Year in Review 2021

thelongblueline

The annual report of the National Coast Guard Museum Association

2021

THE NATIONAL COAST GUARD

MUSEUM ASSOCIATION

COMING INTO FOCUS

The Year in Review

YEAR IN REVIEW 2021

PAGE 1


J.D. POWER III STEWARDSHIP DECK

GALLERIES: Global Supply Chain & Lighthouses

multiple digital displays educate visitors

of the Coast Guard’s role in keeping

domestic and global commerce flowing

Boston Light Fog Signal

Cannon: oldest artifact in the

Coast Guard collection

FROM THE CHAIR:

COMING INTO FOCUS

Journeys in cutters, helicopters, and fixed wing aircraft have one

thing in common: the destination starts out unseen. As the crew

travels, the goal appears on the horizon, and finally comes into

focus. Considerable hard work occurs between charting the

course and reaching the end point. In similar fashion, the Coast

Guard and the Museum Association have been working hard

for several years and the Museum is coming into focus.

Coast Guard leadership has spoken loudly and clearly about

its focus on delivering this Museum, not only for members of

the Service, but for the full array of visitors. Master Chief Petty

Officer of the Coast Guard, Jason Vanderhaden, said in a

recent interview, “Every American should want the Coast Guard

to have a Museum.”

Coast Guard Headquarters is engaged in setting up the team

that will operate this new Service asset in preparation for

opening. Several full-time positions have been filled to ensure

expertise is in place from facility planning and operations to

exhibit curation. Talent acquisition will continue between now

and 2024, when the Museum is projected to be completed.

Detailed plans for exhibits and galleries have been developed

from mere concepts. The Power Family expressed our belief

early in this venture pledging a significant gift to name the

J.D. Power III Stewardship Deck. We are overjoyed to see

the rendering on the facing page of that deck, with specific

3-D detail of what visitors will experience in the Champions

of Commerce Wing. Seeing those image inspires me and my

whole family to focus all the more on our Opening Day.

Our Capital Campaign Committee maintains its laser focus

on raising the private funds required to build the Museum.

We are truly grateful for the donors who have committed to

the campaign this year. Thanks to their generosity, the Museum

Association has raised over $29M in private contributions and

pledges.

Thank you for everything you’ve done to ensure that Coast

Guard men and women will be honored for their dedication

and commitment to our Nation.

Susan J. Curtin

INSIDE THE

EXHIBITS:

CHAMPIONS OF

COMMERCE

RENDERING

J.D. POWER III STEWARDSHIP DECK:

Whether innovating navigation technology,

managing marine traffic through ports, or

breaking paths through icy waters, the

Coast Guard ensures goods and services

flow freely in and out of the country via

the maritime transportation system. The

Champions of Commerce Wing highlights

the diverse, far-reaching Coast Guard

missions of port security, marine safety,

and polar operations through iconic, largescale

artifacts and immersive environmental

elements which transport visitors from

America’s coastal waters, shorelines, and

inland waterways to the farthest reaches

on Earth.

As visitors enter this wing, the Global

Supply Chain Gallery (shown left)

consists of multiple digital displays to

educate visitors of the Coast Guard’s role

in keeping domestic and global commerce

flowing. The scale and importance of this

mission will be displayed through rotating

statistics, e.g. 48,000 aids to navigation

facilitate $4.6 trillion in maritime economic

activity annually.

A series of galleries explores the mission

of maintaining Aids to Navigation

from the early days of the U.S. Lighthouse

Service through today’s sophisticated virtual

positioning technology to monitor and

maintain maritime traffic flow. Visitors will

an audio/visual

lighthouse experience

learn how lighthouses work and about the

people who worked within them.

A highlight of this section of the exhibition

is the Lantern Room, a recreation of the

topmost section of a lighthouse. An audio/

visual presentation will be projected onto

one of the windows, taking visitors into

the experience of lighthouse keeping. The

Fresnel lens inside the lantern room will be

lit while overhead LED bands will mimic the

light beams thrown out over the breakers.

The Boston Light Fog Signal Cannon,

displayed in the far end of the rendering,

is the oldest artifact in the Coast Guard

collection. Dating to the French and Indian

War, circa 1716, the signal cannon was

in use for over 150 years before it was

replaced by a bell. Although the armament

was capable of firing ammunition, the

keepers would simply fire it using black

powder to warn mariners of their proximity

to the coastline in a storm or at night.

PAGE Chair, 2 National Coast Guard Museum Association

NATIONAL COAST GUARD MUSEUM ASSOCIATION YEAR IN REVIEW 2021

PAGE 3

location

DECK

4


WHY I GIVE

Left: CWO4 Michael Fisette, USCG (Ret.) and his wife

Gina in front of New London Ledge Light on a recent

trip to Connecticut.

Right: Michael Fisette, an avid cyclist, is seen here

sporting a Coast Guard themed cycling jersey.

Below (left and right): WWII Veteran Robert

B. Fisette considered his Coast Guard service the

highlight of his 91 years.

MICHAEL FISETTE’S FATHER, THE

LATE ROBERT B. FISETTE, WAS A

USCG SEAMAN FIRST CLASS in

the last year and half of World War II.

He served in the South Pacific aboard

USS Eridanus, an Army ship, with Navy

command and a Coast Guard crew. Bob

Fisette left high school, without a diploma,

at age 17 to serve his country. His Coast

Guard service was the highlight of his 91

years. He went on to work as a toolmaker

in machine shops.

“My father was a good, decent guy,

who didn’t get a lot of recognition,”

Chief Fisette remembers. “He loved to

tell those stories about his time in the

Coast Guard. He wasn’t in for long, so

he told the same stories over and over.

When he died in 2019, the Coast Guard

Honor Guard gave him a sendoff the

Fisette family will never forget.”

Following in his father’s footsteps,

Michael served 20 years in the Coast

Guard. He considered joining the

Marine Corps, but his father counseled

him that in the Coast Guard, he would

always have a roof over his head and

three square meals a day. By his junior

year of high school, he was signed up

for early enlistment. When he graduated

in 1976, he went directly to Cape May.

One of his most memorable experiences

came aboard the seagoing buoy

tender, USCGC MADRONA (WLB-

302). Fisette described the work as

“difficult, humiliating and degrading,

but you always try to take something out

of every experience.” The MADRONA

crew found themselves 200 miles off Cape

Hatteras in 1978 in a big storm.

“We were in 50-foot seas on a 180-foot

vessel towing a monster buoy. The forward

third of the ship was underwater.”

Michael rose quickly through the ranks

to Chief Petty Officer, and retired as a

CWO4 in 1996. The vast majority of his

service time was in Virginia—Chesapeake,

Norfolk, Portsmouth. He worked in

Marine Safety and did a handful of tours

at Headquarters. While on active duty,

Michael earned a bachelor’s degree

from George Mason in decision science

and management information systems.

His final tour sent him to Seattle for three

years, where he completed his Master of

Science in finance.

EVERYTHING I

HAVE IN LIFE, I

OWE TO THE U.S.

COAST GUARD.

—CWO4 MICHAEL FISETTE,

USCG (RET.)

“Without the combination of Coast Guard

tuition assistance and the GI Bill, I would

never have been able to afford this lifechanging

education,” Fisette said. “I owe

all the success I’ve enjoyed in life to the

amazing educational opportunities and

adventures the Coast Guard provided.”

He is now President of Fisette and Kim

Financial Services, in Issaquah, WA.

In his 50’s, Michael decided to bike across

America. He did so in a series of trips over

the next eight years. He then turned his

attention to biking the East Coast, which

afforded him an opportunity to return

to Cape May 40 years after his Coast

Guard journey started there. Another trip

took him through Quantico, VA, where the

National Museum of the Marine Corps

opened in 2006.

“I thought it was amazing to see what the

Marines had put together and felt like the

Coast Guard needs to have our own National

Museum,” CWO4 Fisette explained. “When I

started to read about the plans for the Museum

in the Long Blue Line, I decided to get involved.

I feel like, you can’t take it with you, and if you’re

successful, you have a responsibility to help

those who deserve it. My 20 years of service

represent 10% of the Coast Guard’s history.”

Michael has been married to Gina since he was

a seaman apprentice. They will both tell you

they owe all their success to the Coast Guard.

They feel honored and privileged to leave

a legacy and memorialize Michael’s father

through a generous major gift that will name

an exhibit in the World War II Gallery of the

Defenders of our Nation Wing.

PAGE 4 NATIONAL COAST GUARD MUSEUM ASSOCIATION YEAR IN REVIEW 2021

PAGE 5


AMERICA’S TALLSHIP HOMEPORTED ADJACENT TO THE MUSEUM

A NEW HOME FOR

AMERICA’S TALL SHIP

ONE OF THE KEY BENEFITS OF THE

NATIONAL COAST GUARD MUSEUM

being in New London, CT, is the co-location

and incorporation of “America’s Tall Ship,”

the U.S. Coast Guard Barque EAGLE, as

part of the Museum campus.

In May 2021, Admiral Karl Schultz

announced that EAGLE, which has been

homeported in New London since 1946,

will shift its pier to downtown New London

– immediately adjacent to the Museum.

EAGLE was originally a German training

vessel, which became a war reparation

following World War II. EAGLE became

the training vessel for the Coast Guard

Academy, and over the past 75 years, has

embarked Cadets from the Academy, and

expanded its training mission to include

Officer Candidates, among a host of other

training programs.

Connecticut’s Coast Guard City is always

glad to see EAGLE return to her homeport

from deployments around the world. With

the exception of some periods when vessel

and crew spent the winter in Baltimore, MD

at the Coast Guard Yard for extensive refits,

the square rigger is easily spotted from the

fall to the spring on the Thames River. For

the first five decades, EAGLE tied up at the

Coast Guard Academy. In more recent

years, she was homeported at Fort Trumbull.

Following the Commandant’s announcement

earlier this year, the Coast Guard has taken

steps to secure funding to perform the

required infrastructure work to permanently

homeport EAGLE to its new location, mere

steps from the Museum’s front door. Visitors

will be able to learn about her history inside

the Museum and then interact with living

history by boarding the barque and meeting

her crew.

A frequent visitor to the downtown New

London City Pier over the past decade for

special events, EAGLE adds vitality and a

sense of patriotic pride when viewed at the

foot of State Street. Once homeported at

City Pier, and when the Museum is up and

operating – this will be the iconic Coast

Guard destination for years to come.

U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Thieme

PAGE 6 NATIONAL COAST GUARD MUSEUM ASSOCIATION YEAR IN REVIEW 2021

PAGE 7


LONG BLUE LINE

COAST GUARD RETIREES

SUPPORT THE MUSEUM

THANKS TO A PARTNERSHIP WITH

THE RETIREE SERVICES PROGRAM

AT COAST GUARD HEADQUARTERS,

in 2020 the Museum Association began

publishing the Long Blue Line. The quarterly

magazine has a circulation comprised of

65,000 Coast Guard retirees, retirees from

the Public Health Service and National

Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,

and annuitants.

Eight regular issues and one special issue of

the four-color glossy magazine have now

been published and made available online.

Each issue contains articles and helpful

information for retirees, and has proven

to be a valuable platform for the Museum

Association to share fascinating articles

on Coast Guard history and a behindthe-scenes

look at the storylines, exhibits,

and galleries as they are developed and

designed.

“The Long Blue Line has become the

single most important communication

tool the Coast Guard has to reach its

retiree community,” said RADM Jeffrey

Hathaway, Co-Chair of the Coast

Guard National Retiree Council at its

recent annual conference.

The magazine has also reaped great

benefits for the project, resulting in over

$2M in pledges and contributions to

the When the Most is Expected Capital

Campaign. More than 1,200 retirees have

signed on as Plankowners, contributing an

average of $13 per month as sustaining

donors. A handful of highly-motivated

donors have pledged five-seven figure gifts

to the campaign, including CWO4 Michael

Fisette, who was inspired to encourage

other donors to contribute with a $150,000

Matching Gift Challenge that runs through the

end of 2021.

“Being able to speak directly to this group of

Coast Guard men and women, with a deep

affinity for the Coast Guard after 20+ years

of service, is critically important for us,” said

Captain Wes Pulver, President of the Museum

Association and a Coast Guard retiree

himself. “For many retirees, this is the first time

they have heard about the Museum, and

they are excited to see it come to life. Every

contribution from this group of dedicated

Americans gets us closer to our goal.”

To view the

magazine online,

go to:

longblueline.org

AT A GLANCE

$29M Private Donors

$30M Federal Allocation

WHEN THE MOST

IS EXPECTED

The When the Most is Expected Capital Campaign is a public/private effort to raise $150 million to

construct the National Coast Guard Museum. Our generous individual, foundation, and corporate donors

are helping us reach our goal to ensure that the efforts of countless Coast Guard men and women are

made known to Museum visitors.

PRINCIPAL GIFT

The Museum Association gratefully acknowledges the Principal Gift of $5,000,000 made

by J.D. Power III and Family.

LEADERSHIP GIFTS

The Museum Association gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their contributions and

pledges of $1M or more to the When the Most is Expected Capital Campaign.

- Arnold D. Palmer Charitable Trust

- Bloomberg Philanthropies

- Boysie & Joy Bollinger

- BP America, Inc.

- Gordy & Michelle Bunch

- Frank Loomis Palmer Fund

- CDR Kevin Harkins, Ph.D., USCG (Ret.)

MAJOR GIFTS

The following donors have contributed or pledged between $250,000 and $999,999.

- Anonymous (3)

- American Bureau of Shipping

- American Commercial Lines

- James J. Coleman, Jr. †

- Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc.

- Exxon Mobil Corporation

- CWO4 & Mrs. Michael J. Fisette, USCG (Ret.)

The following donors have contributed or pledged between $50,000 and $249,999.

- Anonymous (1)

- American River Transportation Company

- Robert C. Byrd, Ph.D., P.E.

- CACI International Inc

- Campbell Transportation Company, Inc.

- Canal Barge Company, Inc.

- Chelsea Groton Foundation, Inc.

- Colonna’s Shipyard, Inc.

- Community Foundation for Northern Virginia /

the Stevens Family Charitable Fund

- Cross Sound Ferry Services, Inc.

- Crown Family Philanthropies

- M.C. Dean

- Essex Equity Management, LLC

- General Dynamics Electric Boat Corporation and

General Dynamics Mission Systems

- Global Container Terminals

- Humane Society of the Commonwealth of MA

- Jeff & Allison Kingsley

- Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Langjahr

- Richard Lounsbery Foundation

- Steve Lovelette

- Huntington Ingalls Industries

- Ingram Industries, Inc.

- Kirby Corporation

- Rossin Foundation

- ST Engineering North America – Halter Marine

- James & Karen Tyler

- Thomas P. & Nancy D. Marian

- Matson, Inc.

- McAllister Towing & Transportation

- Moffatt & Nichol

- Moran Towing Corporation, Interlake Steamship

Company, SeaStreak, and Moran Environmental

Services

- National Maritime Historical Society

- CAPT David & Mrs. Kathleen Pascoe, USCG (Ret.)

- Ports America Group

- CAPT & Mrs. Wes Pulver, USCG (Ret.)

- Joe & Tina Pyne

- RADM Richard W. Schneider, USCGR (Ret.)

- LTC Fredrick Seeger, USA (Ret.)

- Samuel K. Skinner

- Howard Slotnick

- Tiedemann Advisors

- Bob Vicente

- Weeks Marine, Inc.

PAGE 8 NATIONAL COAST GUARD MUSEUM ASSOCIATION YEAR IN REVIEW 2021

PAGE 9

$79M

(committed to date)

$20M State of CT

30%

increase in Plankowner

campaign participation

60%

exhibit design

completed

+65K

Coast Guard retiree

outreach (quarterly)

through the Long Blue Line

2024

projected museum

opening date

- CAPT & Mrs. Richard Healing, USCGR (Ret.)

- CAPT Fred Herzberg, USCG (Ret.)

- Pritzker Military Foundation on behalf of the

Pritzker Military Museum & Library

- Lockheed Martin Corporation

- Thomas Niles


NATIONAL COAST

GUARD MUSEUM

ASSOCIATION

STATEMENTS

OF FINANCIAL

POSITION

FOR FISCAL

YEARS ENDING

DECEMBER 31

FACING PAGE

Left: The Coast Guard

purchased two Fairchild

J2K-1s and two J2K-2s

in 1936. Two, V160 and

V161, were assigned to Air

Station St. Petersburg and

the other two, V162 and

V163, were assigned to Air

Station Charleston. (Public

Domain)

Right: Nauset Life-Saving

crew launching their

surfboat, all wearing mixed

uniforms with wading boots

and cork life vests. Date: circa

1915 era. (Public Domain)

BACK COVER

Right: USCG Surfman

Herbert M. Collins at Station

Pea Island, North Carolina.

Collins served there during

World War II. Pea Island was

the first life-saving station in

the country to have an all

African American crew.

(Public Domain)

Middle: Retired Master

Chief Petty Officer Thomas

McAdams. McAdams,

participated in more than

5,000 rescues and was

credited with saving more

than 100 lives. (U.S. Coast

Guard photo by Petty

Officer 2nd Class Travis

Magee/Released)

Left: Phyllis Baguley of

Lansing, Michigan, holds

the honor of being the

first SPAR to set foot on

overseas soil. Baguley sits

on the boat deck of the

former luxury liner that

transported her overseas,

she led the first overseas

contingent of SPARs as they

debarked from the ship at

Honolulu. (Public Domain)

FINANCIAL

REPORT

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITY

The highlights of our most recent audited financials are set forth below. This financial report reflects the continued

momentum achieved through the concerted efforts of our committed directors, officers, expanded staff and

volunteers, who have given so generously of their time and resources to assist us. Fully audited financial

statements and our most recent IRS Form 990 are available at coastguardmuseum.org/annualreport.

ASSETS

CURRENT ASSETS 2020 2019

Cash and cash equivalents $2,962,591 $930,718

Certificates of deposit 1,043,557 1,030,887

Investments 477,784 715,443

Grants receivable 84,943 216,494

Pledges receivable, net 1,415,391 1,889,525

Inventory 64,713 64,754

Prepaid expense 7,086 17,568

Total current assets 6,056,065 4,865,389

PROPERTY & EQUIPMENT 13,898 18,505

OTHER ASSETS

Construction in progress 7,983,602 7,677,836

Pledges receivable, less current portion, net 3,579,088 3,212,427

Other assets 2,600 2,682

Total other assets 11,565,290 10,892,945

TOTAL ASSETS $17,635,253 $15,776,839

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

CURRENT LIABILITIES

Accounts payable $46,881 $370,219

Accrued expenses 70,942 149,322

Total current liabilities 117,823 519,541

NET ASSETS

Without donor restrictions 13,938,342 12,044,871

With donor restrictions 3,579,088 3,212,427

Total net assets 17,517,430 15,257,298

Total liabilities and net assets $17,635,253 $15,776,839

REVENUES

Without donor

restrictions

2020 2019

With donor

restrictions

Total

Without donor

restrictions

With donor

restrictions

Contributions - capital campaign $2,335,707 $1,597,841 $3,933,548 $2,307,338 $1,565,002 $3,872,340

State grants - capital improvements 276,185 - 276,185 673,134 - 673,134

Paycheck Protection Program

loan forgiveness

Total

214,749 214,749 - -

Investment income 25,078 - 25,078 30,274 - 30,274

Other income 16,000 - 16,000 275 - 275

Loss on disposal of property &

equipment

Net realized and unrealized losses

on investments

- - - (1,657) - (1,657)

(6,516) - (6,516) (741) - (741)

2,861,203 1,597,841 4,459,044 3,008,623 1,565,002 $4,573,625

Net assets released from restriction: 1,231,180 (1,231,180) - 833,064 (833,064) $0

Total revenues 4,092,383 366,661 4,459,044 3,841,687 731,938 4,573,625

EXPENSES

Program services

Museum development 633,896 - 633,896 424,754 - 424,754

Total program services 633,896 - 633,896 424,754 - 424,754

Supporting services

Management and general 198,447 - 198,447 323,855 - 323,855

Fundraising 1,366,569 - 1,366,569 1,205,161 - 1,205,161

Total supporting services 1,565,016 - $1,565,016 1,529,016 - $1,529,016

Total expenses 2,198,912 - $ 2,198,912 1,953,770 - $1,953,770

Change in net assets 1,893,471 366,661 2,260,132 1,887,917 731,938 2,619,855

NET ASSETS, beginning of year 12,044,871 3,212,427 15,257,298 10,156,954 2,480,489 12,637,443

NET ASSETS, end of year $13,938,342 $3,579,088 $17,517,430 $12,044,871 $3,212,427 $15,527,298

PAGE 10 NATIONAL COAST GUARD MUSEUM ASSOCIATION YEAR IN REVIEW 2021

PAGE 11


BOARD OF

DIRECTORS

Susan J. Curtin

CHAIR

Partner, Power Family Enterprises

CAPT Wes Pulver, USCG (Ret.)

PRESIDENT

National Coast Guard Museum Association

RADM Richard M. Larrabee, USCG (Ret.)

TREASURER

Past Director, Ports Department, the Port Authority of

New York and New Jersey

CDR Kevin Harkins, Ph.D., USCG (Ret.)

SECRETARY

CEO, Harkcon, Inc.

Jeff Kingsley

COO Known

Steve Lovelette

President, JMB Financial Advisors

ADM James M. Loy, USCG (Ret.)

21st Commandant of the USCG

MCPOCG Vincent W. Patton, Ed.D., USCG (Ret.)

President/National Commander,

Non-Commissioned Officers Association

Michael Rauh

President and CEO, Chelsea Groton Bank

RADM Richard W. Schneider Ph.D., USCGR (Ret.)

President Emeritus, Norwich University

HONORARY

CAMPAIGN CHAIRS

tPresident George H. W. Bush (1999-2018)

tArnold Palmer (1999-2016)

tJ.D. Power III (1931-2021)

CAPITAL CAMPAIGN

COMMITTEE

Gordy Bunch, Chair

ADM Thad W. Allen, USCG (Ret.)

Brandy Birtcher

The Honorable Andrew H. Card, Jr.

The Honorable Michael Chertoff

Lucy Duncan

RADM Tom Gilmour, USCG (Ret.)

Michael Greenwald

The Honorable Michael P. Jackson

The Honorable Jeh C. Johnson

Jeff Kingsley

RADM Mary Landry, USCG (Ret.)

Sarah Miller

Thomas Niles

Joe Pyne

The Honorable Thomas J. Ridge

Bob Vicente

Dave Waldmann

SECRETARIES

CIRCLE *

Norman Y. Mineta, Co-Chair

Thomas J. Ridge, Co-Chair

James H. Burnley, IV

Andrew H. Card, Jr.

Michael Chertoff

Mimi Weyforth Dawson

Elizabeth Dole

Mortimer L. Downey, III

Michael P. Jackson

Jeh C. Johnson

James M. Loy

Janet A. Napolitano

Federico Peña

Arthur J. Rothkopf

Paul A. Schneider

Samuel K. Skinner

Rodney E. Slater

*Former Federal Cabinet and Deputy Secretaries

responsible for oversight of the Coast Guard are assisting

in promoting and supporting the Museum project.

The National Coast Guard Museum will engage, educate and inspire visitors from around the world by honoring the courage and skill of the

men and women of our Nation’s unsung Armed Service. The Museum will explore the Coast Guard’s rich history and current impact on our

Nation and the world through interactive exhibits, science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) based learning experiences,

leadership development programming, and public/private partnerships.

www.CoastGuardMuseum.org I info@coastguardmuseum.org I @USCGMuseum I @USCGMuseum I @USCGMuseum

PAGE 12

NATIONAL COAST GUARD MUSEUM ASSOCIATION

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines