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Vol. 50, No. 22 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916 October 6, 2021

www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com

Vermont Approved to

Welcome 100 Afghan

Refugees

page 2

Governor Phil Scott

Announces Winners of over

$3.6 Million in Downtown

and Village Center Tax

Incentives

page 5

COVID’s tough but I’m tougher.

And, turns out, getting vaccinated

isn’t tough at all.

Rita Copeland

Retiring From

TVSC

page 14

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT

TO THE WORLD

GET THE JOB

page 15-19

Legislative Leadership Sends

Letter to US Department

of Labor page 19

AUTUMN

OUTINGS

page 20-21

Learn more about the COVID vaccine

and how easy it is to get vaccinated.

Call our Helpline at 1-800-642-5119

or visit Vaccine4Vermont.com

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page 26-27

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THANK YOU FOR SAYING

I SAW IT IN

Vermont Approved to Welcome 100 Afghan Refugees

Governor Phil Scott announced the U.S.

Committee for Refugees and Immigrants

(USCRI) was approved this week by the U.S.

Department of State to welcome up to 100

Afghans in Vermont in the weeks ahead. An

exact timeline of arrivals has not yet been established.

I is a national nonrofit resettlement

agency that assists people who have migrated

to the .. to hel them live safe and dignified

lives. Is Vermont ffice overnor

cott the tate efugee ffice at the Vermont

Agency of Human Services and other refugee

programs have been pursuing opportunities to

welcome refugees over the last several weeks.

The goal is to accommodate some of the

many Afghans who are being targeted due to

support of the U.S. military and U.S. government

agencies as well as media and nongov

ernmental organiations following the end of

U.S. military operations in Afghanistan.

“We have a moral obligation to help the

eole of fghanistan who did so much to

hel us in the ar on error said over

nor Phil Scott. “In addition to this being the

right thing to do we now that welcoming

more refugees also strengthens communities

schools our worforce culture and economy.

I appreciate the federal government’s partnership

in helping us welcome more families to

Vermont.

or years the overnor has reuested an

nual increases in refugee resettlement in Vermont

as part of a comprehensive strategy to

increase economic growth and expand Vermont’s

workforce.

“We were glad to receive this approval from

the State Department. It is an honor to help

those who have helped our service members

overseas and it is a wonderful opportunity for

Vermont’s communities and for our businesses

who are very interested in expanding our

worforce and filling our o vacancies said

racy olan the director of the tate efugee

ffice which is woring closely with I

to plan support services for Afghans arriving

in Vermont.

“We are learning from our colleagues at

military bases and arrival centers across the

country that employment is one of the highest

priorities mentioned by these newly arriving

fghans. hey are eager to find os and re

uild their lives added olan.

USCRI Vermont will work closely with

the tate as well as with schools emloy

ers landlords and health and social service

rograms to meet the needs of arriving f

ghans and of the community. Before they arrive

in Vermont fghans will have comleted

medical and security screenings and will e

authorized to work. USCRI is continuing to

respond to Vermont volunteers and businesses

interested in offering support.

“I want to thank Vermonters for the outpouring

of support we are receiving – we

are not always fast to respond immediately

to your offers due to the preparations we are

making but want you to know we are thankful

as we work together to extend a warm welcome

to our fghan neighors said mila

Merdanovic irector of I.

The State Department also approved the

Ethiopian Community Development Council

to oen a new field office in rat

tleboro. ECDC is a resettlement agency that

works with refugees from around the world

and hired oe iah who egan his new role

as director of the rattleoro office on e

tember 20. ECDC plans to submit a proposal

to the State Department to welcome 25 Afghans

to Brattleboro in the coming months.

“ECDC is grateful for the support it has

received from the rattleoro community

the Brattleboro Development Credit Corporation

the ommunity sylum eeers roect

Shapiro Foundation and the Braden-Harder &

Lawrence Harder Charitable Fund to open a

new ranch office the Multicultural

ommunity enter said essica haman

ommunity utreach Manager . “f

ter many months of planning and discussions

we look forward to starting the work of welcoming

refugees and Special Immigrant Visa

holders to the southern art of Vermont.

The State will continue to provide additional

information on the resettlement of Afghans

in Vermont as more details become available.

Additional Information:

fghan Inuiries .. eartment of

State): https://www.state.gov/afghanistaninuiries.

Resources for Afghan Allies still in Afghanistan

(USCRI): https://refugees.org/

resources-for-afghan-allies/.

About ECDC: Ethiopian Community Development

Council (ecdcus.org).

tate of Vermont gency of uman er

vices: https://humanservices.vermont.gov/.

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page 2 The WORLD October 6, 2021


A Coalition of Vermonters Holds Press

Conference on School Funding Inequity

The Coalition for Vermont Student Equity

(CVTSE) held a press conference to highlight

how Vermont is currently failing its moral

and constitutional obligations to ensure that

all children in Vermont, regardless of where

they live, have access to equitable educational

opportunities.

In 2019, a study commissioned by the Vermont

Legislature and conducted by the University

of Vermont and Rutgers University

concluded that Vermont does not accurately

account for the actual costs of educating children

who come from poverty, children who require

English language learning services and

children who attend rural and small schools.

The study also documented exactly how to

accurately account for these costs and bring

equity across Vermont’s K-12 school system.

The Task Force on the Implementation of the

Pupil Weighting Factors Report was established

this year to meet over the summer and

fall months to address the systemic inequity in

Vermont’s education funding formula.

“The UVM/Rutgers study provides us with

a clear and empirical basis for setting pupil

weights,” said Rory Thibault, Chair of the

Cabot School Board. “I urge the task force to

adopt the weighting recommendations as this

is the only means to truly address the inequity

that the majority of Vermont’s districts face.”

The eight-member legislative task force

has been considering two options: Correcting

the weights as recommended in the UVM/

Rutgers report, or using grants known as “categorical

aid”. CVTSE strongly opposes the

use of categorical aid in place of correcting

the awed funding formula.

“Thank you for taking the time to serve on

this important task force,” said Dan Fingas,

Vermont State Organizing Director of Rights

& Democracy. “As staff, members and supporters

of Rights & Democracy, we feel it

is imperative to voice our strong support for

correcting the pupil weighting systems in Vermont,

rather than considering categorical aid.

This is the only option that will advance equity

in Vermont’s education funding formula

and in our overall public education system.

• • •

“Because the amount of categorical aid

would e unnown year to year staffing

would be subject to greater instability, which

may discourage teachers from taking positions

in high poverty school districts like Winooski,”

said Nicole Mace, Winooski School

District’s Business Manager. “Categorical aid

would also mean a tax increase for everyone.

Even underweighted districts like Winooski

would have to contribute taxes into categorical

aid.”

Recently, the task force held a public hearing

to listen to the perspectives and concerns

of Vermonters regarding this critical issue.

Notably, 100 percent of public commenters,

nearly 40 people, urged the task force to reject

the categorical aid approach and instead correct

the awed funding formula.

“As an educator of over 30 years and

someone who has worked in overweighted

districts and who lives in an underweighted

district, I have a unique perspective and I have

seen firsthand the effects of this ineuitale

funding formula,” said Martine Gulick, who

serves as a Burlington School District Commissioner.

“For example, I have seen the ease

with which overweighted districts can add

staff to their schools and create positions that

allow them to meet education quality standards.

I have personally experienced working

in a library with a budget 10 times that

of the library in my local high school. I have

seen staff in underweighted districts doing

the work of two or three staff members in an

overweighted district.”

By December 15, 2021, the task force must

submit a written report to the legislature with

its action plan and proposed legislation which

will then be taken up by the full legislature

during the 2022 Legislative Session.

“I am asking that we place our Vermont

values first in this conversation since the

Brigham decision in 1997 we have recognized

the importance of bringing equitable

educational opportunities to all students,”

said Thibault. “The task force and legislature

have the opportunity to align our education

finance system with these values.

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Vermont’s Pediatricians Support

Implementation of “Test to Stay

Program” to Keep Vermont

Children in School

Vermont’s pediatricians support a “Test to Stay” (TTS)

program for asymptomatic, unvaccinated children exposed to

COVID-19 at school. Vermont pediatricians and pediatric

infectious diseases specialists are collaborating with state

agencies in the design and implementation of TTS based on

the program currently in place in Massachusetts.

The Delta variant has led to an ongoing surge of COVID-19

cases throughout Vermont, resulting in more cases in

Vermont’s K-12 schools. Unvaccinated close contacts of

COVID-19 infected staff and students are required to quarantine

at home, leading to significant missed school days for

children and even some school closures in Vermont.

Test to Stay programs provide unvaccinated, asymptomatic

children who are a close contact of a COVID-19 case due to

in-school exposure an option to undergo daily rapid antigen

testing for seven days following exposure. Students may

attend school each day following a negative test result, but

otherwise must quarantine at home during the testing period.

All participating students must also wear masks while in

school. Symptomatic students cannot participate in TTS and

should instead follow current guidance for return to school

following illness. Test to Stay programs are only implemented

for school-based exposures, as transmission of SARS-CoV-2

is less likely in this setting than other community environments.

If a K-12 student is a close contact due to an exposure

outside of the school setting, they must follow current guidance

and quarantine at home.

The Vermont data shows that mitigation strategies employed

by schools are effective in reducing the risk of COVID-19

transmission in the school environment. A recently published

randomized controlled trial in the U.K. demonstrated that

schools using a TTS strategy had as little school transmission

as schools quarantining students after in school exposure.

Planning and implementing a TTS program is complex at

both the state and local level. AAPVT will continue to work

closely with state agencies, school nurses and school leaders

to develop solutions that will allow students to attend school

safely while minimizing transmission of COVID-19.

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FOR

BREASTFEEDING

Farm id Welcomes

Salvation Farms

ach year arm id oard

memers illie elson eil

oung ohn Mellencam

ave Matthews and Margo

rice host a arm id festival

to ring together a wide variety

of artists farmers and

fans for one mission: keeping

family farmers on the land.

arm id was held

last weeend on aturday

etemer th in artford

onnecticut and Vermonts

own alvation arms was

invited to participate in the

estivals M

Village. arm id says “he M Village is lie

a mini festival within a festival In the Village festivalgoers

explore hands-on activities that engage all of their senses in

the arm id mission.

alvation arms M Village ehiit rovided

a glimse into what nutritious food that doesnt mae it to

your late loos lie while heling fols visualie what re

localied food systems in the nited tates could loo lie if

we used the estimated illion ounds of edile roduce that

remain on farms unharvested unsold and uneaten annually in

this country.

“ur ehiit evoed curiosity y heling fols visualie

what food loss on farms in merica loos lie. e guided

festival-goers through exploring the shocking reality that

merica is leaving an estimated of edile roduce on

farms across the nation. e engaged in discussions around

what role this food can lay to etter reare the nation to

feed itself y reuilding regional shorter suly chains

heresa now alvation arms founder and ecutive

irector elained. “It was such an honor to e a art of arm

id and to engage others in critical conversations aout farming

and how we choose to feed ourselves.

alvation arms ehiit was alive and colorful made u

of surlus roduce a dislay similar to what one might see at

a farmers maret. his covered the foot tale rovided y

arm id. ooending the roduce dislay were vertical anners

that include food loss on farms statistics farmer recommendations

for reducing food loss on farms and images of the

farm surlus management strategies alvation arms has

modeled and instituted in Vermont. ehind the ehiit was a

anner reading “hat if we ate more of what we grew n

the tale among the surlus roduce were smaller signs to get

festivalgoers thining “food loss is not the farmers fault

and “why was this roduce never going to mae it to someones

late

o learn more aout alvation arms www.salvationfarms.

org. o learn more aout arm id www.farmaid.org.

• • •

Central Vermont Regional Planning

Commission and Town of Berlin

Implement Stormwater Treatment at

erlin own ffice

The Central Vermont Regional Planning Commission

(CVRPC) is pleased to announce that they have completed

a multi-phase project to treat stormwater runoff at the Berlin

own ffice in erlin V. his roect started with a tormwater

Master lanning M rocess where it was identified

and rioritied as one of the to five roects within the

plan to help reduce sediment and phosphorus pollutant loadings

within the tevens ranch watershed and ultimately

ae hamlain. he M and suseuent final design and

construction was funded y the Vermont eartment of nvironmental

onservations lean ater fund. V

received funding for the final design and construction through

the lean ater esign Imlementation loc rant rogram

managed y the Mount scutney egional ommission

M.

The construction was completed in the summer of 2021 and

is a wonderful example of partners working together to help a

municiality meet the recent acre ermit tormwater eneral

ermit reuirements. he roerty where the

erlin own ffice and arage is located is considered a “

acre property” as it has more than 3 acres of impervious surfaces

land areas that do not drain. he Vermont eartment

continued on next page

CONSTRUCTION UPDATE

I-89 Bridges 37S and 38S Berlin

TRAFFIC IMPACT: I-89 Southbound Exit 7 on-ramp traffi c will be

stopped for short durations during paving operations next week.

No traffi c impacts anticipated on Route 62 or Crosstown Road next

week.

Motorists will encounter a lane reduction in the Northbound and

Southbound lanes of the interstate. Travel will be reduced to one lane of

travel within the construction zone.

Traffi c has been switched to the crossovers on the interstate. This

pattern will remain in place throughout the construction season, into

the Fall.

Width restrictions will be in place on both the Northbound and

Southbound lanes of travel. Northbound will be restricted to 18 feet,

and Southbound will be restricted to 13 feet.

A speed reduction of 55 mph is in place, and fi nes are doubled for

speeding within the construction zone.

CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES: Public protection measures on the

underside of Bridge 38S have been removed.

Membrane is being applied to the decks on both Bridge 37S and 38S

today and tomorrow (9/30-10/1).

Paving of both bridge decks is scheduled for mid-week next week. Once

paving has been completed, crews will begin installing asphaltic plug

joints at both bridges.

PROJECTED COMPLETION: Fall 2021

CONTACT INFORMATION: Natalie Boyle

Phone - 802-855-3893 Email - nboyle@eivtech.

page 4 The WORLD October 6, 2021


Governor Phil Scott

Announces Winners of over

$3.6 Million in Downtown and

Village Center Tax Incentives

Governor Phil Scott announced funding to support 28 rehabilitation

and revitalization projects in 22 of Vermont’s designated

downtown and village centers. These awards will help

generate over $83 million in building improvements and

public infrastructure to support local businesses, create new

housing opportunities and incentivize investments that will

improve the resiliency and vitality of Vermont’s community

centers.

“Like so many aspects of our lives, neighborhoods and

economy, Vermont’s downtowns and villages have been significantly

impacted by the pandemic. That is why it is inspiring

to see so many Vermont companies, non-profits and individuals

committed to making significant investments for the

future of their communities. This collaborative approach is

part of the reason our Downtown Program is so successful,”

said Governor Scott. “The kind of projects we’re funding

today, along with the strategic use of federal relief dollars,

gives us the opportunity to make transformative change that

will have long-lasting impacts around the state.”

In 2021, $3.6 million in tax credits will offset the costs of

major investments to projects, including transformation of the

former Bennington High School into a community center with

recreation and arts programs, local businesses, and new housing;

creation of three apartments in a formerly vacant home in

the village of East Hardwick; reinvestment to support the

reopening of Currier’s Market in Glover; and support of a

major investment to adapt a vacant warehouse at the former

Ide Feed Mill in St. Johnsbury into a processing facility for a

local hemp-based manufacturing company.

“The Downtown and Village Center tax credit program has

remained popular, despite recent economic uncertainty,” said

Department of Housing and Community Development

Commissioner Josh Hanford. “The continued fierce competition

for funding we see every year is a testament both to the

effectiveness of the program, but also to the dedication of so

many Vermonters who continue to invest in making the place

they call home even better for their residents, businesses, and

visitors.”

Based on the success of this program, Governor Scott has

proposed increasing available credits each year since coming

to office. And with support from the Vermont Legislature, the

cap on these credits has been raised from $2.4 million to $3

million over the last five years.

For a complete list of projects visit the Department of

Housing and Community Development website.

• • •

Stormwater Treatment continued

of Environmental Conservation issued the 3-acre permit in

September of 2020, which includes requiring all properties

with greater than 3-acres of impervious surfaces (including

properties developed prior to 2002 stormwater permit regulations)

to treat stormwater runoff before it enters nearby waterways.

For more information on the Stormwater General

Permit 3-9050 please visit https://dec.vermont.gov/watershed/

stormwater/9050.

The Central Vermont Regional Planning Commission continues

to work with its member municipalities to encourage

efforts to improve water quality and to help them meet the

3-acre permit. The CVRPC assists its member municipalities

to provide effective local government and work cooperatively

to address regional issues. The Commission also works with

area nonrofits other regional organiations tate and ederal

agencies, and the public to implement projects and programs

tailored to Central Vermont and statewide needs. For more information

on CVRPC, visit www.centralvtplanning.org.

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October 6, 2021 The WORLD page 5


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page 6 The WORLD October 6, 2021

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EBT/SNAP Cards Welcome

Pfizer Booster Shots Now Available to

All Eligible Groups

Governor Phil Scott announced that many

more Vermonters can now schedule and

receive their Pfizer vaccine booster shots.

“We know vaccines are safe and effective,

and these additional doses add even more

protection. So, I encourage anyone who is

eligible to register for your booster today,”

said Governor Scott. “At the same time, we

continue to urge those who have not yet gotten

their first dose to get vaccinated. The data

shows we are now in a pandemic of the

unvaccinated, and vaccines are the best way

to protect yourself, friends and family, and to

make sure we continue moving forward from

the pandemic.”

In Vermont, you are now eligible to get a

booster shot of Pfizer vaccine if you received

your second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech

vaccine six months ago or more, and

• are age 65 or older, or

• are age 18 or older with certain medical

conditions that put you at high risk of getting

severely ill with COVID-19, or

• are age 18 or older and are more likely to be

exposed to or spread COVID because of

where you work, or

• are age 18 or older and are Black, Indigenous

or a person of color (BIPOC), or are age 18 or

older and live with someone who is BIPOC.

As of Friday morning (Oct. 1), more than

4,700 people have registered through the state

system for their third dose. People are also

able to get their shots at participating pharmacies

and through their health care provider.

Where and How to Get Your Booster Shot

Getting your booster shot is free and easy!

Visit healthvermont.gov/MyVaccine for more

First Congregational Church of Berlin

Announces Rev. Alison Young as New Pastor

The First Congregational Church of Berlin

is pleased to announce that Rev. Alison

Young has been approved as our settled parttime

pastor, beginning her tenure on October

1, 2021.

Pastor Alison holds a degree in A.B.

English (cum laude) from Oberlin College

(Ohio), and has full standing with the United

Church of Christ, being ordained in 1993

after graduating from Andover Newton

Theological School with a M. Div. (with

Honors). She has served several New England

churches as pastor or transitional minister,

NATIONAL

BUSINESS

WOMEN’S

WEEK

Our October 20 issue is your

chance to unite with all the women

in Central Vermont during

National Business Women’s Week.

This special section will feature

participating women’s “business

cards”...including a picture and

promotion of your business for

only $55.

If you would like to be a part

of this event please call

The WORLD sales staff

and reserve your space.

Deadline is Wednesday,

October 13.

Your

PHOTO

Here

• • •

Your

LOGO

Name, title

Address

Phone

Email

www.webaddress.com

ad size = 3.1 inches x 2 inches

information, and to find a location that offers

the Pfizer vaccine near you.

To register through the Health Department

website:

• Visit healthvermont.gov/MyVaccine

• Click the “make an appointment” button.

• Log in to your account. Have the information

you need to log in ready.

• If you are eligible by work or medical conditions,

you may need to update your details

in the registration system before making an

appointment. Go to the Dependent/

Household/Client tab and click the UPDATE

DETAILS button.

• Proceed with making your appointment.

If you have not previously been vaccinated

through the state registration system, need

assistance or speak a language other than

English, call 855-722-7878.

You will not need to show proof that you’re

eligible or have to be a Vermont resident, but

please bring your vaccination card. You must

have an appointment for the vaccine clinic.

Health officials are also reminding

Vermonters that it’s time to get your annual

flu vaccine, and that there is no waiting period

between getting a COVID-19 booster and

getting your flu shot.

COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective,

and a booster dose gives your body extra

protection. This is especially important as

the world continues to face the Delta variant

of the virus that causes COVID-19. Moderna

and Johnson and Johnson boosters have not

yet been authorized by the CDC, and we will

keep Vermonters up to date as we await

guidance.

and has built a strong portfolio of working

with local communities and wider church

organizations in her ministrations.

Pastor Alison and her husband Denis have

returned to Vermont in their retirement and

will live in the Montpelier area until they

complete plans to build their new home.

The First Congregational Church of Berlin

is inclusive, open and welcoming; Sunday

worship is at 9:30 a.m. every Sunday (in person

or on Zoom). 1808 Scott Hill Road,

Berlin, VT 802-229-0338.

Central Vermont’s

Newspaper

403 U.S. Rte. 302

Barre, VT 05641

www.vt-world.com

PH: 802-479-2582

TF: 800-639-9753

FX: 802-479-7916


Kelly Brush Ride Raises More than

$825,000 for Adaptive Sports

Participants in the 16th Annual Kelly Brush

Ride powered by VBT Bicycling Vacations

raised more than $825,000, setting a fundraising

record for the event. The ride supports the

Kelly Brush Foundation’s mission to improve

the lives of those with spinal cord injury

through sports and recreation.

This year’s ride, which took place on

September 11, was highlighted by the first

female handcyclist successfully completing

the 100-mile route that starts and ends in

Middlebury, Vermont. Starting in the predawn

hours, Naomi Clark of Ashfield,

Massachusetts, handcycled for nearly 12

hours to complete the ride.

“Naomi’s spirit in tackling the 100-mile

route embodies the spirit of this year’s event,

and everything we do at the Kelly Brush

Foundation,” said Executive Director Edie

Perkins. “This unprecedented level of fundraising

support from participants is absolutely

amazing and makes it possible for the Kelly

Brush Foundation to have a direct, positive

impact in the lives of people with spinal cord

injuries across the country.”

The event drew 942 in-person and virtual

participants, including 47 handcyclists. Funds

raised provide direct support for equipment

that gets people with spinal cord injuries out

enjoying the activities that enrich their lives,

like skiing, basketball, cycling and tennis. To

date, the foundation has awarded more than

1,172 grants in 48 states for adaptive equipment

through its Active Fund. The ride also

supports the foundation’s ski racing safety

$31,000 Raised at CVHHH’s Motorcycle Poker

Run & Raffle to Support Central VT Families

Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice

(CVHHH) raised over $31,000 at the

Motorcycle Poker Run & Raffle, which was

held on Saturday, September 18, to benefit its

Maternal-Child Health program. 33 motorcycle

riders gathered at the Capital City Country

Club in Montpelier and took off for a motorcycle

ride led by Rock Solid with stops in

Williamstown, Roxbury, and Northfield.

Participants and friends reconvened at the

Capital City Country Club for a chicken barbecue

and lunch, with food donated by

McAuley’s Foodservice and Dan Violet,

owner of Jockey Hollow catering, and cooking

provided by two members of the

Montpelier Kiwanis, Fred Bushway and

Andy Ribolini.

Brian Aitchison, Berlin resident and

CVHHH Board Member, rode in the event

and said: “I enjoyed participating in the Poker

Run. The riders from Rock Solid did a fantastic

job leading the motorcyclists safely on a

scenic route throughout Central Vermont. The

ride was well organized and safe, and the

checkpoint volunteers were efficient. It was a

fun day with a bunch of friendly riders, all out

to support such a worthy cause. I look forward

to next year’s event.”

Attorney General Donovan Announces

Impact of “Vermont Legal Community

Fighting Hunger Food Drive”

Following the close of a two-week collective

effort, Attorney General T.J. Donovan,

the Vermont Bar Association (VBA), the

Vermont Paralegal Organization (VPO), and

the Vermont Foodbank announced the positive

impact of the Vermont Legal Community

ighting unger ood rive. or the ast five

years, legal professionals across the state have

come together to run the food drive. After

hosting last year’s food drive virtually in June,

AG Donovan, the VBA, VPO, and Foodbank

returned to hosting the event during Hunger

Action Month in September. The COVID-19

pandemic has caused a steep increase in food

insecurity for Vermonters and need has not

yet returned to pre-pandemic levels.

In the two weeks of this year’s food drive,

professionals across the Vermont legal community

together raised $6,845.00, which will

supply more than 11,431 meals for Vermonters.

All funds donated went directly to the important

work of the Vermont Foodbank. Food

and other items donated were brought to local

food shelves or meal sites partnered with the

Vermont oodan. In the fiveyear history of

the food drive, the Vermont legal community

has raised more than $50,000 and collected

over 11,000 food items.

“We are grateful to this year’s participants

in the Vermont Legal Community Fighting

Hunger Food Drive,” said Attorney General

T.J. Donovan. “We know this effort makes

• • •

• • •

program. Each year grants are awarded to ski

clubs and racing programs for improving race

course safety.

“Congratulations to the Kelly Brush

Foundation for such a successful event. It’s

been exciting to see the ride continue to grow

over the past decade that VBT has been the

title sponsor,” said Timo Shaw, VBT

Bicycling Vacations President. “We are proud

to be aligned with the KBF community and

part of this wonderful gathering.”

The Kelly Brush Ride powered by VBT

Bicycling Vacations is made possible thanks

to the generosity of many participants, volunteers

and sponsors including: VBT Bicycling

Vacations, Sugarbush Resort, Murphy Realty

Company, LLC, Audi South Burlington,

Ross-Simons Jewelry, World Cup Supply,

Gravel & Shea PC, NBT Bank, Nokian Tyres,

People’s United Bank, Vermont Mortgage

Company, our hosts on the Middlebury Ski

Team and other generous sponsors.

About Kelly Brush Foundation

The Kelly Brush Foundation is a dynamic

and growing Burlington, Vermont based nonprofit

inspiring and empowering people with

spinal cord injuries to be active and working

closely with the alpine ski racing community

to improve safety. The Kelly Brush

Foundation was founded in 2006 by Kelly

and her family after Kelly sustained a spinal

cord injury while racing in an NCAA alpine

ski race. To date the Kelly Brush Foundation

has awarded more than 1,172 adaptive equipment

grants to people in 48 states.

CVHHH would like to thank the following

top sponsors:

• Event Sponsor New England Excess

Exchange

• Royal Flush Sponsors Carmen Beck,

Northfield Savings Bank

• Four of a Kind Sponsors Maple Capital

Management, John Meyer, National Life

Group, rb Technologies

• Venue Sponsor Capital City Country Club,

Steve and Andy Ribolini

CVHHH would also like to thank the Rock

Solid Crew of the Iron Order Motorcycle

Club for coordinating and leading the ride

portion of the event.

Sage Guggenheim was the lucky raffle

winner. She took home the 2021 Harley

Davidson Forty-Eight Sportster 1200X.

All proceeds from the Poker Run benefit

CVHHH’s Maternal-Child Health program,

which provides prenatal and postpartum medical

and supportive care at home. Services

include lactation education and consultations

seven days a week and coordinating care with

community providers. Learn more about

MCH care on CVHHH’s website at www.

cvhhh.org.

a real impact to improve food insecurity for

Vermonters.”

Vermont Bar Association President Elizabeth

Kruska also expressed her appreciation

to articiants. “ood insecurity is a significant

challenge across Vermont and has only been

heightened by COVID-19. Thank you to all

the legal professionals who contributed to this

year’s food drive. We look forward to working

again with the Vermont Foodbank, the Attorney

enerals ffice and the Vermont arale

gals’ Organization on future food drives.”

Lucia White, CP, Pro Bono Chair of the

Vermont Paralegal Organization expressed

VPO’s gratitude for the opportunity to participate

in helping alleviate hunger in Vermont.

“The timing of this year’s food drive allowed

participants to donate food items at our CLE

onference. aralegals eagerly filled u ags

to help other Vermonters.”

“The long-time support of the Vermont

Legal Community, and their compassion and

dedication to ending hunger, helps provide

meals to our neighbors facing hunger and also

brings greater awareness to our community

around the issue of hunger in our state,” said

John Sayles, CEO of the Vermont Foodbank.

Within participating categories, those collecting

the most item and monetary donations

will be recognized at the Vermont Bar Association’s

Annual Meeting on Friday, October

8, 2021

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October 6, 2021 The WORLD page 7

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Ainsworth

Public Library

Williamstown

Look for us on Facebook: Ainsworth Public Library

802-433-5887

library@williamstownvt.org

www.ainsworthpubliclibrary.org

2338 VT RTE 14 Williamstown, VT

Curbside: M: 10-5:30pm, TH 10-4pm

Appointments: M: 10-5:30pm, TH 10-4pm

Open Days: T: 2-7pm, W: 11-6, FR: 2-7pm SA: 10-2

Phase 4.5 of Library Opening

Please check our website for details regarding what we are

offering for services. www.Ainsworthpubliclibrary.org We are

offering a variety of services M 10-5:30pm & W 11-6pm, TH

10-4pm appointment and curbside. Appointments are limited

to 6 people in the building at one time. You can sign up ahead

of time by email, phone or FB messenger. Open Days no

appointment necessary: T 2-7pm, F 2-7pm, SA 10-2pm. Mask

required.

All Events Will Be Held At the Old Schoolhouse

Common, 122 School St., Marshfield, VT 802-426-3581.

For more info: jaquithpubliclibrary@gmail.com~~ www.

jaquithpubliclibrary.org.

Library hours: Tuesday through Friday 9-12 & 3-6; Saturday

& Monday 9-12.

Batik for Teens Ages 13-18

6 Saturdays: 1p.m. - 4 p.m. October 16 - November 20. Preregistration

Required by October 14

Since everything old is new again; referring to bell-bottoms,

hippie shirts, and platform shoes, how about the great

wall tapestries? Perhaps your very own batik t-shirt or something

from your own closet! Each student will have a finished

product of their own choosing upon leaving class.

Spend a few weeks creating beautiful batik art work, utilizing

hot wax resist and dyes. Guaranteed fun and messy, so

dress down for the occasion and get ready to experiment! This

class will be taught in an open art studio style and will accommodate

each student’s individual style and interest. Classes

will run with a minimum of 6 students and a maximum of 10.

Materials will be supplied; all you need to bring is your creativity.

Instructor: Loraleh Harris

Pumpkin Celebration & Book & Bake Sale

Saturday, Oct. 23 (Rain date Oct. 24)

Decorate or carve a pumpkin, make a lantern, go on a

pumpkin walk. Buy some books or bake sale treats. If you add

your pumpkin to the walk, you win a prize! Come dressed up!

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Book/ Bake sale & Crafting, 3 p.m. to 8

p.m. Pumpkin walk

The walk is along the Old Schoolhouse Common Recreation

Path. Come during the day or in the evening. We will light up

the pumpkins before dark.

Story Time and Playgroup: Kids Birth to Age 5

Fridays October 1 through June 4th 10:30 a.m.

Welcome to our new Youth Services and Outreach Librarian:

Kellogg-Hubbard

Library News

Montpelier

Gentle Movement Series with Amy LePage

Monday, October 4, 2021 5:15–6 PM

Thursday, October 14 12:15–1PM

Join Amy LePage for gentle Somatic movement and therapeutic

yoga you can do in-person at the library or at home via

Zoom. Amy will lead us in slow, gentle, movements and

breathing practices. If you are attending in-person, please

bring your own mat or blanket for floor work. Attendees joining

via Zoom will need to register in advance at www.kellogghubbard.org/adult-programs.

The Ethics of Vermont Eugenics: Past and Present

Wednesday, October 6, 2021 7 PM

In the name of “human betterment” a century ago, public

institutions and private organizations in Vermont chose some

of the state’s most marginalized persons for institutionalization,

sterilization, and family separation. Harvard Medical

School lecturer Charlene Galarneau explores the factors that

led to Vermont’s distinct expression of eugenics, and its continuing

legacies today. This is a First Wednesdays

Program and will be offered via Zoom. To register go to

www.vermonthumanities.org/first-wednesdays

Stories from the WII Bomber Crash on Camel’s Hump

Wednesday, October 13, 2021 6-8 PM

Brian Lindner, National Life’s Corporate Historian, will

explore the famous aviation disaster on Camel’s Hump. When

an Army Air Force bomber crashed in 1944 during a nighttime

a place to connect, inspire and learn

28 N Main St., Waterbury, VT 05676

(802) 244-7036

The Value of Our Stories

Poet, writer, and activist Rajnii Eddins uses the spoken

word as a tool for engagement in conversations about race,

culture, equity and the richness to be found in each of our

stories. He will share his poetry and the historical context in

Closed October 11

Indigenous Peoples’ Day/ Columbus Day. We will resume

regular hours on October 12 2-7pm Open Day no appointment

needed.

Trunk or Treat

Our Annual Trunk or Treat Event will be Saturday, October

30th from 3-5pm. Contact us to decorate a vehicle ($10 a car)

or to donate candy to the cause. We will follow Covid restrictions

as we did last year. All proceeds benefit the library for

the purchase of books.

Looking for Pumpkins

The library would like to give away 25 pumpkins to youth

in Williamstown like we did last year. If you have a

pumpkin(s) you are happy to part with, please contact the

library 433-5887.

Searching for a Turkey

Every month the WES Librarian and the Ainsworth Public

Librarian try to do a coordinated event. In November, we

would like have an event for youth where the big prize would

be a turkey. We are seeking a turkey to give away. Do you

have one you would like to donate? We are also looking for a

live turkey to make a video with. If you can help us, please

contact the library. 433-5887.

• • •

• • •

• • •

Sasha McGarvey. She has two children and comes with a

wealth of experience and ideas. She is motivated to provide

Covid safe and engaging programming for kids of all ages in

our community! Get ready for some fun with Sasha during

story and activity time. These science, art, and nature based

programs will encourage creativity, exploration and time for

parents and caregivers to share child rearing practices and

challenges. We will start with outside programming, eventually

moving inside when it is safe to do so. Please bring

masks to wear while covid numbers are still high in our community.

Chapters in History Eight: Development and Division

Second Saturdays of the month at 2 p.m.

October 9: American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas

Jefferson by Joseph Ellis;

November 13: The Hardest Job in the World by John

Dickerson;

December 11: These Truths; A Story of the United States by

Jill Lepore.

The public is encouraged to participate in this free continuing

series. Books are available for loan from the library. For

more information, please call: 454-1680.

Monthly Book Group for Adults: Fourth Mondays at 7

p.m.

Join us for the Jaquith book group. For copies of the book,

please stop by the library. New members are always welcome,

and it’s only one hour a month

October 25: Dictionary of Lost Words by Pip Williams

November 22: Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell

Visit our Self-Guided Storywalk!

New Story: How to be a Lion

Laminated pages from a children’s book are attached to

wooden stakes, which are installed along the Marshfield recreation

trail. As people walk down the trail they are directed

to the next page of the story. We will change the story every

week to pique people’s interest in the project and get everyone

walking and reading all summer.

We are now open to patrons Tuesday through Friday 9 a.m.

to 12 p.m. and 3 to 6 p.m. and Saturdays and Mondays 9 a.m.

to 12 p.m.

training mission, nine young airmen lost their lives. Lindner

will talk about the crewmen, causes of the crash, search &

rescue operations, and the coincidences surrounding the story,

and will offer a slide show. Attendees joining via Zoom will

need to register in advance at www.kellogghubbard.org/adultprograms.

The Book Garden Review of Games

Wednesday, October 20, 2021 5:30 PM

Move over Monopoly! Brad Carey of The Book Garden

will give a fresh take on the best new board games. Join us in

person or log in on Zoom to hear what’s new in the world of

games. Attendees joining via Zoom will need to register in

advance at www.kellogghubbard.org/adult-programs.

Deconstructing Murder: Exploring Patterns in Multicide

Monday, October 25, 2021 6:30 PM

Dr. Elizabeth Gurian, Associate Professor of Criminology

and Criminal Justice at Norwich University and author of

Serial and Mass Murder: Understanding Multicide through

Offending Patterns, Explanations, and Outcomes, will discuss

how women and partnered offenders have very different

homicide patterns from men. Gurian has discussed her work

through such media as BBC Radio, VPR, WCAX, and the

New York Times and CBS podcast, “Why Women Kill.”

Poetry & Horror with Rachel Hinton

Wednesday, October 27, 2021 6:30-8 PM

How can poetry, with its often elliptical effects, its oddness,

and its unexpected turns, produce effects similar to that of

horror? We can look at examples of chilling and/or dreamlike

imagery in published poems, examine how they create their

effects, then try our hands at creating our own. Facilitated by

Rachel Hinton, MHS graduate whose book Hospice Plastics

won the 2020 Cowles Poetry Prize.

which it was created in his presentation called “The Value of

our Stories” at the Waterbury Public Library on Tuesday,

October 12th at 6:30 PM in the SAL room.

How can our stories be used to confront racism and other

injustices, affirm diversity and equity, and initiate community

dialogue? Come away with the skill to use your own story in

creating healing and growing mutual understanding.

This talk is free, open to the public, and accessible to those

with disabilities.

The Value of Our Stories is made possible by a grant by

Libraries Transforming Communities: Focus on Small and

continued on next page


2

Criminology Professor Publishes Book on Serial and Mass Murder

Norwich University’s Dr. Elizabeth Gurian has published

“Serial and Mass Murder: Understanding Multicide through

Offending Patterns, Explanations, and Outcomes” (Routledge,

2021).

Gurian is an associate professor of criminology and criminal

justice and associate director of Norwich University’s

School of Criminology & Criminal Justice. She teaches about

criminal violence and courts; and mentors undergraduate students;

her research focuses on multicide (serial and mass murder).

She holds a doctorate in criminology from the University

of Cambridge, a Master of Science in criminal justice from

Northeastern University, and Bachelor of Science in human

physiology from Boston University.

“At its basic level, this book compiles decades of homicide

research together in one source. More broadly, I explore offending

and outcome patterns of serial and mass, lone actor

and mass shooter, male and female, and solo and partnered

offenders,” Gurian said. “I am grateful for the student help I

have had over the years via Norwich University’s Apprenticeship

Program. These students have worked directly with me to

enhance my research by exploring additional research areas,

including: victims categorized as the ‘less dead,’ weaponry

used by lone actor terrorists, and serial killers who kill multiple

victims in one incident over the course of their offending.”

This book reframes the study of multicide (that is, serial and

mass murder) to use objective measures, and aims to expand

our understanding of multicide offending through descriptive

and inferential statistical analyses of different homicide

patterns of the offenders. Criminal homicide and multiple

murders are rare occurrences that typically account for a very

4-H Offers Opportunities for Youths and Adults

Sundog Poetry Book Award Deadline Extended to October 10th

Sundog Poetry Center has extended the submission deadline

for its book award to October 10, 2021.

This contest is open to all Vermont-based poets who have

not yet ulished a first or second oo. reen riters ress

will design, print and distribute the book nation-wide.

he final udge is Vermont poet Vievee Francis.

A cash prize of $500 will be awarded along with 50 copies.

Sundog Poetry will provide assistance with promotion

through a featured book launch and readings scheduled

MSAC welcomes many new staff!

Sarah Lipton has transitioned to her role as the new

Director. Janna Clar has transitioned to her new role of

Communications & Development Coordinator for Community

Services (MSAC, Parks & Rec). Kim Myers is the new

FEAST Program Manager, Maddie Sholar is the new

Americorps Aging in Place Coordinator, and Albert Sabatini

is starting in mid-October as the new FEAST Kitchen

Manager / Chef. Join us in welcoming new members to the

team!

MSAC’s October 2021 Active Times Newsletter is available!

Visit https://www.montpelier-vt.org/304/Newsletter to read

the full 12 pages of great contents, including a Director’s

Dispatch from Sarah Lipton, a profile on volunteer Noah

Sexton, a Q&A with Americorps member Maddie Sholar, lots

of updates about FEAST Senior Meals Program and the

FEAST Farm, many events coming this month and next,

updates on Fall classes and more announcements and resources

from MSAC, Parks & Rec, and our community partners.

Please note that the table of contents has moved to page 2!

MSAC members are eligible to receive paper copies of the

monthly newsletter via USPS and enjoy many other benefits

including the lowest rates on classes, area discounts and

more!

• • •

• • •

small percentage of all violent crimes in most countries. Despite

this low occurrence, homicide continues to be an area of

intense study, with a focus on subjective measures and classifications.

he research and analysis ased on a dataase of

over 1,300 cases, contributes to the criminological study of

violence and draws distinctions between types of offenders

(partnered and solo, serial and mass, male and female, etc.)

from a range of different countries and across decades.

Traditionally, studies of homicide focus on male offenders

and theories of offending are then applied to females and

co-offenders. The research presented in this book reveals that

women and partnered offenders have very different homicide

patterns from men. Looking at the history of multicide offending,

this book uses descriptive and inferential statistical analyses

to compare differences in offending and outcome patterns

across multicide offender types.

This exploration of the multidimensionality of homicide

at an international level is useful for scholars and students

interested in criminal justice, criminology, psychology, sociology

or law.

“Criminology Professor Elizabeth Gurian’s new book re-

ects the asolute ideal of the orwich model of teaching

and learning,” College of Liberal Arts Dean Edward Kohn

said. “As a true teacher-scholar, Professor Gurian consistently

brings into the classroom her world-renowned and data-driven

expertise in multicide. By utilizing undergraduate

students to assist with the book’s research, Professor Gurian

shared her knowledge with countless students while offering

them an invaluable experience in the Norwich style of

hands-on learning.”

The start of the new 4-H year brings new opportunities for

youths, ages 5-18, to enroll in a club and for adults to volunteer

to support 4-H programming and events.

“4-H programs help youths explore their interests and leads

them on their way to finding and developing the skills they

need for careers and personal fulfillment,” notes Sarah

Kleinman, University of Vermont (UVM) Extension 4-H state

program director. “Adult volunteers help them find what

sparks their passion, whether it’s traditional 4-H projects,

such as dairy, culinary and clothing, or newer offerings,

including robotics, coding, environmental education and the

performing arts.”

Currently, Vermont 4-H offers both virtual and in-person

activities for all ages from the youngest 4-H Cloverbuds (ages

5-7) to teens, who may participate in teen science cafés and

leadership programs such as TRY (Teens Reaching Youth) for

the environment or volunteer as teen assistants at local and

state 4-H events.

Opportunities for adults may range from working with

short-term programs that teach a skill or longer-term commitments,

such as serving as a club or project leader. Having a

specific skill set or experience teaching youths is not necessary

as Vermont 4-H will train interested individuals on positive

youth development practices.

“Volunteering is more about working side by side with

youths to facilitate learning experiences although often benefits

the adults as much as the 4-H’ers,” Kleinman says, citing

findings from the 2020 Northeast Region Volunteer Impact

Survey, conducted by the Northeast Region Volunteerism

Group.

Respondents credited their 4-H volunteer work with honing

their organizational skills, helping them work with more

diverse youth and handling difficult situations. Others lauded

volunteering for increasing their level of community service

and raising their awareness of what young people can do to

make a difference in their communities.

To learn more about joining a 4-H club or becoming an

adult 4-H volunteer, contact the UVM Extension State 4-H

Office, toll-free at (800) 571-0668 or (802) 651-8343.

throughout the state.

Manuscripts should be between 48 and 64 pages. All submissions

must be authored by a poet who resides in Vermont;

proof of residency will be requested along with a $20 application

fee online via Submittable.

Submissions close at midnight on October 10, 2021. To

learn more, please go to: https://www.sundogpoetry.org/vtbook-award.

• • •

• • •

The Value of Our Stories continued from previous page

VT Home Energy Profile Clinics

Friday, Oct. 8 OR Oct. 22 | 4:00-5:30pm | Free | in-person

at 58 Barre Street | Pre-registration is required Mayor Anne

Watson and the Montpelier Energy Advisory Committee,

together with Efficiency VT and the Northeast Energy

Efficiency Partnership, bring you this free clinic from MSAC’s

Community Room. The clinic will be most effective if you

bring your own laptop or other device.

The VT Home Energy Profile is a useful tool to help homeowners

assess the energy efficiency of their own home. It’s

generated either by answering questions about the home or by

entering utility bill information. In the end, there are some

recommendations to homeowners about next steps they may

take to make their home more efficient. This workshop will

assist attendees in filling out survey questions to get a VT

Home Energy Profile for their homes, making sure it makes

sense and is done correctly. To learn more: https://www.netzeromontpelier.org/home-energy-information-ordinance.

To pre-register and receive electronic resources via email in

advance, email msac@montpelier-vt.org or call 802-223-

2518 by the Wednesday prior to each event (10/6, 10/20),

indicating the date you will attend and your mailing address

or email address for materials distribution before or after clinics.

Fall Adult and Teen Classes with MSAC: Sign up now!

We’ve got 32 affordable, diverse, online, in-person and

hybrid options in the Arts, Humanities, so many forms of

movement, and ten options of yoga. Visit our website at

https://www.montpelier-vt.org/751/Classes, stop by MSAC at

58 Barre Street or call us at 223-2518 to learn more or get help

to register!

We’re open! Stay Informed about MSAC:

To subscribe to our free weekly e-letter, email msac@

montpelier-vt.org. Regularly updated announcements and

events are available at: https://www.montpelier-vt.org/1128/

Special-Events . Click on links at left. Call our office with

questions at 223-2518!

Rural Libraries, an initiative of the American Library

Association (ALA) in collaboration with the Association for

Rural & Small Libraries (ARSL) and the Vermont Humanities

Council, a Speakers Bureau Event, supported in part by the

National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings,

conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program

do not necessarily represent those of the NEH or

Vermont Humanities.

For more information, contact Judi Byron at (802) 244-

7036 or judi@waterburypubliclibrary.com.

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Diancy “Dots” Taylor Adams

Montpelier, VT - Diancy “Dots” Taylor

Adams, 76, passed away September 1,

2021, surrounded by loved ones.

She was born on December 16, 1944

in Chicago, Illinois to Lassie Culling

Adams & Paul Livermore Adams. Diancy

grew u in uuue Iowa with five

siblings, to whom she was like a second

mother.

Dots worked hard in her backyard at

acrobatics, proudly making the high school cheerleading

squad. She graduated from Dubuque Senior High in 1963

and attended Ripon College in Wisconsin.

She moved several times, living in Washington, DC, Las

Vegas t. eters Missouri and again in uuue until fi

nally settling in Montpelier, VT in 1986. She later graduated

from Woodbury College as a paralegal.

Although she didn’t love cooking and sewing, she knew

her way around a kitchen and was a gifted seamstress. She

loved riding motorcycles, good coffee, old movies, and being

at home with her cats. She was often seen taking long walks

through town greeting friends and strangers alike. Diancy

was a great storyteller and was known for her racey sense of

humor, which she had until the very end.

She is preceded in death by her parents, her brother John,

and her son Christopher.

iancy is survived y her five children infried as

er, Heidi Tasker, Lucretia Lakamsani (Bradley), Elizabeth

Townsend (Bradley), and Richard Bradley; her grandchildren,

Paul, Kieran, Claire, Paisley, Mitchell, and Evelyn;

her four siblings, Lucretia “Cree”, Reuben, Paul “Pab”, and

Holly; as well as eleven nephews, and two nieces.

No public services were held. Donations in her honor may

be made to the McClure Miller Respite House in Colchester,

VT.

Arrangements were in the care of Guare & Sons Funeral

Home. Online condolences may be left at www.guareandsons.com.

David “Davy” Callahan

David “Davy” Callahan, 51, of Montpelier,

VT, passed away on September 16,

2021, at his home.

Davy was born February 20, 1970, in

Middlebury VT, to David and Elizabeth

(Walker) Callahan.

Davy was a wonderful son, brother,

and friend. As a young boy he led his

sisters in learning about nature, teaching

them about foraging for wild edibles,

building teepees and forts and other survivalist skills.

David had an especially close relationship with his mother,

Bess. Her love and care were just what he needed. He grew

to be a man with a kind and loving nature. He always helped

others in need and shared what little he had. This was a true

testament to his character, and one reason he had so many

friends and loved ones.

David also learned a lot from his father, David Sr. (aka

Bear). They shared an interest in a diverse array of topics,

including mechanics, animals, nature, and music.

David Sr. greatly encouraged David to pursue music, so he

learned to play guitar around the age of 12, and this became

his passion. He always loved singing and was a talented song

writer, delving into all genres including rock ‘n’ roll, heavy

metal, punk, Christian music, and instrumentals.

Dave attended very little traditional schooling, but he had

a rich and vast education through his travels and reading. As

a young man, David became an avid bicyclist, once traveling

from Vermont to Nevada and back on his own. He loved

traveling and camping.

David enjoyed rebuilding bicycles, pixelated graphic development,

and video gaming. He found great companionship

with his girlfriend Mah Florence. They both believed in

the Lord, Jesus, and shared a great love for each other for the

past six years.

Dave was predeceased by his parents. He is survived by

his sisters, Laura Callahan of Montpelier, VT and Jen Hoffert

of Asheville, NC, as well as extended family and friends. Arrangements

are through Guare & Sons funeral home. Online

condolences may be left at www.guareandsons.com.

Marla Jean Covey

WILLIAMSTOWN - Marla

Jean Covey, 66, peacefully

united with Our Lord, Jesus,

September 26, 2021. Marla

was born May 12, 1955 to

Maida Lasell Covey and Leslie

Covey, both of whom are

deceased. Also deceased are

her beloved grandparents,

Horace and Esther Lasell.

Marla Jean possessed the innocence of a child. In her Heart

of Gold she carried unconditional love for her family. Her

“Love Lights” beamed brightly throughout the joy she brought

to all she knew, particularly to her nieces and nephews. Marla’s

beautiful example of life and love leaves a deep hole in the

hearts of those who knew her.

Marla was witty, sly and unpredictable, her laughter was

contagious. Marla attended The Green Mountain School in

Montelier. he wored riey at the Vermont oin ac

tory, Ben & Jerry’s and Peregrine’s.

Surviving are her brothers, Lanny, Michael, Francis Covey

and their spouses, Leslie, Patty and Connie; her sister, Linda

page 10 The WORLD October 6, 2021

Covey Sterner and her spouse, Timothy; her aunts, Lenora

Larkin, Edah Osgood; her uncles, Morris, Stanley Lasell;

nieces, nephews and beloved cousins.

Marla’s wish is for a Celebration of Life, a Hymn Sing,

followed by a “potluck luncheon” to be held at the home of

Francis Covey, 29 Stone Road, Williamstown, where the family

grew up. This Celebration will be held Saturday, October

9th at 11 am. Please join us in celebrating Marla Jean Covey

in song food and wonderful memories. In lieu of owers the

family has selected Gander Brook Christian Camp as a recipient

of your love. Marla indicated that her dream vacation was

at Gander Brook. Donations may be made in her memory to

Gander Brook Christian Camp, c/o Scott Delbaugh, 36 Oakwood

Circle, Milford, NH 03055. Kingston Funeral Home in

orthfield assisted the family.

Peggy Sue (Willey) Holbrook

Peggy Sue (Willey) Holbrook passed

away on Friday, September 24, 2021 at

Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center at

the age of 48 following a long, hardfought

battle with COVID-19. She was

lovingly surrounded by family and dear

friends through the end.

Peggy was born on December 21, 1972

in Morrisville, VT to the late Lawrence

and Deborah (Hill) Willey. She grew up

in Greensboro Bend with her sister Sasha and brother Anthony,

graduating from Hazen Union in 1990. Peggy was employed

at the Union Bank in Hardwick directly out of high

school and married Shane Holbrook in 1991, later settling in

Walden, VT to raise their sons, Dylan and Dakota. During that

time Peggy helped manage a convenience store in Greensboro

end as well as coowned orthern Vermont raffic ontrol.

Peggy and Shane shared many happy years together and remained

friends after their divorce, sharing a tremendous bond.

eggy continued her wor with orthern V raffic ontrol

nurturing her family and eventually met and fell in love with

David Codling and moved to Woodbury, VT.

Peggy will be remembered for her enduring love for her

family, always placing the needs of others before her own,

even when she was very ill. Her kindness and generosity were

extended to the dogs she was able to rescue. She also thoroughly

enjoyed riding motorcycles, speaking to her fun and

charismatic spirit. Peggy was happiest spending time with

loved ones and cherished opportunities to prepare large meals

for gatherings. For Peggy, her granddaughter Isla was a true

beacon of light. Though she braved health complications for

years, she lived each day for her family and friends and leaves

with them hearts full of beautiful memories.

Peggy is survived by ex-husband, Shane Holbrook of Barre

and their sons, Dylan (and wife Hillarie and their daughters,

Isla and ida of alden and aota and fianc ionca of

Greensboro Bend as well as her loving partner, David Codling

of Woodbury. Peggy also leaves behind her siblings; Sasha

Willey, Anthony Willey, Ma’Lesha Willey, Phoenix Willey,

and Mayly Willey. She was predeceased by her parents, Lawrence

and Deborah Willey.

Visitation hours will be held on Friday, October 8th from

5-8 p.m. at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Hardwick. Those

in attendance are thanked in advance for wearing a mask indoors.

The Memorial Service and burial will take place on

Saturday, October 9th, 11 a.m. in the Stannard Cemetery on

Stannard Mountain Road followed by a Celebration of Life

at the Holbrook Family garage, Rt 16, Greensboro Bend. In

lieu of owers lease consider sending a donation in eggys

name to Justice for Dogs, PO Box 1014, Wolcott, VT 05680.

The des Groseilliers Funeral Home is in care of arrangements.

Visit dgfunerals.com to convey online condolences and memories

to the family.

Chad Arnold Nielsen

ROXBURY, VT - Chad Arnold Nielsen,

53, of Roxbury, VT, passed away on September

25, 2021.

He shared a home with his wife, Karen

Nielsen, in the beautiful mountains of

Roxbury.

Chad was born on July 6, 1968. At a

young age, he developed a passion for

hunting and fishing. e loved to e in the

woods during deer season. He would also

enjoy a chew while sitting in the woods as he said the scent

would not scare the deer away like smoking would do. During

May, he would enjoy his time calling in a spring gobbler to

bring home to the family. Chad’s ultimate passion was deep

sea fishing. e truly enoyed eing in the oen sea and seeing

what he could reel in with his friends and family.

Chad was an excellent baker of tasty treats. Those who had

the privilege of eating his desserts were never disappointed.

Chad was predeceased by his father Corbett Nielsen; his

mother Marcia Nielsen; his step-mother Meri Nielsen; his sister

Jenne Fitzgerald; and his sister Julie Michaud.

Chad is survived by his wife Karen Nielsen; his son Alex

Sandul; his brother Cris Nielsen; his step-sister Lynn Wilkinson;

and his step-brother Mike Wilkinson.

Arrangements are in the care of Guare & Sons Funeral Home.

Online condolences may be left at www.guareandsons.com.

James “Jim” Poitras

James “Jim” Poitras, 83,

passed away peacefully on

September 6, 2021 while family comforted

him as he drifted into eternal rest.

Jim was born in New York City to the

late James and Mary (Conti) Poitras on

June 2, 1938, moving to the family homestead

in Websterville, Vermont in his

youth where urban experiences met rural

sensiilities inuencing his decision to

join the United States Navy. Jim served aboard the Harlan R.

Dickson, a Navy Destroyer based in Newport, Rhode Island.

It was in Newport where he met and married his true love,

Carole Johnsen, with whom he would spend the rest of his life

loving deely and raising five children.

After Jim’s commitment to the Navy, he joined the Merchant

Marines until being hired by UPS in New York City.

hen oened its first distriution center in Vermont im

moved his family to ast arre and was among the first

employees in the state. Jim spent most of his career driving

a nightly tractor trailer route to New York, with several years

driving a daily delivery route to the Lyndonville area where

his sense of humor and perfectly combed hair were his trademarks.

Jim was Shop Steward for local Teamsters Union #597

for most of his UPS career, and accumulated more than one

million safe driving miles – an accomplishment for which he

was incredibly proud.

Upon retirement in 1996, Jim and Carole moved to Inverness,

Florida, returning to Vermont each summer to spend

precious moments with family and friends.

Jim enjoyed hunting, RVing, snowmobiling, NASCAR,

New England Patriots, arguing about politics and gas prices,

and was an avid model truck collector. However, most of his

time was spent enjoying the individual connections he had

with family and friends where each relationship was as unique

as his personality, leaving wonderful memories that will be

cherished forever.

Jim struggled for almost two decades with COPD, but that

never stopped him from constantly working around the house,

driving between Florida and Vermont each summer, and absolutely

did not slow him down when choosing to care for his

wife after her numerous hip operations. Most knew Jim as a

strong-willed man with intense opinions, but those closest to

him saw his heart, felt his complete commitment to family,

and loved him through it all. Jim was certainly someone who

left an impression, and his loss will forever be felt deeply by

family and friends.

Survivors include his wife of 60 years, Carole; daughter

Donna and partner Gary; son James (and Tammy); son Jeffrey

and wife Dawn; son Jerrold; daughter Sandra and husband

Bryant; grandchildren Dustin, Erik, Trevor, Micheal, Corey,

Joshua, Jayvian, Jarod, and Taylor; and great-grandchildren

Maria, Carter, and Simon.

Arrangements are private at this time, asking only for prayer

as we heal from the profound loss of our husband, father, and

dear friend.

Pamela Setien Tucker

BARRE TOWN - Pamela Setien Tucker

died on Friday, September 24, 2021, after

a brief but courageous battle with cancer.

orn in ril she was the first

child of Norma (Giostra) Setien and Valentino

Setien. Her beloved brother Steven

joined the family nine years later.

Pam attended Barre City schools, graduating

from Spaulding High School in

1972. She then attended the University

of Vermont graduating in 1976, and living and studying for

a semester in Madrid, Spain. During this time, she also travelled

with her grandmother Enes Quattropani to Italy, France,

and Switzerland.

After college Pam moved to Minnesota near her uncle

George Giostra and his family. Pam worked for Equitable in

Minneapolis before joining a team of individuals from across

the country in New York City, on a special project for Equitable.

Pam spent six years in New York City (NYC), working

in Manhattan and living in Queens. During this time, she did

some travelling for the job, including several trips to one of

her favorite cities San Francisco. She made many friendships

in NYC that last until today.

In 1985 Pam moved back to Vermont and went to work at

the State of Vermont. She then joined National Life where she

worked for twenty-two years.

Pam married Mark Tucker in and they had their first

home in East Montpelier. They later had two homes built in

Barre Town. During their marriage they travelled each year

on a trip, the most memorable being several trips to Hawaii

(Oahu and Maui), Bermuda, London England and Paris

France. They later divorced in 2005.

After early retirement, Pam volunteered for many years at

the Gift Shop at Central Vermont Medical Center and also was

the long-time secretary for the Wildersburg Homeowners Association.

She enjoyed walking the Barre Town bike path and

nature walks in the Barre Town forest, along with her yoga

class and trips to the ocean in Ogunquit, Maine.

Pam is survived by her mother Norma Setien; her brother

Steven Setien and his wife, Heidi (who was the rock that Pam

depended on during her illness); her two aunts and cousins in

Vermont; an aunt and cousins in Minnesota; and cousins in

North Carolina, Spain, Italy, and France as well as her treasured

best friend Sher Yacono, and many supportive neighbors

at Wildersburg. Also, her fur baby “nieces” Coco and Bella

who brought her great joy.

Pam was predeceased by her grandparents and her father.

Per Pam’s wishes, the service to celebrate her life will be

private at the convenience of her immediate family.

In lieu of owers for those wishing to mae a memorial

contribution, please consider the Central Vermont Humane

Society, PO Box 687, Montpelier, VT 05601, the Vermont

Foodbank, 33 Parker Road, Barre, VT 05641, or the Salvation

Army, PO Box 375, Barre, VT 05641.

Special appreciation for the care and support provided by

the Hematology and Oncology team at Central Vermont Medical

Center and McClure Miller Respite House in Colchester.

Arrangements are by Hooker Whitcomb Funeral Home, locally,

family owned and operated, 7 Academy Street, Barre.

For a memorial guestbook, please visit www.hookerwhitcomb.com.

continued on next page


continued from previous page

ELIZABETH BARCLAY, 84, died Sept. 22,

2021, at Berlin Health and Rehabilitation Center.

She was born July 13, 1937, in Adamant, the

daughter of Perl and Doris Goucher Barclay.

Survivors include a daughter, Cindi Paugh; four

brothers, Bernard, Albert, Steven, Robert; several

grand- and great-grandchildren. Services

will be at the family’s convenience.

KIMBERLY ANN CAMPBELL-MORSE,

58, of Barre, passed away on Monday, Sept. 20,

2021, at her home. Kim was born on Aug. 15,

1963, to Alice and Curtis Campbell, in Montpelier.

After graduating from U-32 in 1981, she

riey went on to study writing at radford ol

lege. Kim worked in many positions throughout

central Vermont, including Ben & Jerry’s where she met her

future husband, Eric Morse, in 1994. She was a passionate

writer and when she wasn’t working or raising her daughter,

she could be found in her home writing. She is survived by her

husband, her daughter, and her extended family. The family

reuests that in lieu of owers lease schedule a colonoscoy

to help prevent possible cancer or make a donation in Kim’s

memory to the American Cancer Society. Services will be announced

at a later date. Pruneau-Polli Funeral Home, 58 Summer

St. in Barre, assisted the family. Those wishing to send

online condolences may do so at: www.pruneaupollifuneralhome.com.

RONALD W. “RON” DURGIN, 74,

of Barre Town, passed away Friday,

Sept. 24, 2021, in his home, surrounded

by his family, after a long battle with

cancer. Ron was born Sept. 15, 1947, in

Franklin, New Hampshire, and was the

son of Raymond W. Durgin and Blanche A. Emery and her

spouse, Bud. Ron attended Franklin High School in New

Hampshire. On Sept. 24, 1966, he married the love of his life,

Nancy Gauthier, whom he referred to as his high school

sweetheart. ons favorite astimes included hunting fish

ing for lake trout and brookies, and driving his pontoon boat

around Woodbury Lake with his family. Ron is survived by

his wife, children, grandchildren, and extended family. A funeral

Mass was celebrated at St. Augustine Catholic Church,

arre t. Montelier. In lieu of owers memorial contri

butions may be made to: The American Cancer Society.

MARK FORGETTE, 72, of Phil Street, passed

away on Saturday, Sept. 25, 2021, at the Central

Vermont Medical Center in Berlin. Born May

19, 1949, in Barre, he was the son of Joseph and

Gilberte (LaRose) Forgette. His early life was

spent in Websterville, and he attended Holy

Ghost School in Graniteville until 1960 when

the family moved to Connecticut. He met Sherla Melendy,

they began a lengthy relationship and were married on Oct. 9,

1992. Survivors include his children, grandchildren, siblings

and extended family. A Mass of Christian Burial to honor and

celebrate his life will be held on Saturday, Oct. 16, 2021, at 9

a.m. in the St. Monica Catholic Church, 79 Summer St., Barre.

Following the service, interment will take place in the St. Sylvester

Cemetery in Lower Websterville. Family and friends

may call on Friday from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Hooker Whitcomb

Funeral Home, 7 Academy St., Barre. For a memorial guestbook,

please visit www.hookerwhitcomb.com.

DOROTHEA IRENE (ROBINSON) FOS-

TER, 97, known to friends as “Robin,” died

peacefully Sunday, Aug. 29, 2021, at Woodridge

Nursing Home in Berlin, Vermont. Dorothea

was born in Quincy, Massachusetts, on Dec. 3,

1923, the daughter of Irene (Jordan) and Theodore

Robinson. Dorothea is survived by her son,

Christian Foster, his wife, Nan Foster, and grandson Daniel

Foster. Dorothea graduated from Middlebury College with the

class of 1945, having earned a BA degree. After college, she

worked as a travel agent in Hartford, Connecticut. Hartford is

where she met Oliver J. Foster, an architect. They were married

in Mystic, Connecticut, in 1961. Dorothea was a dog

lover and could often be seen walking her dog in her neighborhood,

as well as providing treats for neighboring dogs. She

was also fond of tennis, having played well into her later

years. For those who remember Dorothea and wish to make a

charitable contribution in her name, please donate to Central

Vermont Humane Society.

HARRIET MORSE GALLAGHER – There will be a memorial

service for Harriet Morse Gallagher at Robinson Cemetery

in Calais, Vermont on Sunday, October 10th at 2 p.m.

PENNY JANE HASKINS, 58, passed away

unexpectedly on Sunday, Sept. 19, 2021, at her

home in Hancock. Born in Morrisville, on Nov.

3, 1962, she was the daughter of the late Elizabeth

A. (Tatro) and Wayne E. Haskins Sr. Penny

attended schools in the Waterbury area. Penny

enjoyed gardening, arts and crafts, watching

movies, taking photos, watching the wildlife around her home

in Hancock and playing with her dogs. Spending time with her

family was something that gave her great joy and happiness.

She is loved and mourned by her children, grandchildren, siblings

and extended family. A celebration of Penny’s life was

held on Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021, from 1-5 p.m. at Farr’s Field,

1901 U.S. Route #2, Waterbury, Vermont. For those who wish,

memorial gifts would be appreciated to The Vermont Wildlife

Coalition, at www.vtwildlifecoalition.org. To send online condolences,

please visit www.perkinsparker.com.

RICHARD HOMA, 70, passed

away unexpectedly Sept. 26, 2021, at

his home. Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, he

was a son of the late Alec and Amelia Krafton

Homa. Richard was an Air Force veteran and a

carpenter. Left to cherish his memory is his wife

of 10 years, Debra Diane Cadorette Homa, children,

siblings, grandchildren and extended family. Services

will be private. wrightfuneralhome.org.

MADALYNE “DEEDEE” (BUTLER) HUN-

TINGTON, 83, of Huntington Lane, went to

heaven to be with many friends and relatives, at

the Jack Byrne Center for Palliative & Hospice

Care, Lebanon, New Hampshire on Sunday,

Sept. 26, 2021. She was born to Leo and Ethel

(Metcalf) Butler, on Dec. 20, 1937, in Eden, Vermont.

In 1955, she met and married Clifford Huntington. She

loved music and played the piano, mandolin and guitar. Along

with playing music, she enjoyed dancing and joking with family

and friends. She was always the life of the party! Dee Dee

is survived by a son, grandchildren, sister, and extended family.

There will be no calling hours. A memorial service was on

aturday ct. at .m. at aul untingtons field un

tington Lane, East Corinth. Burial will be at the convenience

of the family in the East Orange Cemetery. For more information

or to offer an online condolence, please visit www.rickerfh.com.

Ricker Funeral Home & Cremation Care of Woodsville

is in charge of arrangements.

LINDA JEAN INGERSOLL, 77, of 60 Allen

St., Barre, died Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021, at Berlin

Meadows in Berlin. She was born at Heaton

Hospital in Montpelier to the late Corene Roberta

Beryl Briggs and Charles Leigh Ingersoll

on April 17, 1944. Linda Jean spent much of her

life drawing, painting and photographing birds,

animals and natural landscapes. She worked in watercolor,

pen and ink, charcoal, and oils. She is survived by a beloved

niece cousins and etended family. In lieu of owers dona

tions in her memory may be made to PAWSitive Pantry on the

Onion River Animal Hospital website. A graveside celebration

of life is planned for the spring of 2022. Pruneau-Polli Funeral

Home in Barre assisted with the arrangements.

JOHN WILLIAM KINGSTON passed away on Sept. 14,

2021, in Rutland, at the age of 81. He was the eldest son

of William G. Kingston and Dorothy M. (Jerry) Kingston.

Mr. Kingston was a graduate of St. Michael’s High School

in Montpelier and of the Catholic University of America in

Washington, D.C. Mr. Kingston leaves good friends in Northfield

Virginia elgrade eria lorida and ashington

D.C.; as well as his siblings, nieces and nephews and extended

family. Funeral Mass will be at St. John the Evangelist Church

in orthfield on aturday ct. at a.m.

DOROTHY KATHERINE MORRELL

passed away peacefully during the morning of

Sept. 20, 2021, at the McClure Miller Respite

House in Colchester, Vermont. She was born on

Aug. 9, 1930, in Montpelier, Vermont, and grew

up in Waterbury, Vermont, where she graduated

from Waterbury High School. She went on to

receive a bachelor’s degree from Trinity College in Burlington,

Vermont. Dottie is survived by her brother, nieces, nephews

and extended family. The funeral was held at Saint Andrew’s

Catholic Church on Friday, Oct. 1, 2021, at 11 a.m. In

lieu of owers lease donate to Mclure Miller esite

House in Colchester, Vermont. You may donate online at

https://www.uvmhomehealth.org/donations/make-an-onlinedonation

or send your donation to eveloment ffice VM

Health Network — Home Health & Hospice, 1110 Prim Road,

Colchester, VT 05446.

KENNETH JAMES “KENNY” PAPINEAU,

36, of Moncks Corner, South Carolina, passed

away on Saturday, Sept. 25, 2021. Kenny was

born in Vermont on Sept. 25, 1985, he was the

son of Kenneth Orris Papineau and wife Kerriann,

of Brooksville, Florida, and Tracy Gallison

Meadows, of Moncks Corner, South Carolina. In

addition to his parents, he is survived by his wife, Wendy

Blackburn Papineau, stepdaughters, grandbabies and siblings.

Also surviving are his maternal and paternal grandmothers,

and several aunts and uncles. Services will be held at a later

date in Vermont. A guest register is available at www.stameytysingerfuneralhome.com.

COOLEEN “COOKIE” PARKER, 79, of

Vincent Flats Road, passed away surrounded by

her family on Thursday, Sept. 23, 2021, at the

CVMC, after a brief illness. She was born on

Aug. 8, 1942 in Montpelier, the daughter of Harry

and Myrtle (Tallman) Ghiringhelli. Cooleen

graduated from Montpelier High School in

1960. On July 20, 1968, Cooleen married Robert Parker. Together,

they made their home in East Montpelier. Cooleen enjoyed

the company of her beloved cat, Burt. He was with her

everywhere she went. She enjoyed puzzles, games and cooking.

Survivors include her son, grandchildren and extended

family. A graveside service was held 11 a.m. on Friday, Oct. 1,

2021, in the Doty Cemetery in East Montpelier. Memorial

contributions may be made to the East Montpelier Fire Department.

Those wishing to express online condolences may

do so at www.guareandsons.com.

TIMOTHY LEE QUINLAN, age 76, of Barre, Vermont,

passed away on Sept. 19, 2021. He grew up residing mainly in

North Reading, Massachusetts, with his parents, Jean Homewood

(Baker) Quinlan and Leo Francis Quinlan. Tim was an

electronics whiz-kid, as well as an artist and creator, moving

from medium to medium and interest to interest throughout his

life, ever curious to learn and try new things. Tim is survived

by two sons, grandchildren, his living siblings and extended

family. There will be no calling hours or service. Pruneau-Polli

Funeral Home of 58 Summer St. in Barre assisted the family.

Those wishing to send online condolences may do so at: www.

pruneaupollifuneralhome.com.

CARMELLA MARYANNE TOMASETTO

passed away peacefully in her sleep on Sept. 18,

2021. She was born on June 24, 2021, and

brought so much pride and joy to her mommy,

daddy and big brother. Carmie was such a beautiful

little bundle of joy and had such a unique

personality that would make anyone’s heart melt

the second she made eye contact with you and smiled. She had

just begun smiling, cooing and giggling. She loved cuddling

with her family and the family dog, Paisley, taking warm

baths, and going for walks in her stroller. Carmie is survived

by her parents, Meghan McGregor and Joey Tomasetto; her

big brother, Ryder Elie; as well as her grandparents, her uncle,

along with other family and close friends. She was preceded in

death by her grandfather, Ralph Branon. A private memorial

service was held on Tuesday, Sept. 28, 2021, at Guare & Sons

Funeral Home, 30 School St., Montpelier, VT 05602, at 11

a.m. There was a graveside service in Green Mount Cemetery

immediately following. Online condolences may be left at

www.guareandsons.com. In lieu of owers the family ass for

donations to The March of Dimes organization.

“Central Vermont’s Newspaper”

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October 6, 2021 The WORLD page 11

HWF_World2colx5.indd 6

11/20/10 10:03:13 AM


NOTICE

TOWN OF BARRE

Several Barre Town volunteer board, committee

ositions are unfilled. he electoard is seeing

letters of interest from Town residents willing to serve

on the board or committees listed below. A brief letter

of interest stating availability, reason for interest, and,

if applicable, related work experience can be sent to the

own Managers ffice .. o esterville V

or to officesarretown.org. he ositions and

usual meeting times are:

Cemetery Commission

4th Wednesday,

6:30pm

Housing Advisory Committee as needed

Good Samaritan Haven Work Group Quarterly

(date to be

determined)

The Good Samaritan Work Group position is reserved

for a resident in South Barre. The Work Group provides

community input about operation of Good Samaritan’s

transitional housing at 580 South Barre Road. This

meeting probably will be held during the day, Monday-

Friday.

he euty ealth fficer osition also is vacant. his

position pays a small stipend. The DHO handles calls

and cases in the ealth fficers asence. he and

DHO enforce state rental housing regulations and deal

with dog bite cases. Training information is available.

See instructions above to submit a letter of interest.

Applications will be considered for appointment

upon receipt. For more information about the cemetery

commission and housing committee see the town website

(www.barretown.org). Also, information is available

from the own Managers ffice .

y own Managers ffice

TOWN OF WASHINGTON, VT

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that a Public Hearing will be had before the

undersigned selectboard at the town clerk’s offi ce in Washington

to consider a reclassifi cation of the Class 4 section of TR 38 (aka

0.81 miles of Richardson Road).

Notice is hereby given to all parties that the

site inspection will be on

Wednesday, October 27, 2021 at 3:30 p.m.

Immediately following the site inspection, a hearing will be held

at 5:30 p.m. at the Town Clerk’s Offi ce to hear testimony on the

reclassifi cation.

This Class 4 road is 0.81 miles long and connects the Class 3

section of Richardson Road to the Class 4 section of the Poor

Farm Road.

All petitioners, persons owning or interested in lands through

which said highway pass and persons owning or interested in

land abutting such highway are hereby notifi ed to attend such

hearing for the purpose of examining the premises, hearing the

parties interested therein, in order that the Selectboard may

judge whether the public good or the necessity or convenience

of individuals requires the alteration of said road from the status

of a highway to that of a trail or any portion thereof and if so, to

consider claims for damages, if any.

Dated at Washington, Vermont this 22nd day of September 2021.

WASHINGTON BOARD OF SELECTMEN

Vince A. Vermette, Chair

Robert L. Blanchard

Nicholas P. Bresette

Town of Woodbury

Notice of Public Hearing

Notice is hereby given to the residents of the Town of Woodbury,

Vermont that the Woodbury Planning Commission will hold a

public hearing in the Woodbury Town Hall, 3675 Vermont Route

14, Woodbury, Vermont on Monday, October 18, 2021 beginning

at 6:00 P.M. The meeting will be held for public review of and

comment on the proposed Woodbury Town Plan pursuant to Title

24, Chapter 117 § 4444.

The purpose of the proposed Woodbury Town Plan is to establish

a coordinated comprehensive planning process to guide decisions

made by the Town of Woodbury. The proposed Plan, if and when

adopted, will affect all lands within the Town of Woodbury.

Woodbury Town Plan - Listing of Section Headings:

1. About Woodbury and the Plan

2. Natural Setting

a. Natural Features and Ecological Systems

b. Working Lands

c. Scenic Areas

d. Outdoor Recreation

3. Sense of Community

a. Historic and Cultural Resources

b. Housing

c. Local Economy and Community Development

4. Rural Services and Infrastructure

a. Transportation

b. Local and Regional Services and Facilities

c. Telecommunications and Broadband Connectivity

d. Energy

5. Mapping out the Future

a. Land Use

b. Implementation Program

6. Appendix:

a. Woodbury Enhanced Energy Plan

Copies of the proposed Woodbury Town Plan may be obtained

from the own ffices at Vermont oute oodury

Vermont. Copies of the Plan are also available online at: https://

www.woodburyvt.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/9.17.2021-

Woodbury-Town-Plan-Draft-2.pdf

Dated in Woodbury, Vermont September 27, 2021

Submitted by the Woodbury Planning Commission

page 12 The WORLD October 6, 2021

The WORLD welcomes Letters to the Editor concerning public issues. Letters should be 400 words or less and may

be subject to editing due to space constraints. Submissions should also contain the name of the author and a contact

telephone number for verification. For letters of thanks, contact our advertising department at 479-2582; non-profit

rates are available.

• • •

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

By Deb Paul

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Although

our towns have very little crime when compared with other

cities and towns, offenses such as domestic violence have

remained constant over many years. Domestic violence is

defined as, “Violent or aggressive behavior within the home,

typically involving the violent abuse of a spouse or partner.”

Though the majority of cases seem to be violence against a

wife or female partner, there are also many cases of harm and

abuse that come to husbands and male partners.

Thousands of women and men live with domestic violence

everyday, afraid to report their situations to the authorities.

Unfortunately, it is likely that the prevalence of domestic violence

in our own towns is much higher than what is reported

for a number of reasons, ranging from fear of not being

believed to being brainwashed into believing that the situation

is the victim’s fault. October is Domestic Violence awareness

month, and it is crucial to bring more awareness about what

domestic violence is and how the cycle can be broken.

Domestic violence involves willful intimidation, physical

assault, battery, sexual assault, and other abusive behavior

perpetrated by an intimate partner against another.

This violence often escalates from threats and manipulation

to verbal abuse and or physical violence. This violent behavior

During the Black Plague (1347-1352) 30 percent of the

human population died. Humans were quarantined (separated)

if exposed to the contagious infection. Masks were also worn

and contaminated areas were disinfected to reduce the spread

of the infection. During that time period, there were no vaccines

or antibiotics.

The COVID pandemic seems like we humans are living in

a movie horror story, because we have not experienced a pandemic

before. In reality, pandemics have been around since

the beginning of time. We are living in a more globalized and

crowded world making us more vulnerable to contagious

disease. As the human population explodes so will the contagious

diseases. We humans must work together to fight the

enemy in this new kind of war. Thanks to medical science we

now have safe and effective vaccines to help us win this war.

Vaccines against contagious infections have been around

for many hundreds of years. Systematic implementation has

been practiced since the 18th century. Vaccines work by

injecting a tiny amount of the infection into a human. That

way the immune system is alerted to recognize its enemy and

kill it.

Here is the short list of the contagious infections that have

vaccines: Smallpox, SARS, MERS, Cholera, Plague, Rabies,

Polio, Yellow fever, Shingles, Black Death/Spanish Flu,

Eboli, Swine Flu, Typhoid fever, Measles, Hepatitis, Anthrax,

Whooping cough, Influenza, COVID and more. Today, children

must have a series of vaccines (set by the state) including

Chickenpox, Diphtheria, influenza, Hepatitis, Human

Papillomavirus, Pertussis before entering school.

While I understand there needs to be a careful balance of

rights on the spectrum from individual freedom to public

safety, balance is essential. The unvaccinated can maintain

their freedom by staying home instead of contaminating fellow

employees at the workplace – protecting their right to be

safe. The vaccinated public does not have the right to force

you to get vaccinated, thus protecting your right to be free.

Wants vs. Needs

By G. E. Shuman

• • •

Live Free & Die

• • •

I

stopped by my daughter Emily’s family

home last night, or at least last night

from the time I wrote this column. As I

pulled into the driveway,

I noticed that a piece of

exercise equipment was on the front lawn,

with a big FREE sign on it. (Note: If you

have never seen a house with a piece of exercise

equipment on the front lawn, you’re not

paying attention.) The kids, Emily, her husband

Nick, and daughter Nahla were outside

and asked me if I would like to have the

thing. My first thought and reply was to ask

how much laundry could be successfully

hung on it. I then politely declined the

machine, and we went about talking about

other things.

On my way home from their house, I

began thinking of the day before, when Em

and I had spent some time together, having

breakfast out, and then shopping. Firstly, I

am not a shopper. I spent far too many years working within

the confines of retail stores to want to do more of that now.

(Mailmen probably don’t take long walks after they retire,

either.)

Emily certainly IS a shopper, so whenever I agree to go

shopping with her, I always ask how many stores she ‘needs’

to go to. If the answer is more than two, I ask her to drop me

at home between visiting some of the stores.

In Emily’s defense, when she shops, she always buys things

for other people. She is very generous that way. Em also just

not only directly harms the victim, but it also affects any children

living in the home. According to the National Network to

End Domestic Violence, approximately 15.5 million children

are exposed to domestic violence each and every year. These

children will likely grow up experiencing mood disorders

such as anxiety, anger, and may even grow to perpetuate the

behavior that was impressed upon them from a young age,

thus continuing the cycle of domestic abuse.

Some signs that you or someone you love may be involved

in a domestic violence situation include: feeling trapped,

chronic humiliation from a partner, verbal insults, physical

violence, controlling behavior from a partner, unpredictable

mood swings, alienating friends and family, manipulation,

etc.

If you or someone you love is involved in a domestic violence

situation, it is important to report your situation as soon

as humanly possible. Local authorities and abuse help hotlines

are able to assist with removing the abuser from the situation

and in helping victims find resources ranging from places to

stay to legal help and advice.

Domestic violence is brutal and it is unnecessary, this does

not have to be a way of life for those who are currently suffering.

If you see something, say something. Together we as a

community can help put a stop to the cycle of abuse.

The government does not plan to put the vaccine in salad

dressing. They also have no plans to run around with a couple

of straight-jackets to locate and then inject you with the

COVID vaccine. Although, there have been times….

When society loses balance, it leads to chaos. Hospital ICU

beds are filled to the brink. It is a crisis that could have been

avoided if the majority of humans took advantage of the vaccine

earlier, before it mutated. The new variant is highly

transmittable; it will continue to spread. Obstruction by failure

to take advantage of the vaccine, wear a mask, and refusal

to avoid high risk settings during a pandemic – impedes public

safety. It is for this reason the government must act to

impose mandates for workplace employees. Under the OSHA

Act “Employers are responsible for providing a safe and

healthy workplace free from recognized hazards likely to

cause death or serious physical harm.”

The Government is responsible for “creating and enforcing

the rules of society and public service … such as public

safety, health and welfare”. Laws have been designed and

enforced to protect us from ourself, for example, we are not

allowed to: drink and drive, carry guns to schools, poison our

rivers/air, and more. Freedom is not free. Accessing your right

to freedom is offset by accessing my right to freedom (you

can’t randomly kill me and I can’t randomly kill you).

I have taken the liberty and tinkered with New Hampshire’s

state motto to better reflect reality: “Live free & die”. Yes, you

have a right to be free, but do not expect us (vaccinated) to

shed a tear while you gasp for your last breath of air in a

lonely hospital bed. We are saving our tears for the overworked

heath care workers and the at-risk groups of children

under 12 and the elderly; those individuals that you may have

infected and possibly killed due to your self-satisfying right to

be free (versus your selflessness to protect the public good).

Everyone deserves to be safe.

Doreen Chambers, Williamstown, Vermont

LOVES seasonal decorations, and will go to great lengths,

often travelling many miles, to get a good deal on all that

stuff. She especially loves getting seasonal dec’s AFTER

some, (translation: ‘any’) particular holiday has

passed and seems to like the clearance prices

she pays at least as much as she likes the decorations

themselves. Please do not be offended if

you are like Emily in this way, because if you

are you’re in incredibly good company. Still, I

could never bring myself to buy a bunch of gift

wrap the week after Christmas. My stomach

just would not take that.

So, back to the exercise equipment. You see,

on that ride home from Em’s family’s house

last night I realized that she often seems to want

things she doesn’t ‘need,’ and I (exercise equipment

in mind) probably need things I don’t

want. She loves shopping, shopping, and more

shopping, and buying things that are just too

good a deal not to get. I love avoiding

ANYTHING postseason, and would, frankly,

rather pay full price next year. (I know, I know, I’m a sucker.

But people like me keep Disney selling full-price Mickey

Mouse ears forever.)

To end all this babbling, might I just say, once more, that

my very generous daughter definitely loves shopping. My

opinion is that she should enjoy the seasons, and that at least

she goes after good deals on the ‘stuff’ that makes the seasons

magical. I do think she could ‘need’ what she wants … a bit

less. In reference to the exercise equipment, maybe I could

want what I need … a bit more.


Mayor’s Report – September 2021

Residents and Neighbors,

City Manager Steve Mackenzie

provided an ARPA overview

which led to discussion on what

funds could be used for and a process

for receiving and approving projects.

Step 2 of the Community Visit on

September 29th resulted in three community

items: Develop a Barre Community Center; Improve

River Access; and Start a Barre Housing Task Force. Step 3

on October 20th will be further conversation on those goals.

DPW Director Bill Ahearn reviewed department operations

and the three priorities for FY23: succession planning &

implementation; advancing work organization; and bond

related projects. Fire Chief Doug Brent reviewed calls for

service, ambulance revenues, mass vaccination centers, and

confined space rescue training. Police Chief Bombardier

reviewed services provided from parking meter enforcement,

dispatch, and the police department, which included necessary

changes during COVID. Recruitment and retention of

officers has been a state-wide issue.

VHAC member Justin Srsic reviewed statistics around the

burden of housing and utilities costs, and low availability of

housing stock. Habitat for Humanity Executive Director Zach

Watson discussed the property at 11 Highland Avenue currently

under rehabilitation which a workday is planned on

October 23rd. Barre City Planning Commissioners David

Sichel and Amanda Gustin presented a white paper on housing

to highlight potential sources of funding, interested parties,

and discussion around barriers to development within the

municipal plan. The Community Justice Center presentation

by Executive Director Jeannie MacLeod highlighted increased

Once Upon a Time in America (1984)

• • •

transitional housing beds and services. They continue to offer

restorative justice panels, conflict resolution services, and

referrals for support coming from the police department and

district attorney. Barbara Schlesinger from Property Valuation

and Review provided a Grand List Workshop to educate

Councilors on how this list is created and how it impacts that

property tax rate.

Council approved Resolution #2021-13 for VCDP Grant

Application Authority, NMPS Finding of No Significant

Impact, DIBG Grant Letter of Commitment for Auditorium

Stormwater Mitigation, execution of VYCC FY22 Services

Agreement and Berlin St. Railroad Crossing Safety

Improvements, FY22 Capital Equipment Plan, Strategic

Planning Facilitator RFP, TIF Parking Consultant RFP,

Veterans Day Parade, Elks Club Donation for FY23

Community Picnic, appointments to the Manager’s Search

Committee and Homelessness Task Force, expanded the

Organics Diversion Committee, approved changes to the

Cemetery Investment Policy and removed the Use of Force

Policy.

Upcoming items include committee appointments on

October 12th, joint meeting with Montpelier for the CVPSA

Televate Communications Report on October 19th, emergency

BOR Roof Repair Contract, Planning Commission

Complete Streets Grant, WCSARP Update, priorities overview

and FY23 Budget Presentations from Buildings and

Community Services, Recreation, Planning, Permitting and

Assessing, Clerk, Finance and Manager, and discussion on

Volunteer Appointment Policy.

Be well,

Lucas J. Herring

Mayor, City of Barre

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

Orange Unit

PROBATE DIVISION

Docket No. 21-PR-03942

RE: ESTATE OF

ELLEN PULSIFER

Notice To Creditors

To the creditors of the Estate of

Ellen Pulsifer

Late Of Graniteville, Vermont.

I have been appointed to

administer this estate. All creditors

having claims against the decedent

or the estate must present their

claims in writing within four (4)

months of the first ulication of

this notice. The claim must be

presented to me at the address

listed below with a copy sent to

the Court. The claim may be

barred forever if it is not presented

within the four (4) month period.

Dated: October 1, 2021

Signed:

Ashley Pulsifer, Admin.

By Betsy Wolf Blackshaw, Esq.

Address:

co aw ffice of

Betsy Wolf Blackshaw, P.C.

P.O. Box 543

Barre, VT 05641-0543

Phone: 802-476-0800

Name of Publication: The WORLD

Publication Date: October 6, 2021

Address of Probate Court:

VT Superior Court

Orange Unit, Probate Division

5 Court Street

Chelsea, VT 05038

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

Washington Unit

PROBATE DIVISION

Docket No. 21-PR-03882

RE: ESTATE OF

JANET WHITE MOYSE

Notice To Creditors

To the Creditors of:

Janet White Moyse

Late Of Montpelier, Vermont.

I have been appointed to administer

this estate. All creditors having

claims against the decedent or the

estate must present their claims in

writing within four (4) months of the

first ulication of this notice. The

claim must be presented to me at

the address listed below with a copy

sent to the Court. The claim may be

barred forever if it is not presented

within the four (4) month period.

Dated: September 30, 2021

Signed:

Melody Allen

in care of Earle & Freeman, PLC

Address:

Earle & Freeman, PLC

P.O. Box 1385

Montpelier, VT 05601

Phone: (802) 225-6495

Email: cse@earlefreemanlaw.com

Name of Publication: The WORLD

Publication Date: October 6, 2021

Address of Probate Court:

Washington County Probate Court

65 State Street

Montpelier, VT 05602

1/2

Once upon a time in Italy, Sergio Leone saved the

Western genre. At the dawn of the Counter Culture

movement, Hollywood Westerns were becoming oldfashioned,

predictable, and bland.

Mr. Leone invited Clint Eastwood to Italy in 1964 and

changed everything. Starting with “A Fistful of Dollars,”

Leone’s Westerns were violent, moody art films for men

rather than cowboy movies for boys.

Sergio Leone became so revered that he earned the right to

make whatever movie he wanted with total artistic control.

The result was the four-hour epic disaster “Once Upon a

Time in America.” “America” isn’t just bad; it is a monumental

failure.

Leone tries to tell the story of four Jewish friends growing

up in New York City in the early years of the 20th Century.

The boys eagerly join the gangster underworld. They make it

big during Prohibition – running a popular speakeasy and a

classy brothel.

Two of the friends aren’t developed at all as characters. I

don’t even remember their names.

If there is tension in the movie, it is the rivalry between

Noodles (Robert De Niro) and Max (James Woods). Noodles

is a conservative and hesitant businessman; Max likes to

dream big and take risks.

We are supposed to believe that Max is an explosive criminal

mastermind. But we don’t because he always acts like a

childish hothead jerk.

The most preventable problem with “Once Upon a Time in

America” is the amusing fact that none of the characters look

or act even remotely Jewish. Hey, I get that Sergio Leone was

born and raised in a country with approximately zero Jews. So

… why didn’t he make a movie about Italian gangsters?

Apparently, Leone thinks that Jews are regular American

tough guys who occasionally say “L’Chaim” and “tush.” The

movie isn’t anti-Jew at all. It’s just funny that Mr. Leone

seemingly knew nothing about Jews.

A more uncomfortable problem is Leone’s treatment of

women. Oddly, almost every female character is single-mindedly

sex crazed.

During a Detroit diamond heist, Noodles has semi-consensual

sex with a married woman. A few scenes later, she is in

New York working at the brothel. Did she like the rough treatment

so much that she dropped everything to make a career

out of it? It is never explained.

I don’t think “America” is necessary misogynistic. It’s just

odd that Mr. Leone seemingly knew nothing about women.

Every hour or so, Noodles goes into an opium den to smoke

himself comatose. And every time, I said to myself – “Oh,

yeah. Noodles is some sort of junkie.” It’s easy to forget,

because he never talks about drugs or acts high or indicates

that he craves more opium.

Hey, everyone deals with their bad habits differently. But I

couldn’t help but think that Mr. Leone seemingly knew nothing

about addictive drugs.

Sometimes the very greatest directors make the most outrageously

terrible films. That is certainly what happened here.

Sergio Leone’s “The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly” is arguably

the finest Western ever made. And “Once Upon a Time in

America” is the most overrated Gangster film.

Statement from Lt. Governor Gray, Attorney General Donovan,

Pro Tem Balint, Speaker Krowinski on RNC, Vermont GOP

Lawsuit Over Noncitizen Voting in Montpelier and Winooski

Lt. Governor Molly Gray, Attorney General TJ Donovan,

Pro Tem Becca Balint, and Speaker Jill Krowinski issued the

following statement:

“At a time when we are seeing legislatures with Republicancontrolled

majorities enact restrictive voting laws, it comes as

no surprise that the Republican National Committee (RNC)

and Vermont Republican Party (VTGOP) would sue two municipalities

for expanding voting access to members of their

communities. But that’s not the Vermont way. From same-day

voter registration to our new universal mail-in voting law, our

state has a strong, bipartisan track record of making it easier

for people to participate in our democracy. In this spirit, voters

• • •

• • •

in Montpelier and Winooski came out in favor of expanding

voter access in their communities, and the legislature, after

rigorous debate and deliberation, supported their ability to

regulate their own local elections in this way.

“The RNC has, and continues, to peddle misinformation

about the security and validity of elections in this country.

As elected leaders in Vermont, we will not stand by as a national

political organization questions the will of the people

of Montpelier and Winooski, and their decision to open their

local elections to more members of their respective communities.”

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

Washington Unit

Docket No.: 530-9-20 Wnpr

In re ESTATE of

Donald Erwin Crossman

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

To the Creditors of:

Donald Erwin Crossman,

late of Waterbury, Vermont

I have been appointed to administer

this estate. All creditors having claims

against the decedent or the estate must

present their claims in writing within

four months of the first ulication

of this notice. The claim must be

presented to me at the address listed

below with a copy sent to the Court.

The claim may be barred forever if

it is not presented within the four (4)

month period.

Michael Crossman,

c/o Claudia I. Pringles, Esq.

32 Main St. 370

Montpelier, VT 05602

802-223-0600

cpringles@pringleslaw.com

Name of Publication: The WORLD

Publication Date: October 6, 2021

Vermont Superior Court-

Washington Unit (Probate Div.)

65 State St

Montpelier, VT 05602

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

Washington Unit

Docket No.: 21-PR-03672

In re ESTATE of

Christine Denise Goulet

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

To the Creditors of:

Christine Denise Goulet,

late of Warren, Vermont

I have been appointed to administer

this estate. All creditors having claims

against the decedent or the estate must

present their claims in writing within

four months of the first ulication

of this notice. The claim must be

presented to me at the address listed

below with a copy sent to the Court.

The claim may be barred forever if

it is not presented within the four (4)

month period.

Ali Goulet,

c/o Claudia I. Pringles, Esq.

32 Main St. 370

Montpelier, VT 05602

802-223-0600

cpringles@pringleslaw.com

Name of Publication: The WORLD

Publication Date: October 6, 2021

Vermont Superior Court-

Washington Unit (Probate Div.)

65 State St

Montpelier, VT 05602

ANTIQUES & OLDER ITEMS WANTED

Buying: Crocks, jugs, bottles, jars, pottery & glass vases,

candlesticks, mixing bowls, dishes, knick-knacks, sterling,

Pyrex, cast iron cookware, costume & old jewelry, paintings/

prints, toys, holiday decorations, signs, and so much more

Attics & Full Estates

Call BEFORE donating or having a tag sale

Rich Aronson 802-595-3632

CHILD FIND AD - FY22

All children and youth (ages 0-21) who are residents of Craftsbury,

Greensboro, Hardwick, Stannard, Wolcott and Woodbury are eligible

to receive an appropriate education at public expense, regardless of

any disabilities they have. It is possible that the Orleans Southwest

Supervisory Union may not be aware of all resident children and

youth with disabilities. If you know of a pre-school aged child

(birth-5) who may be delayed developmentally or a school-aged

child who may have a disability and may be eligible for special

education services and who is not in school or otherwise being

educated at public expense, please notify the Orleans Southwest

Supervisory Union by calling or writing to:

Heather Freeman, Director of Student Services

Orleans Southwest Supervisory Union

P.O. Box 338, Hardwick, VT, 05843

Phone 802-472-2908

Students with a disability who live in one of the towns listed above

and who attend an approved private school in one of the towns

listed above may be eligible for limited special education services.

Contact Heather Freeman for more information.

October 6, 2021 The WORLD page 13


HAPPY

80TH

BIRTHDAY

The Benefit Shop

15 Cottage St., Barre 479-4309

October 15, 2021

Closed for Renovations

Send cards to

The CVMC Auxiliary Bene-Fit Shop will be closed

John Trepanier

October 22 Park 29th St., through Apt 1 November 6th.

Barre, Vt 05641

New Shop Hours

We will reopen Wednesday, November 7th with new shop hours:

Wednesday through Friday 10am-4pm

Saturday 9am-2pm.

Come check out our new look and shop for the holidays!

We look forward to seeing you soon, and thank you for

your patronage.

COVID HOURS!

15 Cottage St., Barre • 479-4309

WED., THURS., FRI. 10-2

SATURDAYS 9-Noon

MASKS & SOCIAL DISTANCING REQUIRED

FALL CLOTHING

IS HERE!

~ MORE DONATIONS WELCOME ~

Halloween Is Coming. Check

Our Costume Possibilities!

~ THIS AD SPONSORED BY~

VERMONT MUTUAL

INSURANCE GROUP

89 State St., Montpelier

Happy

Anniversary

Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts and The WORLD would like to help you wish

a special couple a Happy Anniversary. Just send their name, address & wedding

anniversary date. Each week we publish the names, plus we’ll have a

monthly winner for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses at Forget Me Not Flowers

& Gifts, 214 N. Main Street, Barre. No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send

anniversary names two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to: The WORLD,

c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please

provide name, address & phone number for prize notification.

Forget Me Not

Flowers & Gifts

214 N. Main St., Barre • 476-6700

Mon.-Fri. 9-6 | Sat. 9-1

We belong to the Flower Shop Network!

www.forgetmenotflowers.barre.com

Please Send Us Your Anniversaries

And Be Automatically Registered To Win A 1/2 Dozen Wrapped,

Red Roses From Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts

Oct. 6

Ed & Dona Koenemann, 67 Years, Montpelier

Jared & Hannah Felch, 4 Years, Berlin

Oct.7

Winston & Irene Weston, 60 Years, Middlesex

Oct. 10

James & Danielle Covey, 4 Years, Northfield

Oct. 13

Bill & Beverly Coon, 42 Years, Williamstown

FORGET ME NOT FLOWERS & GIFTS

“HAPPY ANNIVERSARY”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD

c/o Happy Anniversary

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week.

Plus, we will draw one (1) couple each month for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses

from Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts, 214 N. Main St., Barre. No obligation, nothing

to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date. Telephone

calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

ANNIVERSARY

DATE_______________________# YEARS______

NAMES___________________________________

ADDRESS_________________________________

_________________________________________

PHONE___________________________________

page 14 The WORLD October 6, 2021

Central Vermont

Fun Runs

Sept. 21,2021

Two Miles

Male:

Ages-60 to 69

Manny Sainz 17:36

Four Miles

Female:

Ages- 60 to 69

Dot Martin 37:44

Male:

Ages-40 to 49

Mack Seltzer 33:31

Ages- 50 to 59

Doug Maddox 41:07

Ages-60 to 69

John Martin 41:07

Six Miles

Female:

30 to 39

Keely Keonig 49:49

Ages- 40 to 49

Natalie Gentry 54:30

Ages-50 to 50

JoAnn Mugford 57:28

Cindy Barr 61:08

Male:

Ages-30 to 39

Mark Evans 49:48

Ages-40 to 49

Jeff Hope 49:49

Fun Runs of two,four and six miles

are held every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.

from May into October.The meeting

place on the bike path just beyond the

Montpelier High School track.

ARIES (March 21 to April

19) Cosmic changes create

a potential for disruptions

in your travel plans. In the

meantime, you might want

to consider shifting your

focus to another area of your life that needs attention.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) It’s a good time for beautyloving

Bovines to enjoy something special for the senses.

It will restore your spirit and return you to the workadayworld

ready for the next challenge.

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) With your planetary ruler,

Mercury, going retrograde, you might want to slow down

the pace in pursuing some of your projects. Rushing things

could be counterproductive.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Tensions begin to ease in

those once-testy relationships. This helps create a more

positive aspect all around. Expect to hear news that could

lead you to rethink a recent decision.

LEO (July 23 to August 22) The pace of activity that had

slowed last week now begins to pick up. This is good news

for Leos and Leonas who have career-building plans that

need to be put into operation.

VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Venus offers encouragement

to romance-seeking Virgos who are ready to get

up, get out and meet more people, one of whom could be

that long-sought soul mate.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) An ongoing problem

with a co-worker might need to be sent to arbitration. Get

all your facts together so that you have a solid base from

which to make your argument.

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) You are usually

decisive about most matters. But you might want to defer

your decision-making this week until you get more facts.

Someone is holding out on you.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) That

quiet period is ending, and a new burst of activity creates

some problems at the workplace. But things are soon resolved,

and everything goes back to normal.

CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Relationships

could be either helpful or hurtful as you pursue your career

goals. ou might have to mae some difficult choices de

pending on what your priorities are.

AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) You might still

have some doubts about a career move that could involve

a lot of travel. If so, continue to check things out until you

feel secure about making a decision.

PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Love rules, as Venus

continues to eercise her cosmic inuence on oth single

and attached Pisces. New developments might cause you

to change your travel plans.

BORN THIS WEEK: You often think of others before you

consider your own needs. You enjoy helping people and

would mae a fine teacher or caregiver.

(c) 2021 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Row 1 (front row): Jo-Anne Caruso Wisniowski, Kay INglis Ashton, Linda Pecor Loomis, Bernadette

Vermette, Cheryl Wilmott Zanleoni, Dan Larochelle. Row 2: Ray McLeod, Barbara Desautels Goulette,

Eurbern “Sonny” Frost, Larry Zampieri, Frank Malnati, Ray Clark. Row 3: Marilyn Taylor Bisson,

Sharon Lafreniere Dickinson, Susan Smith Graves, Dennis Roberts, Kathy Dever, Harry Dailey. Row 4:

Ted Goulette, Elisabeth Nicolino Dion, Pamela Buttura Hebert, Ric Venner, Ron Putney Row 5: James

Bond, Steve Mackenzie, James Clark, Alan Guazzoni, Harper Mitchell, Mike Gilbert, Armand Dion,

Robert “Toad” Spaulding, Brent Whitcomb

Class of ‘66 Reunion

The Spaulding High School Class of 1966 held it’s 55th class reunion at the Mutuo Club in

Barre on Saturday evening, September 25, 2021. Fifty-two persons were in attendance, including

thirty classmates. Those classmates traveling the furthest were James Bond (Colorado),

Sharon Lafreniere Dickinson (North Carolina), and Susan Smith Graves (South Carolina).

Committee members were James Clark (class president), Barbara Desautels Goulette, Robert

“Toad” Spaulding, Harper Mitchell, Cheryl Wilmott Zanleoni and Mike Gilbert.

• • •

Rita Copeland Retires From Twin Valley Senior Center

After 12 years of dedicated work as the executive director

of the Twin Valley Senior Center on Rt. 2 in East Montpelier,

much beloved Rita Copeland is stepping down.

“I feel the center is to a point for more growth with leadership,

knowledge, technology and energy to move to the next

level,” stated Copeland, “The center has grown from a small

unknown entity to an organization that is well known and respected.

I could not have asked for more.”

The Center under Copeland’s direction is open Monday,

Wednesday, 9am to 2pm serving seniors and disabled in

aot alais ast Montelier Marshfield lainfield and

Woodbury.

There is also free bus service for seniors and disabled in

those six towns and many classes are offered from bone building

to art. Lunches on Mondays, Wednesdays, Friday’s at the

center are also very popular.

Pcitrure to the right with Copeland (left) is Dyne Sapp, a

friend and volunteer at the center.

Happy Birthday!

FROM

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone

special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the

names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a

FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to

buy. Just send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o

BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302—Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your

name, address & phone number for prize notification.

OCTOBER 5

Lisa Companion, Waterbury

OCTOBER 6

Paul Tomasini, 88, Graniteville

Emma Dodge, 1, East Montpelier

Isaac Lamberton, 16, Barre

This Week’s Cake Winner:

Paul Tomasini, 88, Graniteville

CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT)

at 479-9078 and ask for the Bakery Department

by Thursday, October 7 to arrange for cake pick-up.

PRICE CHOPPER

“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake

403 U.S. Rt. 302—Berlin

Barre, VT 05641

Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will

publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week

for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin,

VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks

prior to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

BIRTHDATE ___________________________________________

NAME ________________________________________________

AGE (this birthday) ______________________________________

ADDRESS ________________________________________________

PHONE__________________________________ _____________


Another way to impress your possible

employers is show them how respectful and

nice you are. onfidence is great but you

dont want to come off as arrogant or rude.

ere are some tips to help you get the edge

over your competition with proper etiquette.

INTRODUCTIONS MATTER

The little things matter and every gesture of respect you

show your potential employer can put you above others.

mloyers are not only looing for someone ualified for the

position but also looking for someone that is easy to work

with and respectful.

If the potential employer walks up to you as you are sitting

down, stand up and shake their hands. Offer a greeting, look

them in the eyes as you shake hands and smile.

Eye contact is important throughout an interview. It demonstrates

you are listening and retaining the information that

is being shared with you.

KEEP A CONFIDENT POSTURE

As you walk into the room, you are being interviewed in

you should e ooing confidence. old you head u high and

shoulders back. As you walk into the room make sure you

look at each interviewer and share a nod and a smile. As we

said efore etend your hand and give each erson a firm

handshake.

If you are waiting for the interviewers to enter the room

then sit on your chair with your back straight and hands on

your lap. Avoid being on your phone so you focus on the task

ahead of you.

Keep all your items in a bag or portfolio, place them

neatly on the table if you have to. If you have résumés ready

then keep those on the table to be handed out among all the

interviewers.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO THE WORLD

GET THE JOB

Local Employers Recruit and Reconnect — in Person — at the 2021 Vermont Tech Jam

Find a great job, meet collaborators and be inspired at the

2021 Vermont Tech Jam. This annual career and tech expo,

powered by Seven Days newspaper, is back — in person, and

in urlington on aturday ctoer at the new ula

lakeside tech campus.

Dozens of local startups and technology companies will be

exhibiting and hiring, including:

• Electric aviation startup and Tech Jam sponsor BETA

Technologies

• Benchmark Space Systems, maker of propulsion systems for

small satellites

• Wireless charging innovator Resonant Link

Job Interview Etiquette

It is important you keep the same energy up during the

interview. ou want to show you are confident ut not aggressive.

Avoid any slouching or leaning postures that may

make you come off as cocky or that you don’t respect your

interviewers.

SEND A THANK YOU NOTE

It’s important to do the most you can to make yourself

stand out above the rest of your competition. Every little

thing should be taken into account from your eye contact to

the way you walk in. From the way you speak to how loud

you speak. Remember, you are trying to stand outt above the

• • •

• Large local employers such as sponsors GlobalFoundries,

Marvell, BioTek/Agilent, VIP, Data Innovations, C2 and

OnLogic

he ech am taes lace at ula a former oven factory

that has been renovated into a net-zero office and coworking

facility owered y ercent renewale energy. ula is

also a Tech Jam sponsor, along with Mascoma Bank,

oldwell aner ico and oardman orwich

University and the Vermont Technology Council.

This year’s event is divided into two sessions. Admission is

free for the first session, from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. A ticket for

session two, from 1:30 to 6 p.m., costs $10 and includes the

rest. That being said, send a thank you email to the hiring

manager or person you have been in contact with about the

position with in 24 hours of the interview. It can as short as a

quick thank you for their time to as long as restating some of

the key things you talked about during the interview.

Leaving a note like this is a good way to leave a good impression

with the hiring manager and other people involved

in your interview. It also shows you really care about them

and the company to go out of your way to send them note,

card or email.

Use these tips to are yourself stand above the rest.

keynote presentation: an interview with BETA CEO Kyle

Clark and BETA adviser and client Martine Rothblatt, entrepreneur,

futurist and CEO of United Therapeutics. The pair

will discuss how their partnership evolved and how it’s transforming

the field of electric aviation. Rothblatt will be

appearing virtually.

Tech Jam organizers are encouraging attendees to be vaccinated

and will be following Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention masking guidelines for indoor events. For more

information, tickets and registration, visit techjamvt.com.

BUILD YOUR CAREER WITH A GROWING COMPANY

r.k. Miles, Inc, is seeking experienced, positive, energetic individuals to fill the following positions at its Barre, VT location:

CLASS B CDL TRUCK DRIVER

The candidate must have a valid CDL driver’s license and a clean and safe driving record.

Ability to operate a boom is a plus. We will train the right person. Knowledge of building and

construction materials is helpful. Candidate must have a positive attitude and ability to

provide excellent customer service in the yard and at jobsites. Physical requirements include

ability to be on feet all day when not driving a truck, including repeated walking throughout

job sites and up and down stairs. Ability to lift products and place on truck or unload from

truck and carry up-and-down ladders. Ability to work outdoors in all seasons and in all

weather conditions.

DOOR & WINDOW TECHNICIAN

Candidate will be responsible for driving to jobsites; observing and solving technical window

and door issues, making repairs, and processing warranty paperwork. Candidate may perform

small window and door installations processed through the Doors & Windows Department.

Must have knowledge of window and door products, building applications, the ability to

accurately measure projects, read detailed architectural drawings and be able to operate power

and hand tools. Physical requirements include the ability to lift and carry products weighing

up to 100 lbs. Must have valid driver’s license.

MATERIAL HANDLER

Individual will be responsible for learning our inventory and preparing customer orders for pick

up or delivery. Candidate must have a positive attitude and ability to provide excellent customer

service in the yard. Physical requirements include ability to be on feet all day. Ability to lift

products weighing up to 100 pounds and place on truck or unload from truck, and carry

up-and-down ladders. Ability to work outdoors in all seasons and in all weather conditions.

Individuals with construction or building material knowledge are encouraged to apply. Candidates

must have a valid driver’s license. Forklift experience a plus.

We offer competitive wages, a full array of benefits and pleasant work environment. Stop by

our Barre location at 502 Main Street and fill out an application or mail, fax or email your

resume and cover letter to:

r.k. Miles, Inc. attn: Human Resources

PO Box 1125, Manchester Center, VT 05255

email hr@rkmiles.com

tel 802 549 5678 • fax 802 362 6434

BENEFITS

• Medical, Dental, & Life

• 401K & Profit Sharing • Employee Discount

• Flexible Spending Account • Paid Time Off & Holidays

visit rkmiles.com to apply online or

to download an application

EOE

r.k. MILES IS COMMITTED TO ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY BUSINESS PRACTICES.

October 6, 2021 The WORLD page 15


Best Trade Jobs of the Future

There is a perception that

trade-school jobs are low paying.

Have you ever hired a plumber?

They don’t earn a pittance. The

reality is the highest-paying trade

jobs come with salaries near or

above the U.S. household median

income of $61,937, according to

the U.S. Census Bureau.

There are some with the potential to crack

si figures. our hands and a ag of tools

can be very valuable. The top paying trade

jobs, as compiled by TheInterviewGuys.com.

1 PLUMBERS

The median salary for plumbers is

$55,160, but the top 10% bring in more

than $97,000. In Illinois, the average annual

wage is more than $86,000. This career is

sifigure territory and if you saw what they

saw, you’d understand why.

2 CONSTRUCTION MANAGER

The median salary for spending your

days overseeing projects and supervising a

variety of tradespeople — which probably

will require some college — is more than

$95,250.

3 ELEVATOR MECHANIC

Elevator mechanics repair, install and

maintain elevators and, at times, deal in

GET THE JOB | SPECIAL SECTION TO THE WORLD

moving walkways and escalators. The median

annual salary is about $84,990.

4 ELECTRICAL POWER LINE TECHNI-

CIAN

Also called power utility technicians,

these guys work ensuring that homes, businesses

and everything else has access to

electricity. They install, maintain and repair

high-voltage power lines, at times by climbing

power poles and standing in cherry pickers.

The median salary is about $65,700.

5 AIRCRAFT MECHANIC

ou send your days maing sure the

ying machine descendants of the right

Brothers are tuned up, maintained and safe

to y. nd youre certified through a ederal

viation dministrationcertified school.

The annual salary is about $64,310.

6 GEOLOGICAL AND PETROLEUM

TECHNICIAN

If you enjoy some math and getting your

hands dirty, this trade profession might be

for you. Installing

equipment, collecting and testing samples,

recording data and producing a range of reports.

The median salary is $51,130, but you

get to spend your time outdoors and in a lab.

7 BOILERMAKER

These tradespeople install, maintenance

and repair closed vats, boilers and other

containers that store gases and liquids. The

median annual salary is $63,100.

CVMC Ramps up Recruitment

and Retention Initiatives

Central Vermont Medical Center (CVMC)

announced several initiatives underway to

address the national pandemic-driven labor

shortage that is particularly affecting health

systems as increased Covid-19 cases and

higher acuity drive demand for care.

“In health care, people are at the heart of

everything we do. Adequate staffing is essential

to provide the best possible care and service,”

said CVMC President and COO Anna

Tempesta Noonan. “Nationally and locally

we were seeing labor shortages even before

the pandemic began. Covid has accelerated

the demands on health care systems.”

With changes in pay scales, sign-on bonuses

and the launch of innovative professional

educational tracks, the region’s largest

employer hopes to entice a wide range of job

seekers to join its ranks.

As of September 20, CVMC has raised its

wage floor to $15/hr. This means that all

CVMC employees now make at least $15/hr,

coupled with differentials for evening, night

and weekend shifts, paid time off and a generous

benefits package. Current employees

will see the wage bump retroactively applied

to their paychecks. Additionally, applicants

hired into certain positions ranging from food

service workers, environmental service technicians

to nurses, will also receive one-time

sign-on bonuses.

“We deeply value our employees” said

Noonan. “Our move to increasing our minimum

wage, offering a very competitive benefits

package and professional advancement

through our educational programming tracks

are essential to ensuring that CVMC is an

employer of choice for this area.”

CVMC’s Licensed Practical Nursing

(LPN) program saw its first 13 students complete

the 11-month program in June. The

second cohort is currently underway. This

accelerated program is one of several career

advancement initiatives where employees

can enroll in tuition-free certificate and

degree programs while working at CVMC.

Other programs underway furnish education

for Licensed Nursing Assistants (LNA) and

Medical Assistants (MA). Paired with existing

tuition reimbursement and loan repayment

programs, CVMC staff have the ability

to move from entry-level positions to professional

nursing positions within the organization.

CVMC also plans to shore up its ranks by

working to launch a program to recruit health

care workers through the federal government’s

temporary nonimmigrant worker program

(EB-3). This program grants temporary

visas to international health care workers for

a three-year commitment to CVMC.

“The people who make up our health care

team are what makes CVMC a special place.

Working together, we provide high quality,

affordable care to the Central Vermont community,”

said Noonan, a Barre native, who

began her own health care career as a nursing

assistant at Central Vermont Hospital. “We

want CVMC to be a place where team members

grow, thrive and stay, now and for generations

to come.”

Don’t Just Get a Job, Start a Career

New higher starting rate: $15 per hour

$17.25 for evenings | $19.25 for nights

$5,000 sign-on bonus

When you join our Environmental Services Team or

our Food Services Team at Woodridge

Get job stability and great employer support

On-the-job training • Opportunities for career growth

• Tuition reimbursement • Flexible hours to support

child care and school schedules

Now Hiring for Security Positions

New higher starting rate: $15 per hour

$17.25 for evenings | $19.25 for nights

$3,000 sign-on bonus available

For full-time hires, prorated for part-time

Get job stability and great employer support

On-the-job training • Opportunities for career growth

• Tuition reimbursement • Flexible hours to support

child care and school schedules

EXCELLENT

BENEFITS

GENEROUS

PAID TIME OFF

EXCELLENT

BENEFITS

GENEROUS

PAID TIME OFF

Learn more and apply online today:

UVMHealth.org/CVMC/Jobs

or call our Talent Acquisition team at

(802) 821-8340

Learn more and apply online today:

UVMHealth.org/CVMC/Jobs

or call our Talent Acquisition team at

(802) 882-6412

Equal Opportunity Employer

Equal Opportunity Employer

page 16 The WORLD October 6, 2021


GET THE JOB

onfiene s ey

roecting confidence during an interview is ust as important as

having a solid rsum. onfidence is knowing you trust in yourself.

ere are some tips to help you proect confidence in any ob

interview you walk into.

NOW HIRING

TIPS BEFORE THE INTERVIEW

Interviews can be very intimidating,

especially since there is a chance you will

not know what you are walking in to. You

should never wing a job interview. Creating

confidence is erforming simle tass to

help boost your morale.

Start by researching the company and

those who are involved in the hiring process.

The research will help you understand the

company, it’s employees and what your duties

could e if you were to e hired.

nother way to uild confidence efore

the interview is to practice answering basic

uestions to yourself a friend or family

member. It’s important to know whoever

your racticing with has to e ufront and

honest aout how you erformed it will

help you analyze what works and doesn’t.

Practicing like this can also help you

communicate who you are and the value you

could bring to the company.

PREPARE. PREPARE. PREPARE.

nother good way to hel mae yourself

feeling confident going into the interview

is to remember the three P’s. Prepare a list

of reliale references ahead of time. Mae

sure these references are eole that can

confidently answer worrelated uestions

aout your erformance history.

reare eamles of your wor that

explains accomplishments, skills or problem

solving techniques related

to the osition you are alying for.

he last of the three s is to reare

smart insightful uestions for your interviewers.

You may think interviews are just

meant for you to answer a otential emloyers

uestions ut its ust as imortant for

you to ask them questions.

You should also look to make sure the

comany you are alying to is a good fit

for you.

DRESS FOR SUCCESS

You have to remember you are trying to

mae a great first imression on the eole

interviewing you. ne of the est ways to do

that is to dress for success. lan your nicest

suit or unday est the night efore your

interview. his is one of the simlest ways

to get you feeling confident for your interview.

If you dont now how to dress for the

interview, research the company’s attire to

learn what would be appropriate.

PLAN THE DAY

Plan your whole day around your interview.

Plan to wake up early and make a big

reafast efore lan what time you will

leave the house to get to your interview 30

minutes early. lan to ring coies of your

rsum to hand out if there are multile

interviewers in the room.

Its imortant every asect of the day is

planned out leading up to the interview. You

don’t want any surprises or mistakes to keep

you from getting the o of your dreams.

The way you look, the time you arrive

and the confidence you dislay can mae a

huge impact during the interview and can

possibly put you over your competition.

Groundskeeper/

Custodial Opening

There is an immediate opening for a combination 1st Shift

Groundskeeper/2nd Shift Custodian position at Spaulding

High School/Central Vermont Career Center. This is a 1st

shift position (7:00 am to 3:30 pm) as a Groundskeeper

from approximately May through November, and a 2nd

shift position (3:00 pm to 11:30 pm) as a Custodian from

approximately November through May. Both shifts are

Monday-Friday.

The base rate of pay for this position is $17.49 per hour.

There is a shift differential of an additional $.50 an hour

while working the 2nd shift.

Interested candidates are encouraged to apply online

at buusd.org/district/employment or submit a letter of

interest, resume, and three references to: Jamie Evans -

Facilities Director, jevanbsu@buusd.org

TEXT 'DUNKIN'

TO (804) 294-2963

TO APPLY!

We’re Hiring

Work within the community you love!

Love preparing and serving good food? Hunger Mountain

Co-op offers food service jobs with a difference. We

work toward a shared cooperative mission while

preparing high-quality food using local, natural, and

organic ingredients.

Our co-op also offers:

powered by

• Good pay and a gain share program

• Set schedule with no late nights

• Generous paid time off, including seven

major holidays

• Excellent employee benefits, which include 100%

coverage of the health insurance premiums for

full-time employees

• 20% discount on Co-op purchases

Take a look at our current openings and

consider bringing your talents here.

hungermountain.coop/employment

Hunger Mountain Co-op is an equal opportunity employer. Women,

minorities, people with disabilities, veterans, and members of the

LGBTQ+ community are encouraged to apply. Hourly employees

are represented by UE Local 255.

623 Stone Cutters Way, Montpelier, VT

(802) 223-8000 • hungermountain.coop

October 6, 2021 The WORLD page 17


Accounts Payable Administrator

We are seeking an Accounts Payable Administrator

to join the Finance Team at Capstone Community

Action. The Accounts Payable Administrator will be

responsible for all the accounts payable functions.

Additional duties may include providing back up for

accounts receivable, payroll and credit card payment

functions. The ideal candidate would have an associate’s

degree in accounting, experience in a fast-paced fund

accounting/bookkeeping environment and possess

a solid understanding of computers and software –

notably Microsoft Excel. Interested applicants should

submit a letter of interest and resume to:

Capstone Community Action, Inc.

Human Resources

20 Gable Place

Barre, VT 05641

Or e-mail to: jobs@capstonevt.org

Capstone Community Action, Inc. is an Equal

Opportunity Employer and Provider. Applications

from women, individuals with disabilities, veterans,

and people from diverse cultural backgrounds are

encouraged.

Only those applicants selected for an interview

will be contacted.

MONTPELIER ROXBURY

PUBLIC SCHOOLS

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

CUSTODIANS

Montpelier Roxbury Public Schools has two openings for

second shift custodians. For further information about

these positions, or for questions about the application

process, please contact Tom Allen, Custodial Supervisor,

at tomal@mpsvt.org.

INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANTS

Montpelier Roxbury Public Schools has multiple openings

for full-time Instructional Assistants, must be HQP. Please

contact Heather Michaud, HR Coordinator, at 225-

8682 for further information, or apply online at www.

schoolspring.com.

KITCHEN MANAGER, ONE-YEAR POSITION

Montpelier Roxbury Public Schools is looking for a longterm

substitute Kitchen Manager for Montpelier High

School for the 2021-2022 school year. The position is eight

hours per day when school is in session, with a competitive

salary and benefits. Prior food service experience is

preferred. Please contact Jim Birmingham, Food Service

Director, at 225-8016 for further information, or apply

online at www.schoolspring.com.

FOOD SERVICE ASSISTANTS

Montpelier Roxbury Public Schools has multiple openings

for Food Service Assistants. Positions are 5.75 or 4.0 hours

per day when school is in session. This is a great opportunity

to work part-time with school hours. Prior food service

experience is great but not necessary, we are willing to

train the right candidates. Please contact Jim Birmingham,

Food Service Director, at 225-8016 for further information,

or apply online at www.schoolspring.com.

SUBSTITUTES for

TEACHERS, NURSES, INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANTS,

CUSTODIANS, FOOD SERVICE STAFF & CROSSING

GUARDS NEEDED

Individuals are sought to serve as temporary employees

for the 2021-2022 school year. Appropriate background

check reuired. Applications available at the Office of the

Superintendent, 5 High School Drive, Unit #1, Montpelier,

Vermont.

MONTPELIER HIGH SCHOOL

Softball: JV Coach

Boys’ Ultimate Frisbee: JV Coach

Boys’ Ultimate Frisbee: Varsity Coach

Girls’ Ultimate Frisbee: Varsity Coach

MAIN STREET MIDDLE SCHOOL

Nordic Ski Coach

Girls’ Basketball: Grade 7 Coach

Girls’ Basketball: Grade 8 Coach

Boys’ Basketball: Grade 7 Coach

Interested candidates are asked to send a letter of interest

and resumé to Matt Link, Athletic Director, Montpelier

High School, 5 High School Drive, Montpelier, Vermont

05602.

EOE

page 18 The WORLD October 6, 2021

GET THE JOB | SPECIAL SECTION TO THE WORLD

Becoming a Contract Employee

The pandemic has caused great shifts in our lives, not least of all

about how and where we work.

Many eole have discovered the freedom and eiility

of working from home and have chosen to further their careers

as freelancers or contract employees if their employers

don’t offer the option of remaining as a permanent workfrom-home

employee.

Even before the pandemic, a growing number of those

with entrepreneurial spirits elected to forgo traditional

employment and forged independent careers. There are pros

and cons to both traditional employment and becoming a

freelancer or contract employee. But there is a difference

between freelancer and contractor.

DEFINITIONS

Freelancers usually have several, if not many clients for

whom they perform work. Contractors may also have several

clients, but generally offer their services under contract for

an agreed set of payment and circumstances. No matter

where they perform the work, contract employees are bound

by the terms of their agreement.

oth can offer freedom and enefits ut a contract worer

will generally, though not always, devote their work fulltime

to the employer they’ve entered into an agreement with.

ADVANTAGES

Like their freelance counterparts, contract employees

enoy greater eiility in setting their wor schedules.

Depending upon the terms of the agreement, contract

employees can work where they like and often set their own

schedules. In many cases, employers may not mind when or

where you work as long as the work is performed to their

satisfaction.

Unlike freelancers, who may perform work for a client

Social Media Presence

Today’s job seekers have more to take into account than those of the past. Social media

and your social presence can greatly benefit you by showing your employer who you are

before you even meet them. Social media can help you define your brand and can show

SOCIAL MEDIA ON A RÉSUMÉ

You can meet a person and see what they are like and who

they are before even seeing them in person. Social media is a

double edge sword that way. It can hurt you if you are posting

and reposting things that wouldn’t be considered very

professional.

But today, hiring managers use social media to search you

online, listing the links for them on your résumé can make

you seem proactive and inviting them to do so.

Listing your links can encourage you to clean up any

unprofessional posts you may have your page.

WHAT SOCIAL MEDIA LINK TO INCLUDE

Before you start adding every social you have to your résumé

it’s important to think of the most important ones that

would hel define your rand.

LinkedIn is a platform for professionals to post and share

content with others. So many hiring managers use LinkedIn

to reach out to other hiring managers and professionals in

their area. Creating a brand on LinkedIn can get you above

the competition and show hiring managers who you are

before even looking at your résumé.

witter is another great latform that can hel you define

your social brand to hiring managers. Twitter is a great platform

to add to your résumé because you can tweet about and

HIRING

PARAEDUCATORS

Barre Unified Union School District is

seeking Paraeducators for the

21-22 school year.

BUUSD currently has openings for Paraeducators at:

Barre City Elementary & Middle School, Barre Town Middle

& Elementary School, Spaulding High School, and Central

Vermont Career Center. Paraeducators support students

and teachers working one on one and/or with small groups

of students with special needs. Responsibilities will vary

depending on assignment, but typically include:

- Eyes on supervision during class, transition times, and lunch;

- Communication with teachers and case managers;

- One to one support and/or small group support.

The Paraeducator benefits package includes a competitive

wage and an excellent BCBS Healthcare Plan, Dental Insurance,

Long term Disability, retirement plan, Life Insurance, and

tuition reimbursement. Candidates must have a high school

degree/GED.

Interested candidates should apply online @ buusd.org/

district/employment ATTN: Sue Cioffi, Admin. Asst. of Special

Services, sciofbsu@buusd.org

• • •

employers that brand.

once and never again, contract employees are guaranteed a

term of financial security under the terms of the agreement.

hey may also enoy certain comany enefits such as

computers, software and the ability to access programs and

applications necessary to complete tasks, while freelancers

will often provide their own equipment, software or tools,

depending on the role.

DISADVANTAGES

As the old saying goes, with great freedom comes great

responsibility. This is very much the case with both freelancers

and contract employees. While contract employees may

negotiate the terms of their agreements, they are generally

considered 1099 employees and often pay their own taxes

and rovide their own enefits. ecause emloyers understand

this, contract employees are often paid more

than their traditional counterparts.

The upside to this “disadvantage” is that contractors can

often deduct most, if not all of their expenses, as well as

the home office sace they wor in from their taes. hile

these deductions vary and are suect to secific rules this

can often turn a disadvantage into an advantage for the

contract employee.

CONSIDERATIONS

While there are too many other pros and cons to cover

here, there are plenty of resources available online to discover

and weigh before entering into a contract agreement.

ut for many the enefits freedom to wor when and

where they like, the ability to spend more time with friends

and family the ta advantages offer an attractive alternative

to traditional employment.

share stories or trends in your industry. Include your Twitter

rofile if you are one that consistently shares and tweets

about your industry.

Leave your Twitter out if you tweet about sports or anything

that won’t show employers your personal brand.

Other social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram

and YouTube are all other platforms you can include ONLY

if you use the platforms to showcase your skills and personal

brand.

CLEAN UP YOUR ONLINE PRESENCE

Whether or not you decide to include your social media

sites on your résumé, it’s always a good idea to clean up

your online presence. Hiring managers will Google your

name for a couple of reasons. First reason, they will want to

see if they can get a feel for what kind of person you are and

secondly, it will give them peace of mind. They’ll check to

make sure you aren’t posting controversial posts or pictures

on your social media that will put a negative image on their

company if they were to hire you.

Social media today is a huge part of our lives and careers.

For some, social media can determine whether they get and

retain their jobs. It’s important to build a good online brand

to give hiring managers a good first imression of you.

HIRING

SUBSTITUTES

Barre Unified Union School District is seeking Daily

Substitute Teachers for Barre City Elementary and Middle

School, Barre Town Middle and Elementary School,

Spaulding High School and Central Vermont Career Center.

BUUSD is looking for individuals that are available on an on-call

basis to cover teacher, paraeducator and clerical absences. Our

substitutes must be energetic, flexible, friendly, professional,

and want to support a positive learning environment.

Substitute duties include:

- Implementing effective classroom management skills;

- Following Teacher’s written lesson plans;

- Preparing a written summary of work completed;

- Following all policies, rules and procedures to which regular

teachers are subject;

- Complying with all building and safety procedures and

schedules.

Interested candidates should apply online @ buusd.org/

district/employment ATTN: Sara Gaboriault, HR Admin. Asst./

Receptionist


GET THE JOB | SPECIAL SECTION TO THE WORLD

Legislative Leadership Sends Letter to

US Department of Labor

Re: Unemployment Benefits

Leaders of both chambers in the Vermont legislature, and

the relevant committee chairs, sent a letter to the US Department

of Labor last week seeking to clarify legislative intent

around Vermont Act 51 of 2021, which included a change

to increase enefits to Vermonters receiving unemloyment.

The letter also asked the Department to reconsider its August

letter stating the increased enefit did not conform

with guidance. he tet of the letter is elow and attached.

“We are writing regarding our concerns as it relates to the

interpretation of Vermont Act 51 of 2021, which included a

change to increase enefits to Vermonters receiving unem-

loyment. e elieve that the information elow rovides

imortant contet and with this additional information we

request that you reconsider your August 24, 2021 letter of

nonconformance. ver the net decade we anticiate this

decision imacts aout million in enefits to Vermonts

laidoff worers.

t a legislative hearing on etemer Vermonts

ommissioner of aor confirmed that lins the

non-conformance decision to legislative intent regarding

whether or not the $25 increase to recipients is a “supplemental

enefit.

During the 2021 legislative session, which adjourned on

June 24, 2021, we spent many hours reaching a compromise

that would balance $300 million of Unemployment Insurance

I ta relief for usinesses and with an increase in

enefit after the federal sulemental enefit eired. he

goal was to achieve arity etween the reduction in ta rates

and the increase in enefits. Vermont has a tradition of maing

changes to UI Trust Fund that balances any reduction in

ta rates with an increase in enefits.

Throughout the negotiations between the House, Senate

and overnor cotts administration we reeatedly faced

the limits of our aging I mainframe. s you now this has

been a source of frustration for the state as we worked to

rotect and suort Vermonters throughout the andemic.

‘Where Do You See Yourself In 5 Years?’

It’s a question hiring managers like to ask. Lots of things might be running

through your mind, but “running the place” is not the right answer.

IS THIS A TRICK QUESTION?

It might be, but there is a way to answer it to your advantage.

Sometimes the answer is, “not in this job,” or, “in your

job,” or something like, “at a bigger better opportunity

elsewhere. ut none of those are things you actually want

to say to a hiring manager.

The good news is you can be honest while still telling

them what they really want to now. o you have realistic

eectations for your career re you amitious nd does

this particular position align with your growth and goals

overall

or eamle one way I lie to thin aout it is hin

about where this position could realistically take you and

think about how that aligns with some of your broader

rofessional goals.

MORE EXPERIENCED AND

KNOW MORE IN FIVE YEARS

So, what if this position is not a one-way ticket to your

rofessional amitions Its to say you dont really now

what the future holds ut you see how this eerience could

really hel in maing that decision.

ou might say “ell Im really ecited y this osition

at oule agle nergy ecause in five years Id lie to e

• • •

Fortunately, the state is now on a path to modernize the

system ut that will tae several years.

As negotiations neared the end, the Vermont Department

of aor V assured the legislature that the easiest way

to increase enefits to Vermonters without maor ris to the

mainframe was to add a at er wee er reciient.

As leaders of both chambers in the Vermont legislature,

and the five relevant committee chairs we disagree with

Vs interretation that the oost should e seen as

“sulemental to the enefit already in our formula. e

were following the administrations suggestion that a at

was the easiest technical solution to our intended desire to

increase enefits. here was no real discussion of whether it

was to e a searate enefit or art of the wage calculation

formula. hatever mechanism would lead to allowing the

enefit to e aid with trust fund dollars was what the legislature

wanted. If we had een informed during the ills

maru that the enefit could not go forward with trust fund

dollars we would have clarified the legislation.

Since your August 24th letter is based on an analysis of

legislative intent offered y the V we wanted you to

hear directly from the relevant legislative leaders what our

intent was in ct .

We hope this might cause you to reconsider your guidance

and as for the oortunity to discuss this further.

Sincerely,

Senator Becca Balint, Vermont Senate President Pro Tempore

Representative Jill Krowinski, Vermont Speaker of the

House

Senator Michael Sirotkin, Chair of Senate Economic Development,

Housing & General Affairs

Representative Mike Marcotte, Chair of House Committee

on Commerce and Economic Development

Representative Janet Ancel, Chair of House Committee on

Ways and Means”

seen as someone with a deeer understanding and eertise

in oil and gas and I now thats something that Ill have an

oortunity to do here.

“Im also really ecited to tae on more managerial resonsiilities

in the net few years and otentially even tae

the lead on some roects. Ive een lucy enough to wor

with some amazing managers, and so developing into a great

manager myself is something Im really ecited aout.

Looking for One

Person for

Kitchen Hood

Cleaning

and Pressure

Washing

$15/hour

Willing to train.

Knowledge with ladders.

(802)461-8594

802-505-3859

Concrete Laborer

Wanted

Apply at

Breer Bros. Inc.

18 Blackwell St.

Barre, VT

Monday - Friday

7:00 am - 8:00 am

or call 238-3661

Seeking

Flaggers

$

18/HR.

Will Certify. Willing to train.

Please call:

802-505-3859

or email: lpdtrafficcontrol@gmail.com

CUSTODIANS

NEEDED

The Kellogg-Hubbard Library in Montpelier,

VT seeks applicants to provide custodial

services for our beautiful library building.

Applicants must work as independent

contractors, carry their own insurance, and

be able to provide cleaning services 6 days

a week. For details, please see our website:

https://www.kellogghubbard.org/employment

Patient Care Coordinator Position Available

Full time patient care coordinator position available for

busy oral surgery practice.

Requires computer experience including but not

limited to accurate data entry, appointment scheduling,

dental and medical insurance claims and accounts

receivable knowledge. Attention to detail and excellent

communication skills are required.

Send resume to resumes@neos-vt.com

EOE

Sears Hometown Sales & Service

Berlin, VT

Great Pay, bonuses & commissions,

wonderful work environment,

a growing company.

Sales experience preferred but

willing to train the right person.

479-2541 or

email office@tpmsvt.com

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WILLIAMSTOWN

CHICKEN PIE SUPPER

Thursday, October 14

Williamstown Masonic Lodge

Eat-In Seatings 5:00 & 7:00PM

Take Out 5:45-6:45PM

PRICE FOR

$13.00 per person

DINNER

Benefits WUCS

Reservations Only 802-433-5382

Canadian Club

Canadian Club • Route 14 • Barre

Sunday, Oct. 10, 2021

10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Lunch Available 11:00 am-2:00 pm

Chicken & Biscuits W/Squash,

Salad & Roll $10 - Plus Kitchen Food

LIBERTY

ORCHARD

“Pick Your Own”

Apples

West St., Brookfield

Short, Easy-To-Pick Trees

Dwayne

& Ginny

Brees

Mon.-Thurs. 1PM to 5PM

Fri.-Sun. 10AM to 5PM

802-276-3161

www.libertyorchardvt.net

DROP ’N SWAP

Center for Civic Engagement

at NORWICH UNIVERSITY

Annual Fall Clothing

Sat., Oct. 16 and Sun., Oct. 17

Plumley Armory, Norwich University • Northfield, Vt.

SWAP:

DROP:

Sat., Oct. 16

9 a.m.–3 p.m.

• Please separate clothing from rags.

• Label bags appropriately (women’s, men’s, children’s, etc.).

• No boxes or hangers, please.

• Shoes, bags, costumes and coats are also accepted!

Sun., Oct. 17

12–5 p.m.

$1 Entrance Fee

For All The Clothes You Want!

MASKS

ON

PROPANE FILLS

$16 20 Lb. Tanks

$24 30 Lb. Tanks

$30 40 Lb. Tanks

$75 100 Lb. Tanks

Locally Owned & Operated • Mon -Fri 10-6, Sat 10-2

97 US Rt. 302 Barre-Montpelier Rd • 802-479-0671

Mask Required

Inside all Norwich University Buildings

ENGAGE. SERVE. LEAD.

For questions or more information: WCC 230 • (802) 485-2644

4achange@norwich.edu • norwichserves.givepulse.com

Held in partnership with the Salvation Army of Barre, Vt.

page 20 The WORLD October 6, 2021

AUTUMN OUTINGS | FALL 2021

Darn Tough Cancels Sock Sale for 2021

By CompassVermont.com

As of August 2021, Darn Tough has donated the equivalent

of 871,635 meals to the Vermont Foodbank on its way to one

million soon enough. In addition, the Vermont company is

known for sponsoring community events like the Labor Day

arade in orthfield.

Vermonters don’t just like Darn Tough the company; they

love their socks too and look forward in particular to the annual

sock sale in November. But for the second year in a row,

Darn Tough has put a hold on the popular event.

“In the best interest of our employees and customers, we

have made the difficult decision to cancel this years sale a

Darn Tough spokesperson told Compass Vermont in an email.

“We know that this 40-year tradition will be missed by

many in including all of us here in orthfield. e hoe

you will be able to join us in November 2022!”

Another spokesperson reached by phone said, “We miss the

sales; we enjoy them as much as the customers.”

Unfortunately, the recently-debuted pumpkin-spiced themed

socks featured in this story will have to be purchased online or

All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.

com or mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S.

Route 302, Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00 p.m.,

Thursday preceding publication. The Ongoing section is for

free/low cost/non-profit community events.

Ongoing Events

ONLINE IN VERMONT-Shepherd of the Hills Welcomes

Zoom Worshipers Please join us on Sunday mornings at 9:30.

Visit us on the web at montpelierlutheran.org for the link to our

Zoom service and the bulletin for worship. There’s always room

for folks to come and worship.

Divorce and Separated Support Group This group meets the first

Monday of each month from 7:00 - 8:00 on Zoom. For more information

and to get the Zoom link, email DSGvtnh@gmail.com.

Connection Peer Support Group This group will occur on the

1st and 3rd Tuesday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM on

Zoom. This new peer support group will complement the Monday

night and Thursday afternoon support groups. People can visit

https://namivt.org/support/peer-support-groups/ for more information.

Nurturing Skills for Families in Recovery Meets weekly online

on Mondays from 1:00 –2:30 PM. For information and to join a

group contact Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Circle of Parents in Recovery Meets weekly online on Thursdays

from 3:00-4:30 PM. For information and to join a group contact

Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Circle of Parents for Grandparents Meets weekly online on

Thursdays from 4:00-5:00 PM beginning. For information and to

join a group contact Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Seven Stars Arts Center All-Comers Virtually Slow Jam will

be starting back up monthly on second Thursday evenings 6:30-

8PM! Traditional dance tunes at relaxed, accessible pace.

BYOBeverages and snacks! Free, with a recommended donation

of $10-15. All ages, levels and instruments welcome! The Zoom

link will be sent out to folks that RSVP “maybe” or “yes” by

email: resonance.vermont@gmail.com.

Mood Disorders Support Group: Now online via Zoom. Peer &

professionally led support for people coping with mood disorders

such as depression, bipolar disorder, seasonal affective disorder,

postpartum depression, dysthymia, etc. We share our experience,

strength and hope to support each other on our mental health

journey. Wed. 4 - 5 PM. There is no fee. For more information

and meeting code, contact Rosanne at 802-917-1959 or rosanne@

rosanne.info.

Weatherization Wednesdays at noon. We’ll answer your questions

via Zoom and Facebook Live every Wednesday at noon,

when we present a new topic in weatherization. Get a chance to

win smart thermostats and other prizes. More info and to register:

https://buttonupvermont.org/event.

in a store at retail prices. Darn. That is tough.

CompassVermont.Com is an independent publication

founded by a native Vermonter, providing non-editorial news

and stories presented in concert with the culture, mindset, and

values of the Green Mountain State.

Pianist Alison Bruce Cerutti In Recital

One of Central Vermont’s top pianists, Alison Bruce Cerutti,

will perform a solo piano recital at the Barre Opera House

on Sunday, October 10th at 3 p.m.

ith her rogram showcasing lyricism along with fiery

and colorful elements and emotions, Cerutti will perform music

of ameau eussy the remiere of roofield Vermont

composer Erik Nielsen’s “The Calling,” and the Sonata No. 3

in B Minor, Op. 58 by Chopin.

lison ruce erutti a ianist ased in orthfield Ver

mont, frequently performs as a soloist and chamber musician

throughout Vermont, Canada and France. She studied with

ouis Moyse for eight years and accomanied his ute master

classes in Vermont and France. She is a founding member of

Arioso and the Northern Third Piano Quartet. As one of Vermont’s

leading collaborative pianists, Cerutti performs with

the Mad River Chorale, Winooski Valley Festival, All-State

Music Festival, Music-COMP and the Vermont Symphony

• • •

Orchestra.

Cerutti has premiered works by Vermont composers Michael

Close, Lydia Busler, Erik Nielsen, David Gunn, Dennis

Bathory-Kitsz, Carol Wood, and Canadian composer David

Jaeger. She appears in the soundtrack of Bess O’Brien’s documentary

“All of Me,” playing the music of Erik Nielsen.

Tickets are $20 for general admission and $10 for students

and reduced income.

For admission to this concert, the Barre Opera House asks

that all audience members be vaccinated or have proof of a

negative COVID test within 72 hours of entry, and attendees

are required to be masked while in the building. For full information

on COVID protocols, https://barreoperahouse.org/

covid-19-restrictions.html.

For ticket reservations, please call the Barre Opera House:

(802) 476-8188. Or visit the website: https://barreoperahouse.

org/pianist-alison-bruce-cerutti-in-recital.html.

The Montpelier First Church of Christ, Scientist, is conducting

its Sunday (10:30am) and Wednesday (7:30pm) services on

Zoom for the foreseeable future. You are invited to join us using

this URL: https://zoom.us/j/306295907 or calling 1-646-876-

9923 and then keying the meeting ID code: 306 295 907#

The Heart of Vermont BNI Chapter meets weekly via Zoom

for Central Vermont business networking. Meetings are held each

Friday from 8am to 9:30am, and visitors are welcome. For information

or a reservation to attend, please contact Kristin Dearborn

at 802-223-3425. Kristin.dearborn@edwardjones.com.

The Washington County Democrats (Vermont) invite you to

‘like’ or ‘follow’ us on Facebook, and/or send an email to County

Chair, Linda Gravell (washcountydemsvt@gmail.com) to receive

monthly announcements and meeting reminders. We meet on

Zoom on the Third Monday of each month at 5:30 p.m. All

Democrats living in Washington County, Vermont are welcome to

participate.

The Unitarian Church of Montpelier welcomes all to visit

http://www.ucmvt.org and to join weekly Sunday Worship

Services online at 10:00 a.m. on Zoom or Facebook. We welcome

all as we build a loving community to nurture each person’s

spiritual journey, serve human need, and protect the Earth, our

home. Services led by Rev. Joan Javier-Duval, Minister, or Verdis

L. Robinson, Ministerial Intern.

BARRE- Weekly Business Networking in Central Vermont,

Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, 33 Stewart Ln.

8AM-9:30AM. Thurs. Free. Info: mike@eternitymarketing.com.

Families Anonymous is a fellowship for those who have been

affected by the behavior of someone very near to them, whether

by drugs, alcohol, or related behavioral problems. Location:

Turning Point Center. Tuesdays 6-7pm. Info: 802-479-7373

Church of God of Prophecy Sunday Service at 10:30 am. All

are welcome. Pastor Jeffrey Kelley. (814) 428-2696. Also daily

Facebook devotionals.

Sons of the American Legion Squadron #10 Meetings, Barre

Legion Post #10, 320 N. Main St. 3rd Thurs. of each month. 6PM.

The American Legion Barre Post 10, Regular Post

Membership Meetings. Barre Post 10, 320 Main St., third Thurs.

of each month, 6PM.

Central VT Adult Basic Education, Free classes. Pre-GED and

high school diploma prep classes at Barre Learning Center, 46

Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588.

Central Vermont Woodcarving Group, Free instruction projects

for all abilities. Barre Congregational Church, Mon. 1-4pm.

479-9563.

Heart of Vermont Quilt Guild, meets 3rd Tues. of the month at

First Presbyterian Church, Seminary St. 5:30-7:30PM.

continued on next page


AUTUMN OUTINGS | FALL 2021

7th Annual Granite City

5K Run/Walk for Veterans

The 7th Annual Granite

City 5K Run/Walk for

Veterans, a hybrid event

this year, is to be completed

by November 6th, 2021.

The event, with sponsors

such as 802 Cars, Absolute

Spill Response, Community

National Bank, and Metro

Development, LLC., is to

raise awareness of the many

challenges that veterans

endure, with a focus this

year on homelessness.

Proceeds of this event will

go to the Veterans’ Place,

Inc. in Northfield, Vermont

to support transitional housing

and other services for

our most vulnerable veterans.

This event is presented

by the Sons of the American

Legion Squadron #10 and

Barre Elks Lodge #1535

with support from the Barre

Partnership.

Registration is open for

race participants online at

https://legacy.imathlete.

com/events/GC5k2021. A

silent auction will be held

online for the week leading

up to the in-person race on 6th.

Follow the event on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/events/

301760884814752.

For volunteers and donations, please contact

Lisa England at englandl1965@gmail.

com.

For sponsorships and other items, contact

Lucas Herring at lucasjherring@gmail.com.

REACHING

OVER

23,000

READERS

WEEKLY

Montpelier, Barre,

Northfield, Hardwick

Waterbury &

Surrounding Towns

Always Good News

OIL PAINTING BY HUNTER EDDY

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403 U.S. Rt. 302-Berlin • Barre, Vt 05641-2274

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • Fax: 802-479-7916

e-mail: sales@vt-world.com or editor@vt-world.com

Additional Recycling Collection Center,

Open for collection Mon., Wed., Fri. 11:30-

5:30PM, 3rd Sat. 9AM-1PM. 540 N. Main St.,

Barre. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable

items.

Medicare & You, Have questions? We have

answers. Central Vermont Council on Aging, 59

N. Main St., Suite 200, 2nd & 4th Tues. of the

month. Call 479-0531 to register.

Central Vermont Business Builders,

Community National Bank, 1st & 3rd Tues.,

8-9AM. Info: 777-5419.

Weekly Storytime, Next Chapter Bookstore,

158 North Main St., Sat., 10:30AM. Info. 476-

3114.

Vermont Modelers Club, Building and flying

model airplanes year-round. Info: 485-7144.

Community Breakfast, First Presbyterian

Church, 78 Summer St., 3rd Sun. FREE, 7:30-

9AM. 476-3966.

Circle of Parents, Confidential support group

for parents and caregivers. Tues. evenings. Info:

229-5724.

Mothers of Preschoolers, Monthly get-togethers

for crafts, refreshments, etc. Christian

Alliance Church, 476-3221.

Alcoholics Anonymous, Meetings in Barre,

daily; call 802-229-5100 for latest times & locations;

www.aavt.org.

Al-Anon Family Groups Turning Point, 489

North Main St. Use back door of parking lot.

Older children friendly. Sat 5-6pm. Info: vermontalanonalateen.org.

Hedding United Methodist Activities &

Meetings, 40 Washington St., 476-8156. Choir:

Thurs. 7PM; Community Service & Food Shelf

Hours: Weds & Thurs. 3-5PM.

Turning Point Recovery Center, 489 N. Main

St. Safe and supportive place for individuals/

families in or seeking substance abuse recovery.

Open Mon/Tue/Thur: 10AM-5PM; Wed/Fri:

10AM-9PM; Sat: 6PM-9PM. For info and programs,

call 479-7373.

Green Mountain Spirit Chapter, National

women bikers club. 2nd Wed. Info: grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.

Grief & Bereavement Support Group, Central

Vermont Home Health and Hospice office, 600

Granger Road. This group is open to anyone

who has experienced the death of a loved one.

Mondays 4-5:30 Wed. 10-11:30AM, Meeting

via Zoom. 6 consecutive sessions. Free. Info:

223-1878.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Barre

City Police, 15 Fourth St., 476-6613. Get rid of

old or unused meds.

Granite City Grocery Volunteers, every 3rd

Wed./month at 6PM at The Quarry Kitchen &

Spirits, second floor. Info: gaylepoinsette@

gmail.com.

Granite City Grocery’s Board Meeting, every

2nd Tuesday at 6PM. Open to public.

Small Group Bible Studies sponsored by VT

Christian Radio WJPL-LP 92.1 FM. In the

Aldrich Public Library upstairs conference

room, 6 Washington St. Thursdays at 6PM. All

are welcome.

Savvy Speakers Toastmasters International is

an educational club where people learn and

practice how to speak with confidence in a fun

and supportive environment. Meetings held 1st

and 3rd Tuesday of the month 6-7:30 p.m. at

Capstone Community Action, 20 Gable Place,

Barre, VT 05641 Please call Margaret Ferguson

802-476-0908 or MLFerguson2002@yahoo.

com

Memorable Times Cafe Third Wednesday of

each month from 1:30 to 3 p.m. at the VT

History Center, 60 Washington St. A relaxed

social time for people living with mild to moderate

memory loss and their care partners. Come

enjoy stories, memories, music and community.

Free, refreshments provided. Sponsored by

Central VT Council on Aging and the ABLE

Library. 802-476-2681 for more information.

BERLIN- Tuesday Night Drumming Sessions

at the 1st Congregational Church of Berlin.

Sept. 21 - Nov. 9th, 6:30-7:45PM. Learn the art

of drumming West African Style. $80 for 8 sessions

or $11 per drop-in session. Info: shidaaprojects@gmail.com

or call Jordan 498-

5987.

Contra Dance *Dances are canceled for now.

Check www.capitalcitygrange.org/dancing/contradancing

or email cdu.tim@gmail.com for

updates* No experience and no partner needed.

All dances are taught plus an introductory

continued on next page

STOWE FOLIAGE

ARTS FESTIVAL

OCTOBER 8 - 10, 2021

TOPNOTCH FIELD • 3420 MOUNTAIN ROAD • STOWE, VT

10AM - 5PM FRIDAY, SATURDAY, & SUNDAY

•••

FINE ART & CRAFT EXHIBITORS

FIND ORIGINAL ARTWORK, UNIQUE CRAFT, AND MEET THE ARTISTS!

SPECIALTY FOODS TENT

LIVE MUSIC ALL WEEKEND

AARON & ALARIA • HARD SCRABBLE BAND • FOOTWORKS

FOOD TRUCKS & VENDORS

•••

ADULT DAILY ADMISSION $10.00 • WEEKEND PASS $12.00

KIDS GET IN FOR FREE! • FREE PARKING • NO PETS, PLEASE

••• FACE MASKS WILL BE REQUIRED IN THE BIG TENTS •••

VISIT STOWEARTSFEST.COM FOR FULL DETAILS

October 6, 2021 The WORLD page 21


BARRE- Notable Sculptors of Barre Gray Granite August 17

to October 31, 2021 (Tuesday through Saturday 10am to 4pm). At

the Vermont Granite Museum. The Vermont Granite Museum is

excited to be hosting a photography exhibit entitled “Notable

sculptors of Barre Gray Granite” by Nan Carle Beauregard of

Morrisville, Vermont. The exhibit focuses on six Vermont sculptors.

For information: Scott A. McLaughlin, Executive Director

802-476-4605, director@vtgranitemuseum.org.

Art Rocks! August 17 to October 31, 2021 (Tuesday through

Saturday 10am to 4pm). At the Vermont Granite Museum. The

Vermont Granite Museum is excited to be hosting a paintings and

photography exhibit entitled “Art Rocks” by 15 members of The

Paletteers of Vermont. For information: Scott A. McLaughlin,

Executive Director 802-476-4605, director@vtgranitemuseum.

org.

Studio Place Arts Presents Four Art Installations. Rock Solid

XXI, Moves by Austin Furtak-Cole, Crafted Narratives by Rob

Millard-Mendez and In the Current by Gail Skudera. 201 N Main

St. For more info, visit: www.studioplacearts.com. Sept. 15 - Oct.

30 with an art social Sept. 23 5-6:30PM.

CALAIS- 20/20 Hindsight September 10 - October 10, visitors

can safely view works on the grounds of the Kents’ Corner State

Historic Site at 7 Old West Church Road. We invite you to enjoy

original sculpture, installations, assemblages and the written word

by a group of contemporary Vermont artists who explore historic

trades and technology in new and surprising ways. Check

kentscorner.org for updated information or contact thekentmuseum@gmail.com.

Opening celebration Sept. 11, 3-5PM.

GREENSBORO- Still Life - Life, Still – Through October 15 at

the Gallery at the Highland Center for the Arts. Wednesday -

Sunday, noon to 4pm. Look closely at how five artists look

closely. During Covid, photographer Mary Ellen Bartley, and

painters Kate Emlen, Tucker Nichols, Jon Redmond and Margaret

Sparrow, slow down, take notice, and skillfully, beautifully, capture

the moment. For information: highlandartsvt.org.

HARDWICK- 1111 Copper Nails: Bread & Puppet Calendar

Prints – A 36-Year Retrospective Dual Location Exhibition in

Hardwick, Vermont. When: April – summer 2021. Where: exhibition

in 2 fully accessible & Covid-safe mask-required locations

(also by appointment). (1) The Hardwick Inn, 4 S Main Street,

exhibit on all 3 Floors, 8-6, Mon-Sat. (2) Front Seat Coffee, 101 S

Main Street, B&P Calendars & Art for Sale, 8-2, Mon-Fri.

MIDDLEBURY- Pride 1983 The Vermont Folklife Center and

the Pride Center of Vermont announce the opening of our new

exhibit, Pride 1983, at the Vermont Folklife Center’s Vision &

Voice Gallery, 88 Main Street, Middlebury, VT. The exhibit will

run from September 8, 2021 through March 25, 2022. Gallery

hours are Wednesday-Friday from 11am-4pm. Through interviews

with organizers, photographs and scanned images of historic documents

Pride 1983 explores the origins and lasting legacies of

Vermont’s first Pride March on June 25, 1983 in Burlington.

MONTPELIER- The Front presents Daryl Burtnett: Respite a

solo show of recent work by the Front member artist. Burtnett’s

mixed media works on paper and canvas draw inspiration from the

marks, textures and imprints time leaves on things and on us.

Respite brings together work from the past several months, sharing

works that have brought solace in these fraught times. Daryl

Burtnett: Respite runs March 5th through November 29th 2021.

The Front is open Saturdays and Sundays 11-2, and Daryl welcomes

showings by appointment. Join us for Daryl’s artist talk via

zoom on March 18th at 7:00pm; email info@thefrontvt.com to

rsvp.

Show 45 at The Front Join us for Show 45 this October! This

group show runs from October 1 – 31, and will feature works by

Cheryl Betz, Daryl Burtnett, J Carrier, Karen Cygnarowicz,

Monica DiGiovanni, Alice Dodge, and many more. Show will be

open through October 31, every Friday from 4:00- 7:00 and on

weekends from 11:00 -5:00 or by appointment. For more information

visit www.thefrontvt.com or email info@thefrontvt.com.

NORTHFIELD- Liquid Mind: Abstractions by Jennifer

Bryan, an exhibition featuring a colorful selection of abstract

paintings by Norwich alumna Jennifer Bryan ’05, with an opening

reception from 5 to 7 p.m. on Friday, June 4.

RANDOLPH- Changing Seasons: Innovations After 70 A new

exhibit counters the bias that new ideas are mostly generated by

the young by showcasing artists who have been working for seven

decades or longer. Oct. 3-Nov. 6. At the Chandler Gallery located

at 71 N. Main St., and during exhibits is open from noon to 5 p.m.

Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday. For more information,

visit chandler-arts.org, email outreach@chandler-arts.org, or

call 802-728-9878.

STOWE- Meleko Mokgosi: Scripto-Visual June 17 - November

13, 2021. Meleko Mokgosi’s large-scale, figurative, and often

text-based works engage history painting and cinematic tropes to

uncover notions of colonialism, democracy, and liberation across

African history. Join us for the opening with an artist talk and

Q&A at 5pm on Thursday, June 17. Open to the public; masks are

required.

Landscapes & Inscapes: the work of Adolf & Virginia Dehn

Adolf Dehn Adolf & Virgina Dehn were a vital part of the vibrant

arts community in post-war New York. Adolf’s figurative landscapes

in watercolor from the 30s, 40s, and 50s evoke times gone

by. Opening reception, June 25th, 5-7. June 19 through October

10, hours by appointment-only anytime, text 802-777-2713.

Exposed 2021 will highlight artists who focus on current political

and social constructs/issues/systems through the relationship of

language, sculpture, and installation; language as culturally specific,

ideological, controversial, challenging, identifying, uniting,

and separating. The works question or identify the disparate ways

of communication. July 10 - October 23, 2021. At the Current, 90

Pond Street.

WAITSFIELD- The Bill Brauer Retrospective celebrates the

career of this nationally recognized Vermont artist with an exhibition

of drawing, paintings and etchings not publicly shown before.

A native New Yorker, Bill Brauer has lived and worked in

Vermont for the past 40 years. Brauer received an individual grant

from The Vermont Arts Council in 1976 and it was shortly thereafter

that he switched his focus from printmaking to painting.

Brauer’s painting has gone through many changes over the years.

Always figurative, always evocative and frequently sensual, he

strove to be a Renaissance painter while employing contemporary

design and color concepts. At the Festival Gallery, 5031 Main St.

August 13 to October 11, 2021.

31st annual Green Mountain Photo Show presented by Mad

River Valley Arts. Exhibition of outstanding photographs by amateur

and professional photographers. Showcasing traditional to

abstract, black and white to color photographs, the show fills the

Red Barn Galleries at Lareau Farm. The show also illustrates the

various approaches to the photographic image made possible by

recent technical advances in creating the photo image and in the

printing processes. Large scale, wall-size images are also on display.

The Green Mountain Photo Show has images to please even

the most discriminating viewer. Hours for viewing are Thursday

and Friday from 4:00 to 9:00 pm and Saturday and Sunday from

noon to 9:00 pm. The show is a free event with children welcome.

Sept 11 to Oct 12, 2021.

page 22 The WORLD October 6, 2021

session at 7:45. Everyone welcome! The dance takes place at the

Capital City Grange Hall, 6612 Rt 12, 1 mile south of Montpelier.

Please bring clean, soft-soled shoes. Admission is $10 adults, $5

kids and low income, $15 dance supporters. Questions? Call Tim

Swartz at 802-225-8921, visit: http://capitalcitygrange.org/dancing/contradancing.

Every 1st, 3rd, and 5th Saturday year round.

Family Support Groups empower and educate family members

and close friends of individuals with persistent mental health challenges.

All groups are led by trained individuals who have a family

member living with a mental health condition and understand

the same challenges you are experiencing. Central Vermont

Medical Center. Group meets 4th Monday each month.

BETHEL- YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program, United

Church of Bethel, Church St. Thurs., 11AM-12PM. Free. Info:

728-7714.

CVTV CHANNEL 194

Wednesday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00AM - Community Bulletin

7:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

9:00AM - Barre City Council

12:00PM - Barre City Council

3:00PM - Barre City Council

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Williamstown Select

10:00PM - Williamstown Select

Thursday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Williamstown Select

9:00AM - Williamstown Select

12:00PM - Williamstown Select

2:00PM - Community Bulletin

3:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

10:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

Friday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

BROOKFIELD- Mothers of Preschoolers, Meal and childcare

provided. New Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fri., 6PM.

Info: 276-3022.

CABOT- Fiddle Lessons with Katie Trautz: Mon., Info: 279-

2236; Dungeons & Dragons, Fri., 3-5:30PM. All at Cabot

Library, 563-2721.

CALAIS- Men’s & Women’s Bible Study Groups, County

Road, Wed., 7PM. Info: 485-7577.

CHELSEA- Chronic Conditions Support Group, Chelsea

Senior Center, in the United Church of Chelsea, 13 North

Common. Free. Fri. 8:30-11AM. Info:728-7714.

DUXBURY- Duxbury - Green Mountain Community Alliance

Church Worship Service on Sundays at 9:30 a.m. 4987 VT

Route 100. 244-6463 or Pastor Paul Collins at 917-3639. Also

Bible Studies on Mondays and Tuesdays.

E. HARDWICK- Bible Study, Touch of Grace Assembly of God

Church, Tues. 10AM; Bible study; Wed. Youth Group, 5PM dinner,

6PM activity. Info: 472-5550.

EAST MONTPELIER- FREE Zumba-like Fitness Dance for

Women 18+, East Montpelier Elementary, Sundays, 4-5PM.

Info: zabundancejoy@gmail.com.

Men’s Ministry, Crossroads Christian Church. Mon. 7-9PM.

Men’s Breakfast: 2nd Sat., 8AM. Sun. Service: 9:30-11AM. Info:

476-8536.

Twin Valley Senior Center, 4583 U.S. Rte 2. Open Mon., Weds.,

Fri., 9AM-2PM. For class listing & info: 223-3322.

Walk-Through Wednesday Open House at Orchard Valley

Waldorf School, Grace Farm Campus 2290 VT Rt. 14N, 8:30-

9:30am. Join us on the first Wednesday of each month for an

introductory visit to the OVWS grades school from 8:30-10:30

a.m. Campus tour and Q&A. Contact enrollment@ovws.org or

call 456-7400 with questions. Please register by noon the day

prior to the Walk-Through.

GROTON- YA Book Club, 3rd Mon., 6:30PM; Book Discussion

Group: 4th Mon., 7PM; Crafts & Conversation, Wed., 1-3PM.

Round Robin Storytime for kids age 0-5: Tues., 10AM. All at

Groton Public Library. Info: 584-3358.

HARDWICK- Caregiver Support Group, Agency on Aging,

rear entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs. 229-0308 x306.

Peace & Justice Coalition, G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg (old firehouse),

Tues., 7PM. Info: 533-2296.

Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs.,

6-8:30PM. Registration/info: 472-5229.

continued on next page

ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA

• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedules subject to change without notice.

ORCA Media Channel 1075

Public Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, Oct 6

6:00a Vermont Land Trust

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Vermont Humanities Council

10:00a Moccasin Tracks

11:00a Bill Doyle on VT Issues

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Vermont Institute of Community and

International Involvement

3:00p Wednesday Night Live

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Octagon St. Laveau

6:30p Celluloid Mirror

7:00p VT Interfaith Action - COVID-19 Memorial

Service

8:00p Ideas For The Future Of Vermont

9:00p Annette Gordon-Reed: On Juneteenth

10:30p Abled to Cook

11:00p Bear Pond Books Events

Thursday, Oct 7

6:00a Bread and Puppet Theater

7:00a Abled to Cook

7:30a Octagon St. Laveau

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Patriot Rally 8/21/2021

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Bear Pond Books Events

2:30p Kellogg-Hubbard Library

4:30p The Music Zone with Pitz Quattrone

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p David Pakman Show

7:00p Vermont First African Landing Day 2021

10:00p Senior Moments

11:00p The Peoples Law School

Friday, Oct 8

6:00a Senior Moments

7:00a Good Mental Health

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Abled and on Air

10:00a All Things LGBTQ

11:00a Talking About Movies

11:30a Celluloid Mirror

12:00p Brunch with Bernie

1:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

2:00p Vermont First African Landing Day 2021

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Barre Unified Union School

9:00AM - Barre Unified Union School

12:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

3:00PM - Barre Town Select

5:30PM - Community Bulletin

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre Town Select

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Saturday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Barre Town Select

9:00AM - Barre Town Select

12:00PM - Barre Town Select

3:00PM - Community Bulletin

4:00PM - 7:00PM - State House

Programming

7:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Sunday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

CHARTER COMMUNICATIONS OF BARRE

ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

CVTV Channel 192 • BARRE, VT

Wednesday - Art and Music

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - Art and Music Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - Art and Music Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - Art and Music Programs

Thursday - International and Multicultural

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - International and Multicultural

Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - International and Multicultural

Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - International and Multicultural

Programs

Friday - Local Vermont and Conversation

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Capital City Rock Camp

7:00p Moccasin Tracks

8:00p Gay USA

9:00p Bread and Puppet Theater

10:30p St. Laveau's World Cinema

11:00p Vermont Humanities Council

Saturday, Oct 9

6:00a Annette Gordon-Reed: On Juneteenth

7:30a The Music Zone with Pitz Quattrone

8:00a Wednesday Night Live

9:30a Vermont Institute of Community and

International Involvement

11:00a VT Interfaith Action - COVID-19

Memorial Service

12:00p Senior Moments

2:00p The Peoples Law School

4:00p St. Laveau's World Cinema

4:30p Roman Catholic Mass

5:00p Washington Baptist Church

6:00p Good Mental Health

7:00p Dr. John Campbell

8:00p All Things LGBTQ

9:00p Banter and Beans/Vote for Vermont

10:30p Betty St. Laveau's House of Horror

Sunday, Oct 10

6:00a Senator Bernie Sanders Virtual Town

Hall on Climate Crisis

7:30a St. Laveau's World Cinema

8:00a Bear Pond Books Events

9:30a Washington Baptist Church

10:30a Roman Catholic Mass

11:00a Capital City Rock Camp

12:00p Patriot Rally 8/21/2021

2:30p Annette Gordon-Reed: On Juneteenth

4:00p Vermont Humanities Council

5:00p Banter and Beans/Vote for Vermont

6:00p Dr. John Campbell

7:00p Good Mental Health

8:00p The Music Zone with Pitz Quattrone

8:30p Abled and on Air

9:30p Octagon St. Laveau

10:00p Kellogg-Hubbard Library

Monday, Oct 11

6:00a Kellogg-Hubbard Library

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Banter and Beans/Vote for Vermont

10:00a The Peoples Law School

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also

be viewed online at cvtv723.org

6:00AM - 7:00PM - Church Services

Monday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00AM - State House Programming

9:00AM - State House Programming

12:00PM - State House Programming

3:00PM - Plainfield Select

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Plainfield Select

10:00PM - Plainfield Select

Tuesday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Plainfield Select

9:00AM - Plainfield Select

12:00PM - Plainfield Select

3:00PM to 5:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre City Council “Live”

10:00PM - Barre City Council

“All schedules are subject to

change, please call us

with questions - 479-1075.”

Saturday - Education and Nature

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Barre Congregational Church

8:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

9:00AM - 6:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 10:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

10:00PM - Local Sports

11:00PM - 12:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

Sunday - Church Services and Spirituality

6:00AM - 2:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

2:00PM - New England Cooks

3:00PM - 7:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

7:00PM - 12:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

Monday - Science

6:00AM - 3:00PM - Science Programs

3:00PM - Local Sports

4:00AM - 6:00PM - Science Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00AM - 12:00PM - Science Programs

Tuesday - History

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - History Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent

Global News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - History Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest

8:00PM - 12:00PM - History Programs

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p VT Interfaith Action - COVID-19 Memorial

Service

2:00p Ideas For The Future Of Vermont

3:30p Vermont Land Trust

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Moccasin Tracks

7:00p 251 Club of Vermont 66th Annual

Meeting

8:30p Senator Bernie Sanders Virtual Town

Hall on Climate Crisis

9:30p Vermont Institute of Community and

International Involvement

11:00p Bread and Puppet Theater

Tuesday, Oct 12

6:00a Ideas For The Future Of Vermont

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Vermont First African Landing Day 2021

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p All Things LGBTQ

2:00p Bread and Puppet Theater

3:00p Abled to Cook

3:30p Senator Bernie Sanders Virtual Town

Hall on Climate Crisis

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Abled and on Air

7:00p Vermont Land Trust

8:30p Celluloid Mirror

9:00p Wednesday Night Live

11:00p Capital City Rock Camp

ORCA Media Channel 1095

Education Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, Oct 6

12:00p North Branch Nature Center

2:00p First Wednesdays

4:00p HANDS in the Dirt

6:30p Montpelier/Roxbury School

Board LIVE

Thursday, Oct 7

12:00p Harwood Unified

4:00p North Branch Nature Center

8:00p Washington Central Union School

Board

Friday, Oct 8

12:00p Washington Central Union School

www.pointfm.com

Board

3:00p GMALL Lectures

10:30p Game of the Week

Saturday, Oct 9

12:00p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

3:00p North Branch Nature Center

5:00p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

District

9:30p Vermont State Colleges Board of

Trustees

Sunday, Oct 10

12:00p Orange Southwest School District

2:00p Randolph TCC School Board

7:00p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

Monday, Oct 11

12:00p White River Valley Supervisory

Union

2:30p White River Unified District Board

5:30p Randolph TCC School Board

6:30p VT State Board of Education

Tuesday, Oct 12

12:00p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

District

4:30p Orange Southwest School District

6:30p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

8:30p White River Valley Supervisory

Union

10:30p White River Unified District Board

ORCA Media Channel 1085

Government Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wed, Oct 6

6:00a Bethel Selectboard

8:30a Rochester Selectboard

11:00a Press Conference

12:30p Moretown Selectboard

2:30p Central Vermont Fiber

4:30p Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

6:30p Montpelier City Council

11:30p Vermont Community Broadband

Board

Thu, Oct 7

6:00a Middlesex Selectboard

8:30a Montpelier Social and Economic

Justice Advisory Committee

10:00a Calais Selectboard

1:30p Central Vermont Public Safety

Authority

4:00p Central Vermont Fiber

6:00p Waterbury Selectboard

10:00p Press Conference

Fri, Oct 8

6:00a Berlin Selectboard

7:30a Berlin Development Review Board

10:00a Vermont State House

1:00p Green Mountain Care Board

8:00p Rochester Selectboard

9:30p Randolph Selectboard

Sat, Oct 9

6:00a Cannabis Control Board

11:00a Press Conference

1:00p Randolph Selectboard

3:30p Vermont State House

6:30p Calais Selectboard

9:30p Green Mountain Care Board

Sun, Oct 10

6:00a Waterbury Selectboard

9:30a Berlin Selectboard

11:00a Berlin Development Review Board

1:30p Montpelier Social and Economic

Justice Advisory Committee

3:00p Montpelier Planning Commission

5:00p Montp Design Review Committee

6:30p Mont Development Review Board

9:30p Montpelier City Council

Mon, Oct 11

6:00a Moretown Selectboard

8:00a Middlesex Selectboard

12:00p Press Conference

1:30p Bethel Selectboard

4:30p Montpelier Social and Economic

Justice Advisory Committee

5:30p Montp Design Review Committee

7:00p Montp Development Review Board

10:00p Central Vermont Public Safety

Authority

Tue, Oct 12

6:00a VTt Community Broadband Board

10:00a Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

12:00p Press Conference

1:30p Vermont State House

5:30p Montpelier Planning Commission

LIVE

8:30p Cannabis Control Board

Community Media (802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net/schedules


MARSHFIELD- Playgroup, Twinfield Preschool, Mon., 8:15-

9:45AM (except when school is not in session).

MONTPELIER- Circle of Recovery Mondays and Fridays

10am-11am at Another Way, 125 Barre Street. 802-229-0920.

Confidential space to receive support for recovery in all of its

forms.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Sunday School welcomes

children for Sunday school to learn how to feel close to God

everyday. 10:30AM. 223-2477.

Free Coffee House Potluck, 1st Fri. at the Trinity Methodist

Church. 7PM-9PM.

Vermont College of Fine Arts Friday Night Reading Series,

Cafe Anna, 1st floor of College Hall, 36 College St. 5:30-7:30PM.

Free snacks.

Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup, North Branch Nature Center.

Mon. 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 229-6206.

Montpelier Kiwanis Club, Tues., 6PM. at The Steak House. All

are welcome. Info: 229-6973.

Onion River Exchange Tool Library, 46 Barre St. Over 85

tools. Wed., 10AM-2PM, Thurs., 10AM-2PM.

Friday Night Group, Open to all LGBTQ youth ages 13-22.

Pizza and social time, facilitated by adults from Outright VT.

Unitarian Church, 2nd & 4th Fri., 6:30-8PM. Info: 223-7035.

Meditation, Mon. 1PM.; Intro to Yoga, Tues. 4PM; Consults,

Fri. 11AM. Free classes, limits apply. Fusion Studio, 56 East State

St. Info: 272-8923.

Celiac Support Group, Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., 2nd Wed.,

4-5PM. Info: 598-9206.

A Course in Miracles, at Christ Episcopal Church, 64 State St.,

each Tues., 7-8PM. Info: 622-4516.

Parent’s Group & Meet-Up, Connect with local parents to share

advice and info. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes Rm., 1st Mon.,

10-11:30AM. Info: mamasayszine@gmail.com.

Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights, Need help w/a bike

repair? Come to the volunteer-run community bike shop. 89 Barre

St., Wed. 4-6PM and Fri. 12-4PM. Info: freeridemontpelier.org.

Free Community Meals, Mon: Unitarian Church, 11AM-1PM;

Tues: Bethany Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Wed: Christ Church,

11AM-12:30PM; Thurs: Trinity Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Fri: St.

Augustine Church, 11AM-12:30PM; Last Sun., Bethany Church,

4:30-6:30PM.

Calico County Quilters, All skill levels welcome. 2nd Sat. Sept.

through June, 1-3PM. Location info: 244-7001.

Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA), Bethany Church basement,

Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 229-9036.

CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group, Childcare not available.

Woodbury College, 2nd Tues., 5:30-7:30PM. Info: 498-

5928.

Resurrection Baptist Church Weekly Events, 144 Elm St. Sun.,

9:45AM. Bible Study; 11AM. Worship Service; Wed., 7PM.

Prayer Meeting.

Good Beginnings of Central VT, 174 River St. Drop-In hours at

the Nest. 1st floor Weds/Thurs/Fri., 9AM-3PM. Babywearers of

Central Vermont meet upstairs, 4th Mon., 5:45-7:45PM & 2nd

Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 595-7953. Breastfeeding support:

3rd Thurs., 9:30- 11:30AM; Nursing Beyond a Year: 3rd Fri.,

9:30-11:30AM (802-879-3000).

Al-Anon, Trinity Methodist Church, Main St., Sun., 6:15-

7:30PM. Info:1-866-972-5266.

Al-Anon, Bethany Church basement, 115 Main St., Tues. &

Thurs. 12-1PM, Wed. 7-8PM. Info: 1-866-972-5266.

SL AA, 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship problems.

Bethany Church, Wed., 5PM. Info: 249-6825.

Survivors of Incest Anonymous, Bethany Church parlor, 115

Main St., Mon., 5PM. Please call first: 229-9036 or 454-8402.

Brain Injury Support Group, Unitarian Church, 3rd Thurs.,

1:30-2:30PM. Info: 1-877-856-1772.

Playgroups: Dads & Kids, Thurs., 6-7:30PM & Sat., 9:30-

11AM, at Family Center of Washington County. Held during

school year only.

Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer Support, for

patients and caregivers. Info: 1-800-652-5064.

Christian Meditation, Christ Church, Mon., 12-1PM.

Mood Disorders Support Group, 149 State St., last entryway,

first floor. Peer and professionally led support for people coping

with mental illness. Wed. 4-5PM. Free. Info: 917-1959.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Montpelier Police, 1 Pitkin

Court, 223-3445 at Washington County Sheriff, 10 Elm St., 223-

3001. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent safe

disposal sites.

Community Song Circle, Center for Arts and Learning, 46 Barre

St. 1st Sun. except July/Aug., 6-8PM. Info: vtcommunitysing@

gmail.com.

Suicide Grief Support Group - For anyone who has lost a loved

one to suicide. Meets the first Monday of each month, 6:00-7:30.

Please contact Michele Delaney at 802-223-4752 for intake

screening and location. Starting Oct. 4. Group will meet in-person,

masks required.

Flat Track Roller Derby, Montpelier Rec Center, 55 Barre St.

Sunday afternoons - email for practice times. 18+, all genders

welcome, no experience necessary, please bring a mouthguard -

all other gear provided. First practice free then $30/month. Will

resume after COVID pandemic. Info:vtderbytcr@gmail.com.

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Recovery

Mondays at 4:00. Contact Cindy Wells, Family Support Programs

Coordinator, at 802-498-0611 or cwells@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Skills for Families Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10:00.

Contact Cindy Wells, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at

802-498-0611 or cwells@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Skills for Families Mondays at 10:00 Contact

Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-

498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Recovery

Tuesdays at 11:00. Contact Amber Menard, Family Support

Programs Coordinator at 802-552-4274 or amenard@pcavt.org)

Nurturing Skills for Families Thursdays at 5:30. Contact Cindy

Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608

or catkins@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Fathers Program Mondays at 5:30. Contact Amber

Menard, Family Support Programs Coordinator at 802-552-4274

or amenard@pcavt.org.

Circle for Foster & Adoptive Families Thursdays at 5:00.

Contact Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs Coordinator,

at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org).

Circle for Kinship & Guardianship Families Thursdays at 8:00

PM. Contact Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs

Coordinator, at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org.

Circle of Parents open to all. Thursdays at 10:00; Contact Cindy

Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608

or catkins@pcavt.org.

Circle of Parents in Recovery Tuesdays at 5:30; Contact Cindy

Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608

or catkins@pcavt.org. Contact the program manager or call

1-800-CHILDREN

MORETOWN- Mad River Chorale. Rehearsals at Harwood

Union H.S., Mon., 7-9PM. Info: 496-2048.

MORRISVILLE- “The Role of Power, Authority & Control in

Groups” Monthly Meeting, Morristown Centennial Library, 20

Lower Main St. 1st Tues. 5:30PM-7PM. Info: gerette@dreamhavenvt.com.

Overeaters Anonymous, 12-step program for people who identify

as overeaters, compulsive eaters, food addicts, anorexics,

bulimics, etc. All welcome; no dues or fees. Info re: place & time:

863-2655.

River Arts Events, Photo Co-op Drop-in 3rd Thurs., 6PM-8PM.

$5 suggested donation. Poetry Clinic Drop-in 1st & 3rd Tues.,

6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

NORTHFIELD- Bingo, Northfield Senior Center. Mon., 4PM.

Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program, Ages 12-18. Edward F Knapp

State Airport Passenger Terminal, Tues, 6-8:30PM. Info: info.

vt033@vtcap.org.

Clogging & Irish Step Lessons, w/Green Mountain Cloggers,

ages 8-78. Sun., 5-8PM. Info: 522-2935.

Playgroup, United Church of Northfield. Wed., 9:30-11AM. Held

only when school in session. Info: 262-3292 x113.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Northfield Police, 110

Wall St., 485-9181. Get rid of old or unused.

PLAINFIELD- Community Supper Support Group, Grace

United Methodist Church. 4th Tues., 6PM-7PM. Info: michaelbix@gmail.com.

Cardio Funk Class. At the Community Center. Fri., 5-6PM. Info:

email shannonkellymovement@gmail.com.

Cutler Memorial Library Activities, Classic Book Club: 1st

Mon., 6PM; Tuesday Night Knitters (except 1st Tues.). Info:

454-8504.

Diabetes Discussion & Support Group, Everyone welcome.

The Health Center conf. room, 3rd Thurs., 1:30PM. Info:322-

6600.

RANDOLPH- Health Support Groups, Maple Leaf Room at

Gifford Medical Center. Tobacco Cessation Program regularly

offers four-week “Quit in Person” group sessions. Info: 728-7714.

Caregiver Support Group, Gifford Medical Center. 2-3PM.

Meets 2nd Wed. of the month. Info: 728-7781.

Diabetes Management Program, Kingwood Health Center

(lower level conf. room), 1422 VT Route 66. Thurs., 10-12:30PM.

Six week program for people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes.

Info/register: 728-7714.

New Business Forum, Vermont Tech Enterprise Center, 1540 VT

Rte 66, 2nd Weds., 11:30AM-1PM. Info: 728-9101.

Cancer Support Group, Gifford Conference Ctr, 2nd Tues.,

9:30-11AM. Info:728-2270.

Storytime. Kimball Library. Wed., 11AM, ages 2-5; Toddlertime,

Fri., 10:30AM; Gathering for handwork, 2nd & 4th Mon.,

6PM.

Pregnancy and Post-Partum Support Group - For those struggling

with anxiety or depression related to pregnancy, Gifford

Health Care is here to help. Every Tuesday from 1:30 p.m. – 3:00

p.m., in the conference room at Gifford Medical Center. If you

have questions or would like to enroll, email ESchleif@giffordhealthcare.org,

SRoberts@giffordhealthcare.org or call Sarah

Roberts at 728-2372.

WAITSFIELD- Community Acupuncture Night, Free assessment

and treatment. Donations welcome. Three Moons Wellness,

859 Old County Rd., 2nd fl., last Weds., 4-7PM. RSVP: 272-

3690.

WARREN- Knit & Play, Warren Public Library. Bring your kids

and your projects. All levels. Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM.

WASHINGTON- Central VT ATV Club, Washington Fire

Station, 3rd Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 224-6889.

Calef Mem. Library Activities, Art and Adventure w/ April:

3rd Sat., 1PM; Storytime: Mon., 11AM; Tech Help Drop-In:

Sat., 10AM-2PM. Info: 883-2343.

WATERBURY- Waterbury Public Library Activities, Preschool

Story Time: Thurs., 10AM. Baby and Toddler Story Time: Mon.,

10AM. Crafts: Tues., 3-4PM. Info: 244-7036.

WATERBURY CTR- Bible Study Group, Waterbury Ctr. Grange.

Sun., 5-6PM. Bring bible, coffee provided. Info: 498-4565.

continued on page 25

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October 6, 2021 The WORLD page 23


WEBSTERVILLE- Safe Disposal of

Prescription Drugs, Barretown Police, 149

Websterville Rd., 479-0508. Get rid of old or

unused meds.

WEST TOPSHAM- Bible Study, New Hope

Methodist Church, 2 Gendron Rd. Wed.,

6:30PM.

WORCESTER- Knitting Night, The Wool

Shed, Tues., 6:30-8:30PM.

Wednesday, October 6

ONLINE- Writer to Writer Reading –

Francisco Cantú and Emilio Carrero, a paired

reading and conversation between two Latino

writers. Presented by Vermont Studio Center.

7PM. Find more information on all of Virtual

VSC’s offerings on the VSC online events calendar:

https://vermontstudiocenter.org/eventscalendar.

Saturday, October 9

GREENSBORO- Bob Stannard & Those

Dangerous Bluesmen, with special guest John

Fusco at 7:00 PM. Tickets are $22. At the

Highland Center for the Arts, 2875 Hardwick

Street.

Sunday, October 10

BARRE- Pianist Alison Bruce Cerutti In

Recital Cerutti will perform the music of

Rameau, Debussy, the premiere of Brookfield

Vermont composer Erik Nielsen’s “The

Calling,” and more. 3PM at the Barre Opera

House. For full information on COVID protocols,

https://barreoperahouse.org/covid-19-restrictions.html.

For ticket reservations, please

call the Barre Opera House : (802) 476-8188. Or

visit the website: https://barreoperahouse.org/.

Wednesday, October 13

EAST HARDWICK- Community Supper and

Migrant Justice Presentation 5:30 dinner, 6:30

presentation. Caledonia Grange #9, 88 East

Church St. Free, donations welcome. Info: easthardwickgrange@gmail.com

or 472-8987.

Thursday, October 14

WILLIAMSTOWN- Annual Chicken Pie

Supper at the Williamstown Masonic Lodge on

Brush Hill. Eat in servings: 5 and 7PM. Take out

5:45-6:45. For reservations and take-out pickup

call 433-5382. $13.

Williamstown Historical Society Program at

the museum in Williamstown, 5:30 potluck and

annual meeting. 7:30 musical program with

Northeast Fiddlers. All are welcome.

Vaccinations required. Sponsored by the

Historical Society.

Friday, October 15

ONLINE- Introduction to Zero Suicide

Webinars This webinar is for all staff in health

care, mental health organizations, primary care

and hospitals, schools and community settings

interested in suicide prevention skills and the

framework for suicide safer care. It provides

basic information for all involved in a comprehensive

approach to suicide prevention, and

prior to the adoption of advanced practices in a

pathway to care. 9-10AM. To register: www.

eventbrite.com/e/introduction-to-zero-suicidein-vermont-suicide-safe-pathways-to-care-registration-175814103717?goal=0_9008cd1050-

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cid=a255a5e54f&mc_eid=af8fd53545.

Saturday, October 16

ONLINE- The Smirktacular! You’ll laugh,

you’ll cry and you’ll be amazed when you join

us virtually for a Smirkus-style soirée featuring

the talents of our troupers, campers, alumni, and

residency artists. Individual tickets: donate what

you can, VIP ticket: $50 | Virtual table for 10:

$500. 7PM. For info: www.smirkus.org.

BARRE- UVM Men’s Basketball open practice

at the Barre Auditorium. 11AM. Free. Mask

required.

BROOKFIELD- Flea Market & Bake Sale

From 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM. Limited inside tables

available at $10.00, out side bring your own

table at $5.00. To reserve space contact Pat at

802-728-4515. At The First Congregational

Church of Brookfield. At the corner of Ridge

Road and RT 65.

MONTPELIER- Chicken Pie Dinner at the

Trinity United Methodist Church, 137 Main

Street. Meal pick up (take out only) is between

4:30 - 6:00 PM. $12.00. Reservations are

required: Email: TUMCreservation@gmail.

com or call: 802-613-3073 for reservations.

RANDOLPH- Roast Pork Supper Drive-thru

take-outs. Indoor seating at 5pm – Reservations

recommended 802-728-5251. Our Lady of the

Angels Church corner of Route 66 and Hebard

Hill Road. Adults $15, kids $7.

Sunday, October 17

GREENSBORO- The Concert for Wildlife

This is a special benefit concert with The

Mallett Brothers Band, Dave Mallett, and Tish

Hinojosa to support the Vermont Wildlife

Coalition Educational Fund, the Lake Champlain

Maritime Museum, and the Lake Champlain

Committee. 3:00 PM. Tickets are $25 for adults,

$10 for students.

Monday, October 18

JOHNSON- Virtual Visiting Artist Talk with

Jerilea Zempel a discussion of how her work

carries specific political tones. This event is free

and open to the public. 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM.

Registration is required. Register via the link

provided on VSC’s online Events Calendar:

https://vermontstudiocenter.org/calendar/2021/10/18/virtual-visiting-artist-talk-jerilea-zempel.

Fall Fundraiser For

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With your help, this new commercial kitchen will

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So far, the support from our community has been

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towards our $300,000 goal. Over halfway home!

Thanks to a generous “matching donation” of

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All donations small or large are appreciated.

Checks can be mailed to:

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40 Washington St., Barre, VT 05641

c/o Community Kitchen Fund

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October 6, 2021 The WORLD page 25


Celebrating 25-Years of Cleaner Rivers – Thanks to You!

Thousands of volunteers across NH, VT,

MA and CT came together to get dirty for

cleaner rivers as part of Connecticut River

Conservancy’s (CRC) 25th annual Source to

Sea Cleanup. Volunteers removed trash along

rivers, streams, parks, boat launches, trails

and more.

“Source to Sea Cleanup volunteers’ hard

work and dedication is inspiring and makes a

real difference for local rivers. We were heartened

to see volunteers rallying to protect rivers

from trash pollution,” said Stacey

Lennard, CRC’s Cleanup Coordinator.

“Everyone was happy to get outside to connect

with nature while also making a big difference

for their communities. And they

shared their photos and stories online to connect

with each other using #RiverWitness.”

Groups included local river and conservation

groups; elementary, high school, and college

students; Girl and Boy Scouts; and many

employee volunteer groups from local businesses.

GZA GeoEnvironmental hosted an

employee volunteer group in Connecticut, in

addition to sponsoring the event. They noted,

“We had a lot of fun on a sunny day, a great

team building experience. It was good to be

outdoors and do something that is a benefit to

the river and the local neighborhood.”

Final trash totals are still being tallied.

More than 110 registered groups collected

trash from locations as far north as North

Stratford, NH near the Canadian border all

the way down to Essex, CT near the Long

Island Sound. More statistics from the Source

to Sea Cleanup will be shared once trash data

are compiled and processed through the Clean

Swell app developed by CRC partners at the

Ocean Conservancy.

Eversource, USA Waste & Recycling, and

All American Waste are the lead Source to

Sea Cleanup sponsors and organize their own

employee volunteer groups, too. “Our

employees are dedicated to giving back to our

communities throughout the year, and the

Source to Sea Cleanup is always one of our

favorite events because of the difference

we’re able to make when we work together to

• • •

WORLD OUTDOORS

protect the environment,” said Eversource

Vice President for Sustainability and

Environmental Affairs Catherine Finneran.

“We’re proud of the dozens of Eversource

employees who worked with their neighbors

to clean up the Connecticut River this weekend,

and we thank the Connecticut River

Conservancy and all of our volunteer partners

for their leadership and commitment to the

environment.”

“We look forward to sponsoring and participating

in the Source to Sea cleanup event

every year,” says Frank M. Antonacci, COO

of USA Waste & Recycling, “and we know

first-hand that proper waste disposal is important

to keep our rivers and communities

clean.”

Trash Talks

After cleaning up more than 1,200 tons of

trash from the river over the last 25 years, it

is clear that repeated cleaning is not the solution

to our trash problem. CRC is working

with partners across New England on laws

and policies that will improve recycling,

redesign our single-use economy to prevent

waste, and extend producer responsibility to

include the entire life cycle of products.

Join CRC for a series of virtual Trash Talks

that connect the trash found on the ground

with the work being done to keep it from getting

there. Learn more about what was collected

during this year’s Source to Sea

Cleanup and talk about advocacy and legislative

action that continues year-round. Trash

Talk details and registration can be found at

www.ctriver.org/events.

About the Connecticut River Conservancy

Since 1952, Connecticut River Conservancy

has been the voice for the Connecticut River

watershed, from source to sea. They collaborate

with partners across four states to protect

and advocate for your rivers and educate and

engage communities. They bring people

together to prevent pollution, improve habitat,

and promote enjoyment of your river and

its tributary streams. Healthy rivers support

healthy economies. To learn more about

CRC, or to make a contribution to help protect

your rivers, visit www.ctriver.org.

Take a Time Out for Turtles: Volunteers Needed

for Nesting Beach Clean Up Day

Vermont Fish and

more about the turtles and to

Wildlife’s annual spiny

see some recently-hatched

softshell turtle beach

baby turtles.”

cleanup day is Saturday,

Participants are asked to

October 16, and the department

dress in layers of warm

is looking for volun-

clothes and to bring water,

teers to help. Participants

work gloves, a leaf rake,

are asked to arrive at North

short-handled tools such as

Hero State Park at 10:00

trowels, and their own

a.m. After finishing at (VF&W Photo by Tom Rogers)

North Hero, the group will

lunch. Families and kids

are welcome. The cleanup

carpool to another site in Swanton. may run until 4:00 p.m., although participants

Volunteers will pull up vegetation on nesting

can choose how long to assist.

beaches to prepare turtle nesting sites for “This has turned into a very popular annual

next year. They may also find a few hatchlings

event for people interested in conservation,”

that occasionally remain in nests under-

added Mikula. “We’re always glad to see so

ground this late in the year. In addition to many people care about wildlife.”

threatened spiny softshell turtles, these nest To get to North Hero State Park, follow

sites are also used by map turtles, painted Route 2 north past Carry Bay in North Hero.

turtles and snapping turtles.

Take a right on Lakeview Drive, just before

Vermont Fish and Wildlife biologist Toni Route 2 swings west toward Alburgh. Follow

Mikula will have hatchling spiny softshell Lakeview Drive almost to the end until you

and other turtles on hand and will talk about reach the North Hero State Park entrance sign

the long-term turtle recovery efforts. Some of on the left. Drive to the end of the road

these hatchling turtles will be raised in captivity

always bearing right.

by the ECHO Leahy Center for Lake For more information, please contact Toni

Champlain while they are small and most at Toni.Mikula@vermont.gov.

vulnerable to predation. They will be released This event is outdoors and there is enough

back into Lake Champlain next spring. space for social distancing. Hand sanitizer

“This is a great way to help conserve will be provided. Some hand tools will be

threatened wildlife right here in Vermont,” provided but attendees are also encouraged to

said Mikula. “It’s also a fun way to learn bring their own.

• • •

VT Bear Hunters Contribute to Wildlife Science

The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department is on the back of the envelope provided by the

reminding successful bear hunters that a regulation

check station, and a short video showing tooth

requires them to submit a bear tooth so removal is found on our website by clicking

wildlife managers can collect important information

on Hunt and then Black Bear.”

on Vermont’s bear population.

Vermont has two bear hunting seasons. The

The hunter must field dress the bear before early season, which requires a special bear

taking it to a reporting station. It is also legal tag, is from September 1 through November

to skin the bear and cut it up in order to carry 12 with one exception. Nonresident hunters

it out of the woods. Although the bear must using dogs cannot start bear hunting until

be reported within 48 hours, Fish & Wildlife September 15. The late bear season begins

urges doing so quickly to cool the meat. The November 13 and continues through

hunter must also collect and submit a premolar

November 21. A hunter may only take one

tooth from the bear at the time the bear bear during the year.

is reported or within 30 days. The tooth provides

“Carefully regulated hunting plays a very

important data on the age structure and important role in scientific wildlife manage-

size of the bear population.

ment by helping to control the growth of

Envelopes for submitting teeth are available

Vermont’s bear population now estimated at

at all big game check stations. being well within our population objective of

“Successful bear hunters will be helping in 3,500 to 5,500 bears,” said Scott. “Minor

our management of this magnificent big game fluctuations in the bear population will always

animal,” said Director of Wildlife Mark Scott. occur due to changes in food availability, winter

severity and hunter success. Despite these

“The premolar tooth we’re asking hunters to

extract is small and easy to loosen with a fluctuations, we look at the long-term trends

knife. Directions for removing the tooth are to manage for a healthy, robust population.”

page 26 The WORLD October 6, 2021

High Meadows Fund, Vermont Community

Foundation, and Vermont Land Trust Announce

$6 Million Gift to Accelerate the Future of

Farming in Vermont

The High Meadows Fund, the Vermont

Community Foundation, and the Vermont

Land Trust announced a $6 million leadership

gift to diversify farm ownership, accelerate

the economic viability of farming, and

advance natural climate solutions and ecological

health on Vermont farms.

$2 million of this gift will seed the creation

of a new fund to expand land ownership and

access among people who have been historically

marginalized or oppressed based on

their race or ethnicity. This is the largest gift

of its kind ever made in Vermont.

“Words cannot express the joy and hope we

feel around the potential of this gift to shape

a vibrant future for Vermont’s farming. Like

hundreds of farming families in Vermont, we

know first-hand the challenge of holding land

and maintaining what we have,” said Lydia

Clemmons, President and Executive Director

of the Clemmons Family Farm in Charlotte.

“A gift of this kind could help all of us,

particularly those who have been historically

marginalized or oppressed,” Clemmons continued.

“My parents purchased our farm

nearly 60 years ago with a vision of holding

onto the land—at all costs—for future generations.

They are both 98 years old now. Over

the course of their lifetimes, African-

Americans have lost 93% of their land assets

in the United States. The historic Clemmons

farm is one of the few Black-owned farms

remaining in the state and nation. We look

forward to joining hands with others to support

the important work ahead.”

The Vermont Land Trust, alongside a

diverse group of farmers and community

leaders, is convening discussions to design

and grow the $2 million fund to expand land

ownership and access. The fund’s governance,

structure, and decision-making will be

determined by Black, Indigenous, and other

People of Color in Vermont. More information

about this project will be available in

early 2022.

The remaining $4 million will expand

Vermont Land Trust’s work to put hundreds

of farmers onto the land operating successful

businesses over the next 10 years. This

impactful gift comes at a turning point for

Agency Secretary will Host Public Meeting to Provide

Details on $100 Million Available in Infrastructure and

Water Quality Funding for Vermonters

Agency of Natural Resources (ANR) Secretary

Julie Moore invites the public to join

her on Thursday, October 7 from 4:00 to 5:00

p.m. to discuss a variety of environmental

topics. The meeting will start with a conversation

about the American Rescue Plan Act

(ARPA) funding, where Secretary Moore will

talk about ANR’s plan to invest approximately

$100 million in ARPA funding in a variety

of water infrastructure projects.

“This funding offers Vermont an unprecedented

oortunity to mae significant in

vestments in critical infrastructure to support

water and sewer systems, affordable housing,

and water quality improvements,” said Secretary

Moore. “Together, these projects will spur

transformational change here in Vermont.”

Earlier this year, the federal government

committed $1.9 trillion nationally in ARPA

funds to address the public health and economic

crises caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

This includes money to invest in broadband,

water and sewer infrastructure, and assistance

for economically disadvantaged communities

to help protect them from future crises. The

State of Vermont will receive more than $2.7

billion in ARPA funds.

ARPA funding administered by the Vermont

Agency of Natural resources will primarily

support water quality projects. ANR

will administer funding to towns, commercial

entities, and individuals. The funding will

suort five riority areas

• Pretreatment: Pretreatment removes harmful

pollutants in wastewater before it is discharged

to a municipal sewer system. Funding

will support municipal wastewater treatment

facilities to manage incoming loads and help

private enterprises expand their operations responsibly.

• Village water & sewer infrastructure: This

funding will be invested in community sewer

and drinking water systems in some of the

more than 200 villages that currently lack

such systems.

liminating sewer overows his funding

will help eligible municipalities implement

their lan to eliminate sewer overows within

their community.

• Treat stormwater runoff: Vermonters with

• • •

agriculture in Vermont.

“Agriculture is central to our identity and

sense of place. Today, it is under threat. The

climate crisis, demographic change, and

broader economics require us to act boldly

and change the trajectory of decline,” said

Nick Richardson, President & CEO of the

Vermont Land Trust. “Now is the moment to

help the next generation of farmers buy land

and grow farm enterprises. This gift, and

decades-long partnership with the High

Meadows Fund, enables us to take a great

leap forward in protecting and strengthening

agriculture in Vermont.”

“The gift is part of the transition of the

High Meadows Fund, from a relatively standalone

grantmaking entity under the Vermont

Community Foundation to a grantmaking

initiative within the Foundation. It’s time to

do more and to do it in a different way,” said

Gaye Symington, President of the High

Meadows Fund. “An accelerated pace of

investment will have a lasting impact on the

future of Vermont’s agricultural economy,

rural communities, and food system. It’s critical

to give greater control to those who have

been marginalized by traditional approaches

to land ownership.”

Dan Smith, president and CEO of the

Vermont Community Foundation, adds

“Communities where anyone willing to commit

to the working landscape—regardless of

race, ethnicity, or economic background—has

a pathway to steward the land without fear of

discrimination and isolation are key to closing

the opportunity gap in Vermont and fostering

a sense of belonging for all Vermonters.

We are a rural state where the working landscape

has long been central to our economic

vitality. To keep that legacy alive and our

rural communities vibrant, we need to create

conditions that attract, support, and retain a

diverse new generation of farmers running a

range of successful and sustainable enterprises.

This remarkable gift advances that

reality.”

To learn more about the High Meadows

Fund’s gift to the Vermont Land Trust, read

Gaye Symington’s recent blog post: vermontcf.

org/highmeadows-gift-announcement.

properties that contain three or more acres of

impervious surface (e.g. gravel, pavement,

roofs) are required to treat stormwater runoff

from these parcels. These funds will help

property owners meet these requirements.

• Healthy Homes: Funding will be provided to

eligible mobile home parks and low-income

homeowners to repair or replace failed water

and sewer infrastructure such as wells and

septic systems.

Supporting healthy homes is one example

of a priority funding area. During the pandemic,

some low-income Vermont homeowners

saw their income disproportionately affected

by COVID-19. Coupled with that, some also

had their wells or setic tans and leach fields

fail. Many of these residents are not able to

pay for system replacement or repairs.

“For people living with a failed septic

system or well, they know that they have an

expensive problem and can feel powerless to

change the situation,” said Secretary Moore.

“Providing these funds to individuals to cover

design and construction and by having a sliding

scale for assistance empowers property

owners to solve the situation.”

At the meeting, Secretary Moore will be

joined by Billy Coster, Director of Planning

for ANR and Neil Kamman, Water Investment

Division Director for the Vermont Department

of Environmental Conservation.

Together, they will talk about the types of

funding available to towns, businesses and individuals

and provide more information about

regulatory requirements.

After an initial discussion about ARPA,

ecretary Moore will oen the oor to an

swer questions from attendees. The Secretary

encourages attendees to bring any questions

they have about Vermont’s natural resources.

The meeting will be held online via Microsoft

Teams (link) and in-person at the Agency

of atural esources main office located in

Davis Building 2 at One National Life Drive,

Montpelier, VT 05602. To join by phone,

please call 802-828-7667 and enter the Phone

Conference ID: 372 122 774#. If you need

translation services or other hearing or language

accommodations, please email elle.

ocasey@vermont.gov or call 802-760-9967.


VT Fish & Wildlife Monitoring Spread of

Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease in the Region

The Vermont Fish and

Wildlife Department is monitoring

the spread of Epizootic

Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD)

in the region and investigating

possible cases in Vermont.

New York has documented

cases in several counties in

the Hudson Valley, including

counties bordering Vermont.

EHD has never been confirmed

in Vermont but may

occur here this fall. Vermont

Fish and Wildlife is on

heightened alert in the

Castleton area where several

dead deer have recently been

reported. Unfortunately, biologists have not

been able to examine any of these deer before

the samples decomposed.

EHD virus is transmitted by biting midges,

sometimes called no-see-ums. The disease is

not spread from deer to deer, and humans cannot

be infected by deer or bites from midges.

EHD outbreaks can temporarily lower a

local population, but they do not have a significant

long-term impact on regional deer

numbers. EHD occurs regularly in the southern

states, so some southern deer have developed

immunity. EHD outbreaks occur sporadically

in the Northeast, and deer have no

immunity to this virus. Consequently, most

EHD-infected deer in the northeast are

expected to die. The first hard frosts kill the

midges that transmit the disease, ending the

outbreak.

Deer that contract EHD usually die within

48 hours of showing clinical signs. Outbreaks

are most common in the late summer and

early fall when midges are abundant. Signs

of EHD include fever, hemorrhage in the

Vermont Hunters Can Report Turkeys

and Some Deer Online

Vermont hunters will be

able to report turkeys and

some deer they harvest this

fall online through the

Vermont Fish and Wildlife

Department’s website www.

vtfishandwildlife.com.

Turkeys may be reported

online or in-person at a

regional big game reporting

station.

Deer may be reported

online or in-person during the

archery and muzzleloader

seasons, but deer must be

reported in-person during the

youth and novice weekend on October 23-24

and during the regular deer season on

November 13-28 season. This in-person

reporting requirement allows biologists to

collect important information from deer during

these seasons.

Bears must be reported in-person at a

regional big game reporting station. The

hunter must also submit a premolar tooth

from the bear at the time the bear is reported

• • •

WORLD OUTDOORS

mouth or organs, and swelling of the head,

neck, tongue, and lips. A deer infected with

EHD may appear dehydrated and weak.

Infected deer often seek out water sources

and many succumb near water. Several sick

or dead deer may be found in a small area,

particularly around water. There is no treatment

or means to prevent EHD. Dead deer do

not serve as a source of infection for other

animals.

Sightings of sick or dead deer in Vermont

should be reported to the Vermont Fish and

Wildlife Department by contacting your local

State Police radio dispatcher who will notify

the nearest game warden. The department

will collect samples from deer and analyze

data from deer reports to monitor the extent

of the outbreak and determine impacts on the

deer population.

For more information on EHD, see the fact

sheet from the Wildlife Futures Program at

tinyurl.com/cyb2cy59 or visit Cornell

University’s Wildlife Health Lab website.

or within 30 days. The tooth

provides important data on

the age structure and size of

the bear population.

Envelopes for submitting

teeth are available at all big

game reporting stations.

Hunters are required to

report deer, bear and wild

turkeys they harvest during

the hunting seasons within 48

hours. Deer and bear must be

field-dressed prior to reporting,

and a hunter must take a

warden to the kill site of a deer or bear if

requested by a warden.

The online reporting link for deer and turkey

as well as a map and list of big game

reporting stations is available under “Hunt”

on the left side of Vermont Fish and Wildlife’s

website.

Fish and Wildlife urges hunters to review

the 2021 Deer Season Guide also available

their website home page.

Tree Stand Safety Tips for Hunters

Tree stands get hunters out of sight and

smell of wary deer, but they can also get hunters

into trouble. Here are some tips from

Vermont Fish and Wildlife to help stay safe

and get the most out of your tree stand hunting

experience:

• Choose a live, straight tree, and avoid ash

that may be in decline due to emerald ash borers.

• Buy smart. Only use stands certified by the

Treestand Manufacturers Association (TMA).

• Inspect them each time you use them.

Check your treestand for wear and tear each

time you go out into the woods.

• Know the rules. On state lands, it is illegal

to place nails or other hardware into trees or

to build permanent structures. On private

lands, you must have landowner permission

to erect a tree stand, cut or remove trees or

other plants, or to cut limbs. All stands,

including ground blinds, must be marked

with the owner’s name and address.

• Always wear a full-body safety harness,

even for climbing. Most falls occur going up

and down the tree and getting in and out of

the stand. Make sure your safety harness is in

good condition. Especially, check the straps.

• Don’t go too high. The higher you go, the

vital zone on a deer decreases, while the likelihood

of a serious injury increases.

• Never carry firearms or bows up and

down trees. Always use a haul line to raise

and lower all gear. Make sure your firearm is

unloaded.

• Familiarize yourself with your gear

before you go. The morning of opening day

is a poor time to put your safety belt on for the

first time.

• Be careful with long-term placement.

Exposure can damage straps, ropes and

attachment cords. Also, the stand’s stability

can be compromised over time, as the tree

grows.

Two Reasons Why You Should Wear Orange

During Hunting Season

By CompassVermont.com

Hunting is, overall, a safe

outdoor sport. Certainly

safer than riding an ATV in

the woods, especially without

a helmet.

But here is one sobering

statistic. In 2020, 78%

of hunters shot by another

hunter in New York State

were not wearing an orange

vest or other orange clothing

(Compass Vermont

could not find comatile statistics for Ver

mont, but the trend is nationwide).

“tudies rove that wearing uorescent

hunter orange keeps hunters visible to other

people in the woods, but it keeps them relatively

invisible to deer,” said Vermont Hunter

Education Program Coordinator Nicole Meier.

And that is the second point. Deer are unaffected

by color, as their vision relies on movement,

patterns, and color variations.

“Unlike humans, deer do not have multiple

color receptors in their eyes. They can

see color, but their spectrum is limited. This

With Vermont’s archery deer season starting

October 1, Vermont Fish and Wildlife urges hunters

to take the time to follow basic safety procedures

to avoid falls from tree stands. VTF&W

photo.

“Hunter education instructors want you to

be safe this coming season,” said Vermont

Fish and Wildlife’s Hunter Education

Program Coordinator Nicole Meier. “Falls

from tree stands are a major cause of death

and serious injury to deer hunters, but they

are preventable by always wearing a fullbody

harness and staying connected to the

tree.”

Learn more about Tree Stand Safety here:

https://www.fws.gov/uploadedFiles/

TreeStandSafety.pdf.

• • •

means deer must rely heavily

on their ability to detect

movement over the ability to

interpret color variations and

patterns,” says the department.

The time that deer are

most active, during the dawn

and dusk hours, are times of

especially low visibility. You

can improve your chances of

being seen by other hunters

by wearing hunter orange,

which can be seen even in low-light situations.

Meier says hunters moving into the line of

fire of other hunters and mistaing other hunt

ers for game are common causes of the state’s

accidents.

“Every year, we should strive to be the safest

we can be by wearing at least a hunter orange

hat and vest,” she added.

CompassVermont.Com is an independent

publication founded by a native Vermonter,

providing non-editorial news and stories presented

in concert with the culture, mindset,

and values of the Green Mountain State.

ReSOURCE Barre

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Sale ends 6 days from publication date.

October 6, 2021 The WORLD page 27


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please notify us immediately so that corrections can be made. The WORLD will not be

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PHONE NUMBER ___________________________________________________________________________

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Each separate word, each phone number counts as one word

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING FORM

403 U.S. RT. 302 - BERLIN • BARRE, VT 05641-2274

479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • FAX 479-7916

CLASSIFIEDS

DEADLINE: MONDAY 10:00AM DISPLAY ADS THURSDAY AT 5:00PM

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • Fax 802-479-7916 Email: sales@vt-world.com

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT

TO THE WORLD

GET THE JOB

SEE PAGES 15-19

FOR THIS WEEK’S

JOB ADS

TOTAL COST __________________

$ ■ FULL PAYMENT MUST ACCOMPANY THIS FORM ■ ✔

■ MasterCard

■ Visa

Credit Card

Number ____________________________________________________ ■ Discover

CVC#______

Signature __________________________________________Exp. Date ___________________

Use your VISA/MC/DISCOVER

and call 479-2582 or

1-800-639-9753

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

CHRIST EPISCOPAL

CHURCH, Montpelier is looking

for a part-time administrator.

This person will work

alongside the priest, other

staff, and the congregation.

Skills needed are good phone

manner, highly organized, can

work to deadline, able to interact

with many faces of the

public. Computer skills in MS

Word, Excel and / or Google

Drive are essential. Pay is

$15-20 / hr depending on experience

and skills. Hours 10-15

/ wk. Please send cover letter

and resume to administrator@

christchurchvt.org

CONCRETE LABORER

WANTED

Apply at

Breer Bros. Inc.

18 Blackwell St

Barre, VT

Monday-Friday

7:00 am — 8:00 am

or call 238-3661

CHECK HEADING:

■ Animals-Farm ......................500

■ Animals-Pet .........................430

■ Antiques/Restorations .........144

■ Baby/Children Items ............140

■ Bicycles ...............................220

■ Boating/Fishing ...................210

■ Building Materials ................300

■ Business Items ....................080

■ Business Opportunities .......060

■ Camping ..............................205

■ Childcare Service ................030

■ Christmas Trees ..................370

■ Class & Workshops .............103

■ Clothing & Accessories .......130

■ Computers/Electronics ........100

■ Farm/Garden/Lawn .............410

■ Free Ads ..............................108

■ Furniture ..............................180

■ Garage Sales/Flea Mkt. ......145

■ Health ..................................113

■ Home Appliances ................160

■ Hunting/Guns/Archery .........305

■ Insurance/Investments ........090

■ Job Opportunities ................020

■ Lost and Found ...................110

■ Miscellaneous .....................150

■ Musical ................................200

■ Personals ............................105

■ Professional Services .........540

■ Rideshare ............................125

■ Snow Removal Equip. .........355

■ Snowmobiles/Access. .........360

■ Sporting Equipment ............250

■ Storage................................235

■ Support Groups ..................107

■ Tools ....................................330

■ Wanted ................................120

■ Wood/Heating Equip. ...........350

■ Work Wanted .......................040

AUTOMOTIVE

■ Campers/Motor Homes .......845

■ Cars & Accessories ............875

■ Motorcycles/ATV’s ...............850

■ Trucks/Vans/Jeeps Access. .870

■ Vintage/Classic Vehicles .....873

■ Work Vehicles/Heavy Equip. ....855

REAL ESTATE

■ Apts./House for Rent ...........630

■ Camps for Sale ...................650

■ Comm. Rentals/Sales .........605

■ Condominiums ....................680

■ Apt. Blds. for Sale ................685

■ Homes .................................690

■ Land for Sale .......................670

■ Mobile Homes .....................600

■ Vacation Rentals/Sales .......645

■ Wanted to Rent/Buy ............610

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

GENERAL SALVAGE YARD

HELP, Immediate Openings

Part or Full Time. $12-17 802-

685-7799

IMMEDIATE OPENING for

at-Time fe ssistant

Computer skills helpful, retired

and / or physically challenged

encouraged. work from home

Possibilities.

Allens@together.net

802-685-7799

JANITOR NEEDED Barre

Town & Montpelier. Monday

thru Saturday ideal, but not a

deal breaker. Hours after 5pm.

Call 585-6492

PART-TIME /FILL-IN BAR-

TENDER Needed. Apply in person

at American Legion Post 3,

21 Main Street, Montpelier.

TAKING BIDS for Winter

Snow plowing, Sanding and

removal. Send bids to American

Legion Post 3, 21 Main St.

Montpelier 05602

WORK AT HOME AND EARN

BIG BUCKS!

Earn up to $1,000 a week

at your leisure in your own

home? The probability of gainin

i po ts fom this and

many similar at home jobs is

slim. Promoters of these jobs

usually require a fee to teach

you useless, and unpo tale

trades, or to provide you with

futile information. TIP: If a

work-at-home program is legitimate,

your sponsor should

tell you, for free and in writing,

what is involved. If you question

a poam’s leitimay,

call the ATTORNEY GEN-

’ C -

TANCE PROGRAM at 1-800-

649-2424.

BUSINESS

OPPORTUNITIES

LOOKING TO EARN A MIL-

LION$? Watch out for business

opportunities that make

outrageous claims about

potential eanins on’t

get fooled into get rich quick

scams. There are legitimate

business opportunities, but

be cautious of any business

that an’t e et in witin

the typical earnings of previous

employees. TIP: Investigate

earning potential claims

of businesses by requesting

written information from them

before you send any money,

o y allin the TT’

GENERAL CONSUMER AS-

SISTANCE PROGRAM, at

1-800-649-2424.

CLASSES &

WORKSHOPS

Train online to do medical

billing! Become a Medical Of-

e ofessional at CT et

tained eti ed to wo in

months! 888-572-6790. (M-F

8-6 ET)

FREE ITEMS

$ A1-CASH PAID

Pending the Market

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

FOR INFO, 802-522-4279.

FREE “BEWARE OF THE

VERMONT LAND TRUST”

Bumper Stickers, Call

802-454-8561

Looking for One

Person for

Kitchen Hood

Cleaning

and Pressure

Washing

$15/hour

Willing to train.

Knowledge with ladders.

(802)461-8594

FREE ITEMS

TOP PRICE PAID for Your

Complete Junk Cars and

Trucks, FREE metal pickup

839-6812

HEALTH CARE

Attention oxygen therapy users!

Inogen One G4 is capable

of full 24/7 oxygen delivery.

Only 2.8 pounds. Free info.

kit. Call 877-929-9587.

DO YOU HAVE CHRONIC

KNEE OR BACK PAIN? If

you have insurance, you may

qualify for the perfect brace at

little to no cost. Get yours today!

Call 1-800-217-0504

LOOKING FOR A MIRACLE /

Lose 20 pounds in one

week? This is almost impossible!

Weight loss ads must

e et the typial epeiences

of the diet users. Beware

of programs that claim

you can lose weight effortlessly.

TIP: Clues to fraudulent

ads include words like:

“breakthrough,”effortless,”

and “new discovery.” When

you see words like these be

skeptical. Before you invest

your time and money call the

TT ’

CONSUMER ASSISTANCE

PROGRAM, at 1-800-649-

2424.

LOOKING FOR ASSISTED

Living, Memory Care, or Independent

Living? A Place for

simpli es the poess of

ndin senio liin at no ost

to your family. Call 1-833-386-

1995 today!

OXYGEN-Anytime. Anywhee

o tans to e ll o

deliveries. Only 2.8 pounds.!

FAA approved. FREE info kit:

Call 1-855-917-4693

Stroke & Cardiovascular disease

are leading causes of

death according to the AHA.

Screenings can provide peace

of mind or early detection! Call

Life Line Screening to schedule

a screening. Special offer

5 screenings for $149. 1-833-

549-4540

WANT A CURE-ALL?

Health fraud is a business

that sells false hope. Beware

of unsubstantiated claims for

health products and services.

There are no “Quick Cures”

— no matter what the ad is

claiming. TIP: DO NOT rely

on promises of a “money back

guarantee!” Watch out for

key words such as “exclusive

secret,”amazing results,” or

sienti eathouh Fo

more information on health related

products or services, call

the TT ’

CONSUMER ASSISTANCE

PROGRAM at 1-800-649-

2424, or consult a health care

provider.

WANTED

COIN COLLECTOR will Pay

Cash for Pre-1965 Coins and

Coin Collections. Call Joe

Blakely 802-498-3692

WANTED:

COSTUME JEWELRY

HIGHEST PRICES PAID IN

CASH. Ask For Walter, Call

802-485-6185

Wants to purchase minerals

and other oil and gas interests.

Send details to P.O. Box

13557 Denver, CO 80201

ANTIQUES/

COLLECTIBLES/

RESTORATION

ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLES,

Old, New and in between

Call 802-272-1820/802-461-

6441

Last Time Around Antiques

114 No. Main St. Barre.

802-476-8830

continued on next page


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HOME

APPLIANCES

WE SELL

REFURBISHED

APPLIANCES

LOW, LOW PRICES!

WE OFFER SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

for Your Mower, Snow Blowers, Lawn Tractors, Etc.

EQUIPMENT MAY BE DROPPED OFF AT OUR STORE

7 Days A Week. Call 479-2541 for More Details

Husqvarna, Craftsman, PoulanPro, MTD Yard Machines

and most other brands

Owned & Operated by Dave & Lu Thomas

1598 US Route 302 Berlin,

Barre, VT 802-479-2541

STORAGE

T C

illiamstown

oute

802-505-1921

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

T

T, oo --

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F The emont

and Tust ou shae hands

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FIREWOOD

een easoned

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FIREWOOD

plit elieed

een Cod

easoned Cod

ll sh Cod

aul oulin

802-883-5563

T emont and

Tust, ell’s Comin and

Chaley’s Comin with Them

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

F CF ood

unin Funae ee

sed sin , Cost

$2249.00. 802-229-2514

ROUND OAK #18 WOOD-

T, ood funtional heate,

--

T C ellet

toe, owe ue ost

ew, sin

802-461-6441

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

Coes

eah

The ael an

802-439-5519

ARE YOU TIRED OF

T C T

GREEN

e hae the answe

olos of landsape stone

fo you yad poets

e elie

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la o Coal

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802-223-4385

1-800-639-3197

landsapestonesofemont

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fom al al totes

Call fo nfo inell aels

The ael an

802-439-5519.

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BEEF $3.00 LB HANGING.

ou ut ap --

0409

ANIMALS/PETS

F a ood home

fo my aaeets omeone

who has epeiene with paaeets--

ANIMALS/FARM

CT ,

ood uality pe ale

802-279-6675

continued on next page

Why Risk Buying a Pet Overseas?

DEAR PAW’S CORNER: I’m

writing in response to your recent

article about pet imports from

overseas being banned. Potential

pet owners may be frustrated by

this rule, but what is their reason

for going outside the country?

Most likely, they want to purchase

a purebred dog at a lower price.

Buying a dog overseas is very risky. The countries mentioned

in the temporary ban are listed for a reason. Often

the breeding is poor, and standards are low. A country’s

culture can play a role. They learn what is wanted, they

produce, and you buy.

The old saying, “You get what you pay for,” applies here.

Many owners end up spending more in vet bills than they

saved on an overseas dog. The risk is yours.

There are many good breeders in the U.S., but they’re not

always easy to find. The U.S. is not perfect and has poor

breeders too. But certain standards must be met, and it will

show in a so-so breeder. Three things to look for are:

1. Sanitary conditions. If the place you visit smells at all,

go no further.

2. Do puppies live in the house and not in a kennel? The

best of breeders will not replace human contact from birth.

3. Selling too soon. Baby animals need their mothers. A

good pup has stayed with its mother ideally for 11 or 12

weeks. Anyone willing to sell under 8 weeks should raise

your eyebrow.

The American Kennel Club has good representatives taking

calls. They are often breeders themselves and can guide

you to your choice of breed. Why not get the best and safest

dog? It’s important to trust your breeder. Be safe -- buy

American! -- Colleen R., via email

DEAR COLLEEN: You told them, and I thank you.

Send your tips, questions or comments to ask@pawscorner.com.

(c) 2021 King Features Synd., Inc.

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL

TOMORROW WHAT YOU

CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753

Central Vermont’s Newspaper

CLASSIFIEDS

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, Vermont 05641

2-Family Home (Fire Damage)

Thursday, October 28 @ 2PM

399 Lower Main W., Johnson, VT

Open House: Tues., Oct. 12 from 1-3PM

Fire-damaged 2-family home in the village is

awaiting your restoration efforts. 0.37± acre parcel

with beautiful back yard and river frontage.

Collector Cars, Antiques,

Collectibles & Equestrian Tack

Online Ends Mon., Oct. 25 @ 10AM

Moretown, Vermont Location (TBA)

Preview: Fri., Oct. 22 from 11AM-1PM

• Porsche Boxster S

• 1959 Cadillac

• Partial Porsche 911 Kit

• 17’ Sea Kayak

• Vintage Snowshoes

• Antique Furniture

• English & Western

Riding/Show Tack,

Saddlery & Clothing

• Vintage Photography

Equip.

• Swarovski Figurines

• Lynn Katz Artwork

And MORE

3BR/1BA Home

Thurs., Oct. 28 @ 11AM

53 Cotter Avenue, Northfield, VT

Open House: Thurs., Oct. 7 from 2-4PM

3BR/1BA home close to area amenities and

schools. 1,466±SF, basement, covered porch. 0.13±

acre lot. Ready for your renovations.

THCAuction.com • 802-888-4662

1978

1321

197

October 6, 2021 The WORLD page 29


Hand-Held Blowers

Electric Gas

Starting At Starting At

95 $

139 95

$

129

Powerful

Backpack

Blowers

START AT

$

379 99

OCCASIONAL USE

SAW

Ideal for

Home

Use

START AT

$

189 95

85 SOUTH MAIN ST. • BARRE, VT

802-476-5400

WE WILL BE RETIRING

DEC. 31, 2021

HAPPY

TAILS

BOARDING

KENNEL

Jim & Shelly Roux

802-485-5296

Roxbury, VT 05699

• modern facility

• radiant floor heat

• air conditioning

• fresh air system

• indoor kennel

• outdoor

exercise

area

Cat boarding

is also

available.

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

MS 170 Stihl Homeowner TM Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

SALES & SERVICE

Fax:

(802)479-7916

403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

PET OF THE WEEK

DD is a confident feline who loves to show

off to get your attention! She previously had

kittens and is quite the mother hen in her

colony room. She will make sure to check in

with you and help with any chores you

might be trying to accomplish! Do you have

a home for this busy gal?

All adoptions are done by a phone

appointment only (no one is allowed

in the building). Contact an adoption

counselor to set up an appointment

at 802-476-3811 or emailing

info@centralvermonthumane.org

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

$A1-CASH PAID

Pending the Market

CARS, TRUCKS

For More Info, 802-522-4279

AFFORDABLE TRASH SER-

VICES & RECYCLING, Commercial

/ Residential. Also metal

recycling, brush removal.

Contact Steve (802)595-3445

or trashsrv4u@hotmail.com or

www.trashserv4u.com

Ask about cash discount.

ALL WAYS

LANDSCAPING

Fall Clean Up

Rototilling

Tree Work

CALL THE BEST

802-223-6363

CLASSIFIEDS

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

DEPENDABLE LAWN mowing

starting at $35 within 10

miles of Barre Free Estimate

Bob Morin 802-522-9753

DmFURNACE

MAN

•Oil Furnace Tune-Ups

•Cleanings •Repairs

•Installations

Fully Licensed & Insured

Reasonable Rates

Call Daryl

802-249-2814

DOES YOUR home need a

good exterior cleaning? High

Pressure, Pressure Washing.

FREE ESTIMATES Call 802-

461-8422 / 802-461-6441.

ELEVATION ELECTRIC

LICENSED and INSURED

Free Estimate

802-224-6647

NOW HERE’S A TIP

By JoAnn Derson

* “Save plastic bags that cannot be recycled,

and use them to collect food scraps that cannot

be composted or flushed.” -- B.M. in New

York

* “I use double-stick tape to hang lighter items on my walls,

since it does not leave a hole, and I am a renter. You also can

use it to reduce noise from vibrations. For instance, I used it

in my car to keep the carpet lying flat in the trunk.” -- J.T. via

e-mail

* “That time of the year is almost here. You know, the time

when running the heater gives the whole house the zaps. To

keep our carpets from giving us static shock, we fill a water

spray bottle with 1 part laundry softener and 4 parts water.

Give the air and carpet a spritz, and it kills the zaps.” -- A.O.

in Canada

Send your tips to Now Here’s a Tip, 628 Virginia Drive,

Orlando, FL 32803. (c) 2021 King Features Synd., Inc.

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

FULL QUALITY

TREE SERVICE

Removal & Full Tree Services,

Stump Grinding, Hedge and

Shrubs trimming, for free estimates

call Randy 802-479-

3403/802-249-7164 35+ years

experience, Fully Insured.

FURNITURE REPAIR, Antique

Restorations, William

Morrison, Craftsman Since

1980. morrisonwindsors.com

802-522-2929

INTERIOR / EXTERIOR

PAINTING, and STAINING.

wALL PAPER removal,

Dry Wall / Wood work repairs.

Pressure WAshing. Decks

and More.

Quality Work.

Insured

Call JMR 802-793-1017

IS YOUR BASEMENT WET?

Stop the water before it

comes in. Free estimates

given for installing a under

drain system. Call Sunrise

Construction Company LLC

802-461-6441 or 802-917-

3693.

LARGE LAWN MOWING except

badly over grown lawns.

Free Estimate. Bob Morin

802-522-9753

P-G Painting-Staining

Exterior

Metal Roof Painting

Pressure washing

Free Estimates

Fully Insured

802-229-0694

802-793-2363

PAINTING / PAPERING

Done reasonably and neatly.

Smaller Jobs OK

802-793-8544

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

’ T

T ’

*Full Service Drive thru Trash

op atuday’s

*Residential / Commercial

*Scrap Metal

*Construction Debris

Hauling Services & Trailer

op-off’s days a wee

Best & Most competitive rates

in the area! Located in E.

Montpelier.

“Your trash is our business”

Call / Text Paul @

802-595-4383

PICARD

GENERAL

MAINTENANCE

FALL CLEAN-UP

LAWN MOWING &

LANDSCAPING

GARAGE CLEANING

Free Estimates- Fully Insured

802-229-0694

802-793-2363

PROFESSIONAL WINDOW

CLEANING

done in Barre / Montpelier

area. Free Estimates. Call Joe

802-229-6527

TREE SERVICE

Hazardous tree removal /

Clean up, Lot clearing / Selective

falling, Viewing improvement

/ Emergency storm

damage for residential or

commercial, Fully insured /

Senior discounts.

Floyd Beede

802-433-1118

Williamstown, VT

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Since 1974

SERVICES

802-223-6577

407 BARRE ST. MONTPELIER

Professional

Carpet/Upholstery

Cleaning & Maintenance

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

or your money back.

www.MontpelierCarpetCleaning.com

Full Service Plumbing, Heating, Air & Electric

FULLY LICENSED AND INSURED

24-HOUR

EMERGENCY

SERVICE

LLOYD

HOME SERVICE

Your Residential Service Experts

(802) 426-2092

www.lloydplumbingandheating.com

BUILDING GARAGES

FROM FLOOR TO ROOF

Starting At $ 14,000

24 x 24 garage, 6” concrete floors with steel

rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.

Garages to your specifications, any size.

House Framing & Addition Work

Call 802-296-1522 • Ask for Ray

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL

TOMORROW WHAT YOU

CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753

Central Vermont’s Newspaper

CLASSIFIEDS

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, Vermont 05641

RANDY’S HEATING SERVICES

Get your furnace

cleaned, repaired

or replaced!

Sales & Services

GREG’S

PAINTING & STAINING

• Handpaint or Spray

• Metal Roof Painting

• Interior/Exterior

• Guarantee

TOYO On Demand

Water Heaters

Miller Furnace

System 2000 Boilers

Thermopride Furnaces

Service & Installation

Call Randy Duprey

Certified Oil & Propane Heating Technician

Insured & Licensed • Over 20 yrs. experience

802-498-8062

reduprey@gmail.com

• Free Estimates

• Reasonable Low Rates

• Neat, Quality Work

• References • Insured

Call 802-479-2733

gpdpainting@aol.com EPA, RRP, EMP Certified

TRUCK FOR HIRE!

In Need Of A

Pickup Truck And

Helping Hand?

• Hauling

• Dump Run

• Landlords,

Residential

Clean-outs

Call Us!

Tom Moore

T&T Truck For Hire

Montpelier

802-224-1360

Business Technology & Cyber-Security Services

Located in the historic Hangar Building

1970 Vermont Rt. 14 South 802.223.4448

East Montpelier, VT 05651

rbtechvt.com

G. M. Bowen

Excavating Contractor Inc.

2510 Bliss Road, East Calais, VT

(802) 456-7049 (802) 793-0895

Residential & Commercial

Site Prep, Water, Septic, Ponds, Land Clearing, Grading, Hauling

page 30 The WORLD October 6, 2021


AUTOMOTIVE

MOTORCYCLES/

ATVS

CRUISE INTO Fall with a

2003 Yamaha V-Star 1100cc

2 cycle Motorcycle silver with

chrome / leather, low mileage.

m aland, ane,

VT. (802) 439-5607.

TRUCKS/VANS/

JEEPS/ACCESS.

CT C-

RADO mileage 13,898. Price

$4,000. 802-476-8083

2010 DODGE RAM 1500

$17,995 East Barre Auto

ales Fo moe details

476-5370 or (866) 928-9370

or Text 1EC5 to 27414.

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

-C

endin the aet

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

802-522-4279.

F ,

in ew ats new ties, new

ehausts, new unde oat,

all new aes miles,

oaded lean, -

883-9355

Cheolet uino

$8,995 East Barre Auto Sales

fo moe details -

5370 or (866) 928-9370 or text

1A4T to 27414

eep and Cheoee

$9,900 East Barre Auto Sales

(802) 476-5370 or (866)928-

9370 or Text 11DQ to 27414

2012 Chevrolet Traverse $10,

995 East Barre Auto Sales

(802)476-5370 or (866) 928-

9370 or text 1FTA to 27414

uyin ll owe pots and

pen nlosed Tailes

Tuin ailale

eiin Cental emont

802-477-2249

DEADLINE: THURSDAY AT 5:00PM

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 sales@vt-world.com

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

C CT

Fluid Film ndeoatin

Tie ount alane

pay-in edlines

aes uspension

Exhausts

outine aintenane

nteioteio etailin

Fully nsued

802-355-2404

CT C

$6,995 East Barre Auto Sales

For More Details 802-476-

5370 or 866-928-9370 or

TEXT 1A5G TO 27414

C F C e uy all

as un, hih-end, totaledit

doesn’t matte et fee

towin and same day ash

too Call

844-813-0213

onate ou Ca to eteans

Today elp and uppot ou

eteans Fast F pi

up ta dedutile Call

1-800-245-0398.

ERASE BAD CREDIT

F

Cedit epai ompanies mae

false laims and pomises to

ease a tail of unpaid ills o

late payments fom you edit

epot owee, only time an

ease neatie, ut auate

edit infomation n addition,

fedeal law foids edit epai

ompanies fom olletin

money efoe they poide

their service. TIP: If you have

uestions aout you edit

histoy o you want to now

how to get a free copy of your

edit epot all the TT-

’ C-

ER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

at --- on’t

send any money to a edit epai

ompany until you he

it out.

T

, sed ims,

Call wee days

802-883-5506

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL

TOMORROW WHAT YOU

CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753

Central Vermont’s Newspaper

CLASSIFIEDS

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, Vermont 05641

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

403 Route

302-Berlin

Barre, VT 05641

Hunter Heavy Duty

ALIGNMENTS

McLEODS

SPRING & CHASSIS

For All

Sizes

of RVs

Trucks,

Trailers &

Buses

“Your Truck

Chassis

Specialists”

32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641 • 1-802-476-4971

JUST GOOD

AUTOS

296 East Montpelier Rd • Rt. 14 North - Barre

802-479-0140

2010 HONDA ACCORD

CROSSTOUR AWD

Auto., PW, PL, sunroof,

Southern Car

$9,995

012 FORD ESCAPE LMT

Auto., PW, PL, AC, sunroof,

1 owner, low miles

$8,495

2012 CHEV. MALIBU 2LT

Auto., PW, PL, AC, Low Miles

$6,495

2011 CHEV. MALIBU LT

Auto., PW, PL, AC, low miles,

one owner

$6,495

1973 MERCURY COUGAR

XR7 CONVERTIBLE

351 Cleveland-Cobra Jet Motor,

Auto., PW, cruise, tilt, low miles

$11,995

EXTENDED WARRANTIES AVAILABLE

JUST GOOD

AUTOS

Trades Welcome

Prices Negotiable

Just a Sample of Many

Just Good Autos!

WORTH THE WEIGHT

PRESTON’S

OCTOBER SAVINGS

LUBE, OIL & FILTER

CHANGE

• Up to 5 qts.Standard

Motor Oil

• Genuine Factory OIl Filter

• Multi-Point Inspection

• Top off All Fluids

ONLY AT PRESTON’S KIA

$34 95

Plus

Tax

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON ONLY AT

PRESTON’S KIA. Please present coupon at vehicle

write-up. Offer good thru 10/31/21

DISCOUNT TO

15 % OFF

YOKOHAMA GOODYEAR MICHELIN PIRELLI

FIRESTONE GENERAL UNIROYAL NOKIAN

- May not be combined with

any other offer

Please present coupon at

vehicle write-up.

New & Good Used Tires

Passenger, Performance & Lt. Truck

TIRE

CHANGEOVERS

Mounted & Computer Balanced

YOUR TIRES OR OURS

WE DO FLAT REPAIR

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

Mon. - Fri. 8:30-4:30 • Saturday 8:30-1:00

Closed Sunday

FRED BUDZYN

TIRE

Corner No. Main &

Seminary Sts., Barre

479-1819

CALL FOR PRICES

WRANGLER HANKOOK COOPER

VERMONT STATE

INSPECTION

• Most cars &

light trucks

• Inspection only,

repairs extra

• May not be combined

with any other offer

VERMONT

INSPECTION

$49 95

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES & MODELS

You Don’t Have To Purchase Your Vehicle Here To Take Advantage Of Our Quality Service!

10

DUE

Plus

Tax

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON ONLY AT

PRESTON’S KIA. Please present coupon at vehicle

write-up. Offer good thru 10/31/21

BUY 3 TIRES $ 1

GET THE 4TH FOR

Eligible Tires Only • May not be

combined with any other offer.

See Service Advisor for Details

Offer good thru 10/31/21.

VEHICLES ONLY

MEMBER

DISCOUNT

SAVE10 % OFF

Maximum $50. May not be combined with any other offer

FREE BATTERY CHECK

WE DO

FLAT

REPAIR

WE

ACCEPT

WITH PAID

SERVICE

TIRES

Best Prices In Town

AVAILABLE AT CAPITOL $

CITY KIA

40 OFF

WHEN YOU BUY A SET OF 4

ELIGIBLE ON ALL VEHICLES

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON AT PRESTON’S KIA. Please present coupon at vehicle write-up. Offer good thru 10/31/21

EBT

THANK YOU FOR SAYING

I SAW IT IN

ALL SIZES BF GOODRICH GENERAL

Fax:

(802)479-7916

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

33 WATERMAN RD.

EXIT 3 OFF I-89

SOUTH ROYALTON, VT

(802) 764-8150

www.bigtextrailerworld/royalton

PARTS . SALES . SERVICE

51 GALLISON HILL RD.

MONTPELIER, VT

MONDAY-FRIDAY 7-5

SATURDAY 8-Noon

Service & Parts

802-262-2030

October 6, 2021 The WORLD page 31


WINDY TOWN

WINDY WOOD – BARRE TOWN

“A common interest community”

“A common interest community”

VIEW HOMES BEING BUILT SUNDAYS 1 PM – 3 PM

SHOWN BY BY APPOINTMENT

ANYTIME

CALL 802-249-8251 OR 802-734-1920

CALL 802-249-8251 OR 802-734-1920

One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, full basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

Single family homes priced from $267,000 and Duplex homes priced from $229,000

One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, full

basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile on Hill Street, left onto

Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into Windy Wood.

Single family homes priced from $335,000

and Duplex homes priced from $269,000

Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile

on Hill Street, left onto Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into

Windy Wood.

AFFORDABLE

APARTMENTS

WITH HEAT

INCLUDED

Highgate

Apartments

located in Barre, is currently accepting applications

for our 1, 2 & 3 bedroom apartments waiting lists.

Hardwood floors, fresh paint, modern kitchen & baths, yard space,

ample closets, & washer/dryer hook-ups. Laundry room on site.

Rent includes heat/hot water, 24-hour emergency maintenance,

parking, snow removal, & trash removal. Income limits apply.

To request an application, call 476-8645 or stop by the on-site

rental office at 73 Highgate Drive, #121, Barre, VT.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

BUSINESS FOR SALE

Hi, I wanted to let all the

followers of Bear Naked Growler

know that I have decided to sell

the business. I plan on retiring

at some point and would like

to be on other side of the bar.

The business will still operate as

normal through the process.

All equipment is approximately

4 years old. I am asking $135,000.

Any serious inquiries can be

sent on messenger, emailed to

dahadickinson@msn.com or

call me at 802-522-9018.

Thank you for all your support

and I am sure we will see you

again before any changes happen.

-Floyd

Bear Naked Growler

186 River St., Montpelier

www.bearnakedgrowler.com

REAL ESTATE

Advocates Call For Swift Action Guaranteeing

Shelter For Vermonters

On Tuesday September 28th,

advocates led by people with

lived experience and youth held

a press conference asking for a

swift extension of the General

Assistance (GA) Motel Program.

Right now Vermonters are left

with the uncertainty of not knowing

if they will be removed from

shelter at the end of October.

“I was reminded again that

this administration still does not

value me and so many like me

as human beings. So, Governor

Scott will extend 30 days and he

will revisit it again, once again

kicking the can down the road.

That means that for another 30

days, our neighbors, our community

members who have no

where else to go, have to be in

an emergency cycle of figuring

out basic needs, rather than being

afforded enough security to

continue working toward a more

stable future for themselves.”

Josh Lisenby from Vergennes has

been experiencing homelessness

for five years.

“I want us to find the end of

that road once and for all” he

continues, “I don’t want us to talk

about it anymore, I want us to do

something about it. It is important

to note that there is no housing

in this state and that will not

be solved in 30 days.” Lisenby

has been applying for housing for

many months and consistently

coming upon barriers to achieving

any long term housing.

Advocates have laid out necessary

guidelines for what must

come next. They say that the

Governor must fully reinstate

the GA Motel Program, Extend

at minimum for as long as the

federal government will reimburse

the program and commit

to not throwing people on the

street, ensuring that they will stay

safely and consistently housed.

They also say that he must end

Updated Weekly

the eighty-four day rule. This rule

was established in 1989 and says

that people can only have eightfour

days in emergency shelter.

Lived Experience Experts and

Advocates are concerned that

this will open up the possibility

of more Vermonters freezing

to death this winter as there are

more than eighty-four days in

winter, and most people experiencing

homelessness have already

exhausted that time limit

this year.

Finally advocates said that

the Governor must cease the

act of asking people to trade

their shelter for money. Housing

advocate and former candidate

for Vermont House, Jubilee

McGil, said,”Sending folks off

with $2500 and a list of camp

grounds, just as winter begins it’s

approach, is not a plan. It is cruel

and inhumane”. McGill spoke

also of her own experience with

homelessness and how her path

out was not because she somehow

worked harder, but rather an

aligning of support that simply

does not happen for everyone.

The press conference centered

the voices and lived experiences

of those currently experiencing

homelessness and was supported

by housing and policy

advocates,along with State’s Attorney

Rory Thibualt.

“Safe and stable housing is a

pathway to long term employment,

to engaging in treatment,

to staying engaged with services,

and to keeping kids enrolled

and engaged in school”. Said

Thibault, “Poverty remains the

common denominator in most of

the criminal justice system. People

whose basic needs are met are

less likely to enter the system, and

for those who do, their success is

frequently tied to safe and stable

housing”. Thibault discussed the

impact on our communities when

Home Mortgage Rates

LAST

DOWN

LENDER UPDATE RATE APR TERM PTS PAYMENT

Community National 09/24/21 3.125% 3.142% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Bank 1-800-340-3460 2.375% 2.406% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

New England Federal 09/24/21 2.750% 2.773% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Credit Union 866-805-6267 2.125% 2.166% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

Northfield Savings 09/24/21 2.875% 2.911% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Bank (NSB) 2.250% 2.316% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

802-485-5871

VT State Employees 09/24/21 2.875% 2.912% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Credit Union (VSECU) 2.250% 2.317% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

1-800-371-5162 X5345

Rates can change without notice.

***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some products are available with as little as

5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not

included in the APR calculations.

THANK YOU FOR SAYING

I SAW IT IN

we don’t offer safe and consistent

housing to Vermonters in a

housing first model. “Meeting

Vermonters basic needs pays dividends

throughout our communities

– not just to those who are

directly assisted. No matter one’s

past, housing is a fundamental

need – and when it is unmet there

is immense suffering”.

Last week, 46 motels authored

a letter to the Governor and Department

Of Children And Families

Commissioner, Sean Brown.

In this letter they asked the

Governor to extend the program

through the time that the Federal

Government will reimburse. For

months the administration had

offered that it was motels that

did not want to continue this program.

This letter seemed to call

this narrative into question.

In addition, youth advocate

Addie Lentzner who has been

working to end homelessness,

originally inspired by a man in

her community who froze to

death on a night that he did not

have shelter, spoke about the

world that she and eighty youth

that signed on to her letter want to

grow up in. Lentzner had called

all of the motels participating in

the program and all but two of

those she got ahold of enthusiastically

were in support of the

program continuing.

“Motels want to continue this

program. Out of 62 motels we

reached, all but 2 said that they

would continue the program if

allowed. Many said capacity

was not an issue; they are willing

to house people experiencing

homelessness this tourist season

and beyond. The administration’s

narrative that capacity and unwillingness

of motels is the issue,

is a myth”. Said Lentzner

Brenda Siegel, Policy advocate

and former candidate for

Governor spoke of a young man

in Brattleboro who lost his life

after being exited in July from

the GA Motel Program, “Calijah

Lindvall from Brattleboro, VT,

was exited from the General Assistance

(GA) Motel program,

with the first round of Vermonters

exited from their shelter on July

1st. Just under two months later,

Calijah died of an overdose. Calijah’s

death was both predictable

and preventable. Now Vermont

has the choice of whether to save

other vulnerable Vermonters or

to let many more fall to similar

fates”. Siegel called Lindvall’s

death a “policy choice”.

When asked what the long

term solution is, advocates said

that we need this three months

to begin to bring together a plan,

something that they should have

already been happening throughout

the pandemic, but that the

state missed the mark. They say,

the right thing to do, is begin

to build up housing and slowly

transition the population from

the motels and shelter, into permanent

and transitional housing.

Advocates say that they will offer

some solutions as to what

this will look like in the coming

weeks.

“We need to assess this crisis

through the eyes of those who

are living it, not through the

typical lens of privilege and politics,”

said State’s Attorney Rory

Thibault.

PUBLISHER’S

NOTICE

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this

newspaper is subject to the fair housing

act which makes it illegal to advertise

“any preference, limitation or discrimination

based on race, color, religion,

sex, handicap, familial status or

national origin, or an intention, to make

any such preference, limitation or discrimination.”

Additionally, Vermont’s Fair Housing

and Public Accomodations Act prohibits

advertising that indicates any preference,

limitation or discrimination based

on age, marital status, sexual orientation

or receipt of public assistance.

This newspaper will not knowingly

accept any advertising for real estate

which is in violation of the law. Our

readers are hereby informed that all

dwellings advertised in this newspaper

are available on an equal opportunity

basis.

To file a complaint of discrimination,

call the Vermont Human Rights

Commisson toll-free at 1-800-416-2010

(voice & TTY) or call HUD toll

free at 1-800-669-9777 (voice)

or 1-800-927-9275 (TTY).

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For more information, call

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BECKLEY HILL MEADOWS

BARRE TOWN

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page 32 The WORLD October 6, 2021

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