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OCTOBER 7, 2021 • VOL. 60, NO. 40

SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1957

16 PAGES • ONE DOLLAR

School Committee weighing

MCAS and COVID test results

By AllyshA DunnigAn

The city’s School Committee presented

its 2021 MCAS results during

a meeting last week, highlighting the

hard work from both teachers and students

during the pandemic.

Superintendent of Schools Dr. Josh

Vadala said the district is looking at the

results as a diagnostic tool and an opportunity

to see where the kids are with

their learning.

Assistant Superintendent of Schools

Dr. Kelly Chase presented the results

in slides provided by the commonwealth’s

Department of Secondary

Education (DESE), which she said

identifies some of the gaps that exist as

well as areas of strength.

With the MCAS being canceled in

2020 because of the pandemic, the data

SCHOOL COMMITTEE, PAGE 2

Marathoners running to raise funds

for the benefit of city foundation

By Anne MArie ToBin

When the 125th Boston Marathon

kicks into gear on Monday, Oct. 11, two

runners will be running to raise money

for the Peabody-based Progeria Research

Foundation (PRF).

Longtime PRF supporters Paul

Michienzie of Foxboro and Bryan

Dempsey of Miami, Fla. represent the

foundation’s first official entries as a

charity partner of John Hancock.

PRF President and Executive Director

Audrey Gordon said she cannot wait to

FILE PHOTO

Peabody High School students only saw a one percent drop in MCAS testing

scores from 2019 to 2021.

cheer the duo on to the finish line, 26.2

miles from the race’s traditional start in

Hopkinton.

“We’re so thrilled to have two highly-coveted

John Hancock charity entries

this year,” she said. “And to have Paul

and Bryan running their hearts out on behalf

of the children and young adults with

Progeria. Go Team PRF!”

Progeria is an extremely rare and fatal

rapid-aging disease that strikes down children

and young adults in their teens, usually

by heart disease or strokes more commonly

found in the elderly population.

Gordon said that PRF had identified 195

children with progeria, which represents

about half the children who have the disease

worldwide.

PRF was started in 1999 by Gordon,

her sister Dr. Leslie Gordon, and Gordon’s

husband, Dr. Scott Berns, a year after their

son Sam was diagnosed with progeria at 2

years old. He died in 2014 at age 17.

In November 2020, 13 years of research

— which included four PRF-coordinated

clinical trials culminated with FDA

MARATHON, PAGE 2

INSIDE

Page 3:

City’s Jewish history

subject of lecture

Police Academy,

Peabody-style

Page 9:

Peabody struggles on both

sides in loss to Marblehead

Breast Cancer

Awareness section

Pages 5-7

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School Committee weighing

MCAS and COVID test results

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 OCTOBER 7, 2021

SCHOOL COMMITTEE

From page 1

was primarily compared to that

of 2019.

In 2019, 39 percent of fifthgrade

students were meeting

expectations for the English/

Language Arts (ELA) MCAS,

compared to 36 percent in 2021,

which Chase said is not a huge

difference.

“A lot of this shows credit

for our teachers,” Chase said.

“Teachers really do matter,

and I think this shows how important

they are. When our kids

are in front of our teachers, we

get them where they need to

be.”

In the results for grade-eight

ELA, 25 percent of students

were meeting expectations in

2021, compared to 42 percent

in 2019.

In regards to next steps going

forward, Chase said they will

dig into what the questions look

like, where the students did

well, what types of questions

students missed the mark on,

and where to go from there.

They will also look into subgroups

of students, which Chase

said will include researching if

certain groups of students did

better than others and how to

mitigate those gaps.

For grade 10 ELA, 46 percent

of students were meeting expectations

in 2021, compared to

47 percent in 2019.

In terms of exceeding expectations

in ELA, 12 percent of

10th-grade students saw qualifying

scores in 2021, compared

to 5 percent in 2019.

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“That goes along with… our

kids really holding up the progress

that they had before the

pandemic,” Chase said.

With these results, Chase said

they will dig into the root of why

older students can maintain an

upward trend in MCAS scores;

she also mentioned the fact that

the older students may be able

to work better with technology.

For the math MCAS results,

Chase said this is where the

work they are currently doing

with teachers really starts to

matter, as there are significant

drops in scores across the board.

Grade three math scores saw

22 percent meeting expectations

in 2021, compared to 32

percent in 2019.

The 2021 MCAS math scores

also saw 33 percent of third

graders not meeting expectations,

compared to 14 percent

in 2019.

Chase said this drop may have

to do with the younger students

having more difficulty using

computers and technology and

doing things independently.

In fifth-grade math results,

26 percent of students were

meeting expectations in 2021,

compared to 36 percent in 2019,

while eighth-grade math scores

in 2021 saw 25 percent of students

meeting expectations,

compared to 36 percent in 2019.

“It’s kids at all levels and all

grades that need to have this addressed,”

Chase said. “The data

shows us that there is a lot to be

done but there’s also a lot to be

celebrated.”

Some action steps are already

in place to accelerate learning

and mitigate gaps, including

schoolwide improvement plans

formed from the data, common

assessments, and professional

development to address the

needs of all students.

Moving forward in the pandemic,

Peabody schools have

implemented testing programs

that are run through CIC health.

Vadala said this program,

which is for those who are unvaccinated

or in close contact

with someone who tested positive,

began two weeks ago and

saw more than 150 students participate

in the first week.

“This is really designed

to keep students and staff in

school that would typically be

required to be quarantined at

home,” Vadala said.

This “test and stay” program

is also available over

the weekend, so students can

participate in extracurricular

activities.

“I can’t say enough about our

health department here and our

school nurses and our health director.

They’ve done a great job

organizing this,” Vadala said.

Peabody schools also began

diagnostic testing last week,

where students with minimal

symptoms can get tested in

the nurse’s office and stay in

school. If a student has multiple

or significant symptoms,

then they are not able to stay in

school.

“Both of these programs,

we’re very excited about (being

able to) keep kids in school and

get them access to their extracurricular

and academic programs,”

Vadala said.

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FILE PHOTO

Audrey Gordon is the co-founder of the Progeria Research

Foundation, a Peabody-based organization funding research

into the extremely rare and incurable disease that causes accelerated

aging in kids and young adults.

Marathoners running

to raise money

for city foundation

MARATHON

From page 1

approval of Zokinvy (lonafarnib),

the first-ever treatment for progeria

— opened the door for children

and young adults to get the drug

by prescription instead of by clinical

trials. The drug adds two and a

half years to the life expectancy for

someone who has been diagnosed.

Without treatment, the average life

expectancy is only 14.5 years.

“We’ve learned that now, instead

of talking about children

with progeria, we are now talking

about young adults as they are

living longer,” Gordon said.

This year will be Michienzie’s

first time running the marathon

live through the streets of Boston

and the seven other communities

that make up the official race

course, though the runner did participate

virtually in 2020.

“Watching so many people from

myriad walks of life and various

levels of health cross the finish line

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each year, and feeling the energy,

passion and pride of the people of

the city of Boston cheering on the

runners has provided additional

motivation,” Michienzie said.

“Out of tragedy, triumph. Out of

hatred, love. Out of fear, courage.

Love is the key ingredient, and triumph

through the clear mission of

PRF.”

Like Dempsey, this is

Michienzie’s first time running the

marathon in person. His training

has included the challenging

Spartan Beast obstacle course.

“I’m running in memory of Sam

Berns and for every child who is

coping with progeria to help find a

cure,” Michienzie said. “I’m also

doing it because I’m inspired by

the strength, compassion and hard

work (that) Drs. Leslie Gordon

and Scott Berns exhibit each and

every day on behalf of these wonderful

kids.”

Both runners are hoping to raise

$10,000 each and are more than

halfway to their goals.

We want to hear

from you!

Send us a letter at

editor@weeklynews.net.

Letters should be no more

than 300 words.


OCTOBER 7, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 3

By AlenA KuzuB

America’s

Oldest

Founded 1818

203 years in 2021

ANDREW

MARSHALL

SUNDAY, OCT. 10

2PM & 7PM

GRANDSTAND

FrEe

CoNcErTs

WiTh FaIr

AdMiSsIoN

Friday October 1 _ Monday October 11, 2021

City’s Jewish history

subject of lecture

Looking for

past issues?

Find them on

weeklynews.net

The city’s Historical Society

and Museum is hosting its last

program of the year on Wednesday,

Oct. 13, and will be dedicated

to the Jewish history of

Peabody.

The event, which will host

local historian and lecturer Alan

Pierce, will take place in person

on Oct. 13 at 1 p.m. at the Smith

Barn, located at 38 Felton St.

Alan Pierce (PVMHS Class

of 1975) is an attorney and the

president of the Jewish Heritage

Center of the North Shore when

not moonlighting as a lecturer.

He is also the author and co-author

of books, including “A History

of Boston’s Jewish North

Shore,” published in 2009. The

book details rich stories of Jewish

immigrants to the North

shore, who were forced to flee

Europe due to pogroms over 100

years ago. Many of them found

work in tanneries in Peabody

and shoe factories in Lynn. Others

established their own businesses

― butcher shops, grocery

stores, newspapers, etc. ― in

Salem and Beverly.

“I am delighted to have Mr.

Pierce as a speaker to delve into

this important part of Peabody’s

history,” said Nora Bigelow, assistant

curator at the Peabody

Historical Society and Museum.

About two years ago, Bigelow

received a research request

for information about Sephardi

Jews, or members of the Jewish

diaspora who settled on the

Mediterranean coast of Europe

and in North Africa. The request

piqued Bigelow’s historical interest.

While looking into the

facets of Jewish history in Peabody

on her own, Bigelow came

across Pierce.

“He wrote one of the definitive

guides of this local history,

so I reached out to him,” she

said.

Bigelow also said Pierce was

honored to receive the opportunity

to talk about his research.

The idea of the talk was also

well received by local synagogues,

as well as the city’s

Harriett and Ralph Kaplan Estates

assisted-living community,

said Bigelow.

Guests attending the lecture

will be able to learn about the

first-known Jewish settlers in

Peabody; growth of the Jewish

community at the turn of the

19th century, as well as during

and after World War II; contribution

of Jewish residents to

town’s business development;

prominent Jewish organizations

throughout the years; and state

of Peobody’s Jewish community

in modern day.

Seating will be socially distanced

and organizers are asking

everyone to wear masks.

Members of the historical society

can attend the event for free.

Non-members can buy tickets

for $5. Please, bring cash to pay

at the door.

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GRANDSTAND

Police Academy, Peabody-style

By Anne MArie ToBin

FILE PHOTO | SPENSER HASAK

Peabody Police Chief Thomas Griffin credits the city’s

SafeHome.org ranking as third-safest community in

Massachusetts to community policing initiatives.

The Peabody Police Department

is offering a new fall session

of Citizen's Academy, a popular

program that offers people a

chance to learn firsthand about the

important work that police officers

do every day.

“The Citizens Academy allows

residents to become much more

familiar with the inner workings of

the Peabody Police Department,”

said Police Chief Thomas Griffin.

“Participants gain an entirely different

perspective into the community

in which they live when

they learn to see things through

the eyes of a police officer.”

The 10-week program will

be held at police department

headquarters, 6 Allens Lane, on

Wednesdays from 6-8 p.m. from

Oct. 20 through Dec. 22. The application

deadline is Monday, Oct.

11. Seats are limited and will be

filled in the order that applications

are received.

The academy offers community

members a unique opportunity

to get an insider’s view of the daily

duties of not only police officers,

but other key department staff including

dispatchers, clerical staff,

and others who work within the

police department.

Several topics will be covered,

including, but not limited

to, police reform, terrorism, the

legal process, motor-vehicle law,

patrol procedures, domestic violence,

and investigations. The

program also includes a firearms

class at the department's indoor

firing range where students will

have the opportunity to shoot various

weapons and participate in a

simulated “Shoot/Don’t Shoot”

experience. Participants will also

participate in motor-vehicle stop

scenarios and take a tour of the

Middleton House of Corrections.

Academy instructors include

members of the Peabody Police

Department, the Essex County

District Attorney’s office, and the

Massachusetts State Police. All

instructors are well versed in their

subject matter, and they strongly

encourage class participation.

“We hope and expect that participants

will graduate from the

Citizen’s Academy with a newfound

appreciation for what we as

police officers do,” said Captain

Scott Richards, who is spearheading

the program. “Participants will

finish with a good deal of firsthand

knowledge of how the Department

operates. It will be a real

eye-opener.

"It's a wonderful program," he

added. "We feel we have a great

department and this is one of the

best opportunities we have to be

able to shape the negative narrative

about police into something

positive by getting this information

to our citizens."

For more information about

the program, call Richards at 978-

538-6359.

Applications are available at

the police station at 6 Allens Lane.

Applications can also be downloaded

from the department's

website, www.peabodypolice.org.

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WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 OCTOBER 7, 2021

Police Log

MONDAY 9/27

Accidents

A report of a hit-and-run motor

vehicle crash at 6:43 p.m. Monday at

7 Goldberg Road.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 2:19

p.m. Monday at 51 Keys Drive. One

person was taken to Salem Hospital

after overdosing on prescription

pills.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 7:51

p.m. Monday at 19 Martha Terrace.

A caller reported her back yard and

pool were vandalized. Police reported

the $1,000 pool and two $20

20

flower pots were vandalized.

TUESDAY 9/28

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash at

12:51 p.m. Tuesday at 155 Andover

St. and 2 Loris Road; at 7:49 a.m.

Wednesday on Union Street.

A motor vehicle crash into the

front entrance of 286 Newbury St.

was reported at 1:50 p.m. Tuesday.

Overdose

An overdose was reported at 9:17

a.m. Tuesday at 286 Newbury St. A

woman was taken to Lahey Hospital.

A report of an overdose at 7:36

p.m. Tuesday at 61 Tracey St. The

person was taken to Salem Hospital.

PEABODY

WEEKLY NEWS

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Telephone: (978) 532-5880 • Fax: (978) 532-4250

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5, Lynn, MA 01903

News and Advertising Offices: 110 Munroe St., Lynn, MA 01901

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Local Subscription Rate: $20 per year (52 issues) • Single Copy: $1.00

Deadlines: News: Monday, noon; Display Ads: Monday, noon;

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No cancellations accepted after deadline.

The Peabody Weekly News is published 52 times per year on Thursday by Essex

Media Group, Inc. No issue is printed during the week of Christmas. The Peabody

Weekly News is delivered via US Mail to homes in Peabody. It is also available

in several locations throughout Peabody. The Peabody Weekly News will not be

responsible for typographical or other errors in advertisements, but will reprint that

part of an advertisement in which a typographical error occurs if notified immediately.

Advertisers must notify the Peabody Weekly News of any errors in advertisements

on the FIRST day of insertion. The publisher reserves the right to reject,

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Theft

A report of a larceny at 7:08 p.m.

Tuesday at 286 Newbury St. A person

walked into the station to report issues

with her contractor. Richard S.

Abramo, 49, of 13 Greenway Road,

Middleton, was issued a summons

for larceny over $1,200 by false

pretense.

WEDNESDAY 9/29

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 12:44 p.m. Wednesday at Macy’s

at 210M Andover St.; at 2:09 p.m.

Wednesday at American Red

Cross at 85 Lowell St.; at 3:03 p.m.

Wednesday at 136 Lowell St. and 2

King St.

A motorcycle crash into a car was

reported at 5:44 a.m. Wednesday at

Peabody Sunoco at 1 Lynn St. The

operator of the motorcycle was taken

to Salem Hospital; the motorcycle

operator was cited for marked lanes

violation and improper passing.

A report of a hit-and-run motor vehicle

crash at 8:46 p.m. Wednesday

at 21 Sutton St. and 3 Milk St.;

at 11:51 p.m. Wednesday at 25

Gardner St.

Assault

A report of an assault and battery

at 10:11 p.m. Wednesday at 20

Collins St. A caller reported an unknown

man, who appeared to be in

his 50s, approached him and his two

friends while they were out for a walk;

the man reportedly started swinging

at the caller and his friends. A fight

then broke out. Police transported

the juvenile back to his residence.

Complaints

A report of suspicious activity at

8:24 a.m. Wednesday at Lakeside

School at 629 Lowell St. The school

reported a crossbow through a tree.

Fire

A report of a vehicle on fire at 2:55

p.m. Wednesday at Welch School at

50 Swampscott Ave. Police reported

the vehicle fire was away from the

building. It was extinguished.

Theft

A report of a stolen lawn mower at

7:57 a.m. Wednesday at 686 Lowell

St.

THURSDAY 9/30

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash at

8:34 a.m. Thursday at Sullivan Tire &

Auto Service at 175 Washington St.;

at 11:48 a.m. Thursday at Peabody

City Garage at 50 Farm Ave.; at 3:51

p.m. Thursday at Tesla at 210T

Andover St.; at 7:01 p.m. Thursday

at Rainbow Adult Day Center at 210

Lowell St.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle

breaking and entering at 7:12 p.m.

Thursday at Macy’s at 210M Andover

St. No items were taken.

Theft

A report of stolen medication at

5:29 p.m. Thursday at Hampton Inn

at 59 Newbury St.

FRIDAY 10/01

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 8:46 a.m. Friday at Eastern Bank at

37 Foster St.; at 4:03 p.m. Friday at

Petco at 10 Sylvan St.; at 4:18 p.m.

Friday at 30 Andover St. and 1 Hilltop

Drive.

Complaints

A report of suspicious activity at

1:28 a.m. Friday at 13 Fulton St. A

911 caller reported someone was

breaking in, but hung up. On a call

back, the caller said the man was

outside of her apartment and had

been knocking on her window. Police

checked the area, but could not find

the man.

Fire

A report of a structure fire at 10:45

a.m. Friday at 30 Johnson St. An

officer reported someone threw an

item in a vinyl trash barrel, causing

smoke. A passing motorist used a

garden hose to put out the small fire.

SATURDAY 10/02

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 9:53 a.m. Saturday at 66 Aborn

St.; at 10:10 a.m. Saturday at 52

Warren St. and 70 Endicott St.; at

2:32 p.. Saturday at 6 Lynn St.

A car crashed into a sidewalk at

Town Variety, 116 Central St., at 1:06

a.m. Saturday. Police used forced

entry to get to the unresponsive

driver, who had suffered a diabetic

episode. The driver was taken to

Salem Hospital.

At 1:07 p.m. Saturday, a caller reported

a motor vehicle crashed into

a hydrant at Brooksby Farm at 54

Felton St. Police reported there was

no damage to the hydrant.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a breaking and entering

at 11:53 a.m. Saturday at 1

Maddabon Place. A caller reported

a bicycle was stolen from her shed.

Complaints

A report of suspicious activity at

7:34 a.m. Saturday at Marriott Hotel

at 8A Centennial Drive. A caller reported

someone was possibly defecating

in the parking lot. An officer

reported the suspect was gone upon

arrival; the officer said no one in the

area did the act.

A report of a neighborhood dispute

at 11:24 a.m. Saturday at 4

Balgreen Drive. A caller reported a

neighbor was mowing her lawn despite

being asked not to. Police reported

the issue has been resolved.

Suspicious activity was reported

at 8:11 p.m. Saturday at Double Bull

Taphouse at 210D Andover St. A 911

caller reported there was a man with

a gun on mall property. Police reported

the call appeared to be fraudulent;

mall security was notified and

it was determined that the call was

unfounded.

A report of an unwanted guest

at 8:21 p.m. Saturday at 7 Veterans

Memorial Drive. The person left prior

to police arrival. An officer applied for

a warrant for a possible breaking and

entering, but the temporary warrant

was denied by the on-call clerk. Yefry

Cardona, 29, of 101 Rantoul St., Apt.

108, Lynn, was issued a summons

for breaking and entering for a misdemeanor

and malicious destruction

of property under $1,200.

Overdose

A report of an overdose at 2:52

a.m. Saturday at 7310 Silverleaf

Way. The person was taken to Salem

Hospital.

Theft

A report of a larceny at 2:09 p.m.

Saturday at 54 Glen Drive. Stolen

jewelry was reported.

A theft of a cell phone was reported

at 8:43 p.m. Saturday at 19

Union St.

Vandalism

A report of vandalism at 8:23 p.m.

Saturday at Custom Yoga Creations

at 11 Elm St. A caller reported

the windows to her vehicle were

smashed. An officer reported the

rear passenger window was broken

overnight.

SUNDAY 10/03

Arrests

Andrew William Allard, 30, of 7

Nile St., Billerica, was arrested and

charged with shoplifting by asportation

and on three warrants at 8:17

p.m. Sunday.

Brandon Izaiah Baez, 19, of 4

Wakullah St., Boston, was arrested

and charged with shoplifting by asportation

and assault and battery at

7:01 p.m. Sunday.

Abigail Deyanira De La Cruz,

18, of 14 New Whitney St., Apt. 14,

Boston, was arrested and charged

with disorderly conduct at 7:01 p.m.

Sunday.

Areil Lugo Reyes, 40, of 4

Wakullah St., Boston, was arrested

and charged with two counts of assault

and battery with a dangerous

weapon and assault and battery at

7:01 p.m. Sunday.

Accidents

A report of a motor vehicle crash

at 6:49 p.m. Sunday at 62 Walnut St.

and 2 Paleologos St.; at 9:55 p.m.

Sunday on Lowell Street; at 8:13

a.m. Monday at 10 Centennial Drive.

Breaking and Entering

A report of a motor vehicle

breaking and entering at 8:21 a.m.

Sunday at 24 Elm St. An officer reported

there was no forced entry;

some loose change and a pill bottle

containing tylenol and ibuprofen

were taken from the vehicle. Jason J.

James, 38, of 7 Mcintire Court, Apt.

2, was issued a summons for motor

vehicle breaking and entering for a

misdemeanor.

Complaints

A report of suspicious activity at

9:21 a.m. Sunday at 26 Sunset Drive.

A caller reported seeing two men

walking with hunting rifles. Police

spoke with the two men and reported

they were carrying BB guns.

A fight involving a large group

of kids was reported at 7:01 p.m.

Sunday at Rizzo’s Roast Beef at 178

Lynn St. Three people from Boston

were arrested (see arrests).

Overdose

An overdose was reported at 3:59

p.m. Sunday at 111 Foster St. The

caller reported administering Narcan

to a person who had overdosed in a

car. Police, Fire and EMS checked the

area, but could not find the person.

Attempts to call back the caller went

straight to voicemail.

Theft

A larceny was reported at 8:38

a.m. Sunday at 25 Shamrock St. A

caller reported a package was stolen

from her doorstep. Jason J. James,

38, of 7 Mcintire Court, Apt. 2, was

issued a summons for larceny under

$1,200.

MONDAY 10/04

Breaking and Entering

A motor vehicle breaking and

entering was reported at 9:01 a.m.

Monday at 24 Elm St. An iPhone

watch and $15 in cash were taken

from an unlocked vehicle.


OCTOBER 7, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 5

Peabody Promotes Breast Cancer Awareness

1 in 8 women will face breast cancer

Early detection and screening saves lives.

City of Peabody • Edward A. Bettencourt, Jr., Mayor

Sponsored by the Ted Bettencourt Committee

Suggestions for breast health awareness

Editor’s note: This information

was provided by Salem

Hospital’s Breast Health Services

staff.

Wear a Mask, Wash your

Hands, Schedule a Mammogram.

When the COVID -19 pandemic

began in 2020, many

women were forced to cancel

important mammogram and

breast screening appointments.

It is now important to reschedule

those appointments and take

care of health needs. At Salem

Hospital, we offer state-of-theart

screening technology and

easy access to appointments to

help women stay healthy.

Your Role

Beginning at the age of 40,

women should schedule an annual

mammogram appointment.

A mammogram is the single

most effective method for detecting

breast cancer early.

Monthly self-breast exams

are also important. Women

should be familiar with how

their breasts normally look

and feel and should report any

changes to a health care provider

right away.

Our Role

We provide you with a full

spectrum of exceptional breast

health care and support in a

convenient and patient-focused

manner.

Salem Hospital offers 3-D

mammography, an advanced

technology that enables our

breast health experts to examine

changes in the breast that may

go unnoticed by other methods,

leading to better detection and

greater peace of mind.

If your mammogram detects

abnormalities, we’re here for

you. Most of these abnormalities

are non-cancerous, and our

physicians can provide additional

testing to learn more. We’ll

keep you informed every step of

the way and will work with you

to develop a personalized treatment

plan if needed.

Because a mammogram is

important to detecting breast

cancer, we’ve made it easy and

convenient for you to schedule

an appointment. We offer

mammography in six locations

throughout the North Shore,

many offering evening and

weekend hours.

With our safe care commitment,

you can visit our facilities

with confidence knowing that

our staff is doing everything possible

to keep you safe while receiving

this important care. This

includes staff vaccinated for

COVID-19, universal masking

for all staff and patients, social

distancing, rigorous cleaning

and increased safety protocols.

Mammography locations:

Salem Hospital, 81 Highland

Avenue, Salem

–– Salem Hospital Outpatient

Services, One Hutchinson

Drive, Danvers

–– Mass General/North Shore

Center for Outpatient Care, 104

Endicott Street, Danvers

–– Mass General Brigham

Healthcare Center, 480 Lynnfield

Street, Lynn

–– Lynn Community Health

Center, 269 Union Street, Lynn

–– North Shore Physicians

Group, 414 Haverhill Street,

Rowley

Support every step of the way

Salem Hospital collaborates

closely with the Breast Health

program at the Mass General/

North Shore Cancer Center in

Danvers to provide patients with

the most advanced care.

To support our patients who

may need additional imaging

or biopsy, we offer our Breast

Health Navigator service. Our

navigator is a radiology technologist

certified in breast health

navigation, who is here to make

your treatment experience easier.

Working as a liaison between

you and your physician, your

navigator will walk you through

your treatment options, provide

support during treatment and answer

any questions, so you feel

informed and in control throughout

your journey.

Women may have an increased

risk of developing breast

or other cancers based on personal

and family history and early

detection of this increased risk

can be life-saving.

Learn more about Salem Hospital’s

Breast Health services

by visiting our website, https://

nsmc.partners.org/breast_health

or to schedule a mammogram,

please call 978-573-4444.

MEET

Nancy Parshley,

CEO and Wig Enthusiast

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superpower–they make me feel confident, and I want you to feel the same way.

All donations and proceeds go to heapsofhope.org—an organization that provides

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6

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 OCTOBER 7, 2021

ELC fighting breast cancer for almost 30 years

(AP) The Estée Lauder

Companies (ELC) are coming

together to end breast cancer

for all as a company that has

put people, positive impact, and

inclusivity at the heart of everything

it does.

ELC’s call to help end breast

cancer is more urgent than ever,

as female breast cancer is now

the most commonly diagnosed

cancer worldwide — surpassing

lung cancer for the first time in

2020 — with an estimated 2.3

million new cases.

This sobering statistic has

only reaffirmed why The Estée

Lauder Companies’ Breast

Cancer Campaign’s (The Campaign)

mission remains unwavering

in uniting people to create

a breast cancer-free world.

A corporate leader in the

global breast cancer movement

since Evelyn H. Lauder co-created

the Pink Ribbon and started

The Campaign in 1992, The

Campaign now supports more

than 60 organizations around

the globe to raise funds, educate,

support, and bring us closer to a

world without breast cancer.

As the company’s largest

corporate social impact program,

The Campaign has raised

more than $99 million globally

for lifesaving research, education,

and medical services, with

more than $80 million funding

BERKSHIRE

HATHAWAY

HomeServices

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

321 medical research grants

through the Breast Cancer Research

Foundation (BCRF), the

highest-rated nonprofit breast

cancer organization in the U.S.

founded by Evelyn H. Lauder in

1993.

BCRF’s mission is to prevent

and cure breast cancer by

advancing the world’s most

promising research. The BCRF

research grants funded by The

Campaign span the entire continuum

of breast cancer research,

from studying the basic

biology of how healthy cells go

awry and become cancerous, to

developing new diagnostic tests

and treatments, to conducting

research to improve a patient’s

quality of life both during and

after treatment.

Although great strides have

been made against this disease

— breast cancer mortality rates

have decreased in the U.S. by

41 percent among women since

1989 because of earlier detection

and improved treatment 2

— the work is not yet done.

Breast cancer is a disease that

affects all, but not always equally.

The Campaign will continue

to address breast cancer disparities

that exist for minority and

other vulnerable groups through

funded research with BCRF

and various NGOs around the

world.

All of here at Bentwater Brewing Company

support those battling Breast Cancer"

180 Commercial St #18, Lynn bentwaterbrewing.com

Lori Kramich

Sales Associate

REALTOR®, CBR, SRES

Commonwealth Real Estate

26 Main Street

Lynnfield, MA 01940

Cell: 508-269-6317

lori.kramich@commonmoves.com

Lets discuss your home value and

how to properly go to market

A member of the franchise system BHHS Affiliates, LLC

Ronna Tuttle

REALTOR®

Cell: 978-821-0638

Direct: 978-717-9099

ronnatuttle@comcast.net

“As a beauty-inspired, values-driven

company, we strive

to make meaningful social investments

toward issues that

matter to our employees, customers,

and partners around the

world. Family values are and

have always been at the core of

The Estée Lauder Companies.

When my mother, Evelyn H.

Lauder, started The Estée Lauder

Companies’ Breast Cancer

Campaign and co-created the

Pink Ribbon, she had a vision of

a breast cancer-free world. The

Campaign remains unwavering

in its mission to help end breast

cancer,” said William P. Lauder,

Executive Chairman of The Estée

Lauder Companies Inc.

Breast cancer is not a disease

that has a single story. It

is as diverse and complex as

ELC’s global community and it

profoundly affects everyone it

touches — patients, loved ones,

doctors, caregivers, advocates,

and more.

This year’s creative features

layers of the Pink Ribbon, the

universally recognized symbol

for breast cancer. Shades of

pink, and different textures and

designs, intertwine to signify

the diversity of the disease, the

equity The Campaign hopes to

help achieve, and the unity in

support of the entire breast cancer

community worldwide.

The Campaign will take the

following actions aligned to its

mission:

–– Launch a new social media

call to action to encourage

engagement from supporters

worldwide to raise funds for

BCRF through the simple action

of grabbing your favorite

pink lipstick, drawing a ribbon,

sharing your story using the

hashtags #TimeToEndBreast-

Cancer and #ELCdonates and

tagging up to five people to participate.

–– For every public, in-feed

Instagram or Facebook post

during the month of October

featuring both #TimeToEnd-

BreastCancer and #ELCdonates

together, @esteelaudercompanies

will donate $25 to @bcrfcure

up to $150,000

–– Reinforce and build upon

The Estée Lauder Companies’

legacy of breast cancer funding

and furthering the company’s

commitment to Racial Equity.

–– The company and the

Lauder Family will invest $1

million over two years towards

research to help eliminate breast

cancer disparities. Through

grants with BCRF, two important

new initiatives will be supported.

–– Illuminate buildings,

monuments, and landmarks

worldwide in glowing pink

lights to raise awareness of

breast health, including the Empire

State Building, New York

City and the Eiffel Tower, Paris.

–– Mobilize employees

worldwide to positively impact

communities and unite in action

to support more than 60 breast

cancer organizations around the

world.

–– Convene world-class experts

to educate on the importance

of breast health.

–– Continue to produce and

distribute informative materials

and Pink Ribbons worldwide.

–– Drive donations to BCRF

through ELCompanies.com/

BreastCancerCampaign.

“My role as Global Ambassador

for The Breast Cancer

Campaign continues to be my

life’s most meaningful work. I

joined Evelyn to work on The

Campaign shortly after she started

it in the early 1990’s. Over

the years, I’ve seen the powerful

impact The Estée Lauder Companies

has had on the global

breast cancer community, including

groundbreaking progress

made through the research

The Campaign has funded to

advance science, treatments,

and care. We must carry on Evelyn’s

legacy and come together

in support of The Campaign and

help to find a cure for this disease,”

said Elizabeth Hurley, the

longstanding Global Ambassador

for The Campaign.

This year, 19 of The Estée

Lauder Companies’ brands will

support The Campaign’s mission:

AERIN, Aveda, Bobbi

Brown, Bumble and bumble,

Clinique, Darphin, DKNY, Donna

Karan, Dr. Jart+, Estée Lauder,

GLAMGLOW, Jo Malone

London, La Mer, Lab Series,

Michael Kors, Origins, Smashbox,

TOM FORD BEAUTY,

and Too Faced. Each will sell

Pink Ribbon Products or make

donations to BCRF and/or other

charitable organizations around

the world.

“The Estée Lauder Companies’

success is deeply rooted

in our core values and the positive

impact we have on our employees,

our communities and

the planet. The Breast Cancer

Campaign is an authentic cornerstone

of our commitments to

being a Beauty Inspired, Values

Driven company and we will

continue our work to drive positive

change for the breast cancer

community and beyond,” said

Fabrizio Freda, President and

Chief Executive Officer, The

Estée Lauder Companies Inc.

Through the collective efforts

of its employees, consumers,

and partners worldwide,

The Campaign remains at the

forefront of facilitating real

progress against this disease,

bringing it closer to its mission.

Together, with the dedication of

its global community, ELC can

help create a breast cancer-free

world for all.

To learn more about The Estée

Lauder Companies’ Breast

Cancer Campaign, visit EL-

Companies.com/BreastCancer-

Campaign.

The Estée Lauder Companies

Inc. is one of the world’s leading

manufacturers, marketers

and sellers of quality skin care,

makeup, fragrance and hair care

products. The company’s products

are sold in approximately

150 countries and territories.

We want to hear

from you!

Send us a letter at

editor@weeklynews.net.

Letters should be

no more than

300 words.


OCTOBER 7, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 7

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast cancer screening and treatment

progress disrupted by COVID-19 pandemic

DALLAS (AP) –– Susan

G. Komen, the world’s leading

breast cancer organization,

is warning that decades

of progress in lowering breast

cancer mortality rates may be

in jeopardy due to the ongoing

COVID-19 pandemic and

called for a united response to

help save lives during this year’s

National Breast Cancer Awareness

month.

Komen noted that in response

to the growing need for

financial support and overcoming

barriers to care, the organization

has increased its focus

on providing care and support

directly through its Patient Care

Services Center, the demand for

which has more than doubled

over the past year.

“Facing a breast cancer diagnosis

is difficult in the best

of times, but more so during the

uncertainty of a pandemic,” said

Paula Schneider, a breast cancer

survivor and Komen’s CEO.

“More people than ever are

encountering challenges in accessing

and continuing needed

care. Many have lost their jobs,

health insurance and are facing

new financial challenges. The

pandemic has also highlighted

persistent and tragic racial disparities,

like the startling reality

that Black women in the U.S.

are about 40 percent more likely

to die from breast cancer than

white women. Our support is

needed now, more than ever. Yet

meeting those needs will only

be possible thanks to the generosity

and passion of our donors

and fundraisers.”

Komen noted that there are

many ways that people can

help support Komen’s advocacy,

research and patient care

programs, from fundraising

through one of the organization’s

local Race for the Cure

or MORE THAN PINK Walk

events, supporting someone

walking in the Komen 3-Day,

60-mile walk, supporting one of

Komen’s LIVE Pink partners, or

by doing a personal fundraiser

that is meaningful to you, such

as hosting a Dress Up to Take

Down Breast Cancer educational

session or fundraiser at work.

The need for support is

clear and growing more urgent

by the day. Komen noted that

while progress has been made

in lowering mortality rates from

breast cancer by 41 percent in

the U.S. since 1989 thanks to

more than three decades of increased

access to early detection

and more effective treatments,

the trajectory of that progress is

now in jeopardy due to COVID-

19’s lingering impact on breast

health care.

Without a renewed focus on

early detection and efforts to

maintain people in the continuum

of care, as well as investments

in improved treatments,

we are likely to see more people

die from the disease. Even

without taking the impact of

COVID-19 on screening and

treatment into account, more

than 44,000 people are expected

to die this year from breast

cancer in the U.S. alone. Now,

due to the pandemic, which has

caused people to become hesitant

to get screened or see a doctor,

suddenly become uninsured

or face new financial challenges,

people are facing new delays








and barriers to care that are likely

to have tragic consequences.

–– Initial reports from the

National Cancer Institute in

2020 suggested there could be

an excess of 10,000 deaths due

to breast and colorectal cancer

by 2030 due to the pandemic.

–– A newer model in July

2021, suggests about 2,500 excess

deaths from breast cancer

by 2030 are expected to occur

due to reduced screening, delays

in diagnosis and decreased chemotherapy

use among women

with estrogen receptor positive

early breast cancer.

–– While screening rates are

rebounding from the pandemic

lows, we are still catching up for

many people who should have

already been screened and diagnosed.

This may lead to a surge

of new breast cancers, with later

stage diagnoses and increased

mortality.

–– While healthcare systems

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support for those facing breast

cancer today, Komen has developed

a new national Patient

Care Center to help people overcome

barriers to care, no matter

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These services include a free

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Have a story to share?

Need a question answered?

contactus@essexmedia.group


8

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 OCTOBER 7, 2021

John Robert Mitchell, 71

1950 - 2021

A banner day for

LYNNFIELD - John Robert Mitchell,

age 71, of Lynnfield, formerly of

Chelsea, died Saturday, October 2

at his residence.

Born in Chelsea on July 6, 1950

he was the son of the late James

Donald and Marion Viola (Spracklin)

Mitchell.

John was raised in Chelsea and

was a graduate of Chelsea High

School. He went on to graduate

from the former Grahm Junior College

of Boston and to attend Boston

University. John had worked

in media, first with NBC in New

York City, then he spent time with

WEEI and WXKS-AM of Boston

until 1994 when he went out on

his own and build the now CAM

Media, which continues to this day.

In his younger years, John was an

avid skier and played softball and

hockey – most recently he had gotten

into cycling. John was a very

philanthropic man and was dedicated

to several causes, most importantly,

the Pan-Mass Challenge,

Bike MS (National MS Society,)

Best Buddies, Salvation Army, ALS

ONE, and Communitas of Wakefield

(formerly EMARC).

He was the beloved husband

of Lauren (Cantalupa) Mitchell.

He was the loving father of Cara

A. Mitchell of Merrimac, MA and

Megan E. Mitchell and her partner

Chris Eriksen of Eagle Bridge,

NY. He was the brother of James

Mitchell and his wife Ethelyn of

Revere, Nancy Belanger and her

husband Daniel of Charlton, MA

and the late Jean V. Montesano

and her surviving husband Vincent

of Revere, and the late Joan Mitchell.

He is also survived by many

nieces and nephews as well as his

beloved dogs Gavin and Maggie.

Service Information: His Funeral

Service will be held in the

Centre Congregational Church,

5 Summer St., Lynnfield on Saturday,

Oct 9 at 10am. Visitation

for relatives and friends at the

McDonald Funeral Home, 19

Yale Ave., Wakefield on Friday,

Oct 8 from 4-7pm.

In keeping with John’s philanthropic

spirt, the family asks for

contributions to be made to the

charity of one’s choice.

BY ANNE MARIE TOBIN

While rumors have been

circulating for six months that

Christianbook on Summit Street

would be sold, employees were

given the good news on Tuesday

that the company has taken on a

new employer, which will keep

the store open.

Before Tuesday’s announcement,

many employees had been

left wondering about their futures

if the giant book and online

retailer fell into new ownership.

Now it appears that they will

be staying right where they are,

after learning the company is not

being sold. Christianbook is taking

on the Boston-based private

equity firm Nonantum Capital

Partners as a partner.

“It’s not the blockbuster news

we thought it would be, but it’s

better than anything we could

have hoped for, and we are elated,”

said Christianbook CEO

and President Ray Hendrickson.

“I spoke to our employees (Tuesday)

and they are absolutely

Christianbook

thrilled. The feedback we have

been getting already is overwhelmingly

positive. None of

us ever pictured this happening.

It’s the best possible outcome: a

win-win for everybody.”

Hendrickson said he will stay

on as president and CEO, but

will eventually move into a new

role on the board of directors.

“This will allow me to step

back from my current role, but

we still own the company together,”

he said. “The great thing

is there will be no change in the

way we conduct business going

forward except for those things

we need to do to grow the business

even forward. We will stay

in place as we still have 14-plus

years left on our lease, so we aren’t

going anywhere. Our entire

management team is unchanged

and we hope to have more job

opportunities.”

Hendrickson said Nonantum’s

vision for the future is in

sync with that of Christianbook.

“They and their president,

Jon Biotti, see the world the

same way we do and we share

the same values: integrity with

a high degree of confidence,” he

said.

According to Hendrickson,

Christianbook will benefit in

other areas, including development

of key strategic direction

learned from Nonantum’s extensive

experience in the e-commerce

catalog industry.

“We will be able to share

notes and best practices,” Hendrickson

said. “They have industry

veterans that will serve on future

boards to help identify and

develop new areas of growth.

“Honestly, six months ago

when we started our dialogue

with Nonantum, people were

afraid they were going to lose

their jobs if a new owner came

in. Nobody could have imagined

this. I think Tuesday was an incredible

day to be able to see our

entire staff have such a wonderful

day. It’s just an amazing feeling,”

he said.

STUDENT OF

THE WEEK

Meet Peabody’s

Project

351 Ambassadors

BY HANNAH CHADWICK

Eighth graders Angela Fabbo

and Luke Maglione both said

that it was an incredible honor

to be selected as ambassadors

representing Higgins Middle

School in a statewide nonprofit

initiative known as Project 351.

“It’s great knowing others

value you,” Luke said.

Angela agreed, adding that

she was “proud to see people realize

our hard work.”

Project 351 is a youth-led

service corp that encourages

student ambassadors across the

commonwealth to lead volunteer

projects in their home communities.

The ambassadors who are

chosen exemplify the project’s

values of kindness, compassion,

humility, and gratitude.

Angela said that the first big

project they do each year is a

food drive right after Thanksgiving.

Luke said that it’s to help

restock the shelves of Haven for

Hunger.

Angela said she hopes to

make it a friendly competition

between homerooms at Higgins.

“We can have themed days,

like Macaroni Mondays, where

students bring in all the nonperishable

stuff to make mac and

cheese,” Angela said, adding

that the school could throw a

party for the winners.

The second major donation

drive is a town-wide clothing

drive. Luke said that he was really

excited for that project.

“There’s always so many

donations every year for it,” he

said. Angela added that they’ll

get to visit all the schools in Peabody

to raise awareness about

the drive and to collect the donated

clothing.

On top of being honored for

being selected as this year’s ambassadors,

Angela and Luke said

that it’s even more special that

they were selected together.

“We’ve been friends since we

were seven,” Angela said, adding

that their older brothers were

close friends, which led to them

forming a friendship.

Angela is on the Principal’s

List at Higgins. She also loves

playing ice hockey and lacrosse

in her free time. She said that

she loves living in Peabody and

is excited to see what the new

school year will bring.

Luke has a 4.0 grade point

average, and is an avid athlete.

This year, he is the captain of

his football team. He said that

he is excited to play after having

to take last year off due to

COVID-19.

Both students said that they

Luke Maglione, left, and Angela Fabbo were named ambassadors

for Project 351, a youth-led nonprofit initiative in

Massachussetts.

were very excited to get started

planning their Project 351 donation

drives and to act as role

models for other students.

“It’s so cool!” Luke said.

Angela agreed, adding that,

“Everyone is looking up to you.

It’s a really big deal.”

Have a story to share?

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 9

Sports

PHOTO | JAKOB MENENDEZ

Peabody’s Jovante Dailey, right, is tackled by Marblehead’s Andy Palmer during a game at

Coley Lee Field Friday night.

Peabody struggles on both

sides in loss to Marblehead

FOOTBALL

By Sam Minton

PEABODY — The

Marblehead Magicians might

have defeated Peabody 35-14,

but head coach Jim Rudloff

was not happy with his team’s

performance.

“We didn’t have a great week

of practice and to be honest

with you we made a lot of dumb

mistakes,” he said after the

game. “I did a poor job on the

sidelines. For us, it was kind

of a mess on the sidelines. We

did a couple of good things that

obviously worked pretty well

but it was just pretty sloppy

for where we want to be in the

season right now.”

The Tanners couldn’t have

had a worse start on offense

as they went three and out and

the Magicians didn’t waste

time taking advantage, capping

a just over two-minute

drive with senior quarterback

Joshua Robertson connecting

with senior James Doody for a

43-yard touchdown pass to give

Marblehead a 7-0 lead with

8:23 left in the first quarter.

The mistakes continued for

the Tanners as a fumbled snap

on the third play of the following

drive with just under

seven minutes left turned into a

Robertson QB sneak from four

yards out just over a minute later

to make it 14-0. Peabody’s offense

continued to struggle and

went three and out; Robertson

threw another dime, this time

for 25 yards to Zander Danforth

in the endzone to increase their

lead to 21-0 with two minutes

left in the first quarter.

Peabody’s poor play followed

it into the second quarter

as Marblehead started with the

ball into the red zone; with 9:28

left in the first half, Marblehead

once again found the end zone,

this time courtesy of a threeyard

rush from George Percy

with 9:28 left in the half.

Head coach Mark Bettencourt

said that his team made too

many mistakes on Friday night.

“We have too many turnovers,”

he said. “The last few

games we have been putting the

ball on the rug. We are trying

to sustain drives and we are

shooting ourselves in the foot

by giving them the ball back.”

The Tanners found some

success handing the ball off to

sophomore Alexander Silva,

who was able to gain some yards

on the ground; but he would

eventually fumble with 4:31

left in the second quarter, which

seemed to doom Peabody to

give up yet another touchdown.

However, the Tanner defense

came up with their first stop and

had 1:37 to drive 70 yards down

the field.

And that’s exactly what they

did with the drive culminating

with Peabody quarterback

Shea Lynch throwing a 22-

yard touchdown pass to junior

Jovante Dailey as the clock hit

zero to make it a 27-7 game entering

the half.

Marblehead drove down

the field, getting all the way

to Peabody’s 30-yard line, but

Robertson was picked off, with

Dailey making a great snag to

save the Tanners from giving up

another touchdown.

Peabody started with the ball

on its own 42-yard line with

9:51 left in the third quarter and

it once again found success as

Lynch would end up throwing

a 47-yard touchdown pass to

Eli Batista to make it a 27-14

game with 8:30 left in the third

quarter.

The Tanners defense once

again answered the bell, forcing

Marblehead to put on the ensuing

drive, but their momentum

would come crashing

down when they fumbled the

ball on a reverse with four minutes

left in the third. Percy then

got his second rush of the day as

Marblehead coasted to a 35-14

victory.

Peabody is now 1-4 this

season as they prepare to face

Swampscott Friday.

FILE PHOTO

Bishop Fenwick quarterback Steven Woods rushed for a touchdown

and threw for two more in a loss to St. Mary’s Friday.

Fenwick falls to

St. Mary’s in

overtime thriller

FOOTBALL

By Mike Alongi

The St. Mary’s football team

needed overtime to pull out

the win over Catholic Central

League rival Bishop Fenwick,

taking the Crusaders down

21-19 in extra time on the road

at Donaldson Stadium.

Derek Coulanges had a big

game on the ground for the

Spartans with two rushing

By Mike Alongi

On Thursday afternoon, the

Northeastern Conference principals

accepted the recommendations

of the NEC athletic directors

and voted unanimously

to rename the NEC athletic

divisions.

The North Division has been

renamed the Dunn Division

after Cornelius Dunn, who was

the founder and first president

of the NEC ― which started in

1932.

touchdowns, while Ali Barry

also rushed for a touchdown in

the win.

Fenwick (3-1) plays on the

road at Cardinal Spellman

Friday (6:30).

Steven Woods threw for two

touchdowns and ran for another

in the loss, while Jason Romans

and Troy Irizarry each had a

touchdown reception.

St. Mary’s (4-0) hosts Bishop

Stang Friday (7:30).

Northeastern

Conference votes to

rename divisions

The South Division has

been renamed the Lynch

Division after Dick Lynch,

who was a three- sport coach at

Swampscott High School from

1954 until 1973 and also served

for many years as the athletic director

at Danvers High School.

The Northeastern Conference

is currently made up of

Beverly, Danvers, Gloucester,

Marblehead, Masconomet,

Peabody, Salem, Saugus,

Swampscott, and Winthrop.


10

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 OCTOBER 7, 2021

THURSDAY

Golf

Lynnfield at CAL Open (9)

Cardinal Spellman at Bishop Fenwick (3)

Girls Soccer

Peabody at Central Catholic (7:30)

Field Hockey

Bishop Fenwick at Bishop Feehan (4)

Amesbury at Lynnfield (7)

Volleyball

Lynnfield at Georgetown (5:30)

FRIDAY

Football

Bishop Fenwick at Cardinal Spellman (6:30)

Swampscott at Peabody (7)

Golf

Bishop Fenwick at Arlington Catholic (2:30)

Boys Soccer

Amesbury at Lynnfield (3:45)

Bishop Fenwick at Masconomet (4)

Girls Soccer

Lynnfield at Amesbury (3:45)

Field Hockey

Lynnfield at Beverly (4)

Volleyball

North Reading at Peabody (5:30)

Reading at Lynnfield (5:30)

SATURDAY

Football

Lynnfield at Hamilton-Wenham (2:30)

Girls Soccer

Bishop Fenwick at Central Catholic (12)

Volleyball

Essex Tech at Bishop Fenwick (5:30)

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS SCHEDULE

MONDAY

Boys Soccer

Bishop Fenwick at Arlington Catholic (2)

Girls Soccer

Ipswich at Lynnfield (10)

Field Hockey

Lynnfield at Ipswich (10)

TUESDAY

Golf

Bishop Fenwick at Cardinal Spellman (2:30)

Swampscott at Peabody (4)

Boys Soccer

Lynnfield at Ipswich (4)

Field Hockey

Bishop Fenwick at Bedford (3:45)

Volleyball

Lynnfield at Arlington Catholic (5:30)

Cross Country

Arlington Catholic, Austin Prep at Bishop Fenwick (4)

TUESDAY

Golf

Arlington Catholic at Bishop Fenwick (2:30)

Peabody at Danvers (4)

Boys Soccer

Peabody at Masconomet (4)

Girls Soccer

Masconomet at Peabody (4)

Arlington Catholic at Bishop Fenwick (4)

Field Hockey

Danvers at Peabody (4)

Volleyball

Masconomet at Peabody (5:30)

Cross Country

Peabody at Beverly (4)

North Reading at Lynnfield (4:15)

FILE PHOTO

Peabody’s Isabel Bettencourt led the way with 13 kills in a win over Marblehead Monday evening

at Veterans Memorial Field House.

Peabody scores season sweep

of Marblehead on the court

VOLLEYBALL

By Mike Alongi

The Peabody volleyball

team notched a season sweep

of Northeastern Conference

foe Marblehead Monday evening,

as the Tanners shut out

the Magicians 3-0 at Veterans

Memorial Field House.

Peabody won by set scores of

25-14, 25-17, 25-21.

Michael Garabedian

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Isabel Bettencourt led the offensive

attack for the Tanners

with 13 kills, while Sarah

Broughton and Ally Flewelling

combined for 11 kills. Kristina

Cardello had 26 digs and

Michaela Alperen had 23 service

points. Abby Bettencourt

added 22 assists and four kills,

while Maddie Castro and

Lauryn Mendonca also played

well in the victory.

Peabody (6-3) travels to

Swampscott Tuesday (5:30).

Keira Sweenam had seven

kills and three blocks to lead the

way for the Magicians, while

Lilah Thompson added six

kills. Dylan Kerble and Caitlin

Parkman combined for 32 digs

on the defensive end, while

Julia Potvin had 20 assists in

the loss.

Marblehead (6-2) hosts

Saugus Tuesday (6).

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FILE PHOTO

Ryan Alves scored one goal for Peabody in a win over Lynn

Classical Saturday at Manning Field.

Peabody notches

non-conference win

over Lynn Classical

BOYS SOCCER

By Mike Alongi

LYNN — The Peabody boys

soccer team went on the road

and pulled out a quality win

under the lights Saturday night,

taking down former conference

foe Lynn Classical by a score of

3-1 at Manning Field. This was

the first matchup between the

two teams since Classical left the

Northeastern Conference for the

Greater Boston League following

the 2019 season.

The Tanners had three different

goal scorers in the win, getting

tallies from Ryan Alves, AJ Forte

and Nathan Braz. Victor Maciel

and Bruno Correia continued

their respective strong seasons

with one assist apiece, while

Marc Ortiz and Cam Collins also

played well for Peabody.

The lone goal for Classical

came from Jair Alvarez, who

continues to play well for the

Rams. Ryan Dunn had a solid

game at right defender, while

Yahir Viveros played well at left

back.

Classical (4-5-1) returns to

Manning Field Tuesday night

(7:15) to host Greater Boston

League foe Chelsea.

Peabody (4-4-0) has another

non-conference game on the

docket when it goes on the road

to face Dracut Monday evening

(6).


OCTOBER 7, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 11

Marblehead kicks Peabody, 35-14

Photos | Jakob Menendez

Peabody’s Alexander Silva breaks a run to the outside during a game against Marblehead Friday

night at Coley Lee Field.

Peabody’s Michael Perez wraps up the legs of Marblehead running

back George Percy.

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Jovante Dailey, left, and Michael Perez celebrate after scoring

Peabody’s first touchdown of the game Friday.


12

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 OCTOBER 7, 2021

Tanners come up short against Marblehead

Photos | Jakob Menendez

Peabody’s Alexander Silva is tackled by Marblehead’s Connor

Cronin.

Marblehead’s Andy Palmer, left, gets his hands on a pass to break up a potential touchdown by

Peabody’s Jovante Dailey.

Michael Perez, right, sacks Marblehead quarterback Joshua

Robertson during Friday night’s game.

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

for the weekly news

Destination Creation has

announced it will be offering a

complimentary, six-week course

to help businesses reach new

customers through product differentiation

as well as digital

means. The course is designed

to help independent businesses

and communities stand out and

increase customer traffic from

PACC free event:

Destination Creation

both local consumers and consumers

from miles away. The

course ($800 value) is being

offered through the Peabody

Chamber of Commerce and

Peabody Main Streets. Upon

completion of the course, businesses

are eligible to receive a

$2,500 grant to implement an

idea to create a new website and

improve their online presence,

add e-commerce capabilities, or

enhance social media channels.

The course is first-come, firstserved

and is limited to the first

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 13

30 participants. For more information,

go to www.peabodychamber.com.

Classes begin on

Monday, Oct. 4 and run through

Nov. 8 from 6-8 p.m. via Zoom.

The class will be led by Deanne

Healey, the only certified Destination

Creation instructor in

Massachusetts, and Jon Schallert.

Schallert has interviewed

more than 10,000 independent

business owners in nearly 600

cities to develop his proprietary

"Destination Business" program.

Inn to Opportunity

for the weekly news

Citizens Inn is hosting a

“Citizens Inn To Opportunity”

campaign launch/open house on

Saturday, Oct. 16 from 2-5 p.m.

at Haven From Hunger, 71 Wallis

St., Peabody. The event features

a behind-the-scenes tour

of the newly renovated Haven

from Hunger facility. Participants

will have the opportunity

to learn about food insecurity

and homelessness that is facing

the community and how Citizens

Inn can partner with the

community to transform those

challenges “Inn to” Opportunity.

All guests will be required to

wear masks during the indoor

tours. There will be an outdoor

reception with live music and

refreshments. The deadline to

register is Oct. 8. Please go to

https://bit.ly/3z5uDQ to reserve

a time for a 15-minute tour. For

questions or additional information

contact Rachel Leibowitz

at 978-735-1585 or rleibowitz@citizensinn.org.


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WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 OCTOBER 7, 2021

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NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage

given by Helda C. Medina to The Savings Bank, dated January 28, 2008 and

recorded in the Essex County (Southern District) Registry of Deeds in Book 27493,

Page 346 of which mortgage the undersigned is the present holder, by assignment

from:

Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Financial Freedom

Acquisition, LLC, its successors and assigns to CIT Bank, N.A., recorded on

October 23, 2015, in Book No. 34463, at Page 113

The Savings Bank to CIT Bank, N.A., recorded on August 24, 2016, in Book No.

35199, at Page 363

CIT Bank, N.A. to WVMF Funding, LLC, recorded on October 17, 2018, in Book No.

37087, at Page 407

for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing,

the same will be sold at Public Auction at 1:00 PM on November 1, 2021, on the

mortgaged premises located at 10 Lincoln Road, Peabody, Essex County,

Massachusetts, all and singular the premises described in said mortgage,

TO WIT:

The land with the buildings thereon situate on Lincoln Road in said Peabody, being

shown on a plan entitled "Preliminary Proposed Subdivision of Land Owned by

Manuel C. Mello, Peabody, Mass. April 18, 1958, Kenneth W. Richardson, Reg.

land Surveyor recorded with Essex South District Registry of Deeds, Book 4597,

Page 83, bounded and described as follows:

NORTHERLY by Lincoln Road, 75 feet;

EASTERLY by land now or formerly of Mello, 123.49 feet;

SOUTHERLY by land now or formerly of said Mello, 75.15 feet; and

WESTERLY by land now or formerly of said Mello 118.82 feet.

Containing 9,086 square feet, according to said plan.

Being the same premises conveyed to the herein named mortgagor (s) by deed

recorded with Essex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 6657, Page 657.

For mortgagor's (s') title see deed recorded with Essex County (Southern

District) Registry of Deeds in Book 6657, Page 657.

These premises will be sold and conveyed subject to and with the benefit of

all rights, rights of way, restrictions, easements, covenants, liens or claims in the

nature of liens, improvements, public assessments, any and all unpaid taxes, tax

titles, tax liens, water and sewer liens and any other municipal assessments or

liens or existing encumbrances of record which are in force and are applicable,

having priority over said mortgage, whether or not reference to such restrictions,

easements, improvements, liens or encumbrances is made in the deed.

TERMS OF SALE:

A deposit of Five Thousand ($5,000.00) Dollars by certified or bank check

will be required to be paid by the purchaser at the time and place of sale. The

balance is to be paid by certified or bank check at Harmon Law Offices, P.C., 150

California St., Newton, Massachusetts 02458, or by mail to P.O. Box 610389,

Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 02461-0389, within thirty (30) days from the

date of sale. Deed will be provided to purchaser for recording upon receipt in full

of the purchase price. The description of the premises contained in said mortgage

shall control in the event of an error in this publication.

Other terms, if any, to be announced at the sale.

WVMF FUNDING, LLC

Present holder of said mortgage

By its Attorneys,

HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C.

150 California St.

Newton, MA 02458

(617)558-0500

2016040036

LEGALS

Weekly News: October 7, 14 and 21, 2021

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of Kevin Baez

and Ramona Ciampa for a Variance from the Provision of the Zoning Ordinance

2019, as amended, Section 7.2 and 7.1.5, as it applies to the premise known as

14 Dublin Rd., Peabody, MA, Map 033, Lot 025. Petitioner seeks a variance to

build an accessory structure and an addition and requires relief to Accessory

Structure Right Side Yard where 10' is required and 5' is proposed; Accessory

Structure where 500 sf is permitted, and 864 sf is proposed; Addition Rear Yard

Setback where 35' is required and 28.9' is proposed. The property is located in a

R1 Zoning District. The application and plan are available to the public and can

be viewed by contacting Carla McGrath at carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or

978-538-5792 in advance and prior to the Public Hearing. The agenda for this

meeting is posted on the City of Peabody website.

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

Legal Notice

There will be a Tree Removal Hearing on Friday October 8, 2021 @ 9:30am at

the Recreation, Parks & Forestry Department office located at 50 Farm Avenue,

Peabody, MA, for the removal of a Public Shade Tree(s) at the following

location(s).

Address: 16 Reynolds Road

Peabody, MA 01960

Legal Notice

There will be a Tree Removal Hearing on Friday October 8, 2021 @ 9:00am at the

Recreation, Parks & Forestry Department office located at 50 Farm Avenue,

Peabody, MA, for the removal of a Public Shade Tree(s) at the following

location(s).

Address: 11 Putnam Street

Peabody, MA 01960

LEGALS

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of Gervazlo and

Telma Dell'Orto c/o Leandro Foresto for a Variance from the Provision of the

Zoning Ordinance 2019, as amended, Section 7.2, as it applies to the premise

known as 30 Tremont St., Peabody, MA, Map 075, Lot 112. Petitioner seeks a

variance to build an addition and requires relief to Left Side Yard where 15' is

required and 3.1' is proposed; Rear Yard where 35' is required and 26.9' is

proposed; Lot Coverage where 30% is allowed and 31.9% is proposed. The

property is located in a R1A Zoning District. The application and plan are

available to the public and can be viewed by contacting Carla McGrath at

carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792 in advance and prior to the

Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is posted on the City of Peabody

website.

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m. at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of Angelo

Perrina c/o Attorney John Keilty for a Variance from the Provision of the Zoning

Ordinance 2019, as amended, Section 7.2 and Section 9, as it applies to the

premise known as 3 Bourbon St., Peabody, MA, Map 036, Lot 021. Petitioner

seeks a variance to construct an addition and outdoor dining area to Toscana

Restaurant and requires relief to Side Yard where 40' is required and 35' is

proposed; Parking where 118 spaces are required and 71 spaces are proposed.

The property is located in a BR Zoning District. The application and plan are

available to the public and can be viewed by contacting Carla McGrath at

carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792 in advance and prior to the

Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is posted on the City of Peabody

website.

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of 437 Essex

St. Inc. c/o Attorney Patrick Burke for a Variance from the Provision of the

Zoning Ordinance 2019, as amended, Section 7.2, as it applies to the premise

known as 15 Oak Ave., Peabody, MA, Map 114, Lot 048. Petitioner seeks a

variance to build a deck and requires relief to Right Side Yard where 20' is

required and 10.5' is proposed; Rear Yard where 35' is required and 23.5' is

proposed. The property is located in a R1 Zoning District. The application and

plan are available to the public and can be viewed by contacting Carla McGrath at

carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792 in advance and prior to the

Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is posted on the City of Peabody

website.

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

As per the petition of (Alan Bratt)

Per Order of Brian Grant, Tree Warden

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

As per the petition of (Mike Soper)

Per Order of Brian Grant, Tree Warden


OCTOBER 7, 2021

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 15

Lights out for 2,000 after

tree downs power line

LOOKING TO GAIN A GREAT FUTURE?

BY ANNE MARIE TOBIN

PEABODY –– A downed tree

took down power lines behind

the Torigian YMCA on Lynnfield

Street Tuesday morning

at about 8 a.m., according to a

statement posted on the Peabody

Municipal Light Plant’s (PMLP)

Facebook page. Approximately

2,000 PMLP customers, including

several businesses in the

Centennial Drive Office Park

and three schools, temporarily

lost power. Power was restored

shortly before 9 a.m., according

to the statement.

“These downed lines were the

result of a tree that fell in a remote

section of Peabody behind

the YMCA,” PMLP said. “It

took a bit over an hour for customers

to be restored. Honestly

we thought it would take longer

based on the damage to the pole

from the fallen tree. The engineers,

substation team, and line

workers were able to isolate the

area with the downed wires and

snapped pole, and re-energize

customers. Now that customers

are restored, we will take steps

to replace the snapped pole.”

The statement went on to

say that PMLP will deploy

“special equipment” to replace

the snapped pole and remove

downed wires.

School Superintendent Dr.

Josh Vadala said the three affected

schools were the Welch and

South elementary schools and

the Higgins Middle School, but

there was “never any doubt that

we would have school today.

“PMLP and our facilities department

were right on top of

it, so it was a great example of

a partnership with the city and

light department,” he said, adding

that power was restored in all

three schools by 8:45.

“Higgins has a generator, so

even though they start at 8:30,

there were no problems and the

elementaries don’t start until 9

so everything was good.”

Anne Marie Tobin can be

reached at atobin@itemlive.

com.

AUTO | HOME | BUSINESS | LIFE

• We make shopping for insurance EASY.

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Please visit us at one of our locations:

The BGCL is looking for motivated individuals to join our team!

We are currently interviewing for the following positions:

"OST" (out of school time) Assistants/Teachers/Group Leaders

(Part-Time/ Afternoon Hours: $15-17 an hour)

Responsibilities & requirements include but are not limited to,

implementing curriculum, assist and support youth with

homework, create and implement enrichment activities such as

Art, Cooking, STEAM, & physical activity while providing a safe and

nurturing experience. All staff & children are required to wear a

mask, regular hand washing, and sanitizing daily. Must have

experience with working with children, undergo a background

check, have CPR/ First- Aid certification or willing to obtain

certification. Please email resumes to: jfurlong@bgcl.org.

25 North Common Street Lynn, MA 01902 781.593.1772 www.bgcl.org

Looking for past issues?

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LYNNFIELD 550 Summer Street @Pillings Pond

MALDEN 1012 Eastern Avenue

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LEGALS

LEGALS

LEGALS

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin Auditorium,

ity Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of Nelson

acheco for a Variance from the Provision of the Zoning Ordinance 2019, as

mended, Section 7.2, as it applies to the premise known as 145 Russell St.,

eabody, MA, Map 004, Lot 073. Petitioner seeks a variance to construct a

armer's porch and requires relief to Front Yard Setback where 25' is required and

1.8' is proposed. The property is located in an R1 Zoning District. The

pplication and plan are available to the public and can be viewed by contacting

arla McGrath at carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792 in advance

nd prior to the Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is posted on the

ity of Peabody website.

eekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of Richard and

Teresa Read c/o Penney Construction for a Variance from the Provision of the

oning Ordinance 2019, as amended, Section 7.2, as it applies to the premise

nown as 6 Ethel Rd., Peabody, MA, Map 084, Lot 110. Petitioner seeks a

ariance to build a deck and requires relief to Right Side Yard Setbacks where

0' is required and 6.2' is proposed. The property is located in a R2 Zoning

istrict. The application and plan are available to the public and can be viewed

y contacting Carla McGrath at carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792

n advance and prior to the Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is

osted on the City of Peabody website.

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of Chris LeDuc

c/o Joe Foreman for a Variance from the Provision of the Zoning Ordinance

2019, as amended, Section 7.2, as it applies to the premise known as 9

Ravenwood Rd., Peabody, MA, Map 100, Lot 077. Petitioner seeks a variance to

build a deck and requires relief to Left Side Yard where 20' is required and 16' is

proposed. The property is located in a R1 Zoning District. The application and

plan are available to the public and can be viewed by contacting Carla McGrath at

carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792 in advance and prior to the

Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is posted on the City of Peabody

website.

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Does your company need employees?

Placing a help wanted ad is great for finding

the skilled workers you need.

781-593-7700, ext.2

City of Peabody

Zoning Board of Appeals

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Appeals of the City of Peabody will hold a

Public Hearing Monday, October 18, 2021 at 7:00 p.m at the Wiggin Auditorium,

City Hall, 24 Lowell Street, Peabody, MA 01960 on the application of Margaret

Shambarger c/o Mark Mancinelli for a Variance from the Provision of the Zoning

Ordinance 2019, as amended, Section 7.2, as it applies to the premise known

as 4 Hillside Ave., Peabody, MA, Map 120, Lot 86A. Petitioner seeks a variance

to build a deck and requires relief to Right Side Yard where 15' is required and

9.2' is proposed. The property is located in a R1A Zoning District. The application

and plan are available to the public and can be viewed by contacting Carla

McGrath at carla.mcgrath@peabody-ma.gov or 978-538-5792 in advance and

prior to the Public Hearing. The agenda for this meeting is posted on the City of

Peabody website.

Weekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson

eekly News: September 30 and October 7, 2021

Board of Appeals

Frances Bisazza-Gallugi, Chairperson


16

WEEKLYNEWS.NET - 978-532-5880 OCTOBER 7, 2021

The North Shore’s Premier Real Estate Agency

Beverly $4,599,000

Enjoy limitless views to Misery Island, Baker’s

Lighthouse and beyond from this distinctive,

extensively renovated 4-bedroom, 4.5 bath oceanfront

home with private sandy beach and mooring.

Alle Cutler

Hamilton $4,200,000

Savin Hill ~ Stately 1924 brick Georgian

residence on 15+ acres in the heart of horse

country offers classic symmetry, impeccable scale,

charm, livability, and irreplaceable craftsmanship.

Susan Bridge

Middleton $3,250,000

WOW! Sophisticated, brilliantly designed home.

Open living room-chef’s marble kitchen has

2 islands. Enjoy 2-sided gas fireplace from living

room or outdoor kitchen. Spa-like master retreat.

The Lopes Group

Danvers $1,100,000

Beautiful Colonial at the end of cul-de-sac.

5 bedrooms, 3.5-baths. Well-appointed kitchen

has custom cabinetry, family room. office/1st floor

bedroom. Master bedroom retreat. 2-car garage.

Steven Graczyk

Newly Priced

Wenham $1,099,000

Hidden treasure! 5-bedroom, 4.5-bath expanded

Cape with accessory apartment on 3+ private acres.

Central air, home office, 1st floor primary suite.

Private yet centrally located.

Deb Evans

Gloucester $995,000

Rare development options on 2-lot parcel high

above Annisquam River. Post & Beam home has

flexible floor plan; needs finishing touches. Buyers

do all due diligence for lot division & permits.

Shelly Shuka

Hamilton $995,000

Wonderful, detached townhouse at Patton Ridge,

55+ community. Offers 1st floor master suite,

cathedral ceiling in living room, 4-season sunroom

and finished lower level. Deck, 2-car garage.

Josephine Mehm Baker

Winthrop $949,900

Spectacular views from well-maintained 2-family

across from the Atlantic! 1st floor 2-bed, 1.5-bath

unit. 4-bed, 2-bath townhouse unit. Each has

2 decks, in-unit laundry. Updated systems.

Maria Salzillo

Newly Priced

Newly Priced

Peabody $699,900

Beautiful classic with charming Victorian era details.

4 spacious bedrooms, 2 full baths and many period

details: high ceilings, gorgeous woodwork, elegant

wainscoting and fireplace mantels.

Daniel Meegan

Marblehead $699,000

Location, location! Spacious 3-4 Bedroom home

near schools, beach and downtown has flexible floor

plan, large living-dining room, 2 decks, new oil &

hot water tanks, yard. Attached garage.

Cressy Team

Danvers $699,000

Enchanting 4-bedroom Colonial on tranquil grounds

in St. John’s Prep neighborhood. Sleek, upscale granite

kitchen, formal dining room, spacious fireplaced

living room, screen porch, 2 decks.

Team Curtin

Lynn $699,000

3-family for owner-occupied or investors. 2017

roof, new kitchen floor, counters & baths in 2 units,

new heating system - 2nd flr. Eat-in kitchen with

pantry in each 2-bedroom unit. Parking.

Debbie Aminzadeh

Commercial

Newly Priced

Beverly $625,000

You want this! Charming Cape with 3 bedrooms

(1 on 1st floor), 2 fireplaces, family and living

rooms, AC, finished basement, fenced lot, deck,

garage. Hardwood floors and open floor plan.

Kate Richard

Magnolia $540,000

Open new restaurant or relocate to new, boutique

mixed-use condo complex in seaside Magnolia

across from beach. 1,076 sf, handicap accessible

space. Blank canvas ready for complete buildout.

Mary Ciaraldi

Beverly $499,000

Efficient 3-bedroom starter home in Ryal Side near

park and Beverly Depot. All hardwood flooring,

sunny living room and 2nd floor bonus room. 2018

hot water heater, insulation. Yard, patio.

Michelle Bettencourt

Groveland $444,900

“Enchanted Cottage” - Charming 2-bed antique in

sylvan setting. Updated kitchen, wide pine floors in

living room with wood stove. Electricity in separate

mahogany screened house. Koi pond.

Dee Penachio

LAND

Swampscott $415,000

Open floor plan, updated eat-in kitchen and

bath, private deck and shared yard are only a few

amenities of this 3-bedroom condo near the train,

bus, parks, schools, beaches. 2-3 car parking.

Stephanie Moio

Salem $369,900

Inviting 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo at The Essex has

upgraded cabinets and quartz countertops in the

kitchen. Near restaurants, shops, parks, world-class

Peabody Essex Museum, and commuter rail.

Tina McManus

Beverly $325,000

First-floor medical office condos on hospital campus.

Set up/expand practice. 6+ exam rooms, 2 waiting

areas/entrances, 3+ offices, 2 bathrooms, storage.

Patient & staff parking.

Paula Polo-Filias

Gloucester $250,000

West Gloucester residential developable parcel.

Opportunity to build new home. BOH approved

3-bedroom septic design and drainage plan. Easy

access to Rt. 128. Buyer to do all Due Diligence.

Jackelyn Enslow

100 Cummings Center, Suite 101K • Beverly, MA 01915 • 978.922.3683

J Barrett & Company, LLC supports the principles of both the Fair Housing and the Equal Opportunity Acts.

www.jbarrettrealty.com

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