2021 TNA Virtual Conference

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0

ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Table of Contents

Welcome from the TNA President...................................................................3

Welcome from the TNA Executive Director. .........................................................5

Welcome from Kirk Lawson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

General Announcements...........................................................................9

2021 TNA Virtual Conference Schedule ............................................................. 13

Session Speakers................................................................................. 17

Disclosures to Participants, Continuing Nursing Education Instructions.................................25

2021 Membership Assembly Rules and Information. .................................................27

Introduction to Robert’s Rules of Order.............................................................29

113th Membership Assembly Agenda ...............................................................32

2020-2022 Legislative and Health Policy Statements ................................................33

2022-2024 TNA Strategic Plan. ...................................................................35

2021 Resolutions.................................................................................36

Proposed Bylaws Changes and Link to Current Bylaws .............................................. 40

2021 TNA Virtual Conference Sponsors............................................................. 41

Tennessee Nurses Political Action Committee (PAC) .................................................43

Nightingale Tribute & Memoriam.................................................................. 44

TNA Board of Directors & Staff with TNA District Map ...............................................45

TNA Member Benefits ........................................................................... 48

TNA Leadership Opportunities. .................................................................. 49

2021 Slate of Candidates......................................................................... 50

Poster Abstracts .................................................................................56

TNA Financials.................................................................................. 66

TNA Past Presidents..............................................................................70

Tennessee Nurses Foundation (TNF) - Mission - Goals - Initiatives ..................................... 71

TNF Board of Trust Roster. .......................................................................73

TNA 2022 Events. ...............................................................................77

Published for the Tennessee Nurses Association by:

Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency

P.O. Box 216, Cedar Falls, IA 50613 • (319) 277-2414

www.tnaonline.org

Published by:

Arthur L. Davis

Publishing Agency, Inc.

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• Group Life Insurance

Program

• Excellent Selection of Health

Benefits Plans

• Dental/Vision Plans

• Flexible Spending Account

• Educational Loan Assistance

• Employee Assistance

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• Guaranteed Hours

2


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Welcome from the TNA President

Carla Kirkland, MSN, APRN, ACNP-BC, FNP-BC, ENP-BC

Welcome to the 2021 Tennessee Nurses Association Virtual Annual Conference! The

TNA staff and Board of Directors appreciate your support of the Association and

Foundation, and your participation today.

While we had our hearts set on an in-person conference this year, it was just not meant

to be. Due to the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines, we are overall in a better

place this year than last, but still have a way to go. I know we’re all suffering from

COVID fatigue! Thank you to all of you for your resilience and fortitude in continuing to

lead during this ongoing public health crisis.

We are all going to miss Tina Gerardi, our TNA Executive Director, as she retires after this conference. She

has been a mentor and exceptional leader for TNA during challenging times and is leaving the Association

and Foundation in a very strong place. We wish her peace and relaxation!

One of our Board challenges this year was conducting a nation-wide search for a new TNA Executive

Director. You will meet our new Director, Kirk Lawson, at conference. Kirk is a Certified Association

Executive and will do a great job leading the Association! Please give him your support as he settles in. I

would like to thank Executive Director Search Team Committee members Julie Hamm, Heather Jackson,

Nancy Stevens, Jeny Conrad-Rendon, La-Kenya Kellum, Ruth Kleinpell, Haley Vance, Raven Wentworth, and

Christine Reed. The wealth of expertise and counsel in this group was very appreciated!

Thank you for the opportunity to serve as your TNA President the past two years. It has been a privilege

to represent you. The Association will be in very capable hands with Julie Hamm as your new President!

Blessings to you all.

Enjoy the conference!

Best Regards,

Carla

3


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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Welcome from the Executive Director

Tina Gerardi, MS, RN, CAE

Welcome to the 2021 Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) Virtual Annual Conference.

The Board of Directors and staff were looking forward to having this conference be our

first in-person event since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID, however,

had other ideas, and out of an abundance of caution, the Board decided to go virtual

again this year. I will miss saying goodbye to all of you personally, as this is my final

conference as the Executive Director of TNA. I will be retiring at the conclusion of the

conference and look forward to having you welcome Kirk Lawson as the new TNA

Executive Director.

Throughout 2020 and 2021, the globe has witnessed in real-time the incredible

impact that nurses and nursing have on public health, healthcare delivery, and the human essence of caring

while delivering high-quality care to everyone across Tennessee, the country, and around the world. TNA

continues to honor that impact with the conference theme, Year of the Nurse 2.0: One Year Wasn’t Enough.

We acknowledge how physically, mentally, and emotionally depleted many of you are and honor all that you

have done to support your patients, students, and communities throughout the pandemic.

The conference planning committee hopes you will see the theme of self-care throughout the conference.

There will be a general session on racism, diversity, and inclusion featuring TNA member panelists sharing

their own first-hand accounts of the struggle for inclusivity and equity in nursing. The Membership

Assembly will convene to do the work of the Association – reviewing resolutions and setting direction and

priorities for the upcoming year, as well as electing new members of the board of directors. You will be able

to receive 4.5 contact hours for taking concurrent educational sessions during the virtual conference and

receive up to 9.5 contact hours for taking additional sessions after the conference concludes.

Since we cannot have our regular fundraisers for the Foundation and PAC, please go to the TNA website

and donate to the Foundation https://tna.nursingnetwork.com/page/94390-donate-to-tnf and to the PAC

https://tna.nursingnetwork.com/page/94251-donate-to-tn-nurse-pac. A $25 donation or a donation of any

size will be greatly appreciated. Please visit the sponsors’ pages on the TNA website. TNA could not provide

the conference the way we do without their financial support.

I hope you all enjoy, learn, support each other, and have fun! I wish you a fond farewell and best wishes for

continued success as the premier nurses association in Tennessee.

Warmest regards,

Tina

5


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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Welcome from Kirk Lawson

Kirk Lawson, CAE

Today, along with Carla and Tina, I am pleased to welcome you to this year’s annual

conference.

As your newly selected Executive Director, I am honored to attend this year’s

conference, and look forward to meeting and working with each of you as TNA moves

forward in its service to all registered nurses throughout the state of Tennessee.

I know it will be difficult for you to say goodbye to Tina as she has served you well

over the years, but I know you all will join with me in wishing her all the best in her

retirement.

I would be remiss if I didn’t also thank Carla for her leadership and guidance during this past year under the

most difficult of circumstances.

As Julie and I begin our leadership journey together, we understand the challenges and opportunities that

lay before us as we move forward during these unprecedented times with regards to the health and welfare

of all Tennesseans.

I would like to thank the TNA board for giving me this opportunity, and consider it a privilege to support

TNA’s amazing work. I recognize that I have a lot to learn and intend to invest the time and attention

necessary to get to know you, the TNA culture, and the policies and procedures of the organization. I look

forward to working with you to build upon the successes of the past and develop even more diverse and

equitable programs and services to support the TNA community.

Together, we will make a difference!

Sincerely,

Kirk W. Lawson, CAE

7


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Welcome to the 2021 TNA Annual Conference.

General Announcements

Please follow the conference schedule and be sure to connect to the appropriate link for Membership

Assembly and General Sessions and for the appropriate Zoom meeting for concurrent sessions. A slide

showing the appropriate web address to connect to the sessions will be displayed during breaks between

sessions. Please take advantage of the chat feature while you wait for sessions to start to greet and make

welcome the new members and first-time attendees to our conference.

Since we cannot meet in person, the Tennessee Nurses Foundation Silent Auction and PAC Basket Auction cannot

take place. These events are major fundraisers for each group. Please consider making a monetary donation to

both by visiting the TNA website. We are asking for a $25 donation to each, but any amount is welcome.

Voting on resolutions will take place via the chat function.

Not a TNA member? Don’t miss out on this opportunity to become part of the Voice for all nurses in

Tennessee. Join TNA now!

To receive the 1.0 contact hour for attending the poster presentations, you must visit ten posters. Poster

Presentations can be viewed on the poster session page on the TNA website, tnaonline.org.

Paid participants of the conference will be able to do poster self-study and view concurrent sessions you

were unable to attend in real time to receive additional contact hours until December 1.

Tennessee Nurses Association is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional development

by the South Carolina Nurses Association, an accredited approver with distinction by the American Nurses

Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

No conference speakers have indicated any conflict of interest related to their presentations.

TNA members will vote for Board Officers and Directors via SurveyMonkey from 12:20 p.m. – 1:20 p.m. A link to

vote will be emailed to all attendees by Noon on October 15. Please check your SPAM or JUNK email for the link

if you do not see it in your Inbox. If you have not received the link by noon, please contact Diane Cunningham at

diane.cunningham@tnaonline.org. The Slate of Candidates begins on page 50.

9


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

11


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

13


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

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• Group Life Insurance

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• Excellent Selection of Health

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• Dental/Vision Plans

• Flexible Spending Account

• Educational Loan Assistance

• Employee Assistance

Program

16


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Session Speakers

All times are central

9:40 a.m. - 11:10 a.m.

General Session

Panel Discussion

Diversity: Tennessee Nurses First-Hand Accounts of the Struggle for Inclusivity and Equity

TNA President, Carla Kirkland, MSN, APRN, ACNP-BC, FNP-BC, ENP-BC, Session Host

• Kristi Wick, DNP, FNP-BC, GS-C - Moderator

Univ. of TN Chattanooga School of Nursing, Vicky B. Gregg Chair of Gerontology, Assistant Professor

• Martina Harris, EdD, RN, Chattanooga State Community College

• Mary Lambert, DNP, RN, FAAN, Director, Office of Community Health for Chattanooga

• Latisha Toney, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, Univ. of TN Chattanooga, Assistant Professor Community Health

Outcome:

1. Participants will self-report increased knowledge regarding racism in nursing.

2. Participants will self-report increased knowledge of implicit bias.

Carla Kirkland

Kristi Wick Martina Harris Mary Lambert Latisha Toney

11:20 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions (A-C)

session B & C are on the next page

Session A:

Importance of Emotional Intelligence in Nursing Leadership

Tiffany Street, DNP, ACNP-BC - Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Center, Associate Nursing Officer,

Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute.

Outcome:

1. The learner will understand the concept of emotions and intelligence.

2. The learner will understand the impact of emotional intelligence on nurse leader and

team effectiveness.

3. The leader will understand how to implement strategies based on the components of

emotional intelligence to improve leadership effectiveness.

Tiffany Street

Page 1 of 4

17


18


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Session Speakers

continued

11:20 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions (B-C)

Session B:

Improving the Safety of Healthcare Providers through MAPS Program (Management of

Aggressive Patient Situations)

• Sara Day, PhD, RN, FAAN - Univ. of TN Health Science Center College of Nursing,

Professor, Assistant Dean, Center for Community & Global Partnerships

• Lisa Beasley, DNP, APRN, NP-C, RN - Univ. of TN Health Science Center College of

Nursing Assistant Professor

Outcome:

1. Gain awareness of the current state of health care violence in the U.S.

2. Understand the concepts surrounding aggression on behalf of patients and families that

affect healthcare providers.

3. Analyze participants own knowledge and understanding of aggressive behaviors

(pre and post assessment).

Session C:

Improving Screening for Depression in Adults in Primary Care

Brie LaJeret, DNP, AGPCNP-BC - AGPCNP in the Nurse Faculty Clinics at Vanderbilt

University Medical Center

Outcome:

1. Define depression

2. List common signs/symptoms of depression

3. Discuss clasic vs. somatic presentations

4. Discuss current screening recommendations and implementation

5. Understand the importance of routine depression screenings

Sara Day

Lisa Beasley

Brie LaJeret

2:10 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions (D-F)

session E & F are on the next page

Session D:

Nurse Mitigation of Potential Violence Using Trauma Informed Approaches in Addiction Care Delivery

Kendrea Todt, PhD, RN - East TN State University, Special Asst. to the Undergraduate Dean, Asst.

Professor of Nursing

Outcome:

1. Discuss the challenges nurses experience when caring for patients diagnosed with SUD.

2. Describe the trauma dose response associated with SUD.

3. Identify and describe trauma informed approaches to facilitate therapeutic nursing care

delivery to patients with SUD.

4. Discuss current addiction science issues with nurse scholars to foster collaboration.

5. Identification of art forms to raise awareness of addiction as a disease among health care professionals.

Kendrea Todt

Page 2 of 4

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Session Speakers

continued

2:10 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions (E-F)

Session E:

The Grief Experience of RNs Working on the Frontlines During the COVID-19 Pandemic

• Susan Jacob, PhD, RN - Univ. of TN Health Science Center, College of Nursing

• Dwayne Accardo, DNP, CRNA - Program Director - Univ. of TN Health Science Center, Nurse Anesthesia

Concentration

• Jennifer S. Dolgoff, BSN, RN - Nursing Science PhD Student - Univ. of TN Health Science Center

• Alise Farrell, MSN, RN, CPN - Univ. of TN Health Science Center, College of Nursing

• Tracy McClinton, DNP, AGACNP-BC, APRN - Univ. of TN Health Science Center, College of Nursing

• Emma Murray, DNP, ACAN-BC, APRN - Assistant Professor - Univ. of TN Health Science Center, College of

Nursing

• Loretta Alexia Williams, PhD, RN - Assistant Professor - Univ. of TN Health Science Center, College of

Nursing

Outcome:

1. Participants will self-report increased knowledge about the grief experience of RNs working on the

frontlines during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2. Participants will self-report increased knowledge related to strategies to support RNs working on the

frontlines during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Susan

Jacob

Dwayne

Accardo

Jennifer

Dolgoff

Alise

Farrell

Tracy

McClinton

Emma

Murray

L. Alexia

Williams

Session F:

Identifying Barriers to APRN Practice: Results from a National Survey

• Mavis Schorn, PhD, APRN, CNM, CNE, FACNM, FNAP, FAAN - Senior

Assoc. Dean for Academics, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing.

• Tamika Hudson, DNP, APRN, FNP-C- Assistant Dean for Student Affairs,

Assistant Professor in Nursing-Vanderbilt University School of Nursing.

Outcome:

1. Participants will gain knowledge of APRN barriers as reported by a large

sample of APRNs representing all four APRN roles practicing in all 50 US

states and from a variety of practice settings.

2. Participants will identify strategies to reduce functional and regulatory

barriers to practice.

Mavis

Schorn

Tamika

Hudson

Page 3 of 4

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Session Speakers

continued

3:20 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions (G-H)

Session G:

Pandemic Mental Health Challenges: Patients and Providers

• Carole R. Myers, PhD, RN, FAAN – Professor - College of Nursing, Univ. of

Tennessee, Knoxville

• Mary Johnson, DNP, PMHNP-BC - Clinical Assistant Professor - College of

Nursing, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville

• Lauren Munoz, MSN, FNP-BC - Graduate Research Assistant - Univ. of

Tennessee, Knoxville

• Tracey Stansberry, PhD (c), MSN, APRN, AOCN - PhD Candidate-Univ. of

Tennessee, Knoxville, College of Nursing; TN Plateau Oncology, Advanced

Practice Nurse (PRN)

Outcome:

1. Describe key findings from interviews with Tennessee APRNs regarding

mental health challenges associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.

2. Discuss practice, policy, and educational implications from study findings

about mental health challenges.

Carole Myers

Lauren

Munoz

Mary Johnson

Tracey

Stansberry

Session H:

Peer Tutoring’s Effect on Nursing Students’ Anxiety Levels During Nursing

Skills Demonstrations

• Kayla Lambert, MSN, RN - Assistant Professor of Nursing, Union University

• Jean Crawford, MSN, RN - Assistant Professor of Nursing, Union University

Outcome:

After reviewing literature, faculty determined that optional peer tutoring could

have a positive effect on student anxiety levels. The aim of this study is to

determine if the use of student skills tutors (SST) decreases anxiety levels prior

to nursing skills demonstrations with faculty. The anticipated benefits for this

study are to reduce the anxiety level of nursing students while learning and

demonstrating basic nursing skills.

Kayla

Lambert

Jean

Crawford

Page 4 of 4

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Outcome

Disclosures to Participants

Participants will gain knowledge and new tools to integrate into their practice.

Contact Hour Credit

Participants at the 2021 TNA Virtual Conference will receive 4.5 contact hours the day of the event, with the

ability to earn up to 9.5 total contact hours. Paid participants of the conference will be able to do poster

self-study and view concurrent sessions you were unable to attend in real time to receive the additional

contact hours until December 1.

Official Accreditation Statement

The Tennessee Nurses Association is approved as a provider of nursing continuing professional

development by the South Carolina Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses

Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Requirements for Successful Completion for Continuing Education Credit

To receive contact hour credit for each session attended, attendees must:

• Visit at least ten posters

• Miss no more than five minutes of any session.

• Remain in the session until the scheduled ending time.

• Complete and submit the Evaluation Form(s) and the Verification of Attendance/Certificate Form listing

each session attended. Survey Monkey will be used this year to complete evaluations and verification of

attendance certificates.

Conflicts of Interest

The ANCC has established guidelines whereby all speakers must disclose any affiliations which may

cause a conflict of interest.

A Conflict of Interest occurs when an individual has an opportunity to affect educational content about

health-care products or services of a commercial interest with which she/he has a financial relationship.

No conflicts of interest were disclosed.

Commercial Support

Sponsors have made contributions to Tennessee Nurses Association in support of the 2021 TNA Annual

Conference.

Non-Endorsement of Products

The Tennessee Nurses Association’s approved provider status refers only to continuing nursing education

activities and does not imply that there is real or implied endorsement of any product, service, or company

referred to in this activity nor of any company subsidizing costs related to the activity.

Off-label Product Use

This CNE activity does not include any unannounced information about off-label use of a product for a

purpose other than that for which it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

2021 Virtual Membership Assembly

Rules and Information

Attending the Meeting via Virtual Technology

1. Participants should join this virtual meeting online via the link provided to registrants.

2. All participants should begin joining the meeting 30 minutes prior to the stated start time to

facilitate attendance and quorum determination. Participants may join the meeting on any computer

or smart device with an internet connection. Participants using desktop or laptop computers should

use their computer microphones and speakers for audio connection.

3. Each participant is responsible for his or her connection to the internet and conference based

on these Rules; no action will be invalidated on the grounds that the loss of, or poor quality of a

member’s individual connection prevented him or her from participating in the meeting, provided

that at least a quorum of participants was connected and able to participate.

4. During the Membership Assembly, voting on resolutions and bylaws will take place via negative vote

using the chatbox feature.

5. Upon entering the Zoom concurrent sessions, all participants should mute their audio and remain

muted unless being recognized to speak.

6. Each TNA member should name themselves via appropriate technology.

7. Each non-TNA member participant needs to “rename” themselves with a “NM-“ prefix (ex . NM-Jane

Doe), this will facilitate voting as nonmembers may not vote on any TNA issues.

8. Attendance and quorum will be based on the prefix and names of the participants.

9. Chat messages/short comments will be sent to everyone. The Q&A box will not be monitored.

10. Use the Chat message feature to pose a question to the chair, speaker, or staff. Questions will be answered

by the chair, speaker or be read aloud so that the appropriate person can be requested to answer.

11. A member intending to make a main motion, to offer an amendment, or to propose instructions to a

committee, shall type the motion in the chat window. Having this prepared beforehand will provide

a better understanding of the motion to be considered. Only members may propose or vote on

motions.

Membership Assembly (MA) General Rules of Order

1. The Membership Assembly and General Sessions will take place on TNA’s website (TNAonline.org)

via YouTube.

2. The Concurrent Sessions and PAC meeting will take place via Zoom. The web address for these

sessions is on the Conference Page on the website that was sent to you previously, and the link

addresses for the sessions will be displayed in this room prior to the sessions. The program book has

an overview of each concurrent session and poster presentation. Having the conference information

page open on your computer will make it easier to click on the hyperlink and go to the session you

choose.

3. To ask a question, make a motion, or comment, you must use the chatbox function. Your audio will

not work via YouTube, and you will be on mute via Zoom.

4. When asking a question, please include your name and district, then ask your question or make

your motion/comment. If you are not a TNA member, please use the suffix NM prior to your name as

members have priority, and nonmembers may not vote on motions.

5. To facilitate voting on motions, negative or no votes will be solicited first via the chatbox. If there are

not a majority of no votes cast, the motion will pass by consent.

6. Each member registered for the conference will receive a link to vote in the board election via

secured SurveyMonkey. You must vote between 12:20 p.m. – 1:20 p.m. central time. No voting will

take place after 1:20 p.m. central.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

7. All attendees were given the opportunity to self-nominate for TNA offices; self-nominations were

received for the office of secretary. You will vote for candidates as written on the survey monkey

ballot.

8. All attendees were given the opportunity to submit changes to the resolutions, no substantive

changes were submitted. Voting will take place on the documents as printed in the Program Book.

9. Only the resolves of resolutions/proposals shall be acted upon by the MA.

10. Only emergency motions or courtesy resolutions may be presented outside of the reference

process.

11. The voting body shall consist of the Board of Directors and TNA members in attendance.

Guidelines for Discussion on Resolutions/Proposals

1. No new proposals/resolutions will be appropriate during this virtual meeting.

2. To facilitate discussion, comments will be limited to those received via chatbox.

3. The sponsor may withdraw a resolution/proposal at any point in the review process.

4. Only the resolves of resolutions/proposals shall be acted upon by the MA.

Continuing Nursing Education (CNE) Credit

RN participants attending CE sessions will be awarded contact hours. The procedure is as follows:

1. Complete the Evaluation and return within the time frame established on the evaluation.

2. Complete an Attendance Verification of CNE Activity listing the sessions you attend via the SurveyMonkey

link sent to attendees. Participants must attend an entire CNE session to receive contact hours.

3. Make a copy of the SurveyMonkey form for your records.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Introduction to Robert’s Rules of Order

What Is Parliamentary Procedure?

It is a set of rules for conduct at meetings that allows everyone to be heard and to make decisions without

confusion.

Why is Parliamentary Procedure Important?

Because it’s a time tested method of conducting business at meetings and public gatherings. It can be

adapted to fit the needs of any organization. Today, Robert’s Rules of Order newly revised is the basic

handbook of operation for most clubs, organizations and other groups. So it’s important that everyone

know these basic rules!

Organizations using parliamentary procedure usually follow a fixed order of business. Below is a typical

example:

1. Call to order.

2. Roll call of members present.

3. Reading of minutes of last meeting.

4. Officers reports.

5. Committee reports.

6. Special orders --- Important business previously designated for consideration at this meeting.

7. Unfinished business.

8. New business.

9. Announcements.

10. Adjournment.

The method used by members to express themselves is in the form of moving motions. A motion is a

proposal that the entire membership take action or a stand on an issue. Individual members can:

1. Call to order.

2. Second motions.

3. Debate motions.

4. Vote on motions.

There are four Basic Types of Motions:

1. Main Motions: The purpose of a main motion is to introduce items to the membership for their

consideration. They cannot be made when any other motion is on the floor, and yield to privileged,

subsidiary, and incidental motions.

2. Subsidiary Motions: Their purpose is to change or affect how a main motion is handled, and is voted

on before a main motion.

3. Privileged Motions: Their purpose is to bring up items that are urgent about special or important

matters unrelated to pending business.

4. Incidental Motions: Their purpose is to provide a means of questioning procedure concerning other

motions and must be considered before the other motion.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

How are Motions Presented?

1. Obtaining the floor

a. Wait until the last speaker has finished.

b. Rise and wait in line at microphone.

c. Wait until the Chairman recognizes you.

2. Make Your Motion

a. Speak in a clear and concise manner.

b. Always state a motion affirmatively. Say, “I move that we...” rather than, “I move that we do not...”

c. Avoid personalities and stay on your subject.

3. Wait for Someone to Second Your Motion

4. Another member will second your motion or the Chairman will call for a second.

5. If there is no second, your motion is lost.

6. The Chairman States Your Motion

a. The Chairman will say, “it has been moved and seconded that we ...” Thus placing your motion

before the membership for consideration and action.

b. The membership then either debates your motion, or may move directly to a vote.

c. Once your motion is presented to the membership by the chairman it becomes “assembly

property”, and cannot be changed by you without the consent of the members.

7. Expanding on Your Motion

a. The time for you to speak in favor of your motion is at this point in time, rather than at the time

you present it.

b. The mover is always allowed to speak first.

c. All comments and debate must be directed to the chairman.

d. Keep to the time limit for speaking that has been established.

e. The mover may speak again only after other speakers are finished, unless called upon by the

Chairman.

8. Putting the Question to the Membership

a. The Chairman asks, “Are you ready to vote on the question?”

b. If there is no more discussion, a vote is taken.

c. On a motion to move the previous question may be adapted.

Voting on a Motion:

The method of vote on any motion depends on the situation and the by-laws of policy of your organization.

There are five methods used to vote by most organizations, they are:

1. By Voice – The Chairman asks those in favor to say, “aye”, those opposed to say “no”. Any member

may move for an exact count.

2. By Roll Call – Each member answers “yes” or “no” as his name is called. This method is used when a

record of each person’s vote is required.

3. By General Consent – When a motion is not likely to be opposed, the Chairman says, “if there is no

objection ...” The membership shows agreement by their silence, however if one member says, “I

object,” the item must be put to a vote.

4. By Division – This is a slight verification of a voice vote. It does not require a count unless the

chairman so desires. Members raise their hands or stand.

5. By Ballot – Members write their vote on a slip of paper; this method is used when secrecy is desired.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

There are two other motions that are commonly used that relate to voting.

1. Motion to Table -- This motion is often used in the attempt to “kill” a motion. The option is always

present, however, to “take from the table”, for reconsideration by the membership.

2. Motion to Postpone Indefinitely -- This is often used as a means of parliamentary strategy and allows

opponents of motion to test their strength without an actual vote being taken. Also, debate is once

again open on the main motion.

Parliamentary Procedure is the best way to get things done at your meetings. But, it will only work if you

use it properly.

1. Allow motions that are in order.

2. Have members obtain the floor properly.

3. Speak clearly and concisely.

4. Obey the rules of debate.

Most importantly, BE COURTEOUS.

31


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

113th Membership Assembly Agenda

Friday, October 15, 2021 | Virtual

8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Call to Order and Pledge of Allegiance – Carla Kirkland, TNA President

Greetings/President’s Address – Carla Kirkland

Introduction of Reference Committee – Alvin Jeffery, Chair

Adoption of the Membership Assembly Agenda – Carla Kirkland

Adoption of Rules of Order – Angela Heatherly, TNA Secretary

Treasurer’s Report – Nancy Stevens, TNA Treasurer

Slate of Candidates – Raven Wentworth, Nominating Committee Chair

Candidates Forum – Raven Wentworth

Announcements – Tina Gerardi, TNA Executive Director

Recess – Carla Kirkland

12:20 p.m. – 1:20 p.m.

Virtual Voting

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Call to Order – Carla Kirkland

Updates on 2020 Resolutions – Carla Kirkland

Bylaws Amendments – La-Kenya Kellum, TNA Director for Operations

Introduction of 2021 Resolutions – Alvin Jeffery

Executive Director Remarks – Tina Gerardi

Announcements – Tina Gerardi

Recess – Carla Kirkland

4:20 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Call to Order – Carla Kirkland

Report of Tellers – Raven Wentworth

Introduction of New Board and Members – Carla Kirkland

Board of Directors Oath of Office – Tina Gerardi

Remarks/Adjournment – Julie Hamm

SEE YOU NEXT YEAR IN FRANKLIN AT THE COOL SPRINGS MARRIOTT ON OCTOBER 7-9, 2022

32


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

2020-2022 Legislative and

Health Policy Statements

Introduction: The Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) is the professional association representing over

115,000 Tennessee registered nurses. This position paper outlines the basic philosophy of the TNA’s

Membership Assembly relative to health care policy, which may be addressed by the Tennessee General

Assembly and the U.S. Congress.

Mission: To improve health and health care for all Tennesseans and residents of the state, advance nurse

leaders, and the practice of nursing as essential to improvement efforts and transformational change and

serve as the voice for professional nurses.

The American Nurses Association’s Code of Ethics outlines foundational provisions that frame TNA’s

initiatives and actions.

Vision: TNA supports a transformed and modern health care delivery system that ensures that all

Tennesseans and residents of the State have access to equitable and affordable essential services no matter

where they live or when they are needed. The transformed modern system envisioned by TNA is patientcentered,

where primary care and prevention are priorities, promotes inter-professional collaboration

and care coordination, emphasizes values, and has expanded use of information technology to promote

efficiency and effectiveness in improving patient outcomes for all Tennesseans.

Goals: TNA is supportive of initiatives that improve health and health care and advance the following goals:

Optimal health system performance, including:

• Improved patient care experiences; and

• Improved population health; and

• Expanded opportunities for technology such as telehealth; and

• Reduced per capita cost for health care.

Access to high-quality, affordable and acceptable care for all Tennesseans and residents of the state,

including:

• Supporting the expansion of Medicaid in Tennessee; and

• Provision of a standardized package of essential health care services provided and financed by

public and private plans with protection against catastrophic costs and impoverishment; and

• Expanding primary care capacity by allowing RNs to practice to the full extent of their license by

diagnosing, providing chronic care management, care coordination, and preventive care in primary

care settings; and

• Enhanced access to efficient, cost–effective, high-quality, equitable, and comprehensive healthcare

services by allowing APRNs to practice to the full extent to which their education and training

prepare them by removing the economic barriers and burden of collaborative agreements and

allowing for full prescriptive authority; and

• Allow all APRNs with appropriate training to prescribe buprenorphine to increase access to

medication- assisted treatment (MAT) to combat the state’s opioid crisis regardless of the medical

setting;

33


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Full practice authority and enhanced participation in the delivery of care and policymaking for all

professional nurses, including:

• Support for the Tennessee Board of Nursing as the sole regulatory authority over nursing education

and practice; and

• Adoption of the Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and

Education (2008); and

• Elimination of financial, regulatory, organizational, and institutional barriers to the practice of

professional nursing; and

• Participation of registered nurses on all local, state, and national health care advisory, policymaking,

and governing boards, committees, and task forces; and

• Inclusion of APRNs as licensed independent providers (LIPs) in hospital licensure rules, health plans,

and health care facilities.

Assuring an adequate, competent and diverse nursing workforce to meet current and projected health

care demands, including:

• Improved data collection and information infrastructure to inform policymaking, planning, and

evaluation; and

• Promotion of higher levels of education and training through seamless academic progression, interprofessional

education of health professionals, and lifelong learning; and

• Funding for nursing students and faculty, including loan forgiveness programs; and

• Support for nurse safety in the patient care environment, staffing effectiveness plans, whistleblower

protection, and bans on mandatory overtime; and

• Protecting that nurse practice acts describe entry level qualifications such as education, practice

standards, and code of conduct for continued privilege to practice nursing.

Protecting and advancing the nursing profession:

• Working with the Tennessee State Legislature and Local Governments to modernize their

regulations, laws, ordinances and policies to include provider neutral language; and

• Continue to work with partners and stakeholders to prevent workplace violence and discrimination.

34


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

TNA Resolution

The Future of Nursing 2020-2030 Report

Whereas, the National Academy of Medicine, with sponsorship from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation,

in May 2021 released its report, The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity,

with a continued goal toward promoting a culture of health for all;

Whereas, the vision of this report is the achievement of health equity in the United States built on

strengthened nursing capacity and expertise, with the following recommendations:

Recommendation 1: In 2021 all national nursing organizations initiate work to develop a shared agenda

for addressing social determinants of health and health equity, to include explicit priorities across nursing

practice, education, leadership, and health policy engagement.

Recommendation 2: By 2023 government agencies, health care organizations, payers, and foundations

should initiate actions to enable the nursing workforce to address social determinants of health and health

equity more comprehensively, regardless of practice setting.

Recommendation 3: By 2021 nursing education programs, employers, nursing leaders, licensing boards, and

nursing organizations should initiate implementation of structures, systems, and evidence-based interventions

to promote nurses’ health and well-being, especially as they take on new roles to advance health equity.

Recommendation 4: All organizations, including government entities and employing organizations, should

enable nurses to practice to the full extent of their education and training by removing barriers that prevent

them from fully addressing social needs and social determinants of health and by improving health care

access, quality, and value.

Recommendation 5: Federal, tribal, state, local, and private payers and public health agencies should

establish sustainable and flexible payment mechanisms to support nurses in both health care and public

health, including school nurses, in addressing social needs, social determinants of health, and health equity.

Recommendation 6: All public and private health care systems should incorporate nursing expertise in

designing, generating, analyzing, and applying data to support initiatives focused on social determinants of

health and health equity using diverse digital platforms, artificial intelligence, and other innovative technologies.

Recommendation 7: Nursing education programs, including continuing education, and accreditors and

the National Council of State Boards of Nursing should ensure that nurses are prepared to address social

determinants of health and achieve health equity.

Recommendation 8: To enable nurses to address inequities within communities, federal agencies, and other

key stakeholders within and outside the nursing profession should strengthen and protect the nursing

workforce during the response to such public health emergencies as the COVID-19 pandemic and natural

disasters, including those related to climate change.

Recommendation 9: Representatives from nursing, public health, health care, and other stakeholders should

convene to develop and support a research agenda and evidence base describing the impact of nursing

interventions, including multisector collaboration, on social determinants of health, environmental health,

health equity, and nurses’ health and well-being; therefore, be it

36


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Resolved, that Tennessee Nurses Association will encourage, advocate for, and support efforts at the local,

state, and national legislative, regulatory, and institutional levels regarding these recommendations; and be

it further

Resolved, that Tennessee Nurses Association will support the health and well-being of nurses, and

encourage them to attend to their own self-care; and be it further

Resolved, that Tennessee Nurses Association will continue to advocate for all nurses to have the ability to

work to the top of their education and license; and be it further

Resolved, that Tennessee Nurses Association will continue to foster and support the diverse roles of nurses

as leaders and advocates in all communities.

Reference: https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/the-future-of-nursing-2020-2030

37


TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

TNA Resolution

Safe Staffing in Tennessee

Whereas, in the year 2021, the State of Tennessee has a substantial interest in promoting quality care and

improving health care delivery to patients in facilities across the state;

Whereas, nurses have risen to the challenge of being on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, and with

increasing acuity levels of those patients, the need for improved quality measures to protect patient care is

an essential component of that care;

Whereas, nurses are stating the need for improved staffing to reduce the incidence of medical errors;

Whereas, nurses are the most significant single component of the health care system, with inadequate and

poorly monitored registered nurse staffing practices resulting in too few registered nurses providing direct

care, jeopardizing the quality-of-care delivery;

Whereas, numerous studies show that patient outcomes directly correlate to safe nurse staffing levels,

including a 2010 Health Service research study that concluded increases in nurse staffing and skill mix lead

to improved quality and reduced length of stay at no additional cost;

Whereas, nurses need established requirements for safe staffing, including but not limited to, direct care

registered nurse staffing ratios to help address the registered nurse shortage;

Whereas, registered nurses need improved retention strategies for nurses considering leaving direct patient

care due to inadequate staffing; therefore, be it

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will advocate with elected officials throughout our state

to establish safe staffing protocols, including but not limited to, minimum direct care registered nurse-topatient

ratios that consider acuity measures to improve quality of care and patient safety; and be it further

Resolved, that Tennessee Nurses Association will stand with all nurses to support increased and improved

recruitment and retention strategies to address the shortage of registered nurses; and be it further

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will support and advocate the outcomes of nursing

research that show safe nurse staffing levels lead to quality care and reduced length of stay; and be it

further

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will advocate for legislation and institutional strategies

that support all registered nurses from leaving direct patient care due to inadequate staffing.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

TNA Resolution

Nurse Well Being and Resilience

Whereas, The National Academy of Medicine has formed an action collaborative on clinician well-being and

resilience;

Whereas, clinician well-being supports improved patient-clinician relationships, a high-functioning care

team, and an engaged and effective workforce;

Whereas, The National Academy of Medicine reports 43% of nurses experience symptoms of burnout which

can result in immense costs, personally, professionally, as well as, a cost to health care organizations and

patient care;

Whereas, nurses experience depressive symptoms at a rate more than double that of the general adult

population and untreated depression can lead to suicide; therefore, be it

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will stand with and support all nurses in improving

resiliency and well-being; and be it further

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will provide resources for nurses to measure burnout and

encourage individual strategies to promote well-being; and be it further

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will encourage institutions and hospitals to respond and

provide nurse wellness/resiliency programs; and be it further

Resolved, that the Tennessee Nurses Association will work with appropriate parties to create transparency

in nurse suicide reporting.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Thank you to our Sponsors who make

our 2021 Conference a huge success!

(At Press Time)

Gold Level Sponsorship

Core Civic

Silver Level Sponsorship

Ultragenyx

Bronze Level Sponsorship

Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency, Inc.

CHI

DCI Donor Services, Inc.

Janssen Pharm

NSO

Sponsor Level

Accuvein

Arkansas State University

BlueCare

East Tennessee State University

Galen School of Nursing

King University

UT Health Science Center – School of Nursing

Walden University

Year of the Nurse Sponsors:

Marcia Barnes

Kerry Copeland

Tina Gerardi

Julie Hamm

Carla Kirkland

Susie Leming Lee

TNA District 9

Hailin Swann

Patti Scott

Raven Wentworth

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

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TNA Board of Directors & Staff

Carla Kirkland

MSN, APRN, ACNP-BC,

FNP-BC, ENP-BC

President

Collierville

Julie Hamm

BSN, MSN, ACNP-BC

President-Elect

Hermitage

Heather Jackson

PhD, APRN, FNP-BC

Vice President

Franklin

Angela Heatherly

DNP, MSN, RN

Secretary

LaFollette

Nancy Stevens

DNP, APRN-BC, CEN

TRN-C, FAEN

Treasurer

Ooltewah

La-Kenya Kellum

DNP, RN, NE-BC, CNML

Director – Operations

Memphis

Jennifer Hitt

PhD, RN, CNE

Director - Membership

Memphis

Kerry Copeland

MSN, RN, CNRN,

CRRN, NPD-BC

Director - Education

Arlington

Marcia Barnes, DNP,

ACNP-BC, CWS, CPSN

Director –

Government Affairs

Lebanon

Laura Reed

DNP, APRN, FNP-BC

Director - Practice

Olive Branch, MS

TNA Staff

Tina Gerardi

MS, RN, CAE

Outgoing

Executive Director

Kirk Lawson, CAE

Executive Director

Diane

Cunningham

Office Manager

Kathleen Murphy

Director,

Government

Affairs/Chief Lobbyist

Kathryn Denton

Director, Computer/

Network Systems

Managing Editor -Tennessee

Nurse, TNF Program Mgr.

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Tennessee Nurses Association

District Map

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

We are Better Together – Join Our Team of Members Today

What an incredible force RNs will have in the health care world if more nurses support their professional

organization. There are over 100,000 registered nurses in Tennessee. When you join TNA/ANA, you will become

an integral part of a network of over 1.4 million nurses that speak for nursing…and more importantly, the profession

will gain your much-needed participation, support, and expertise.

Joint Membership in TNA and ANA is now only $15/month or $174/year. Joining TNA and ANA is a smart choice to

achieve quality patient care, advance your career and elevate our profession.

When you join you’ll have access to resources that will help you:

• Enhance your skills through discounted continuing education modules and a monthly FREE Navigate

Nursing webinar

• Network and connect with new peers and colleagues

• Stay up-to-date on the news and issues affecting nurses through members-only journals and publications

• Discover professional opportunities through the TNA Career Center, as well as the ANA Career Center

• Develop your leadership skills through the ANA Leadership Institute

Best of all, your voice will be heard when we speak out on nursing issues. Together with TNA, ANA

represents the largest and most inclusive group of registered nurses in the country.

Now is the best time to join to advance your career, your profession, and your patient care. Make TNA/ANA

your choice today!

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Tennessee Nurses Association’s

2021 Slate of Candidates and Statements

SECRETARY Vote for one (1)

Angela Heatherly, DNP, MSN, RN

I currently serve as District 2 Co-President and would like to increase my service

with TNA. I have a DNP from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga and an

MSN with a Specialization in Clinical Education from King University. I have a thirtyyear

background in nursing, and primarily my clinical background is in leadership,

emergency medicine, and medical-surgical. My goal is to advocate for nursing

professionals while improving the health care for our communities.

Jennifer (Jeny) Conrad-Rendon, NP-C

I would be honored to serve as your TNA Secretary for another two-year term. I have

loved representing the approximately 110,000 Nurses in TN these past 2 years. We have

helped influence the following bills to be passed that: added nurses in where an assault

is a criminal offense; allows APRNs to order/sign home health orders for our patients. We

have also joined back in the fight against the American Medical Association towards Full

Practice Authority. In 2020 the TNA FPA bill was pulled before it could be killed. In 2021

the TNA FPA bill was scheduled to be heard in the 2022 legislative session, which is the farthest the FPA bill

has ever got. We have also grown TNA membership to over 4000 members! We need YOUR help in finding the

approximately 106,000 nurses remaining and get them involved in TNA so we can have a bigger voice. I feel that

it is my responsibility to give back to our profession and help it to become the strongest and best it can be in TN

and worldwide.

My calling to be a nurse came from my cousin, who is a nurse. It began with becoming a CNA, where I worked

in home health. From there my AA degree, BSN degree, and MSN degree were completed. My 21 years of being

a registered nurse consists of just about every aspect of nursing: Labor & Delivery, Oncology, Primary Care,

Cardiology, Behavioral Health, and Pediatrics. I was an RN for ten years before I became an APRN in 2009. As

a Family Nurse Practitioner, I became an entrepreneur and owned a primary care clinic for approximately 5.5

years and grew it to approximately 1800 patients. I have also helped grow a new concept in a business. We

took preventive physicals to the workplace via Mobile clinics/vans staffed with an FNP and an EMT. We grew it

in a 2-year timespan from no van runs to thirty a month. I am currently starting up a concierge clinic under my

husband’s personal training studio.

Full Practice Authority is critical as APRNs should be able to practice to the full extent of our education. I have

been very active in this important fight and have started a petition, met with legislators, started several social

media pages to educate others on FPA. I have testified to the TN Senate on Insure TN because access to

healthcare should be one of our basic rights, and no one should be without healthcare.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

I strongly believe that a true leader helps to build others up into the best person they can be. When people feel

appreciated and respected, they tend to be happy, and that reflects on to their care towards their patients. I

am the type who is eager to learn new things and quick to jump in to help wherever it is needed. Teamwork is

crucial for success to advance our profession, and I look forward to continuing to be a part of the TNA team.

DIRECTOR - GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Vote for one (1)

Marcia Barnes, DNP, APRN, ACNP-BC, CWS, CPSN

I have had the pleasure of serving as Director, Government Affairs for the past 2 years

and am a longstanding member of ANA/TNA for many years. I have always recognized

the need of professionalism, serving as a role model for others, and being an active

advocate for nursing. I have even learned and grown during the past two years as an

advocate for both our profession and the citizens of Tennessee. I am a strong advocate

for independent practice for advanced practice nurses and feel it is as much my

responsibility as any other APN to be involved and advocate for not only APNs but Tennesseans. I believe all

nurses should be allowed to practice to their full extent of their education and training. I served as Chair of

the Government Affairs Committee prior to being elected and embraced the opportunity to learn about

the legislative process. This solidified for me that collaborating with legislators through TNA, independent

practice will become a reality. I will continue to work hard and advocate through the legislative process and

look forward to working with TNA.

DIRECTOR - OPERATIONS Vote for one (1)

Michele McCarthy, MSN, CNE

In my role as nurse faculty, I have the position of chair for the nursing program

committee. I have also served on the college curriculum committee for 3 years. This

experience, coupled with involvement in the program effectiveness committee, has

given me knowledge about various bylaws and procedures applicable to nursing and

education. I would love the opportunity to serve on TNA in this position to continue

growth and development opportunities for TNA and our nurses.

DIRECTOR - PRACTICE Vote for one (1)

Monique Beale, MSN, RN, CCM, COHN

I am passionate about the modeling of sound health policy as the framework for

greater access to quality care, improved outcomes, enhanced resource utilization,

and ultimately better health equity for all. For more than a decade, I have worked as

a healthcare policy expert for Managed Care Organizations (MCOs): private insurance

entities, Medicare, and Medicaid. Professionally, I believe that becoming a TNA board

member can only enhance my contribution to healthcare – by broadening my ability

to engage more entirely in the narrative of health and nursing policy research and development.

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NOMINATING COMMITTEE Vote for three (3)

Ashley Carter, BSN, RN

A little about my background, I started my nursing career as a Licensed Practical

Nurse in an urgent care setting and then relocated to Nashville, TN a year later to

pursue my passion in Pediatrics. I worked at Vanderbilt as a Pediatric/Adolescent

Primary and Acute care nurse for about 4 years before returning to school. I

completed my ASN at Fortis Institute because they had a bridge program for LPN-

RN in 18 months. During that time, I worked as a night shift supervisor at a Skilled

Nursing Facility and served as interim Resident Services director. I returned to school to complete my BSN

at Chamberlain University and am currently enrolled in the MSN program to achieve my goal of becoming

a Nurse Educator. I am beyond thankful for the opportunities that I have been able to access through TNA;

it has truly helped me grow professionally. I am a self-motivated individual. I love learning from others

and sharing my personal experiences. I strive to represent diversity in healthcare and provide better care

for diverse populations while creating more inclusion within the nursing profession. I want to represent

areas of nursing that are often underrepresented and believe that their participation and knowledge is

vital to gain insight on patient experience, education, quality, and safety. The skills we develop as bedside

nurses can easily translate to leadership/managerial roles. One of my favorite quotes of all time is, “Don’t

let the fear of what could happen make nothing happen.” The year 2020-2021 for me is about stepping

out of your comfort zone, being brave, and bold. With every stage in my life, I wanted to focus on being

the best version of myself that I can possibly be while spreading positivity and confidence.Today I am

honored to nervously place myself at the forefront of a meaningful leadership opportunity. I hope you chose

me to represent TNA based on support, guidance, and faith, as I would love to represent this incredible

organization. I am humbled by the sheer possibility of representing a caliber of nurses who I have found to

be outstanding individuals. To me, nurses represent resiliency and selflessness. Nurses are professionally

driven to serve and have shown complete dedication time and time again. As a newer member, I was

overwhelmed by the wealth of knowledge, support, and mentorship that I’ve received, and it has had a

profound impact on me as a nurse leader. I am fortunate to have had nothing but positive experiences,

encounters, and encouragement on this journey. Since my start with TNA, I have become an interim board

member for District 3, made the May 2021 edition of Tennessee Nurse for the “I am TNA” segment, and I

am the current member of the month for District 3. I value working as a team and feel that my personable

character, eagerness to learn, and ability to overcome challenges would be befitting in this role.

La-Kenya Kellum, DNP, RN, NE-BC, CNML

I have been a practicing registered nurse and active member of TNA/ANA for 21 years.

I have held positions in TNA including: Director of Operations, Chair of Nominating

Committee, Secretary, Vice-President, and ANA Delegate. At the local level (District 1),

I have served as President, Vice-President, and Treasurer. I have been a nursing leader

for over 15 years. My strengths include energy and drive to accomplish goals, faith in

abilities and judgment, focus, diversity, creativity, positivity, and consistency.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Sherry Raber, DNP, MMHC, MSN, RN

My name is Sherry Raber, I have been a member of ANA/FNA/TNA for years and

currently serve in the role of Interim Treasurer for TNA District 3. Since serving

in this role, I realize more than ever the importance of being active and getting

involved with our nursing community. In 2020-2021, I served as a mentor in the ANA

Mentorship program and quickly noticed the impact mentoring has on future nurse

leaders. I have over 20 years of leadership experience in a variety of settings and

as a nurse leader I am very familiar with the importance of implementing and adherence to policy and

procedures. Additionally, I am quite familiar with the screening process of evaluating candidates’ resumes/

CVs to determine if they meet specific qualifications related to a particular role; somewhat like the role

of the nominating committee with screening candidates to be placed on the slate for TNA elections. I am

excited about serving on the nomination committee and I look forward to you casting your vote for me to

serve on the Nominating Committee.

Hailin Swan, BSN, RN

I care. I care about my patients, my family, my friends, and anyone who asks for help.

I want to be able to help them all heal and lead healthier, fuller lives. While I can do

much as a nurse, I believe I can contribute to our profession through volunteer service

to the Nurse professional association. I worked full-time and transitioned to parttime

after my third child and completed my BSN with honors on scholarship in 2020.

I am accepted into the University of Southern Alabama Master of Science Nurse

Practitioner program in the Fall, 2021. I have moved from floor nurse to med-step/cardiac telemetry unit to

my current favorite, the emergency department. Each position has given me unique challenges, rewards,

and growth. I have even taken opportunities to change departmental practices to improve response times

between the emergency room and the pharmacy to improve patient care. I am a member of the Shelby

County Medical Reserve Corps. During the pandemic, I have helped with vaccination drives, PPE gathering

missions, call center hotline staffing, and vaccinating community members. All the while, I have been an

active TNA member chairing the practice council and serving on the nominating committees for District 1.

This year, I was inducted to the “40 under 40” sponsored by the TNA, the Tennessee Hospital Association,

and the Tennessee Action Coalition. I am passionate and committed to being a caring, responsible health

care provider and would hope to continue my growth as a TNA nominating committee member.

ANA MEMBERSHIP ASSEMBLY REP. Vote for three (3)

Lisa Beasley, DNP, APRN, NP-C, RN

I am currently serving as D1 President and have served as Vice-President in recent years.

I am an advocate for the nursing profession and have built a rapport with many members

in our district and across the state. I was recently selected for a Fellowship in the Health

Policy and Media program at George Washington University and will be mentored by an

experienced faculty member at GWU. I have served on several committees in the College

of Nursing in both past and current employment, and am dedicated to health and health

care for all Tennesseans. I recently started a podcast entitled “That’s Healthful”, featuring guests and topics that

impact health from local to global. I am an assistant professor in the UTHSC CON and have recently been part of

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

a team that has obtained a $1.5M HRSA grant to increase the number of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE)

in the West TN Region (both rural and urban areas with an emphasis on rural). I also serve on another HRSA

grant to develop the nursing workforce in rural areas. I recently completed a Leadership Academy through the

Rural Health Association of Tennessee (RHAT), where I learned valuable information on leading and improving

the lives of rural Tennesseans. I would be honored to serve the Tennessee Nurses Association as a representative

of the ANA Membership Assembly. Thank you for your consideration.

Ashley Carter, BSN, RN

A little about my background, I started my nursing career as a Licensed Practical Nurse

in an urgent care setting and then relocated to Nashville, TN a year later to pursue my

passion in Pediatrics. I worked at Vanderbilt as a Pediatric/Adolescent Primary and Acute

care nurse for about 4 years before returning to school. I completed my ASN at Fortis

Institute because they had a bridge program for LPN-RN in 18 months. During that time,

I worked as a night shift supervisor at a Skilled Nursing Facility and served as interim

Resident Services director. I returned to school to complete my BSN at Chamberlain University and am currently

enrolled in the MSN program to achieve my goal of becoming a Nurse Educator. I am beyond thankful for the

opportunities that I have been able to access through TNA; it has truly helped me grow professionally. I am a

self-motivated individual. I love learning from others and sharing my personal experiences. I strive to represent

diversity in healthcare and provide better care for diverse populations while creating more inclusion within

the nursing profession. I want to represent areas of nursing that are often underrepresented and believe that

their participation and knowledge is vital to gain insight on patient experience, education, quality, and safety.

The skills we develop as bedside nurses can easily translate to leadership/managerial roles. One of my favorite

quotes of all time is, “Don’t let the fear of what could happen make nothing happen.” The year 2020-2021 for

me is about stepping out of your comfort zone, being brave, and bold. With every stage in my life, I wanted to

focus on being the best version of myself that I can possibly be while spreading positivity and confidence.Today

I am honored to nervously place myself at the forefront of a meaningful leadership opportunity. I hope you

chose me to represent TNA based on support, guidance, and faith, as I would love to represent this incredible

organization. I am humbled by the sheer possibility of representing a caliber of nurses who I have found to be

outstanding individuals. To me, nurses represent resiliency and selflessness. Nurses are professionally driven to

serve and have shown complete dedication time and time again. As a newer member, I was overwhelmed by the

wealth of knowledge, support, and mentorship that I’ve received, and it has had a profound impact on me as a

nurse leader. I am fortunate to have had nothing but positive experiences, encounters, and encouragement on

this journey. Since my start with TNA, I have become an interim board member for District 3, made the May 2021

edition of Tennessee Nurse for the “I am TNA” segment, and I am the current member of the month for District

3. I value working as a team and feel that my personable character, eagerness to learn, and ability to overcome

challenges would be befitting in this role.

Carla Kirkland, MSN, APRN, ACNP-BC, FNP-BC, ENP-BC

As your soon to be Tennessee Nurses Association Immediate Past President, I would

love to take the information I have obtained as TNA President over the past two years

and represent our Association at the ANA Membership Assembly. With a new TNA

Executive Director and President in place, I can help give guidance and background to

recent ANA policies and interests. I was honored to be an ANA Membership Assembly

representative during my term as your TNA President.

With almost 40 years as an RN, then APRN in ICU, Internal Medicine, and Emergency Medicine, I have

extensive experience with current bedside nursing and advanced practice nursing issues. Prior to the TNA

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Board of Directors, I was a Director, then President, of TNA District 1. I have a passion for engaging nurses

in health policy and advocacy. I am a 2019 graduate of the American Nurses Advocacy Institute. I am one of

the TNA representatives on the Coalition for Access to Care in Tennessee and am on the ANCC APRN Task

Force. I would appreciate your vote for ANA Membership Assembly Representative.

Erin Morgan, DNP, FNP-BC

My name is Erin Morgan, and I am asking for your vote to serve as one of TNA’s ANA

membership assembly representatives. Currently, I serve as the Co-president for

District 2 in East Tennessee. This position has offered the opportunity to organize,

lead, and advocate for nurses at the local level. Additionally, I continue to work as an

APRN and teach nursing students at the undergraduate and graduate levels at UT-

Knoxville. These roles offer the opportunity to remain in touch with nursing practice

and current discussions in nursing education. I now seek the opportunity to advocate and speak for all

Tennessee nurses at the national level. Now is the time for nurses to come together and use our voices to

advocate for our patients and our profession. I commit to do my best to represent the wide diversity of

nurses from all regions of Tennessee as the ANA Membership Assembly Representative. Thank you for your

vote for ANA Membership Assembly Representative.

Carole Myers, PhD, RN, FAAN

Carole R. Myers-Candidate to Represent TNA at 2022-2023 ANA Membership

Assemblies. Carole R. Myers was elected to represent the Tennessee Nurses Association

(TNA) at the American Nurses Association (ANA) bi-annual conventions of the House

of Delegates 2008-2012 and the Membership Assemblies 2014-present. Carole’s

long-term involvement with ANA was on display at the 2018 in-person Membership

Assembly meeting as a member of the Presidential Endorsement Task Force and

when she was called upon with approximately 30 minutes notice to fill-in for an ill colleague to talk about

nurses and media engagement for one of the Dialogue Forums. Carole was selected to serve on the ANA

2019 Presidential Endorsement Task Force. Carole has been involved in TNA in a variety of leadership and

other roles since the 1980s. Her service includes: TN-PAC chair 1985-1988 and 2007-2010, secretary 2007,

and member of the board 2004-2007 and GOVA chair 2010-2017 and member 2008-2010 and 2017-present.

Carole has been active in state policymaking related to health, health care and APRN practice since the 1980s

and served as co-chair of the 2016 Tennessee General Assembly Scope of Practice Task Force.

Carole is a recognized national expert on nurses’ media engagement, access to care, APRN practice

authority, Medicaid, and national health reform. Carole was a long-term columnist for the Tennessee

Nurse and now the American Journal of Nursing. Carole is the creator and co-host of HealthConnections,

a radio show on WUOT-FM, the Knoxville NPR affiliate. Myers blogs, is an avid Tweeter, and author of

numerous national and state OpEds, other commentaries, and scholarly publications. Carole is a Fellow

in the American Academy of Nurses and a Senior Fellow at the Center for Health Policy and Media

Engagement at George Washington University. Most recently, Carole has been a member of a research

team that conducted a national survey and interviews with Tennessee APRNs to examine 1) describe

state practice barriers, 2) determine the effect of COVID-19 pandemic-related suspension of all practice

restrictions or waiver of select practice agreement requirements in states with reduced or restricted

practice, and 3) explore the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on APRN practice. Carole is also the lead

Principal Investigator for study evaluating nurse’s media competencies.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Poster Presentation Abstracts

The Ambulance is Our Emergency Room: The Voices of Rural Tennessee

Tracey Stansberry, PhD(c), MSN, APRN, AOCN (Presenter)

Richard Henighan, MSN, APRN (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Since 2010, Tennessee has lost more hospitals per capita than any other state. Most of the closures have

occurred in vulnerable rural communities, which have an increased incidence of chronic disease and

premature death. These closures move hospital and emergency care away from those who often need it the

most and threaten to worsen existing rural health disparities.

Objectives:

Nurses will identify and understand the impact of Tennessee’s hospital closures on individuals and

communities, thereby informing policymaking and strengthening health equity in these vulnerable

populations.

Methods/Procedures:

Focus groups and informant interviews were conducted in rural communities across the state of Tennessee,

both in person and virtually. Data were coded, and themes were identified from the transcripts. Themes

revolved around local community impacts and policy recommendations.

Findings:

Rural communities are often faced with an abrupt closure of their local hospitals. The closures impact local

access to hospital and emergency services and exacerbate anxieties surrounding access to care, particularly

in emergencies. Local economies decline following the loss of a hospital. Affected rural residents are

seeking policy solutions from all levels of government.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Policymakers at all the federal, state, and local levels must work together to address this multifaceted rural

health equity challenge. Nurses, as the largest and most trusted group of health care professionals, are in a

unique position to advocate for patients and communities.

COVID-19 Mobile Vaccination Clinic:

Increasing Vaccine Access in a High-Risk Community

Carrie Plummer, PhD, ANP-BC (Presenter)

Anna Dennis, BA (Student Co-Presenter) | Elizabeth Gilley, RN (Co-Presenter)

Mariam Hameed, BS (Student Co-Presenter) | David Spielman, PhD (Co-Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

There is a dearth of evidence-based research on how best to provide COVID-19 vaccinations to extremely

high-risk, difficult to engage community members.

Objectives:

1. Participants will be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of a mobile vaccination program

at reaching “high risk” community members.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

2. Participants will be able to construct a pilot vaccination program for their own “high risk”

populations in their communities.

Methods/Procedures:

Students went door-to-door distributing vaccine eligibility questionnaires, answering questions, and

completing pre-registration. Residents’ vaccine hesitancy was addressed by providing evidence-based

vaccine information. Vaccines were provided on site, and homebound residents were provided in-home

vaccination.

Findings:

Eighty-three percent of residents were fully vaccinated, ensuring internal herd immunity for this residential

apartment complex. Mobile vaccination clinics overcome several barriers to accessing the COVID-19 vaccine,

including vaccine hesitancy, limited mobility and access to transportation, and low health literacy.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Future quality improvement initiatives based on the mobile vaccination clinic will help to increase the

accessibility of vaccines to other “at-risk” communities.

Enhancing Nurse Skills for Promoting Evidence-based Smoking Cessation

Julia Steed, PhD, APRN, FNP-BC (Presenter)

Problem Addressed:

Smokers often underestimate the risks of cigarette smoking. However, nurses are in an ideal position to

routinely assess and provide treatment for smoking cessation. Additionally, nurses are inherently passionate

about supporting efforts to enhance health promotion strategies among patients.

Objectives:

1. This session will present a comprehensive overview of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for

smoking cessation along with supporting tobacco research.

2. This session will also engage its participants in problem-based learning to ultimately achieve

competence to initiate a smoking cessation treatment plan using a brief counseling approach.

Methods/Procedures:

n/a

Findings:

n/a

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Ensuring that nurses possess the knowledge and skill to effectively deliver evidence-based treatment

strategies to smokers is necessary to reduce the prevalence of smokers in Tennessee and to decrease the

morbidity and mortality associated with cardiopulmonary smoking-related diseases.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Problem Addressed:

First Aid Training Increases Teachers’ Confidence in

Providing Care for Students in San Eduardo, Ecuador

Mary Evelyn Carroll, BA (Student Presenter)

Anya Krause, BA (Student Co-Presenter)

Zoey Williams, BS (Student Co-Presenter)

In San Eduardo, Ecuador, there is a lack of pre-hospital services, first aid supplies, and access to healthcare

facilities. The closest hospital is 15 km away, and there is no designated area to care for sick or injured

children or community members.

Objectives:

By the end of this activity, participants will be able to:

1. Describe specific factors contributing to reduced access to basic injury prevention and treatment in

a rural, global health population

2. Identify the benefits and challenges of implementing a virtual First Aid training workshop for an

underresourced, “at risk” rural population.

Methods/Procedures:

Students implemented a virtual First Aid training workshop for teachers at Escuela Anne Stevens using

PowerPoint and Zoom. Educational content included standardized materials from the “American Red

Cross First Aid Training Guide”. The presentation was in Spanish, addressed individual First Aid needs, and

indicated how to identify injuries, what to do, when to seek medical care, and how to prevent future injuries.

To measure training outcomes, teachers’ confidence pre- and post-training were measured, along with the

teachers’ self-report of satisfaction with the training and self-confidence utilizing the training materials.

Content quizzes from the American Red Cross First Aid app were also used during the presentation to

informally assess knowledge and increase audience participation.

Findings:

Eight teachers successfully participated in the virtual First Aid training workshop. The teachers’

confidence in providing First Aid care to the students increased 69.9% after the training. Surveys showed

96.8% participant satisfaction with the virtual training model and 93% self-confidence in mastering and

utilization of the materials presented.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Providing First Aid resources and basic skills training to under resourced community members helps

address the gap in access to healthcare in rural, global health populations. This simple and low budget

intervention can be adapted to other at risk populations both in and outside the United States.

Problem Addressed:

“Got Grit!”

Julie Windmiller, MSN, RN (Presenter)

Many factors have been associated with nursing students’ success on NCLEX-RN. These factors have

become the building blocks for admissions criteria into Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs.

Robust grade point averages (GPA), strong science scores, and proficient Test of Essential Academic

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Skills (TEAS) are a few of the must-have criteria. What has not been readily studied is the impact Grit can

have on student NCLEX-RN success. A poster presentation will be used to provide knowledge about the

power of Grit.

Objectives:

The participant will:

1. Identify current terms and characteristics associated with Grit.

2. Discover the relationship of Growth Mindset and Resilience within the nexus of Grit.

3. Articulate how Grit can be used as part of a nursing admission prerequisite to determine BSN

student NCLEX-RN success.

Methods/Procedures: ,

n/a

Findings:

n/a

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

n/a

Horticulture Therapy: Creation of a Community Garden at a Residential

Substance Abuse Treatment Facility

Courtney Keller, B.A. (Student Presenter) | Amber Hopkins B.S. (Student Co-Presenter)

Tift Palmer B.A. (Student Co-Presenter) | Sydney Center B.S. (Student Co-Presenter)

Jean Wu B.A. (Student Co-Presenter) | Allyson Jessen B.S. (Student Co-Presenter)

Jessica Levey B.S. (Student Co-Presenter) | Dr. Brittany Haskell PMHNP-BC, DNP, CNE (Mentor)

Problem Addressed:

Horticulture therapy is a type of occupational therapy that uses the science of planting, growing, and

maintaining a garden to improve emotional health including, the expansion of social networks and the

reduction of stress. Participation in gardening activities has the potential to lead to a decrease in tension,

anxiety, depression, anger, and confusion in addiction populations. This quality improvement project

was implemented at a treatment facility providing services to women 17 and older, located in the middle

Tennessee area voluntarily seeking treatment for substance use, who may also be experiencing mental

illness, trauma, and/or incarceration. Upon assessment of the facility via a windshield survey there was no

productive use of the outdoor space.

Objectives:

The purpose of our quality improvement project is to fund and build a community garden, create a

curriculum to promote mental health and well-being, and foster a sense of responsibility and

community.

Methods/Procedures:

Nursing students found, by electronic survey for staff and paper survey for residents, that there was

initial interest for an outdoor garden. The students applied for and obtained a grant to purchase supplies,

implement the design plan, and create a gardening curriculum. Nursing students constructed a garden

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

space that the treatment facility can use for years to come. A local herb society provided the students

with a variety of herbs to plant in the garden. Through a partnership with a local gardening non-profit, a

curriculum was created and shared with the treatment staff and future nursing cohorts.

Findings:

Outcome-based measurements were used rather than quantifiable impact-based measurements due

to the nature of the project. The following outcomes were achieved: acquiring funds from an outside

grant, obtaining all materials necessary to build a garden, building of a garden, maintaining the garden

successfully, creating a structured curriculum to guide the next group of students at the organization, and

implementing a lesson with the residents of the treatment facility.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

The project was a valuable learning opportunity for students, and initial interactions with residents created a

positive impact. Future directions for this project include implementation of gardening curriculum as well as

measurement of the impact of horticulture therapy on the residents. If results are positive, this project could

be implemented at other substance use treatment facilities serving different populations where impacts

could be measured and compared.

Implementation of Fall Prevention Education and Protocol at Georgetown

Public Hospital Corporation in Georgetown, Guyana

Problem Addressed:

Hailee Hunt-Hawkins, BA (Student Presenter)

Rachel Gutierrez, BSA (Student Co-Presenter)

Stephanie Kress, LCSW, LICSW-PIP (Student Co-Presenter)

Jessica Van Meter, DNP APN-BC AEMT (Co-Presenter)

The current project seeks to address the lack of a falls prevention protocol and the noted high number of

falls in the ED in Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation in Guyana.

Objectives:

At the completion of this presentation, participants should understand the importance of a community

needs assessment and demonstrate confidence to create and analyze such an assessment. Additionally,

participants will identify the relationship between multimodal learning tiers and demonstrated impact on

student learning. Finally, participants will engage with the challenges and rewards of implementing a new

protocol in a global health setting and will utilize tools provided to streamline their own such projects in the

future.

Methods/Procedures:

Utilizing pre- and post- assessments and multimodal learning interventions, we were able to assess the

success of student learning regarding falls prevention practices. Additionally, by engaging with champions

in the ED, we were able to obtain objective data on the number of falls recorded. Importantly, we also

collected meaningful data on the perceptions of the number of falls and the reasons that falls may not be

recorded. These data were tremendously helpful in understanding the culture and challenges at GPHC that

should be addressed in future QI projects.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Findings:

We found that learning was effective, as evidenced by increased mean scores on the pre- and postassessments.

Additionally, at the conclusion of our project, a significant increase in the number of reported

falls per month was reported. This may be indicative of successful teaching and prioritization on the

importance of recording patient falls.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

n/a

Improving Knowledge of Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome

at an Addiction Treatment Facility for Women

Emily Reeves, BS (Student Presenter) | Allie Van Houten, BS (Student Co-Presenter)

Annalyce Bass, BS (Student Co-Presenter) | Alyssa Kalams, BS (Student Co-Presenter)

Caroline Garvin, BS (Student Co-Presenter) | Kelly Nichols, BS (Student Co-Presenter)

Mary Higby, BS (Student Co-Presenter) | Olivia Harper, BA (Student Co-Presenter)

Victoria Regan, BA (Student Co-Presenter) | Dr. Brittany Haskell PMHNP-BC, DNP, CNE (Mentor)

Problem Addressed:

Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome (PAWS) is the term used to describe protracted symptoms, like anxiety,

insomnia, and irritability, that continue after the acute detox of a substance. These symptoms are a result

of the neurotransmitter pathways in the brain rebuilding after damage that occurred during substance

use. There is evidence that PAWS symptoms can precipitate relapse. When people don’t anticipate the

challenges of PAWS and are not equipped with coping mechanisms, they may give up on the recovery

process. At The Next Door (TND), an addiction treatment facility for women located in Nashville, TN, many

of the residents have a knowledge deficit about PAWS.

Objectives:

The aim of our quality improvement project is to educate the women at The Next Door about Post-Acute

Withdrawal Syndrome (PAWS) signs and symptoms and coping mechanisms by providing a weekly onehour

group educational program, with outcomes measured by survey responses.

Methods/Procedures:

The women at The Next Door who were seeking addiction services were our target population. Every

week an educational PAWS presentation was given, and a survey was filled out anonymously after the

presentation. This survey provided us with both qualitative and quantitative data. At the end of our

intervention, results were analyzed.

Findings:

Through qualitative and quantitative data, participants reported they had a better understanding of PAWS

symptoms, strategies to address them, and plans to leverage new coping skills. These new coping skills

included: meditation, walking, yoga, massage, emotional breathing, exercise, routine generation, journaling,

good nutrition, acupuncture, binaural beats, mindfulness, etc.

Our mixed-method data analysis allowed us to measure the effectiveness of the presentation and the

participants’ increased knowledge of PAWS. Before the presentation, many of the women reported they

were unfamiliar with PAWS. Our survey data reported a 4.4/5 of relevance on the subject.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

We recommend the continuation of this project because our survey data suggests it has addressed a significant

knowledge deficit, which may ultimately improve relapse rates. By equipping the participants with coping

mechanisms, we hope our psychoeducation program will improve sobriety outcomes. Further research would

be necessary to determine if, indeed, a psychoeducation program like our project improves relapse rates.

Future recommendations for VUSN students continuing this project at The Next Door include:

incentivizing attendance, focusing on popular topics (e.g., mindfulness, nutrition, and exercise), and incorporating

interactive tools to boost engagement. The addition of a follow-up survey after the participants have completed

their 30-day program at TND could provide insight to the long-term impact of the education intervention.

Increasing Medication Adherence and Reducing Knowledge Deficits with

the Use of a Personal Health Application in the Management of 65- to

70-Year-Olds’ Medication Regimen

Problem Addressed:

Medication adherence/management

Personal Health Application (PHA) MedHelper

Objectives:

Angela Flemmer, DNP, AGNP (Presenter)

1. Evaluate the effectiveness of the PHA as compared to the MedMaIDE tool for assessing medication

adherence

2. Compare self-reporting data from the PHA with verbally-collected, self-reported data.

3. Evaluate the use of a PHA as a tool to increase medication adherence in the older adult population.

Methods/Procedures:

Quasi-experimental mixed method study with one group pretest-posttest post educational

intervention. A paired t-test was used to compare pre and post medications and milligrams listed in the

Section A of MedMaIDE tool. Self-reported medication adherence data was collected from the needs

assessment and was compared using descriptive statistics to the percentage of adherence found in

the MedHelper data. MedHelper data was analyzed by day, week, and entire six-week period that the

application was used to determine levels of adherence, and to look for trends in the data.

Findings:

The MedHelper application contained a total of 2,791 entries from the 24 participants. The entries were

assessed in four categories, the participant performed an entry that was adherent to the medication

regimen, the participant performed an entry that was one to two hours after the time due in the application,

the participant performed an entry that was greater than two hours after the due time in the application

and a completely missed entry. The entries were further divided into AM and PM, where AM is anything

from 0500 to 1200, and PM was 1201 until 2300.

The first category, the adherent entries, was 2093 (75%) of the total entries. These entries were

divided into 971 total AM entries and 1112 total PM entries. Week one had 140 AM entries and 171 PM entries,

week two had 161 AM entries and 179 PM entries, week three had 151 AM entries and 177 PM entries, week four

had 157 AM entries and 186 PM entries, week five had 150 AM entries and 186 PM entries and week six had 137

AM entries and 167 PM entries. Weeks seven through nine had many less entries due to the smaller number of

participants. Those weeks had 48, 11, and 16 AM entries and 41, seven, and eight PM entries, respectively.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

The second category, one to two hours after scheduled administration, had a total of 150 (5%) of entries.

The third category, greater than two hours after the scheduled administration in the application,

had a total of 321 entries.

The fourth category missed entries, had a total of 253 entries.

Overall, there were 10,639 doses of medication entered into the MedHelper application by the 24

participants that had adherence data in their device. Of the 10,639 doses, 6613 doses were AM

administration, and 4026 were PM administration. The individual participant’s doses ranged from 172 doses

to 836 doses, see table 3. The PI, when determining adherence to the medication regimen, considered each

medication individually.

A total of 1687 doses were late entries into the MedHelper application during the measured six-week time

frame. There were 1301 late entries AM doses and 386 late entry PM doses missed during the six weeks that

were measured. A total of 687 doses were not entered into the MedHelper application during the measured

six-week time frame. There were 284 non-entered AM doses and 403 non-entered PM doses.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Additional resources need to be spent on a large scale research looking at a Personal Health

Application with the older adult population.

Problem Addressed:

Lessons Learned from Engaging Students in a

Geriatric Dementia Clinical Immersion Simulation

Lisa (Kay) Murphree, EdD, MSN, RN, CMSRN (Presenter)

Of the geriatric dementia simulation literature searched in CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, Science Direct (2018

2021) using the search terms: nursing student + dementia + simulation, no articles were identified which

provided clinical immersion simulation implementation guidance.

Objectives:

1. The participant will be able to identify practical ways to minimize challenges in the planning and

implementation of a clinical immersion simulation.

2. The participant will be able to state a positive outcome of engaging nursing students in an active

learning strategy focused on understanding aging persons with dementia.

Methods/Procedures:

n/a

Findings:

n/a

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

n/a

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Problem Addressed:

Mental Health and Black America

LeTizia Smith, DNP, PMHNP-BC (Presenter)

Brandee Madden DNP, PMHNP-BC (Co-Presenter)

How can healthcare workers improve the quality of care provided to Black Americans?

Objectives:

1. Explore the relationship between social determinants of health and race

2. Understand the legacy of racism and mental health in the black community

3. Explore how healthcare workers can improve the mental health care of black people.

Methods/Procedures:

Explored social determinants of health, including racism, to create dialogue about best solutions for

delivering culturally informed care.

Findings:

1. Adapt assessments to the specific needs of Black Americans

2. Work on self assessment

3. Engage in policy changes

4. Engage in research that involves Black people

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

Engage in quality improvements to determine which potential solutions will be effective.

Recruitment during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Calculating the Return on

Investment for a Pre-Procedure COVID-19 Testing Team

Problem Addressed:

Jill Kinch, MSN, MMHC, APRN, CPNP-PC/AC (Presenter)

Kim Isenberg, MSN, APRN, CPNP-PC/AC (Co-Presenter)

At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, elective surgeries were paused in the state of TN. To restart

elective surgical care, our hospital had to create a policy and process to determine a patient’s COVID-19

status prior to anesthesia/surgery to ensure safety for staff and patients.

Our hospital quickly proceeded with development and implementation of a pre-procedure COVID-19 team

and had to quickly recruit and establish manpower to support these new workflows.

In this presentation, we provide a case analysis of how to advocate for funding for additional manpower in

support of creating a Pre-Procedure COVID-19 Testing Team. We review how to create the business case

using return on investment calculations to advocate for support for this team.

Objectives:

We will establish the rationale for development of a pre-procedure COVID-19 testing team and review the

process implemented at our hospital. We will share our case study analysis and review how to calculate the

Return on Investment to advocate for manpower in support of the pre-procedure COVID-19 team.

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Methods/Procedures:

For a program with an anesthesia volume of approximately 100 cases per day, we recommend 1.4

FTEs for this work. This expense can be estimated at approximately $105,000. If this approach reliably

avoids cancellations and delays of elective surgical cases, this strategy will serve to protect the $2.5M of

contribution margin that is at risk due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings:

This program has served to maintain our routine pre-pandemic surgical volume of 80-100 cases per day and

has minimized barriers to accessing surgical and procedural care throughout the pandemic.

Recommendations for Practice/Research:

n/a

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

TENNESSEE NURSES ASSOCIATION

Tennessee

Statements

Nurses

of Financial

Association

Position

Statements December of 31, Financial 2020 and 2019 Position,

December 31, 2020 and 2019

2020

2019

Current Assets

Cash, including donor restricted amounts of

$7,125 in 2020 and $5,750 in 2019

Investments

Accounts receivable

Prepaid expenses

Assets

$ 156,086

288,549

35,295

2,819

$ 144,730

266,449

31,916

9 645

Total Current Assets

482,749

452,740

Property and Equipment, Net

Total Assets

$ 482,749

$ 452,740

Current Liabilities

Accrued expenses

District dues payable

Deferred revenue

Liabilities and Net Assets

$ 34,384

7,820

64,172

$ 23,885

6,436

43,524

Total Current Liabilities

106,376

73,845

Net Assets

Net assets without donor restrictions

Net assets with donor restrictions

Total Net Assets

369,248

7,125

376,373

373,145

5,750

378,895

Total Liabilities and Net Assets

$ 482,749

$ 452,740

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: TENNESSEE YEAR NURSES OF THE ASSOCIATION

NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Statements of Activities and Changes in Net Assets

For the Year Ended December 31, 2020

Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Activities and Changes in Net Assets

For the Year Ended December 31, 2020

Without

With

Donor

Donor

Restrictions Restrictions

Revenues and Support

Membership dues $ 374,065 $

Administrative fees 62,004

Convention 44,185

Continuing education program 23,057

Investment income 22,100

Nurses day on the hill 13,470

Other income 7,571

Affinity programs 4,972

Interest income - money market 21

Access to care coalition 2,550

Net assets released from restrictions 1,175 (1,175)

Total Revenue and Support 552,620 1375

Expenses

Program services 468,930

Management and general expenses 87,587

Total Expenses 556,517

Change in Net Assets (3,897) 1,375

Net Assets - Beginning of Year 373,145 5,750

Net Assets - End of Year $ 369,248 $ 7,125

Total

$ 374,065

62,004

44,185

23,057

22,100

13,470

7,571

4,972

21

2,550

553,995

468,930

87,587

556,517

(2,522)

378,895

$ 376,323

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: TENNESSEE YEAR OF NURSES THE ASSOCIATION

NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

Statements of Activities and Changes in Net Assets (Continued)

For the Year Ended December 31, 2019

Tennessee Nurses Association

Statements of Activities and Changes in Net Assets (Continued)

For the Year Ended December 31, 2019

Without

With

Donor

Donor

Restrictions Restrictions

Revenues and Support

Membership dues $ 370,986 $

Convention 100,545

Administrative fees 62,004

Continuing education program 46,504

Investment income 38,511

Legislative summit 23,057

Other income 3,927

Affinity programs 1,388

Interest income - money market 31

Seed funds

Access to care coalition

Net assets released from restrictions 10,174

3,567

3,000

(10,174)

Total

$ 370,986

100,545

62,004

46,504

38,511

23,057

3,927

1,388

31

3,567

3,000

Total Revenue and Support 657,127

Expenses

Program services 528,387

Management and general expenses 85,168

Total Expenses 613,555

Change in Net Assets 43,572

Net Assets - Beginning of Year 329,573

Net Assets - End of Year $ 373,145 $

(3,607)

(3,607)

9 357

S,7SQ

653,520

528,387

85,168

613,555

39,965

338,930

$ 378,895

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

TENNESSEE NURSES ASSOCIATION

Tennessee

Statements

Nurses

of Cash

Association

Flows

For the Statements Years Ended December of Cash 31, Flows 2020 and 2019

For the Years Ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

Cash Flows from Operating Activities

Change in net assets $

Adjustments to Reconcile Change in Net Assets

to Net Cash Provided by (Used for) Operating Activities

Unrealized (gain) loss on investments

Changes in operating assets and liabilities

(Increase) decrease in accounts receivable

(Increase) decrease in prepaid expenses

Increase (decrease) in district dues payable

Increase (decrease) in accrued expenses

Increase (decrease) in deferred revenue

Net Cash Provided by (Used for) Operating Activities

Cash Flows from Investing Activities

Proceeds from sale (purchases) of investments, net

Net Cash Provided by (Used for) Investing Activities

Net Change in Cash

Cash - Beginning of Year

Cash - End of Year $

2020 2019

(2,522) $ 39,965

(17,686) (32,409)

(3,379) (455)

6,826 (3,508)

1,384 25

10,499 (6,491)

20,648 627

15,770 (2,246)

(4,414) (6,101)

(4,414) (6,101)

11,356 (8,347)

144,730 153,077

156,Q86 $ 144,73Q

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

TNA Past Presidents

*Mrs. Lena A. Warner ....................1905-1918

*Nina E. Wootton ....................... 1918-1919

*Myrtle Marion Archer. ..................1920-1921

*Mrs. Daisy Gould. ...................... 1921-1923

*Mrs. Myrtle E. Blair..................... 1924-1925

*Abbie Roberts. ....................... 1926-1927

*Mrs. Corrine B. Hunn................... 1928-1929

*Hazel Lee Goff ........................ 1930-1932

*Nancy Rice (Nashville)................. 1933-1935

*Aurelia B. Potts (Nashville). ............ 1936-1937

*Mattie E. Malone (Memphis) ............ 1938-1939

*Lennis Ault (Knoxville)................. 1940-1942

*Frances H. Cunningham (Memphis)...... 1942-1944

*Beatrice M. Clutch (Nashville)........... 1944-1948

*Ruth Neil Murry (Memphis)............. 1948-1950

*Elizabeth H. Killeffer (Cookeville)........ 1950-1952

*Violet M. Crook (Union City)............ 1952-1955

*Catherine M. Sterling (Memphis) ........ 1956-1959

*Vesta L. Swartz (Johnson City). .........1960-1961

*Mary Frances Smith (Memphis) ......... 1962-1966

*Dorothy L. Griscom (Memphis).......... 1966-1969

*Dorothy Hocker (Nashville).............. 1969-1971

*Mary Evelyn Kemp (Nashville). .......... 1971-1973

*Erline Gore (Nashville) ..................1973-1975

Patsy B. McClure (Knoxville)..............1975-1977

*Emma Lou Harris (Chattanooga).........1977-1979

*Mary Windham (Clarksville). ............ 1979-1981

Annie J. Carter (Nashville) ............... 1981-1983

Margaret Heins (Knoxville) .............. 1983-1985

Virginia(Ginna)Trotter Betts (Nashville)... 1985-1987

Margaret Heins (Knoxville) .............. 1987-1989

Frances Edwards (Nashville) ............ 1989-1993

Carol Blankenship (Johnson City)........ 1993-1995

Sharon Adkins (Nashville)............... 1995-1997

Margaret (Peggy) Strong (Memphis) ..... 1997-1999

Gary Crotty (Knoxville). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1999-2001

Wanda Neal Hooper (Nashville)......... 2001-2003

*Maureen Nalle (Knoxville). ............ 2003-2005

Susan Sanders (Lynchburg) ............ 2005-2007

Laura Beth Brown (Nashville)........... 2007-2009

Elizabeth (Beth) H. Smith (Piney Flats). .... 2009-2011

Lena Patterson (Ooltewah)...............2011-2012

Jill S. Kinch (Nashville)

(Interim President)................. 2012-2013

Frances (Billie) Sills (Johnson City)....... 2013-2015

Sandra (Sandy) Murabito (Nashville). . . . . .2015-2017

Haley Vance, (Nashville). ............... 2017-2019

*deceased

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

2021-2022 TNF Board of Trust & Staff

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

2021-2022 TNF Board of Trust & Staff

Staff

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

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TNA VIRTUAL CONFERENCE | 2021: YEAR OF THE NURSE 2.0 - ONE YEAR WASN’T ENOUGH

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