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W A V E S

VOL 2.2


Photo by

Luke Whittaker

N Y E

Historic

B

E A

C H

Located just a few short blocks off Highway 101,

the “European walking neighborhood” of Historic Nye beach is a

perfect spot to enjoy easy access to miles of perfect beaches

and offers the visitors lots of …

Beachcombing

Bike Riding/Rental

Beach Walking

Kite Flying

Surfing

Sail-boarding

Tide Pooling

Photography

Galleries

Jewelry

Visual Arts

Apparel

Lodging

Spa – Massage

Cafés & Fine Dining

Hours of Family Fun

Unique

Retail Shops

Professional

Services

Fine Gifts and

Home Decor

World Class

Performing Arts

Sweets - Ice Cream

- Chocolates

For more information: www.NyeBeach.org


OC

W A V E S

Publisher

Jeremy Burke

Editor

Steve Card

Advertising Sales

Teresa Barnes

Kathy Wyatt

Jenna Bartlett

Jeanna Petersen

Misty Berg

P.8

Cleaning crab has never

easier

P.12

Recipe - Apple pie cookies

P.14

Recipe - Venison Nacho

Fries

Contributing Writers

News-Times Staff

Leslie O'Donnell

Susan Schuytema

Photographers

Jeremy Burke

About the Cover Shot

Long exposure of Cobble Stone Beach. If

you haven't been here before this is a must

visit. It isn't just the sites. The sound of the

cooblestones moving is amazing. photo by

Jeremy Burke

P.20

Dream Home of the Month

P.22

Waldport Oil Painter

P.30

Joy of Creating Art

P.32

P.34

P.38

oregoncoastwaves.com

Love of Animals

Chance Encounter

Met Opera returns to the

PAC

Facebook

@OregonCoastWaves

Instagram

@oregoncoastwaves

All rights reserved. No part of this

publication may be reproduced without

the written permission from this publisher.

Photographs, graphics, and artwork are

the property of Newport Newspapers LLC

©2021 and J.burkephotos ©2021

Oregon Coast Waves 2021

P.40

P.42

P.48

A News-Times Publication

831 NE Avery Newport Or 97365

Take the family on a Quest

Oregon Sea Grant turns 50

Moon Jellies light up for

the camera


contents

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W A V E S

VOL 2.1

VOL 1.9

APRIL 2021


Oregon fishermen Tony Thiessen

and Eugene Calkins invented a tool

called Crack’n Crab, which allows

users to cut the crab in two pieces

while leaving the guts in the top

shell. (Photos by Casey Felton)


CLEANING CRAB NEVER EASIER

Product makes crab cleaning easy and efficient

he proverb “Necessity is the mother of

invention” and the saying “Happy wife, happy

life” encapsulate what led two friends to invent

a product that not only led to happy wives, but

thousands of happy customers.

Eugene Calkins and Tony Thiessen are the inventors of

Crack’n Crab, a product that makes cleaning Dungeness crab

quick and easy.

“There are a lot of ways to clean a live crab, but the crab doesn’t

like any of them,” joked Thiessen.

“We’ve been friends since college, and we’ve always crabbed

together, and we’ve always cooked them whole,” said Calins.

“About five years ago, all the crabbing was shut down around

here because of all the biotoxins in crabs.”

Those biotoxins were domoic acid — a neurotoxin that causes

shellfish poisoning. Domoic acid is produced by algae and

accumulates in shellfish, sardines and anchovies. When sea

lions, otters, cetaceans, humans and other predators eat

contaminated animals, poisoning may result.

“When crabbing opened up the following year, we went

crabbing and I took the crabs back home, and my wife wouldn’t

eat them until they were cleaned,” said Calkins. His wife, Lena,

had read about domoic acid and took a hard stance.

When a whole crab is cooked in liquid, domoic acid may leach

into the cooking liquid. “We had never cleaned them ahead of

boiling them,” said Calkins.

The two old friends continued crabbing for a couple weeks

when one day, Calkins showed up with a surprise. He had a 2

x 6 piece of wood with a piece of aluminum he had embedded

upright. The idea was to design a product that made cleaning

crab quick, easy and with no waste. By putting a crab on the

steel edge and giving it a smack, the crab is cut down the middle

with the guts remaining on the top shell (carapace.) A pull on

the legs of each side releases the body from the shell, and then

a shake of each side releases the lungs and any remaining guts.

With the Crack’n Crab, a Dungeness can be cleaned in as little

as 40 seconds.

“It was a big ‘wow’ moment. It was so easy,” said Thiessen.

The fishermen continued to brainstorm for a few days on the

idea. “Nobody wants a big clunky three-dimensional thing to

BY SUSAN SCHUYTEMA | PHOTOS CASEY FELTON, KATIE WILEY, SUSAN SCHUTEMA

9


store on a small boat. So, we wondered how we could store

it flat so it wouldn’t take up too much room or risk someone

getting injured by stepping on it,” Thiessen said. Their idea

was a two-piece product where the metal gauge is interlocked

onto the base when not in use.

Within three weeks, Calkins and Thiessen had a working

prototype and sold the first Crack’n Crab in November of

2017. In 2018, they patented their invention. “We made 250

to start with,” said Thiessen. “We knew if nobody liked them,

we would have Christmas presents for family and friends for

the rest of our lives.”

Those 250 Crack’ns, as the inventors call them, sold out in

three weeks.

But early on, the two discovered another problem and set out

to solve it. “It came up after we lost three of them,” explained

Calkins. “So, we brainstormed again and came up with a float

that is attached with Velcro. It won’t sink if it goes into the

water and is comfortable when measuring the crab.”

Englund Marine, located on the Newport Bayfront, was the

product’s first retailer, and the owners invited Calkins and

Thiessen to set up a table with the Crack’n Crab in their

booth at a sportsmen and outdoor show. “We came out of

that by selling 450 Crack’n Crabs,” said Thiessen. The product

is now in nearly 50 retailers from Alaska to the Bay area.

Both men are retired mechanical engineers and worked at an

aerospace company in southern California for a time. They

both agreed they weren’t looking for a job, but they certainly

enjoy the dividends. “It does help support our fishing habit,”

said Calkins. The men own and harbor a boat in Newport’s

South Beach marina.

The Crack’n Crabs are manufactured in the Salem area. “The

production facility,” they say in quotes, is in Calkins’ garage.

The stainless-steel gauges are sourced from a laser cutter in

Salem, and the food-grade cutting board plastic comes from a

factory in Wilsonville. “We get those as blank square blocks,

and we do the machining on them,” Thiessen explained. “We

cut the slots, cut the holes, and route all four sides. We assemble

them and package them ourselves, in our ‘production facility.’

One of us has touched every one of these that are made.”

A fresh caught Dungeness crab, (top) is prepped for a quick and easy cleaning


Since 2017, the men have sold just under 16,000 Crack’ns. “I

used to tell people that we sell a ton of these,” said Thiessen.

“Then I got to thinking, they are a pound a piece, so we have

really sold about 8 tons.”

Through trial and error, the business partners have also dialed

in the perfect way to cook the cleaned crab, and it isn’t boiling

them. “When we first used the Crack’n, we boiled them just

like how we used to cook them when they were whole,” said

Calkins. “The water washed out the flavor, and we didn’t like

the way they tasted. Someone recommended we steam them,

and that is the only way we cook them now.”

After steaming the cleaned crabs, they recommend plunging

them into a sea salt/ice water bath. “The temperature cools

them down fast, and then the crab absorbs some salt,”

explained Calkins. “When you are cooling so fast, it also pulls

the meat away from the shell, which makes it easier to pick.”

Another benefit of cleaning crab before cooking is that they

also last longer in the refrigerator after they are cooked. After

they are cleaned, rinsed and put in a plastic bag, they can be

placed on ice and transported without the concern that they

might die. Crab cleaned in this method also allow more to fit

in a cooking pot.

More and more people are switching to the Crack’n Crab

and the recommended steaming methods. “There are a lot

of converts out there,” Thiessen said. “And it’s been a really

fun process. Taking an idea, to making a product and seeing

people using them at the cleaning station, just about anytime

we are there, is just really cool. It’s always fun to get feedback

from other fishermen about how much they love the product.”

Their website is tealcrab.com. Teal is an acronym for the

business owners and their wives: Tony, Eugene, Alison and

Lena. “Naming the business and the website were the most

difficult things we had to decide in the beginning,” Thiessen

said.

As for what is next for the two inventors, or problem solvers,

they say they are planning a new product, but it is still in the

works. It’s a safe bet it involves something to do with fishing.

“We fish and crab a lot,” Thiessen said. “And we eat a ton of

crab. We are here. We live this.”

Above, Thiessen prepares to clean a crab on a Crack’n Crab device. A Dungeness crab can be

cleaned in about 40 seconds with the innovative tool. (Photos by Susan Schuytema)


12

PHOTO BY: JEREMY BURKE


CELESTE’S KITCHEN PNW

BY CELESTE MCENTEE AND GUESTS

Caramel Apple Pie Cookies

These apple pie cookies are stuffed with

delicious homemade apple pie filling and

caramel, then surrounded by flakey pie crust.

These mini pies are absolutely addictive!

These mini apple pies are a fall favorite. I love

the way this lattice looks, and I can’t explain

how delicious they are — a huge part of that

is the homemade caramel. Each bite has the

perfect combination of apple, caramel and

flakey crunch.

The recipe makes a lot of filling. You can

repurpose the leftovers into extra for topping

pancakes, ice cream or snacking.

It’s easiest to assemble the cookies on the

prepared baking sheet as they can be difficult

to transfer. If you’re short on time, you can

use frozen pastry dough, pre-made caramel

and/or even store bought pie filling. That

said, all the components are easy to make,

and you will definitely taste the difference if

you take the time to make these from scratch.

Measure your flour correctly. Adding too

much flour to the recipe is the most common

mistake. The best and easiest way to measure

flour is by using a scale. If you don’t have one,

then fluff your flour with a spoon, sprinkle it

into your measuring cup, and use a knife to

level it off.

Ingredients

For the filling:

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

3 pounds apples Honey crisp, 1/2 Granny

Smith

2/3 cup sugar plus more for sprinkling on

the pie

1/4 cup salted butter

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

For the dough:

2 1/2 cups flour plus more for rolling

4 tablespoons granulated sugar

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

16 tablespoons unsalted butter chilled

4 tablespoons ice water

2-3 teaspoons cinnamon

For the egg wash:

1 egg

1 tablespoon cream

For the caramel:

1 cup brown sugar

5 tablespoons butter, salted

1/2 cup cream

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

1 pinch salt, generous

Directions

To make the dough, add the flour, sugar, salt and

spices in a food processor. Give it a few pulses

before adding the butter.

Cut the cold butter up into tablespoon-sized pieces

and add it to the flour mixture. Pulse a few times

until the butter is in pea-sized clumps. Drizzle the

mixture into the processor while pulsing. If you

can squeeze the dough into a clump that stays

together, it’s done. If not, add a tablespoon of ice

water.

Transfer the dough onto a pastry mat or another

floured surface and knead 2 to 3 times just to help

it come together a bit. Gently flatten the dough

into a one-inch thick disk and cover it in plastic

wrap or a Ziploc bag, then place it in the fridge to

chill for about 30 minutes to an hour.

To make the caramel, combine the sugar, salt and

cream in a small pot and heat over medium-low

heat while whisking. Cook for 7-8 minutes until

the caramel begins to thicken. Once caramel has

thickened and is bubbling, remove it from the heat

and pour into a bowl, then set it aside to cool off.

Because this is getting baked into the cookies, you

don’t have to worry about crystallization.

Instructions for the filling: Once your apples are

roughly chopped, put them in a bowl and add the

sugar, spices and lemon juice. Toss them around

to make sure they are evenly coated.

In a large skillet, melt the butter over medium-high

heat. Add the apples and cook, stirring until the

sugar dissolves and it begins to simmer. Cover it

up, reduce the heat to medium-low and cook until

the apples soften.

Strain the apples in a colander over a medium

bowl to catch all the juice. Give the colander a

good shake to get as much liquid as possible.

Return the juices to the skillet and simmer over

medium-high heat until thickened and lightly

caramelized — about 10 minutes. Toss the apples

with the reduced juices and spices. Make sure

everything is evenly coated. Go ahead and set

them aside to cool completely. Once the apples

are fully cooled, dump them out on cutting board

and chop them up into small pieces, then return

them to the bowl.

Now to prepare the pie crust. Roll your pastry

dough out to about a quarter-inch thick. One half

of the dough is for the bases and the other half

is for the lattice tops. You will probably want to

chill the dough for the lattice tops until just before

cutting the strips and arranging on top. First, cut

your circles.

I use a ruler to help me cut straight lines for the

lattice tops. You will probably need 6-7 small

strips to drape over the top of each pie. Once you

have all of your pastry dough cut out, it’s time

to grab that apple filling. Place each base on a

baking sheet and brush the caramel on top. Make

sure you leave a border at the edge. Add about 1

tablespoon of the apple pie filling to the center of

each circle and brush the edge with egg wash.

For the egg wash, mix an egg and dash of cream

in a small bowl. Brush the edge of the cookie with

the egg wash then arrange the first rows of the

lattice on top and brush with the egg wash. Place

the perpendicular strips on top. Using the same

size cookie cutter, cut and remove the excess pastry

dough. Brush a final egg wash on and sprinkle

with sugar (and cinnamon if desired) and bake at

350 degrees for about 20-25 minutes until golden

brown.

Combine confectioners’ sugar and 1 teaspoon

cinnamon in a mixing bowl; add 1 teaspoon

vanilla extract. Stir in milk slowly until desired

consistency is reached; drizzle over cooled pies.

You can also bottle the leftover apple filling and

use for later, or eat with a spoon.

13


THE KITCHEN WILD

BY KATIE WILEY

Venison Nacho Fries

Venison Nacho Fries

Ingredients:

1 pound ground venison

1 packet taco seasoning

6 large russet potatoes

Shredded cheese

Oil for frying

Salt

Directions:

Sauté ground venison until browned,

drain off excess fat. Add taco seasoning

per taco brand instructions. Set aside.

For fries:

Heat oil to 375 degrees

Puncture potatoes with a fork and

microwave as you would a baked potato

until almost fully cooked (approximately

90 percent cooked). Allow to cool.

We have had a blast archery hunting

this season, taking the kids out night

after night, all dressed from head to toe

in their camo.

Unfortunately, we weren’t able to tag a

deer this year, but we were able to teach

our little ones some invaluable life skills.

They’re finally getting to the age that

they’re able to identify tracks and game

trails, learning to pay close attention to

the wind, and, most importantly, they’re

learning how to stay quiet out there in

the woods when hunting.

For those of you who have hunted

with little ones, you know they don’t

like to stay quiet for long out there,

and everything sounds about 10 times

louder in the woods. But I’m really

proud of how well they did this archery

season and how much fun they had

learning.

Not only did they tackle some really

important hunting skills, but they

also identified so many plants and

mushrooms while we were out there,

too — picking blackberries and salal

berries as we hiked and even bagging

some beautiful lobster mushrooms

along the way.

We may not have tagged a deer this year,

but we certainly had a blast trying! If you

happened to have better luck than we

did, then these Venison Nacho Fries are

an absolute must try. If not, they would

be great made with ground beef as well.

Slice potatoes into wedges, then deep

fry until golden brown and sprinkle

with salt immediately when removed

from fryer.

Top fries with ground venison and

shredded cheese and place under the

broiler until melted.

Serve with sour cream, your favorite

salsa or hot sauce.


Crispy Salmon Head Curry

“A fish is much more than a fillet. The

head, bones, skin and fins can account

for half the weight of each fish, but

rarely make it onto your plate.” — Fishful

Future

In an effort to use as much of my

recent salmon catch as possible, I’ve

been creating dishes with the typically

discarded parts of the fish, such as the

ribs, head and eggs.

With the ribs, I made my family’s

favorite — Smoked Salmon Ribs — that I

have written about in previous articles.

They are far too delicious not to share (if

you haven’t seen that recipe published,

you can find it on my Instagram at @

thekitchenwild or feel free to reach out

to me directly at katie.r.wiley@gmail.

com and I’m happy to send it your way.)

This recipe is incredible on just about

any cut of any fish!

With the eggs I made Fried Salmon Roe

w/ Spicy Sriracha Dipping Sauce and a

Salmon Roe Crostini w/ Brown Butter

and Thyme.

The Fried Salmon Roe was absolutely

terrible — don’t try this at home folks,

you will immediately regret it.

However, I actually kind of enjoyed

the Salmon Roe Crostini w/ Brown

Butter and Thyme though. The brown

butter and thyme gave the salmon roe

a really nice savory flavor. Paired with

a crisp baguette, sweet cherry tomato

and chives, it was a well balanced bite.

Would I eat it again? Yes. Would I prefer

this appetizer with thinly sliced salmon

filet instead? Also yes.

All in all, it was pretty OK, and very

simple to make. If you’re feeling

adventurous and want to give this recipe

a try, it’s located at the bottom of the

page.

But my favorite use of this salmon

so far has been Crispy Salmon Head

Curry. It was so incredibly delicious!

The salmon head was super meaty and

flavorful, with the collar and cheeks

being a couple of the most delicious

parts of this fish. Served with a spicy

yellow curry and a side of jasmine rice,

this meal will certainly be one I repeat

with my salmon heads from here on

out. Honestly, even without the curry to

go with it, these Crispy Salmon Heads

are so fantastic. I’ve actually eaten them

three times this week already.

Crispy Salmon Head Curry

Ingredients:

1 salmon head

Tempura mix (use per directions)

Club soda (for tempura mix)

Oil for frying fish head

1/2 tablespoon coconut oil

Bell peppers (I used small red, purple

and green farmers market peppers for

this)

3 garlic cloves, minced

1 (13.5 ounce) can of coconut milk

2 tablespoons yellow curry paste

2 tablespoons peanut butter (I prefer

creamy peanut butter)

1 teaspoon red pepper flakes

1/4 teaspoon salt

Fresh basil, cilantro and chives for

garnish

Directions:

• Preheat oil to 375 degrees

• Mix tempura mix with club soda per

directions. Fully coat salmon head in

batter and fry until golden brown.

• In a large skillet or stock pot on

medium heat, add coconut oil, peppers

and garlic, sauté until peppers are

cooked.

• Add coconut milk, yellow curry paste,

peanut butter, red pepper flakes and

salt and simmer for approximately 5

minutes.

• Add your crispy salmon head. Garnish

with fresh basil, cilantro and chives and

serve with a side of jasmine rice.

For the adventurous eaters:

Salmon Roe Crostini w/ Brown Butter

and Thyme

Ingredients:

1/4 cup butter

A few sprigs of fresh thyme

Fresh salmon roe

Toasted baguette slices

Cherry tomatoes, thinly sliced

Chives

Directions:

In a small saucepan, melt butter over

medium heat, cooking the butter until

it begins to foam and brown specks float

up through the foam.

Add salmon roe and fresh thyme

and sauté until salmon roe is cooked

through.

Place approximately a tablespoon-sized

amount atop toasted baguette slices.

Top with cherry tomatoes and chives.

15


AGATE BEACH

SURF

CLASSIC

Crowds watched as Newport Parks & Recreation hosted

the Agate Beach Surf Classic. Following a year without

the event due to the pandemic, the 2021 Agate Beach

Surf Classic took place September 11-12 2021

PHOTOS BY JEREMY BURKE


(Top) Randy Ford rides a wave last weekend during the Agate Beach Surf Classic, hosted by the city of Newport Parks & Recreation. (Bottom) Ocean Shores

surfer Jay Sennewald competes last weekend at Newport’s Agate Beach Surf Classic.


(Top) Local surfer and former event champion Kirk Tice battles a wave during last weekend’s Agate Beach Surf Classic in Newport, sponsored by the News-Times,

Ossies Surf Shop and 10 Barrel Brewing Co. (Bottom) Newport surfer Olivia Schroeder competes last weekend in the Agate Beach Surf Classic in Newport.


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WALDPORT ARTIST

SHARES

PAINTING TECHNIQUE

Gina Nielsen painted this

canvas, illuminated with

streetlights and apartment

windows.


It was a class she didn’t want to take,

but Gina Nielsen finally agreed to enroll

to please her husband. It was a decision

she has never regretted.

“I didn’t want to go to the painting class

— I didn’t think I had time for it,” Nielsen

recalled. “But my husband wanted to

take the class and wanted me to take it

as well. We had to bring a roll of paper

towels and $35 and we each went home

with a painting. And I got hooked.”

That was in the late ’80s in Cobb

Mountain in northern California,

and ever since then, Nielsen has been

painting and teaching what she learned

in that long-ago class.

“I took the wet-on-wet class in 1987 or

1988 and started sharing my paintings

with people who wanted to learn to

paint,” she said. “I started teaching a

year or two later. I love to share with

people what I know — when you get

something good, you want to share it.”

The class that got her hooked was in

the wet-on-wet method of oil painting

taught by William Alexander, host of

the Magic of Oil Painting TV series.

Devotees of his style of painting, and

that of Bob Ross, who studied with

Alexander and later hosted the TV show

“The Joy of Painting,” are numerous.

At the time she took the class, Nielsen

was living on a farm in northern

California with no television and few

distractions. “I started painting and just

kept going,” she said.

In 2005, she moved to Waldport to be

near one of her daughters, who had

recently been widowed. Nielsen worked

at the Lincoln County Assessor’s Office

and then in the accounting department

of the Central Lincoln People’s Utility

District before retiring in January. But

she continues to paint and to teach the

wet-on-wet quick painting style. She is

offering a class titled “Oil Painting, Weton-Wet

Method” this fall at Oregon

Coast Community College. And she

has no plans to stop.

Wet-on-wet painting produces a

luminous canvas in which layers of wet

paint are applied to previous layers of

paint that are still wet. Working quickly

is required, and paintings are often

completed in one sitting.

Nielsen explains that in wet-on-wet

painting, the canvas is first covered

with white or black paint that has been

thinned with linseed oil. “Then you

start adding color,” she said. “Every

color you put on starts intense and then

slowly lightens up. As soon as you wet

it down, the paint blends on its own.”

She always starts out by painting what

is furthest away, usually the sky; then

she moves into the foreground, perhaps

painting clouds and adding mountains

or buildings. “You add color as you

go,” she said. “You blend with a 2-inch

brush throughout the painting to soften

what you’re putting on the canvas.” She

also uses a palette knife in some of her

paintings.

Not only does she love the process of

painting, she also loves the finished

product. “Some of the paintings I can’t

part with,” she said.

While she never expected to paint on

canvas, Nielsen did tole painting for

years, and worked with ceramics and

porcelain dolls. “I’m musically inclined

also and did music for 15 years before I

worked with art,” she said.

But there was early inspiration behind

her unanticipated devotion to painting.

When she was 10 years old, her father

— “he was creative and really stretched

our imaginations,” she said, — invited

an artist to their Orange County, Calif.,

home, and the family watched as the

woman painted a 4-foot-wide seascape

in the space of one day.

“So I already had the bug from my dad

having invited that lady to the house to

paint,” Nielsen said.

(Top Left) Gina Nielsen of Waldport has found her niche as a painter in the wet-on-wet oil style. (Above) “Blue Guitar” is a dramatic sunset, and when turned

on its side, is the image of a guitar. (Courtesy photos)


These days, Nielsen uses her dining

room as her studio, and she teaches

two students a week — one on Saturday,

one on Sunday. “We work on a painting

until we’re done,” she said.

“I think I like this technique because

it’s pretty fast,” Nielsen said. “When I

teach, I can finish a painting in a day.”

She’s taught people ranging in age from

8 to 86, and limits her classes to 10 so

she can provide extensive individual

attention.

She usually does not know what she is

going to paint until she gets in front

of her canvas. “I may see a picture of

something I really like, and I go from

there, making adjustments as I go,”

she explained. “I never know what I’m

going to do and how much I’m going

to change my idea until I get into it.

The changes make it more personal and

unique.

“And oil paint is very forgiving,” she

added. “If I don’t like it, I scrape it off.”

Early on she hung some of her paintings

in a restaurant, only to find they had

all sold in two weeks. “Then I started

showing them in galleries,” she said.

She will often take a digital photograph

of her painting and order prints of that

photo printed on canvas.

There’s cleverness to some of her

paintings: “Blue Guitar” looks like a

sunset, but when the canvas is turned

sideways, the image of a guitar appears.

And in a painting called “Fairyland,”

with a castle struck by lightning, all the

trees have faces.

“Painting in oils allows me to create

my own colorful vision of land and

sea for others to enjoy,” Nielsen said

in her artist’s statement. “My hope is

to bring forth the beauty and depth all

around us represented in oils. If I can

help enhance a person’s view of this

world through my paintings, I have

accomplished my artistic mission.”

Her work can now be seen at the

Lippman Gallery in the COVE at the

News-Times office in Newport and at

the Waldport Café.

(Above)“Fairyland,” painted by Gina Nielsen, brings the viewer a castle struck by lightning, fairies hovering around,

and trees lighting up in the night in the wet-on-wet style of painting.

25


Long exposure of Cobble Stone Beach. If you haven't

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amazing. PHOTO BY JEREMY BURKE


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SAVE

LINCOLN COUNTY

JOBS & LOCAL BUSINESSES

MEASURE 21-203 WOULD

DEVASTATE LINCOLN COUNTY TOURISM

Measure 21-203, is a ban on vacation

rentals in Lincoln County that will

appear on the November 2021 ballot.

The measure is designed to phase out

vacation rentals in Lincoln County.

A ban on vacation rentals would

devastate the number one driver of the

Lincoln County economy: Tourism.

› DEVASTATE Local Businesses:

$105 Million in tourist spending LOST in Lincoln County

› DEVASTATE Local Restaurants:

$27 Million in spending LOST in our local restaurants from visitors.

› DEVASTATE Local Workers:

Thousands of tourism and hospitality jobs LOST

› DEVASTATE School/Community:

$11.5 Million LOST in city, county, and local school budgets

for community projects

› DEVASTATE Community Development:

$3.8 Million LOST in construction and renovation projects

PROTECT LINCOLN COUNTY’S

LOCAL ECONOMY.

PAID FOR BY SAVE LINCOLN COUNTY JOBS

VOTE NO!


Sweets, Soups, and Swag

THE JOY OF CREATING ART

Artist wants to teach others to be creative

Seal Rock, Oregon

10645 NW Pacific Coast Hwy • 541-819-1555

REAL DEDICATION

Maria Jean

Eaton,

Principal Broker

meaton@bhhsnw.com

mobile(541) 999-0241

office(541) 997-6000

1875 Hwy. Florence

(541)635-0084

328 W Hwy 20 • Toledo, OR 97391

hough she grew up in

an artistic household

— the only child of a

journeyman and librarian

— Jill Myer never imagined

she would create art for a

living.

“Both of my parents are creative

individuals,” said Myer. “I grew up in

the ’70s when everyone lived on what

they had. We didn’t have credit cards.

We made do. We made things, and we

fixed things. And that’s the heart of an

artist. ‘How do I make that? How do I

represent that in a way no one else has

done?’ I came by it pretty naturally.”

But even though she was artistically

inclined, art was not on her radar as a

career. She had only taken one art class

in high school and after graduation,

started pursuing a degree in social work.

She quickly realized social work was not

for her. “My grades were slipping. I knew

that taking art classes would be easy A’s

for me, so I became an art major. It kind

of felt like cheating because it was what

I knew and what I did. So, I got a degree

in art.”

BY SUSAN SCHUYTEMA | PHOTOS SUSAN SCHUYTEMA

But even after earning her art degree at

the University of Montana, Myer didn’t

think she could support herself as an

artist. “So, I went and got a job.” She

worked as a barista, in retail, and as a

guide on a dude ranch. She worked in

property management and other office

jobs before she got a job fundraising at

a nonprofit. “It’s one of those things

where you just feel good doing what

you’re doing.”

There was always an undercurrent of

wanting creativity to be a career. A few

years ago, Myer said she experienced an

art craving, so she bought a children’s

set of watercolor paints and painted for

12 hours straight. “The next day, I went

to an art store and bought some better

paints. It was the smallest investment

possible to get started. I watched classes

online and loved every second of it,” she

said.

Since that day, her work has evolved

into encaustic paintings inspired by

the beauty of the coast in the Pacific

Northwest. “My current work reflects

the soft soothing gray rainy days, the

frothy roar of the ocean waves, and the


wide array of plant life provided by the

lush landscape of Oregon,” Myer said.

Encaustic paints are pigment, beeswax

and a natural tree resin called damar. To

work with encaustic paints, they must

be melted from a solid wax to a liquid.

Torches, heat guns and carving tools are

then used to render an image.

Myers had always been interested in

encaustic work, but it is a lot more

complicated than what she had been

doing. “It needs cross-ventilation.

There must be a setup. This is not your

dining room table type of art. It’s a

commitment.”

The colored wax is placed on an electric

griddle to keep it warm enough to

remain a liquid. The wax dries almost

as soon as the brush touches canvas,

or in Myer’s art, the cradle board the is

the surface sturdy enough for hot wax.

“Encaustic is not a traditional type of

painting. The torches are actually the

paint brushes because when I put the

wax on a dry surface, it would let go. It

is not enough time to blend. So, I dab

and come back through with the flame

and re-melt the wax to smooth and

blend and swish.”

Though encaustic is her primary

medium, Myer still works with

watercolors. She has a current project of

creating small paintings — about an inch

in size — and leaving them for people to

find. “My hope is that it brings someone

joy. But if it gets thrown away, I’m not

out too much. It makes me happy. I add

my Instagram handle to the back along

with a hashtag #artlefttofind and I hope

that one day someone finds a mini

painting and tags me in a photo. To

me, this is the modern-day version of a

message in a bottle.”

Myer has recently been accepted into

the For Arts Sake Gallery — an artistowned

gallery in Newport’s Nye Beach.

“It’s a huge milestone professionally for

me to be involved,” she said.

After completing a residency with

the Corvallis Art Center focused on

business training, Myer is also working

toward helping other artists think like

business owners.

“If you want to make a career as an

artist, you not only need to create the

art, but you have to market yourself.

You are a salesperson. You have to apply

for grants. You have to sell yourself to

gallery owners.”

She discovered she was really good at

sales and very comfortable talking with

people. “I’m a chatty lady. I’ve been a

communicator this whole time, and

now I get to talk about something I

love.”

Myer is creating a workshop to help

other artists promote and sell their

work. “I see a need. Some people think

if their art is good enough, people will

just buy it without any extra effort on

their part. I think it is something that

people can learn.

“I see the value of how creativity and

being a creative person has enriched

my life,” she added. “People need some

encouragement. Humans are creative. I

want that for everyone.”

Visit jillmyerartist.com to view her

current work and projects.

31


LOVE OF ANIMALS SHINES IN ARTIST’S WORK

am Levander, of

Otis, has moved

on from raising

and breeding

Afghan Hounds to

creating whimsical

clay sculptures of

people and animals, particularly dogs

and fish, and she’s enjoyed every minute

of both worlds.

“I had raised, bred and showed

Afghans for about 25 years and was

very successful at it,” she said, noting

some of her dogs now live in Canada

and Germany. “But as time went on, I

got older and it was harder to compete

in the ring, so I decided to do judging

instead, and I let the (breeding) lines die

out.”

Now she is an American Kennel Club

(AKC) judge emeritus in the hound

group.

Levander and her husband were

living in Minneapolis when they

acknowledged it was no longer fun to

shovel huge piles of snow each winter,

and they decided on a move to the

Oregon coast. Levander’s parents were

living in Otis, and the Levanders found

a nearby house and made the move the

year Mount St. Helens blew.

“My husband was working for a

company in San Francisco at the time,

and the prices for houses three hours

away from there were so high,” Levander

recalled. “So we went up to Oregon to

visit my parents, and found a house at

the end of their road and made an offer.

I was tired of climbing out the dining

room window to shovel out the walk

to the front door in those Minneapolis

winters. Instead, we could move to

Oregon and I could paint and write.”

While still in Minnesota, Levander

also was a volunteer with a project that

provided foster care for wild animals

needing a home while they were being

rehabilitated. “I took in baby mammals

and would wean them, and then the

state would help place them,” she said.

She fostered animals ranging from bears

to squirrels — and even provided six

weeks of shelter for Thor, the cougar in

the car commercial, when he needed to

be in quarantine.

But once settled in Oregon, it was time

for art. Levander took a class in clay at

Sitka Center for Art and Ecology, and

discovered that sculpting in clay was

what she wanted to do.

“I’ve painted since I was in kindergarten

in Chicago and have been very


successful, but I fell in love with clay,”

she said.

She has taken numerous classes in clay

since then, particularly in raku. “You

just keep learning — whatever art form

you’re doing, you can always learn

more,” she said.

“The raku glaze with its color and

shine is so typical of what I see when I

look at fish in the water when the sun

is shining,” she said. And if she’s not

working in raku, she fires her handsculpted

stoneware to Cone 6, the

temperature range most potters work

in, usually choosing earth tones in her

structural glazes.

She sculpts images of children and

animals predominantly, saying,

“Everyone does vessels and pitchers,

which to me can be boring. I’d rather

create something.” Her love of animals

— and her sense of humor — are found

in her art as well

And her success in art dating back to

kindergarten? She recalled that one

day in her kindergarten class she was

using tempera paint and slathering

it on. “A lady from the Chicago Art

Institute came to our school and saw me

slathering, and said she had to take my

painting for the children’s collection,”

she said. “So my work has been hung at

the Chicago Art Institute!”

She’s painted most of her life and

still paints a little now for her own

enjoyment, adding “people have been

known to buy my paintings,” but her

particular joy is her sculpting. “I’ve been

very fortunate to have a husband who’s

supported me through these ventures

and has let me be me,” she said.

Levander is one of the founders of the

Pacific Artists’ Alliance Co-op Gallery at

620 NE Highway 101 in Lincoln City.

“It’s a place where I can take my things

BY LESLIE O’DONNELL

and maybe visitors will find something

they enjoy,” she said, adding with a

laugh, “one of my fears is saddling my

two kids with all my clay inventory

when I die.

“I’ve been part of cultural tours and

have met many neat people,” she said.

“The gallery has been really successful

for me.”

She said she helped found the gallery in

2009 because there was no place locally

for artists, particularly beginners, to

display their work.

“The gallery promotes interaction with

other artists as well as putting art out

for public view, where it’s basically

adjudicated by the public,” she said.

Levander added that an artist’s success

or failure can be the guide for how long

they are members of the gallery.

“The gallery gives artists a chance to talk

with other artists and get inspiration

as well as criticism,” she said. “I enjoy

visiting with other clay artists at the

gallery.”

Levander has also taught clay classes

for years, and while she did not teach

during the height of the COVID-19

pandemic, she has resumed offering

occasional classes at her home studio.

Her work can be seen at the Pacific

Artists’ Alliance gallery.

She said she plans to continue sculpting

and showing her work for the foreseeable

future. “It’s a social outlet — I get to be

out among people, and it’s fun when

people say they love my work,” she said.

“And it sure beats housework!”

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ecades after she

began working with

fused glass, Teresa

Kowalski of South

Beach remains

devoted to her

medium. “When I

found glass, I felt

an affinity, and I’ve

stayed with it for 35 years,” she said. “I’ve

enjoyed it the whole time, and have no

intention of doing anything different. I’ll

keep at it as long as I can.”

Kowalski didn’t plan to be a glass artist.

Raised in the Midwest, where she grew

up making art at school, she traveled to

Germany in the 1970s for a vacation and

ended up staying four years.

“I took a tour of a glass factory and was

mesmerized by the beauty and fluidity

of glass,” she said. At that time she was

working in ceramics and experimenting

with melting bottles and glass onto clay

in a kiln.

When she returned to the U.S., she

settled in Eugene to be near friends, and

when her friends moved to the coast, she

did as well. “It was wonderful here then,”

she said.

She was doing torchworked glass in

1986 when Boyce Lundstrom, one of

the founders of Bullseye Glass Co., in

Portland, invited her to his workshop

on the new technique of glass fusing —

melting glass together in a kiln. That

workshop and his first book on fused

glass were the starting points for her

devotion to fused glass. “I fell in love

with it,” she said.

By 1990, she had stopped doing

torchwork and was devoting herself

to fused glass. She also took classes at

Pilchuck Glass School in Washington

state and at the Camp Colton Glass

Program.

She started offering classes in her studio

around 1990, and taught at Sitka Center


for Art and Ecology in Otis for two years.

When she began working with fused

glass, it was a new technique. She noted

that glass expands and shrinks in firing,

and all of the glass used has to shrink

and expand at the same time. In those

early years, this technique required a lot

of experimentation and testing, “and

I fell in love with that,” Kowalski said.

“Now there’s a huge selection of tested,

compatible glass.”

Kowalski explained that fused glass

involves stacking layers of compatible

glass to make a design that is then placed

in a kiln, where it melts — or fuses —

together. “That’s what I do now,’ she

said.

She also continues to teach fused glass

(see sidebar). “I’ve done a lot of research

and experimentation so I can take care

of all the technical aspects of firing and

guide my students to build their project,”

she said. “You don’t have to learn how to

paint or draw to learn how to play with

design and color and produce art. My

students can immediately start working

on their project and experiment with

design and color,” what she considers

the most interesting part of creating art.

“Glass is very accessible, but it requires

many materials,” she said. “It’s not a

portable technique. My students have

access to all my supplies in my studio.”

In her own work, Kowalski is

experimenting with vitrigraph and wire

melt techniques. Vitrigraph uses a special

kiln with a crucible and shelf, each with

holes in their bottoms. When the glass is

heated sufficiently, a thin stream of glass

flows out the bottom of the vitrigraph

and toward the floor, allowing her to

make a variety of stringers. The kiln is

heated up to 1700 degrees Fahrenheit.

The technique of wire melt involves

placing small pieces of glass strategically

BY LESLIE O’DONNELL

on a

stainless

steel wire mesh

screen and heating it to 1540

degrees. As the pieces liquefy, they slowly

drip through the mesh and onto the kiln

shelf, creating random mixing of colors

as they merge into a single sheet. “This

gives the wire melt a wonderful organic

feel and a special beauty,” she said.

Kowalski’s work is bright and colorful.

“I’ve always loved vibrant colors and

overlaying them to create different

shades of color,” she said.

One of her more striking techniques

is woven glass, in which she cuts strips

of glass, layers them and fuses them

together. She places the glass on a

zigzag mold and alternates the bars, as if

weaving in reverse.

Kowalski has three kilns in her studio —

a large one about 40 inches, a vitrigraph

kiln about 20 inches, and a tiny test

kiln. She uses the large kiln most often,

both for her regular glass pieces and her

classes.

The COVID pandemic caused Kowalski

to stop all of her classes; she reopened

her studio in May. During the pandemic

she sold art supplies on Etsy. “People

were off work and staying home and

doing more hobbies, so it worked out,”

she said. “It was nice to take a break, and

I kept busy with commissions.”

And as part of the city of Newportfunded

repair project for Sam Briseño’s

“Ambassador” metal

sculpture, long a fixture overlooking

the ocean in Nye Beach, she will be

recreating the figure’s two glass inserts.

Kowalski is inspired by the beauty of the

coast, especially the ocean and water.

As she says on her website, her work

“reflects the dynamic play of color, tone

and nature of the Northwest.

“The properties of transparency,

refraction, and magnification set glass

apart from other art mediums,” she

wrote. “The optics of glass can bring

the illusion of movement and life to a

sculpture. When the alchemy of intense

heat is added, the fluid nature of fused

glass holds a fascination that no other

medium can satisfy.”

Her work ranges from realistic

representations of nature to abstract

interpretations of the “essence and

palette of her environment.

“I don’t try to pre-think a piece,” she

said. “Leaving it to the unconscious,

ideas and designs can come from the

intuitive, subconscious level. Designs

can express that which lies under the

surface. I’m searching for what remains

after self is forgotten.”

Kowalski’s art can be seen at Icefire

Glassworks in Cannon Beach or at her

website: kowalskiglass.com.

35


THE MASSIVE

WAVE

SEASON IS HERE

This photo was taken in Depoe Bay last fall.

PHOTOS BY JEREMY BURKE


37


METROPOLITAN OPERA ‘LIVE IN HD’

Series returning to Newport Performing Arts Center

A trip to the big city isn’t the only

way to enjoy live opera, thanks to the

Metropolitan Opera’s “Live in HD”

(high definition) series at the Newport

Performing Arts Center (PAC). The

10-opera series is presented by Oregon

Coast Council for the Arts (OCCA).

The 15th season for the opera begins

with an encore presentation Oct. 16 at

2 p.m. of “Boris Godunov,” the tale of a

tortured tsar caught between ambition

and paranoia.

Additional operas continue through

June 11 and are:

• Oct. 23 at 9:55 a.m., live in HD, the

Met premier of Terence Blanchard’s

“Fire Shut Up in My Bones.”

• Dec. 11, 2 p.m., “Eurydice,” encore

presentation.

• Jan. 22, 2022, 2 p.m., “Cinderella,”

encore presentation in the abridged

BY LESLIE O’DONNELL

English language version, a shorter

program targeted to families and youths.

• Jan. 29, 9:55 a.m., live in HD,

“Rigoletto.”

• March 26, 9 a.m. live in HD, “Don

Carlos.”

• April 2, 2 p.m., encore presentation,

“Ariadne auf Naxos.”

• May 14, 2 p.m., encore presentation,

“Turandot.”

• May 21, 9:55 a.m., live in HD, “Lucia

di Lammermoor.”

• June 11, 2 p.m., encore presentation,

“Hamlet.”

Jason Holland, OCCA executive

director, noted that the operas listed as

encore presentations are recorded live in

HD and then broadcast at a later time.

The ones listed as “live” are just that —

shown as they are being performed.

The series from the Metropolitan

Opera in New York City presents high

definition live cinema transmissions

shown in HD with 5.1 surround

sound and 80 speakers, and added

acoustical support from Meyer Sound’s

Constellation system.

The programs are presented on a huge

screen on stage at the PAC. Holland

said the screen in the Silverman Theatre

was lowered last week to make sure it

was OK, and it stands about two stories

vertically.

“HD is the next best thing to seeing

something live,” Holland said, adding

that surround sound contributes to the

experience. “To share the Met Opera

with that sensory experience is exciting.”

He said seating is by general admission,

meaning attendees are not assigned

seats but can sit where they want,


allowing them to space apart from their

neighbors as they wish.

Noting that opera is a very expensive art

form to produce and maintain, Holland

said, “For an organization like the Met

to make performances accessible to

theaters around the country is a great

asset. The scale of the production is so

impressive, and the quality of what they

produce is overwhelming.”

In past years, OCCA has presented

National Theatre Live offerings as well.

While none have been booked so far

this year, Holland said they are keeping

an eye on new offerings, including

Broadway shows, as they become

available. And as theaters reopen, he

expects more of National Theatre Live

HD to be offered.

Longtime Newport resident Paul

Brookhyser is an ardent supporter of

“The Met: Live in HD,” along with his

wife, Evelyn. He is looking forward to

the coming season’s performances, and

said, “You’ve got the best seat in the

house in Newport — nowhere in the

PAC is there a bad seat for those shows,

and you get close-ups of the individuals

on stage while they perform.” He

added that the presentations include

interviews with performers during

intermission or a look at “phenomenal”

set changes being made backstage.

“It’s like watching a ballet,” he said of

the set changes.

Opera now runs in the family, with

Brookhyser’s daughter Erica an

accomplished opera singer as well as a

voiceover artist. Brookhyser said he had

not been interested in opera until Erica

got involved in the art form.

Brookhyser said another benefit of “The

Met: Live in HD” is that subtitles appear

at the bottom of the screen, rather than

as supertitles at the top, making them

easier to read while enjoying what is

happening.

He said the Newport opera season

attracts a consistent audience, and

he is looking forward to the opening

performance, “Boris Godunov,” which

he described as “one of the best operas

in the world, with a lot of costuming

and instrumentation. I wouldn’t miss

this one,” he said.

Tickets are $22 each; a subscription of

10 for 2021-2022 programs is $175.

Met member and OCCA member

ticket prices are $20 per program or

a subscription of 10 for $145. For

seniors, individual tickets are $19 or a

subscription of 10 for $145.

Children’s tickets are $10, and student

tickets are $12 each, with a subscription

of 10 2021-22 tickets at $80.

Tickets are available at the PAC box

office. Season tickets can be purchased

up until the first performance, Oct. 16.

The box office is open Tuesdays through

Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the

PAC. Masks are required when visiting

the box office. For more information,

visit www.coastarts.org or call 541-265-

2787.


QUESTS OFFER OUTDOOR FUN AND

LEARNING FOR ALL AGES

Whether you are a visitor to Lincoln

County or a seasoned local, there are

plenty of opportunities to learn about

the Lincoln County area in a fun and

interactive way.

Quests are fun and primarily outdoor

learning adventures that use clues

and hints to encourage participants

to discover the natural, cultural and

historical “treasures” of place and

community.

Cait Goodwin, Oregon Coast Quest

coordinator for Oregon Sea Grant

at Oregon State University, said the

quests are suitable for all ages and allow

lifelong learners to explore parks, trails

and other outdoor spaces in new ways

and at their own pace.

“It is great for kids, adults and open

to anyone,” said Goodwin. “It’s a cluedirected

hunt with people being outside

and finding some hidden treasure.”

Quests aren’t trinket trading exchanges

like geocaching or letterboxing,

explained Goodwin. At the end of each

interpretive quest, participants find

a hidden box containing a logbook to

sign and a hand-carved stamp to mark

their accomplishment. The only actual

treasure is the fun of the walk and

learning about special places in the

community.

All the quests contain three types

of clues: movement clues where the

participant reads a map and follows

directions; learning clues that provide

historical or factual information; and

letter clues where the questers collect

letters that eventually spell a message

on where to find the hidden box.

Most quests take about 45 minutes to

complete.

Once adventurers find the hidden box,

they can sign a logbook and stamp their

quest book to prove they made it to the

end. Those who complete 10 or more

quests are eligible to receive an Oregon

Coast Quests embroidered patch.

There are 27 active quests in seven

Oregon counties, with 11 of those in

BY SUSAN SCHUYTEMA | PHOTOS SUSAN SCHUYTEMA

40


Lincoln County. Each quest is unique

in content, with some focused on

nature while others have an emphasis

on history or architecture.

An informational tsunami quest based

out of the Hatfield Marine Science

Center is not only educational, but

practical. “It is fun with family while

talking and learning about a scary

topic,” said Goodwin. “It’s like having a

fire drill. We think we know something

but haven’t practiced it. This allows

you to think about things ahead of

time and that starts a conversation. It’s

empowering.”

There is also a historic cemetery quest

in Lincoln County. “People have

preconceived notions about cemeteries,”

said Goodwin. “And people don’t

usually recreate there. But there is so

much to learn about math and history.

And it has incredible views and plants.”

Avery Chandler, an area seventh grader,

has participated in all Lincoln County

quests and said he loves each one of

them. “They are all so fun, but there

are four that really stand out to me,”

Chandler said. “I like the South Beach

quest and the HMSC quest because you

get to explore different habitats, and

you learn a lot about the ecosystem.” He

also counts the Eureka Cemetery quest

and the Bayfront quest as favorites.

Chandler said participants learn all

kinds of facts about the history of the

place where the quest is. “In the Eureka

Cemetery quest, you get to visit Sam

Case’s grave and get to learn about all

of the amazing things he did, including

building Sam Case Elementary School,”

he explained. “Also, you usually get to

hike and walk in some really cool areas.”

About 1,000 people participate in

Oregon quests each year. Chandler

said anyone who might be hesitant

about trying a quest should just try

one. “I don’t know any single person

that has done a quest and not enjoyed

it,” Chandler said. “They are fun, take

an hour at most, and you learn a lot.

And start off doing a simple one, like

the HMSC Nature Trail quest. It’s fun,

short and sweet.”

Goodwin suggests that anyone setting

out on a quest check their website at

seagrant.oregonstate.edu/education/

quests for the latest information. “We

have volunteers up and down the coast

which is super helpful,” said Goodwin.

“If there is something that we can’t

correct immediately, such as a sidewalk

repair, that will be noted online.”

The maps and directions needed to

go on a quest are found in the Oregon

Coast Quest guidebook, available at

bookstores around the region. The

newest guidebook costs $10 and has

directions for all 27 hunts. The list

of retailers can also be found on their

website.

The introduction to the quest guidebook

includes the approximate time of

the journey, the approximate time to

complete, the terrain, accessibility,

whether there are any parking fees and

whether you can bring a dog.

Chandler’s mother, Leigh Chandler,

said the quests are a wonderful way to

spend an afternoon. “Every time I have

done one, I see a new place or learn

something new about my community,”

she said. “We always have fun together

too, laughing and discussing the

challenges, trying to find our way.

It’s like an escape room, but free and

outdoors. I just wish there were more!”

For more information about quests

or to see the latest updates on specific

quests, go to seagrant.oregonstate.edu/

education/quests or contact Goodwin

at 541-961-0968.


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impact of Oregon Sea

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walks of life.

Oregon Sea Grant (OSG), a marine

science program based at Oregon State

University (OSU), officially turns 50 on

Sept. 17. On that date in 1971, OSU was

designated a Sea Grant college. Today,

OSG is one of 34 Sea Grant programs

in the U.S. under the National Oceanic

and Atmospheric Administration. OSG

funds research, outreach, scholarships

and K-12 education, as well as manages

and staffs the public education wing of

the Hatfield Marine Science Center in

Newport.

“If you care about ocean resources,

then you are connected to Oregon Sea

Grant,” said Charlie Plybon, member

of Oregon Sea Grant’s stakeholder

advisory council. “It’s about informed

management about all we love on the

coast. We don’t need to understand

all the science, but we can enjoy and

appreciate it.”

Plybon said OSG connects policy with

real people and makes a huge impact

in the lives of everyday citizens. “OSG

helps fishermen be safer and more

effective on the water.” Those efforts

have a trickle-down effect on the

community and consumers.

Salmon is one of the many areas of

focus for OSG. With Pacific salmon

on the decline, scientists in the 1970s

and 1980s studied their reproduction,

distribution, predators and viral and

parasitic diseases. In the late 1990s,

OSG began funding nearly a decade of

research in the Salmon River Estuary

that pioneered concepts for evaluating

(Above left) Charlie Plybon, the Oregon policy manager for the Surfrider Foundation, facilitates a

panel on coastal livability during Oregon Sea Grant’s 2019 State of the Coast conference in Gleneden

Beach (Above right) Sea Grant Extension has worked with the U.S. Coast Guard to introduce and train

commercial fishermen in seagoing safety and survival gear. (Courtesy photos)


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how salmon respond to restored

wetlands. In 2004 and 2005, they

published reports on how tide gates

affect salmon and other fish, and in

2006, they co-sponsored a symposium

on the topic. After restrictions were

imposed on salmon fishing off Oregon

and California in 2006 to protect

Klamath River chinook, OSG teamed

up with Oregon fishermen to collect

genetic samples from salmon in the

ocean to determine their river of origin.

Jeri Bartholomew, department head of

microbiology at OSU, began studying

salmon parasites in the 1980s with

funding from OSG. Though most of

the funding for that ongoing research

now comes from other sources,

Bartholomew said it laid the foundation

for ongoing partnerships.

Oregon Sea Grant funding helped

us dive into basic research,” said

Bartholomew. “We now collaborate

with scientists in Israel and other

areas. Our goal is to make it possible

that salmon are plentiful enough to be

harvested, which support our fishing

economies.”

Fostering the next generation of

natural resource managers, scientists

and environmental stewards by

administering paid internships and

fellowships is another focus of OSG.

Since 1980, they have helped place

more than 60 early-career professionals

from Oregon universities in federal

offices in Washington, D.C. In 2017,

OSG began partnering with Oregon’s

Department of Environmental Quality

on an internship program that has

placed more than three dozen interns

with about 30 Oregon businesses to

help the companies reduce waste and

energy use.

OSG director Shelby Walker said

recent graduates from the scholarship

program work with industries for a

mutual benefit. “They work with such

businesses as Pacific Seafood and

Boeing, for example, in areas such

as pollution reduction and energy

efficiency. It is impactful.”

Walker said OSG supplies the research

to help communities make better

decisions. “We need to be informed

by science and about what our coastal

communities can look like when we

are informed by science to navigate an

uncertain future. It’s heartening to see

OSG’s impact.”

The extension-based agents are another

critical component to OSG, explained

(Above) Bob Jacobson, right, Oregon’s first marine extension agent, meets with fishermen early in his long

career. The Oregon Sea Grant program celebrates its 50th anniversary this month. (Courtesy photo)


Walker. “The extension

agents work directly with

people in the community

and are the faces many

people see first.”

Bob Jacobson, retired

marine extension specialist

with Oregon Sea Grant,

was the very first employee

of OSG back in 1971.

“Basically, what they told me

when they hired me was that

you are an agricultural agent

in hip boots,” said Jacobson

in an oral history from 2008.

He spent the first six months

on the job talking with

fishermen about their needs.

“One of the things that was

very obvious was that there was

very little communication,

if any, between members

of the commercial fishing

industry and those people

who regulated them — the

National Marine Fisheries

Service at the federal level

and the old Oregon Fish

Commission employees from

the state level,” Jacobson said.

He organized face-to-face

meetings with fishermen and

regulators to open the lines

of communication. “Those

were very, very successful in

getting those two groups a

little closer together,” he said.

Jacobson was also

instrumental in vessel and

fishermen safety. In the mid-

70s, he ordered, financed,

and sold hundreds of survival

suits. “Survival suits were

basically big cumbersome

oversized neoprene suits

that you climbed into with

a zipper that came up the

front all the way to your

BY SUSAN SCHUYTEMA

chin that were waterproof,”

he explained. “And if you

ever had to ditch at sea, you

could get into these survival

suits and the theory was that

it would protect you from

the cold water and would

improve your chances for

survival over a longer period

of time.”

Survival suits are now

required on all vessels, as

are life rafts. “The Fishing

Vessel Safety Act put in

motion a safety program for

fishing vessels that was long

overdue, first of all, and it’s

been very, very effective in

reducing vessel and crewmen

casualties,” said Jacobson.

Marine education,

preparation for natural

disasters, wave energy,

support for fisheries and

marine debris research have

been other highlights of OSG

efforts in the past 50 years.

Looking toward the future,

Walker said OSG research

will continue to explore

the impacts of climate

change. “From coastal

storm frequency, to erosion,

to ocean temperatures

impacting fish and the fishing

industry, it is a challenging,

dynamic and complicated

thing. But it is our duty to

provide the scientific data

so industries can make

informed decisions.”

Oregon Sea Grant is

funded by federal and state

appropriations, as well as

project-specific contributions

from local governments and

industry.

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"MOON JELLY"

As I was taking this photo at a small gathering in the

one of the backrooms of the Oregon Coast Aquarium,

I heard one of the aguarium's staff explain

how special these organisims reflect light. Every

time I have seen them previously they have been

translusent white color. Three mins after that conversation

someone by the door moved and the light

hit this jelly perfectly. I just happen to be shooting at

that time it only lasted about 25 pictures, which is

about 5 seconds.

PHOTO BY JEREMY BURKE


49


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Thank you for reading our magazine.

Photo by Jeremy Burke


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