”

In the meeting two weeks

ago, Narcus had nearly

ten people stand up and

support her business, including

Mayor Edward A.

Bettencourt Jr. and Ward 4

Councilor candidate Julie

Daigle. Other businesses

that operate in the downtown

area spoke about how

proud they felt seeing people

dressed for fancy events

OLIO, PAGE 2

Council on

Aging

addresses

address

By alena KuzuB

The Council on Aging (COA) is asking

the city to change its legal address to separate

the agency from Peabody Housing

Authority (PHA) and Seeglitz Senior

Housing, which representatives say will

put an end to wrong address deliveries and

missed rides for elders.

Carolyn A. Wynn, executive director of

the COA, and Ann Marie Burns, executive

director of PHA, wrote letters to Mayor

Edward A. Bettencourt Jr. and members of

the City Council in early September to request

the address change.

The COA is located at Peter A. Torigian

Senior Center, which was built in 1991 on

the PHA land. The legal address for PHA

offices and building is 75-81 Central St.

and the PHA has a ground lease for the

Senior Center with the city.

For more than 20 years since the construction

of the Senior Center, its address

was listed as 79 Central St., clearly distinguishing

it from the PHA building at 75

Central St. Several years ago, when the

Senior Center requested a permit for a new

sign for the entrance, they were told that

they could not list their address as

COUNCIL, PAGE 3

The #1 Selling Real

Estate Brokerage in

Peabody*

DANVERS SQUARE

COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL

DANVERS

$1,100,000

Wanted!

Ranch with garage

1st floor main bedroom

Any condition!

5 Unit Mixed-Use FOR SALE

Call Sandy

Medical Office Condo

LYNN

$799,000

LYNNFIELD

$859,900

BEVERLY

$139,900

*MLS PIN 1/1/18 - 12/31/2018

Steve Macdonald

508-982-5005

Annie L. Belmer

857-559-3977

Joyce Cucchiara

978-808-1597

Sandy Moroney

978-210-7386

Denise Moynihan

781-872-1200


2

COURTESY PHOTO | NEWHALL FARM

Newhall Fields Community Farms and Bridgewell are partnering together for a Day of Giving on

Tuesday, Oct. 5 at the farm from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Volunteers will harvest the farm’s fall crops and

learn about the important services the two organizations provide to the local community.

By Anne MArie ToBin

Before

Dig in and get your hands

dirty at Day of Giving

Get your car looking

great this Fall

After

Don Winslow’s

AUTO B O D Y

Celebrating 49 Years

MON-FRI 8-5 • SAT. 9-12

166 Holten Street • Danvers

(corner of Center & Collins)

978-762-6366 • 978-535-2474

www.DonWinslowAutoBody.com

Bridgwell and Newhall Fields

Community Farms are partnering

together for a "Day of Giving" on

Tuesday, Oct. 5.

The theme of the event is

"Give back. Give time. Give a

gift." A team of approximately 40

Bridgewell staff members, volunteers,

and clients, along with about

a dozen farm volunteers, will be

on hand to help to not only spread

their organizations' missions, but

to dig and get their hands dirty,

helping to harvest some of the

many varieties of organic produce

grown on the farm.

The event will run from 10

a.m. to 1 p.m. at Tillie's Farm, located

at 189 Lynn St. in Peabody.

The rain date is Oct. 7.

"We are really excited to host

this event, as we know the more

we work with local organizations,

the better we get to know the

people in our communities," said

Newhall Outreach Coordinator

Emily Cooper. "Having the opportunity

to work with people of

all abilities is a truly wholesome

experience, not only for the individuals,

but to further the work

we do every day on this property

to give people the healthy, organic

foods they deserve but may not

have access to."

Bridgewell's Chief Development

Officer Erik Langhoff said

this is the second time his organization

has participated in a similar

event; the last one was held in the

spring of 2019 at Citizens Inn.

"It's our first year partnering

with Newhall and we are excited

about being able to have an outdoor

event that will allow people

who may have different comfort

levels with COVID," he said. "We

had intended (for) it to become

an annual event and honestly,

we feel that the fall is the perfect

time to do this, as there is a good

amount of work to be done in the

fall. We'll have people from substance-abuse

and autism programs

so we will have people of varying

ability levels who will be able to

help with the harvest."

Bridgewell provides a unique

range of social and human services,

which empower people

with life challenges to live safe,

self-directed and productive lives.

Bridgewell's programs include

community housing, outpatient

treatment, recovery services, education,

and employment training.

Newhall strengthens the

community by creating access

to healthy, local food through

sustainable agriculture, volunteer-powered

farming, and outdoor

education.

Cooper said there are plenty of

added benefits when people come

together at events like this.

"Working together, side by

side in the community gives us

chances to pick up conversations

and dialogue that you can build on

for the future," she said. "I know

we have a pretty big Bridgewell

invitation list and we hope to

have plenty of volunteers from the

farm, so this will be a great event

for all involved to learn about what

Bridgewell and Newfall Fields

do and spread awareness about

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

our two organizations, and also

to help pitch in and help us with

our harvesting. We are excited to

welcome Bridgewell staff and clients,

as well as local partners and

community members, to tend and

harvest food and also care for the

land."

Langhoff said he hopes the

event will shine a spotlight on Newhall

Fields.

"Everybody knows Tillie's but

not everybody knows about the

great work Newhall Fields is doing,"

he said. "So it's good for the

farm, and we get the added benefit

of helping a service project that

really is therapeutic for our clients.

We hope to participate with

Newhall in the future on a more

regular basis. Things like this

are an important aspect of giving

back, especially when it comes to

recovery,"

Several sponsorship opportunities

are still available, with four

sponsorship levels ranging from

$500-$5,000. In-kind sponsorship

opportunities are also available.

To sign up as a sponsor, go

to Bridgewell's website at www.

bridgewell.org and fill in the sponsorship

forms. Checks should be

made payable to Bridgewell and

mailed, along with the form to

Bridgewell, ℅ Development &

Marketing Department, 10 Dearborn

Road, Peabody MA 01960.

Those unable to volunteer are

asked to consider donating blood

at Bridgewell's American Red

Cross Blood Drive from 10 a.m.

to 3 p.m. on Oct. 5. Langhoff said

that time slots are still available. To

register, go to www.Bridgweell.

org/Dayofgiving.

To learn more about the Day

of Giving, contact Bridgewell

Institutional Giving Manager

Brian Gosselin at bjgosselin@

bridgewell.org or 339-883-2112,

or Langhoff at elanghoff@

bridgewell.org or 339-883-2163.

Partial win for Olio

at Council meeting

OLIO

From page 1

walking around.

Only one household, the

McGinns, spoke in opposition

to Olio’s proposal.

Half a dozen people from

the neighborhood behind Olio

spoke against the extended

hours that Narcus had proposed

two weeks ago, saying that the

late hours were disrupting their

sleep and that they couldn’t believe

that events could go until

11 p.m. on weeknights.

Prior to the hearing, Narcus

had removed many of the requests

that abutters had raised

concerns about, such as extending

her operating hours on

Mondays through Thursdays.

Only one person, Matt Molk,

who operates Peabody Access

TV and recently ran for councilor

of Ward 5, spoke in favor

of Olio’s requests.

“You were so quick to deny

her the conversation,” said

Molk. “The optics of this is

that there is a group of good ol’

boys looking out for their own

instead of the better interests of

the city.”

Molk added that he didn’t

feel the noise could be too horrible.

In his closing remarks, he

said that treatment of Narcus

and Olio would lead to other

businesses hesitating when

looking at Peabody as a potential

location.

“You can all trade ghost

stories about how you turned

downtown Peabody into a ghost

town,” Molk said.

Despite the tension, Narcus

said that she is still happy that

she was able to participate in

the public hearing and is currently

planning her next move.

“We didn’t get what we asked

for in terms of permit changes,

and we didn’t get what we

needed to be in line with other

downtown businesses,” Narcus

wrote in a statement the day after

the meeting. “That said, we are

grateful to have had the chance

to be heard in a public setting.

We continue to believe in the

vision of a vibrant and bustling

downtown. We’ll regroup now

to consider our next steps.”

Old South Burial Ground

to undergo restoration

By SAM MinTon

The city's Community Preservation

Committee has voted

unanimously (8-0) to approve

funding the Peabody Historical

Society's application to restore

the Old South Burial Ground off

of Boston Street.

The project is slated to cost

$22,680 and will be done by Epoch

Preservation, a preservation

company licensed by Massachusetts

to perform historic restoration

work.

Mayor Edward A. Bettencourt

Jr. believes that preserving

the area's history is a job that

shouldn't be taken lightly.

"Projects like this are extremely

important to help preserve

our city's history and to

honor the memory of those who

have passed," he said. "I am

extremely grateful for the hard

work of the Peabody Historical

Commission who have made the

preservation of our city's cemeteries

a top priority."

The project includes the

restoration of 49 gravestones,

which will include cleaning, excavation,

resetting, joining pieces,

adding mortar, and infilling,

where appropriate. The gravestones

designated for restoration

are the ones that have the most

immediate need for repairs.

According to Epoch, interments

at the Old South Cemetery

began in the early 1600s and

lasted through the late 1800s.

Also, according to oral history,

it is believed that some grave

markers have been removed or

moved in the cemetery.

The cemetery has some famous

inhabitants, including

transcendentalist poet, Christian

mystic, and local eccentric Jones

Very, who died in 1880, as well

as four Minutemen killed in the

Battle of Lexington and Concord.

For former Mayor Michael

J. Bonfanti, who aided the Peabody

Historical Society in this

preservation project, it comes

down to respecting those who

have passed and also preserving

the history of the city.

"We have a lot of them (cemeteries)

that are in disrepair,

so the Society. along with the

Peabody Historical Commission,

has been taking a look at

the cemeteries and trying to get

new signage and fix them up and

maintain them," Bonfanti said.

The project is estimated to

start this fall and will look to be

completed by this winter.


SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

America’s

Oldest

Founded 1818

203 years in 2021

ANDREW

MARSHALL

SUNDAY, OCT. 10

2PM & 7PM

GRANDSTAND

FrEe

CoNcErTs

WiTh FaIr

AdMiSsIoN

Friday October 1 _ Monday October 11, 2021

Council on Aging

addresses address

COUNCIL

From page 1

79 Central St. and that it had to

be 75R Central St.

The current legal address of

the Senior Center creates confusion

for its clients, for mail and

package delivery, and for transportation

providers, according

to COA representatives.

“Most disturbing is that participants

from our Adult Day

Health program that utilize

the RIDE program have been

dropped off at 75 Central St.,”

said Wynn in a letter to the city.

On one occasion, a senior

from Malden who attended a

Thursday morning dance and

was ready to go home at 11:30

a.m., was not picked up until

4:00 p.m. The RIDE sent three

separate cars that all waited at

the PHA at 75 Central St. and

left reporting to the dispatch

center that the person was a

“no show.” An employee of the

COA had to wait outside of the

PHA and direct the fourth car to

the Senior Center.

“If they were from our

Peabody area, our transportation

service, Mobility, would

have brought them home. We

wouldn’t let him sit around for

so long,” said Wynn.

“It really illustrates the situation,

and I can understand

the confusion,” Wynn added.

“Many people trying to get

here, if they google it, often end

up on the other side over at the

Housing Authority.”

The City of Peabody has its

own transportation service,

Correction

Project Mobility, that provides

door-to-door transportation for

seniors over 60 years old and

people with disabilities. But

clients from outside of Peabody

and the four surrounding towns

have to use taxis, Uber or the

RIDE service, Wynn said.

The last Census has shown

that more than 36 percent of

Peabody’s population are over

60 years old, said Wynn. On

any given day, 300 to 400

people visit the Senior Center,

attending classes and activities,

the Adult Day Health program,

or the lunch program. Another

few hundred get transported

to appointments outside of the

Senior Center.

The Senior Center also receives

mail that should be delivered

to PHA and vice versa

on a daily basis. Wynn said that

several staff members spend a

lot of time sorting through mail

and tracking deliveries that

were sent to the wrong address.

Packages for the Senior Center,

including food items for the nutrition

program, are left over the

weekend at the PHA door or in

the lobby of the senior housing

wing. Posting signs has not

remedied the situation, Burns

wrote.

“We are also very specific

with 911 dispatchers when we

need to call, saying that we are

calling from the senior center

behind 75 Central St.,” Wynn

wrote.

Wynn is hoping that the

matter will be resolved at the

next City Council meeting,

which is scheduled for Oct. 14.

Due to an editor’s error, a story entitled “Distinguished Service

Award presented to Light Commissioner Orphanos” did not refer to Mr.

Orphanos by his proper title. He is the city’s light manager. The Weekly

News regrets the error.

We want to hear

from you!

Send us a letter at

editor@weeklynews.net.

Letters should be

no more than

300 words.

COLIN JAMIESON

MONDAY, OCT. 11

12PM & 5PM

GRANDSTAND

CultureHouse Peabody reflects

on month-long pop-up space

BY ALLYSHA DUNNIGAN

Community-building nonprofit

CultureHouse has recently

released an impact report analyzing

the successes and challenges,

community engagement and economic

revitalization of its monthlong,

pop-up event space in the

city.

The report reflects on the successes

and challenges faced by

city planners, business owners,

and community organizations as

they used the pop-up space to improve

their downtown main streets

and revitalize the community.

Events at the pop-up Culture-

House space would change daily

and would often contract with

local businesses, including restaurants,

to put on community artsand-culture

events.

The report contains observations

on how the popup connected

with the town's downtown streetscape,

transportation network,

public spaces, demographics, and

social infrastructure, all while providing

context to the origins of the

project as well as its impact on the

community.

The impact report also showed

that 95 percent of visitors stayed

at events for longer than one hour,

favorable opinions of the area increased

from 17 percent to 77 percent

after visiting the popup, and

48 percent of visitors heard about

the popup through an event or program

the space was hosting.

In addition to data-driven insights,

the report discusses successes,

including that it provided

a hub for businesses and entrepreneurs

to gather and collaborate,

supported local artists, and empowered

teens to utilize the space.

It also includes the challenges

the space overcame, saying it

reached a wider audience, created

a multilingual-accessible space,

and attracted visitors to less popular

programs.

Aaron Greiner, director at CultureHouse,

said it’s important to

share these insights in a report that

continues the momentum of this

project.

“Over the five short weeks we

were open to the public, we observed

how the space was used,

opened minds to new ways of

using storefronts to foster community

engagement, and gained

valuable insight into potential opportunities

to revitalize downtown

main streets in Peabody," Greiner

said. “And while we hope that our

findings analyzed in this report

will build on current successes in

the city of Peabody, there are also

insights in this report that could

Looking for a house?

help other towns in Massachusetts

and beyond become livelier and

more vibrant.”

Some of the recommendations

from the impact report are already

being implemented by businesses

that neighbored the pop-up space.

Create & Escape, a DIY creative

workshops studio, has implemented

some of the street-level

activations such as sidewalk signage.

They also added new community-oriented

programs to their

calendar, including open mic

nights and meet-the-artist events

to attract residents to the location,

inspired by the community engagement

they witnessed across

the street from the popup.

CultureHouse will be meeting

with members of the city's advisory

group, the City of Peabody,

Peabody Main Streets, and local

businesses to share the details of

the impact report and additional

suggestions for increasing economic

vitality in the downtown

Main Street area. CultureHouse

said they hope the impact report

will inspire local leaders to take

meaningful steps to establish a

healthy, vibrant, and lively city

through relevant and engaging

community services.

To read the report, visit http://

culturehouse.cc/peabody

Check the real estate section!


4

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

Police Log

MONDAY 9/20

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 12:17 p.m. Monday

at Dunkin’ Donuts at 3 Central

St.; at 7:31 p.m. Monday at

26 Margin St. and 2 Kirkland

Road.

A report of a hit-and-run

motor vehicle crash at 1:45

p.m. Monday at Duddy’s

Liquors at 134 Newbury St.; at

5:09 p.m. Monday at Oliveira’s

Steak House on Washington

Street

20

Fire

A car fire was reported at Exit

63 on Route 128 south at 8:01

p.m. Monday. Police reported

the car fire was in Lynnfield.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at

8:33 p.m. Monday at 145 Main

St. The person was taken to

Salem Hospital.

Theft

A report of a larceny at

6:27 p.m. Monday at 12

Crowninshield St. A caller reported

money had been taken

from her wallet. The incident

PEABODY

WEEKLY NEWS

(USPS #66)

Telephone: (978) 532-5880 • Fax: (978) 532-4250

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903

News and Advertising Offices: 110 Munroe St., Lynn, MA 01901

Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

www.weeklynews.net

Editor: Sophie Yarin syarin@essexmediagroup.com

Reporter: Anne Marie Tobin atobin@essexmediagroup.com

Sports Editor: Mike Alongi malongi@essexmediagroup.com

Advertising Reps: Ralph Mitchell rmitchell@essexmediagroup.com

Patricia Whalen pwhalen@essexmediagroup.com

Ernie Carpenter ecarpenter@essexmediagroup.com

Local Subscription Rate: $20 per year (52 issues) • Single Copy: $1.00

Deadlines: News: Monday, noon; Display Ads: Monday, noon;

Classified Ads: Monday, noon;

No cancellations accepted after deadline.

The Peabody Weekly News is published 52 times per year on Thursday by Essex

Media Group, Inc. No issue is printed during the week of Christmas. The Peabody

Weekly News is delivered via US Mail to homes in Peabody. It is also available

in several locations throughout Peabody. The Peabody Weekly News will not be

responsible for typographical or other errors in advertisements, but will reprint that

part of an advertisement in which a typographical error occurs if notified immediately.

Advertisers must notify the Peabody Weekly News of any errors in advertisements

on the FIRST day of insertion. The publisher reserves the right to reject,

omit or edit any copy offered for publication.

PEABODY WEEKL Y

N E WS

MAIL TO PEABODY WEEKLY NEWS, P.O. BOX 5, LYNN, MA 01903

CHECKS AND MONEY ORDERS ALSO ACCEPTED.

MAKE PAYABLE TO: ESSEX MEDIA GROUP, INC.

occurred at Salem Hospital;

the caller was advised to contact

Salem Police.

TUESDAY 9/21

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 9 a.m. Tuesday at

115 Lowell St.; at 2:01 p.m.

Tuesday at Petco at 10 Sylvan

St.; at 3:06 p.m. Tuesday at

Peabody Shell at 85 Lynnfield

St.

A motor vehicle crash was

reported at 8:42 a.m. Tuesday

at 35 Lynn St. A vehicle into a

house was reported. One of the

drivers was taken to the hospital

and later died.

Complaints

A report of a neighborhood

dispute at 12:55 p.m. Tuesday

at 261 Newbury St. A caller reported

a neighbor was egging

her house.

A report of vandalism at 4:35

p.m. Tuesday at 3 Stark Circle.

Vandalism

Vandalism was reported

at 4:43 p.m. Tuesday at 183

Lynnfield St. Past damage to

the lawn was reported.

WEDNESDAY 9/22

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash involving a person on a

bicycle at 5:35 p.m. Wednesday

at 194 Washington St. and 2

Blaney Ave. Guilherme Jose

Ferreira, 26, of 42 Summit

Ave., Winthrop, was issued a

summons for unlicensed operation

of a motor vehicle.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle

breaking and entering at 8:05

a.m. Wednesday at 165B

Lynnfield St. A caller reported

her lock cylinder was removed

from her car.

Complaints

A report of unemployment

fraud at 4:36 p.m. Wednesday

at 6 Mandalay Drive.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at

12:56 p.m. Wednesday at 6

Crowninshield St.

THURSDAY 9/23

Arrests

Costica Serban, 49, of 217

E Third Ave., Apt. 14, Redfield,

S.D., was arrested and charged

with unlicensed operation of

a motor vehicle and marked

lanes violation at 6:58 p.m.

Thursday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 6:18 a.m. Thursday at

72 Newbury St.; at 8:55 a.m.

Thursday on Route 128 North.

A caller reported a juvenile

bicyclist was struck by a motor

vehicle at 6:30 p.m. Thursday

at 39 Central St. The juvenile

was taken to Salem Hospital

for an evaluation. There was

no damage to the bike.

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 9:21 p.m. Thursday

at Route 128 south and 312

Lowell St.; at 8:41 a.m. Friday

at 163 Washington St. and 124

Foster St.; at 11:39 a.m. Friday

at Tesla at 210T Andover St.

Complaints

A report of solicitors at 5:29

p.m. Thursday at Marano’s

Trattoria at 637 Lowell St. A

manager reported a person

was playing the violin and

soliciting money outside the

storefront. Police reported

this was an ongoing issue; the

person was asked to leave and

advised of the city ordinance. A

15-year-old juvenile was issued

a summons for trespassing.

Theft

A report of a stolen motor

vehicle at 2:09 p.m. Thursday

on Wallis Street.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 1:36

p.m. Thursday at Mill Street

Municipal Lot at 1 Mill St. A

caller reported the driver’s side

window of their vehicle was

broken.

FRIDAY 9/24

Arrests

Tyler Logan, 29, homeless,

was arrested on a warrant

and charged with carrying a

prohibited weapon, carrying a

dangerous weapon, and disturbing

the peace at 11:06 a.m.

Friday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 3:06 p.m. Friday at

108 Lowell St.; at 3:23 p.m.

Friday on Route 128 south.

A report of a motor vehicle

crash with injury at 8:25 a.m.

Friday at 156 Goodale St. and

629 Lowell St. A truck rollover

was reported. One of the

drivers in the two-car crash

was taken to Salem Hospital.

The other driver was issued a

written warning for a red-light

violation.

At 7:59 p.m. Friday, a caller

reported a car struck a deer at

134 Lake St.

Complaints

A report of a disturbance at

2:24 p.m. Friday on Lynnfield

Street. A caller reported three

juveniles were throwing items

at vehicles.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle

breaking and entering at 12:57

p.m. Friday at 22 Paleologos

St. A caller reported her wallet

was stolen from her vehicle.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 8:52

a.m. Friday at Burlington at 310

Andover St. Loss Prevention

reported a past theft by an

employee.

SATURDAY 9/25

Arrests

Jarrid Reese, 33, of 90

Aborn St., Apt. 4, was arrested

on a warrant at 12:33 p.m.

Saturday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 3:47 p.m. Saturday

at Summer Street and 20 Park

St.; at 6:55 p.m. Saturday at

The Container Store at 210C

Andover St.; at 7:33 p.m.

Saturday at Route 128 south

and 312 Lowell St.; at 7:40

p.m. Saturday at 17 Andover

St.

A report of a hit-and-run

motor vehicle crash at 7:48

p.m. Saturday at Champions’

Pub at 114 Foster St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle

breaking and entering at 7:28

p.m. Saturday at 30 Nickerson

Road. A caller reported the

break occurred overnight. An

officer reported $600 worth

of tools were taken from the

vehicle.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at

12:29 p.m. Saturday at Italian

American Citizens’ Club at 7

Blaney Ave. A 64-year-old unresponsive

man was taken to

Salem Hospital.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 10:55

a.m. Saturday at 204 Lynn St.

A caller reported a backpack

was stolen from a vehicle. An

officer reported the backpack

contained $2,000 in cash.

SUNDAY 9/26

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 1:08 p.m. Sunday at

2 King St. and 136 Lowell St.;

at 4:53 p.m. Sunday at 350

Lowell St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of an attempted

burglary at 5:55 p.m. Sunday

at 6 Maryvale Lane. A caller reported

noticing their front door

was damaged after returning

home from a trip.

Complaints

A report of suspicious activity

at 6:32 a.m. Sunday at

36 Sabino Farm Road. A caller

reported someone was going

into cars. An officer reported

no access was gained.

At 12:27 p.m. Sunday, a

caller reported a man in a

brown shirt was defecating at

Dunkin’ Donuts at 3 Central St.

Police checked the area and

could not locate the man.

MONDAY 9/27

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle

crash at 7:43 a.m. Monday at

Holy Cow Ice Cream Cafe at 86

Andover St.


SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

Monday Crafternoons

at Peabody

Institute Library

For the Weekly NeWs

Each Monday afternoon,

school aged children are invited

to complete a fun craft in the

main library’s courtyard. Guided

crafts will be provided to all

who register in advance, but participants

are welcome to use our

free craft materials to create their

own individual masterpiece, too.

Stop by anytime between 3:00

and 4:30 p.m. to join us!

This event is open to all

school aged children. In case

Obituary

Kenneth M. Hopkins, 92

1929 - 2021

PEABODY - Peabody – Kenneth

M. Hopkins 92, beloved husband

of Barbara (DeCosta) Hopkins

died Saturday, September 25,

2021 at home surrounded by his

loving family.

An honorably discharged veteran,

he served his country during

World War II, the Korean Conflict

and the Vietnam War as a Tech

Sergeant Security Police with the

United States Air Force.

Following over twenty years of

loyal service to the U.S. Government,

Mr. Hopkins had been employed

as an office manager for

Roadway Express until the time of

his retirement.

A resident of Peabody for

almost fifty-four years, Mr.

Hopkins was a member

of the Disabled American

Veterans Chapter 100 and

the V.F.W. Chapter 1011

both of Peabody. He was

a faithful parishioner of St.

Adelaide’s Church in Peabody.

In addition to his wife with whom

he shared seventy-two years of

marriage, he is survived by his devoted

children, Susan Mazzola and

husband, Ronald of Peabody, Donna

Hopkins Bourque and companion,

Ronald O’Rourke of Danvers,

Kenneth D. Hopkins and wife, Donna

of Peabody, and Karen Powers

and husband, Christopher of Boxford,

eight grandchildren, Melanie

Erickson, John Bourque and his

wife, Jina, Allani and Lyndsay Mazzola,

Ashton Hopkins, Kristin Kennedy

and fiancé, Adam DeBaggis,

Samuel and Kenneth Powers,

three great granddaughters, Makenzie

and Charlotte Erickson, Julia

Bourque and was eagerly awaiting

the birth of his newest great granddaughter

next month; a

brother, Rodney Hopkins

and wife, Josephine of

Stoneham and many nieces

and nephews. He was

also the brother of the late

Anna, Arlene and Marilyn.

Service Information: His funeral

Mass will be celebrated

at St. Adelaide’s Church, 708

Lowell St., Peabody, today, September

30, 2021 at 10:00 a.m.

Burial in Cedar Grove Cemetery,

Peabody. Arrangements by the

Conway Cahill-Brodeur Funeral

Home, 82 Lynn St., Peabody. In

lieu of flowers, contribution may

be made in his memory to Honor

Flight New England, PO Box

16287 Hooksett, NH 03106 or

www.honorflightnewengland.

org. For online guestbook

please visit www.ccbfuneral.

com.

of inclement weather, this event

may be canceled or postponed.

This program is free and open to

the public, but space and materials

are limited and registration is

required. To reserve your child’s

spot or to learn more about this

event, please visit our online

calendar at peabodylibrary.org/

calendar.

FOR FURTHER

INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Allison Bridgewater

Senior Children’s Librarian

978-531-0100 x35

abridgewater@noblenet.org

Looking for past issues?

Find them on weeklynews.net

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 5

5th annual Sip and Shop fundraiser

coming to the Black Box theater

For the Weekly NeWs

The 5th Annual Autism

Awareness Sip and Shop fundraiser

will be held on Thursday,

Oct. 14 from 6-9 p.m. at Peabody’s

Black Box Theater, 22

Foster St.

The event was originally

scheduled to be held last spring,

but was pushed back due to the

pandemic.

“We decided to move this to

October as we were hoping that

most people would be vaccinated

by that time and willing to go

out and shop,” said Black Box

Event Manager Lisa Geczi. “In

theory, this should have been the

6th annual event but we missed

our 5th annual event due to the

pandemic. I didn’t want to skip

the fifth one, so we will be offering

a virtual shopping event

sometime in the future.”

One hundred percent of the

proceeds of this event will be

donated to the Northeast Arc

Autism Support Center (ASC).

The event is being organized

by Sugar Me Sweets Events of

Danvers and ASC. There is no

charge for general admission.

VIP admission is $5, which allows

early access at 5:30 p.m.

DJ Scott Sica will be on

hand to provide the music with

special uplighting displayed for

the occasion. The concession

stand will have a cash bar and

snacks will be available for purchase.

Several local artisans and

vendors will be on hand. Raffle

tickets will be available to win

prizes donated by supporters of

the Black Box and ASC. Several

ASC representatives will be on

hand to share information about

Northeast Arc and ASC.

To learn more about the

event, visit the Black Box’s website

at www.ne-arc..org/blackbox-events.org/

or Sugar Me

Sweet Events’s website at www.

sugarmesweetevents.com

Inn to Opportunity campaign

to launch in October

For the Weekly NeWs

Citizens Inn is hosting a “Citizens

Inn To Opportunity” campaign

launch/open house on Saturday,

Oct. 16 from 2-5 p.m. at

Haven From Hunger, 71 Wallis

St., Peabody. The event features

a behind-the-scenes tour of the

newly renovated Haven from

Black American Literature

lectures will come to PIL

For the Weekly NeWs

The Peabody Institute Library

is pleased to announce the return

of Professor Theo Theoharis for a

four-week class and discussion series

on Black American literature

and poetry. The lectures will take

place on Wednesdays at 11 a.m.,

starting on October 13, and will

Last Historical Society program

of the year will be in-person!

For the Weekly NeWs

Hunger facility. Participants will

have the opportunity to learn

about food insecurity and homelessness

that is facing the community

and how Citizens Inn can

partner with the community to

transform those challenges “Inn

to” Opportunity.

All guests will be required to

wear masks during the indoor

On Wednesday, October 13th

at 1pm, we are delighted that local

historian Alan Pierce will present

“The Jewish History of Peabody.”

The event will be held at the

Smith Barn, 38 Felton Street, Peabody,

MA. Seating will be socially

distanced. We ask everyone to

wear a mask for the safety of all.

Event is handicap accessible.

Members free | Non-members

$5.00

You can register in advance

using Eventbrite, but it is not re-

tours. There will be an outdoor

reception with live music and

refreshments. The deadline to

register is Oct. 8. Please go to

https://bit.ly/3z5uDQ to reserve

a time for a 15-minute tour. For

questions or additional information

contact Rachel Leibowitz at

978-735-1585 or rleibowitz@

citizensinn.org.

be in the Sutton Room. Patrons

should be advised that masks are

required indoors in Peabody. The

lecture series has been a favorite in

the past and we’re excited to bring

it back!

Advance registration is required

– patrons can sign up for

one class or the whole series

here: https://peabodylibrary.assabetinteractive.com/calendar/

black-american-literature-series-with-theo-theoharis-5/

The class will be discussing

Giovanni’s Room by James

Baldwin, as well as poems from

The Penguin Anthology of 20th

Century American Poetry, which

are available for checkout at the

Public Services Desk at the Main

Library.

quired and any payment is separate.

We will accept cash at the

door. However, if you would like

to pay via PayPal, please use this

link: https://www.paypal.com/

webapps/hermes?token=6AK-

15702MC935925C&useraction=commit.


6

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

Religious News

All Saints Episcopal Church

of the North Shore

Good morning and thank you!

All Saints Episcopal Church of

the North Shore in Danvers has

in-person worship, as well as

Zoom opportunities on Sunday

mornings and throughout the

week. Our webpage is https://

allsaintsepiscopalnorthshore.

org/, and we are also on Facebook,

Twitter and Instagram.

In-person Worship

Join us for our modified service

of the Holy Eucharist at

8:30 Sunday mornings, with

COVID-19 safety protocols in

place. Advanced registration is

required (call the church at 978-

774-1150).

Outreach

Join us on the third Sunday

of each month as we prepare 40-

50 bagged lunches for the food

insecure in Peabody. Contact the

church office (978-774-1150) if

you would like to donate food or

help prepare the lunches.

We also have the following

Zoom services and fellowship

opportunities:

Worship on Sundays at 10

a.m.

https://zoom.us/j/134596872

Meeting ID: 134 596 872

Phone: 929-205-6099

Coffee hour on Tuesdays at

10 a.m.

https://zoom.us/j/201985541

Meeting ID: 201 985 541

Phone: + 1 929 205 6099

Frank Time Discussion on

the second Wednesdays of each

month at 5:15 pm

https://us02web.zoom.

us/j/85499949543

Meeting ID: 854 9994 9543

Phone: +1 929 205 6099

Morning Prayer on Fridays at

8:30 a.m.

h t t p s : / / z o o m .

us/j/96760775904

Meeting ID: 967 6077 5904

Phone: +1 929 205 6099 US

Perfect Paws Pet Ministry,

the third Sunday of each month

at 5 p.m

https://zoom.us/

j/990855545?pwd=YVN4bzFhOEpLZkY3Y1dxQkt2OTJMdz09

Meeting ID: 990 855 545

Password: Saintfranc

Parish office: Call 978-774-

1150 or email allstoffice@

gmail.com

Peace,

Michelle Behling, Parish Administrator

Carmelite Chapel

Carmelite Chapel in the

Northshore Mall

Holy Mass:

Monday through Friday:

Noon and 3 p.m.

Saturday: Noon, 4 and 5:30

p.m.

Sunday: Noon

Confession:

Monday through Friday

11-11:45 a.m. and 2-2:45

p.m.

Saturday

11-11:45 a.m. and 2:45-3:45

p.m.

Gift Shop

Open Monday through Saturday:

11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Phone: 978-531-8340

Congregation Tifereth Israel

The next Congregation

Tifereth Israel Shabbat service

is scheduled for Friday, October

15, at 7:30 PM. It will be held

both in person at our synagogue

at 8 Pierpont Street, Peabody,

and also on Zoom. The Zoom

link is sent to all members several

days prior to the service. To

be added to the email list, please

leave a voice mail message at

978-531-8135, or email info@

ctipeabody.org.

Congregation Tifereth Israel

8 Pierpont Street

Peabody, MA 01960

Tel. 978.531.8135

web: www.ctipeabody.org

North Shore Baptist Church

706 Lowell St., W. Peabody

Sharing God’s Truth for

Life’s Transitions

Small Group Worship & Bible

Study (in-person) - 10:30

a.m. Sundays. For info, prayer or

help, contact us at 978-535-6186

or office@northshorebaptistchurch.org.

St. Clare of Assisi

(non-Roman)

Our Parish family welcomes

everyone. We are not here to

condemn, criticize, or judge

you. Rather, we want to offer

our love, our support, and our

prayers for you. Your presence is

an important part of our celebration

of the Mass and when you

are not here, you are missed!

The Rev. Fr. Mike Otero-Otero,

O.S.F.

978-804-2250

www.stclarepeabody.org

Holy Mass: Saturdays at 3

p.m.

St. Clare Mission (feeding

the hungry)

Saturdays at 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Mission Outreach Services

(Homelessness Outreach)

Call Jill at 267-481-5725.

Al-Anon Meetings

Find us at:

https://alanonma.org/.

St. John Lutheran Church

Worship: 9:30 a.m., Sunday,

in-person and on Zoom

Bible Study: 11 a.m.

22 Ellsworth Road, Peabody

Website: https://stjohnpeabody.org

Church phone: 978-531-1731

Pastor: The Rev. Charles N.

Stevenson

Email: stjohnpastor@earthlink.net

For the Zoom link, please

email the pastor.

Temple Ner Tamid

Service Times

Sunday to Thursday: 7 p.m.

Friday: 8 p.m.

Saturday: 9:30 a.m.

Holidays as published.

Join Us Online.

Services and all other programs

are being held virtually

using Zoom, Facebook and

YouTube

Rabbi Richard Perlman

Associate Rabbi Bernie

Horowitz

Visit our website

www.templenertamid.org

Contact office

978-532-1293

office@templenertamid.org

368 Lowell St.

Peabody, Mass.

Temple Tiferet Shalom

Services and all other programs

are being held virtually

via Zoom and StreamSpot.

Services Friday evenings at

7:30 p.m. and Saturday mornings

at 9:30 a.m.

Rabbi David Kudan

Music Director Bryna Toder

Tabasky

Prayer Leader Gary Gillette

489 Lowell St.

Peabody, Mass

978-535-2100

www.templetiferetshalom.

org

Seniors


SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

Daigle to host

front yard get-together

For the Weekly NeWs

Ward 4 City Council candidate

Julie Daigle will be holding

a “Front Yard Get Together” on

Saturday, Oct. 2 from 12-2 p.m.

at the Amico home, 7 James St.,

Peabody. The cost is $10 per

person for adults. There is no

charge for children. Hot dogs,

PACC free event:

Destination Creation

For the Weekly NeWs

Destination Creation has announced

it will be offering a

complimentary six-week course

to help businesses reach new customers

through product differentiation

as well as digital means.

The course is designed to help

independent businesses and communities

stand out and increase

customer traffic from both local

consumers and consumers from

miles away. The course ($800

value) is being offered through

the Peabody Chamber of Commerce

and Peabody Main Streets.

Upon completion of the course,

businesses are eligible to receive

a $2,500 grant to implement an

Peabody residents

to participate in

Jimmy Fund Walk

For the Weekly NeWs

Seven residents from Peabody

will choose their own routes on

October 3 for the Boston Marathon®

Jimmy Fund Walk: Your

Way presented by Hyundai. Participants

are encouraged to “Walk

Your Way” from wherever they

are most comfortable—whether

that be from their neighborhood,

favorite trail, or from a treadmill

in their own home.

Gianna Anzalone, Lindsay

Huntoon, Janis Marshall, Emily

Marshall, Mandi McLaughlin,

Christine O’Brien, and Martha

Theriault, along with thousands

of other walkers, will participate

in virtual programming during

the Walk that aims to recreate

the most inspiring elements of

Walk day. While the event will

not physically bring walkers together

along the famed Boston

Marathon course, it will unite the

community to raise funds to support

all forms of adult and pediatric

care and cancer research at

the nation’s premier cancer center,

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

The event has raised more than

pizza, snacks and Treadwell’s

Ice Cream will be served. Proceeds

will be donated to the

Mass General Hospital Cancer

Center in honor of Breast Cancer

Awareness Month. Participants

will have the opportunity

to pick up “Dear Friends” cards

and sign up to help on Election

Day, Nov. 2.

idea to create a new website and

improve their online presence,

add e-commerce capabilities or

enhance social media channels.

The course is first-come, firstserved

and is limited to the first

30 participants. For more information,

go to www.peabodychamber.com.

Classes begin on

Monday, Oct. 4 and run through

Nov. 8 from 6-8 p.m. via Zoom.

The class will be led by Deanne

Healey, the only certified Destination

Creation instructor in

Massachusetts, and Jon Schallert.

Schallert has interviewed more

than 10,000 independent business

owners in nearly 600 cities

to develop his proprietary “Destination

Business” program.

$150 million for Dana-Farber

Cancer Institute in its 30+ year

history.

This year’s event will have a

lower fundraising requirement,

$100 for adults and $25 for those

under 18, with a $5 registration

fee. All registered walkers will

receive a bib and medal and the

first 5,000 to register will receive

a Jimmy Fund Walk T-shirt.

Funds raised from the Jimmy

Fund Walk support all forms of

adult and pediatric patient care

and cancer research at the nation’s

premier cancer center, Dana-Farber

Cancer Institute. The

Boston Athletic Association has

supported the Jimmy Fund Walk

since 1989, and Hyundai has

been the presenting sponsor since

2002.

To register to walk (#Jimmy-

FundWalk) or to support a walker

visit www.JimmyFundWalk.org

or call (866) 531-9255. All Jimmy

Fund Walk participants are

encouraged to utilize the Charity

Miles App to help with training

and fundraising, engage with Dana-Farber

patient stories and podcasts,

and much more!

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 7

TIPS FOR SURVIVORS OF A PANDEMIC: MANAGING STRESS

A pandemic is an epidemic of disease that often spreads quickly across far-reaching areas affecting

many people. Few pandemics have affected as may communities around the world as the coronavirus

disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Pandemics and other disasters involve physical danger and also stress that can overwhelm survivors’

usual coping strategies, both during and after the disaster. After a pandemic or other disaster, people

often notice changes in how they feel, think, and act, and they may not realize that these changes are

reactions to the disaster.

Survivors may be at higher risk of intense reactions if they live in communities where many people

got sick; they had the disease themselves, or they had health, mental health or substance abuse

conditions before and during the pandemic. Pandemics, unlike other types of disasters to not have a

clear beginning and ending, sometimes leading to increased uncertainty and distress. This tip sheet

describes common reactions after pandemics and other disasters and suggest ways to cope. It also

covers financial stress and signs of the urgent need for mental health assistance and lists sources of

help and support.

COMMON REACTONS TO DISASTERS

Survivors often notice changes in their thinking, feeling, and behavior during and after a disaster, as

well as physical signs and symptoms.

Changes related to thinking may include nightmares, confusion, trouble making decisions, trouble

concentrating, difficulty with remembering things and inability to listen to others.

Changes in feelings may include increased or overwhelming fear, anxiety, depression, irritability and

anger, hopelessness, or guilt. Survivors may also experience a sense of disconnection, or not caring

about things, as well as inability to feel joy or sadness.

Changes in behavior may include having an exaggerated startle response trouble sleeping, or more

arguments with others. Survivors may also notice that they are eating too much or too little, crying

more often, having angry outbursts, or spending more time alone. Their substance use may increase.

Physical signs and symptoms may include headaches, stomachaches, or diarrhea; loss of appetite;

sweating or having chills; remorse (shaking) or muscle twitches; higher or lower energy than usual;

or being unable to relax.

TIPS TO MANAGE DISTRESS AFTER A PANDEMIC

Coping skills and strategies can help you deal with the distress that is common among disaster

survivors. Modeling these strategies can also help your family through phases of disaster recovery.

Make and use Your connections. Build close relationships with others, especially with those who

accept and understand your feelings, and take time to enjoy the close relationships you have.

Socializing with others can reduce stress and create a sense of support and connection. Try

volunteering, visiting family, calling a friend, or reaching out to a faith leader.

Find Purpose. After a disaster there may be time to reflect on what is important to you in life and to

make sure you’re spending the most time on things that matter most to you. Take part in activities

you find enjoyable and meaningful, or create a plan to move in that direction.

Have a Flexible Routine. Create a routine or daily schedule. Have a plan to accomplish required

tasks, and create a flexible routine to accomplish them. Routines provide a sense of control over your

life and reduce stress and uncertainty. Flexible routines allow you to accommodate unexpected events

or urgent needs that arise while also maintaining a degree of consistency.

Manage Thoughts. In challenging times, it is easy for your attention to focus more on the negative.

To News counter Intake. this tendency, Try not to remind overconsume yourself news. of transitions Doing so and has challenges been shown you to have increase successfully stress levels navigated

in the past. It may be helpful to remember coping methods that worked for you then, as they may also

and anxiety. It may be helpful to identify a few sources you trust and plan to consult regularly; stick

with those sources; and set a daily time limit for reading, watching, and listening to news.

Sense of Humor. Use humor to reduce stress. Watch a funny movie or podcast, read a good book,

or tell a funny joke to someone you know.

Physical Care. Eat healthy meals and snacks, drink plenty of water, and get enough rest. Avoid

excessive amounts of caffeine and alcohol. Model these behaviors for your family.

Exercise. Set aside time for regular exercise of other physical activity as research shows this

reduces stress and anxiety while also boosting physical health. If your schedule doesn’t allow for long

segments of activity, take a couple of 5-minute walks instead. Try to make regular physical activity a

part of your everyday routine.

Get outside. Visit a local park or other beautiful space. Find time to step outside regularly and move

around. The fresh air will decrease stress while providing a boost to physical and mental health.

Write in a Stress Journal. Take 15-20 minutes each day to reflect upon stress and write down your

thoughts and feelings. If you take time during the day to address stress, it is less likely at night to

interfere with sleep.

Celebrate Successes, and Make Time for Activities You Enjoy. Know it is okay to experience

joy in the disaster recovery process and have moments of success even after a pandemic or other

disaster. Return to doing things you enjoy with your family and spending time with friends.

When to Seek Professional Support. Reactions to disasters dissipate in time for many survivors.

However, some survivors may experience reactions that persist over time, cause them distress and get

in the way of their daily lives; especially survivors with a recent history of intense stress or health

conditions. Here are examples of more serious reactions after a disaster.









Disorientation or confusion, and difficulty communicating thoughts

Limited attention span and difficulty concentrating

Overwhelming guilt and self-doubt

Feelings of hopelessness

Frequent mood swings or continuous crying

Reluctance to leave home

Fear of crowds, strangers or being alone

Increase use of drugs, alcohol, or prescription medication

Helpful Resources:

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services

Administration (SAMHSA)

Toll free 1-877-726-4727

SAMHSA Disaster Technical Assistance Ctr.

1-800-308-3515

Seniors

Helplines:

SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline

1-800-846-8517

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

1-800-273-8255

Treatment locator

SAMHSA’s National Helpline: 1-800-662-4357.


8

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

Stephanie James comes home

PHOTOS | Jakob Menendez

Alexander Olsen, a Foxborough-native, performed on the keys at James’ show outside of the

Peabody Institute Library.

Peabody High graduate-turned-singer/songwriter Stephanie

James smiles while singing the song “You Have Your Love” off

of her debut album, “Unbreakable.”

A sign advertising Stephanie James’ social media handles sits on top of a table while she performs

outside of the Peabody Institute Library.

Stephanie James addresses the audience while belting out the

lyrics to an unreleased song titled, “Just Like Me.”

A TRADITION OF TRUST, CARING & PROFESSIONAL SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1952

Service to all faiths

Complete Pre-Need Planning

Medicaid Approved Trust &

Insurance Plans

Spacious Modern Facilities

Ample Private Parking

Handicapped Accessible

19 YALE AVE.,

WAKEFIELD, MASS.

Conveniently Located off Exit 39 (North Ave.) Rt. 128

Area Code 781

245-3550 • 334-9966

Alexander Olsen accompanies Stephanie James’ music on Monday night.


SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 9

Sports

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Peabody’s Marc Ortiz, left, had one goal and one assist in a win

over Swampscott Tuesday afternoon at Blocksidge Field.

Peabody takes

down Swampscott

in NEC battle

PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Bishop Fenwick receiver Costa Beechin caught one touchdown and rushed for another in a win

over Austin Prep Friday night at Donaldson Stadium.

Bishop Fenwick earns conference

win over Austin Prep

FOOTBALL

By Mike Alongi

PEABODY — Behind a solid

defensive effort and a balanced

attack on the offensive end,

the Bishop Fenwick football

team kept its perfect record

alive on Friday with a 28-7 win

over Catholic Central League

foe Austin Prep at Donaldson

Stadium.

“The guys are really playing

well and really coming together,”

said Fenwick coach

Dave Woods. “(The coaches)

were talking about it earlier and

we realized that we haven’t had

a bad day of practice with this

group yet. It’s great that they’re

all adapting well and listening

to the coaching and executing

the game plan out there.”

Quarterback Steven Woods

had a solid game under center,

completing 10-of-19 passes for

196 yards and two touchdowns.

Receiver Costa Beechin had

one rushing and one receiving

touchdown, while receiver

Jason Romans also added a receiving

touchdown. Running

back Troy Irizarry rushed for

one touchdown in the win.

“We were able to spread

Jason and Costa out wide, and

there aren’t a lot of teams who

can stick with both of those

guys out there all game long,”

said Woods. “It was nice to be

able to move the ball through

the air efficiently like we did.”

After struggling to a threeand-out

on its first offensive

possession, Fenwick came right

back with a few big plays near

the end of the first quarter.

After a solid punt return set up

the Crusaders inside the Austin

Prep 30, Woods dropped back

and connected with Beechin on

a 29-yard go route for a score to

make it a 7-0 game.

The Crusaders added to that

lead early in the second quarter

thanks to a pair of great plays

from Romans. Backed up in

their own territory, Woods hit

Romans on a quick screen that

Romans turned into a 45-yard

run-and-catch. On the very next

play, Woods found Romans up

the sideline for a 27-yard touchdown

to put the score at 14-0

Fenwick.

After another solid defensive

possession, Fenwick got the ball

back with less than two minutes

to go and a chance to extend the

lead further. The Crusaders did

just that, as Woods threw a pair

of quick strikes to get deep in

Austin Prep territory. After a

three-yard touchdown run from

Irizarry, Fenwick took a 21-0

lead into the halftime break.

Austin Prep was able to avoid

the shutout with a touchdown

late in the third quarter, but

when Fenwick got the ball back

to start the fourth, the Crusaders

went on a 14-play marathon

drive that ate up more than 10

minutes of game clock. After

Beechin capped the drive with

a 27-yard touchdown run, the

Crusaders coasted to the 28-7

victory.

Fenwick (3-0) hosts rival St.

Mary’s — which knocked off

previously undefeated Bishop

Feehan Friday night — next

Friday (7).

“We know we’re going to

have our hands full, they’ve

got a ton of talented athletes

and they’re obviously playing

really good football right now,”

said Woods. “It’s always great

to go up against them in a rivalry

game, and we know we’re

going to have to put in another

good week of practice to get

ready for them.”

BOYS SOCCER

By Mike Alongi

SWAMPSCOTT ― The

Peabody boys soccer team

may not have played its most

consistent game Tuesday afternoon,

but the Tanners put

together enough solid plays

to come away with a 5-2 win

over Northeastern Conference

foe Swampscott on the road at

Blocksidge Field.

“We didn’t play consistent

possession soccer like we’re capable

of, but we moved the ball

well at times,” said Peabody

coach Stan McKeen. “I thought

we missed out on a couple of really

good opportunities to score

in the first half, but it all panned

out and we were able to get the

win.”

Junior Victor Maciel led

the way for Peabody with two

goals, while senior Marc Ortiz

added one goal and one assist.

Juniors Ryan Alves and Bruno

Correia each scored one goal,

while senior Matthew Calver

had two assists and sophomore

Hugo Coutinho had one assist.

For Swampscott, junior

Andrew Freger and senior

Valerio Tatafiore each scored

one goal in the loss.

“This was a good lesson

for the guys and it gives us

things to work on when we

get back to it (Wednesday),”

said Swampscott coach Adam

Bailey. “Peabody is a strong

team and they put up a great

fight.”

The game was scoreless for

the first 10 minutes of play before

Peabody got on the scoreboard.

After taking the ball

up the right side, Calver sent

a cross into the box that was

headed into the net by Ortiz to

make it a 1-0 game.

But Swampscott answered

right back, getting a goal from

Freger to knot the score at 1-1

and even out the momentum.

The game was back-andforth

for the next several minutes

from there, but Peabody

was able to retake the lead with

about 13 minutes left in the

first half when Correia knocked

home a rebound. Then, with

less than 30 seconds to play in

the half, Maciel scored his first

of the game to give the Tanners

a 3-1 lead at the break.

Peabody then came right out

and scored early in the second

half, with Maciel finding the

back of the net for the second

time.

Swampscott was able to get

a goal back a few minutes later

when Tatafiore launched a missile

into the back of the net from

25 yards out, but Peabody offset

that momentum when Alves

scored to make it a 5-2 game

with about 14 minutes to play.

The Big Blue made a couple

of runs at the net to try and get

a little closer, but the Peabody

defense held strong and the

Tanners walked away with the

win.

Peabody (3-2-0) hosts

Danvers Friday (4).

“We just need to keep

working on the fundamentals

and focus on moving the ball

more,” said McKeen. “We’ve

got three games this week, so

we’ve got to stay focused and

hopefully come out of the week

with a winning record.”


10

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

THURSDAY

Golf

North Reading at Lynnfield (3)

Peabody at Winthrop (4)

Field Hockey

Lynnfield at Georgetown (3:45)

Austin Prep at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Volleyball

Peabody at Danvers (5:15)

Bishop Fenwick at Bishop Feehan (5:30)

FRIDAY

Football

Lynnfield at Newburyport (6:30)

Marblehead at Peabody (7)

St. Mary’s at Bishop Fenwick (7)

Boys Soccer

Danvers at Peabody (4)

Girls Soccer

Bishop Fenwick at Bishop Feehan (4)

Field Hockey

Peabody at Marblehead (4)

Volleyball

Lynnfield at Triton (5:30)

Medford at Peabody (5:30)

SATURDAY

Boys Soccer

Peabody at Lynn Classical (6)

Girls Soccer

Peabody at Danvers (5)

Field Hockey

Bishop Fenwick at Bishop Stang (3)

Volleyball

Swampscott at Bishop Fenwick (2)

MONDAY

Golf

Peabody at Masconomet (4)

Boys Soccer

Bishop Fenwick at Cardinal Spellman (3:30)

Lynnfield at Newburyport (3:45)

2 Large

Cheese Pizzas

$17.99

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULE

Pizza • Hot & Cold Subs • Dinners

• Salads • Sandwiches • Side Orders

• Pasta Dinners • Fish Dinners

• Calzones • Homemade Soups & Chowder

We deliver!

Peabody at Dracut (6)

Girls Soccer

Cardinal Spellman at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Newburyport at Lynnfield (5:45)

Field Hockey

Masconomet at Peabody (4)

Volleyball

Marblehead at Peabody (5:30)

TUESDAY

Golf

Lynnfield at Georgetown (3:30)

Salem at Peabody (4)

Boys Soccer

Peabody at Winthrop (4)

Girls Soccer

Winthrop at Peabody (6)

Field Hockey

Bishop Fenwick at St. Mary’s (3:45)

Lynnfield at Newburyport (3:45)

Volleyball

Peabody at Swampscott (5:30)

Bishop Fenwick at Cardinal Spellman (5:30)

Pentucket at Lynnfield (5:30)

Cross Country

Bishop Fenwick at Archbishop Williams (4)

WEDNESDAY

Golf

Bishop Stang at Bishop Fenwick (3)

Boys Soccer

Greater Lowell at Lynnfield (4)

Bishop Feehan at Bishop Fenwick (6:30)

Girls Soccer

Lynnfield at Marblehead (4)

Field Hockey

Peabody at Swampscott (4)

Volleyball

Salem at Peabody (5:30)

Cross Country

Marblehead at Peabody (4)

Lynnfield at Triton (4)

Peabody native

Antonelli hired as

Bishop Fenwick

baseball coach

By Mike Alongi

PEABODY — Bishop

Fenwick announced on Friday

that it has hired Peabody native

and former St. John’s Prep star

Matt Antonelli as the school’s

baseball coach.

Antonelli — who was drafted

by the San Diego Padres in 2006

out of Wake Forest University —

takes over the job from Russell

Steeves, who left as the program’s

second-winningest coach

with 102 victories.

“Bishop Fenwick High School

is excited to welcome Matt

Antonelli into the Fenwick family

as the new head baseball coach,”

Bishop Fenwick Athletic Director

Dave Woods said in a statement.

“Matt’s reputation in the baseball

community is unmatched and the

Antonelli name is synonymous

with excellence. We have such

high regard for Matt, not only as

a baseball coach, but as a person

of integrity and character. Matt

is exactly the type of person we

want influencing our student-athletes.

We are blessed and look

forward to having him lead our

baseball program and represent

our school.”

After starring in baseball,

hockey and football at St. John’s

Prep, Antonelli chose baseball

and played collegiately at Wake

Forest — becoming a first-round

draft pick of the San Diego

Padres in 2006.

He made his Major League

debut in 2008 and played eight

seasons for the Padres, Nationals,

Orioles, Yankees, and Indians.

After his playing career ended, he

coached at Wake Forest and was

the recruiting coordinator and assistant

coach at The College of

the Holy Cross.

Antonelli will take over a

Fenwick program that has earned

back-to-back Division 3 North

championships in 2019 and 2021.

PHOTO | JAKOB MENENDEZ

Bishop Fenwick’s Meredith Spooner, left, meets St. Mary’s Molly Cummings at the net during a

match at Conigliaro Gymnasium Tuesday.

Bishop Fenwick gets the best of

conference rival St. Mary’s

VOLLEYBALL

By Sam Minton

LYNN ― Tuesday’s volleyball

match between the St.

Mary’s Spartans and the Bishop

Fenwick Crusaders was a nailbiter

even though the Crusaders

swept the Spartans three sets to

none.

With Fenwick allowing the

Spartans to get back in the

game, coach Samantha Kelly

said that there is still a lot to

work on after the victory.

“Finishing the sets (with)

scores of 25-12, 25-16, to (then)

have a 27-25 third set, I told

the kids I wasn’t satisfied with

that,” said Kelly. “We have AP

Thursday. Austin Prep is a good

team so we’re just looking to

get better and do the little things

right.”

The Crusaders got off to a

roaring start, going on a 6-0

run that would cause an early

Spartans timeout. Lynnfield

went on to make a comeback

effort making the score 7-4, but

Fenwick would respond by extending

their lead to 17-6 before

forcing another timeout.

The Spartans bounced back

once again, making it 19-10,

but the Crusaders would end up

taking the first set 25-12. Lacey

Murphy got off to a fast start as

she recorded four kills and two

aces in the set.

Bishop Fenwick started the

second set just as they did the

first, they jumped out to a 6-0

lead, which caused a Lynnfield

timeout. They then extended

their lead to 9-2 before the

Spartans responded by cutting

the deficit to 13-6.

The Crusaders found their

second wind in the set as they

leaped out to a 23-13 lead,

causing another Spartans timeout.

Fenwick would eventually

take the set 25-16.

When the third set began, you

could sense a different tone.

The Spartans got out to a 3-0

lead, but from then on it was

a back-and-forth affair. Bishop

Fenwick and St. Mary’s traded

blows before the Crusaders

gained some separation with

a 12-7 lead that caused the

Spartans to take a timeout.

St. Mary’s answered the bell

after the timeout, closing the

gap to 14-11. After tying the

match at 15, the Spartans got

the lead back 19-15. From then

on, there would be four lead

changes, but Bishop Fenwick

wound up on top, winning the

third set 27-25.

Fenwick’s coach gave credit

to the Spartans for the comebacks

after the match.

“St. Mary’s definitely got a

lot better,” Kelly said. “It was

good to have that tight competition

in the third set.”

Sophomore Lacey Murphy

showed her poise with some

quality serves with the score

tied at 25 and eventually helped

lead the Crusaders to victory

with seven kills, four digs, and

four aces on the night.

After the match, Kelly said

that while she had a good game,

there was still room for improvement

in Murphy’s game.

“She’s a sophomore so she’s

learning as she goes,” the coach

said. “I think her passing we

have to work on, (but) her hits,

as we saw in the third set, were

aggressive. I just wish she hit

like that the first two sets. She’s

getting there, though.”

Fenwick (4-2) travels to

Bishop Feehan Thursday (5:30).


SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 11

Bishop Fenwick football rolls to another big win

PHOTOS | Spenser Hasak

Bishop Fenwick quarterback Steve Woods drops back to pass during a win over

Austin Prep Friday night at Donaldson Stadium.

An Austin Prep player is wrapped up by Bishop Fenwick’s Jacob Vargus, left,

and Kurtis Bruch.

Fenwick head coach Dave Woods watches on during Friday

night’s game against Austin Prep.

Bishop Fenwick defenders celebrate after Thomas Swanton, center, after he intercepted a pass.

Bishop Fenwick’s Aidan Silva kicks one of his four extra-point attempts Friday night.

Bishop Fenwick’s Jason Romans, left, and Austin Prep’s James

Holmes battle for a pass.


12

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

Peabody boys soccer takes down Swampscott

PHOTOS | Spenser Hasak

Peabody’s Kyle Lobao collects the ball near midfield during a win over

Swampscott Tuesday at Blocksidge Field.

Peabody’s Bruno Correia works the ball around Swampscott’s Lucas Bereaud.

Peabody’s Michael Balke, right, clears the ball away from

Swampscott’s Andrew Freger.

Peabody goalkeeper Paul Drilon makes a diving stop.

Peabody’s Ryan Alves, right, collects the ball near the sideline.

Peabody’s Frayluis Almonte knocks the ball away from

Swampscott’s Szymon Wabno.


SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 13

Northfields United kicks off at Higgins Field

PHOTOS | Vanessa Leroy

Juventus Academy’s girls soccer goalie attempts to block Northfields United’s scored goal

during Northfields United Kick-Off at Higgins Field.

Northfields United’s Valentina Mitchell heads toward the goal.

Northfields United’s Olivia Costa, center, prepares to kick the ball to her teammate.

Members of Northfields United’s girls soccer team do leg stretches to warm up before their

game.

Northfields United’s Valentina Mitchell faces off against her

Sphinx Soccer Academy opponent.


14

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

Classified

HOME AND BUSINESS SERVICES LEGALS LEGALS

• Residential

• Commerical

• Industrial

ALL PAVING INSTALLED BY

ROAD PAVING MACHINES TO

INSURE UNIFORM SURFACES

=FULLY INSURED=

Paul DeNisco

Mason Contractor

Brick • Block • Stone

Concrete • Tile

978-532-4066

Repairs - Big or Small

The Leonard Co.

Residential Window

& Screen Cleaning

Yard clean-ups

Gutter cleaning

Power Washing

Comp. Clean-outs

Graffiti removal

theleonardco.com

Call 617.512.7849

for a FREE estimate

or email: fondinib@aol.com

If you need it clean,

we’re on the scene...

CUSTOM PAVING

3rd Generation Paving Contractor

• Emergency Winter Maintenance

• Parking Lots • Patchwork

• Private Roads • Sealcoating

Serving the North Shore since 1981

WEST

PEABODY

(978) 535-8980

(800) 227-1652

www.CustomAsphaltPaving.com

• CARPENTRY • TILE

• PAINTING

978-314-4191

LICENSED & INSURED

amoutsoulashomeimprovementservices.com

Follow us

on Facebook

Baystate Paving

and Landscape Design

DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, PARKING LOTS, ROADWAYS

RESURFACING, REPAIRS, SEALCOATING, HARDSCAPES,

RETAINING WALLS, DRAINS, PAVER PATIOS,

ARCHITECTURAL LANDSCAPING,

DELIVERY OF LOAM, MULCH, STONE, AND AGGREGATE

Call for free estimates:

978-826-5363

Does your company

need employees?

Placing a help wanted ad is great for

finding the skilled workers you need.

781-593-7700, ext.2

Legal Notice

There will be a Tree Removal Hearing on Friday October 8, 2021 @ 9:00am at the

Recreation, Parks & Forestry Department office located at 50 Farm Avenue,

Peabody, MA, for the removal of a Public Shade Tree(s) at the following

location(s).

Address: 11 Putnam Street

Peabody, MA 01960

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, September 20, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin

Auditorium, City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of

Chris LeDuc c/o Joe Foreman for a Variance from the Provision of the Zoning

Ordinance 2019, as amended, Section 7.2, as it applies to the premise known

as 9 Ravenwood Rd., Peabody, MA, Map 100, Lot 077. Petitioner seeks a

variance to build a deck and requires relief to Left Side Yard where 20' is required

and 16' is proposed. The property is located in a R1 Zoning District. The

application and plan are available to the public and can be viewed by contacting

Carla McGrath at carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792 in advance

and prior to the Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is posted on the

City of Peabody website.

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m. at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of Angelo

Perrina c/o Attorney John Keilty for a Variance from the Provision of the Zoning

Ordinance 2019, as amended, Section 7.2 and Section 9, as it applies to the

premise known as 3 Bourbon St., Peabody, MA, Map 036, Lot 021. Petitioner

seeks a variance to construct an addition and outdoor dining area to Toscana

Restaurant and requires relief to Side Yard where 40' is required and 35' is

proposed; Parking where 118 spaces are required and 71 spaces are proposed.

The property is located in a BR Zoning District. The application and plan are

available to the public and can be viewed by contacting Carla McGrath at

carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792 in advance and prior to the

Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is posted on the City of Peabody

website.

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of Nelson

Pacheco for a Variance from the Provision of the Zoning Ordinance 2019, as

amended, Section 7.2, as it applies to the premise known as 145 Russell St.,

Peabody, MA, Map 004, Lot 073. Petitioner seeks a variance to construct a

farmer's porch and requires relief to Front Yard Setback where 25' is required and

21.8' is proposed. The property is located in an R1 Zoning District. The

application and plan are available to the public and can be viewed by contacting

Carla McGrath at carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792 in advance

and prior to the Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is posted on the

City of Peabody website.

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of Richard and

Teresa Read c/o Penney Construction for a Variance from the Provision of the

Zoning Ordinance 2019, as amended, Section 7.2, as it applies to the premise

known as 6 Ethel Rd., Peabody, MA, Map 084, Lot 110. Petitioner seeks a

variance to build a deck and requires relief to Right Side Yard Setbacks where

10' is required and 6.2' is proposed. The property is located in a R2 Zoning

District. The application and plan are available to the public and can be viewed

by contacting Carla McGrath at carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792

in advance and prior to the Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is

posted on the City of Peabody website.

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

As per the petition of (Alan Bratt)

Per Order of Brian Grant, Tree Warden

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of 437 Essex

St. Inc. c/o Attorney Patrick Burke for a Variance from the Provision of the

Zoning Ordinance 2019, as amended, Section 7.2, as it applies to the premise

known as 15 Oak Ave., Peabody, MA, Map 114, Lot 048. Petitioner seeks a

variance to build a deck and requires relief to Right Side Yard where 20' is

required and 10.5' is proposed; Rear Yard where 35' is required and 23.5' is

proposed. The property is located in a R1 Zoning District. The application and

plan are available to the public and can be viewed by contacting Carla McGrath at

carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792 in advance and prior to the

Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is posted on the City of Peabody

website.

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of Gervazlo and

Telma Dell'Orto c/o Leandro Foresto for a Variance from the Provision of the

Zoning Ordinance 2019, as amended, Section 7.2, as it applies to the premise

known as 30 Tremont St., Peabody, MA, Map 075, Lot 112. Petitioner seeks a

variance to build an addition and requires relief to Left Side Yard where 15' is

required and 3.1' is proposed; Rear Yard where 35' is required and 26.9' is

proposed; Lot Coverage where 30% is allowed and 31.9% is proposed. The

property is located in a R1A Zoning District. The application and plan are

available to the public and can be viewed by contacting Carla McGrath at

carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792 in advance and prior to the

Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is posted on the City of Peabody

website.

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, September 20, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin

Auditorium, City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of

Margaret Shambarger c/o Mark Mancinelli for a Variance from the Provision of

the Zoning Ordinance 2019, as amended, Section 7.2, as it applies to the

premise known as 4 Hillside Ave., Peabody, MA, Map 120, Lot 86A. Petitioner

seeks a variance to build a deck and requires relief to Right Side Yard where 15'

is required and 9.2' is proposed. The property is located in a R1A Zoning District.

The application and plan are available to the public and can be viewed by

contacting Carla McGrath at carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792 in

advance and prior to the Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is posted

on the City of Peabody website.

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of Kevin Baez

and Ramona Ciampa for a Variance from the Provision of the Zoning Ordinance

2019, as amended, Section 7.2 and 7.1.5, as it applies to the premise known as

14 Dublin Rd., Peabody, MA, Map 033, Lot 025. Petitioner seeks a variance to

build an accessory structure and an addition and requires relief to Accessory

Structure Right Side Yard where 10' is required and 5' is proposed; Accessory

Structure where 500 sf is permitted, and 864 sf is proposed; Addition Rear Yard

Setback where 35' is required and 28.9' is proposed. The property is located in a

R1 Zoning District. The application and plan are available to the public and can

be viewed by contacting Carla McGrath at carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or

978-538-5792 in advance and prior to the Public Hearing. The agenda for this

meeting is posted on the City of Peabody website.

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

to subscribe today.

t y $4.50 a week.

e


SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 15

Bridgewell assists those turning 22

PHOTO | SHUTTERSTOCK

For the Weekly NeWs

At Bridgewell, our team delivers

on our mission to inspire

hope and empower people experiencing

life challenges to

achieve their fullest potential.

One critical area of need for

individuals with intellectual

and developmental disabilities

is building independent living

skills as they graduate, upon

turning 22 years old, from residential

educational environments.

Bridgewell recently

launched a pilot program in partnership

with the Department of

Development Services (DDS)

designed to serve as a “bridge”

model, helping individuals turning

22 transition from highly-supervised

environments, with

24/7 direct support, to living

more independently in the community

with fewer needed supports.

“There is a huge gap in

support for individuals in this

age group, and the need for

skill-building among these individuals

as they mature is

massive,” said Andrea Ward,

Bridgewell’s residential director

of individual supports.

Based in Wakefield, the program

provides participants with

support on structuring an independent

routine based on needs

determined during a living skills

assessment process. Bridgewell

staff help participants create

individual development goals

and build independent living

skills, such as meal planning and

preparation, financial skills such

as budgeting and paying bills,

laundry, navigating the community,

taking care of their health,

and coping strategies. Job skills

training is also a key component

of the program.

In addition to direct support

from Bridgewell staff, program

participants also benefit from

cutting-edge technology, including

smart home technology and

a care.coach digital platform,

which provides a new channel

of communication and care delivery

in the home. The digital

platform offers capabilities ranging

from telemedicine to a 24/7

engaging avatar companion, all

of which can be customized to

meet a wide range of needs.

“Most young adults have the

desire to live independently in

their own space after they’ve

finished school. I am excited to

be part of this new Bridgewell

service, supporting these young

adults as they learn the skills to

move into adulthood and live independently

in their own space

– whatever that may be for each

of them,” said Jennifer Dinan,

Bridgewell’s residential manager,

who also oversees day-today

operations of the program.

The program is intended for

participants to be enrolled for

24-48 months with staff support,

but then to “graduate”

and be prepared to safely transition

into the community, gain

steady employment, and live

as independently as possible.

This is a new service for DDS

and Bridgewell, with no other

programs like it available in the

North Shore area. Based on the

learnings of this pilot program,

we hope to grow and expand this

individual support programming

into other communities we serve

in Metro North.

LYNNFIELD

35 CARTER RD

$690,000

B: Michael Touchette

S: Tina M Arista

7 LOWELL ST

$1,400,000

B: Catherine E Murphy & Thomas B

Murphy

S: Gail B Marcus & Peter C Marcus

317 SALEM ST

$4,290,632

B: SCF RC Funding 4 LLC

S: Double 9 Property I LLC

11 WILLIAMS RD

$825,000

B: Joseph M Keating & Marcia

Quezada-Keating

S: Thomas Murphy & Catherine E

Murphy

PEABODY

119 CENTRAL ST

$700,000

B: Jose Cruz & Gloria M Grullon

S: Jason Nolan

38 COLUMBIA BLVD

Real Estate Transfers

$535,000

B: Tami White

S: Douglas S Degennaro & Stephanie

E Degennaro

9 GEORGE AVE

$625,000

B: Derek West & Jessica G West

S: Joyce Newman & Arthur White

4904 HEATHERWOOD LN U:4904

$520,000

B: Isabelle C Vargas & Victor J Vazquez

S: Janet G Ryan & Mark Ryan

22 LYNN ST

$635,000

B: Kevin Shrestha

S: Kathleen Marcinelli & Michael

Marcinelli

61-R LYNN ST

$322,500

B: Elias A Dossantos

S: Richard Brennan

31 MAY ST

$515,000

B: Louis Biondo & Athena C Biondo

S: Christopher Pramas & Anna

Dalamangas

22 N CENTRAL ST U:6

$377,000

B: Mai-Linh Dao

S: Amy L Mark & Yuk C Mark

1 PINEWOOD RD

$587,000

B: Anthony J Lafratta & Rebecca L

Lodato

S: James B Manning

7 SHAMROCK ST

$700,000

B: Glender L Olivacce & Migel Olivacce

S: Isabel Espinola & Manuel S

Espinola

3 WILL SAWYER ST

$560,000

B: John Yannone & Robyn Yannone

S: Mark R Gauthier Tr, Tr for 3 Will

Sawyer St NT

Legal Notice

There will be a Tree Removal Hearing on Friday October 8, 2021 @ 9:30am at

he Recreation, Parks & Forestry Department office located at 50 Farm Avenue,

eabody, MA, for the removal of a Public Shade Tree(s) at the following

ocation(s).

ddress: 16 Reynolds Road

Peabody, MA 01960

eekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Selling a house?

Buying a house?

As per the petition of (Mike Soper)

Per Order of Brian Grant, Tree Warden

Find out what properties

recently sold in your area.

Check out

the Real Estate page

in Saturday’s paper.

City of Peabody

Conservation Commission

LEGAL NOTICE

Pursuant to Mass General Laws, Chapter 131, Section 40, Massachusetts

Wetlands Protection Act and Chapter 32 of the Code of the City of Peabody,

Wetlands and Rivers Protection Regulations, the Peabody Conservation

Commission will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday October 13, 2021 at 7

p.m. on a Notice of Intent submitted by Weston & Sampson (Alexandra Gaspar)

for Salem Country Club c/o Peter Fischl. The proposed work is the altering

wetlands (2,841 SF of BVW and 1,848 IVW) and replication of wetlands

(approximately 5,368) located near the 6th green/7th tee. Other site work I

proposed. The property is known as 133 Forest Street, Map 70, Lot 003, Peabody

MA.

Public Participation will be via Virtual Means Only - Pursuant to Governor Baker's

March 12, 2020 Order Suspending Certain Provisions of the Open Meeting Law,

G.L. c. 30A, §18, and the Governor's March 15, 2020 Order imposing strict

limitation on the number of people that may gather in one place, as extended on

June 15, 2021 with the Governor signing of Senate Bill #2475 Suspending certain

provisions of the Open Meeting Law, allowing public bodies greater flexibility in

utilizing technology in the conduct of meetings under the Open Meeting Law, this

meeting of the Peabody Conservation Commission will be conducted via remote

participation. The public may participate in this meeting via Remote Participation:

A website for the meeting will be provided on the Conservation Agenda posted on

the City's website and outside/inside city hall at least 48 hours prior to the

meeting: https://www.peabody-ma.gov/

Copies of the application may be examined electronically by emailing conservation

staff at lucia.delnegro@peabody-ma.gov

Weekly News: September 30, 2021

Conservation Commission

Stewart Lazares, Secretary

City of Peabody

Conservation Commission

LEGAL NOTICE

Pursuant to Mass General Laws, Chapter 131, Section 40, Massachusetts

Wetlands Protection Act and Chapter 32 of the Code of the City of Peabody,

Wetlands and Rivers Protection Regulations, the Peabody Conservation

Commission will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday October 13, 2021 at 7 p.m.

on a Request for Determination of Applicability submitted by Greg Hochmuth

(Williams & Sparages) for Katie & Ryan Billingsly (owners). The proposed work is

the construction of an in-ground swimming pool and patio within 100 feet of an

IVW. The property is known as 6A Murphy Road, Map 115, Lot 311C, Peabody MA.

Public Participation will be via Virtual Means Only - Pursuant to Governor Baker's

March 12, 2020 Order Suspending Certain Provisions of the Open Meeting Law,

G.L. c. 30A, §18, and the Governor's March 15, 2020 Order imposing strict

limitation on the number of people that may gather in one place, as extended on

June 15, 2021 with the Governor signing of Senate Bill #2475 Suspending certain

provisions of the Open Meeting Law, allowing public bodies greater flexibility in

utilizing technology in the conduct of meetings under the Open Meeting Law, this

meeting of the Peabody Conservation Commission will be conducted via remote

participation. The public may participate in this meeting via Remote Participation:

A website for the meeting will be provided on the Conservation Agenda posted on

the City's website and outside/inside city hall at least 48 hours prior to the

meeting: https://www.peabody-ma.gov/

Copies of the application may be examined electronically by emailing conservation

staff at lucia.delnegro@peabody-ma.gov

Weekly News: September 30, 2021

Conservation Commission

Stewart Lazares, Secretary


16

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

The story behind

Peabody’s world

champion cyclist

COURTESY PHOTOS | PEABODY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Boston Herald clips from the turn of the century detail

Ingraham’s life and achievements.

BY THE PEABODY

HISTORICAL SOCIETY

On September 6, 1882, Boston

hosted the nation’s first 100-

mile bicycle race. Americans

simply went bicycle crazy from

the 1880s to the 1910s, loving

the sense of independence it

gave them.

Peabody’s own James (Jim)

F. Ingraham was a champion cyclist,

among his many other accomplishments.

Ingraham was

born on May 24, 1876 to James

F. Ingraham and Mary Jane

Moore. His parents were both

born in Canada and settled in

Peabody. The elder James Ingraham

was a successful morocco

(leather) manufacturer in West

Peabody.

In 1895, Jim Ingraham entered

his first bicycle race in

Malden, the Linscott 25-mile

road race, and came in 2nd place

out of 250 riders. In 1897, Ingraham

rode in 32 races, and placed

in the top 4 in every race that

year. He competed in the International

Cycling Championship

in Montreal, Canada in 1899.

In 1901, Ingraham rode in

the Pan-American Cycling Exhibition

in Buffalo, New York.

He broke the amateur record for

the 5-mile race and came in third

overall for amateur riders.

He continued to compete

and ran two local race tracks.

He managed the Revere Track

at Revere Beach as well as the

Charles River Track in Boston.

He ultimately retired from cycling

due to a heart condition

After his racing career, James

F. Ingraham had an impressive

business and political career. He

owned Eagan Leather Company,

was a trustee for the JB Thomas

Hospital and the Danvers State

Hospital, served as director for

the Warren National Bank and as

president for the Essex County

Board of Trade. In addition, he

was a member of the Governor’s

Executive Council under governors

Calvin Coolidge and Channing

Cox. He was also appointed

as the chief appraiser for the Port

of Boston.

He married Carrie Eaton

Upton in 1896 and together

they had five children: James,

Shirley, Elizabeth, Richard, and

Robert. They lived at 2 Forest

Street. Ingraham died on September

8, 1954 and was buried

at Oak Grove Cemetery.

THE RIGHT SIZE

SOLUTIONS

NO MATTER

YOUR BUSINESS.

For generations Joseph’s Bakery has

been making fresh, authentic and healthy

flatbreads. We’re proud to continue to be

a trusted partner as they expand around

New England and across the country.

It’s time to make your move to

Salem Five Bank.

Learn more at SalemFive.com/business

JOSEPH’S

BAKERY

Lawrence, MA

Banking • Investments • Insurance • Mortgage

Salem Five Bank is a Member of both the FDIC and DIF. Mortgage Products provided by Salem Five Mortgage Company,

LLC, NMLS ID 4662,

. Wealth, Trust, Investment and Insurance Products are provided by Salem Five

Investment Services and Salem Five Insurance Services and are not FDIC insured, not bank guaranteed, not a deposit, not

insured by any federal government agency and may lose value.

More magazines by this user