October 2021 253 Lifestyle

livinglocal360

October 2021 253 Lifestyle

ISSUE NO. 34

OCTOBER 2021

L I F E S T Y L E M A G A Z I N E

The Evolution of

South End, Tacoma

MAKING NOISE IN

SOUTH TACOMA WAY

Johnson Candy Co.

Q&A WITH

BILL JOHNSON CARRIES ON HIS FAMILY’S NEARLY 100-YEAR LEGACY OF CANDY MAKING

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 1


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 3


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 5


MARKETING

WASHINGTON EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Julie Reed | 253.363.8832

julie@like-media.com

EDITORIAL

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Jillian Chandler | jillian@like-media.com

STAFF WRITERS

Colin Anderson | Taylor Shillam | Rachel Kelly

DESIGN

CREATIVE DIRECTOR | Maddie Horton

LEAD GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Darbey Russo

GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Marisa Inahara

GRAPHIC DESIGNER | Nicole Robitaille

DIGITAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR | Whitney Lebsock

OPERATIONS

MANAGING PARTNER | Kim Russo

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR | Steve Russo

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS | Rachel Figgins

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING | Allyia Briggs

CONTRIBUTORS

Deann Hammer, Serina Jones, Missi Balison, Kim Davenport,

Marguerite Cleveland, Tina VanDenHeuvel-Cook

great things for

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of a rapidly changing industry.

PHOTOGRAPHY

Photographers: In-Gear Media - cover & pg. 28, Marguerite

Cleveland - pg. 60, Tina VanDenHeuvel-Cook - pg. 58

Courtesy Photos: Jon Conant - Theory Real Estate,

Tacoma Public Library, Symphony Tacoma

Advertising Agency

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253 Lifestyle Magazine is published monthly and distributed freely

throughout the Pacific Northwest. Opinions expressed in articles

or advertisements do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the

publisher. 253 Lifestyle Magazine is not responsible for omissions

or information that has been misrepresented to the magazine.

253 Lifestyle Magazine is produced and published by Like Media,

and no part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted

without the permission of the publisher.

6

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 7


PUBLISHER’S Picks

Steve Russo

Executive Director

ENJOY THE SLOWER-PACED DAYS OF THE SEASON

The smell of pumpkin spice is in the air. The leaves are beginning

their transformation, brightening nature with their deep hues of

red and gold before making their way to the ground for children

to play in—and adults to clean up. Life has slowed down a bit, as we

breathe in the fresh, cooler air, reflecting on the beauty of the season.

The days continue to grow shorter, and our hearts begin to prepare

for the holiday season, when we can once again gather with our loved

ones and reminisce of the many blessings we’ve experienced during the

course of the year.

It’s time to bundle up and breathe in a big sigh of relief, as you’ve made

it through three quarters of the year!

In our October issue of 253 Lifestyle Magazine, you’ll explore some

wonderful stories sure to brighten these cloudier, darker days. From our

feature article, highlighting United Way and its immense impact on the

local communities it serves—including Pierce County, to our Arts article

exploring Symphony Tacoma, and our Tacoma Focus shedding light

on Tacoma’s South End, there’s so much to appreciate here at home. In

addition, our Travel article will take readers on a wine journey, while our

recipe is perfect for savoring the flavors of the fall season. And it’s time

to get baking, as our Trending article walks you through how to become

a star baker for those novices in the kitchen.

We hope you can take the time to sit back with your favorite blanket,

warm drink in hand, and enjoy what 253 Lifestyle Magazine has in store

for you this month.

12

16

40

60

FALL DECORATING

DRAMA FOR 2021: KEEP

IT LIGHT AND SIMPLE

A BEGINNER’S BAKING

GUIDE: WHERE TO START TO

FIND SUCCESS AS A BRAND-

NEW BAKER

SAGE INTERIORS: IT’S TIME TO

LOVE YOUR HOME

TRAVEL AND TASTE: A FOOD

AND WINE WEEKEND IN

CHARMING WOODINVILLE,

WASHINGTON

8

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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CONTENTS

12

40

28

12

HOME

Fall Decorating Drama for 2021: Keep it light

and simple

16

TRENDING

A Beginner’s Baking Guide: Where to start to

find success as a brand-new baker

28

Q&A

36

Bill Johnson of the Johnson Candy Co.: Carrying on

his family's nearly 100-year legacy of candy making

36

HEALTH & LIFESTYLE

The latest tips and trends about living a healthy,

active life

22

TACOMA FOCUS

The Evolution of South End, Tacoma: Making

noise in South Tacoma Way

10 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

32

THE ARTS

Symphony Tacoma Celebrates its Diamond

Anniversary: 75 years of ‘building community

through music’

40

BUSINESS PINPOINT

Sage Interiors: It’s time to love your home


253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 1

sneak peek into October ...

44

58

60

ISSUE NO. 34

OCTOBER 2021

L I F E S T Y L E M A G A Z I N E

The Evolution of

South End, Tacoma

MAKING NOISE IN

SOUTH TACOMA WAY

44

FEATURE

Standing Together with its Community: United

Way collaborates to bring change

54

ENTERTAINMENT

Events you don’t want to miss!

58

FEATURED RECIPE

Savor the Fall Harvest: Pumpkin Bars with Cream

Cheese Frosting and Bacon Maple Bits

60

TRAVEL & LEISURE

Travel and Taste: food and wine weekend in charming

Woodinville, Washington

Q&A WITH

Johnson Candy Co.

BILL JOHNSON CARRIES ON HIS FAMILY’S NEARLY 100-YEAR LEGACY OF CANDY MAKING

About The Cover

THE JOHNSON CANDY CO. HAS BEEN

SERVING THE TACOMA COMMUNITY FOR

ALMOST A CENTURY! Today, William “Bill”

Johnson can be found at the candy making

shop, carrying on his family’s legacy of

creating one-of-a-kind unique treats to be

enjoyed by those young and old. Find out

more about the history of Johnson Candy

Co. in this month’s Q&A on page 28.

Cover Photo by In-Gear Media

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 11


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LIFESTYLE

LIFESTYLE

MAGAZINE

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Home

Fall Decorating Drama for 2021

KEEP IT LIGHT AND SIMPLE

BY DEANN HAMMER, BROADWAY DESIGN

As the light turns golden outdoors and the leaves follow, it is the time of year to begin to look inward into our homes and prepare

for comfort during the cooler months ahead.

Fall decorating has taken on a new twist to coordinate with the grey, white and softer home colors of today. Ditch the classic pumpkin

colors of heavy oranges, browns and reds for fall, and opt for a lighter variation of the theme this year.

Floral arrangements that include grasses from your yard that are starting to seed and dry mixed with larger seed pods and protea

(found online from Hawaiian online sources or at Washington Floral in Tacoma) will last indoors for many months and add rich

natural texture and color to your decorating theme. Adding herbs from the garden such as large sage leaves, chive, parsley and dill will

enhance the aroma and also add color.

Floral arrangements can be made in large ceramic urns with tree branches for extra height on fireplace hearths, kitchen tables or foyer

tables. Drying hydrangeas are also nice to add, bringing in soft color to the mix.

I like to stuff a pomegranate or two into my arrangements for color (wire them in on a stick), and let them dry in the arrangement

until Christmas when I change themes.

Fall front door wreaths don’t have to be laden with Halloween trinkets. Go for a more sophisticated fall look with a wreath brimming

with natural elements from outdoors such as thistle, seed pods, grasses and dried flowers. You can buy them finished online or make

your own with a grapevine wreath base, wire and a glue gun. Add a velvet or textured ribbon at the top of the piece to hang your

wreath. Brass wreath hangers lay on the top of your door and are also a nice addition, alleviating the need for a nail in your door.

Light up any room with a glass baby with tea light (always best in groups of three or more), or use battery-operated candles on timers

that turn on at dusk (average run time is four hours) and turn themselves off. Battery-operated candles are terrific for hard-to-reach

places like the top of a cabinet, foyers and hallways that are not often traveled, and lighting for shelves that cannot handle the heat of

a regular candle. Avoid any fluorescent or LED blue light bulbs in your home’s light fixtures or lamps in the winter. Warming up your

lighting to look like warm candlelight is the name of the game.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 13


Outdoor lighting is important to expand the view from your home

at night. Replace any burned-out exterior landscaping bulbs and

clean solar lights to prepare for winter. String Edison bulbs or white

Christmas lights in your trees for extra outdoor lighting. Batteryoperated

candles are also terrific in lanterns by your front door or

outdoor seating areas. Make sure they are covered or brought inside

when the rain starts.

Bring in a chunky knit throw for your sofa in neutral colors to add

warmth, texture and style to any room. Faux fur throw blankets are

still on trend but in lighter colors this year (ditch the orange and black

cheetah print) and go for snow leopard, white fox or faux shearling.

Bundle up and enjoy the season!

Deann Hammer is the owner of Broadway Design, a boutique interior

design firm in Gig Harbor. She and her team craft spaces that are

tailored to each client's personality and lifestyle, while mindful of their

budget, creating a perfect harmony between aesthetics and function.

BroadwayDesign.net

14 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Trending

A BEGINNER’S

BAKING

GUIDE

Where to start to find success

as a brand-new baker

By Taylor Shillam

It’s autumn, and for many, enjoying a cozy pastime

helps ease the transition to cooler, shorter days.

Aside from the comforting treats that come as

a result, baking can be a comforting form of both

mental and physical therapy. The concentration

required to follow a recipe and carefully measure

ingredients, mixed with the creativity that comes with

a chance to experiment with flavors, makes baking a

unique activity that is often considered more than just

a hobby.

If you’re new to the realm of baking, there are a few

steps you can take to find success as a beginning baker.

Once you have a few key elements down, including

starting with the right tools and techniques, you’ll feel

like an expert in no time!

Where to Start: Baking Equipment

Set yourself up for success with quality baking tools.

The right equipment will make your road to becoming

a seasoned baker much sweeter, as quality bakeware

makes for easier cleanups and more evenly cooked

results.

Invest in quality, non-stick bakeware. A non-stick

or silicone baking mat will help you skip the sticky

baking sprays and endless rolls of parchment paper—

16

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 17


Becoming a skilled, comfortable baker

doesn’t happen overnight. It takes time, and

practicing is key.

plus save you from cleaning up a sticky mess later. There are nonstick

options for just about every piece of baking equipment, from

muffin tins to cake pans, so if you’re watching your budget, start by

investing in the pieces you’ll use most often.

Make sure your measuring tools are in order, including measuring

cups, a set of teaspoons and tablespoons, and a quality liquid

measuring cup. A set of dependable, accurate, easy-to-use

measuring tools comes in handy not just for baking but for recipes

of all kinds.

While your remaining baking equipment will depend on your

needs, tastes and budget, many experts advocate for an investment

in a standing mixer. Compared to a handheld beater, standing

mixers ensure an easy, even blend of your ingredients. It helps you

expend less energy and save time, with the ability to multitask while

your ingredients mix away. A KitchenAid isn’t required—there are

plenty of budget-friendly options that produce similar results.

Use High-Quality Ingredients

Investing in high-quality ingredients where you can will yield a

noticeable difference in taste. For example, there’s a difference

between pure vanilla extract and artificial vanilla extract—the real

deal will produce a stronger, more authentic flavor.

As much as you can, look for high-quality ingredients to produce

the best results. Pure extracts and real spices might be pricier, but

a little bit goes a long way, and the results are guaranteed to be

noticed.

Some experts advocate for additional ingredient upgrades like

swapping table salt for sea salt to produce a more complex flavor

profile, or using browned butter for more tender, flaky results.

Choose the upgrades that are best for your specific recipe, baking

interests and budget.

Take your recipe with you when shopping for ingredients, so you’ll

know exactly how much you need.

Set the Stage

When your equipment is purchased and your ingredients ready, it’s

time to begin. Set the stage by placing all ingredients on the counter

and thoroughly reading your recipe for key details.

Read the recipe to completion before you pour or mix anything.

You’ll have a better idea of timing, measurements and techniques

needed to complete the recipe.

Look for the phrase “room temperature”—you won’t want to

ignore that instruction. Temperature is a more critical component

producing your desired outcome than you may expect. Room

temperature supports a proper emulsion, which promotes an ideal

texture in the finished product. Allow any refrigerated ingredients

listed that are called to be room temperature to sit out on the

counter for some time before you begin.

If your recipe requires any ingredients to be “warmed,” be careful

to keep that ingredient warm—not hot. Mixing in hot ingredients

will often wreak havoc on the quality of the result and the chemical

18 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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eactions between other ingredients. Keep any and all warmed

ingredients in the recipe lukewarm at best.

When you’re ready to start mixing ingredients, follow the recipe

in order. As tempting as it may be to get creative and experiment,

most recipes are trusted for a reason. As you further develop

your baking skills, you’ll have the experience and knowledge

base to successfully experiment in the future.

Take Time to Enjoy the Process

Like any skill, art or hobby, baking takes time to learn. Don’t

rush—allow yourself to be patient and learn from your mistakes.

During those first few recipes, give yourself plenty of time and

grace.

If you’re brand new to baking, you can save yourself a bit of

stress by starting with a simple recipe. Chocolate chip cookies,

brownies and muffins are all straightforward and give beginning

bakers a great starting foundation. Take time to enjoy the taste

tests along the way!

Becoming a skilled, comfortable baker doesn’t happen overnight.

It takes time, and practicing is key. You can keep baking practice

varied and fun, both by trying new recipes and perfecting

familiar classics.

Start simple, and start today—as we head into the holiday

season, you'll be ready to contribute fresh, expertly baked treats

to your family gatherings and festive events. After all, one of the

best, most rewarding aspects of developing your baking skills is

sharing them! All you have to do now is choose that first recipe

and begin.

20 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Tacoma Focus

THE EVOLUTION OF

SOUTH END, TACOMA

MAKING NOISE IN SOUTH

TACOMA WAY

BY RACHEL KELLY

For most of us, opening up to events this last summer

came as a surprise. While we all scrambled to our

closets to see if any of our real clothes still fit, South

End in Tacoma was already gearing up for some

major events. For years now, local developers, businesses

and event curators have been eyeing the vacant buildings

in South End. Over the pandemic, those buildings, eclectic

restaurants, bars and streets were developed and primed

for success, with the only thing missing being the people.

That’s when Reggae on the Way stepped in. This last

August bands such as J Boog and Dirty Heads attracted

4,000 ticket-holders to South Tacoma Way. With a rocking

lineup of known and new bands, the event was a muchneeded

release of pent-up fun. A kind of fun that South

End will soon be known for.

South Tacoma Way has been long known for gems such

as the Asia Pacific Cultural Center and Stonegate Pizza.

Stonegate Pizza, now The Main Ingredient Pizza, was

known for its hosting of various veteran bands. The

APCC has always been treasured for its presentation of

cultural dance, as well as for its longtime efforts to bridge

communities through art, culture, business and education.

More recently, South Tacoma Way has also become known

for its eclectic restaurants, such as the Church Cantina,

which holds various smaller events throughout the week

served alongside a delicious rotating menu. In addition,

Grit City Events recently bought the old bank on the corner

of 56th and South Tacoma Way and plans to utilize it as

a venue for local events. The Realm is also newly located

here and generally hosts weddings.

Reggae on the Way has since become a prophetic

foretelling of bigger and larger events along South Tacoma

Way. South End is soon to be home to four event spaces

within four blocks: The Plaid Pig, Edison Square, Real Art

and the Airport Tavern—which makes South Tacoma Way

22 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 23


24 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


a unique hub for art and music. Together these event spaces are capable

of hosting upward of 1,200 people (with each space at varying levels

of capacity).

This kind of activity is nothing new for South End, which has a rich

history that not even many residents know. Before I-5 was built, and

before the renovation of downtown Tacoma in the ‘90s, South Tacoma

Way was a hub of activity. South Tacoma Way has some of the oldest

buildings in Tacoma, which sprung up around the railroad center. The

street was once alive with commerce that serviced the railroad laborers

and their families, as well as the railroad itself.

However, by the late ‘80s, Tacoma was burdened by large factories,

accelerated growth and pollution. Tacoma was experiencing

growing pains. The

last generation of

Tacomians will

remember our efforts

to clean the waterways

and pass legislation

meant to bring about

local health, wealth

and growth. South

End, however, could

no longer rely on the

railroad to support

local traffic. It saw its

business and commerce

move to the newly

renovated downtown.

Many of our city's

oldest buildings were

left empty.

SOUTH END IS

SOON TO BE

HOME TO FOUR

EVENT SPACES

WITHIN FOUR

BLOCKS.

Until now. Once again, Tacoma is coming together to do something

new. The Miller Family, Alan, Rondi, Issac, Austin and Taylar, who own

Theory Real Estate and now Edison Square, see the opening of their

event space as a neighborhood effort. So willing are they to engage with

their neighbors that they opened the doors of Edison Square to the

attendees of Reggae on the Way—even though Edison Square wasn’t

quite ready for business. Just days before the event, they thought they

might utilize the space to pass out water. They got a DJ too, just for

fun. Before they knew it, they had hundreds of thirsty concert-goers

streaming in to get some free water, and use the restrooms.

“We really just wanted to welcome people to this part of town; let

them see what South End is all about,” says Rondi. “We’re definitely

not the first ones here, and we aren’t interested in growth without

collaboration,” says Alan. As they open up Edison Square, they share in

the general spirit of the community, in that they are interested in seeing

everyone thrive. They aren’t displacing anyone. They simply want to

build within the natural opportunity that South End already has to

offer. To participate in its hospitality and to collaborate with the mutual

growth of their neighbors. The people at Edison Square are looking to

give and thrive with neighbors who also have a heart for the character

and health of South End.

It’s thanks to neighbors like Dan Rankin, who runs Danno Presents,

that we’re seeing so much growth in the South End. Not only is he the

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 25


mastermind behind Reggae on the Way, and the previous

general manager of Jazzbones, but he is the current owner of

the Airport Tavern. Once finished, the Airport Tavern will

host concerts and musical events for up to 600 people.

It’s neighbors like the Plaid Pig, everyone’s favorite dive

bar and live music lounge. It’s neighbors like the Church

Cantina, or the Asia Pacific Cultural Center. There are the

owners of Real Art, a venue that is capable of hosting up

to 300 people. There’s Grit City Events that is creating The

Space. There’s still more, but honestly, it’s hard to keep up

with all that’s going on!

South End is brimming with new life, and it’s about time!

Thanks to people like these, thanks to us who live here,

South End is “breathing new energy into what was once

a thriving business center,” as Alan and Rondi say. As the

coming months fade into winter, it’s places like these that

give us a warm place to engage in everything that our city

has to offer. From art to local musical talent, from weddings

to one-of-a-kind food, it’s time to make some noise in the

South End.

26 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Proudly serving Pierce County children in need since

1994, we are a 100% volunteer run organization that

refurbishes and recycles gently-used toys.

SouthHillMall.com • MallGiftCards.n

Help us continue to serve children by

donating or volunteering today, and by

joining our Ripples of Hope Campaign!

ToyRescueMission.org | 253.460.6711 | martha@toyrescuemission.org

607 S. Winnifred St., Tacoma, WA (across from Tacoma Boys on 6th Ave.)

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 27


Q&A

Johnson Candy Co.

Q&A WITH BILL JOHNSON OF THE

CARRYING ON HIS FAMILY'S NEARLY 100-YEAR

LEGACY OF CANDY MAKING

BY MARGUERITE CLEVELAND

28 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Pumpkin Spice

and Everything Nice

Nothing says Fall like a cup of hot

spiced tea! Visit our shop for warm

flavors and blends that you’re sure

to enjoy and love.

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Our Queso Flameado is the perfect way to fire

Our Queso Flameado is the perfect way to fire

up this October! Served in a piping hot

up this October! Served in a piping hot

molcajete lava stone and lit aflame tableside

molcajete lava stone and lit aflame tableside

with tequila! Pair this fiery dish with our

with tequila! Pair this fiery dish with our

popular Passion Fruit-Guava Margarita

popular Passion Fruit-Guava Margarita

and welcome this fall Moctezuma’s style!

and welcome this fall Moctezuma’s style!

Our Queso Flameado is the perfect way to fi

up this October! Served in a piping hot

molcajete lava stone and lit aflame tablesid

with tequila! Pair this fiery dish with our

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 29

popular Passion Fruit-Guava Margarita


"I LOVE BEING A PART OF THE HILLTOP

NEIGHBORHOOD. WE HAVE BEEN HERE FOR ALMOST

100 YEARS AND DON’T PLAN ON GOING ANYWHERE

ELSE. WE LOVE THE PASSION PEOPLE HAVE FOR

THE NEIGHBORHOOD. HILLTOP HAS A WONDERFUL

HISTORY AND A GREAT SENSE OF COMMUNITY."

30 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Q&A

The Johnson family has deep roots in

Tacoma. William "Bill" Johnson is a thirdgeneration

candy maker at the iconic

Johnson Candy Co., the family’s business.

His wife, Mariclair, is an elementary school teacher

in the city. They are raising two boys, ages 7 and

10, who will have the opportunity to continue the

family legacy in this iconic business.

The Johnson Candy Co. started in 1925 when Bill’s

grandfather Russell Johnson began working in his

parents’ business, the Olympic Dairy—a creamery,

ice cream shop and finally a confectionery. With

a love for candy, he began selling handcrafted

chocolates he made using vintage molds. Russell

and his wife Irene purchased the business from

his parents in 1927 and ran it as a lunch counter

where he also sold his candy. In a stroke of luck, he

purchased recipes from an old candy maker which

have stood the test of time. Many are still used today.

Popular local architect Silas Nelson designed the

building on what is now known as Martin Luther

King Jr. Way, and the company moved in in 1949.

It is in the Hilltop District, one of the most diverse

neighborhoods in Tacoma. This historic building

has a bright neon light sitting atop the roof and

draws people in to enjoy the delectable treats within.

Bill makes the candy and runs the business now, and

his dad, Ron, is still active in the family business.

The candy has always been made by hand—and it

is still that way today. The open-face caramels are

one of the top sellers. It is easy to see why as they

truly are an artisan work of culinary art. Caramel is a

notorious medium to work with as the temperature

must be just perfect; a few degrees too cool and it is

a syrupy mess; too hot and it becomes a hard chew.

Throw in Tacoma’s rainy weather, which affects

candy making, and you can begin to appreciate the

craftsmanship. The company’s caramel is soft and

chewy, made with real butter and not too sweet. It

is combined with roasted almonds and then hand

dipped in either milk or dark chocolate. Whether

you purchase at the store or online, the candy will be

fresh, and that really does make a difference.

Q. What is it like to work in a family business,

especially with your father still dropping in to

work most days?

A. I enjoy being able to carry on this legacy. My

grandfather started this business, passed it on

to my dad, and now I get to share in that. We

are genuinely a small business. Family is very

important to me, and the opportunity to work

with my parents has been something I have

really cherished. I have memories of melting ice

mints with my dad when I was a young boy, and

everything I know about candy making I learned

working alongside him. Since COVID has begun,

my father has been working from home, but he is

still involved in daily operations.

Q. Your candy is seriously good (I sampled as

part of my "research”). What is the secret to

such a great product? What is your favorite?

What is the most popular?

A. I use the same 100-plus-year-old recipes my

grandfather used when he started this business.

We truly are a small business, and we genuinely

care about everything we make, and we hand

make most of our candies onsite. My favorite

is the dark mint truffle. Our most popular is

probably our sea salt caramel, but people also

love our open-faced caramels, nut clusters, and

our hand-dipped ice cream bars. Our gluten-free

and vegan options have been very popular as well.

Q. Can you share with our readers about your

company's commitment to staying in the

Hilltop District of Tacoma and the exciting

updates with the Tacoma Link Rail Expansion

running right past your door?

A. I love being a part of the Hilltop neighborhood.

We have been here for almost 100 years and don’t

plan on going anywhere else. We love the passion

people have for the neighborhood. Hilltop

has a wonderful history and a great sense of

community. The Link Rail has been an exciting

development. We hope the neighborhood can

grow and honor the people here and its history.

Q. The Johnson Candy Co. has a loyal local base

of customers. Can you share what that support

means to you as a small business owner.

A. Nobody relies more on their customer base

than a small business. When you wait on our

customers you quickly learn many of them have

been coming here since they were children. It

often feels like the candy store is as important

to those multi-generational families as it is to

ours. I feel like our loyal customers are almost an

extension of our family. I am incredibly thankful

for their support.

Q. Do you or the company do any community

volunteer work or support local nonprofits?

A. The store donates to small charities and

nonprofits like the Hilltop Action Coalition, local

food banks and shelters. I am also a PTA member

at my sons’ schools.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 31


Arts

SYMPHONY TACOMA CELEBRATES ITS

DIAMOND ANNIVERSARY

75 years of ‘building community through music’

BY KIM DAVENPORT

32 32253

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 33


Dreams of a professional orchestra for Tacoma—one

which both serves its community and puts the city on the

artistic map—date back to the 1890s. Early civic boosters

knew that before Tacoma could truly become the City of Destiny,

musical achievement at the highest level was a necessary part of

the landscape.

Several early efforts to sustain an orchestra in Tacoma ultimately

failed, in spite of ample musical talent and appreciative audiences.

It was not until December of 1946 that a performance of Handel’s

Messiah at the College of Puget Sound (CPS) would establish an

ensemble which would grow and change with our city for the

next 75 years, ultimately becoming the orchestra known today as

Symphony Tacoma.

That first concert was led by conductor Raymond Vaught, professor

of violin at CPS. The school’s music department invited “all people

in the community with any instrumental talent” to consider joining

the orchestra. Over the next decade, the orchestra presented three

concerts per year, with College of Puget Sound students performing

alongside community members.

In 1959, violinist and conductor Ed Seferian joined the faculty

of the University of Puget Sound and took the reins of the UPS-

Tacoma Symphony. Seferian was adamant about two points:

Concerts would have free admission, and the orchestra would

regularly feature internationally renowned artists as soloists. This

unique combination would set the Tacoma Symphony apart from

its peer community orchestras around the nation.

Throughout the 1960s, the orchestra performed in a variety of

community venues, from churches and school auditoriums to the

large stage of the Temple Theatre. It was there, in the spring of 1971,

that the ensemble performed for the last time as the UPS-Tacoma

Symphony. By the next season, the name was officially changed to

34 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Tacoma Symphony Orchestra. During the 1977-78 season, thanks to the collective efforts of the

Tacoma Musicians Union (Local 117, American Federation of Musicians), orchestra members were

paid for the first time.

In 1983, the renovated Pantages Theater opened, becoming the new home for the Tacoma Symphony.

By the late 1980s, free admission was no longer possible, but Seferian had successfully overseen

the orchestra’s transition to a professional ensemble with widespread community support and a

stunning historic theater to call home. In March of 1994, Seferian conducted the orchestra for the

last time, stepping down after 35 years.

On September 30, 1994, Harvey Felder took the podium as the new conductor of the Tacoma

Symphony, a position he would hold for 20 years. Maestro Felder brought to Tacoma a professionalism,

charm, and compelling artistic vision that continued to raise the profile of the orchestra. His mission

was to create a “Tacoma Symphony sound,” one defined by artistic vitality and rhythmic precision.

Felder, passionate about youth education, greatly expanded the Symphony’s Youth Concert program.

He also oversaw the development of the Tacoma Symphony Chorus (now Symphony Tacoma Voices)

and expanded the number of concert offerings each year. Upon his departure in 2014, Felder was

given the title of conductor laureate.

In 2014, Symphony Tacoma welcomed music director Sarah Ioannides, whom the Los Angeles

Times called “one of six female conductors breaking the glass podium.” Building on the work of her

predecessors, Ioannides has continued to expand the orchestra’s education programs. She has also

championed new works, often through collaborative projects with other artistic organizations in the

Tacoma community.

As Ioannides begins her eighth season as music director, the orchestra’s core season includes six

main-series classical concerts, holiday choral pops, an annual performance of Handel’s Messiah and

a spring choral concert. With a stated mission of “building community through music,” Symphony

Tacoma celebrates this Diamond Anniversary Season and looks forward to many more years of

sharing music with the people of Tacoma.

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 35


Health

OUR GUIDE TO SKIN TIGHTENING

Combining laser treatments, injectables and skin care

BY SERINA JONES, LME, GIG HARBOR AESTHETICS

The newest kid on the block isn’t really a new kid, but it is the

actual cosmetic approach which is the newly crowned king of

all cosmetic procedures—the “combination treatment.”

This is where the combined effects of more than one treatment are

harnessed to maximize treatment outcomes and benefits. At Gig Harbor

Aesthetics, we prefer and perform combination treatments to achieve

optimal results. Combination therapy is not only more efficient in terms

of time, but more often than not, the combination naturally allows for

better results compared to each stand-alone treatment. The combination

of injectables, lasers and skin care has a synergistic effect, boosting one

another for remarkable results.

The idea behind combining modalities is simple, as we just mentioned,

but the bottom line is that it leads to more effective clinical results and

increased patient satisfaction. Why let your treatments stand alone when

your treatments can stand together and give you more efficacy and better

results?

What happens to us as we age?

As we age, we lose volume in our skin and tissue, our texture changes due

to past sun damage, and our overall skin tone dulls while our elastin and

collagen diminish. These important structures serve as scaffolds, and the

decline of volume leads to our face sagging and drooping, creating deep

folds and lines. Facial aging typically starts in our 20s and 30s with the

loss of essential volume, and the effects of past sun damage will appear

as brown spots, facial vessels and textural changes. Simply put, aging isn’t

just a one-dimensional effect, so our approach isn’t a one-way path. It’s a

plan that includes different techniques to create balance, brightness, skin

tightening and improved skin health.

Botox, Laser Treatments and Skin Care

We take a synergistic approach to create a combined plan to reverse

damage, smooth out texture and tighten skin. Sure, it’s great to be on

a progressive home-care routine, but when you combine that with inoffice

treatments, you are getting optimal results with your skin health.

Some of the most popular treatments to slow down the effects of aging

are injectables, Radio Frequency Microneedling and Broad Band Light.

Botox/Dysport and Dermal Fillers

Botox and Dysport is a type of a neuromodulator that has received FDA

approval for cosmetic treatments to reduce wrinkles. Dermal fillers are

used to restore volume loss and support the skin to maintain its texture,

volume and suppleness.

Laser Treatments

Radio Frequency Microneedling and BBL are incredibly effective at

smoothing out texture, tightening the skin and improving overall skin

tone and radiance. Through the use of these modalities, you will notice a

visible improvement in the overall health of your skin.

Skin Care

Being on proper skin care for your particular skin is one of the most

important parts of maintaining beautiful skin as well as correcting past

damage. Our experts will guide you on what to use to achieve your

skin goals.

For additional information about Gig Harbor Aesthetics and the services

they offer, visit GigHarborAesthetics.com or call 253.514.6766.

The combination of injectables, lasers and skin care has a

synergistic effect, boosting one another for remarkable results.

36 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 37


Health

GINGER

The benefits of this true superfood

BY JENNIFER MILLER

With fall officially here, there is more on the horizon

than college football and changing leaves. Germs.

I don’t need to remind you all the yuckies our kids

bring home from school and sports. We all do

our best to keep them at bay. I am a big believer in all the vitamins and

supplements, drinking all the water, and doing my best to get a decent

amount of sleep. Like many of you, as a busy parent, I don't have time to

get sick, so I’ll do whatever I can to up my immune system. I’ve been so

lucky to work in an office that supplies me with daily ginger shots. The

benefits of this spicy little root are many, and I won’t let a day go by now

without a shot of ginger.

Ginger is a flowering plant that originated in Southeast Asia. It belongs

to the Zingiberaceae family, which is closely related to turmeric and

cardamom. While its flowers are a beautiful yellow leafy assortment,

it’s the root that is most commonly used. Ginger comes in many forms,

the most popular being fresh, dried, powdered or, my personal favorite,

juiced. With a lightly spicy and unique taste and smell from its most

important bioactive component, gingerol, it’s a popular spice as well

as medicinal. Ginger has a long and deep history in traditional and

alternative medicine. Its medicinal usage dates all the way back to more

than 2,000 years ago in ancient China. Now its many benefits are backed

by science.

Most commonly, ginger is used for all things stomach related. It is highly

effective in reducing the effects of nausea and vomiting. Most commonly

it is prescribed to pregnant women as a safe cure or curb for morning

sickness, and is also a favorite among travelers for motion sickness. Even

just holding ginger oil up to my nose during a bout of car sickness works

wonders. Ginger is also prescribed to chemotherapy patients to help

reduce its side effects. It’s also found to help ease the pain of menstrual

cycles due to its anti-inflammatory properties.

Those anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties are the key

components in ginger's immune-boosting properties. Ginger has been

shown to help ward off germs (due to having antibacterial and antiviral

properties), and stop the growth of E. coli and viruses like RSV. Adding

ginger to your diet, or any other anti-inflammatory food or drink, can

help enhance your immune system. Adding in other key ingredients like

lemon or honey can also help boost immune response.

My favorite way to get my daily dose of ginger is through a custom ginger

shot, which are usually available at most local health stores. I also love

to make ginger tea, especially during the chilly fall and winter months.

Using grated or powdered ginger, I simply add hot water to honey, half

of a fresh squeezed lemon, and a little turmeric on top for added benefits

and flavor. Stir it all up for a warm drink on these fall days.

Your food choices can help speed up both the refueling

and repair processes. Those anti-inflammatory and

antioxidant properties are the key components in

ginger's immune-boosting properties.

38 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 39


40

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


pinpoint

TACOMA, WA

EXCEPTIONAL.

LUXURIOUS.

MINDFUL.

It’s time to love your home

BY JILLIAN CHANDLER

Nicole and Nigel Wakley have made it a lifestyle to live, breathe and

work with sustainability in mind. After starting their family (they

have two beautiful boys), the Wakleys moved from Hong Kong to a

rustic farm in Australia, which allowed them the opportunity to homeschool

their boys in an environment that gave their minds space for growth. “We

lived among acres of rainforest and cleared farmland with sheep, chickens,

cows, and a home designed to collect rainwater,” shares Nicole. “We lived off

of the land. As a family, we learned what sustainability and eco-conscious

living were all about—we even planted 80 trees on the farm together.”

In 2014, the family was drawn to relocate to the Pacific Northwest, as “the

area held a mindset of eco-consciousness and a frequency that aligned with

ours,” Nicole states.

The family has called the South Sound home ever since. And just two years

after making their way to the PNW, they would create a business inspired

by Nicole’s longing to have a small storefront, where she could share her

passion for detail and nostalgia through helping others through furniture

and design.

“I was blessed to travel the world with my pilot husband, flying alongside

him in the cockpit and following his adventures worldwide,” she recalls.

“Through our travels, I met skilled artisans and craftsmen who made solid

furniture in stunning designs with their own hands. I knew that people

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 41


needed pieces like these in their homes—

pieces that told their own sustainable story,

were made by hand with love, and offered

timeless beauty and design to last a lifetime—

and so my passion grew into this business.”

Sage Interiors, located in the heart of Tacoma’s

Historic Brewery District, first planted roots in

the beautiful Pacific Northwest as TREE Eco

Home Furnishings in 2016, with the owners

Nicole and husband Nigel making the decision

to rebrand the company as Sage Interiors in

May of 2021. Offering award-winning home

furnishing and décor, with the rebrand has

come the addition of honing their interior

design services for their clients through their

signature service—Home Style + Design

Services. “Not only can clients come in and

shop, but they can seamlessly work with our

design team to create an entire home design

specific to their custom needs and unique

style,” shares Nicole.

The talented team of interior designers help

clients to create a customized design, from rugs

to tables, to color suggestions, to room layouts.

“Our design services are not only unique to

Sage, but the passion and care each one of our

team members shows toward our clients sets

us apart from other companies,” adds Nicole.

The company is one that values the unique and

personalized feeling of home with exceptional,

luxurious and sustainable furniture and décor.

From the mindfully made dining tables and

chairs, award-winning sofas and solid-wood

beds to on-trend desks, vintage rugs, plush

throws and more, the Sage team is committed

to curating pieces that are mindfully sourced

and carefully crafted.

The retail store and interior design services are

complemented by Sage Interiors’ exceptional

white-glove delivery service, where the pieces

are delivered directly into the client’s home.

They even offer a service in which their

delivery team can remove unwanted furniture

from the client’s home and deliver it directly

to Northwest Furniture Bank, which is located

just down the street from Sage Interiors! “We

have been able to donate hundreds of loveable

pieces over the years and are very proud to offer

that service to clients and our community,”

smiles Nicole.

SAGE INTERIORS

2416 SOUTH C STREET

TACOMA, WASHINGTON 98402

833.855.8733

SAGEINTERIORS.COM

42 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

It's no secret that Sage Interiors is a fabulous

furniture store—they recently received the

"Best Place to Buy Furniture" award in the

South Sound for 2021. Nicole feels blessed to be

able to share her passion with the community

and invites you to shop the gallery, which is

open daily from 10am to 6pm.


JOIN

OUR TEAM!

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HIRING

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~ WILL PROVIDE TRAINING ~

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 43


Feature

STANDING TOGETHER WITH ITS

COMMUNITY

UNITED WAY COLLABORATES

TO BRING CHANGE

BY RACHEL KELLY

United Way has a mission to improve lives. They do this by seeking

out the un-touched or un-talked about problems, using hands-on

experience and research-backed initiatives to solve them. While

United Way is a global nonprofit that functions all over the world, this doesn’t

stop them from being involved personally within their separate communities.

United Way believes that “to live better we must live United.” Which means that

they don’t shy from working with their neighbors to address common issues, to

ensure the health, education and financial stability for everyone.

United Way’s worldwide mission is to “improve lives by mobilizing the caring

power of communities around the world to advance the common good.” They

do this by providing access to basic needs, such as food, shelter and financial

stability. United Way also seeks to tackle transportation needs that inhibit

access to those basic needs. Those resources additionally provide for health

care and address domestic violence. The reach and scope of United Way as an

international nonprofit is huge, but the focus is small. Funds and resources

donated to a local United Way are distributed locally—to local organizations

and local people. It’s no wonder then that the United Way in Northern Idaho and

Pierce County have individual local relationships, initiatives and partnerships.

“Most people know United Way as a global organization. What most people

don’t realize is that we are a network of smaller nonprofits,” says Mark Tucker,

the executive director of United Way of North Idaho. This is especially

important, because this means that United Way is operating according to local

needs heard from local people and organizations. There are larger consistent

methods that United Way in the Pacific Northwest uses as a whole to assess

smaller community needs, such as ALICE. ALICE refers to the people within

any community that are Asset Limited, Income Constrained, and Employed.

ALICE works as a snapshot that allows each individual United Way to assess its

community needs and address systemic issues that contribute to any shortages.

“The great thing about a local structure with local volunteers is that we are

able to identify and focus on our community’s greatest needs,” says Mark. The

staff at this locality is relatively small, but their capacity for impact is increased

through their partnerships. Through the ALICE system as reference, United

Way in North Idaho has sought an understanding of their unique community

needs. This is the first step in any United Way venture and is especially true in the

counties of North Idaho. According to ALICE, 41 percent of these communities

are struggling to make ends meet. Through their local partnerships, they seek

real solutions. Using both ALICE and local connections, North Idaho has been

able to identify their community's greatest unmet need and proactively tends

to that need through working across sectors. Because their partnerships with

local agencies and providers have brought about a greater understanding of

how to approach the issue, United Way in North Idaho is in a unique position.

Not only are they able to provide research, but they are also able to step in

with funding.

Right now, North Idaho has identified childcare as a large unmet community

need. Since childcare is the most expensive item in the budget for a family, it

often is the barrier to getting parents back to work or working within the job

44

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 45


that they prefer. “As we dug deeper into the issue,

we realized that childcare workers are suffering

themselves. Since teacher pay is so low, turnover is

high, and lowering pay is not an option. With real

estate having gone up dramatically, relocating for

expansion is out of the question,” says Mark. What’s

more, providing childcare benefits the community

as a whole. Quality childcare prepares children for

school readiness, which means that kindergartners

are less likely to fall behind. Children who are not

able to keep up in school, that do not receive the

support they need, can often become delinquent.

This, in turn, means that schools lose tax revenue.

Loss of revenue, in turn, limits resources.

Even more urgently, providing quality childcare

supports businesses. When parents have consistent,

affordable childcare, both parents are able to go

back to work. Without this drain on their income,

they are able to use more of their income to

prepare for their future, invest in savings and pay

off debt. Employers consistently see childcare as

the top reason for tardiness or missed work. With

the current shift in the economy and workforce,

employers are beginning to change the way that

they see their employees. In turn, this affects how

they do business. With the current scarcity of

employees, employers are looking to invest into

childcare. Providing childcare in North Idaho helps

with recruitment and retention, as well as fills a

community need.

To move out of the current childcare crisis, United

Way of North Idaho approaches the problem

using two strategies: funding and direct service

programming. Using the Community Care Fund,

United Way funds nonprofits that are already doing

phenomenal work in the community. Direct service

programming is a straightforward approach to

address the crisis, where United Way develops its

own services to answer needs where no services

may be available. Examples include the Ready!

For Kindergarten, Bank on North Idaho Financial

literacy training, and the Family Scholarship

Funds and resources

donated to a local

United Way are

distributed locally—to

local organizations and

local people.

46 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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Experience. Life. Better .

Re-Elect

DAVID OLSON

Peninsula School Board

Please Vote

ACCOMPLISHMENTS:

• Built four new elementary schools

• Modernizing two middle schools

• State leader in safe return to in-person learning

• Hired PSD’s first female superintendent

• Expanded vocational opportunities & added NJROTC

IMPROVING EDUCATION,

Together

It has been an honor serving as your Peninsula School Board President. I look forward

to continuing to serve our outstanding students, teachers and the community as I

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program. Of course, United Way also uses

collaboration. The Child Care Committee

developed through $100,000 in funds from

United Way in North Idaho. This committee

has developed relationships with childcare

providers, municipalities, educators and

business leaders. Everyone is working together,

focused on ending the childcare crisis.

United Way in Pierce County just celebrated

100 hundred years of local service in their

area. They are as historically a presence in the

community as much as the theatres, train station

and harbors. Celebrations have commenced

throughout this last year, beginning with a food

drive and birthday party in May. The ending

celebrations finished on September 21 with a

free virtual rally. The centennial celebration

was part of an $8 million centennial campaign

series. Amanda Westbrook of the CityLine talk

show hosted the celebrations in style, bringing

participants back through the rich history of

United Way and culminating in a look at what’s

in store for the future. Participants were treated

to a first look at the Centennial video, as well

as given an opportunity to learn trivia and win

prizes. The spotlight has been on United Way

in Pierce County as they continue to rejoice in

their centennial year, but their everyday work

in the community has not ceased.

United Way’s long varied history in Pierce

County began in 1921 with the Federation

of Social Agencies. Partners in this building

included local churches, the Red Cross and

Tacoma Community Housing. Fundraising for

28 local charities and social agencies continued

throughout the years. In 1951, $318,000 was

raised and distributed, with close to $2,500

awarded to the Girl Scouts. In 1956, United

Way’s fundraisers reached $1 million for the

first time. In 1976, $2 million was reached

for the first time, with $238,000 donated to

its longtime partner The Red Cross. 1984

saw $4 million raised. In 1994, they broke $7

million. In 2000, Joanne Bamford introduced

early learning as a community focus. In 2003,

ABCD was established, which provided dental

services for low-income communities. For

several years after this, United Way established

itself as an advocate for early learning, with

$5 million raised specifically for this. In 2013,

70 percent of United Way resources were

allotted for prevention, such as early learning.

They were able to fund prevention while

still addressing present needs such as food,

shelter and clothing. In 2016, two Centers

for Strong Families were established. The

centers continued to raise funds for services

to families throughout the next few years, with

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large donations made by the Kaiser Permanente Foundation.

In 2019, the Center for Strong Families eventually established

Resilient Pierce County, which focuses on Franklin Pierce and

East Tacoma communities.

Today, United Way in Pierce County has directed its focus on

poverty, which they began in 2017. This was also the year that

United Way held its first From Poverty to Possibilities Summit.

Using the ALICE approach, a consistent research approach

among all of the United Ways in the Pacific Northwest, UWPC

has found out some information about present needs within the

community. According to research, 23 percent of the families

in Pierce County are ALICE families. This number has risen

over the pandemic. That means every one in five families are

struggling to make ends meet. United Way has done a lot in

Pierce County over its 100-year-long residence, but recent

research has shown that Pierce County is struggling with a

unique shortage of employment combined with a decrease in

housing. Everything United Way is doing in Pierce County

is focused on addressing this problem. United Way in Pierce

County has a goal of ending poverty for 15,000 families by

2028. They will continue to do this by partnering with local

organizations and nonprofits that provide for community

needs, in the hopes that, together, the community can break

down barriers toward self-sufficiency.

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“MOBILIZING THE

CARING POWER

IN COMMUNITIES

AROUND THE WORLD

To say that the partnerships are fast and widespread is an understatement. UWPC has coordinated efforts in school

districts, health and human services, faith-based groups, government agencies and individuals with commitments to

research forward action. UWPC is continuing in its trend to be an active part in meeting these families holistically, where

they’re at. This has been true for the last 100 years, and will continue to be true for the next.

United Way stands true to its mission to “mobilize the caring power in communities around the world.” They focus

on education, health and financial stability. The international impact of United Way is a vast interconnection of

communities around the world. Their projects include access to health care in Korea, books for children in Australia, and

financial stability in Denver, USA. Hundreds of thousands of people receive these services and financial aid. Many local

organizations receive grants. This has only been possible through unity. Not only is the fulfillment seen in United Way’s

unified network of interconnected smaller nonprofits, who mobilize among themselves, United Way also creates cohesion

in the communities they serve by pursuing relationships, providing funding, seeking out research, and gathering together

to hear directly from their community.

Approaches are vast and widespread, and they are direct and impactful. Whether they are large or small, personal or from

afar, United Way is making a difference in individual lives, one unified community collaboration at a time.

52 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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253

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

October 2021

SEE WHAT’S HAPPENING

54

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


EXCITEMENT RETURNS TO THE

BIG SCREEN

TACOMA FILM FESTIVAL SET FOR

OCTOBER 7 THROUGH 14

By Jillian Chandler

2021 marks the 16th year of the Tacoma Film Festival, with

this year’s event featuring screenings in the Grand Cinema as

well as making some of the festival programming available to

stream online.

According to David Dinnell, festival director, “The Tacoma Film Festival

began and continues to this day as a project of the Grand Cinema, and

the weeklong festival allows us to celebrate independent film and give

our audiences an opportunity to see some of the most recent and best

short films, documentaries, animation and narrative features from all

over the world.”

He adds that another focus of the festival is to celebrate filmmaking

right here in the Pacific Northwest, with the festival screening films by

many up-and-coming filmmakers from this region.

“The festival has a team of people, all drawn from the staff of the Grand

Cinema, along with many volunteers, who watch many films for the

better part of the year that come through an open call, and additionally

seek out some films that audiences here would otherwise not have a

chance to see.”

This year’s event will show more than 150 films at Tacoma’s Grand

Cinema, 22 of those feature length. From comedies to drama to

documentaries “exploring serious themes in very creative ways,” to

animation, a music video program, ‘late-night cult weirdness’ and

more, there really is something for just about everyone.

The morning of Saturday, October 9, there are two programs specifically

for children and their families: short fiction and animated films

presented by The New York International Children’s Film Festival, one

a Spanish-language only program (this is the first year the festival is

presenting this). All other films and programs in the festival are better

suited for high school age and older.

“It's a really enjoyable week, and a great way to come together with

people to celebrate the art of film,” shares David.

Visit TacomaFilmFestival.com for additional details and to purchase

tickets. Students will be allowed to attend for free this year thanks to

the festival's partnership with Tacoma Creates. For those unable to

attend this year’s festival but would like to make a donation, donations

can be made online as well by hovering over the "About Tab" and

clicking "Support."

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 55


16

COCKTAILS WITH THE CURATORS HAPPY HOUR: RED

WOLVES, ZOOBOOZE & BITES

Join The Zoo Society on Saturday, October 16, for Cocktails with the

Curators Happy Hour. Enjoy seeing animals, savoring sips and tastes from

local partners, and interacting with special guests. Proceeds from this

event will support the zoo and the Dr. Holly Reed Wildlife Conservation

Fund. Cost to attend is $75 and includes a champagne greeting, animal

encounters, signature cocktail, variety of drinks and appetizers from local

partners, meet and greet with the Red Wolf Keepers, and a special swag bag.

There will also be a silent auction and raffle, and a prize for the best face

mask. There are only 75 tickets available, so get yours today! For additional

details, visit TheZooSociety.org and click on "Events." For questions, email

society@thezoosociety.org.

ENTERTAINMENT

/ October

FOR EVENTS, VISIT 253LIFESTYLEMAGAZINE.COM.

16

21-

24

DEFIANCE 50K, 30K & 15K

The Tacoma City Marathon Association presents the Defiance 50k, 30k &

15k, a scenic race that takes runners through the beautiful trails of Point

Defiance, with over 700 acres of old-growth forests and panoramic views

of the Puget Sound. This year's race will take place on Saturday, October

16. Registration closes at 10am on Wednesday, October 13. Registration is

$240 for a three-person relay, $100 for 50k, $90 for 30k and $80 for 15k.

All entry fees are non-refundable. All race distances are chip timed, with

start time at 8am and the course closing at 4pm. Participants receive a

finisher medal and T-shirt. For additional details, to preview the course

and register, visit TCMAEvents.com/Defiance-50k.

30TH ANNUAL TACOMA HOLIDAY

FOOD & GIFT FESTIVAL

If you're looking to find the largest holiday show in the West, look no further

than the 39th annual Holiday Food & Gift Festival at the Tacoma Dome!

Held over four days, October 21 through 24, the show will feature unique

gift ideas, holiday and home décor, handmade arts and crafts, photography,

health and body, clothing, specialty foods and more. Enjoy the Santa area,

daily cooking demonstrations, entertainment and train setup by TNMRA!

Hours of the show are 10am to 8pm Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and

10am to 6pm Sunday. Tickets are $16.50, and those 13 and younger can

attend for free! Visit HolidayGiftShows.com for additional details and to

purchase tickets.

* Please note, as of press time, these events were still scheduled to take place as

planned. Due to the continuing pandemic, there is the possibility that event schedules

may change or events canceled completely. Be sure to visit event websites to stay up to

date with current information.

SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE!

Want your event to appear on the largest event site in the Northwest?

Submit your events to us online at Events.DirectoryNorthwest.com 24/7, 365 days a year!

56 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


Julie Reed

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253LifestyleMagazine.com

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 57


Eat & Drink

58

58

253 LIFESTYLE

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MAGAZINE

MAGAZINE


PUMPKIN BARS

WITH CREAM CHEESE FROSTING

AND BACON MAPLE BITS

Recipe Courtesy of Tina VanDenHeuvel-Cook, NTP, NHC

You can follow Tina @madebetterforyou on Instagram

INGREDIENTS:

MAPLE BACON TOPPING

2 tbsp. maple syrup (I like Lakanto brand)

1 tsp. butter

4 strips cooked bacon, cut into bits

CREAM CHEESE FROSTING

8 oz. softened cream cheese

4 tbsp. softened butter

3/4 cup Swerve confectioners sweetener

2 tsp. heavy cream

2 tsp. vanilla

PUMPKIN BARS

5 eggs

3/4 cup coconut oil, melted

1 cup canned pumpkin puree

3/4 cups Swerve brown sweetener

2 cups almond flour

1 tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. baking powder

2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice

3/4 tsp. Himalayan pink salt

METHOD:

MAPLE BACON BITS

• In a small skillet over medium heat, add maple syrup and butter.

• When butter has melted, add bacon bits and cook until bacon has absorbed most of the

syrup, about 4 minutes.

• Remove bacon from the pan onto a small plate and set aside to cool completely.

CREAM CHEESE FROSTING

• In a medium bowl add cream cheese, butter, sweetener, heavy cream and vanilla. Using

a hand mixer or stand mixer, mix ingredients until fully combined. Set frosting aside.

PUMPKIN BARS

• Preheat oven to 350˚F. In a medium bowl, add eggs, coconut oil (coconut oil may be

warm but not hot, as you don't want the eggs to scramble by adding the oil), pumpkin

and brown sugar. Using a hand mixer or stand mixer, combine all the ingredients until

smooth. Set aside.

• In another medium bowl, combine almond flour, baking soda, baking powder, pumpkin

pie spice and salt. Stir together and make sure you get all the clumps out.

• Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and mix well with a spatula until fully

combined.

• Line a 9x13 pan with parchment paper to prevent the bars from sticking to the pan. Pour

the batter into the pan. Bake for 30 minutes. Let cool completely on the counter.

• Spread the frosting evenly over the bars and sprinkle bacon bits over the frosting. Enjoy!

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 59


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Travel

TRAVEL AND TASTE

A FOOD AND WINE WEEKEND IN CHARMING

WOODINVILLE, WASHINGTON

BY MARGUERITE CLEVELAND

Amidst the Sammamish River Valley sits the charming town of Woodinville. With over 130 tasting rooms,

Woodinville, Washington, is a wine drinker’s heaven. There are four distinct wine districts each with their

own vibe. If you want to learn more about wine production, head to the Warehouse District for a behindthe-scenes

look. For city lovers, the Downtown District has lots of new tasting rooms, breweries, shopping and

restaurants. The West Valley District is situated on the west side of the Sammamish River and has a slower, more

relaxed atmosphere with the tasting rooms spread out. The landmark Hollywood School is where the Hollywood

District gets its name. For a food and wine weekend, Hollywood is where you want to be with a Conde Nast goldrated

resort, destination restaurants and more than 40 tasting rooms within walking distance.

Where to Stay

For a high-end super luxurious stay, the Willows Lodge is a gold-rated Conde Nast resort on 5 beautifully landscaped

acres within walking distance of the Hollywood District. The private patios overlook the peaceful gardens dominated

by old-growth trees. Truly a special place and worth the splurge.

It can be challenging to find lodging in Woodinville, especially during busy fall weekends. Just a 10-minute drive,

the Hilton Garden Inn Redmond Town Center is more like a boutique hotel with its modern, upscale décor. It is

a great option, and if you don’t feel like driving, there are a variety of transport options on the Woodinville Wine

Country website.

Where to Eat

So many great choices from charcuterie boards at wineries to multicourse fine dining can all be found in the

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 61


Hollywood District. For fine dining, The Barking Frog elevates the farmto-table

experience with creative menu items and gorgeous presentations.

Executive Chef Bobby Moore and team are inspired by fresh, local ingredients

and the cultural diversity of the Pacific Northwest. Make sure to try the Penn

Cove Mussels in a flavorful curry broth. Divine!

Heritage Restaurant is chef and owner Breanna Beike’s baby. She serves up

elevated comfort food moderately priced at this local favorite. Her food is

seriously good. Her Citrus Honey-Brined Half Chicken is a work of art. The

roast chicken’s crisp, caramel-hued skin is served with in-season vegetables,

cheddar whipped potatoes and a rich, red wine-enhanced chicken jus.

Foodie nirvana is a wine bar with great food. The Purple Café & Wine Bar offers

an extensive wine list. The wine flights are themed small pours of three different

wines; just enough, and you can pair one with each course. The café is known

for its Baked Brie, which is a wonder of gooey melted cheese smothered with

apricot, caramelized onions and candied walnuts encased in pastry. It is served

with fruit and crackers. The dine-in menu has a wide variety of starters that are

perfect to share with your table and make a meal out of it. This gives you the

opportunity to try a variety of food and wine pairings.

What to Do

Frankly, visitors come to Woodinville to drink wine, so that should be the focus

of your visit. With 130-plus tasting rooms, it can be overwhelming. Plan to visit

one in the morning followed by a great lunch, then visit two in the afternoon.

In the Hollywood District you can easily fit in more with so many wineries right

next to each other, but it will give you a much less relaxed experience. Also,

with COVID-19 protocols, it is not as easy to just drop in and taste. Research

prior to your visit and make reservations for the places you want to try to avoid

disappointment.

Here are three worth trying. Dusted Valley is a family owned business creating

the American Dream. With a dentist in the family, wine-stained teeth have

inspired the names of both wines and the Stained Tooth Wine Club Society.

Good wine grows in the vineyards, and Dusted Valley’s sustainable farming

practices are creating excellent fruit. The 2018 Stained Tooth Syrah is a standout

with its rich purple hue. It is a gorgeous wine of 97 percent Syrah with a 3

percent hint of Viognier.

Lauren Ashton Cellars is in the Apple Farm Village, a darling collection of

historic cottages that are nestled in beautiful gardens, which give outdoor space

to the tasting rooms. Kit Singh, owner of Lauren Ashton Cellars, is a gifted

winemaker who crafts beautifully nuanced wines with his own take on the

French style of winemaking. Singh makes both red and white wines, but he

produces a greater variety of whites than most Washington winemakers. For

those who love white wine, you will have a difficult time choosing your favorite.

A unique wine worth trying is the 2020 Roussanne, as Singh is one of the few in

Washington who creates a wine from this complex white grape varietal, which

is indigenous to the Rhone Valley of France. Its delicate flavor pairs perfectly

with shellfish.

The tasting room for Obelisco Estate is also at the Apple Farm Village. General

manager and winemaker Ken Abbott carries on the legacy of his uncle, famed

62 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


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64 253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


winemaker Doug Long, while continuing to work with Aunt Betsy Long. They are known for their big, bold Red

Mountain (AVA) reds, and you are going to want to take home a bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon or a red blend

to age for a special occasion. Abbott also makes some unique wines such as a Rosé of Cabernet Sauvignon. It is

100 percent juice unlike most Rosés which have water added. The winery staff have dubbed it the “Brose” due

to its big fruit flavor while remaining dry. It is the “white wine” for red wine drinkers. Another unusual wine is

the Late Harvest Cabernet, which is sweet enough to be a dessert wine. At the end of the harvest season, Abbott

and all the staff pick the final grapes of the season for this wine.

Before visiting Woodinville, take the time to visit the Woodinville Wine Country website and view the event

calendar. There is usually something going on every weekend. A fun activity is Yoga and Wine at Gard Vintners

Woodinville. You’ll take a yoga class which is a mixture of Hatha and Vinyasa followed by a wine tasting flight

or glass of wine. On Friday evenings, check the schedule for happy hours with live music at a tasting room. If

you feel like getting some outside time, walk the Sammamish River Trail, which, as its name suggests, follows

the river.

Insider Tip: If you are new to wine tasting, make your first stop the iconic Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery. This

gorgeous chateau hosts multiple tasting rooms and offers a variety of wine experiences and classes which will

increase your wine education.

The Specifics

Information

WoodinvilleWineCountry.com

Where to Stay

The Willows Lodge - WillowsLodge.com

Hilton Garden Inn Redmond Town Center - Hilton.com

Where to Eat

The Barking Frog - WillowsLodge.com/barking_frog

Heritage Restaurant - HeritageWoodinville.com

Purple Café & Wine Bar - PurpleCafe.com/woodinville

What to Do

Yoga and Wine - YogaWineatGard.eventbrite.com

Lauren Ashton Cellars - LaurenAshtonCellars.com

Obelisco Estate - Obelisco.com

Dusted Valley - DustedValley.com

253 LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE 65


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