The World 110321

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The WORLD
World Publications
Barre-Montpelier, VT

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Scott Administration Announces Path Forward

for Vermonters Experiencing Homelessness

The Scott Administration outlined a comprehensive

plan to address the housing needs

of Vermonters experiencing homelessness,

including the need to fully fund Governor

Scott’s $249 million Housing Recovery Plan

which includes historic funding for permanent

housing for the homeless.

As part of this plan, Administration officials

announced an extension to the current

General Assistance (GA) Emergency Housing

Program until December 31, and other meaningful

actions to support Vermonters experiencing

homelessness and permanent housing

development.

“I appreciate the thoughtful work of our

housing and human services experts to identify

both short term supports to transition

people into more sustainable housing options

and a path for a long term solution that will

provide permanent housing for those experiencing

homelessness,” said Governor Scott.

“To make this plan a reality, we’ve proposed

to the legislature historic investments in housing

to help people move out of homelessness,

benefiting them and their communities.

The proposal has been presented to legislators,

and can be viewed below:

As of October 14, the Department for

Children and Families (DCF) is serving

950 households, representing 1,100 adults

and 402 children. Prior to the pandemic, the

program provided emergency housing for

roughly 2,500 Vermonters annually. Those in

GA Emergency Housing currently are some

of the most vulnerable, including Vermonters

with disabilities, families with children, and

households who have faced chronic housing

instability. Demand for emergency housing

and shelter is a symptom of Vermont’s current

housing crisis. Ultimately, permanent housing

solutions, not simply emergency housing and

shelters, are needed.

Proposed actions to address the housing

crisis

Throughout the pandemic DCF and the

Department of Housing and Community

Development (DHCD) have met and coordinated

with towns and municipalities, first responders,

homeless shelter/service providers,

homeownership centers, affordable housing

developers, community justice centers, designated

agencies, public housing authorities,

hospitals and health centers, advocates, private

landlords and people with lived experiences.

DCF and DHCD meet bi-weekly with

VSHA, VHFA and VHCB as part of the housing

recovery workgroup. More recently during

this pause, the Departments have sought

the input of stakeholders to propose the following

actions to address the current housing

crisis.

To be able to support the housing plan, we

must fully fund Governor Scott’s Housing

Recovery Plan. On April 6, 2021, Governor

Scott called for $249 million in capital funding

for housing as part of his Economic Recovery

and Revitalization Plan. To achieve

this level of ARPA investment, the Legislature

must release an additional $179 million

in ARPA funding to help create affordable,

permanent housing. It is important to send a

strong signal that more funding is coming,

so housing developers continue pre-development

work to ensure projects will be ready as

soon as possible.

Maintain the Safety Net

• Extend to the current pause until December

31, 2021 to ensure that the most vulnerable

Vermonters remain housed during Vermont’s

inclement winter. During the continued pause,

GA clients will still be required to recertify

eligibility, receive housing support services

and work on their housing plan. This pause

can be implemented due to the extension of

FEMA funding at no cost to the state.

• Provide transportation (as needed) for eligible

GA participants when no rooms are

available within the district

DCF is working with community organizations

to create and coordinate transportation

options for Vermonters unable to access

emergency housing due to lack of transportation.

DCF has $300,000 of CRF available

for transportation needs through December

2021. DCF anticipates an additional need of

$600,000 to continue transportation through

SFY22.

• Strengthen understanding of who is in

motels and what barriers exist to exiting

We know that substance use, frequent and significant

mental health issues, and medical and

elder care needs are faced by many people we

serve, and the solutions involve organizations

and agencies outside of DCF and DHCD. By

using existing data (Coordinated Entry) and

partner relationships, we can strengthen services.

Support Safe Exits from the General Assistance

Program

• Transition Motel Guests to Emergency

Rental Assistance Program (ERAP) for

long-term motel rentals

GA Emergency Housing participants can stay

in place while transitioning out of the GA

Emergency Housing Program and into Emergency

Rental Assistance Program. In this

separate program, individuals will rent from

the lodging establishment and re-apply every

three months to DCF to support 100% of their

room rent. The Emergency Rental Assistance

Program will operate as a separate program

from the GA Emergency Housing Program.

ERAP can cover up to 18 months of rent. It

is anticipated that the existing ERAP I & II

award would be more than sufficient to support

this in SFY22 and SFY23.

• Sustain the Rapid Resolution Housing

Initiative (RRHI) beyond Coronavirus Relief

Fund (CRF) expiration

he flexible funds provide one-timeshort

term financial assistance to help households

exit to safe housing. Almost 600 households

have used RRHI funds to address housing

barriers and increase housing options. DCF

anticipates an additional cost of $500,000 to

maintain this assistance. continued on page 3

icr ont v to comict.

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page 2 The WORLD November 3, 2021


Vermont’s Health Care Leaders Support

State Workforce Initiatives Aimed at

Addressing Health Care Staffing Crisis

A coalition of Vermont associations representing

home health and hospice, physicians

and other clinicians, dentists, mental health

providers, long term care facilities, adult day

centers, and hospitals expressed support for

the Scott Administration’s proposals to

strengthen Vermont’s vital health care workforce

and help address our state’s workforce

shortage. The Agency of Human Services

presented its Health Care Workforce

Development Strategic Plan to the Green

Mountain Care Board on Wednesday recommending

new investments and increased supports

that are critical to the state’s health care

system.

“On behalf of our organizations, we want

to thank the administration and lawmakers for

their work to address this crisis,” said Jill

Mazza Olson from the VNAs of Vermont.

“We need immediate and comprehensive

action to ensure that enough providers are

available to give Vermonters the right care in

the right place at the right time. We must

attract new health care workers and retain the

workers we have. This is incredibly hard

work, made even more difficult during the

pandemic.”

“This is a national problem,” noted Laura

Pelosi from the Vermont Health Care

Association. “Vermont will need to take bold

action now to compete with other states.”

Although Vermont has had tremendous

success with its vaccination rate and other

measures against COVID-19, it is not immune

to the current workforce crisis, which involves

much more than the number of COVID cases.

Vermont’s workforce entered the pandemic

needing at least 5,000 nurses by 2020.

COVID-19 increased the stresses facing

our health care workforce. In addition to risking

their own health, many health care workers

have been taking on longer hours and

additional duties due to workforce shortages

and colleagues who are ill or in quarantine.

Health care exposes its workers to unusual

types of stress, including moral distress if

they feel constrained in delivering the best

possible care. These conditions contribute to

a vicious circle where understaffing leads to

increased burnout and an even weaker health

care workforce.

Jessa Barnard from the Vermont Medical

Society said, “We express our deep gratitude

to all of those providing care in the face of

adversity. We thank you for your dedication

and work on behalf of all Vermonters.”

In addition to traditional programs and

benefits such as loan forgiveness and scholarships

for health care professions, the report

also establishes a workgroup to pursue more

innovative approaches to attracting health

care workers, including child care, housing

supports and tax incentives. Vermont’s high

cost of living and lack of affordable housing

and access to child care are commonly cited

as significant barriers for workers.

“Vermont’s health care associations are

united on the issue of workforce because it

affects every aspect of care for Vermonters

across the state and across providers, indeed,

we are all connected,” said Devon Green

• • •

Homelessness continued from previous page

Expand Permanent Housing

• Establish a Rental Risk Mitigation Program. Provide

landlords and motels with an incentive and added security

to work with tenants receiving rental subsidy. Funds could

support up to $5,000 in qualifying damages caused by a tenant

during tenancy, as well as fill other important gaps unaddressed

by ERAP and other funding. In order to establish a

rental risk mitigation program, including administration costs,

DCF anticipates an additional need of $1,512,500.

• Enhance the Vermont Housing Incentive Program

(VHIP).

With current funding, VHIP will have aided over 340 rental

units for people experiencing homelessness. With additional

funding proposed through ARPA, we could bring hundreds of

additional units online for Vermonters experiencing homelessness.

Increase Emergency Shelter Capacity

While shelter capacity has increased above pre-COVID levels,

more than 200 winter shelter beds have been lost. Motel

capacity remains strained, with no capacity for GA clients in

many districts regularly.

• Expand shelter capacity in high needs areas. DCF can

work with BGS to identify possible underutilized dorms, vacant

spaces that may be converted or other lease options and

then partner with community organizations to operate larger

emergency shelters in these locations, even if time-limited

(two years or less). This solution may be most viable in districts

with higher populations.

The Department for Children and Families and the Department

of Housing and Community Development view the current

crisis as an opportunity to shift towards housing crisis

response system that can re-house Vermonters experiencing

homelessness quickly and for the long term.

There is immediate and long-term work ahead and we look

forward to implementing an emergency housing system that is

sustainable past State Fiscal Year 2022.

from the Vermont Association of Hospitals

and Health Systems. “When we do not have

caregivers for long term care facilities,

patients stay in the hospital. In turn, that bed

is not available to the person needing trauma

services. When a person cannot find a primary

care provider or dentist, they end up in

the emergency department causing further

strain. Home health care prevents many emergency

room visits and hospitalizations, but

only when home health agencies have enough

staff to provide those services.”

Julie Tessler from Vermont Care Partners

added, “There are individuals with intellectual/developmental

disabilities who have lost

their homes because of a shortage of residential

providers and hundreds of children are

waiting for outpatient mental health care,

leading some to require inpatient psychiatric

care. We need to be there when Vermonters

need care, especially life-saving care, and to

do that, we need a strong workforce.”

To view the full report, visit: https://

gmcboard.vermont.gov/sites/gmcb/files/documents/VT%20Health%20Care%20

Workforce%20Development%20

Strategic%20Plan%2010-15-21%20

Final%20GMCB.pdf.

About the Vermont Health Care Coalition

The Vermont Health Care Coalition is an

ad hoc group of Vermont’s health care associations.

This group has collaborated since

the beginning of COVID-19 pandemic to

address Vermont’s health care needs, tackle

our state’s toughest challenges using best

practices, data and sound policy. The coalition

consists of the following:

• Jessa Barnard - Vermont Medical Society

• Patrick Gallivan - Vermont State Dental

Society

• Devon Green - Vermont Association of

Hospitals and Health Systems

• Mary Kate Mohlman - Bi-State Primary

Care Association

• Jill Mazza Olson - VNAs of Vermont

• Laura Pelosi - Vermont Health Care

Association

• Virginia Renfrew - Vermont Association of

Area Agencies on Aging VT Association of

Adult Day Services

• Susan Ridzon - HealthFirst Independent

Practice Association

• Julie Tessler - Vermont Care Partners: VT

Council

• Jason Williams - University of Vermont

Health Network

• Stephanie Winters - Vermont Academy of

Family Physicians and American Academy of

Pediatrics – Vermont Chapter

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page 4 The WORLD November 3, 2021

CONTACT US

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Vermont Students Head Back to

School on Electric Buses

As Vermont students headed back to school,

some of them enjoyed a quieter, cleaner ride

on the first electric school buses to be used

in ermont. State officials, clean energy proponents,

elected officials, and educators gathered

at Bellows Free Academy in Fairfax to

commemorate this milestone toward decarboniing

transportation in ermont.

Champlain alley School istrict and

Franklin est Supervisory nion each welcomed

two new electric school buses in time

for the start of the school year. Student ransportation

of America in partnership with the

Barre nified nion School istrict anticipate

their buses will arrive in November and

look forward to the educational opportunities

the buses will provide for students.

he buses are part of the Agency of Natural

esources (AN) olkswagen Environmental

Mitigation rust Fund pilot to test how

electric school buses work in Vermont. After

being selected through a competitive process,

the participating schools worked with AN

and EC to select electric bus and charging

equipment vendors. he buses that arrived

in uly and August came from Blue Bird and

he Lion Electric Company.

he tenth anniversary of ropical Storm

rene, and the devastation wrought by it and

other more-localied but equally intense

storms reminds us that the impacts of climate

change are already being felt and will get

far worse if we don’t make progress in cutting

greenhouse gas emissions, said ulie

Moore, Secretary of the ermont Agency of

Natural esources. Electrification of ermont’s

school bus fleet is a critical component

of addressing transportation emissions

but switching to electric buses will require

new and different fleet management. his pilot

program will help us and schools across

the state understand how to make this transition

effectively. ur school communities, students,

teachers, and administrators are ready

to lead. am pleased to partner with EC to

give them the tools to do so.

As the program administrator, EC supported

AN and the partners through initial

selection to the purchase and deployment of

the buses. ith the buses on the roads, EC

will undertake a year of tracking and evaluation

to learn more about their performance.

EC will also provide technical assistance to

proect partners as needed.

Electric buses are the future, said ennifer

allace-Brodeur, irector of Clean ransportation

at EC. Each student that rides to

school on an electric bus this year will get to

see firsthand the benefits of electric transportation.

e are excited to spend the next year

learning alongside the school districts about

how these buses work in ermont.

Students, community members and bus

drivers will see an immediate benefit from

the electric buses as they start their routes this

fall. Electric buses emit fewer greenhouse gas,

particulate matter, and nitrogen oxides (Nx)

emissions than their diesel counterparts. hey

are also quieter, improving the quality of the

ride for all passengers.

e are beyond excited to add electric busses

to our fleet, said ustin Brown, rades

5-8 Principal at Bellows Free Academy,

which is part of the Franklin est Supervisory

nion. he support we have received

from our students, families, staff and community

has been overwhelmingly positive. As a

school that actively incorporates the nited

Nations lobal oals for Sustainable evelopment

into our curriculum, staff and students

are able to apply our learning in a meaningful

real-world context both through the data collected

through this proect, as well as through

reducing our carbon footprint each day these

busses are on the road. e all hope this paves

the way for more green transportation in our

(and our kids’) future.

he CS community prides itself on

being a leader in sustainable practices, said

eanne ensen, C at Champlain alley

School istrict. hese buses allow us to not

only transport students more safely and efficiently,

but to make a concrete example of

how we live up to our values. e are confident

that we are educating a whole cohort of

future E consumers.

ver the life of a bus, participating schools

might save as much as 3,000 in fuel costs

compared to a diesel bus. Annual greenhouse

gas emissions for the buses will be approximately

97% lower than diesel buses.

The Vermont Agency of Natural Resources

is charged with oversight and management

of ermont’s natural environment on

behalf of the people of ermont. e endeavor

to draw from and build upon ermonters’

shared ethic of responsibility for our natural

environment, an ethic that encompasses a

sense of place, community and quality of life,

and an understanding that we are an integral

part of the environment, and that we must all

be responsible stewards for this and future

generations. anr.vermont.gov.

VEIC is a sustainable energy company on

a mission to generate the energy solutions the

world needs. For over 30 years EC has been

working with governments, utilities, foundations

and businesses across North America to

develop and deploy clean energy services that

provide immediate and lasting change. ith

expertise in energy efficiency, building decarboniation,

transportation electrification,

and new approaches for a clean and flexible

grid, EC brings innovative solutions to the

market. EC is nationally recognied for

developing pilots and programs that optimie

energy use, reduce energy burdens for low-income

customers, and advance new technologies.

n addition to our full-service consulting

business, EC administers three large-scale

sustainable energy programs: Efficiency ermont,

Efficiency Smart, and the C Sustainable

Energy tility (CSE). veic.org.

Is Your Child Ready to Stay Home Alone?

• • •

ecently ’ve noticed that parents have

been eager to ask me what age they can leave

their children home alone without a sitter.

feel at home, but not alone, with this common

question so let me provide some information

on the topic.

Wait until age 10

First, children under 10 should never be

left alone even for a few minutes. f your

child is older than 10, but still frightened or

apprehensive about being left alone, don’t

leave them alone either. n the other hand,

you can consider leaving them alone if they

are older than 10 and showing signs of

responsibility like getting homework and

chores done without asking, following rules

and understanding safety measures in your

house, and are interested in trying to stay

home alone.

ere are a few hints that will make things

go well:

Agree on house rules

First set the house rules ahead of time and

make sure your child understands and can

repeat them back to you. hese rules are up to

you but usually include:

No guests when an adult is not at home,

unless having a friend to keep them company

is arranged in advance.

Never answering the door for a stranger or

telling a stranger on the phone that they are

alone.

Not using the oven or microwave in your

absence.

Expectations for whether the television and

internet are to be used and for what purpose

when you are not home.

Prepare for emergencies

Make sure your child knows how to

respond in the event of an emergency such as

a fire by talking your child through such situations

and hearing how they would respond.

Post all key phone numbers and any special

instructions on a visible place such as the

fridge.

Make sure your home is adequately childproofed,

meaning you have secured any medications,

alcoholic beverages, firearms, car

keys, lighters and matches so that your child

or teen can’t access them.

f your children are staying alone after

school until you get home, ask one of them to

call you or a neighbor if you are unavailable

as soon as they get home from school to let

you know they’re okay.

ith these hints in place, you might give

your child the opportunity to try out this

experience, first by leaving them alone for a

brief period of time, such as 30 minutes to an

hour, and then increasing the time alone

gradually.

opefully tips like these will hit home

when it comes to allowing your older child to

stay home alone when you cannot be there to

provide the supervision.

Lewis First, MD, is Chief of Pediatrics at

The University of Vermont Children’s Hospital

and Chair of the Department of Pediatrics at

the University of Vermont’s Larner College of

Medicine. You can also catch “First with

Kids” weekly on WOKO 98.9FM and NBC5.


NOVEMBER COUPONS

n on

in rir

Novello Adds Two Native

Vermonters to Sales Team

Novello Home Furnishings has announced the hiring of two

new sales associates, Sean Maloney and Aidan Marlier. Each

brings a wealth of experience, along with a native Vermonter’s

unique outlook on style, comfort and practicality.

The youngest of five siblings, Sean Maloney grew up in

central Vermont and boasts over 20 years in sales, including

retail, real estate and wine. He lives with two French bulldogs

and a yellow Labrador Retriever, and participates in the

American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life.

Aidan Marlier grew up in Walden with his mom, and afterward

moved to scenic Moretown with his girlfriend. Though

new to furniture sales, he brings to his job a passion for helping

shoppers find the perfect piece, to breathe new life into

their homes.

Says store owner Steve Kidder, “Sean and Aidan have

already proven themselves on the sales floor; they’re knowledgeable,

friendly and happy to go the extra mile to make sure

every customer leaves the store happy.”

Novello Home Furnishings has served Berlin, Barre, and

Montpelier, VT since 1981, offering quality furniture and

exceptional design services. Novello stocks a variety of furniture,

mattresses, accents, and accessories for the entire home.

• • •

The Vermont Women’s Fund

Launches This Way UP to

Increase Data on Vermont

Women Owned Businesses

The Vermont Women’s Fund announces the launch of This

Way UP: there’s power in our numbers, a new initiative to

identify and track women-owned businesses and women leaders

throughout the state. While women business owners are a

strong part of Vermont’s economy, there is no conclusive data

to determine how many there are, in what sectors, and what

gender-specific challenges they might face such as lack of

access to funding.

“There’s no time to waste,” says Meg Smith, director of the

Vermont Women’s Fund. “When the state received federal

funding to help women-owned and BIPOC-owned businesses

during the pandemic, there was no data source to turn to—it

was a glaring gap that the Women’s Fund set out to fill.”

Smith sought funding and hired Louisa Schibli, co-founder

of Milk Money VT, a statewide equity crowdfunding platform,

and Marguerite Dibble, owner of GameTheory, a gamebased

educational and research company in Londonderry, to

build a database of female founders. Together, they designed

a website where women business owners sign in, take a

10-minute survey, and see the impact of their business on

Vermont’s economy in real time.

“We did not do this alone,” says Schibli. “We spoke with

over fifty organizations from technical assistance providers to

the Vermont Chamber of Commerce to several departments

within the state of Vermont—basically everyone we could

think of that has a touchpoint to women entrepreneurs. We

want to be sure the information we gather is useful to a wide

audience.”

“We’re creating a digital database and capturing stories

about a sector of our economy that has been overlooked in the

past,” says Dibble. “The information will be collected securely,

and users will be able to see the data constantly evolve as

the survey is populated, which gives energy to the project and

builds excitement.”

The data gleaned from the survey creates an interactive

map and real-time infographics and provides users instant

information on how their business contributes to Vermont’s

overall economy. To learn more about This Way UP and to

register a business, visit ThisWayUpVT.com.

The Vermont Women’s Fund is the first and largest philanthropic

resource in the state founded specifically to advance

women and girls in Vermont. Founded in 1994, it is a component

fund of the Vermont Community Foundation and awards

annual grants to nonprofits around the state that serve women

and girls with programs that promote economic self-sufficiency,

career development and systems change. Learn more at

vermontwomensfund.org.

The Vermont Community Foundation inspires giving

and brings people and resources together to make a difference

in Vermont. A family of hundreds of funds and foundations,

we provide the advice, investment vehicles, and back-office

expertise that make it easy for the people who care about

Vermont to find and fund the causes they love. We envision

Vermont at its best—where everyone has the opportunity to

build a bright, secure future. Visit vermontcf.org or call 802-

388-3355 for more information. For information on our

COVID-19 response, visit vtcovid19response.org.

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November 3, 2021 The WORLD page 5


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Green Mountain Power (GMP) and Efficiency

ermont announced a new streamlined

heat pump rebate process for customers

that will start November 1 making it easier

to switch away from fossil fuel for heating.

hrough a partnership with Efficiency ermont,

GMP customers who buy heat pumps

can still get up to $1,200 in total savings per

condenser, with some of that savings applied

up front without the need to submit a rebate

form after the purchase. And, customers who

are low and moderate income will get bonus

savings through a single streamlined postpurchase

rebate application. Previously, customers

had to fill out separate forms, with

different criteria, for MP rebates and Efficiency

ermont rebates.

e’re so glad to work with Efficiency

ermont on this proect for our customers.

housands of ermonters have already

switched away from fossil fuel for heating

through GMP rebates this year, and the new

rebate process starting on November 1 will

make it even easier for customers to save

while reducing their carbon footprint,” said

Kristin Carlson, MP ice President and

Chief Energy Services executive. eating

with fossil fuels is the second-largest source

of carbon pollution in ermont after driving,

and our goal is always to empower customers

through our programs to help them cut carbon

and costs.”

The process will be simpler for customers

because GMP’s current base rebate of $400

per heat pump condenser will become a savings

applied by heat pump distributors, eliminating

a post-purchase form and documentation

step for customers and creating direct

upfront savings when people buy.

GMP customers who are low or moderate

income will also be able to receive bonus

savings through a single form, instead of two

separate forms previously required for GMP

and Efficiency ermont rebates. he extra rebate

amounts – $300 from GMP for moderate

income customers, $600 from GMP for lowincome

customers and 200 from Efficiency

ermont for both income-eligible groups

will remain the same through this new streamlined

process, and customers will receive the

bonus savings in one check instead of two.

“We know that reducing the upfront cost

of energy efficiency investments is important,

but it’s not the only consideration. Making

the buying experience as simple as possible is

also critical to helping more ermonters adopt

clean, efficient technologies like cold climate

heat pumps, said Carol eston, irector of

Efficiency ermont. reen Mountain Power

is incredibly customer focused, and we’re

excited to partner with them to improve the

customer experience of buying a heat pump.”

eat pumps are increasingly popular with

customers for heating and cooling. They are

hyper efficient, and rather than heat or cool

neier re are

riia eer nin

By CompassVermont.com

Governor Phil Scott announced

that four municipalities

have been awarded $10

million in American Rescue

Plan Act (ARPA) funding to

accelerate efforts to eliminate

combined sewer overflows

(CSs) in their cities

and towns.

CSs occur during intense

or extreme storm

events when stormwater

runoff overwhelms sewer

system capacity. Montpelier,

Northfield, St. ohnsbury and ergennes will

each receive a portion of this $10 million.

The four municipalities selected to receive

initial funding will use these funds to implement

high-priority proects identified in their

long-term plan for controlling sewer overflows.

The Governor has recommended a total of

30 million in APA funding to help ermont

municipalities fast-track planned sewer overflow

reduction proects.

These projects will decrease pollution in

streams and lakes. $10 million was appropriated

this year to support these projects, and

additional funding is anticipated over the next

three years.

Combined sewer systems collect sewage

and stormwater in the same pipe before sending

it to a wastewater treatment plant. CSs

work well under normal conditions, however,

• • •

the air, they pull warmth or coolness from it.

And GMP’s energy supply is 100% carbon

free. The growing popularity of heat pumps

as a clean way to heat and cool your home has

been great for local heat pump installers.

Chris Blanchard and her son Stephen Cobb

own Bristol Electronics. The company installs

and repairs solar systems and heat pumps with

its crew of six full-time employees. The business

was founded by Chris’s father, avid

Cobb, and is now in its 49th year of business.

Blanchard suggested this change to GMP.

eat pumps are a great choice for ermonters.

We’ve been really busy helping

people reduce their carbon footprint in both

their heating and electricity consumption. We

are happy to see this change as it simplifies

the rebate process.”

This new streamlined process will apply

for heat pump sales on and after November

1. More details about heat pumps and GMP’s

rebates are available on GMP’s website, or on

Efficiency ermont’s rebate center at www.

efficiencyvermont.comrebates.

fien ern

As the nation’s first Energy Efficiency tility,

Efficiency ermont has helped ermont

avoid over 12 million metric tons of greenhouse

gas emissions and has received the

.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s EN-

ERGY STAR Program for sustained excellence

award for the last six consecutive years.

Efficiency ermont works with partners to

help our state transition to a more affordable,

low carbon energy future through education,

incentives, and support for our clean energy

workforce. For more information, contact Efficiency

ermont at (888) 921-5990 or visit

www.efficiencyvermont.com.

reen nain er

Green Mountain Power (GMP) serves approximately

266,000 residential and business

customers in ermont and is partnering with

them to improve lives and transform communities.

GMP is focused on a new way of doing

business to meet the needs of customers with

integrated energy services that help people

use less energy and save money, while continuing

to generate clean, cost-effective and

reliable power in ermont. MP is the first

utility in the world to get a B Corp certification,

meeting rigorous social, environmental,

accountability and transparency standards

and committing to use business as a force for

good. MP earned a spot on Fast Company’s

Most nnovative Companies in the orld list

four years in a row (2017, 2018, 2019, 2020).

In 2021, the Smart Electric Power Alliance

(SEPA) honored GMP as a nationwide leader

in energy transformation, and in 2019 MP

earned the eane C. avis utstanding ermont

Business of the Year Award from the

ermont Chamber of Commerce and ermont

Business Magazine.

when strong storms hit, runoff

from rain and snowmelt

can overwhelms a system’s

capacity. When this happens,

system operators are forced

to divert some of the untreated

wastewater into lakes

and rivers via outfall pipes to

prevent sewage backups into

basements or onto roadways.

Eliminating discharges will

improve the water quality of

streams and lakes.

“Working with municipal

partners, we’ve made great

progress reducing combined sewer overflows,

including eliminating more than 20 outfalls

in the last three years alone,” said Agency of

Natural esources Secretary ulie Moore.

Annual precipitation in ermont has increased

by almost seven inches over the past

50 years. ith much of ermont’s municipal

wastewater infrastructure dating back to the

1800s and early 1900s, the systems were not

built to withstand today’s extreme storms.

Since 1990, ermont’s epartment of Environmental

Conservation has been working

with municipalities to eliminate 75 percent of

ermont’s CS outfall points, reducing the

number from 178 to 44.

CompassVermont.Com is an independent

publication founded by a native Vermonter,

providing non-editorial news and stories presented

in concert with the culture, mindset,

and values of the Green Mountain State.


Lost Nation Theater

Announces

All Together Now!

A New Musical Revue

“We Want to Bring Some JOY!” says cast member Shanda

Williams about All Together Now!, the new musical revue reopening

Lost Nation Theater, November 12-14, 2021.

This new musical revue, made possible by MTI, is a global

event designed to celebrate and raise funds for local theater.

LNT’s production will be live onstage 7:30 p.m. Friday & Saturday,

November 12 & 13, and 2 p.m. Sunday, November 14.

Customized with songs from Into the Woods, Ragtime, Rent,

Waitress, Mamma Mia, Company and many more, All Together

Now! brings audiences and artists back to Lost Nation Theater.

It’s a milestone moment for Lost Nation Theater. The company

returns to the stage with a fully staged multi-performer

production inside the theater for the first time in two years

To keep everyone safe, patron spaced seating, mask-wearing,

proof of vaccination, and adherence to other Covid-safety

protocols are required for in-person seating.

The shows will be live-streamed on-demand for anyone not

yet comfortable gathering indoors (or who is unable to meet

the industry-standard Covid-safety protocols LNT must follow).

All Together Now! offers a journey of ups and downs, highlighting

experiences past and present which are sure to resonate

with everyone in the room. So many Tony Winners are

represented! From the jazzy Andrew-Sisters medleys of Bobby’s

raving girlfriends to perhaps less well known and more

recent theatrical song stylings of Jason Robert Brown, the

imagination is set loose on this versatile musical soundscape.

About the revue MTI’s President and CEO, Drew Cohen,

says:

“All Together Now! is about bringing people back to the

theatre, whether as audience members or cast, crew and musicians.

The revue features songs from the world’s most iconic

musicals, so there is definitely something for everyone to enjoy.

Our goal with this worldwide event is for organizations to

provide hope, inspiration, and excitement to their communities

through the transformative power of musical theatre.”

Lost Nation Theater joyfully participates in this special

event, an international outreach effort.

For additional information about and to purchase tickets to

All Together Now!, visit lostnationtheater.org.

ou can also call the Box ffice at 802-229-0492. Lost Nation

Theater’s performance space within Montpelier City Hall

Arts Center is wheelchair accessible and offers assisted listening

services. Guide dogs are always welcome.

About Lost Nation Theater:

Lost Nation Theater: 2020 “Theater of the Decade” - Broadway

World; 2014 winner “Best in New England”- Yankee

Magazine, and named ”One of the Best Regional Theaters in

America” by NYC Drama League. 2012 Outstanding Achievement

Award from the New England Theatre Conference; recipient

of numerous People’s Choice awards from both Seven

Days and The Times Argus for Best Theater.

Lost Nation Theater is sponsored by Capitol Copy, City of

Montpelier, Eternity, Vermont Arts Council/NEA, National

Life Group, Vermont Mutual Insurance and The World. Additional

funding from The Mary Shriver Memorial Fund of the

Alan Weiss Estate, The Estate of Ted Richards, and Montpelier

Community Fund.

Join Us! In person. Live! Or online! Friday & Saturday,

Nov. 12 & 13 at 7:30 p.m.; Sunday Nov. 14 at 2 p.m.

Advance reservation only. No walk-ins – this is to keep indoor

gathering time to minimum to keep all safe .

Tickets are $35 (general); $25 students & seniors.

Available online; by phone (Tu-Fri, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.) or in

person at Montpelier City Clerks ffice (M-F, 8:30 a.m.-4

p.m.).

By purchasing tickets you agree to adhere to all of LNT’s

safety protocols, which can be found on our website.

www.lostnationtheater.org, phone: 802-229-0492, email:

info@lostnationtheater.org.

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1365 US Route 302 Barre, VT 05641-2351

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combinable with other specials, installation not included. Expires 11/30/2020.

1365 US Route 302 Barre, VT 05641-2351


Ainsworth

Public Library

Williamstown

Look for us on Facebook: Ainsworth Public Library

802-433-5887

library@williamstownvt.org

www.ainsworthpubliclibrary.org

2338 VT RTE 14 Williamstown, VT

Phase 4.3 of Library Opening

Please check our website for details regarding what we are

offering for services. www.Ainsworthpubliclibrary.org We are

offering a variety of services M 10-2pm & W 11-6pm, TH

11-3pm appointment and curbside. Appointments are limited

to six people in the building at one time. You can sign up

ahead of time by email, phone or FB messenger. Open Days

no appointment necessary: T 2-6pm, SA 10-2pm. Mask

required.

• • •

Looking for a Clerk

We are looking for a clerk M 2-6pm, F 2-6pm every other

Saturday 10-2pm. See our website for more information.

Contact or stop by the library for an application EOE.

Thank you

Thank you to everyone that helped support the Trunk or

Treat Fundraiser! See you next year.

Searching for a Turkey

Every month the WES Librarian and the Ainsworth Public

Librarian try to do a coordinated event. In November, we

would like have an event for youth where the big prize would

be a turkey. We are seeking a turkey to give away. Do you

have one you would like to donate? We are also looking for a

live turkey to make a video with. If you can help us, please

contact the library. 433-5887

Closed Veteran’s Day

The Library is Closed November 11.

Trustee Meeting

Join us at the Library 10AM November 12. Our meetings

are open to anyone. Look for our agenda on our website.

Route 5, Lyndonville, VT

Mon. thru Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3, Sun. Closed

1-800-439-5996

296 Meadow St., Littleton, NH

4584 U.S. Rte. 5, Newport, VT

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page 8 The WORLD November 3, 2021

PUBLIC LIBRARY

6 Washington Street

Barre, VT 05641

Phone: (802) 476-7550

www.aldrichpubliclibrary.org

Library Friends Raffling Off Thanksgiving Pies

Besides turkey, what says Thanksgiving more than pie? If

you like pie, you are sure to enjoy the two homebaked 9” pies

featured in the Friends of the Aldrich Public Library’s popular

Thanksgiving pie raffle. The winner may choose from apple,

pumpkin, peach, pecan, lemon meringue, raspberry, strawberry

rhubarb, maple cream, or frozen Oreo crust peanut butter.

The pies will be baked by Library Friend Marilyn Blake

of East Barre, arguably Barre’s best baker.

Kellogg-Hubbard

Library News

Montpelier

Getting to Know Libby: Using Your Library Card to

Download E-books and Audiobooks

Monday, November 1, 2021 1:30 PM In Person & Zoom

Learn how you can use your library card to download

e-books and audiobooks to your smartphone, tablet, e-reader,

or computer—all for free! Have your device and library card

on hand as you join in-person or via Zoom. By the end of the

program, you’ll leave ready to read or listen to your favorite

authors. Join in-person in the Hayes Room or register to join

via Zoom at www.kellogghubbard.org/adult-programs.

We Are the Land: Historical and Contemporary

Perspectives on Abenaki Sovereignty

Wednesday, November 3, 2021 7 PM Zoom Only

Although four bands of the Abenaki were recognized by the

state of Vermont ten years ago, the bands continue to face

challenges. Bryan Blanchette and Melody Walker Mackin

discuss the historical ramifications of colonialism, contrast the

traditional Abenaki connection to the land with contemporary

ideas, and consider ideas on reciprocity and reconciliation.

This is a First Wednesdays. Program and will be offered via

Zoom. Register at www.vermonthumanities.org/first-wednesdays.

College Talk Roundtable: Applying To and Paying For

College

Monday, November 8, 2021 6-7 PM Zoom Only

A casual Zoom gathering of parents and students to offer

support and advice for those navigating the process of applying,

and then paying, for college. Chelsea Martin, of Vermont

Student Assistance Corporation (VSAC) will be on hand for

questions. Register to participate via Zoom at www.kellogghubbard.org/adult-programs.

The Connection between Racism and Public Health

League of Women Voters Speaker Series

Wednesday, November 10, 2021 7 PM Zoom Only

The first of the Vermont League of Women Voters’ speaker

• • •

The drawing will be held on Saturday, November 20, so

that Blake may contact the winner, find out his/her choice of

flavor(s), and arrange for the fresh pies to be picked up at the

library in time for Thanksgiving. Tickets are now on sale at

the library and from the Friends at $1 for one ticket, and $5

for six. For more information or to reserve some tickets, call

the library at 476-7550.

series on “Racism and Public Health.” Featured speaker,

Maria Mercedes Avila, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the

Department of Pediatrics in the College of Medicine and in

the College of Nursing at the University of Vermont. Dr. Avila

teaches courses on Racism and Health Disparities in the U.S.

and is a member of the State of Vermont Racial Equity

Advisory Panel. Register to participate via Zoom at www.

kellogghubbard.org/adult-programs.

Sense & Sensibility

Monday, November 15, 2021 6:30-8 PM Zoom Only

Join JASNA members (the Vermont Region of the Jane

Austen Society of North America) as they gather online to

discuss Austen’s first published novel in October of 1811.

Readers new to Austen, as well as Janeites, are welcomed.

Register to participate via Zoom at www.kellogghubbard.org/

adult-programs.

Introducing Kanopy and Flipster: Using Your Library

Card to Access Free Movies and Magazines

Wednesday, November 17th, 6:30 PM In Person & Zoom

The Kellogg-Hubbard Library has introduced two new

exciting digital services: Kanopy, a free movie streaming

service, and Flipster, a free digital magazine library. Have

your library card in hand as we guide you through accessing

to these services and provide a tour of the scores of films and

magazines that they offer. Join in-person in the Hayes Room

or register to join via Zoom at www.kellogghubbard.org/

adult-programs.

Make Your Own Bernie Mittens Workshop

Saturday, November 20, 2021 2:30-5 PM In Person Only

The mittens worn by Bernie Sanders at Biden’s inauguration

and immortalized in memes were handmade for him from

a repurposed wool sweater by a second-grade teacher in

Vermont. Join this in-person workshop to make a pair of your

own! Bring your own retired wool sweater or use one we have

to create a fun and warm pair of mittens for you, a loved one,

or a special politician in your life. Some sewing-machine

skills required. Pre-register by emailing msinger@kellogghubbard.org.

Space is limited. Special thanks to Notion for

the use of their sewing machines.

• • •

MSAC’s November 2021

need to register; just show up!

Active Times Newsletter

Community Strength Award

Visit montpelier-vt.org/304/

On Saturday, October 9, MSAC’s

Newsletter to read the full 12 pages of

FEAST Senior Meals received a

great content, including a Director’s

Community Strength Award from the

Dispatch from Sarah Lipton, a profile

Central Vermont Council on Aging. We

on volunteer Ghazi Ben Rhaim, a

celebrated coming back together as a

Q&A with FEAST Program Manager

community to support aging services

Kim Myers, lots of updates about FEAST Senior Meals with a Zoom event. This event featured a comedic story,

Program and the FEAST Farm, many events coming this music, special video messages, a creative aging activity, and

month and next, updates on MSAC at Home and more more. During the event, FEAST and other meal providers

announcements and resources from MSAC, Parks & Rec, and were presented with awards for their heroic efforts to keep our

our community partners. We also express our gratitude for the older Vermonters safe and cared for during the pandemic. We

bounty of produce, volunteers and partners that support our are grateful for the award and even more grateful for the

community, and we give you information about the FREE opportunity to work with CVCOA to provide meals for our

Thanksgiving Meal being offered by National Life on Nov. 24 community.

(reserve by Nov. 17!)

MSAC At Home Can Help!

Making Seed Collages Walk

As seasons shift, we are accepting MSAC At Home

Saturday, November 13, 10:00am (rain date, 11/14) | Free | requests! These requests can include outdoor or indoor chore

For all ages

assistance, socialization, walking buddies (new!), or technology

assistance. If someone you know needs a hand, contact

Meet at parking lot next to the Winooski River on Siboinebi

Path, Old Country Club Road, Montpelier, for a very easy us! To learn more or make a request, contact MSAC’s Aging

walk. Join Naturalist Gail Johnson for a creative and fun way in Place Coordinator Maddie Sholar at 802-262-6287 or email

to learn about local plant seeds. We’ll each have a cardboard msac-americorps@montpelier-vt.org.

with mailing tape, sticky side out on which we will arrange We’re open! Stay Informed about MSAC:

local seeds we find along the trail. Seeds and their cases come Visit https://www.montpelier-vt.org/304/Newsletter to read

in all shapes, and it's interesting to see how flowers you our full monthly newsletter, typically 12 pages of great content.

To subscribe to our free weekly e-letter, email msac@

know in summer transform once they have made their seeds.

This trail has a wide variety of plants, so your collage will be montpelier-vt.org. Regularly updated announcements and

full! We’ll even see the berries of poison ivy, but we will not events are available at: https://www.montpelier-vt.org/1128/

be touching them! Come help find the seeds! Gail will have Special-Events. Click on links at left. Call our office with

photos of some of the local flowers of the seeds we find. No questions at 223-2518!


aine era e ran Reenin

Dangerous Danziger in Barre

A conversation with a group of young people

about the ietnam war led nationally syndicated

political cartoonist eff aniger to chronicle his

own experiences as a S Army lieutenant during

that conflict. he result was Lieutenant angerous:

a ietnam Memoir, a frank, acerbic, sometimes

humorous account of his time in ietnam

and his reflections about the war and the military.

he Kirkus eviews called it, A must-read

war memoir . . . with ero punches pulled.

eff aniger will discuss his experiences and

book at Barre’s historic ld Labor all on hursday,

November 11 at :30 p.m. A former English

teacher, he is especially interested in questions

from area high school students.

aniger was born in New ork City and moved to ermont

after college. At age 24 and with his wife pregnant, he

was drafted and sent to ietnam as a linguist and intelligence

officer. learned, and think most veterans learn, aniger

writes, that making people or nations do something by bombing

or sending in armed troops usually fails.

n 1971, aniger received a Brone Star and Air Medal

along with his honorable discharge. e returned to ermont,

Barre Author Writes Novel About Home Care and Hospice

At what point does a caregiver cross the

boundary between providing professional, compassionate

care to getting too involved with

their patients’ lives hat question stands at the

heart of o Alice, the debut novel by . Peter

Cobb. o Alice is set to release anuary 12,

2022 through ouchPoint Press of Brookland,

Arkansas. As C cases in the nited States

continue to rise, o Alice speaks to a group

facing greater responsibility and financial strain

in their efforts to uphold societal health: home

health and hospice caregivers. As a director for

33 years in the trade association for the state’s

10 isiting Nurse Associations, Cobb was continually

inspired by the heroism and grace behind

simple carea bed bath, wound dressing,

house cleaning, or simple companionship. n speaking to the

valiant, direct care given by home care agenciescare given

often in spite of the staffing and financial pressures these agencies

frequently faceCobb also hopes that o Alice will ultimately

work to contemplate the delicate boundaries between

patient and caregiver.

he boundary between providing compassionate care and

getting too involved with a patient is often blurred, especially

for home care and hospice aides who work with their patients

week after week for months, sometimes years, Cobb said.

bviously, the vast maority stay on the right side of the line

but that’s not always easy. Some days the home care aide is

the only person her patient sees for the day. n speaking to

the challenges faced in the hospice care setting, there is a hope

that o Alice will inspire greater understanding and celebration

for caregivers navigating steep conflicts in a society now

Scats and Tracks, a Virtual Offering for Elementary School Students

he C-19 pandemic has had many teachers on the

lookout for new and exciting ways to teach outside. ermont

Fish and ildlife is offering a virtual program for Elementary

School classes grades 1- designed to get kids outside with

their teacher, while also learning about ermont’s local wildlife.

Scats and racks is a 4-week program that gives educators

plans and support to lead nature hikes on school or nearby

grounds. Each week’s hike teaches students to identify scat

and tracks for a different native species, and it is supported

with access to a virtual class visit on nature facts from Fish

and ildlife epartment experts. his year’s species are gray

fox, beaver, gray squirrel, and eastern wild turkey.

here are two ways for classes to participate, designed to

meet the needs of different schedules and student groups: 1)

pre-recorded lessons; or 2) live virtual presentations with a

• • •

• • •

• • •

he Friends of the Plainfield pera

ouse rand e-opening Celebration e

are open for business And we want to celebrate

ou’re invited to oin us in person at

the pera ouse or attend the meeting on

oom.

e are excited to announce our reopening

with a concert and celebration on November

7 starting at 3 p.m. e will start

things off at 3:00 p.m with a benefit performance

by ermont’s finest (and only)

Klemer Band :

The Nisht Geferlach Klezmer Band

Come and enoy this lively and poignant music. ance,

clap, listen, sing along

he band will play for about 45 minutes starting at 3 p.m.

After the music, at 4:00 p.m., we will have refreshments, some

brief announcements about the future of the Friends of the pera

ouse, the own all itself, our plans for the winter and

spring, a big thank you to the donors to the Full ouse Fund

which enabled us to double pera ouse parking, and our annual

meeting.

his brief meeting is open to all past, present, and future

members. So, if you are a member, have ever been a member,

or want to become a member (in other words, everyone)

please stay. e will be discussing plans for the future, what

you can do to help (volunteering, oining the board, etc.), answering

any questions you may have, and

more. e enthusiastically encourage and

welcome new members

here will be membership forms available

and are now able to take credit card

payments in person. ou can also become

a member.

e are expanding the number of board

members and defining board member

roles more clearly. Please let us know if

you would like to be considered for a seat

on the board.

he pera ouse will be following

strict C protocols including requiring proof of vaccination

for all eligible people, masking for all, physical distancing

(we are limiting capacity to 5 people), and contact tracing.

oward that end we are requiring advanced reservations to

the concert and meeting with an optional donation to help us

cover expenses. Please go to our website www.plainfieldoperahousevt.org

for tickets. ou can also register for only the

meeting portion of the celebration via oom. e are working

on the technology to stream our future concerts but it will not

be ready by November 7.

mmediately after the meeting (4:30 the latest) we will

cross the street for a quick ribbon cutting ceremony for the

new parking lot.

For more information go to: www.plainfieldoperahousevt.

org Email: plainfieldtownhallgmail.com.

where he taught English at -32 igh School

in East Montpelier. e began his career as a

cartoonist in 1975 with the Barre-Montpelier

imes Argus and utland erald.

aniger has since worked for the New ork

aily News and Christian Science Monitor. e

oined the New ork imes Syndicate in 2002.

e has been twice short-listed for the Puliter

Prie and was awarded an verseas Press Club

Prie in 1998. e won the erblock Prie in

200 and the homas Nast Award in 2008.

he Barre istorical Society encourages

high school students to attend.

aniger’s talk at the ld Labor all is free,

though donations are appreciated. Lieutenant angerous: a

ietnam Memoir will be available from Next Chapter Books

for signing.

Proof of vaccination and masking are required. Seating is

limited to 50 people, and reservations will receive priority.

o reserve a space, go to https:danigerlaborhall.eventbrite.

com, email infooldlaborhall.org, or call (802) 479-500.

he ld Labor all is at 4 ranite St., in Barre.

increasingly impacted by illness and isolation.

About the Book

Protagonist Alice ammond is a troubled

soul. She dropped out of medical school when

one of her professors made it too stressful for

her to stay. Now she works as a home health

and hospice aide in the fictional town of Providence,

ermont. She is a wonderful aide, the

quality of her work is high and her patients

love her. But she tends to become too involved

with them. She has made their lives her life, a

problem both for them and her.

All readers can discover the dignity and

grace behind simple hospice care by finding

o Alice on anuary 12, 2022 at https:bit.

lyoAlice. o Alice will also be available

from maor book retailers in eBook (4.99) and paperback

(15.99). holesale from ngram and ouchPoint Press.

About J. Peter Cobb

Peter Cobb was the executive director for thirty-three years

of the NAs of ermont, the trade association that represents

ermont’s isiting Nurse Associations. Cobb lives in Barre

own, ermont with his wife Cindy and their two cats. o

Alice is Cobb’s first novel.

About the Publisher

ouchPoint Press is a traditional publisher of fiction and

nonfiction. ur staff is comprised of professionals whose collective

experience in publishing, editing, ournalism, design,

and marketing set the stage behind our growing list of published

titles. e are proud to work with talented authors and

strive to be as innovative and energetic as possible from acquisitions

to promotion before and after publication.

department staff member once a week.

ermont Fish and ildlife understands that many educators

have questions about leading a nature hike of their own.

Staff are available to answer any questions about that portion

in advance and to provide tips

he live virtual sessions will take place weekly during

anuary 2022. Educators that choose the pre-recorded option

will receive the video links and additional information in late

2021.

o register for the program, educators should contact

Education Specialist Corey art by emailing him at corey.

hartvermont.gov, or calling him at 802-505-552. Please

indicate which option you prefer, school, grade level, and how

many students will be participating. he homeschool community

is also encouraged to reach out.

ANGEL TREE FINAL SIGN UP

DATES & TIMES

NOVEMBER 2, 2021

11:00 AM - 1:00 PM & 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM

NOVEMBER 9, 2021

11:00 AM – 2:00 PM & 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

NOVEMBER 16, 2021

11:00 AM – 2:00 PM & 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

LOCATION

75 North Main Street, Barre, VT 05641

REQUIRED DOCUMENTS

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Residence (Utility Bill with Clients Name)

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November 3, 2021 The WORLD page 9


Robert Christopher Chaplin

EAST HARDWICK – Robert Christopher

Chaplin, born on June 29,1994 to

Stephanie Badger and Shawn Chaplin,

passed away on October 20, 2021.

Robert was an avid outdoorsman and

especially loved deer hunting. He started

hunting at a young age and bagged his

first buck at the age of 12. n 2012, he

shot his most pried possession, a buck

scoring him 126 1/8 with the Vermont

Big Game Trophy Club and 121 4/8 with

Boone Crockett. obert loved four

wheeling, dirt biking, mud and was fearless. obert began

working with his dad in the woods when he was only three.

Later on he worked alongside his dad logging and loved running

equipment. obert was a ack of all trades and was

always willing to lend a hand. obert had the gift of gab so

much so it would sometimes take him all day to tell a 10 minute

story. e had a love for the little kids in his life and they

all loved him. iding around on the back roads, singing in

the truck even if he didn’t know the words were some of his

favorite things to do. e was a mama’s boy and he didn’t care

who knew. hey had a special bond that can never be broken.

Robert is survived by his mother, Stephanie and her husband

amie Block; his father Shawn Chaplin and his partner

Aliesha ouglass; fiance Shamcie Cota and her daughter

Neveah; half brother Brighton Marsh; grandparents Charles

orothy ow, ichard iane Badger, oberta inckler

and aoul McAllister as well as great-grandmother lendeen

. Pario; aunts and uncles Melissa Estivill, Kristen Badger,

Chad Badaunts, Chad Badger, Sarah Badger, Lonnie inckler,

Cheyenne inckler, Angela Lope Nava, Matthew McAllister,

endy Palmer, Frank McAllister, Adam McAllister and

Katie McAllister. e also leaves behind his best friend ustin

Dunbar and several cousins and honorary aunts & uncles.

Robert was predeceased by his great-grandparents, Robert &

Doris Chaplin.

Calling hours will be held on Saturday, November 6, 2021

from 5-7 p.m. at the desroseilliers Funeral ome in ardwick.

hose planning to attend are thanked in advance for

observing mask recommendations. Memories and condolences

are welcome at dgfunerals.com. Burial will be at the

convenience of the family.

Penny Lynn (Baker) Durant

Penny Lynn (Baker) urant passed away

at age 61, on Oct. 14th, surrounded by

family. She battled cancer for many

years, but is now resting.

er life began on anuary 4th, 190,

born as a fraternal twin, to her parents

elbert Baker and anet LaCoss.

She was predeceased by her father

elbert, his wife ackie Baker and her

step-father ichard LaCoss.

She grew up in the ardwick area

until she was a teenager, then spent her young adult years

in orcester and Barre. She enoyed being young, free, and

beautiful.

She had two sons, Shawn and Glenn, who she loved very

deeply along with her three beautiful granddaughters, and

great-grandson.

As an adult, she rooted on a dirt road back in ardwick, and

shared her life with her partner, uy.

Penny was very close with her Native American heritage

and spent a lot of time outdoors in her bare feet. She was creative

and crafty.

Cooking, canning, making chocolates, holiday crafting,

wreath making, gardening, landscaping, fishing, or hanging

by the water were ust a few things of the many that she loved

to do, and was good at!

She enoyed gatherings and holidays. After her sons grew,

she held parties for the extended children in her family and

community, such as Easter egg hunts and haunted forest trails.

She was best friends for life with her twin sister Shelley,

and also very close with her brother ick, her younger sister

ebbie, and half brother elbert r. She had many nieces

and nephews that loved and grew up very close to their Aunt

Penny.

She will be missed deeply by all who knew her. here are

many memories and stories to be told about Penny’s life that

will be shared at her alloween-themed Celebration of Life,

open to all friends and family, November th, 2 p.m., 137

utton rd, ardwick t.

Deborah L. Gibson

eborah L. ibson, 9, of ebsterville

Road in East Barre, passed away peacefully

on uesday, ctober 19, 2021, in

the comfort of her home and loving care

of her family, with her daughters by her

side.

Born in Montpelier, on November

22, 1951, the daughter of Edward F.

and Aline Avery, eb attended Saint Michael’s

School and graduated from Montpelier

High School in 1969. She later

attended Pierce College for omen in Concord, N, graduating

with an Associate’s egree in 1971. n 1972, she married

Stephen R. Blondin. Although they later went their separate

ways, together they shared two daughters, odi and ennifer.

n 1995, eborah met the love of her life, Michael E. ibson.

hey were married in 1998, uniting their two families as one.

heir love was an inspiration to all who knew them. Sadly,

Mike passed away on ctober 18, 2003.

Deb held various positions throughout her career but was

most proud of her time spent at Barre own Elementary

School where she worked first as a teacher’s and clerical aide

and later as the Executive Secretary to the Superintendent of

the Barre nified nion School istrict. uring these years

she made countless friends and inspired many with her kindness

and dedication. She retired in 2017.

page 10 The WORLD November 3, 2021

eb loved her family with all of her heart. She was dedicated

to her children, always available to help in any situation,

or to ust lend an ear for conversation. Nothing made her happier

than cheering on her grandchildren, whether it be at the

hockey rink, ball field, theater or simply in life. She enoyed

family gatherings, weeks at oodbury Lake with kayaking

and turtle-catching adventures, shopping trips with her girls

and walks on the Marginal ay.

eb’s talents were many. A great cook and hostess, she

made many amazing meals and always made every occasion a

special one. ver the years, she sewed everything from dolls

to dresses and created beautiful folk-art designs, mittens and

memory bears. here was nothing that she wasn’t able to

mend. ne of her favorite pastimes was quilting. ours spent

crafting beautiful quilts brought her much oy and laughter

while spending time with her Seyon sisters, creating cherished

treasures for her family. er attention to detail and thoughtful

nature made all of her creations even more special.

eb was strong, courageous, independent and kind. er life

was rich in love and friendship. She had many friends with

whom she shared countless special times, laughs and hugs.

er kindness was a reflection of the beauty within her and

brought many moments of happiness to those who knew her.

She will be dearly missed and forever remembered for her

beautiful smile, sense of humor, love and dedication to family

and friends, as well as her many talents and gifts of handmade

items. er peanut butter fudge and crab apple elly were a favorite

to many.

Survivors include her children: daughter Jodi Sibley and her

husband Scott of East Montpelier; daughter ennifer Burke

and her husband Chad of Barre; son Michael ibson and his

wife Paula of pton, MA; her grandchildren Colby Brochu

and his fiancé Logan Blake; Katelyn Sibley, Camden Burke,

Avery Burke, Alexa ibson, and ayley ibson; her companion

obert Bridges, sister-in-law an Avery; brothers-in-law

avid ibson, ichard ibson and his wife endy, nieces

and nephews: Mike Avery, Steve Avery, Katie Evans, eff

ion, Kristen ion, Stacy randfield, Christine avis, Chris

and on ibson and their families. n addition to her parents,

she was predeceased by her husband Michael, brother ohn

Avery and sister Carol Dion.

A funeral mass will be held on Monday, November 22,

2021, at St. Monica’s Catholic Church in Barre at 11 a.m.

Committal prayers will be offered immediately following at

Hope Cemetery in Barre.

n lieu of flowers, Memorial contributions may be made

to Central Vermont Home Health and Hospice, 600 Granger

oad, Barre, 0541. hose wishing to express online condolences

may do so at www.guareandsons.com.

Roger Joseph LeClair

SOUTH BARRE - Roger Joseph LeClair,

85, of South Barre, passed away peacefully

ctober 23rd, 2021, after a five year

battle with Alzheimers.

Born in Barre, ermont on April 25th

193, he was one of six children born

to Napoleon LeClair and ulia (Barnes)

LeClair. Roger attended school in the

city of Barre. After schooling he oined

the S Navy for four years where he received

a medal of ood Conduct.

n February, 192, oger married Barbara (Alexander) and

they raised seven children in their home on Beckley ill and

later on, Richardson Road in Barre.

hroughout oger’s life he worked passionately as a proectionist

for the Paramount heaters 1952-1955, was a member

of the Navy from 1955-1959, working for Montgomery ard

from 190-1975 and lastly he devoted the remainder of his

working years 1975-201 to Bond Auto arehouse in Barre,

retiring on the same day as the owners of the local business.

Roger enjoyed bowling at Twin City Lanes, horseshoes at

local clubs and most of all calling bingo and selling rip-offs

at all of the bingo halls in Barre until he was 83 years old. e

was also a member of the Knights of Columbus for several

decades, serving on many committees and honored as Knight

of the Month multiple times.

Survivors include the mother of his children Barbara

LeClair of Barre and his children, odi, erri, Kelli, oger,

icki, ami and Brittany as well as many grandchildren and

great-grandchildren. e is also survived by his brother Michael

LeClair and nieces and nephews. He was predeceased

by his parents as well as two brothers and two sisters.

A Mass of Christian Burial was held on Saturday, ctober

30, 2021 at 11 a.m. at St. Monica’s Church in Barre. Burial

will follow to ilson Cemetery in Lower ebsterville, .

Calling hours were held on Friday, ctober 29, 2021 from 7-9

p.m. at the Pruneau-Polli Funeral ome, 58 Summer Street in

Barre VT.

n lieu of flowers donations may be made to Meals on

heels, made out to City otel Cafe, 30 ashington Street

Suite 1 Barre ermont 0541 in Memory of oger LeClair.

Arrangements are in the care of the Pruneau-Polli Funeral

Home in Barre.

hose wishing to express online condolences may do so at:

www.pruneaupollifuneralhome.com

Lizzette D. Provencher

BARRE TOWN-Lizzette D. Provencher,

74 of Barre own, oined the Lord at her

home on ctober 19, 2021 of natural

causes. A loving wife, mother, grandmother

(Memeré) and great grandmother,

Li spent her life in service to others.

Born in Lac Megantic, uebec, Li

immigrated to Vermont as a child with

her family. She attended school at St.

Michaels School in Montpelier. Li later

met and married her soul mate, Ronald J.

Provencher on uly 1, 197.

She raised three children while working part-time as a waitress

at The Wayside Restaurant until 1980 when she began

cosmetology school. Liz started her cosmetology career at

’Brien’s Salon on Main Street in Barre before operating

Shear Art beauty salon in Graniteville, VT. Her ambitious and

hardworking nature was ever present in her work ethic. n

1989 she started her own business, The Family Hairloom Hair

anning Salon located on North Main Street in Barre which

was her proudest professional achievement. er fondness of

antique furniture was the inspiration for the name and décor.

Li loved the social aspect of her career and loved connecting

with her clients, family and friends. er caring nature continued

into her retirement with the Ladies Auxiliary of CMC

where she volunteered her time in the gift shop.

hile Li has left this world, she does so knowing her greatest

contribution to life was raising her children and knowing

that her heart, smile and contagious laugh will forever reside

in theirs. Her children Tina Routhier and husband Donald,

odd and spouse Linda (Fasci) and Marc Provencher and

spouse Kathy (errish) will honor her life in the character she

instilled in them. er husband of 54 years, on has lost his

true love and while she will not be here to love him for the rest

of his life, she loved him for all of hers. Li leaves the most

precious gifts of life behind her in her great grandchildren

Raven, Violet, Denver and grandchildren Lindsay, Amanda,

Ariel, Cloe, Brittany, Tierney and Colby. Her niece Diana

(Furlong) Buono and nephew obert Furlong always had a

special place in her heart and she leaves behind many other

nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her parents Gertrude

and Frank eynolds and her siblings achael Furlong,

Harriet Ryan, Jeannine Bilodeau, Paul & Gilles Badeau and

grandsons Boxer and Bear who now hold her hand in heaven.

he family held a private service on ctober 22, 2021 and

Liz will be buried at St. Sylvester Cemetery in Barre Town.

Friends and family gathered at the Cleora’s Carriage ouse at

the eynold’s ouse nn, 102 South Main Street in Barre for

a celebration of Liette’s life.

Arrangements are in the care of the Pruneau-Polli Funeral

ome, 58 Summer Street in Barre.

hose wishing to express online condolences may do so at:

www.pruneaupollifuneralhome.com

FLORILLA P. AMES, of Barnes ill oad,

passed away on Friday, Oct. 22, 2021. She was

110 years and seven months of age, and was ermont’s

oldest resident. Florilla was born in

Montpelier on March 17, 1911, St. Patricks’

ay. She was the second of three children born

to Arthur and da (Barnes) Perkins. She graduated

from aterbury igh School in 1928. She studied at

Montpelier Seminary and received her teaching credential

from Lyndon State. n erby she met her beloved, arrel

Ames. hey married on uly 28, 1938. A celebration of Florilla’s

rich and full life was held at the aterbury Center Community

Church, 300 aterbury-Stowe oad, aterbury

Center, on ednesday, Nov. 3, at 11 a.m. nterment took place

in the family plot in the Maple Street Cemetery in aterbury

Center. n lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made to the

aterbury Ambulance Service, P.. Box 95, aterbury Center,

0577. Assisting the family is the Perkins-Parker Funeral

Home and Cremation Services in Waterbury. To send

online condolences, please visit www.perkinsparker.com.

STEVE ALAN BENNETT SR., 61, died Oct.

26, 2021, at his home in Williamstown. Steve

was born in Middlebury, ermont, on uly 18,

190, and was the son of heodore oosevelt

Kendall and Clara McNeil. Steve spent his early

years in ancock where he received his education.

e married udy Lawson in 1983. he

couple later divorced. Steve loved fishing, auto racing, snowmobiling,

bowling and golf. Steve is survived by his children,

sisters, grandchildren and extended family. A celebration of

his life will be held at a later date and will be announced.

Kingston Funeral ome in Northfield assisted the family.

MARION ELISE (DUNHAM) DEITZLER,

97, died ct. 1, 2021, at Central ermont Medical

Center, Berlin, Vermont. She was born July

11, 1924, to arry essup unham and Marion

Elise (uthrie) unham, in Easton, Pennsylvania,

but grew up in much-loved Newport, Rhode

sland. n 194, she graduated from hode sland

State College, married Richard Price Deitzler and moved

to roy, New ork. She is survived by her children, grandchildren

and extended family. No funeral service is planned and

burial will be held privately in Fayetteville, New ork. he

family would like to offer much appreciation to the staffs at

Mayo esidential Care and Central ermont Medical Center.

Memorial contributions may be made to the nited Methodist

Church of Fayetteville, New ork.

ROBERT M. DOLE JR. — The service to honor and celebrate

the life of obert M. ole r., 84, will be held on Saturday,

Nov. 13, 2021, at 1 p.m. in the range Alliance Church,

oute 302, range, ermont. Following the service, there will

be a gathering at the Orange Town Hall. He passed away on

ct. 14, 2021. Arrangements are by ooker hitcomb Funeral

ome, 7 Academy St., Barre.

CATHERINE “CATHY” GOULET was born

in 194 to Marie and Lucien oulet in Montpelier,

Vermont. She passed away on Oct. 6, 2021,

at the age of 5, at he Einstein Medical Center

in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Cathy graduated

from Montpelier igh School, he College of

New Rochelle, and attended graduate school at

Cornell University. Cathy was an intelligent woman, and a

champion for women’s rights, but her real passion was being a

mother to her two children. In addition to her beloved children,

she leaves behind her husband, siblings, and extended

family. Services were private. A celebration of life will be held

later this year. he family appreciates and is thankful for gifts

made in Cathy’s name to ift of Life onor Program, an organization

which coordinates organ and tissue donors. Their address

is 401 North 3rd St., Philadelphia, PA 19123; their website

is: donors1.org.

WILLIAM FRANCIS GRADY,

92, of Fogelsville, passed peacefully

on ct. 19, 2021, listening to his favorite classical

music, movie scores, the stories told by his

children and grandchildren, along with both

tears and laughter which he would have enthusiastically

encouraged, if not demanded. e was

born to Leo Cleveland rady Sr. and Margaret Emma (Colwell)

rady, in North Adams, Massachusetts. e is survived

by his children, sister, grandchildren and extended family.

continued on next page


continued from previous page

Arrangements by Keller Funeral Home, Fogelsville. Online

condolences may be offered to the family at www.KellerFuneralomes.com.

n lieu of flowers, the family would encourage

donations to the Second Harvest Food Bank of the Lehigh

Valley, c/o the funeral home, P.O. Box 52, Fogelsville, PA

18051 or directly at https://shfblv.org or to a charity of your

choice. The family would like to thank all the staff at Lehigh

Valley Hospital and Hospice for their excellent, compassionate

care.

ANDREW HUCKINS — A graveside service to honor and

celebrate the life of Andrew “Andy” Huckins, 45, will be held

on Sunday, Nov. 7, 2021, at 12 p.m. in the Wilson Cemetery

in Lower Websterville. He passed away on April 12, 2020.

DOUGLAS A. MORSE, 75, of Washington

Street, passed away on Wednesday, Oct. 20,

2021, at the Central Vermont Medical Center in

Berlin. Born on May 23, 1946, in Montpelier,

he was the son of Arnold and Victoria (Santamore)

Morse. He attended local elementary

schools and graduated from Marian High

School. Survivors include his daughter, grandsons, his former

wives, and extended family. The service to honor and celebrate

his life was held on Friday, Oct. 29, 2021, at 1 p.m. in

the Enough Ministries Church, 24 Washington St., Barre. A

graveside service will be held in the Holy Cross Cemetery in

uxbury at a later date. n lieu of flowers, memorial contributions

may be made to the Central Vermont Humane Society,

P.O. Box 687, Montpelier, VT 05601. Arrangements are by

Hooker Whitcomb Funeral Home, 7 Academy St., Barre. For

a memorial guestbook, please visit www.hookerwhitcomb.

com.

WAYNE I. MORSE, 92, passed peacefully

from this life on Oct. 23, 2021, at The Gary

Residence where he had lived for the past four

years. Born Aug. 11, 1929, the son of Ira A. and

Eva avis Morse, ayne grew up in the fifth

generation of Morses who lived on the ancestral

farm in Calais which was homesteaded by his

great-great-grandparents. In 1950, he married Elizabeth Rogers,

of Barre. He is survived by his children, and many cousins,

nieces, nephews and friends. It was Wayne’s wish that

there be no calling hours or service. Arrangements are in the

care of Guare and Sons Funeral Home. Interment will be in

the family plot in Calais. Contributions in Wayne’s memory

may be sent to Central Vermont Home Health and Hospice,

600 Granger Road, Barre, VT 05641.

ROBERT RALPH NEWCITY, 79, passed away

on Saturday, Oct. 23, 2021, at the Berlin Health and

Rehab Center, after a long illness. He was born on Oct. 8,

1942, in St. Albans, Vermont, the son of Ralph and Wanieta

(Bruley) Newcity. After his family moved to Montpelier, Bob

attended Montpelier Public Schools. In 1961, Bob enlisted

into the United States Navy. He served his country as a Navy

Seaman Apprentice until his honorable discharge in 1963. In

1967, Bob married Sandra Gushea at St. Augustine’s Church

in Montpelier. Survivors include his brother, many nieces,

nephews and friends. Calling hours were held from 6 to 8 p.m.

on Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021, at the Guare & Sons Funeral

Home. A funeral Mass was celebrated 11 a.m. on Friday, Oct.

29, 2021, at St. Augustine’s Catholic Church. Committal

prayers and military honors will be offered in Berlin Corners

Cemetery. Those wishing to express online condolences may

do so at www.guareandsons.com.

THOMAS JOHN PERRINO died

peacefully Oct. 10, 2021, at St. Johnsbury

Health and Rehab where he had been residing.

Born Aug. 24, 1938, in Ludlow, Vermont,

Thomas shined as a baseball star, basketball

sharpshooter and All-State player for Black River

High School, State Champions 1955-1956. He

later went on to play basketball for the U.S. Air Force. He was

a kind and loving father and a man of few words except when

sharing tales of his many adventures, accompanied with his

boisterous laugh, playful smile and twinkle in his eye. He

leaves behind his loving wife, Barbara Perrino, brother, children,

and extended family. The family will gather privately the

weekend of Nov. 13, per his wishes, to pay their respects and

to share memories. His ashes will remain in Newark, Vermont.

Memories and condolences may be shared with the family at

www.guibordfh.com.

ERNESTINE MAY SHATNEY, 90, of Johnson,

passed away peacefully on Friday, Oct. 22,

2021, at Copley Hospital in Morrisville. She was

born Jan. 30, 1931, in St. Johnsbury, the daughter

of the late Seymour and Emily (Morse)

Hutchinson. She attended Danville Public

Schools and St. Johnsbury Academy. On Feb.

19, 1947, she married the love of her life, Ale William Shatney,

in est anville. ogether, they raised five daughters. She

loved family gatherings and cooking large meals for all to enjoy.

She was a devoted mother and grandmother. Survivors

include children, grandchildren and extended family. To honor

her request, all gatherings will be private at the convenience of

her family. n lieu of flowers, contributions in her memory

may be made to the Lamoille Home Health & Hospice, 54 Farr

Ave., Morrisville, VT 05661. Arrangements are in the care of

Dian R. Holcomb of Northern Vermont Funeral Service, 60

Elm St., Hardwick. Online condolences are welcomed at:

northernvermontfuneralservice.com.

Patients Counting On Blood and Platelet Donors

as Shortage Continues

With Thanksgiving and the holidays approaching, the

American Red Cross urges donors to continue to make and

keep appointments now and in the weeks ahead to help overcome

the ongoing emergency blood and platelet shortage that

has significantly impacted the nation’s blood supply. In fact,

the current blood supply is the lowest the Red Cross has seen

this time of year in more than a decade.

Since declaring an emergency need for donors last month,

thousands of people have come to Red Cross blood drives

across the country to roll up a sleeve and help patients who

are counting on lifesaving transfusions. The Red Cross is

incredibly grateful for the kindness and generosity of these

blood and platelet donors, but hospital demand remains

strong. At least 10,000 more donations are needed each week

in the coming weeks to meet patient needs – ahead of the

upcoming holiday season, which always presents seasonal

challenges to blood collection.

Donors are urged to schedule an appointment now by using

the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org

or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

In honor of the new series, I Know What You Did Last

Summer, those who come to give Nov. 3-12, 2021, will automatically

be entered to win a trip for two to Hawaii, courtesy

of Amazon Prime Video.* The trip will transport you to where

the series was filmed and includes round-trip airfare for two,

hotel accommodations for nine nights, meals, $1,000 gift card

for expenses and on-trip transportation with tour stops from

Honolulu to Maui. Plus, those who come to donate Nov. 3-23

will receive a $10 Amazon.com Gift Card* by email, thanks

to Amazon.**

Blood drive safety

Each Red Cross blood drive and donation center follows

the highest standards of safety and infection control, and additional

precautions – including face masks for donors and staff,

regardless of vaccination status – have been implemented to

help protect the health of all those in attendance. Donors

are asked to schedule an appointment prior to arriving at the

drive.

Upcoming blood donation opportunities Nov. 3-23

Caledonia County

Hardwick

11/16/2021: 11:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Knights of Columbus, 206

VT Rte. 14S.

Saint Johnsbury

11/17/2021: 12 p.m. - 5 p.m., VFW St Johnsbury, 204 Eastern

Ave

Lamoille County

Morrisville

11/22/2021: 11:30 a.m. - 4 p.m., VFW, 28 Pleasant Street

Stowe

11/3/2021: 12:30 p.m. - 5 p.m., Blessed Sacrament Catholic

Church, 728 Mountain Rd

Orange County

Bradford

11/19/2021: 12 p.m. - 5 p.m., National Guard Armory, 99

Fairground Rd

Randolph Center

11/18/2021: 11:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Vermont Technical College,

124 Admin Dr

• • •

Orleans County

Irasburg

11/19/2021: 2 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., Irasburg United Church, 4714

Route 14

Washington County

Barre

11/8/2021: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m., Barre Elks Lodge, 10 Jefferson

Street

Berlin

11/15/2021: 9 a.m. - 2 p.m., Central Vermont Medical Center,

130 Fisher Road

11/6/2021: 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., Berlin Mall, 282 Berlin Mall

Road, Space 5

Montpelier

11/12/2021: 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., Montpelier City Hall, 39

Main Street

Northfield

11/11/2021: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Norwich University, 158 Harmon

Drive

Waterbury

11/20/2021: 8:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., Waterbury Municipal

Building, 28 North Main Street

Waterbury Center

11/23/2021: 11 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Ivy Computer, 2933

Waterbury Stowe Road

Save time during donation

Donors can also save up to 15 minutes at the blood drive by

completing a RapidPass®. With RapidPass®, donors complete

the pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire

online, on the day of donation, from a mobile device or

computer. To complete a RapidPass®, follow the instructions

at RedCrossBlood.org/RapidPass or use the Red Cross Blood

Donor App.

To donate blood, individuals need to bring a blood donor

card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification

that are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of

age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by

state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally

good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school

students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also

must meet certain height and weight requirements.

Health insights for donors

At a time when health information has never been more

important, the Red Cross is screening all blood, platelet and

plasma donations from self-identified African American

donors for the sickle cell trait. This additional screening will

provide Black donors with an additional health insight and

help the Red Cross identify compatible blood types more

quickly to help patients with sickle cell disease who require

trait-negative blood. Blood transfusion is an essential treatment

for those with sickle cell disease, and blood donations

from individuals of the same race, ethnicity and blood type

have a unique ability to help patients fighting sickle cell disease.

Donors can expect to receive sickle cell trait screening

results, if applicable, within one to two weeks through the

Red Cross Blood Donor App and the online donor portal at

RedCrossBlood.org.

Season Starts November 8th

Locally Owned

Locally and Operated Owned

Since

and Operated

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Thoughtful Since Service 1908.

in Accordance

Thoughtful with Service Your Wishes in Accordance

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Arrangements Prearranged Coordinated & Prepaid Services Anywhere

Arrangements and Trust Coordinated Agreements Anywhere

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and Cremation

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Traditional Funeral Services

and and Cremation Services for

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802-476-3233 Fax 802-476-4310

R. Brent Whitcomb

hwfhinvt@charter.net

Director 802-476-3233 Fax 802-476-4310

802-476-3233 Fax 802-476-4310

Funeral & Cremation Services Sandra 802-476-3251 hwfhinvt@charter.net

B. Whitcomb

Fax 802-479-0250

Director

Funeral & Cremation

hwfhinvt@charter.net

Services

802-476-3203

Nick 802-476-3251 Fax 802-479-0250

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B. Whitcomb

Funeral & Cremation Services Director

802-476-3251

Fax 802-479-0250

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802-476-3243 Fax 802-476-4310

whitcombsinvt@charter.net

hwfhinvt@charter.net

802-476-3243 Fax 802-476-4310

November 3, 2021 The WORLD hwfhinvt@charter.net page 11

HWF_World2colx5.indd 3

For more information

Please call (802)476-5301

Lt. Chris West

®

OF BARRE

WE ARE

OPEN

TUES.-FRI.

9-5

SAT. 9-2

& By Appointment

Paid & Volunteer

Positions

The Salvation Army

Thrift Store

25 Keith Avenue

Barre, VT 05641

Worldwide’s beautiful, yet affordable, cellular shades come in an impressive

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ANTIQUES & OLDER ITEMS WANTED

Buying: Crocks, jugs, bottles, jars, pottery & glass vases,

candlesticks, mixing bowls, dishes, knick-knacks, sterling,

Pyrex, cast iron cookware, costume & old jewelry, paintings/

prints, toys, holiday decorations, signs, and so much more

Attics & Full Estates

Call BEFORE donating or having a tag sale

Rich Aronson 802-595-3632

CONSTRUCTION UPDATE

I-89 Bridges 37S and 38S Berlin

TRAFFIC IMPACT: Daily lane reductions will be in place on I-89

Northbound and Southbound throughout the week next week.

A speed reduction of 55 mph will be in place, and fi nes are doubled for

speeding within the construction zone when lane closures are in effect.

CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES: Construction signs on I-89 Southbound

will be removed by the end of this week.

Removal of temporary lines that were placed during construction on

I-89 Northbound and Southbound is scheduled for completion by the

end of this week.

Installation of rumble strips along the shoulders within the project area

is scheduled for next week. Single lane closures will be required while

this work takes place.

Line striping using temporary paint will occur next week. Permanent line

striping and cleanup operations will take place in the spring of 2022.

This will be the last regular update for this project. Thank you for your

patience and cooperation throughout the construction process.

LOCATION: The town of Berlin on Interstate 89. Bridge 37S spans

Crosstown Road. Bridge 38S spans Vermont Route 62.

PROJECTED COMPLETION: Fall 2021

CONTACT INFORMATION: Natalie Boyle

Phone - 802-855-3893 Email - nboyle@eivtech.

Contacting Congress

U.S. Rep. Peter Welch

Mailing address:

128 Lakeside Ave, Suite 235

Burlington, VT 05401

Web site: www.welch.house.gov

Phone: (802) 652-2450

U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders

Mailing address:

1 Church St., Third Floor,

Burlington, VT 05401

Web site: www.sanders.senate.gov

Phone: (802) 862-0697

U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy

Burlington office:

199 Main St., Fourth Floor,

Burlington, VT 05401

Web site: www.leahy.senate.gov

Phone: (802) 863-2525

“Central Vermont’s Newspaper”

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web site: www.vt-world.com

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rates are available.

• • •

The Age of Disinformation: How You Can Help Protect Our Democracy

By Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos

October is Cybersecurity Awareness Month. Over the past

few weeks, I have given considerable thought to the message

I want to convey to Vermonters on this important topic.

The world of cybersecurity has changed significantly for

election officials over the last five years. Turn back to

September of 2017, when Department of Homeland Security

officials confirmed what we had suspected for months:

Russian cyber actors had attacked our elections in an attempt

to unduly influence the outcome.

This reality changing announcement kicked off a yearslong

public education campaign that continues today about

the many layers of robust cyber security we have in place

protecting elections. From the ‘gold standard’ voter marker

paper ballot we use in Vermont, to post-election audits, strict

chain of custody procedures, routine penetration testing,

threat prevention, detection and mitigation, multifactor

authentication, and state and federal partnerships, my goal has

always been to be transparent and give Vermont voters the

information they need to feel confident in the security and

integrity of our elections.

This won’t be the last time you’ll hear me say the phrase

“cybersecurity is a race without a finish line.”

This threat landscape is ever-evolving, but rather than talk

about the protections we have in place for election systems, I

want to discuss a threat that is as, if not more, dangerous to

fair elections. It just so happens it is one we can all play a role

in defeating. Election disinformation threatens to rip our

country in two if we do not join together to do something.

Red or blue, it doesn’t matter: how can we expect to have

Spooky!

By DG. E. Shuman

ear Readers,

I know that Halloween has just

passed, and hope it’s not too late for

this column, one of the few that I repeat

from year to year.

It is a distant memory, cold

and old, dusted off now as a long-neglected,

rediscovered book might be. It matters,

somehow, that this nearly forgotten evening

happened within a mid-nineteensixties

year. Perhaps it could be that the

late autumn wind cooled and creaked

the leafless, lifeless-looking trees

even more then than now; again…

somehow. Or perhaps it is only

because those October thirty-firsts

were spookier then, at least to the one

whose memory of the night it is.

Those Halloweens contained no costumes

of bleeding skulls or vividly

maimed souls. They were, simply, or

perhaps, not so simply, ghostly, hauntingly

spooky nights.

On this one Halloween, dusk, as dust, had

settled slowly upon the small New England

town of the boy’s youth. Supper had been a hurried

affair, gobbled by giggling goblins anxious to get

out into the night. Low voices and footsteps of other spooks

were already upon the front steps; knocks and bone-chilling

knob-rattling had already begun at the door.

The boy of ten or so was more than ready to go out. By

accident or plan, his siblings had already slipped into the night

without him. He was very alone; at least he hoped that he was

alone, as he ventured into the much too chilly night air. The

cold breeze stung his eyes as he peered through the rubberyodored

mask of his costume. He began the long walk through

the frozen-dead, musty-smelling leaves covering the sidewalk.

The youth hurried past the frightful row of thick and dark,

moonlit maples that lined the way. He was very afraid that the

dry crunch of death in those old leaves would alert of his presence

whatever ghoul or ghost might be lurking behind one of

those trees. As he walked on in the increasingly inky black,

he dared not peek even slightly around any of them. It was a

sure thing that not EVERY roadside tree hid some witch or

ghastly ghoul, but the boy knew that he was certain to pick the

one which did, if he were to dare to look.

By sheer will, or by chance, the youth succeeded in passing

by the haunted trees, and successfully trick-or-treated at many

houses on the street. Every inch of the way he thought about

• • •

civil conversations when swirling around us everywhere we

turn we see conspiracy theories, offensive memes, and outright

lies designed to warp our own perceptions of the democratic

process until we turn on each other?

It has been almost a year since the 2020 General Election,

and the results were carefully and deliberately certified by

Democrat, Republican, and non-partisan election officials

across the country, but it doesn’t feel that way when I go

online. Instead, I see the same old disproven conspiracy theories,

designed to appeal to those who didn’t like the outcome

and spread in an effort to weaken our confidence in American

democracy.

At best, bad actors push false rhetoric that leaves us badly

informed. At worst, disinformation and deliberately misleading

mal-information leads to abusive and threatening behaviors,

including death threats and physical violence.

We are teetering on a knife edge, and if we are to find our

way off, it needs to be together. I hope you will use this

Cybersecurity Awareness Month as a reminder to look only to

primary, official sources for your information. The talking

heads in our news feeds don’t count: it is on all of us to verify

the information we hear before promoting it ourselves. If

you’re skeptical, or have questions, reach out to those who

have answers. You can call or email my office anytime, and

we will gladly answer your questions to best of our ability.

Disagreeing with each other through civil discourse, based

on facts and evidence, is the minimum standard we must consider

in order to return to a healthy democracy. Please join

me: be skeptical about what you read online and think before

you link!

Support for Carbon Pricing Growing

Support for carbon pricing from members of the House

continues to grow, with 87 members of the House signing on

to cosponsor Rep. Ted Deutch’s carbon pricing bill, the

Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act (H.R. 2307).

The bill would assess the fossil fuel industry a fee of $15

per ton of CO2 they bring out of the ground, mine, wellhead,

or port. The fee would increase each year, creating a strong

market incentive to pivot towards less carbon-intensive products.

Funds collected would be distributed in even shares to

all Americans as a monthly carbon cash-back check, helping

to protect low- and middle-income households during the

transition.

Economists worldwide agree that the fastest way to lower

emissions, whether corporate or consumer, is by putting a

price on carbon. And recent news shows that the idea is gaining

momentum. The chairman of the Senate Finance

Committee, Senator Ron Wyden-OR, confirmed that the

• • •

Senate Majority Leader has asked him to craft legislation that

would put a price on carbon emissions.

A record number of Americans are concerned about climate

change: After a summer of unprecedented flooding, hurricanes,

heatwaves, drought, wildfires, and air pollution, there

has been a drastic increase in public concern about global

warming. Polling by the Yale Program on Climate Change

Communications reveals an all-time record 70% of Americans

are now very or somewhat worried about climate change.

And, for the first time, a majority of Americans say people in

the U.S. are being harmed “right now.”

The time is now for bold climate action and that actions

needs to start at the top. If you want our Government to do

something, please tell the President at: https://citizensclimatelobby.org/white-house/

Mariah Boyd-Boffa

the one house he dreaded visiting most: the house of the

witchy-looking old lady. Sure, she seemed kind in the daytime,

but you didn’t see her humped old back or the wrinkly

look in her eyes in the daytime. Her house was cold as a tomb,

at least, such was her old porch, at night, in late October. The

boy knew this well from the year before, but that year he had

been with his brothers and sisters. As he walked, the scuffing,

leaf-scraping sound of every step seemed to taunt him

with the words: Every… witch… awaits… the

child… who walks… alone… Every…

witch… awaits… the child… who walks…

alone…

The boy’s small hands were nearly

freezing by the time he reached the old

lady’s small dark house far down the

street. He managed to climb to the

top of the worn and creaky steps. He

stood there a moment, and then

worked up enough courage to open

the narrow door of the witch’s small,

windowed porch. The rusty door

spring, worn to its own insanity by

countless other small boys who were

fools enough to enter here, screeched a

hateful, taunting announcement of the

boy’s arrival. This it repeated, mocking

its original scream, as the door slammed

tightly shut between the lad and the world

outside.

The long, enclosed tomb of a porch offered no relief

from the cold, but some little relief from the night wind. The

only light therein was that of a maddening, perfectly placed

jack-o-lantern which hideously smiled up at the boy from the

floor, at the farthest corner of the room. The porch exuded the

sooty-sweet smell of that candle-lit carved pumpkin. This

strange aroma mingled with that of crisp, cold Macintosh

apples which filled a wooden crate at one wall. “What could

possibly be the use of apples to a witch?” The boy briefly

pondered.

The one who disguised herself as a regular, kind old lady

during the daytime was very cunning indeed. Her trap for

little boys was a porch table full of the biggest and best treats

in the town. Those very famous treats were the single reason

the boy was even on this terrifying porch. There was a tray

which held beautiful, candied apples and another laden with

huge, wax-paper-wrapped popcorn balls. A bowl between

them overflowed with candy corn, the boy’s favorite.

Thoughts of poison apples and boiling cauldrons momentarily

filled the child. He then nervously picked his treat and got it

safely into the candy-stuffed pillowcase he carried. Hearing

the nighttime witch walking across her kitchen floor toward

continued on next page


2

Mayor’s Report – October 2021

Do The Right Thing (1989)

HHHH

In 1714, Parliament passed the Riot Act.

It was aimed at groups of over 12 people who were

“unlawfully, riotously, and tumultuously assembled together.”

If an authority figure asked a rowdy group to disperse, they

were required to go home within one hour. If they were still

there in an hour, the rioters instantly became felons and violent

force could be used against them. After that hour, anyone

who hurt or killed a rioter was free from prosecution.

This is a restrained, sober, and reasonable law.

Rioting is one of the most destructive and unforgivable

crimes a person can commit. I am anti-murder, but murder is

a fundamental part of the human condition and can’t actually

be eradicated (ask Cain and Abel).

Rioting destroys neighborhoods, businesses, and personal

property for zero positive gain. It is an ugly consequence of

packed cities. And it can be eradicated. The first thing we need

to do is all agree that rioting is disgraceful and unacceptable.

“Do the Right Thing” is part of the problem. Spike Lee’s

third film is a thought-provoking meditation on rioting. It is

bursting at the seams with intelligence, intensity, and ambiguity.

It is both the most gut-wrenchingly anti-riot and the most

frightening pro-riot film.

The film takes us through one tumultuous summer day in a

mostly black Brooklyn neighborhood.

Spike Lee stars as Mookie: a mild-mannered pizza delivery

guy. Danny Aiello is Sal: proud owner of the neighborhood

pizza shop.

The first 2/3 of “Do the Right Thing” is an ensemble comedy.

Writer/director Lee tries to show us every little quirk

about black urban life. There’s a scene where the neighborhood

drunk buys a single beer from the Korean grocer with the

only dollar he has. And the scene where the local hothead is

furious because someone scuffed up his new Air Jordans.

The film gets deadly serious in the final act, when the

neighborhood racial tensions come bubbling to the surface.

• • •

Residents and Neighbors,

Barre City is projecting over a

$500,000 surplus for FY22, which is

the largest surplus in decades. Council

finalized Department Head FY23

Budget presentations. Buildings and

Community Services requested an

additional maintenance person, return

to full-time seasonal staffing and noted both an increase in

cemetery lot sales and vandalism in City Hall Park. The

Recreation update spoke of previous staffing changes and

FY23 cost increase to account for what was covered in the

Summer Matters for All grant. Planning currently has Assessor

and Permit Administrator vacancies, but is looking to include

a new Junior Planning position. Finance noted an increase in

training & development. Clerk Dawes noted only minor

changes in revenue line items, and Manager Mackenzie noted

an increase due to an ARPA audit requirement, software and

advertising, and the addition of an IT systems administrator

position.

Step 3 of the Community Visit process occurred as a hybrid

meeting on October 20th. The official meeting process is now

over for the Community Visit process, but task forces for each

group have been established and VCRD resources are available

to assist. The Merchant’s Row redevelopment project is

postponed and will revert back to normal maintenance.

CVPSA Chair Dona Bate provided the Televate

Communications report detailing the needs for upgrades to

the police, fire and EMS radio systems. Washington County

Substance Abuse Regional Partnership spoke of their threeyear

federal grant focused on substance abuse prevention,

excitement for Barre City’s Community Visit decision for a

community center, and presented the most recent youth risk

behavior survey. Jeff Bergeron discussed his review of the

Chapter 20 Tree Ordinance, with recommended changes on

tree warden duties, clarifying the City’s responsibilities, and

protecting City trees.

Council approved Resolution #2021-15 Honoring Police

Chief Timothy Bombardier, emergency BOR Roof Repair

Contract, Bike-Ped Complete Streets Planning Grant

Application, Elks Club Donation to Fire Department, Road

Salt purchases, Consultant-Led Capital Improvement Plan

Process (CIP), Mayoral Proclamation for Extra Mile Day for

the Barre Rotary, and using surplus funds for an IT Position,

roof repair, and traffic calming items.

Upcoming items include Locker Searches & Inspection,

Volunteer Appointment, Capital Improvement, Temporary

Parking and Tax Stabilization Policies. There will be review

of FY22 Quarter 1 Budget, overall FY23 General Fund

Budget, bond projects status, Wheelock House leases with the

Barre Partnership and Rotary Club, Manager’s transition plan,

Chapter 5 Electricity and Chapter 6 Fire Protection and

Prevention Ordinances, and Act 164 (S.54) Regulation of

Cannabis. Council will receive updates from the Charter Work

Group, Aldrich Library, Barre Area Development, Barre

Partnership, Working Community Challenges Update, and

Montpelier’s Community Development Program.

I hope you all had a great Halloween!

Lucas J. Herring

Mayor, City of Barre

For years, Sal has had a Wall of Fame in his pizza shop that

features great Italian Americans (Pacino, De Niro). The local

hothead demands that Sal put some famous black Americans

up there. Sal refuses. Another guy enters the pizza shop blasting

Public Enemy’s “Fight the Power” on his boom box. Sal

loses it and starts yelling racial slurs. A riot ensues.

In the film’s most thought-provoking scene, it is mildmannered

Mookie who throws the first garbage can through a

window.

The unique virtue of “Do the Right Thing” is its inscrutable

ambiguity. In each character, there is love and hate. Spike Lee

encourages us to empathize with every single character – even

white guys, even cops. Yet Lee is plainly predicting an

American race war, and partially looking forward to it. This

has been an undercurrent to his films for decades.

The one thing missing from “Do the Right Thing” is a

reminder that riots never help anyone, particularly the rioters

and their cause.

Do you think the lives of black Americans were improved

by the riots of the mid to late 1960s? Do you think Donald

Trump’s political career was helped by the numbskulls who

rioted on January 6th?

A lot of people are like Spike Lee and feel a sympathy for

rioters who are angry about a good cause. This is the problem.

Rioting is always 100% destructive and 0% helpful. I love this

movie. But rioting is absolutely never the Right Thing.

Spooky! continued from previous page

• • •

the door to the porch, he headed out, past the screeching door, night-prowling, costumed, youthful vagabonds, young souls

down the creaking steps, and toward home. If she had ever whose parents had no fear at all that they would not return

invited any little boy into her home, that boy certainly had home safely.

never come back out, he thought, as he briskly walked. This Halloween nights were ones of simple, frightful fun, in

boy, that night, had, somehow, survived another visit to that those years. Cartoon ghosts and goblins, fake witches and

house. He had even gotten away with the biggest, most delicious

popcorn ball of all! His only fear then was in once again

funny Frankenstein monsters were all that stalked the streets

or the innocent imaginations of children then. True evil had

getting past the street-side ghouls that certainly stared at him

nothing to do w ith those nights at all.

from behind those huge old maples.

It is a fact that Halloween was different in the nineteen sixties,

before the age of sugar and plastic holidays. There was

The ghouls of Halloweens long-past may live on only as

aging, dusty memories, but the dark and distant nineteen-sixties

Halloween you just read about really did happen. At

just something hauntingly powerful about the cheap paper

cutouts, cheesy cardboard skeletons and black and orange least, that’s how this old trick-or-treater remembers it.

streamers of those years. Fold-out paper pumpkins and eerie (Note: The author invites you to view his novels, “A Corner

(and probably dangerous) cardboard candleholders lit the Café” and the second edition of “The Smoke and Mirrors

yards. Homemade, totally safe treats filled pillowcases and Effect” at Amazon.com. Both books are available on Kindle

paper bags of those who dared to face the night. Those were and in paperback.)

• • •

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November 3, 2021 The WORLD page 13


The CVMC Auxiliary Bene-Fit Shop will be closed

October 29th through November 6th.

Its Brenda Corliss 60th Birthday

On Nov. 18, 2021!!

Let’s celebrate 60 years with

showering her with cards to make

her day extra special! Send her

a greeting with a story or two of

your memories or favorite photos!

Or a simple phone call will do!

802-889-2826

Send your cards to:

474 Rte. 110

North Tunbridge, VT 05077

Thank you for being a special

part of Brenda’s day!!

Chase

Family Reunion

Nov. 7, 2021

Barre Legion

Noon

Potluck

Call Janet

802-793-3475

Birthday Card Shower

85 Years

Nov. 10, 2021

Annette

(Jean)

Lawson

8 Fecteau Circle, Unit 4, Barre, VT 05641

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Also, Follow me on Facebook or email me at

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Cell 802-793-9371

1176 Route 302, East Barre

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Happy Birthday!

FROM

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone

special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the

names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a

FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to

buy. Just send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o

BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302—Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your

name, address & phone number for prize notification.

NOV. 3

Carol Patterson, 67, Barre Town

NOV. 4

Pete Demasi, Northfiled

NOV. 5

Angie Demasi, 40, Northfield

Jonathan Mangan, 10, Cabot

This Week’s Cake Winner:

Cynthia Ambrosini, 72, Barre

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

Fax:

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NOV. 8

Cynthia Ambrosini, 72, Barre

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CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT)

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page 14 The WORLD November 3, 2021

Gifford Medical Center

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

The following birth announcements were submitted by Gifford Medical Center on

October 20, 2021. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to Gifford.

A girl, Rose Darlene was born October 12, 2021 to Mary

(Kirkpatrick) Young and Caleb Young of Randolph Center

A boy, Everett was born October 13, 2021 to Hanna G.

Morris and Spencer A. Taylor of Barre

A boy, Adam Noah Keighley was born October 15, 2021

to Whitney Kittredge and Seth Keighley of Williamstown

Happy

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Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts and The WORLD would like to help you wish

a special couple a Happy Anniversary. Just send their name, address & wedding

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Site and Hearing Fund

Raffle Winner

For 54 years ordon lsen and his brother oug bought a

ticket for he Barre Lions Club 100 Ball affle. oug is deceased

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403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, VT 05641

ARIES (March 21 to April

19) The pitter-patter of all

those Sheep feet means

that you’re out and about,

rushing to get more done.

hat’s fine, but slow down

by the weekend so you can heed some important advice.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You’re in charge of your

own destiny these days, and, no doubt, you’ll have that

Bull’s-eye of yours right on target. But don’t forget to

make time for family events.

EMN (May 21 to une 20) Be prepared for a power

struggle that you don’t want. Look to the helpful folks

around you for advice on how to avoid it without losing

the important gains you’ve made.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Congratulations! You’re

about to claim your hard-earned reward for your patience

and persistence. Now, go out and enoy some fun and

games with friends and family.

LE (uly 23 to August 22) he Big Cat might find it difficult

to shake off that listless feeling. But be patient. By

week’s end, your spirits will perk up and you’ll be your

perfectly purring self again.

(August 23 to September 22) A problem with a

co-worker could prove to be a blessing in disguise when

a superior steps in to investigate and discovers a situation

that could prove helpful to you.

LBA (September 23 to ctober 22) his is a favorable

time to move ahead with your plans. Some setbacks are expected,

but they’re only temporary. Pick up the pace again

and stay with it.

SCP (ctober 23 to November 21) our creativity

is recognied and rewarded. So go ahead and claim what

you’ve earned. Meanwhile, that irksome and mysterious

situation soon will be resolved.

SAAS (November 22 to ecember 21) A new

associate brings ideas that the wise Sagittarian quickly will

realie can benefit both of you. Meanwhile, someone from

the workplace makes an emotional request.

CAPCN (ecember 22 to anuary 19) t might be a

good idea to ease up on that hectic pace and spend more

time studying things you’ll need to know when more opportunities

come later in November.

AAS (anuary 20 to February 18) A relatively

quiet time is now giving way to a period of high activity.

Face it with the anticipation that it will bring you some

well-deserved boons and benefits.

PSCES (February 19 to March 20) o with the flow, or

make waves t’s up to you. Either way, you’ll get noticed.

owever, make up your own mind. on’t let anyone tell

you what choices to make.

BN S EEK: ou like to examine everything before

you agree to accept what you’re told. our need for

truth keeps all those around you honest.

(c) 2021 King Features Syndicate, nc.


Planting Perennials In the Fall

By Deborah J. Benoit

Extension Master Gardener

University of Vermont

The leaves are turning to their autumn glory and it’s nearly

time to put the garden to bed. But wait.

There’s still time to add perennials to your garden, and I’m

not talking about spring-blooming bulbs such as daffodils and

tulips. ou may be focused on trimming back faded leaves or

deadheading flowers, but fall cleanup isn’t the only way to

prepare for spring.

While spring is the time of year we generally think of as

planting time, fall also is a great time to add perennials to your

garden.

Why plant in the fall when the days are growing shorter and

your to-do list is growing longer?

Consider this. Today, you can stroll through your garden

and note all the successes and failures. The plants you noticed

in neighbors’ yards and added to your garden wish list are

fresh in your mind.

Why not take advantage of this and plan a trip to your local

garden center? You just might find some end-of-season sales.

The perennials you plant now will have an advantage over

those you plant next spring as they will have a chance to

adust to their new home. he more time you allow before the

ground freees, the better established they’ll be, though at a

minimum, planting should be done a month before.

When selecting perennials now to add to your garden, take

into account all the factors you would if you were planting in

spring. Know your . S. epartment of Agriculture hardiness

one and what plants are intended for which ones.

Enter your ip code at https:planthardiness.ars.usda.gov

Indigenous Vermont Crops

By Andrea Knepper

Extension Master Gardener Intern

University of Vermont

Several crops have been cultivated in ermont for centuries

by indigenous Abenaki tribes. f great significance to the

Abenaki are the seven sisters, corn, beans, squash, sunflower,

erusalem artichoke, ground cherry and tobacco.

Carbon dating of corn cobs recovered from archaeological

sites in Vermont reveals that corn was cultivated as early as

1110 A. A reliable variety for home gardeners, available

today from commercial suppliers, is Roy’s Calais Corn.

Calais corn is a flint corn, which means it is best used for

cornmeal and making hominy because of its lower sugar content.

ts presumed origin lies with the western Abenaki

(Sokoki) in ermont although it was named after oy Fair

who cultivated this variety on his North Calais farm for more

than 50 years in the 1900s.

According to regional lore, acob’s Cattle Beans were

gifted by the Passamaquoddy community in Maine to the first

child born to European settlers in the 100s. hese red and

white speckled kidney beans are highly regarded by chefs for

use in baked beans and soups and readily available in many

local grocery stores.

East Montpelier Squash is a native ermont variety with an

exciting history. his winter squash was on the verge of

extinction when seed was found in 2014 in Orange County.

ork is still underway to bring it back to its original characteristics

as the seed found had been crossed with blue hubbard

squash.

n time, this squash may become more available at local

markets. f you are able to find one, it is reportedly a delicious

squash with generous yielding plants, high flesh content,

edible seeds and many culinary uses.

Sunflower cultivation in our region was first documented in

115 by explorer Samuel de Champlain. t is believed that the

white-seeded Morrisville Sunflower may be the variety he

OUTDOORS IN AUTUMN | THE WORLD

• • •

to find your one. hen be sure the site is suitable in terms of

sunlight or shade and that there is enough space to accommodate

the plant as it grows into its mature sie.

eed the site you’ve chosen, and dig a hole larger (but no

deeper) than the plant is in its pot. ork some compost or

other organic matter into the soil (adding more if the soil is

heavy clay).

Before planting, loosen the roots, particularly any which

have grown around the interior of the pot. Then place your

plant in the hole and fill with soil.

At this point, you could consider adding some spring bulbs,

such as crocus, to the soil around the base of your plant for

added interest in the spring. This also is a good time to add a

plant marker since after the long winter months you may not

remember where your new plant is located. his could be a

particular problem if the perennial you’ve selected is one that

dies back to the ground during winter.

nce planted, water well and be sure the plant continues to

be well watered until the ground freees. here is no need to

fertilie at this time since doing this could encourage the plant

to put its energies into producing tender new growth that

could be damaged or killed by the first hard frost.

nstead, add a nice layer of mulch around the base of your

plant and your ob is done. At least until spring.

And when you see those first hosta sprouts or colorful heuchera,

or smell those lilacs blooming in your yard for the first

time next year, you’ll be glad you decided to add some perennials

to your garden this fall.

For more information on growing perennials, check out the

Perry’s Perennials page at www.uvm.edu/~pass/perry.

refers to in his report, in which he notes that oil was harvested

from the sunflowers. he seeds have a thin coat so can be

eaten whole. hese seeds would have been valuable as a longstoring

food source to the Abenakis and early settlers.

Stands of erusalem artichokes, or sunchokes, can be seen

along many ermont riverbanks. hese clusters of tall plants

with vibrant yellow flowers resembling small sunflowers

bloom in late fall. esearchers believe that the Abenakis

planted sunchokes at their campsites. he tubers can be harvested

after a hard frost and prepared in many ways, similar

to potatoes.

round cherries, also known as husk tomatoes, are an interesting

fruit with a taste that is best described as weird but

tasty. Vaguely citrusy, somewhat sweet yet tart with a surprisingly

less sweet aftertaste, ground cherries can be used in both

sweet and savory preparations.

he tobacco historically grown by the Abenaki people is

used solely for ceremonial purposes and is considered sacred.

he cultivation and care of this crop was the responsibility of

the men, who grew tobacco in small, fenced-in plots and dried

both the flowers and leaves to smoke.

uring the growing season, all of these varieties can be

viewed in the demonstration garden, maintained using traditional

Abenaki methods, at the ermont ndigenous eritage

Center at the Ethan Allen omestead Museum (https:ethanallenhomestead.org)

in Burlington. his also is the home of

the Seeds of Renewal project, which protects indigenous

seeds and maintains and documents ancestral horticultural

and culinary information.

r. Fred iseman, a Missisquoi Abenaki and ethnobotanist,

and Chief on Stevens, chief of the Nulhegan Abenaki,

will present a talk on indigenous agricultural practices and

their application for home gardens at the niversity of

ermont Extension Community orticulture Annual

Conference, Nov. 5-. o learn more, go to http:go.uvm.edu

comhortconference.

New E-Book Inspires

Pollinator Gardening

Pollinator-friendly gardens not only provide a source

of nectar and pollen for bees, butterflies and other beneficial

insects but can add beauty and diversity to a home

landscape.

To help gardeners and homeowners understand the role

of pollinators in food production and provide strategies

for creating pollinator habitat, a group of niversity of

ermont (M) Extension Master ardener volunteers

have developed Gardening for Pollinators and Beneficial

Insects. he e-book, available now for garden planning

this winter, can be downloaded for free at https:go.uvm.

edu/garden4pollinators.

In addition to identifying some common pollinators

and beneficial insects, the authors also delve into the

causes of pollinator decline and provide insight into why

choosing native plants is so important for providing

proper habitat for pollinators.

he e-book includes a number of tips for creating an

effective pollinator garden, such as planting a minimum

of 10 native plants with different colors, shapes and

bloom times and selecting at least three varieties each for

early, mid and late season bloom. Links to a pollinator

plant palette chart, nurseries and several native plant

databases are provided for help with plant selection.

Other sections cover additional recommended features,

such as a water source, for creating an inviting garden

and tips for being a good host to insects, including planting

tall native grasses and interplanting vegetables with

flowers. he e-book also is packed with links to resources

on native plants, pollinator-friendly garden planning

and pollinators and beneficial insects, as well as the

M Extension Master ardener Program.

For more information about the Master ardener

Program in Vermont, visit ww.uvm.edu/extension/mastergardener.

VPR & Vermont PBS

Accepting Applications for

New Community Forum

VPR and Vermont PBS are accepting applications for its

Community Forum, a volunteer group that will help Vermont’s

new, unified public media organiation assess its service and

ensure it is representative of the whole community.

ur new organiation is founded on a commitment to represent

and celebrate our entire community, said Scott Finn,

VPR & Vermont PBS president & CEO. “To accomplish this,

we must broaden and diversify our audience, and engage community

members we have failed to reachwhile continuing

to serve our existing supporters. The Community Forum is an

essential link in this process and key to our future success.

he advisory group will comprise 20-40 members, reflecting

the demographic, geographic, cultural, economic and social

diversity of the region.

Forum members serve for a three-year term and meetings

are held twice a year. Forum members will learn about public

media, meet staff members, and have regular communication

with the station about programming and service. hey’ll have

the opportunity to discuss the goals of public media with other

members of the Forum. Members also serve as ambassadors

for strong public media service within their communities.

Public Media belongs to everyone, and it should look and

sound like our whole community, said Emerald rake, Community

Forum Steering Committee member. he Community

Forum is open to people of all walks of lifewhether you

tune in all the time or hardly at all.

Community members interested in serving on the P

Vermont PBS Community Forum can apply at VPR.org/forum

or call 800-639-2192 for a paper application.

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November 3, 2021 The WORLD page 15


Let’s Eat!

Fresh Herbs That Can Reduce Your Reliance On Sodium

Salt has long been used to add flavor to people’s favorite

foods. In fact, the use of salt as a means to preserving

foods and adding flavor to recipes dates back to ancient

times and has led to countless conflicts ever since.

According to istory.com, wars over

access to salt reserves in China are believed

to have been fought as early as ,000 B.C.

hough that shows ust how valuable salt

has been throughout much of human history,

it doesn’t indicate the negative effects that

can result from diets that feature excessive

amounts of sodium.

he American eart Association notes

that sodium plays an essential role in the

human body by regulating the kidneys and

helping to control the body’s fluid balance.

Sodium also helps send nerve impulses and

affects muscle function. owever, excessive

amounts of sodium can compromise

heart health. he AA notes that excessive

amounts of sodium in the bloodstream pulls

water into the blood vessels, increasing the

total volume of blood within them. As more

blood flows through blood vessels, blood

pressure increases. ver time, that can

adversely affect blood vessels and speed up

the build-up of plaque that can block blood

Some people may associate healthy diets

with bland foods that lack flavor, people

can incorporate various heart-healthy herbs

and spices into their favorite dishes to make

them more nutritious and flavorful.

arlic: arlic has long since earned its

place on the kitchen spice rack. owever,

botanically, garlic is neither an herb or a

spice but a vegetable. egardless of how

it’s classified, garlic is loaded with flavor

and can be used to improve ust about any

recipe, all the while benefitting heart health.

he nited States-based health services

provider Mercy ealth notes that garlic can

help lower blood pressure and reduce bad

cholesterol levels.

Cayenne pepper: Few ingredients may

change a recipe as quickly as cayenne pepper.

he addition of cayenne pepper can

instantly make dishes more spicy. But cayenne

pepper brings more than a little extra

kick to the dinner table. ealthline notes that

various studies have shown that capsaicin,

the active ingredient in cayenne pepper,

can provide a host of health benefits. ne

such study published in the British ournal

of Nutrition found that adding capsaicin to

a high-carbohydrate breakfast significantly

reduced hunger and the desire to eat before

lunch. Eating less can help people more effectively

control their body weight, which in

turn reduces their risk for heart disease.

urmeric: arlic and even cayenne pepper

may already be staples in many people’s

kitchens, but that’s not necessarily so with

turmeric. A yellow spice often used when

preparing ndian foods, turmeric has antiinflammatory

properties thanks to curcumin,

the part of turmeric responsible for giving

it its yellow color. Experts acknowledge

Cooking comes down to three basic methods:

typically roasting.

dry heat, moist heat and combination Baking: Baking utilies indirect heat to

cooking. ere’s a look at some popular ways surround foods and cook from all sides. t is

to cook a meal.

similar to roasting, but the temperature tends

Broiling: Broiling involves cooking food to be lower than with roasting. oasting is

directly below dry heat. t produces a crispy, used on vegetables, meats and other foods.

crunchy outer layer on the food.

owever, baking is reserved for breads and

oasting: Another dry heat cooking cakes, among other things.

method, roasting involves cooking food in Sautéing: hen you sauté, foods are

an oven at high temperatures. oasting is cooked quickly over a burner in a shallow

best for large cuts of meat or poultry that are pan, using a small amount of fat to coat

tender and have internal or surface fats to food for even browning. Sauté is a French

keep them moist.

term for ump. Since food cooks quickly,

rilling: ry heat comes from the bottom they must be tossed and stirred frequently to

when grilling over an open flame. Foods are prevent burning.

cooked quickly while grilling.

Poaching: his is a gentle method of cooking

Searing: uring searing, one browns food,

in which foods are submerged in liquids

usually meat, on all sides using high heat in a certain temperature range. he low heat

to give the meat color and flavor. hen the is ideal for delicate items, preserving the

meat is finished utiliing another technique, flavor and moisture of the food without uspage

16 The WORLD November 3, 2021

that turmeric needs to be studied more to

definitively conclude its effects on heart

health, but ebM notes that one small

study indicated that turmeric can help ward

off heart attacks in people who have had

bypass surgery.

Coriander: A popular herb used across

the globe, coriander is sometimes mistaken

for cilantro. hough the two come from

the same plant, cilantro refers to the leaves

and stems of the coriander plant, while the

coriander in recipes typically refers to the

seeds of that plant. Mercy ealth notes that

coriander seeds may help reduce bad cholesterol

and high blood pressure, both of which

are significant risk factors for heart disease.

eart-healthy herbs and spices can be

added to various recipes, proving that nutritious

meals need not be void of flavor.

Essential Cooking Methods Everyone Should Know

Mastering an assortment of cooking techniques is a key to

becoming a great chef, whether you’re an amateur cooking

at home or a professional aspiring to earn a Michelin star. By

understanding the various ways to prepare and cook food, cooks

can work with a variety of ingredients and kitchen equipment en

route to creating delicious meals.

• • •

flow. igher blood pressure forces the heart

to work harder and increases a person’s risk

for heart disease.

So what about sodium, a mineral so

valued, and indeed vital to human existence,

that it’s led to wars and created countless

devotees in kitchens over the centuries f

it’s flavor cooks are aiming for, it’s possible

to reduce reliance on sodium and increase

the use of fresh herbs without sacrificing

flavor. Such a transition can improve heart

health and introduce a host of new flavors at

meal time.

BASIL

he AA notes that basil has a sweet and

fresh flavor profile and is best added to a

dish right before serving. Freshly cut basil

leaves can be added to any number of dishes,

including tomato sauces, pastas, salads, pi-

as, and eggs.

CILANTRO

Cilantro are the delicate leaves and stems

of the coriander plant. Like basil, cilantro

should be added to a dish right before serving

and should not be cooked. Cilantro can be

paired with beans, tomatoes, corn, and avocados

among other foods, and is widely used

when preparing Mexican foods at home.

OREGANO

he AA notes that reek dishes often

combine oregano, mint and lemon to create a

memorable, delicious flavor profile. f chopping

fresh oregano, strip the leaves from the

stem and then discard the stem.

PARSLEY

Parsley isn’t ust a garnish used to add

• • •

Healthy Doesn’t Have To Be Bland

ing fat or oil.

Stewing: Stewing is ideal for cooks

who want to create very tender meats and

vegetables. uring stewing, food is cooked

slowly in liquid over low heat. his helps to

tenderie tough cuts of meat.

Pan-frying: Similar to sautéing, pan-frying

involves cooking food that may have coating

or breading in a small amount of hot oil.

aesthetic appeal to plates. Flat-leaf parsley

provides a light and fresh flavor, while

the AA notes that curly parsley offers a

slightly peppery profile. Parsley is typically

added to a dish during the final minutes of

cooking or right before serving, and can be

paired with chicken, fish, potatoes, and pasta

among countless other foods.

hese are ust a handful of herbs that

can give meals a flavorful punch and help

chefs avoid an overreliance sodium in their

recipes.

eep-frying: eep-frying submerges foods

in very hot oil to cook it quickly and crisp it

up.

Braising: Like stewing, braising utilies

moisture. o braise foods, place them in small

amounts of liquid in a tightly covered pan on

the stove or in the oven.

Practicing various cooking methods can help

amateur chefs expand their culinary skill sets.


AUTUMN OUTINGS | FALL 2021

All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.

com or mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S.

Route 302, Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00 p.m.,

Thursday preceding publication. The Ongoing section is for

free/low cost/non-profit community events.

Ongoing Events

ONLINE IN VERMONT-Shepherd of the Hills Welcomes

Zoom Worshipers Please join us on Sunday mornings at 9:30.

Visit us on the web at montpelierlutheran.org for the link to our

Zoom service and the bulletin for worship. There’s always room

for folks to come and worship.

Divorce and Separated Support Group This group meets the

first Monday of each month from 7:00 - 8:00 on Zoom. For more

information and to get the Zoom link, email DSGvtnh@gmail.

com.

Connection Peer Support Group This group will occur on the

1st and 3rd Tuesday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM on

Zoom. This new peer support group will complement the Monday

night and Thursday afternoon support groups. People can visit

https://namivt.org/support/peer-support-groups/ for more information.

Nurturing Skills for Families in Recovery Meets weekly online

on Mondays from 1:00 –2:30 PM. For information and to join a

group contact Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Circle of Parents in Recovery Meets weekly online on Thursdays

from 3:00-4:30 PM. For information and to join a group contact

Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Circle of Parents for Grandparents Meets weekly online on

Thursdays from 4:00-5:00 PM beginning. For information and to

join a group contact Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Seven Stars Arts Center All-Comers Virtually Slow Jam will

be starting back up monthly on second Thursday evenings 6:30-

8PM! Traditional dance tunes at relaxed, accessible pace.

BYOBeverages and snacks! Free, with a recommended donation

of $10-15. All ages, levels and instruments welcome! The Zoom

link will be sent out to folks that RSVP “maybe” or “yes” by

email: resonance.vermont@gmail.com.

Mood Disorders Support Group: Now online via Zoom. Peer &

professionally led support for people coping with mood disorders

such as depression, bipolar disorder, seasonal affective disorder,

postpartum depression, dysthymia, etc. We share our experience,

strength and hope to support each other on our mental health

journey. Wed. 4 - 5 PM. There is no fee. For more information and

meeting code, contact Rosanne at 802-917-1959 or rosanne@

rosanne.info.

Weatherization Wednesdays at noon. We’ll answer your questions

via Zoom and Facebook Live every Wednesday at noon,

when we present a new topic in weatherization. Get a chance to

win smart thermostats and other prizes. More info and to register:

https://buttonupvermont.org/event.

The Montpelier First Church of Christ, Scientist, is conducting

its Sunday (10:30am) and Wednesday (7:30pm) services on Zoom

for the foreseeable future. You are invited to join us using this

URL: https://zoom.us/j/306295907 or calling 1-646-876-9923

and then keying the meeting ID code: 306 295 907#

The Heart of Vermont BNI Chapter meets weekly via Zoom for

Central Vermont business networking. Meetings are held each

Friday from 8am to 9:30am, and visitors are welcome. For information

or a reservation to attend, please contact Kristin Dearborn

at 802-223-3425. Kristin.dearborn@edwardjones.com.

The Washington County Democrats (Vermont) invite you to

‘like’ or ‘follow’ us on Facebook, and/or send an email to County

Chair, Linda Gravell (washcountydemsvt@gmail.com) to receive

monthly announcements and meeting reminders. We meet on

Zoom on the Third Monday of each month at 5:30 p.m. All

Democrats living in Washington County, Vermont are welcome to

participate.

The Unitarian Church of Montpelier welcomes all to visit

http://www.ucmvt.org and to join weekly Sunday Worship

Services online at 10:00 a.m. on Zoom or Facebook. We welcome

all as we build a loving community to nurture each person’s

spiritual journey, serve human need, and protect the Earth, our

home. Services led by Rev. Joan Javier-Duval, Minister, or Verdis

L. Robinson, Ministerial Intern.

BARRE- Weekly Business Networking in Central Vermont,

Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, 33 Stewart Ln.

8AM-9:30AM. Thurs. Free. Info: mike@eternitymarketing.com.

Families Anonymous is a fellowship for those who have been

affected by the behavior of someone very near to them, whether

by drugs, alcohol, or related behavioral problems. Location:

Turning Point Center. Tuesdays 6-7pm. Info: 802-479-7373

Church of God of Prophecy Sunday Service at 10:30 am. All

are welcome. Pastor Jeffrey Kelley. (814) 428-2696. Also daily

Facebook devotionals.

Sons of the American Legion Squadron #10 Meetings, Barre

Legion Post #10, 320 N. Main St. 3rd Thurs. of each month. 6PM.

The American Legion Barre Post 10, Regular Post Membership

Meetings. Barre Post 10, 320 Main St., third Thurs. of each

month, 6PM.

Central VT Adult Basic Education, Free classes. Pre-GED and

high school diploma prep classes at Barre Learning Center, 46

Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588.

Central Vermont Woodcarving Group, Free instruction projects

for all abilities. Barre Congregational Church, Mon. 1-4pm.

479-9563.

Heart of Vermont Quilt Guild, meets 3rd Tues. of the month at

First Presbyterian Church, Seminary St. 5:30-7:30PM.

Additional Recycling Collection Center, Open for collection

Mon., Wed., Fri. 11:30-5:30PM, 3rd Sat. 9AM-1PM. 540 N. Main

St., Barre. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable items.

Medicare & You, Have questions? We have answers. Central

Vermont Council on Aging, 59 N. Main St., Suite 200, 2nd & 4th

Tues. of the month. Call 479-0531 to register.

Central Vermont Business Builders, Community National

Bank, 1st & 3rd Tues., 8-9AM. Info: 777-5419.

Weekly Storytime, Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main St.,

Sat., 10:30AM. Info. 476-3114.

Vermont Modelers Club, Building and flying model airplanes

year-round. Info: 485-7144.

Community Breakfast, First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer

St., 3rd Sun. FREE, 7:30-9AM. 476-3966.

Circle of Parents, Confidential support group for parents and

caregivers. Tues. evenings. Info: 229-5724.

Mothers of Preschoolers, Monthly get-togethers for crafts,

refreshments, etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.

Alcoholics Anonymous, Meetings in Barre, daily; call 802-229-

5100 for latest times & locations; www.aavt.org.

Al-Anon Family Groups Turning Point, 489 North Main St. Use

back door of parking lot. Older children friendly. Sat 5-6pm. Info:

vermontalanonalateen.org.

Hedding United Methodist Activities & Meetings, 40

Washington St., 476-8156. Choir: Thurs. 7PM; Community

Service & Food Shelf Hours: Weds & Thurs. 3-5PM.

Turning Point Recovery Center, 489 N. Main St. Safe and supportive

place for individuals/families in or seeking substance

abuse recovery. Open Mon/Tue/Thur: 10AM-5PM; Wed/Fri:

10AM-9PM; Sat: 6PM-9PM. For info and programs, call 479-

7373.

Green Mountain Spirit Chapter, National women bikers club.

2nd Wed. Info: grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.

Grief & Bereavement Support Group, Central Vermont Home

Health and Hospice office, 600 Granger Road. This group is open

to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one. Mondays

4-5:30 Wed. 10-11:30AM, Meeting via Zoom. 6 consecutive sessions.

Free. Info: 223-1878.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Barre City Police, 15

Fourth St., 476-6613. Get rid of old or unused meds.

Small Group Bible Studies sponsored by VT Christian Radio

WJPL-LP 92.1 FM. In the Aldrich Public Library upstairs conference

room, 6 Washington St. Thursdays at 6PM. All are welcome.

Savvy Speakers Toastmasters International is an educational

club where people learn and practice how to speak with confidence

in a fun and supportive environment. Meetings held 1st and

continued on page 19

Video On Demand

1. Escape Room: Tournament of

Champions (PG-13)

2. F9: The Fast Saga (PG-13) 3.

Snake Eyes: G.I. Joe Origins

(PG-13) Henry Golding

4. The Forever Purge (R) Ana de

la Reguera

5. Cruella (PG-13) Emma Stone

6. Boss Baby: Family Business

(PG) animated

7. Old Henry (NR) Tim Blake

Nelson

8. Survive the Game (R) Chad

Michael Murray

9. Hocus Pocus (PG)

10. The Hitman’s Wife’s

Bodyguard (R) Ryan Reynolds

DVD, Blu-ray Sales

1. F9: The Fast Saga (PG-13)

Universal

2. Space Jam: A New Legacy

(PG) Warner

3. Black Widow (PG-13)

Disney/Marvel

4. Hocus Pocus* (PG) Disney

5. The Forever Purge (R)

Universal

6. Cruella (PG-13) Disney

7. Boss Baby: Family Business

(PG) Universal/Dreamworks

8. The Nightmare Before

Christmas* (PG) Disney

9. Beetlejuice* (PG) Warner

10. It’s the Great Pumpkin,

Charlie Brown* (NR) Warner

*Re-release

Source: Media Play News

(c) 2020 King Features Synd., Inc.

Prepare for the Holiday

Season at Morse Farm

Maple Syrup & Maple Products

Gift baskets for the holidays!

Vermont specialty

food and gifts

We ship nationwide

We’ll have Christmas

trees and wreaths soon!

Maple creemees available year round!

SIP & SHOP VERMONT

Black Friday &

Small Business Saturday Events

Nov. 26 & 27

10am-6pm

30+ Vendors • Door Prizes

Specialty Cocktails

Canadian Club, Barre

16” & 20” New York Style

Pizzas

Calzones • Pasta • Sandwiches

Wraps • Salads • Knots

OPEN

Mon.-Fri. 11-2

CLOSED SAT. & SUN.

Except for

Deli

366 E. Montpelier Road

next to Agway on Rte. 2, Montpelier

Open Every Day 5am – 9pm

802-223-5300

OPEN DAILY 10am - 5pm | (802) 223-2740

1168 County Road, Montpelier, Vermont 05602

Just 2.7 miles from downtown Montpelier

www.morsefarm.com

November 3, 2021 The WORLD page 17


Let’s Eat!

Serve Up A Slice Of Sweet Flavor

Pie is delicious any time of year, but especially when seasonal fruits are included in the recipe. When the weather

warms up, mouthwatering blueberries are in season, making this an ideal time to enjoy some blueberry pie.

According to Peggy Brusseau, author of “The Contented Vegan” (Head of Zeus), fresh blueberries help to make a

memorable pie, especially when paired with apple, which brings sweetness and a contrast in texture.

Home chefs can use Brusseau’s recipe for “Blueberry

Apple Pie” to create their own delicious dessert. This recipe

is designed for those who adhere to a vegan diet, but bakers

can substitute a traditional pie crust if desired.

BLUEBERRY APPLE PIE

Makes 1 large pie

1 quantity Vegan Shortcrust Pastry (see below)

2 medium apples

21⁄4 pounds fresh blueberries

1⁄4 cup granulated sugar

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

(Alternative: Use 1 tablespoon oat bran instead of the

flour)

Preheat the oven to 350 F. Line an 111⁄4 inch pie dish

with half of the pastry, and prepare the top crust.

Peel, core and slice the apples. Spread the apple slices

over the bottom of the pastry base. Tip the blueberries into

the pie dish, and spread evenly to cover the apples.

Mix together the sugar and flour in a small bowl, and

sprinkle the mixture evenly over the berries.

Position the prepared top crust over the pie, seal together

the edges of the pastry and pierce the top crust with a fork

or knife.

Bake for 25 to 30 minutes until the pastry is golden and

crisp.

Cool and serve.

The holiday season is a popular time to entertain. Food

is often a focal point of holiday season entertaining.

• • •

VEGAN SHORTCRUST PASTRY

Makes top and bottom pie crust

1 cup all-purpose flour, plus extra for dusting

23⁄4 ounces coconut oil

1⁄3 cup fine cornmeal

Measure the flour into a large bowl. Add the coconut oil

and ‘cut’ it into the flour, using a fork or table knife, to create

an even texture throughout. Add the cornmeal, working it in

the same way to create an even texture.

Add 1⁄2 cup ice cold water, and quickly work it into the

dough with your fingertips. Shape the dough into a ball, cover

the bowl and chill in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour, and

up to 24 hours.

Remove the pastry from the refrigerator 20 to 30 minutes

before use, and bring to room temperature. Lightly flour your

work surface and a rolling pin. Keep a little extra flour to one

side, to use as needed.

Divide the dough in two, and knead one portion on the

work surface to ensure an even consistency. Roll out the

pastry into a round or rectangle, as required, to a thickness of

1⁄4 inch.

Lift the pastry into the pie dish and press into place, trimming

off any excess. Roll the remaining pastry in the same

way, to make the top crust, or to line a second pie dish.

Crustless Pie A Treat For Those With Gluten Intolerance

Individuals who navigate food allergies

or intolerances may shy away from certain

celebrations out of fear that a nibble of

this or a bite of that may trigger an allergic

response. In such instances, concern about

ingredients can cast a pall over normally

festive occasions.

Those with Celiac disease or gluten

intolerances must be mindful of the foods

they consume. Meals or desserts containing

gluten, a protein found in grains like wheat,

semolina, rye, barley, graham, spelt, farina,

and more, can trigger intestinal distress and

other symptoms. With delicious pies, cakes

and cookies on the holiday serving table,

gluten is likely to make an appearance.

However, with careful planning, people who

cannot stomach foods that contain gluten can

still indulge in their favorite holiday flavors.

“Crustless Libby’s® Famous Pumpkin

Pie” is a variation on traditional pumpkin pie

served at Thanksgiving and Christmas gatherings.

Without the crust, individuals who

avoid gluten can still dive into that pumpkinand-spice

combination that’s so popular

around the holiday season. Enjoy this recipe,

courtesy of Libby’s® Pumpkin.

CRUSTLESS LIBBY’S® FAMOUS PUMPKIN PIE

Makes 8 servings

3⁄4 cup granulated sugar

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1⁄2 teaspoon salt

1⁄2 teaspoon ground ginger

1⁄4 teaspoon ground cloves

2 large eggs

1 can (15 ounces) Libby’s® 100% Pure Pumpkin

1 can (12 fluid ounces) Nestlé® Carnation Evaporated Milk

Nonstick cooking spray

Whipped cream (optional)

1. Preheat oven as directed below. Glass baking dishes without crust require a cooler oven,

and in most cases, a longer baking time.

2. Spray baking dish with nonstick cooking spray or lightly grease bottom of baking pan or

baking dish.

3. Mix sugar, cinnamon, salt, ginger and cloves in a small bowl. Beat eggs in a large bowl.

Stir in pumpkin and sugar-spice mixture. Gradually stir in evaporated milk.

4. Bake as directed below or until a knife inserted near center comes out clean.

5. Cool on wire rack for 2 hours. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

page 18 The WORLD November 3, 2021

COOKING TIMES

9-inch-round glass pie dish: 325 F; bake for 55 to 60 minutes

10-inch-round glass pie dish: 325 F; bake for 45 to 50 minutes

8-inch-round cake pan: 350 F; bake for 45 to 50 minutes

9-inch-round cake pan: 350 F; bake for 35 to 40 minutes

8-inch-square baking pan: 350 F; bake for 45 to 50 minutes

8-inch-square glass baking dish: 325 F; 50 to 60 minutes

9-inch-square baking dish: 350 F; bake for 35 to 40 minutes

11x7-inch glass baking dish: 325 F; bake for 45 to 50 minutes

13x9-inch baking pan: 350 F; bake for 35 to 40 minutes

13x9-inch glass baking dish: 325 F; bake for 40 to 45 minutes


AUTUMN OUTINGS | FALL 2021

3rd Tuesday of the month 6-7:30 p.m. at Capstone Community

Action, 20 Gable Place, Barre, VT 05641 Please call Margaret

Ferguson 802-476-0908 or MLFerguson2002@yahoo.com

Memorable Times Cafe Third Wednesday of each month from

1:30 to 3 p.m. at the VT History Center, 60 Washington St. A

relaxed social time for people living with mild to moderate

memory loss and their care partners. Come enjoy stories, memories,

music and community. Free, refreshments provided.

Sponsored by Central VT Council on Aging and the ABLE

Library. 802-476-2681 for more information.

BERLIN- Tuesday Night Drumming Sessions at the 1st

Congregational Church of Berlin. Sept. 21 - Nov. 9th, 6:30-

7:45PM. Learn the art of drumming West African Style. $80 for 8

sessions or $11 per drop-in session. Info: shidaaprojects@gmail.

com or call Jordan 498-5987.

Contra Dance *Dances are canceled for now. Check www.capitalcitygrange.org/dancing/contradancing

or email cdu.tim@

gmail.com for updates* No experience and no partner needed. All

dances are taught plus an introductory session at 7:45. Everyone

welcome! The dance takes place at the Capital City Grange Hall,

6612 Rt 12, 1 mile south of Montpelier. Please bring clean, softsoled

shoes. Admission is $10 adults, $5 kids and low income,

$15 dance supporters. Questions? Call Tim Swartz at 802-225-

8921, visit: http://capitalcitygrange.org/dancing/contradancing.

Every 1st, 3rd, and 5th Saturday year round.

Family Support Groups empower and educate family members

and close friends of individuals with persistent mental health challenges.

All groups are led by trained individuals who have a family

member living with a mental health condition and understand

the same challenges you are experiencing. Central Vermont

Medical Center. Group meets 4th Monday each month.

BETHEL- YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program, United

Church of Bethel, Church St. Thurs., 11AM-12PM. Free. Info:

728-7714.

BROOKFIELD- Mothers of Preschoolers, Meal and childcare

provided. New Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fri., 6PM.

Info: 276-3022.

CABOT- Fiddle Lessons with Katie Trautz: Mon., Info: 279-

2236; Dungeons & Dragons, Fri., 3-5:30PM. All at Cabot

Library, 563-2721.

CALAIS- Men’s & Women’s Bible Study Groups, County

Road, Wed., 7PM. Info: 485-7577.

CHELSEA- Chronic Conditions Support Group, Chelsea

Senior Center, in the United Church of Chelsea, 13 North

Common. Free. Fri. 8:30-11AM. Info:728-7714.

DUXBURY- Duxbury - Green Mountain Community Alliance

Church Worship Service on Sundays at 9:30 a.m. 4987 VT

Route 100. 244-6463 or Pastor Paul Collins at 917-3639. Also

Bible Studies on Mondays and Tuesdays.

E. HARDWICK- Bible Study, Touch of Grace Assembly of God

Church, Tues. 10AM; Bible study; Wed. Youth Group, 5PM dinner,

6PM activity. Info: 472-5550.

EAST MONTPELIER- FREE Zumba-like Fitness Dance for

Women 18+, East Montpelier Elementary, Sundays, 4-5PM. Info:

zabundancejoy@gmail.com.

Men’s Ministry, Crossroads Christian Church. Mon. 7-9PM.

Men’s Breakfast: 2nd Sat., 8AM. Sun. Service: 9:30-11AM. Info:

476-8536.

Twin Valley Senior Center, 4583 U.S. Rte 2. Open Mon., Weds.,

Fri., 9AM-2PM. For class listing & info: 223-3322.

Walk-Through Wednesday Open House at Orchard Valley

Waldorf School, Grace Farm Campus 2290 VT Rt. 14N, 8:30-

9:30am. Join us on the first Wednesday of each month for an

introductory visit to the OVWS grades school from 8:30-10:30

a.m. Campus tour and Q&A. Contact enrollment@ovws.org or

call 456-7400 with questions. Please register by noon the day

prior to the Walk-Through.

GROTON- YA Book Club, 3rd Mon., 6:30PM; Book Discussion

Group: 4th Mon., 7PM; Crafts & Conversation, Wed., 1-3PM.

Round Robin Storytime for kids age 0-5: Tues., 10AM. All at

Groton Public Library. Info: 584-3358.

HARDWICK- Caregiver Support Group, Agency on Aging,

rear entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs. 229-0308 x306.

Peace & Justice Coalition, G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg (old firehouse),

Tues., 7PM. Info: 533-2296.

Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs.,

6-8:30PM. Registration/info: 472-5229.

MARSHFIELD- Playgroup, Twinfield Preschool, Mon., 8:15-

9:45AM (except when school is not in session).

MONTPELIER- Circle of Recovery Mondays and Fridays

10am-11am at Another Way, 125 Barre Street. 802-229-0920.

Confidential space to receive support for recovery in all of its

forms.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Sunday School welcomes

children for Sunday school to learn how to feel close to God

everyday. 10:30AM. 223-2477.

Free Coffee House Potluck, 1st Fri. at the Trinity Methodist

Church. 7PM-9PM.

Vermont College of Fine Arts Friday Night Reading Series,

Cafe Anna, 1st floor of College Hall, 36 College St. 5:30-7:30PM.

Free snacks.

Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup, North Branch Nature Center.

Mon. 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 229-6206.

Montpelier Kiwanis Club, Tues., 6PM. at The Steak House. All

are welcome. Info: 229-6973.

Onion River Exchange Tool Library, 46 Barre St. Over 85

tools. Wed., 10AM-2PM, Thurs., 10AM-2PM.

Friday Night Group, Open to all LGBTQ youth ages 13-22.

Pizza and social time, facilitated by adults from Outright VT.

Unitarian Church, 2nd & 4th Fri., 6:30-8PM. Info: 223-7035.

Meditation, Mon. 1PM.; Intro to Yoga, Tues. 4PM; Consults,

Fri. 11AM. Free classes, limits apply. Fusion Studio, 56 East State

St. Info: 272-8923.

Celiac Support Group, Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., 2nd Wed.,

4-5PM. Info: 598-9206.

A Course in Miracles, at Christ Episcopal Church, 64 State St.,

each Tues., 7-8PM. Info: 622-4516.

Parent’s Group & Meet-Up, Connect with local parents to share

advice and info. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes Rm., 1st Mon.,

10-11:30AM. Info: mamasayszine@gmail.com.

Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights, Need help w/a bike

repair? Come to the volunteer-run community bike shop. 89 Barre

St., Wed. 4-6PM and Fri. 12-4PM. Info: freeridemontpelier.org.

Free Community Meals, Mon: Unitarian Church, 11AM-1PM;

Tues: Bethany Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Wed: Christ Church,

11AM-12:30PM; Thurs: Trinity Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Fri: St.

Augustine Church, 11AM-12:30PM; Last Sun., Bethany Church,

4:30-6:30PM.

Calico County Quilters, All skill levels welcome. 2nd Sat. Sept.

through June, 1-3PM. Location info: 244-7001.

Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA), Bethany Church basement,

Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 229-9036.

CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group, Childcare not available.

Woodbury College, 2nd Tues., 5:30-7:30PM. Info: 498-

5928.

Resurrection Baptist Church Weekly Events, 144 Elm St. Sun.,

9:45AM. Bible Study; 11AM. Worship Service; Wed., 7PM.

Prayer Meeting.

Good Beginnings of Central VT, 174 River St. Drop-In hours at

the Nest. 1st floor Weds/Thurs/Fri., 9AM-3PM. Babywearers of

Central Vermont meet upstairs, 4th Mon., 5:45-7:45PM & 2nd

Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 595-7953. Breastfeeding support:

3rd Thurs., 9:30- 11:30AM; Nursing Beyond a Year: 3rd Fri.,

9:30-11:30AM (802-879-3000).

Al-Anon, Trinity Methodist Church, Main St., Sun., 6:15-

7:30PM. Info:1-866-972-5266.

Al-Anon, Bethany Church basement, 115 Main St., Tues. &

Thurs. 12-1PM, Wed. 7-8PM. Info: 1-866-972-5266.

SL AA, 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship problems.

Bethany Church, Wed., 5PM. Info: 249-6825.

Survivors of Incest Anonymous, Bethany Church parlor, 115

Main St., Mon., 5PM. Please call first: 229-9036 or 454-8402.

Brain Injury Support Group, Unitarian Church, 3rd Thurs.,

1:30-2:30PM. Info: 1-877-856-1772.

Playgroups: Dads & Kids, Thurs., 6-7:30PM & Sat., 9:30-

11AM, at Family Center of Washington County. Held during

school year only.

Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer Support, for

patients and caregivers. Info: 1-800-652-5064.

Christian Meditation, Christ Church, Mon., 12-1PM.

Mood Disorders Support Group, 149 State St., last entryway,

first floor. Peer and professionally led support for people coping

with mental illness. Wed. 4-5PM. Free. Info: 917-1959.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Montpelier Police, 1 Pitkin

Court, 223-3445 at Washington County Sheriff, 10 Elm St., 223-

3001. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent safe

disposal sites.

Community Song Circle, Center for Arts and Learning, 46 Barre

St. 1st Sun. except July/Aug., 6-8PM. Info: vtcommunitysing@

gmail.com.

Suicide Grief Support Group - For anyone who has lost a loved

one to suicide. Meets the first Monday of each month, 6:00-7:30.

Please contact Michele Delaney at 802-223-4752 for intake

screening and location. Starting Oct. 4. Group will meet in-person,

masks required.

Flat Track Roller Derby, Montpelier Rec Center, 55 Barre St.

Sunday afternoons - email for practice times. 18+, all genders

welcome, no experience necessary, please bring a mouthguard -

all other gear provided. First practice free then $30/month. Will

resume after COVID pandemic. Info:vtderbytcr@gmail.com.

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Recovery

Mondays at 4:00. Contact Cindy Wells, Family Support Programs

Coordinator, at 802-498-0611 or cwells@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Skills for Families Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10:00.

Contact Cindy Wells, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at

802-498-0611 or cwells@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Skills for Families Mondays at 10:00 Contact

Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-

498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Recovery

Tuesdays at 11:00. Contact Amber Menard, Family Support

Programs Coordinator at 802-552-4274 or amenard@pcavt.org)

Nurturing Skills for Families Thursdays at 5:30. Contact Cindy

Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608

or catkins@pcavt.org.

continued on next page

UNITED CHURCH OF CHELSEA

ROAST BEEF SUPPER

TAKE OUT ONLY

SAT., NOV. 13, 2021

5:00PM to 7:00PM

$15.00 Adults

$7.50 Children under 12

CALL FOR PICKUP TIME

LYNDA WATSON 802-685-3161

ORDER BY NOV. 10

10 th Annual Vermont

Crafts & Products

Fair

Where: St. John Church

206 Vine Street, Northfi eld

Sat., Nov 13, 9am-4pm

& Sun., Nov 14, 9am–4pm

Over 15 Vermonters exhibiting

handmade crafts and products.

Lunch available.

Jump Start your Holiday

Shopping with lovely

handmade items

NOVEMBER 2021

New moon 4-Nov-21 2:15:26 PM 227,240 miles

First quarter 11-Nov-21 5:48:22 AM 233,039 miles

Full moon 19-Nov-21 1:59:41 AM 251,391 miles

Last quarter 27-Nov-21 5:29:51 AM 240,185 miles

Full Beaver Moon - For both the colonists and the Algonquin

tribes, this was the time to set beaver traps before

the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter

furs. This full Moon was also called the Frost Moon

NOV 1 MONDAY

All Saints' Day

NOV 2 TUESDAY

All Souls Day of the Dead

NOV 3 WEDNESDAY

National Sandwich Day

NOV 4 THURSDAY

National Chicken Lady Day

NOV 5 FRIDAY

National Redhead Day

NOV 6 SATURDAY

National Nachos Day

NOV 7 SUNDAY

Daylight Saving Day

NOV 8 MONDAY

International Tongue Twister Day

NOV 9 TUESDAY

National Scrapple Day

NOV 10 WEDNESDAY

Marine Corps Birthday

NOV 11 THURSDAY

Veterans Day

NOV 12 FRIDAY

National Happy Hour Day

NOV 13 SATURDAY

Sadie Hawkins Day

NOV 14 SUNDAY

World Diabetes Day

NOV 15 MONDAY

Odd Socks Day

NOV 16 TUESDAY

National Fast Food Day

NOV 17 WEDNESDAY

National Hiking Day

NOV 18 THURSDAY

Great American Smokeout

NOV 19 FRIDAY

World Toilet Day

NOV 20 SATURDAY

National Pay Back

Your Parents Day

NOV 21 SUNDAY

National Stuffing Day

NOV 22 MONDAY

Love Your Freckles Day

NOV 23 TUESDAY

National Espresso Day

NOV 24 WEDNESDAY

DrinksGiving

NOV 25 THURSDAY

Thanksgiving

NOV 26 FRIDAY

Black Friday

NOV 27 SATURDAY

Small Business Saturday

NOV 28 SUNDAY

Hanukkah

NOV 29 MONDAY

Chadwick Boseman Day

NOV 30 TUESDAY

National Mason Jar Day

~ THIS AD SPONSORED BY~

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MONTPELIER

190 E. Montpelier Rd, Montpelier•229-9187

November 3, 2021 The WORLD page 19


HARDWICK- 1111 Copper Nails: Bread & Puppet

Calendar Prints – A 36-Year Retrospective Dual

Location Exhibition in Hardwick, Vermont. When: April

– summer 2021. Where: exhibition in 2 fully accessible &

Covid-safe mask-required locations (also by appointment).

(1) The Hardwick Inn, 4 S Main Street, exhibit on

all 3 Floors, 8-6, Mon-Sat. (2) Front Seat Coffee, 101 S

Main Street, B&P Calendars & Art for Sale, 8-2, Mon-Fri.

JOHNSON- There Was Once... by Cathy Cone a solo

exhibition by Vermont-based photographer and painter.

November 2, 2021-January 8, 2022.

MANCHESTER- What Remains | Scattered Memories

German-born, Shushan NY-based artist Katrin Waite is the

next artist to be featured in a solo show at Ellenbogen

Gallery. Presenting paintings created over six years, from

2014 to present, will open to the public on Saturday, July

25th at 11:00 AM. On Friday, July 24th at 4:00 PM, “Eg.

Live: Virtual Vernissage” on Facebook will feature host

Elizabeth Spadea in discussion with the artist and doscenttour

of the exhibition. Info: email at ellenbogengallery@

gmail.com or by calling (802) 768-8498.

MIDDLEBURY- Pride 1983 The Vermont Folklife

Center and the Pride Center of Vermont announce the

opening of our new exhibit, Pride 1983, at the Vermont

Folklife Center’s Vision & Voice Gallery, 88 Main Street,

Middlebury, VT. The exhibit will run from September 8,

2021 through March 25, 2022. Gallery hours are

Wednesday-Friday from 11am-4pm. Through interviews

with organizers, photographs and scanned images of historic

documents Pride 1983 explores the origins and lasting

legacies of Vermont’s first Pride March on June 25,

1983 in Burlington.

MONTPELIER- The Front presents Daryl Burtnett:

Respite a solo show of recent work by the Front member

artist. Burtnett’s mixed media works on paper and canvas

draw inspiration from the marks, textures and imprints

time leaves on things and on us. Respite brings together

work from the past several months, sharing works that

have brought solace in these fraught times. Daryl Burtnett:

Respite runs March 5th through November 29th 2021.

The Front is open Saturdays and Sundays 11-2, and Daryl

welcomes showings by appointment. Join us for Daryl’s

artist talk via zoom on March 18th at 7:00pm; email

info@thefrontvt.com to rsvp.

To See & Be Seen is a nonbinary tarot solo show of artwork

created by PJ Desrochers. The show invites you to

experience Desrochers’ artistic process. They seek to

make transparent the layers of their journey building a

nonbinary tarot deck. The Front, 6 Barre St., November

5-28, 2021, Opening Reception November 5, 4-7 p.m.

Gallery Hours Friday 4-7, Saturday and Sunday 11-5.

Artist’s talk on Zoom Thursday, November 18, 7 p.m. -

see thefrontvt.com for details.

Nurturing Fathers Program Mondays at 5:30. Contact Amber

Menard, Family Support Programs Coordinator at 802-552-4274

or amenard@pcavt.org.

Circle for Foster & Adoptive Families Thursdays at 5:00.

Contact Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs Coordinator,

at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org).

Circle for Kinship & Guardianship Families Thursdays at 8:00

PM. Contact Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs

Coordinator, at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org.

Circle of Parents open to all. Thursdays at 10:00; Contact Cindy

Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608

or catkins@pcavt.org.

Circle of Parents in Recovery Tuesdays at 5:30; Contact Cindy

Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608

or catkins@pcavt.org. Contact the program manager or call

1-800-CHILDREN

CVTV CHANNEL 194

Wednesday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00AM - Community Bulletin

7:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

9:00AM - Barre City Council

12:00PM - Barre City Council

3:00PM - Barre City Council

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Williamstown Select

10:00PM - Williamstown Select

Thursday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Williamstown Select

9:00AM - Williamstown Select

12:00PM - Williamstown Select

2:00PM - Community Bulletin

3:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

10:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

Friday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Barre Unified Union School

9:00AM - Barre Unified Union School

12:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

3:00PM - Barre Town Select

5:30PM - Community Bulletin

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

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7:00PM - Barre Town Select

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Saturday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Barre Town Select

9:00AM - Barre Town Select

12:00PM - Barre Town Select

3:00PM - Community Bulletin

4:00PM - 7:00PM - State House

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7:00PM - Democracy Now!

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10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Sunday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

CHARTER COMMUNICATIONS OF BARRE

ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

CVTV Channel 192 • BARRE, VT

Wednesday - Art and Music

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - Art and Music Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - Art and Music Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - Art and Music Programs

Thursday - International and Multicultural

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - International and Multicultural

Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - International and Multicultural

Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - International and Multicultural

Programs

Friday - Local Vermont and Conversation

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also

be viewed online at cvtv723.org

6:00AM - 7:00PM - Church Services

Monday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00AM - State House Programming

9:00AM - State House Programming

12:00PM - State House Programming

3:00PM - Plainfield Select

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Plainfield Select

10:00PM - Plainfield Select

Tuesday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Plainfield Select

9:00AM - Plainfield Select

12:00PM - Plainfield Select

3:00PM to 5:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre City Council “Live”

10:00PM - Barre City Council

“All schedules are subject to

change, please call us

with questions - 479-1075.”

Saturday - Education and Nature

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Barre Congregational Church

8:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

9:00AM - 6:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 10:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

10:00PM - Local Sports

11:00PM - 12:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

Sunday - Church Services and Spirituality

6:00AM - 2:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

2:00PM - New England Cooks

3:00PM - 7:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

7:00PM - 12:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

Monday - Science

6:00AM - 3:00PM - Science Programs

3:00PM - Local Sports

4:00AM - 6:00PM - Science Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00AM - 12:00PM - Science Programs

Tuesday - History

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - History Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent

Global News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - History Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest

8:00PM - 12:00PM - History Programs

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org

MORETOWN- Mad River Chorale. Rehearsals at Harwood

Union H.S., Mon., 7-9PM. Info: 496-2048.

MORRISVILLE- “The Role of Power, Authority & Control in

Groups” Monthly Meeting, Morristown Centennial Library, 20

Lower Main St. 1st Tues. 5:30PM-7PM. Info: gerette@dreamhavenvt.com.

Overeaters Anonymous, 12-step program for people who identify

as overeaters, compulsive eaters, food addicts, anorexics,

bulimics, etc. All welcome; no dues or fees. Info re: place & time:

863-2655.

River Arts Events, Photo Co-op Drop-in 3rd Thurs., 6PM-8PM.

$5 suggested donation. Poetry Clinic Drop-in 1st & 3rd Tues.,

6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

NORTHFIELD- Bingo, Northfield Senior Center. Mon., 4PM.

Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program, Ages 12-18. Edward F Knapp

State Airport Passenger Terminal, Tues, 6-8:30PM. Info: info.

vt033@vtcap.org.

Clogging & Irish Step Lessons, w/Green Mountain Cloggers,

ages 8-78. Sun., 5-8PM. Info: 522-2935.

Playgroup, United Church of Northfield. Wed., 9:30-11AM. Held

only when school in session. Info: 262-3292 x113.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Northfield Police, 110 Wall

St., 485-9181. Get rid of old or unused.

PLAINFIELD- Community Supper Support Group, Grace

United Methodist Church. 4th Tues., 6PM-7PM. Info: michaelbix@gmail.com.

Cardio Funk Class. At the Community Center. Fri., 5-6PM. Info:

email shannonkellymovement@gmail.com.

Cutler Memorial Library Activities, Classic Book Club: 1st

Mon., 6PM; Tuesday Night Knitters (except 1st Tues.). Info:

454-8504.

Diabetes Discussion & Support Group, Everyone welcome. The

Health Center conf. room, 3rd Thurs., 1:30PM. Info:322-6600.

RANDOLPH- Health Support Groups, Maple Leaf Room at

Gifford Medical Center. Tobacco Cessation Program regularly

offers four-week “Quit in Person” group sessions. Info: 728-7714.

Caregiver Support Group, Gifford Medical Center. 2-3PM.

Meets 2nd Wed. of the month. Info: 728-7781.

Diabetes Management Program, Kingwood Health Center

(lower level conf. room), 1422 VT Route 66. Thurs., 10-12:30PM.

Six week program for people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. Info/

register: 728-7714.

continued on next page

www.pointfm.com

NORTHFIELD- Liquid Mind: Abstractions by

Jennifer Bryan (above), an exhibition featuring a colorful

selection of abstract paintings by Norwich alumna

Jennifer Bryan ’05, with an opening reception from 5 to 7

p.m. on Friday, June 4. On display until December 10,

2021.

RANDOLPH- Changing Seasons: Innovations After

70 A new exhibit counters the bias that new ideas are

mostly generated by the young by showcasing artists who

have been working for seven decades or longer. Oct.

3-Nov. 6. At the Chandler Gallery located at 71 N. Main

St., and during exhibits is open from noon to 5 p.m.

Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday. For more

information, visit chandler-arts.org, email outreach@

chandler-arts.org, or call 802-728-9878.

STOWE- Meleko Mokgosi: Scripto-Visual June 17 -

November 13, 2021. Meleko Mokgosi’s large-scale, figurative,

and often text-based works engage history painting

and cinematic tropes to uncover notions of colonialism,

democracy, and liberation across African history. Join us

for the opening with an artist talk and Q&A at 5pm on

Thursday, June 17. Open to the public; masks are required.

WAITSFIELD- Fluid Expressions the annual awards

show by the Vermont Watercolor Society, completes the

2021 exhibition season at the Festival Gallery. 30 outstanding

paintings were selected as eligible for awards

in this exclusive exhibition. Free to the public, and made

possible through a collaboration between the Vermont

Watercolor Society and Mad River Valley Arts. The

exhibition runs from October 22 to December 17. The

Festival Gallery located at #2 Village Square is open on

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 1pm to 5pm. The

show with the award winners can also be viewed online

at the VWS website www.vtwatercolor.org starting in

November. For information: 802-496-6682 or info@

madrivervalleyarts.org.

page 20 The WORLD November 3, 2021

ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA

• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedules subject to change without notice.

ORCA Media Channel 1075

Public Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, Nov 3

6:00a The Moonlighters

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Vermont Humanities Council

10:00a Moccasin Tracks

11:00a Bill Doyle on VT Issues

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Stop Line 3 March and Rally

3:00p The Peoples Law School

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Octagon St. Laveau

6:30p Celluloid Mirror

7:00p Good Mental Health

8:00p Wednesday Night Live

10:00p Bread and Puppet Theater

11:00p Bear Pond Books Events

Thursday, Nov 4

6:00a Bread and Puppet Theater

7:00a Abled to Cook

7:30a Octagon St. Laveau

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a 251 Club of Vermont 66th Annual

Meeting

10:00a COVID Comic Relief & Music Show

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Bear Pond Books Events

2:30p Kellogg-Hubbard Library

3:30p Vermont Land Trust

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Hunger Mountain Coop Annual Meeting

10:00p Senior Moments

11:00p The Peoples Law School

Friday, Nov 5

6:00a Senior Moments

7:00a Good Mental Health

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Abled and on Air

10:00a All Things LGBTQ

11:00a Talking About Movies

11:30a Celluloid Mirror

12:00p Brunch with Bernie

1:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

2:00p Hunger Mountain Coop Annual Meeting

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Vermont Humanities Council

7:00p Moccasin Tracks

8:00p Gay USA

9:00p COVID Comic Relief & Music Show

11:00p St. Laveau's World Cinema

11:30p The Music Zone with Pitz Quattrone

Saturday, Nov 6

6:00a Vermont Institute of Community and

International Involvement

7:30a The Music Zone with Pitz Quattrone

8:00a Hunger Mountain Coop Annual Meeting

10:00a Green Mountain Monteverdi Ensemble

of Vermont

12:00p Senior Moments

2:00p COVID Comic Relief & Music Show

4:00p St. Laveau's World Cinema

4:30p Roman Catholic Mass

5:00p Washington Baptist Church

6:00p Good Mental Health

7:00p Vermont Humanities Council

8:00p All Things LGBTQ

9:00p Banter and Beans/Vote for Vermont

10:30p Betty St. Laveau's House of Horror

Sunday, Nov 7

6:00a Vermont Land Trust

7:30a St. Laveau's World Cinema

8:00a Bear Pond Books Events

9:30a Washington Baptist Church

10:30a Roman Catholic Mass

11:00a Modern Times Theater

12:00p 251 Club of Vermont 66th Annual

Meeting

1:00p The Moonlighters

3:00p The Music Zone with Pitz Quattrone

3:30p Vermont Institute of Community and

International Involvement

5:00p Banter and Beans/Vote for Vermont

6:00p Dr. John Campbell

7:00p Green Mountain Monteverdi Ensemble

of Vermont

8:30p Abled and on Air

9:30p Octagon St. Laveau

10:00p Kellogg-Hubbard Library

Monday, Nov 8

6:00a Kellogg-Hubbard Library

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Banter and Beans/Vote for Vermont

10:00a The Peoples Law School

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p ORCA Media Board Meeting

2:00p Crowdsourced Cinema VT Jurassic Park

4:00p Modern Times Theater

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Moccasin Tracks

7:00p Good Mental Health

8:00p Stop Line 3 March and Rally

10:00p Abled to Cook

10:30p Vermont Institute of Community and

International Involvement

Tuesday, Nov 9

6:00a Stop Line 3 March and Rally

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Crowdsourced Cinema VT Jurassic Park

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p All Things LGBTQ

2:00p Bread and Puppet Theater

3:00p Abled to Cook

3:30p Green Mountain Monteverdi Ensemble

of Vermont

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Abled and on Air

7:00p Vermont Land Trust

8:30p Celluloid Mirror

9:00p The Moonlighters

11:00p ORCA Media Board Meeting

ORCA Media Channel 1095

Education Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, Nov 3

12:00p North Branch Nature Center

2:00p First Wednesdays

4:00p HANDS in the Dirt

6:30p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

LIVE

Thursday, Nov 4

12:00p Harwood Unified

4:00p North Branch Nature Center

7:00p Norwich University Military Writers’

Symposium LIVE

10:00p Washington Central Union School

Board

Friday, Nov 5

12:00p Washington Central Union School

Board

3:00p GMALL Lectures

10:30p Game of the Week

Saturday, Nov 6

12:00p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

3:00p North Branch Nature Center

5:00p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

District

9:30p Vermont State Colleges Board of

Trustees

Sunday, Nov 7

12:00p Orange Southwest School District

2:00p Randolph TCC School Board

7:00p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

Monday, Nov 8

12:00p White River Valley Supervisory

Union

2:30p White River Unified District Board

5:30p Randolph TCC School Board

6:30p VT State Board of Education

Tuesday, Nov 9

12:00p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified

District

4:30p Orange Southwest School District

6:30p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

8:30p White River Valley Supervisory Union

10:30p White River Unified District Board

ORCA Media Channel 1085

Government Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wed, Nov 3

6:00a Bethel Selectboard

9:30a Rochester Selectboard

11:00a Press Conference

1:30p Moretown Selectboard

4:30p Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

6:30p Montpelier City Council LIVE

Thu, Nov 4

6:00a Middlesex Selectboard

8:30a Montpelier Social and Economic

Justice Advisory Committee

10:00a Calais Selectboard

1:30p Central Vermont Public Safety

Authority

4:00p Central Vermont Fiber

6:00p Waterbury Selectboard

10:00p Press Conference

Fri, Nov 5

6:00a Berlin Selectboard

8:30a Berlin Development Review Board

10:30a Vermont State House

1:00p Green Mountain Care Board

8:00p Rochester Selectboard

9:30p Randolph Selectboard

Sat, Nov 6

6:00a Cannabis Control Board

11:00a Press Conference

1:30p Randolph Selectboard

4:00p Vermont State House

6:30p Calais Selectboard

9:30p Green Mountain Care Board

Sun, Nov 7

6:00a Waterbury Selectboard

8:30a Berlin Selectboard

11:00a Berlin Development Review Board

2:00p Montpelier Social and Economic

Justice Advisory Committee

3:00p Montpelier Planning Commission

5:00p Montpelier Design Review Committee

6:30p Montpelier Development Review

Board

9:30p Montpelier City Council

Mon, Nov 8

6:00a Moretown Selectboard

8:30a Middlesex Selectboard

11:00a Press Conference

2:00p Bethel Selectboard

5:30p Montpelier Planning Commission

LIVE

8:30p Cannabis Control Board

Tue, Nov 9

6:00a Cannabis Control Board

10:00a Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

12:00p Press Conference

2:30p Vermont State House

5:30p Montpelier Design Review Committee

7:00p Montpelier Development Review

Board

10:00p Central Vermont Public Safety

Authority

Community Media (802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net/schedules


New Business Forum, Vermont Tech Enterprise Center, 1540 VT

Rte 66, 2nd Weds., 11:30AM-1PM. Info: 728-9101.

Cancer Support Group, Gifford Conference Ctr, 2nd Tues.,

9:30-11AM. Info:728-2270.

Storytime. Kimball Library. Wed., 11AM, ages 2-5; Toddlertime,

Fri., 10:30AM; Gathering for handwork, 2nd & 4th Mon.,

6PM.

Pregnancy and Post-Partum Support Group - For those struggling

with anxiety or depression related to pregnancy, Gifford

Health Care is here to help. Every Tuesday from 1:30 p.m. – 3:00

p.m., in the conference room at Gifford Medical Center. If you

have questions or would like to enroll, email ESchleif@giffordhealthcare.org,

SRoberts@giffordhealthcare.org or call Sarah

Roberts at 728-2372.

WAITSFIELD- Community Acupuncture Night, Free assessment

and treatment. Donations welcome. Three Moons Wellness,

859 Old County Rd., 2nd fl., last Weds., 4-7PM. RSVP: 272-

3690.

WARREN- Knit & Play, Warren Public Library. Bring your kids

and your projects. All levels. Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM.

WASHINGTON- Central VT ATV Club, Washington Fire

Station, 3rd Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 224-6889.

Calef Mem. Library Activities, Art and Adventure w/ April:

3rd Sat., 1PM; Storytime: Mon., 11AM; Tech Help Drop-In:

Sat., 10AM-2PM. Info: 883-2343.

WATERBURY- Waterbury Public Library Activities, Preschool

Story Time: Thurs., 10AM. Baby and Toddler Story Time: Mon.,

10AM. Crafts: Tues., 3-4PM. Info: 244-7036.

WATERBURY CTR- Bible Study Group, Waterbury Ctr. Grange.

Sun., 5-6PM. Bring bible, coffee provided. Info: 498-4565.

WEBSTERVILLE- Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs,

Barretown Police, 149 Websterville Rd., 479-0508. Get rid of old

or unused meds.

WEST TOPSHAM- Bible Study, New Hope Methodist Church,

2 Gendron Rd. Wed., 6:30PM.

WORCESTER- Knitting Night, The Wool Shed, Tues., 6:30-

8:30PM.

Friday, November 5

EAST HARDWICK- Turkey Bingo at the Caledonia Grange #9,

88 East Church Street. 6:30pm. Free entrance, cards are two for

$1. Info: moderntimestheater@gmail.com, 472-8987.

WATERBURY CENTER- The Waterbury Center Community

Church will host its Annual Santa Sale, next to the Cider Mill

from 9am to 5 pm. Do your Christmas shopping early. We will

have rooms filled with Christmas items, gift shop, craft shop, and

a bake sale, a great variety of homemade cookies, and maple

baked beans. Masks are a must. Come check us out.

Saturday, November 6

GREESNBORO- The Wicked Fine Players! at the Highland

Center for the Arts, 7:00 PM. Tickets are $20. For info: www.

highlandartsvt.org.

MONTPELIER- Simply Crafts craft fair hosted by the National

Life Recreation Association is back! 10am-3pm. 40 artists and

crafters. Silent auction to benefit a local charity. Join us for

incredible local holiday shopping! At the National Life building.

RANDOLPH- JigJam an award-winning quartet from the heart

of the Midlands in Ireland, will bring their unique blend of traditional

Irish music with bluegrass and Americana to the Chandler

stage at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 with reserved seating to allow for

social distancing. The performance will also be streamed live at

chandler-arts.org and on Facebook.

WATERBURY CENTER- Annual Santa Sale The Waterbury

Center Community Church will host its Annual Santa Sale, next

to the Cider Mill from 9am to 3pm. Do your Christmas shopping

early. We will have rooms filled with Christmas items, gift shop,

craft shop, and a bake sale, a great variety of homemade cookies,

and maple baked beans. Masks are a must. Come check us out.

WILLIAMSTOWN- Harvest Supper Take out only - pick-up

between 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM - $13.00 per meal. At the

Williamstown United Federated Church. Call to order for pick-up

time: 802-433-5382. Baked ham, baked beans, scalloped potatoes,

cole slaw, winter squash, rolls and apple squares for dessert.

Sunday, November 7

GREENSBORO- Harvest Barter Fair, 2-4pm, Lakeview

Elementary 189 Lauredon Avenue. Bring items that you have

grown, preserved, baked, or raised to swap with neighbors. Items

will be swapped on a one for one basis. Bring items with an estimated

value of $5, or $5 increments. Info at swapsisters@gmail.

com or 755-6336.

NORTHFIELD- Breakfast Buffet 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Open to the

public! $12.00 adults, $6.00 (children under 10). Eggs and

omelets made to order, pancakes, French toast, chipped beef on

toast, corned beef hash, bacon, sausage, home fries, fruit, juice,

coffee, tea and more! Bar opens at 10 a.m. with specials on

Bloody Mary’s and Mimosas!

Wednesday, November 10

ONLINE- How to Overcome Overwhelm this Holiday Season

5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Free UVM Health Network Webinar. Drs.

Eckhaus and Steward will share evidence-based ways to increase

resilience throughout the ups and downs of the season and address

frequently asked questions around this topic. Register at www.

UVMHealth.org/Healthsource6.

Friday, November 12

BARRE- Tom Papa 8 p.m. at The Barre Opera House. Since

working for several years as Jerry Seinfeld’s opener Papa has

become one of comedy’s top voices with Netflix specials, a podcast,

guest appearances on “Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me.” $25-35.

Call the box office at 802-476-8188 or order online at www.

barreoperahouse.org.

NORTHFIELD- Ladies Night Out at the American Legion Post

63. 7 to 10 p.m. Featuring karaoke with Levi Beach, Friday

Night Grill open 5 to 7 p.m. Open to the public. No cover

charge, 21 and up.

Saturday, November 13

BARRE- The Wailin’ Jennys at the Barre Opera House. One of

folk/roots music’s most beloved groups, the Jennys, offer showstopping

harmonies, impressive instrumental prowess, breathtaking

songs and witty stage banter. $36-42. Call the box office at

802-476-8188 or order online at www.barreoperahouse.org.

BROOKFIELD- 19th Annual Hunter’s Breakfast 7:00 am -

11:00 am. At the First Congregational Church of Brookfield, at

the corner of Ridge Road and RT 65. Breakfast includes: plain or

blueberry pancakes, french toast, scrambled eggs, bacon, home

fries, orange juice, coffee and tea. Adults: $8, children: $5. A bake

sale will be available.

CHELSEA- Roast Beef Supper with homemade apple crisp.

5-7PM. Take out only. $15 adults, $7.50 children under 12. Call

for pickup time: Josh Sherman 802-685-2048. Order by Nov. 10.

Presented by the United Church of Chelsea.

MONTPELIER- Story Walk and Bundle Up Story Time with

authors Sarah Dillard and Amy Huntington. Start at Bear Pond

Books, pick up a map that directs you to view pages of Amy’s

Frankie Gets A Doggie posted in shop windows ending at TW

Wood Gallery, 46 Barre St. At 11:00, authors / illustrators will be

at the TW Wood, signing their books and reading from picture

books featured in the The Art of Stories: A Vermont Picture Book

Exhibit that will be on view in the gallery.

Pianist Michael Arnowitt 3pm at Bethany Church. Donation

suggested. Advance reservations are requested by calling 802-

229-0984 or emailing MA@MAPiano.com.

WATERBURY- Eleva Chamber Players presents The

Harmonious Harp Eleva will also be joined by Vermont’s preeminent

flutist Karen Kevra and clarinetist Dan Liptak. 7:00 pm

at the United Church of Christ/Waterbury Congregational Church,

8 North Main Street. Tickets will be available at https://www.

elevachamberplayers.com or at the door.

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

Fax:

(802)479-7916

403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

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November 3, 2021 The WORLD page 21


In Lieu of Flowers

By Morgan W. Brown

(Remember and Care for the Living)

For those living unhoused,

abandoned to the streets,

left to live in the woods,

underneath bridges,

sleep in dumpsters and the like;

it is far too late to think of,

remember fondly, send flowers

or otherwise honor and memorialize them

after they have languished and died from lying wet,

frozen, alone and forgotten,

due to deliberate indifference

as well as from a lack

of sufficient caring and empathy

by their fellow human beings.

A Dead Leaf

By Wayne F. Burke

on the sidewalk

leaves an imprint then

slides away

to be dead

elsewhere,

among a heap

maybe

in rooftop gutter, or

cul de sac, or

other; else

to wander aimlessly

pushed hither and

thither (more hither) by the

wind, that

tore the leaf

from the tree

and brought it

to the sidewalk.

Steel By Kimberly Madura

Unknowable.

Austere.

Aloof.

Unsympathetic.

Steel is avenging.

And, there can be hidden messages.

This time it simply says

“you are unforgiven.”

Endless Play By Corinne Davis

As I scan the sky throughout the day

I realize I’m watching an endless play

When I look up I cannot help but feel fine

As I am gently nudged to remember the divine

Early morning the color array is bright

As the sun peaks through to end the night

And then there is a fog to sometimes break through

Which permeates its own tranquilizing hue

The cast of characters throughout the hills and trees

Leave me breathless as I welcome the breeze

The shapes and dyes blend so pleasingly well

Regardless of the story it is trying to tell

The colors grab at me as I descend the hill

My wanting to stop and just be still

Not wanting to leave this place of mine

And knowing that others will too soon find

I climb to the top of the mountain each day

Eager to view natures endless displays

Fall

By Wayne F. Burke

Last yellow leaves of the

season falling from the old

tree: grandmother-fingers of

tree limbs letting them go,

the leaves, dive-bombing,

slaloming, dropping like

acrobats on descent and

littering the ground where

they hop, wave, and

flop – pave a golden trail:

become mulch in the blades

of a lawnmower, or else

live to a rusty old age and

molder in the ground.

In Your Heart By Old George

I love you with all my heart.

In the valley flowers will bloom.

From my heart I’ll pick them for you.

Though in you heart I will never be.

I try with a heart that’s true.

But I’ll never hear you say I love you.

Broken is my heart.

So lonely for you.

But I’ll never hear you say I love you.

Through in your heart I will never be.

But in love with you I will always be.

Fibromyalgia

By Corinne Davis

Fibromyalgia, what is this for?

I am asking the Lord to show me more

This chronic illness comes and goes

To look at me you would never know

Although when it flares up really bad

I am very quiet and my expression is sad

I guess I get very lonely too

The depression comes on and then I am blue

I always go through this when it’s at its worst

It sneaks up on me like a witch’s curse

People ask me “what is this disease?”

I hand them the book – read it please

One day you’re fine, the other you’re not

It ties me up in a tenuous knot

Non-restorative sleep is one of the signs

Although with medicine I do just fine

Another one is chronic fatigue

So when activities come up they’re out of my league

My body constantly aches with pain

But with moderate exercise there is some gain

The sensitivity that I have to the cold

Sends me hibernating and feeling old

They say there is something going on in the brain

That sets me off from being sane

My emotions run high and then way low

And when it is done there is nowhere to go

People tend to like me but don’t understand

Why I can’t keep up when others can

This is so very weird to me

To live a life of futility

I know in a few days I’ll be back on my feet

Back in denial of my pending defeat

The Lords Throne By Old George

Be thankful for the time we had.

An angel sent down from heaven.

But for awhile.

For me do not feel sad.

Think of the fun we had.

Before I went back home to god.

While having fun with friends,

that I loved best.

Near this tree I went to my eternal rest.

My final moments with friends,

that were the best.

Upon golden angel wings.

I took my final journey home

Now I rest upon the Lords Throne.

Kind Stranger By Old George

Do not look down on others.

Only god sits that high.

There may be a kind stranger

that you do not know.

Sent to bring a heavenly message.

Of a friend called home too soon.

On the meadow, where flowers grow.

Will soon be covered in snow.

Oh please don’t leave me,

so lonely ‘neath the snow.

‘Neath the tree I’ll be so lonely so cold.

The highest honor

on me you can bestow.

Is to make a sculpture of me of snow.

To warm me ‘neath this snow.

So that I will know.

From you heart, I will never go.

Color Scheme By Corinne Davis

Fireworks burst across the valley and hills, up my spine runs a quivering chill

The air is clean and the breeze is crisp, mountainsides fill with a delectable bliss

Pigeons serenade uttering tranquil tones of content while sunning a top a roof

Boastfully they adorn their shimmering scarves of purple and green appearing to be smug or aloof

Families tighten up the house and yard, ready from jack frost to guard

The leaves crunch beneath our feet, like frosted flakes a special treat

Little girls set up with Grandma Halloween villages and scenes, she twirls in her prettiest dress, she will be a

princess queen

Grampa is on his tractor bringing wood to stack in the shed, in winter down the trail his two boys will sled

Apple cider and cinnamon tea, long country rides does the eye please

Chicken pie suppers sprout up in every town, not a seat left as family and friends gather round

Sweet yellow corn sold from the tailgate of a truck, a break from chores to earn a few extra bucks

Sunflowers lean forward from their overwhelming weight, last minute repairs to mend fences and gates

A puppy plops down into a delightful mud puddle bath as hikers take to the woods to travel endless paths

The sun fades early evening, flannel shirts come out, what to wear is always in doubt

Leaves fall like confetti from the bountiful trees, all in flight once there comes a breeze

Tourist arrive in droves to savor the majestic colors, Vermont noted for this unlike any other

Concepts Kakuro

Best described as a number

crossword, the task in

Kakuro is to fill all of the

empty square, using numbers

1 to 9, so the sum of

each horizontal lock equals

the number to its left, and

the sum of each vertical

block equals the number

on its top. No number may

be used in the same block

more than once.

page 22 The WORLD November 3, 2021


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GO FIGURE

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November 3, 2021 The WORLD page 23


WORLD SPORTS & OUTDOORS

Survey Takes Stock of Native Tree Production

Using locally sourced native plant material for forest restoration

projects results in more successful plantings, minimizes

risk of introducing invasive pests and disease pathogens and

translates to economic benefits for the state and local communities.

However, as a recent survey discovered, Vermont is

experiencing a shortage of native tree seedlings for restoration

work, and demand is expected to increase by more than half

in the next 5-10 years.

To quantify the native tree seedling shortage in Vermont,

restoration practitioners from Lake Champlain Sea Grant and

the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently conducted a survey

targeting existing and aspiring native tree nursery operators

specializing in native trees for riparian forest and wetland

restoration projects. The survey complements earlier work

(https://go.uvm.edu/plant-source) exploring plant material

sourcing needs among restoration organizations like watershed

groups and conservation districts.

For this latest survey, the researchers collected data on the

number of units, type (e.g., bare-root, container or other type),

size and species grown and/or sold annually. Nursery operators

also were asked whether they are able to meet current

demand, if they would expand if they had the resources and

about the challenges and limitations they face that impact

production.

A total of 18 individuals, representing seven existing nurseries

and 11 aspiring growers, responded to the survey, conducted

by Alison Adams and Annalise Carington. Adams is

Cyanobacteria Blooms are Continuing into Fall

New Perry Hill Trail Extension Promotes Trail Sustainability and Improves User Experience

Waterbury Area Trails Alliance (WATA) and The Vermont

Department of Forests, Parks, and Recreation (FPR), which

owns and manages the Perry Hill Block within the CC Putnam

State Forest, are excited to announce the opening of a 1,500-

foot extension to the Six Flags Trail at Perry Hill. The new

section of multi-use mountain bike trail will connect Joe’s

Trail to the Main Climb and will support mountain biking and

pedestrian activities. The new trail section will allow for the

closure of the Duct Tape Trail which was receiving limited

use and required a high degree of annual maintenance.

FPR and WATA have been working together to evaluate the

Perry Hill Trail network and identify projects that will

increase trail sustainability and improve user experience. This

trail realignment provides for increased expert-level riding in

a section of the network that has seen lower use over the

years. It is hoped that the new trail alignment and features will

attract increased use to this area of the parcel, more evenly

distributing use across the network.

“This modification to the network was a really strong proposal

from WATA,” said FPR Forest Recreation Specialist

Walter Opuszynski. “This is an example of one of our partners

recognizing they had a trail on the network that did not meet

sustainable trail specifications. They found a creative solution

that also improves the trail user experience and strengthens

the network as a whole.”

Trail construction work was performed by Ide Ride, a

Vermont-based trail building company, as well as groups of

volunteers. Most of the upper portion of the new trail tread is

constructed on bedrock, bringing a unique experience to

users. Given the steep rock roll-out and challenging topography,

Six Flags is rated a double black diamond and is likely to

become a Perry Hill classic similar to the experience found on

Joe’s Trail.

John Duston, WATA Program Director, recognizes the

importance of the effort: “This new section is an incredible

example of what Perry Hill has to offer. The community has

page 24 The WORLD November 3, 2021

the watershed forestry coordinator for Lake Champlain Sea

Grant and University of Vermont Extension. Carington works

as a conservation specialist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife

Service and the Intervale Center in Burlington.

According to the survey, annual plant material sales for

Foliage season is in full swing and the

summer heat is fast becoming a memory, but

health officials want Vermonters to still be on

the lookout for cyanobacteria blooms and

avoid any they see.

“Cyanobacteria blooms most often occur in

the summer months, but they have been

reported as late as November in recent years,”

said Bridget O’Brien, an environmental

health scientist with the Department of

Health. “People continue to be out enjoying

the state’s waters, so it’s important to be

aware that cyanobacteria may still be present,

and to keep children and pets away from

blooms along the shorelines.”

Cyanobacteria are tiny microorganisms

that are a natural part of fresh water ecosystems.

Under certain conditions – including

warm, sunny weather – cyanobacteria can

multiply quickly, creating blooms on the

water’s surface that can wash up along shorelines.

They can produce toxins harmful to

humans and animals that may cause skin

rashes, diarrhea, a sore throat, stomach problems,

or more serious health problems.

Children and pets are at higher risk because

they are more likely to drink the water while

swimming or playing, and pets may lick the

cyanobacteria off their fur.

Climate change has increased water temperatures

by 2°F to 7°F in Lake Champlain

over the past 50 years and extended the warm

season by several weeks. This and other factors

provide favorable conditions for continued

cyanobacteria blooms.

“If you come into contact with water that

may contain cyanobacteria, rinse off as soon

as possible,” said O’Brien. “If you get your

drinking water from a lake or a pond, be sure

to treat it. Don’t use untreated water for

drinking, cooking, showering or bathing, or

for brushing your teeth.”

O’Brien said it’s important to know what to

look for. Blooms are usually green or bluegreen

and can often make the water look like

pea soup or spilled paint, but they can be

other colors and consistencies too. A video of

cyanobacteria and photos of what is and isn’t

a bloom are available at healthvermont.gov/

cyanobacteria.

If you think you see a bloom, you can send

in a report and upload photos to the Health

Department using this online form. People

heading to the water can check the

Cyanobacteria Tracker map for where blooms

have been reported – but remember that

bloom conditions can and do change rapidly.

If you think you see a cyanobacteria

bloom:

• Avoid contact with the water.

• Do not let children, pets or livestock swim

in or drink the water.

• If you come in contact with cyanobacteria,

rinse off thoroughly as soon as possible.

• Talk with your health care provider if you

have concerns from possible exposure.

Learn more about cyanobacteria at healthvermont.gov/cyanobacteria.

• • •

• • •

restoration projects, including from both in-state and out-ofstate

nurseries, totaled approximately 133,000 units this year.

Around 50 percent of total sales (66,000 stems) came from

stock purchased from out-of-state nurseries for resale in

Vermont.

The majority (115,300 stems) of all stems sold were bareroot,

the preferred plant type for restoration projects due to the

lower cost and ease of transport. Of the out-of-state sales,

64,000 were bare-root stems, representing 56 percent of all

bare-root material sold.

Among the limitations cited by growers were the availability

of seed and cuttings for propagation, lack of knowledge

about proper seed and cuttings collection protocols and handling

techniques and cost of specialized equipment for seed

processing and storage. All existing nurseries that responded

indicated that they would expand production if they had the

capital and other resources.

The survey concluded that while restoration projects help

improve water quality, the ecological benefits to sourcing

trees locally also are significant, including locally adapted

genetics of trees and limiting risk of spreading pests and

pathogens. Developing a larger in-state nursery labor force

will help meet the rapidly growing demand for local native

plant material and keep dollars spent on trees in Vermont.

To learn more, go to https://go.uvm.edu/tree-stock or tune

into a recent podcast produced by the Watershed Forestry

Partnership at https://go.uvm.edu/native-tree-shortage.

Vermont and the USDA Forest Service Sign an

Agreement for Shared Stewardship

The state of Vermont and the USDA Forest

Service signed an Agreement for Shared

Stewardship, strengthening their commitment

to collaborative land management efforts

throughout the state. The signatories on the

agreement were Julie Moore, Secretary,

Agency of Natural Resources and Randy

Moore, Chief of the USDA Forest Service.

The agreement establishes a framework to

allow the state and the Forest Service to work

collaboratively on forest management. This

includes outdoor recreation, which has been

essential to many American’s health and wellness

during the pandemic.

“The agreement signed today is a reflection

of the spirit of cooperation between the

been looking for more technical trails and by finding this vein of

rock coupled with the talents of Ide Ride Builders, we now have a

fantastic new section of trail in this State Forest”.

Agency and the USDA Forest Service that

extends back decades,” Secretary Moore said.

“Further, it solidifies our partnership for

future leaders in both agencies and ensures

synergy for true conservation of forests and

other natural resources which rely on our

forests, including clean air and water, wildlife,

plants and fish.”

“Shared Stewardship strengthens our commitment

to coordinating and prioritizing forest

management activities using our collective

resources and authorities,” said Chief

Moore. “With a collaborative approach, our

efforts will continue to provide abundant

resources and diverse habitats in the state of

Vermont.”

The federal, state, and private land managers

in Vermont face a range of urgent challenges,

among them catastrophic storms,

flooding, insect and disease outbreaks, invasive

species and increasing use from the

public. These challenges must be met with

proactive measures across all lands to ensure

the future of healthy and resilient forests.

Through working together, developing

joint priorities, and using collective authorities,

the state and the Forest Service can be

sure that the scale of the work will match the

scale of the challenge. With a collaborative

approach, we can do more to ensure forests

continue to provide clean air and water,

diverse plant and animal habitat, and support

strong and resilient communities.

“We tip our visor to WATA and FPR for such a wonderful

trail,” said WATA business partner Noah Tautfest

of Bicycle Express. “It’s a really good addition to the

network and it’s great to see a technical trail being

built. This is what our community has been waiting

for.”

The total cost of this construction project was

$18,000. Annual WATA membership dues, along with

the generosity of local business partners, helped cover

the construction cost.

WATA is currently working with volunteers to perform

the closeout work on Duct Tape Trail. Close-out

work will include the installation of multiple water

bars, the removal of culverts and bridges, and revegetation

work that will support the old trail returning to a

more natural condition. It is estimated that this work

will take 90 hours of volunteer labor. If you would like

to join in these efforts, please visit https://www.waterburytrails.com/events

to see upcoming trail work

dates.

Founded by a dedicated and skilled group of local

leaders in 2015, Waterbury Area Trails Alliance

(WATA) is the third largest Vermont Mountain Bike

Association chapter with over 1300 members. WATA is

a primarily volunteer-run organization that builds and

maintains trails for a healthy, vibrant, and sustainable

future. WATA represents a growing segment of trail

users and businesses that are committed to enhancing

and maintaining our Waterbury area trails for the benefit

of residents and visitors alike.

The Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation

(FPR) is responsible for the conservation and management

of Vermont’s forest resources, the operation and

maintenance of the State Park system, and the promotion

and support of outdoor recreation for Vermonters

and our visitors.


WORLD SPORTS & OUTDOORS

Winter Sports in Vermont Schools

Are a Go; Here Are the Details

By CompassVermont.com

Secretary of the Vermont Agency of Natural

Resources, Julie Moore, has announced

recommendations for winter sports safety in

Vermont schools for the coming season.

Vermont indoor winter school sports include

basketball, bowling, cheer, dance, gymnastics,

ice hockey, indoor track, and wrestling.

Moore introduced the state’s recommendations

by urging all eligible student athletes to

get vaccinated before beginning practices if

they have not done so already.

ei ieine

Girls on the Run Vermont to Raise

Funds to Support Programs

By purchasing a Vermont Wins 50/50 raffle

ticket you support the Girls on the Run

Vermont Every Girl Fund. This fund allows

Girls on the Run Vermont to provide reduced

fees and financial assistance for every girl

who participates to empower more of

Vermont’s young women. Proceeds raised for

Girls on the Run Vermont subsidize the program

fee for all participants. One lucky winner

will receive half of the proceeds raised!

50/50 raffle tickets are available for $20.00

for one ticket or $50.00 for 3 tickets. By purchasing

tickets, you support the future female

Tri-Track Modifieds Coming to Thunder

Road for 2022 Memorial Day Classic

The Tri-Track Open

Modified Series (TTOMS) is

making its first-ever visit to

Barre’s Thunder Road on

Sunday, May 29, 2022. Track

and series officials have

announced the $10,000-towin

Granite Capital 100 as

part of the 59th Mekkelsen

RV Memorial Day Classic.

It will be the first time

Tour-type Modifieds have

competed at Thunder Road

since the 2010 Memorial Day

Classic event. The Granite

Capital 100 is also the inaugural

trip for the Tri-Track

Modifieds to the state of Vermont.

The Tri-Track Modifieds are part of a program

that includes the 59th Memorial Day

Classic for the Maplewood/Irving Oil Late

Models along with the Lenny’s Shoe &

Apparel Flying Tigers, RK Miles Street

Stocks, and Burnett Scrap Metals Road

Warriors. The entire program can be seen live

at the track or worldwide on FloRacing.

The biggest names in Modified racing are

expected to compete on the Barre high banks

for the five-figure top prize. Regulars on the

Tri-Track Open Modifieds include six-time

series champion Matt Hirschman, three-time

NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour champion

Justin Bonsignore, defending Thompson

Icebreaker winner Ron Silk, former Stafford

Speedway champion Woody Pitkat, and 2019

Tri-Track champion Ronnie Williams.

In 2021, Tri-Track officials provided technical

inspection for the Outlaw Open Modified

Series at Connecticut’s Thompson Speedway

Motorsports Park, which is co-sanctioned by

the American-Canadian Tour (ACT). With

Thunder Road also sanctioned by ACT, the

working relationship established at Thompson

Speedway helped lead to Tri-Track joining the

Thunder Road schedule for 2022.

“Wayne Darling, myself, and the entire Tri-

Track Open Modified Series staff and teams

are excited to be heading to this iconic race

track for 2022,” Tri-Track Open Modified

Series managing partner Ed Bennett said.

“We are looking forward to visiting Vermont

and showcasing Modified racing to their

dedicated fan base.”

• • •

• • •

The following are the recommendations

of the Scott Administration, but the ultimate

guidelines remain the responsibility of each

school.

Masks should be worn by all athletes,

coaches, and spectators at all meetings, practices,

scrimmages, and games.

School sports exempted from wearing

masks include running events, gymnastics,

dance, cheer, and wrestling, as masks can

pose a choking hazard if caught on equipment

or impair vision if they accidentally cover an

athlete’s eyes.

Students who have been vaccinated will

not need to quarantine if a COVID-19 exposure

occurs, which was an issue last season.

Unvaccinated students who have been determined

to be in close contact can continue

to practice with their teams as long as they

are regularly tested, but they may not play in

games.

Unvaccinated athletes should be tested at

least once per week.

Spectators are expected to observe all mitigation

guidelines by each school.

Athletes, parents, family, and fans are encouraged

to check with their schools regarding

their mitigation guidelines.

CompassVermont.Com is an independent

publication founded by a native Vermonter,

providing non-editorial news and stories presented

in concert with the culture, mindset,

and values of the Green Mountain State.

leaders of Vermont! You can purchase tickets

from November 1st , 2021 through December

1st, 2021. The winner will be announced on

December 2nd via Instagram, Facebook and

on our website.

Girls on the Run Vermont envisions a

world where every girl knows and activates

her limitless potential, including recognizing

the positive impact she has on the community

in which she lives.

To purchase tickets please go to: www.

gotrvt.org.

Thunder Road will host the 59th Mekkelsen RV Memorial Day

Classic on May 29, 2022, which includes the Classic for the Late

Models, the Tri-Track Open Modified Series, and all local divisions.

(John Raper/Todd Wells photo)

“We know fans have wanted to see Tourtype

Modifieds back at Thunder Road for a

while, and we’re excited to finally make it

happen,” Thunder Road managing partner

Cris Michaud added. “Tri-Track has a topnotch

group of drivers and officials at every

event, and they always put on a good show.

It’s easy to see why they’ve become so popular

among the region’s race fans in such a

short time. With the Memorial Day Classic

plus our local divisions also on the program,

it’s going to be a spectacular holiday racing

weekend.”

The Tri-Track Open Modified Racing

Series was founded in 2014 and just completed

its eighth season of operations. They

wrapped up the 2021 campaign at

Massachusetts’ Seekonk Speedway Saturday,

October 23 with Chase Dowling winning the

event. The series has also held events at

Monadnock Speedway, Stafford Motor

Speedway, Oxford Plains Speedway, and

other tracks throughout New England.

Thunder Road expects to announce its full

2022 racing schedule by Thanksgiving.

Season pass order forms, license application

forms, and other information will be released

shortly thereafter.

For more information, contact the Thunder

Road offices at (802) 244-6963, media@

thunderroadvt.com, or visit www.thunderroadvt.com

or www.tritrackmodifieds.com.

You can also follow us on Facebook and

Twitter at @ThunderRoadVT. For more information

about FloRacing, visit www.

FloRacing.com.

Vermont’s Regular Deer Season

Hunters are gearing up for the start of

Vermont’s traditionally popular 16-day regular

deer season that begins Saturday, November 13

and ends Sunday, November 28.

A hunter may take one legal buck during this

season if they did not already take one during

the archery deer season. The definition of a

legal buck depends on the Wildlife Management

Unit (WMU). A map of the WMUs is on pages

22 and 23 of the 2021 Vermont Hunting &

Trapping Guide available from license agents

statewide.

In WMUs C, D1, D2, E1, E2, G, I, L, M, P,

and Q a legal buck is any deer with at least

one antler three inches or more in length.

In WMUs A, B, F1, F2, H, J1, J2, K, N, and

O a legal buck is any deer with at least one

antler with two or more antler points one inch

in length or longer.

“The greatest numbers of deer continue to

be in western regions of the state and other

valley areas,” said Vermont Fish and

Wildlife’s deer biologist Nick Fortin. “The

Green Mountains and Northeast Kingdom

offer more of a big woods experience with

fewer, but often larger, deer.”

Vermont hunting licenses include a buck

tag for this season and a late season bear tag

(for Nov. 13-21), cost $28 for residents and

$102 for nonresidents. Hunters under 18

years of age get a break at $8 for residents and

$25 for nonresidents. Licenses are available

on Fish and Wildlife’s website and from

license agents statewide.

Fish and Wildlife urges hunters to wear a

fluorescent orange hat and vest to help maintain

Vermont’s very good hunting season

safety record.

A 2021 Deer Hunting Guide can be downloaded

from the department’s website at

Maplefields

Twinfield

Buck Pool

-2021-

Rifle Season

OFFICIAL

VERMONT

WEIGHING

STATION

www.vtfishandwildlife.com. The guide

includes a map of the Wildlife Management

Units (WMUs), season dates, regulations, and

other helpful information.

Hunters who get a deer on November 13 or

14 can help Vermont’s deer management pro-

Hunters who get a deer on opening weekend of

t ov. r on cn rmont

deer management program by reporting their

deer at a biological check station. VTF&W photo

by John Hall.

gram by reporting their deer at one of the

biological check stations listed below that

will be staffed from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.,

unless the store closes earlier:

• Buck Stop Mini Mart – Bennington

• Keith’s Country Store – Pittsford

• R&L Archery – Barre

• Newfane Store – Newfane

• West Enosburg Country Store – Enosburg

Falls

• The Old Fishing Hole – Morrisville

(Saturday only)

• Bob’s Quick Stop – Irasburg

• Lead & Tackle – Lyndon

• Village Grocery & Deli – Waitsfield

• Wright’s Sport Shop – Newport

• Tyson Store - Ludlow

Hunters who do not go to a biological

reporting station are asked to provide a tooth

from their deer. Obtain a tooth envelope from

your regular reporting agent. Remove one of

the middle incisor teeth, being careful to

include the root. Place the tooth in the envelope

and give it to the reporting agent. Each

tooth will be cross sectioned to accurately

determine the deer’s age, and the results will

be posted on the Fish and Wildlife website

next spring.

Cost of each entry will be $5.

All entries must be completed before the

start of Rifle Season

(by MIDNIGHT on November 12th).

Must be a VERMONT BUCK.

Bucks must be checked in at Maplefi elds

or show proof of check-in at another Vermont

reporting station.

Weight will be the checked-in weight of

the fully dressed deer plus three pounds

for each point.

Pool value will be all money collected from

entrants along with additional $500 contributed by

Maplefields & Irving.

Payout of winners will be as follows

• 75% of pool to heaviest overall

• 15% of pool to second heaviest

• 10% of pool to third heaviest

• Additional prizes may be awarded by

random drawing of all entries

Winners will be

contacted on Monday,

Dec. 6, 2021.

Breakfast

Sandwiches

Great Coffee

Last Year’s

Winner

Won Over

$

1100

FOR BREAKFAST.

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November 3, 2021 The WORLD page 25


Start Your Career with Us!

New higher starting rate: $15 per hour

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You may be eligible for a sign-on bonus up to $5,000

Available entry-level positions include

Administrative Assistants • Food Service Workers

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page 26 The WORLD November 3, 2021

WHERE YOU AND

WHERE YOURYOU WORK AND MATTER...

YOUR WORK MATTER...

VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS

VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF BUILDINGS

AND GENERAL SERVICES IS SEEKING A

AND GENERAL SERVICES IS SEEKING BGS CUSTODIAN I

BGS CUSTODIAN Custodian I Middlesex Complex Noon-8:30PM, Monday through Friday.

Custodian Looking for I Middlesex a Team player Complex that’s Noon-8:30PM, able to work inMonday securedthrough area including Friday.

Looking Mental Health for a Team facility, player State that’s Police able Barracks, to work inState secured Records area including Facility.

Background Mental Health clearance facility, is required. State Police RoomBarracks, for advancement State Records in this position. Facility.

Background clearance is required. Room for advancement in this position.

Apply online at humanresources.vermont.gov/careers

Apply online at humanresources.vermont.gov/careers

DEADLINE TO APPLY 10/14/19

DEADLINE TO APPLY 10/14/19

For more information contact:

Sue GallagherFor - 241-6547 more information - sue.gallagher@vermont.gov

contact:

or Ann Sue Courchaine Gallagher --241-6547 241-0221 -sue.gallagher@vermont.gov

ann.courchaine@vermont.gov.

or Ann Courchaine - 241-0221 - ann.courchaine@vermont.gov.

CLASSIFIEDS

GENEROUS PAID TIME OFF

DEADLINE: MONDAY 10:00AM

DISPLAY ADS THURSDAY AT 5:00PM

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • Fax 802-479-7916

Email: sales@vt-world.com

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For Salvador and Babic, P.C.,

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CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED

MISCELLANEOUS

MISCELLANEOUS

ARCHERY

Wants to purchase minerals

and other oil and gas interests.

Send details to P.O. Box

13557 Denver, CO 80201

ANTIQUES/

COLLECTIBLES/

RESTORATION

Last Time Around Antiques

114 No. Main St. Barre.

802-476-8830

GARAGE SALES

FLEA MARKETS

RUMMAGES

ANTIQUE MARKET IS BACK

at The Canadian Club. November

14 & 28, 8am-1pm.

Early Buyers $5(8am) General

$(9am) Call Don Willis

Antiques for more information

802-751-6138

GARAGE SALE Fri and Sat

8-5pm 51 LePage rd. Barre

Town.

MISCELLANEOUS

!! OLD GUITARS WANTED!!

GIBSON, FENDER, MARTIN,

t 0 to 0

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FREE 1-866-433-8277.

$ A1-CASH PAID

Pending the Market

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

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DEALING WITH WATER

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GENERAC Standby Generators.

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HOME

APPLIANCES

WE SELL

REFURBISHED

APPLIANCES

LOW, LOW PRICES!

WE OFFER SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

for Your Mower, Snow Blowers, Lawn Tractors, Etc.

EQUIPMENT MAY BE DROPPED OFF AT OUR STORE

7 Days A Week. Call 479-2541 for More Details

Husqvarna, Craftsman, PoulanPro, MTD Yard Machines

and most other brands

Owned & Operated by Dave & Lu Thomas

1598 US Route 302 Berlin,

Barre, VT 802-479-2541

STORAGE

A STORAGE PLACE

Williamstown

Route 64.

802-505-1921

HUNTING/GUNS/

HELP WANTED

FOR

WINTER

MAINTENANCE

•Experienced Equipment

Operators

•Snow Shoveling

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etc. Call 802-522-8271

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

ANTHRACITE COAL

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Bulk Only

BLACK ROCK COAL

www.blackrockcoal.com

1-800-639-3197

802-223-4385

BEWARE OF The Vermont

Land Trust. You shake hands

with them be sure to count

or fi ner hen o re

done. 802-454-8561.

VS N

FIREWOOD

Green & Seasoned

802-454-1062

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GET READY Vermont Land

rt, ell oin nd

hrle oin ith he

PELPRO 2009 PELLET Stove

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6429.

continued on next page

MMI IS SEEKING

A FULL TIME

WORKER

A motivated individual

who is driven and can

work independently.

Duties are receiving

materials, organizing,

Keeping inventory,

cleaning, light

carpentry skills, and

deliveries. High school

diploma and clean

driving record a must.

Benefits after 90 days

of employment. Send

resume to jamie@

merrillmechanical.com

or call 802-234-0254.

Production Position Available

Must be able to lift up to 50# on a regular basis.

Shift is Full-time, Mon-Thurs 6:00-2:30 and Fri

5-1:30 with OT during busy times. Pay based

on experience. Attendance premium. Benefits

available. Please apply in person to:

Highland Sugarworks 49 Parker Rd. Websterville, VT

No phone calls please.

HIRING

SUBSTITUTES

Barre Unified Union School District is seeking Daily

Substitute Teachers for Barre City Elementary and Middle

School, Barre Town Middle and Elementary School,

Spaulding High School and Central Vermont Career Center.

BUUSD is looking for individuals that are available on an on-call

basis to cover teacher, paraeducator and clerical absences. Our

sstttes mst e eneretc ele frendly professonal

and want to support a positive learning environment.

Substitute duties include:

- Implementing effective classroom management skills;

- Following Teacher’s written lesson plans;

- reparn a rtten smmary of or completed

- Following all policies, rules and procedures to which regular

teachers are subject;

- omplyn t all ldn and safety procedres and

schedules.

nterested canddates sold apply onlne sd.or

dstrctemployment Sara aoralt dmn. sst.

eceptonst

BUUSD is an equal opportunity employer

HIRING

PARAEDUCATORS

Barre Unified Union School District is

seeking araeducators for the

school year.

BUUSD currently has openings for Paraeducators at:

Barre City Elementary & Middle School, Barre Town Middle &

Elementary School, Spaulding High School, and Central Vermont

Career Center. Paraeducators support students and teachers

working one on one and/or with small groups of students

with special needs. Responsibilities will vary depending on

assignment, but typically include:

- Eyes on supervision during class, transition times, and lunch;

- Communication with teachers and case managers;

- One to one support and/or small group support.

e araedcator enefits pacae ncldes a compette

wage and an excellent BCBS Healthcare Plan, Dental Insurance,

Long term Disability, retirement plan, Life Insurance, and tuition

reimbursement. Candidates must have a high school degree/

GED.

Interested candidates should apply online @ buusd.org/

dstrctemployment Se offi dmn. sst. of Specal

Services, sciofbsu@buusd.org

BUUSD is an equal opportunity employer

NORWICH IS HIRING!

Seeking applicants for positions at all levels.

Openings include Building Control Specialist, Assistant

Supervisor of Heating Plant, Grounds Crew Worker,

Custodians and full time administrative support staff. Parttime

positions include Uniform Store Clerk and Accounting

Assistant.

We have a great benefits package! Our excellent benefit

package includes medical, dental, vision, group life,

and disability insurances, flexible-spending accounts for

health and dependent care, a 403(b) retirement plan with

employer match, an employee assistance program, paid

time off, use of the University pool and fitness center, and

tuition scholarships for eligible employees and their family

members. Some employees may qualify for the Public

Service Loan Forgiveness Program on their Federal Student

Aid Direct Loan balance.

Check out these and other great jobs at

https://norwich.interviewexchange.com

November 3, 2021 The WORLD page 27


Community Based Income Tax Specialist

and Site Coordinator

Capstone Community Action is seeking a part-time

site coordinator for our tax service programs that provide

no cost tax services to the community with committed

volunteers. Help your neighbors get the maximum tax

credits and refunds they deserve and supports investment

in our local economy.

Free training provided for IRS certifications, flexible

schedule and competitive pay. This job is seasonal, from

January through April.

Interested applicants should submit a letter of Interest

and resume to:

Capstone Community Action, Inc.

Human Resources

20 Gable Place

Barre, VT 05641

Or e-mail to: jobs@capstonevt.org

Capstone Community Action, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity

Employer and Provider. Applications from women,

individuals with disabilities, veterans, and people from

diverse cultural backgrounds are encouraged.

Only those applicants selected for an interview will be contacted.

$2,000 SIGN ON BONUS!

COMPREHENSIVE BENEFIT PACKAGE

Town of Calais Highway Department

The Town of Calais is accepting applications for an im-

edite lltie oition to fill n nd ne

oition ith the hih dertent ndidte t

he l or hiher, eeriene ith he

equipment and be able to work additional hours outside of

relrl hedled ord lint t e le to dr reen

hi oition oer orehenie enefit e

or ore inortion or to l, ontt od oiioner lred rree t

lirodoiionerirointnet or t 666 lition eted

ntil oition i filled

The Town of Calais is an equal opportunity employer.

CUSTODIAN 2ND SHIFT POSITION

arre nied nion School istrict is seeking ustodians for

arre it lementar iddle School and arre on iddle

lementar School. Second shift starts

during the school ear and during summer.

andidates must

e able to perform unassisted phsical laboractivities lifting

bending standing climbing and alking.

ork effectivel and respectfull ith the public.

nderstand and carr out oral and ritten directions.

aintain cooperative orking relationships.

emonstrate sensitivit to and respect for a diverse population.

ass a background and ngerprint check.

ackground in commercial cleaning preferred.

Starting age is .hr plus differential shift pa. enets include

health and dental insurance retirement paid sick time vacation and

personal leave.

nterested candidates are invited to appl online at buusd.orgdistrict

emploment or submit a letter of interest resume and three references

to amie vans acilities irector evanbsubuusd.org

BUUSD is an equal opportunity employer

Groundskeeper/

Custodial Opening

There is an immediate opening for a combination 1st Shift

Groundskeeper/2nd Shift Custodian position at Spaulding

High School/Central Vermont Career Center. This is a 1st

shift position (7:00 am to 3:30 pm) as a Groundskeeper

from approximately May through November, and a 2nd

shift position (3:00 pm to 11:30 pm) as a Custodian from

approximately November through May. Both shifts are

Monday-Friday.

The base rate of pay for this position is $17.49 per hour.

There is a shift differential of an additional $.50 an hour

while working the 2nd shift.

Interested candidates are encouraged to apply online

at buusd.org/district/employment or submit a letter of

interest, resume, and three references to: Jamie Evans -

Facilities Director, jevanbsu@buusd.org

BUUSD is an equal opportunity employer

page 28 The WORLD November 3, 2021

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

Fax:

(802)479-7916

403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

CLASSIFIEDS

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

ST. CROIX WOOD Pellet

Stove, Power Auger cost

$2000 New, Asking $ 400.00.

802-461-6441

VERMONT CASTING STOVE

VIGILANT, $300 O/B, Located

in Corinth. 802-439-9613

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

5 GALLON PAILS W/Covers

$1.00 each.

The Barrel Man

802-439-5519

ARE YOU TIRED OF

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Black Rock Coal

East Montpelier

802-223-4385

1-800-639-3197

landscapestonesofvermont.

com

FOOD GRADE Barrels totes,

We have over 700 in stock

from 2 1/2Gal — 275 Gal totes.

Call for Info; Bicknell Barrels

The Barrel Man

802-439-5519.

FOR SALE: COLUMBIA

ZTL50 ZERO Turn Rider,

runs and operates real good,

$1500.00 obo. 802-479-1210

ORGANIC GRASS FED

BEEF $2.50 / LB HANGING.

You cut & Wrap. 802-839-

0409

ANIMALS/PETS

REGISTERED BORDER

COLLIE Puppies. Ready anytime,

2 Shots, $800. 802-565-

7749

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

$A1-CASH PAID

Pending the Market

CARS, TRUCKS

For More Info, 802-522-9140

$A1-CASH PAID

Pending the Market

CARS, TRUCKS

For More Info, 802-522-9140

AFFORDABLE TRASH SER-

VICES & RECYCLING, Commercial

/ Residential. Also metal

recycling, brush removal.

Contact Steve (802)595-3445

or trashsrv4u@hotmail.com or

www.trashserv4u.com

Ask about cash discount.

ALL WAYS

LANDSCAPING

Fall Clean Up

Rototilling

Tree Work

CALL THE BEST

802-223-6363

DmFURNACE

MAN

•Oil Furnace Tune-Ups

•Cleanings •Repairs

•Installations

Fully Licensed & Insured

Reasonable Rates

Call Daryl

802-249-2814

FULL QUALITY

TREE SERVICE

Removal & Full Tree Services,

Stump Grinding, Hedge and

Shrubs trimming, for free estimates

call Randy 802-479-

3403/802-249-7164 35+ years

experience, Fully Insured.

For Classified

Advertising

That Works

Call

479-2582 or

1-800-639-9753

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

INTERIOR

PAINTING / STAINING

Wall Paper Removal,

Dryw all / Woodwork repairs

and more

Quality Work.

Insured

JMR 802-793-1017

MALE PERSONAL Care Attendant

looking for Client

who needs minimal assistants,

and companionship, will

do meal prep and light housekeeping

in Vermont. 802-272-

7892

PAINTING / PAPERING

Done reasonably and neatly.

Smaller Jobs OK

802-793-8544

S S

S

*Full Service Drive thru Trash

ro Strd

*Residential / Commercial

*Scrap Metal

*Construction Debris

Hauling Services & Trailer

roo d ee

Best & Most competitive rates

in the area! Located in E.

Montpelier.

“Your trash is our business”

Call / Text Paul @

802-595-4383

PICARD

GENERAL

MAINTENANCE

FALL CLEAN-UP

LAWN MOWING &

LANDSCAPING

GARAGE CLEANING

Free Estimates- Fully Insured

802-229-0694

802-793-2363

PROFESSIONAL WINDOW

CLEANING

done in Barre / Montpelier

area. Free Estimates. Call Joe

802-229-6527

TREE SERVICE

Hazardous tree removal /

Clean up, Lot clearing / Selective

falling, Viewing improvement

/ Emergency storm

damage for residential or

commercial, Fully insured /

Senior discounts.

Floyd Beede

802-433-1118

Williamstown, VT

Hiring Permanent Substitutes

he Barre nified nion School istrict is seeking Permanent Substitutes

to support our teaching staff. BS currently has openings for Permanent

Substitutes at: Spaulding igh School, Barre City Elementary Middle

School, and Barre own Middle Elementary School. Permanent

Substitutes are full time, school year employees and show up to their

assigned school every day; (this position is different from our aily

Substitute position.)

esponsibilities will vary depending on assignment, but typically include:

- eceiving daily placement from the Substitute Coordinator.

- Following all plans outlined in the Substitute Plans prepared by the

absent teacher.

- Completing reports on the day’s activities at the conclusion of each

teaching dayperiodblock.

- Performing other duties when not assigned to a classroom (e.g. assisting

teachers in the classroom, supervising students in study hall, hallways,

during lunch, performing basic clerical duties for the schools’ admin.

support staff, etc.)

- Providing one on one andor small group academic support to students.

he Permanent Substitute position offers a full benefits package including:

an excellent BCBS ealthcare Plan, ental nsurance, sick time, Life

nsurance, long-term disability, and tuition reimbursement. he rate of pay

for this position is 15-18hr based on experience and education.

nterested candidates are encouraged to apply online

buusd.orgdistrictemployment, or via SchoolSpring.

BUUSD is an equal opportunity employer


CLASSIFIEDS

Getting To The Heart Of Pet

Parasite Prevention

Pets rely on their owners to look out for their physical well-being.

an serious health issues can afflict pets and parasites are a

common cause of illness and discomfort.

Of all the parasitic worms dogs, cats and other companion

animals may acquire, heartworms may be the most concerning.

Heartworm disease can result in lung and heart failure,

other organ damage, and potentially death. Heartworm disease

is caused by a blood-borne parasite known as irofilariaimmitis,

offers the U.S. Food & Drug Administration. It is

spread through the bite of a mosquito. Dogs are often the host

of choice. The parasites infect the dog, mature into adults,

mate and produce offspring all while living inside the animal.

Cats are atypical hosts for heartworms, and most worms in

cats do not survive the adult stage.

While heartworm infection has been reported in all 50

states, it is most common along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts.

Heartworms also can occur in the warmer regions of Canada

where summer temperatures are high enough for the worm

larvae to survive inside carrier mosquitoes. Once inside a

new host, it takes approximately six months for the larvae to

develop into sexually mature adult heartworms, advises The

American Heartworm Society. Once mature, heartworms

can survive five to seven years in dogs and up to two to three

years in cats. Each mosquito season can increase the number

of worms in infected pets.

Prevention is key to ensuring the health of a pet. Adult

heartworms can infect the heart, pulmonary artery and adjacent

large blood vessels. A blood test can reveal whether a pet

is affected by heartworms, as early infection may not yield

noticeable symptoms.

Apart from keeping pets away from mosquito-heavy areas,

pet owners will find that annual heartworm testing as well as

monthly prevention medications can provide the protection

needed to keep animals safe. Heartworm preventives must be

purchased from a veterinarian or with a prescription through

a pet pharmacy in the United States. Check requirements for

those living in Canada.

The FDA warns that the treatment for heartworm disease is

not easy on the dog and it is costly. Treatment can be potentially

toxic to the dog’s body and can cause serious complications,

such as the development of life-threatening blood clots

in the dog’s lungs. Preventive medicines can reduce pets’ risk

of developing heartworm.

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

403 Route

302-Berlin

Barre, VT 05641

Fax:

(802)479-7916

www.facebook.

com/vtworld.

news

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

WE WILL BE RETIRING

DEC. 31, 2021

HAPPY

TAILS

BOARDING

KENNEL

Jim & Shelly Roux

802-485-5296

Roxbury, VT 05699

• modern facility

• radiant floor heat

• air conditioning

• fresh air system

• indoor kennel

• outdoor

exercise

area

Cat boarding

is also

available.

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

PET OF THE WEEK

Osmore is a beautiful gal who

seeks a library type home to call her

own. She loves a good, cozy spot to

sunbathe in and a home that has no

children or canines. Osmore is not

opposed to living with another feline

companion, especially if it is a cat

with similar personality traits.

All adoptions are done by a phone

appointment only (no one is allowed

in the building). Contact an adoption

counselor to set up an appointment

at 802-476-3811 or emailing

info@centralvermonthumane.org

SERVICE DIRECTORY

BUILDING GARAGES

FROM FLOOR TO ROOF

Starting At $ 14,000

24 x 24 garage, 6” concrete floors with steel

rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.

Garages to your specifications, any size.

House Framing & Addition Work

Call 802-296-1522 • Ask for Ray

GREG’S

PAINTING & STAINING

• Handpaint or Spray

• Metal Roof Painting

• Interior/Exterior

• Guarantee

• Free Estimates

• Reasonable Low Rates

• Neat, Quality Work

• References • Insured

Call 802-479-2733

gpdpainting@aol.com EPA, RRP, EMP Certified

TRUCK FOR HIRE!

In Need Of A

Pickup Truck And

Helping Hand?

• Hauling

• Dump Run

• Landlords,

Residential

Clean-outs

Call Us!

Tom Moore

T&T Truck For Hire

Montpelier

802-224-1360

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL

TOMORROW WHAT YOU

CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753

RANDY’S HEATING SERVICES

Full Service Plumbing, Heating, Air & Electric

FULLY LICENSED AND INSURED

24-HOUR

EMERGENCY

SERVICE

Central Vermont’s Newspaper

CLASSIFIEDS

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, Vermont 05641

Get your furnace

cleaned, repaired

or replaced!

Sales & Services

TOYO On Demand

Water Heaters

Miller Furnace

System 2000 Boilers

Thermopride Furnaces

Service & Installation

Call Randy Duprey

Certified Oil & Propane Heating Technician

Insured & Licensed • Over 20 yrs. experience

802-498-8062

reduprey@gmail.com

LLOYD

HOME SERVICE

Your Residential Service Experts

(802) 426-2092

www.lloydplumbingandheating.com

G. M. Bowen

Excavating Contractor Inc.

2510 Bliss Road, East Calais, VT

(802) 456-7049 (802) 793-0895

Residential & Commercial

Site Prep, Water, Septic, Ponds, Land Clearing, Grading, Hauling

Business Technology & Cyber-Security Services

Located in the historic Hangar Building

1970 Vermont Rt. 14 South 802.223.4448

East Montpelier, VT 05651

rbtechvt.com

Since 1974

SERVICES

802-223-6577

407 BARRE ST. MONTPELIER

Professional

Carpet/Upholstery

Cleaning & Maintenance

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

or your money back.

www.MontpelierCarpetCleaning.com

November 3, 2021 The WORLD page 29


JUST GOOD

AUTOS

296 East Montpelier Rd • Rt. 14 North - Barre

802-479-0140

2008 FORD FOCUS 2 DR.

5 speed, PW, PL, AC,

cruise, low miles

$3,495

2010 FORD 150 FTX

Auto., 4x2, PW, PL, AC,

Tonneau Cover, low miles

$9,995

2012 FORD ESCAPE LMT

Auto., PW, PL, AC, sunroof,

1 owner, low miles

$8,495

2012 CHEV. MALIBU 2LT

Auto., PW, PL, AC, Low Miles

$6,495

2011 CHEV. MALIBU LT

Auto., PW, PL, AC, low miles,

one owner

$6,495

1973 MERCURY COUGAR

XR7 CONVERTIBLE

351 Cleveland-Cobra Jet Motor,

Auto., PW, cruise, tilt, low miles

$11,995

EXTENDED WARRANTIES AVAILABLE

JUST GOOD

AUTOS

Trades Welcome

Prices Negotiable

Just a Sample of Many

Just Good Autos!

VERMONT

Tire & Service

We Repair All

Snowplow

Brands

AUTOMOTIVE

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

Snowplows

SALES & SERVICE

For Superior Snowplowing Performance

McLEODS

SPRING & CHASSIS

“Your Truck Chassis Specialists”

32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641 • 1-802-476-4971

Winter is right around

the corner

E-mail

us!

Classified & Display

ADS

Now Placing Your

Classified Or Display Ad

Is Even Easier!

Our E-mail address is

sales@vt-world

.com

Please include contact

person & payment info

( Only)

479-2582 or

1-800-639-9753

TRUCKS/VANS/

JEEPS/ACCESS.

1994 FORD BRONCO

$16,900 East Barre Auto

Sales 802-476-5370 or 866-

928-9370 or TEXT 11O1 TO

27414

2005 TOYOTA TUNDRA

$12,995 East Barre Auto

Sales 802-476-5370 or 866-

928-9370 For more details

Text 1D1N TO 27414

2009 TOYOTA RAV4 $12,995

East Barre Auto Sales 802-

476-5370 or 866-928-9370

For more Details TEXT 0UTU

TO 27414

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

1998 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX

$3,995 East Barre Auto Sales

802-476-5370 or 866-928-

9370 or Text 11O6 to 27414

2011 HONDA CIVIC CR-V

$11,955 East Barre Auto

Sales (866) 928-9370 / 802-

476-5370 For more details

TEXT 0UU7 TO 27414

4 FIRE STONE M&S 16”

TIRES, 500 miles, $250. 802-

229-9890

4 HANKOOK SNOWTIRES,

224/60 / R18 $400 used but

in good condition, less than

13,000 miles 802-223-2699

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all

cars! Junk, high-end, totaledit

doent tter et ree

towing and same day cash!

NEWER MODELS too! Call

844-813-0213

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

Donate Your Car to Veterans

Today! Help and Support our

Veterans. Fast — FREE pick

up. 100% tax deductible. Call

1-800-245-0398.

ERASE BAD CREDIT

FOREVER!

Credit repair companies make

le li nd roie to

ere tril o nid ill or

lte ent ro or redit

report. However, only time can

erase negative, but accurate

redit inortion n ddition,

ederl l orid redit re

ir onie ro ollet

in one eore the roide

their erie o he

questions about your credit

history or you want to know

ho to et ree o o or

credit report call the ATTOR-

N NS NS

ER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

t 00622 ont

send any money to a credit repair

company until you check

it out.

FOR SALE; 4-P225/75R15

S ire on 6 hole ri, fi t

Chevy & Early Toyota, near

good shape, $250.00 or best

oer 0220

NEW & USED TIRES ALL

SIZES, Used Rims,

Call week days.

802-883-5506

SNOW TIRES — FOUR COO-

PER 235/55R17, Low mile-

e, ont fi t ne r, 00

802-229-4350

EXPERIENCE COUNTS!

Fluid Film Undercoating

Tire Mount & Balance

Spray-in Bedliners

Brakes • Suspension

Exhausts

Routine Maintenance

Interior/Exterior Detailing

ALL MAKES & MODELS

802-355-2404

Winter Storms Hit Hard and Fast!

Get up to a

$70 VISA ®

PREPAID CARD

or Virtual Account when you buy a new set of four qualifying

QUALIFYING TIRES

$

70

*

Discoverer ® AT3 4S

Discoverer ® AT3 LT

Discoverer ® AT3 XLT

Discoverer ® SRX

Discoverer ® SRX LE

$

60

CS5 Ultra Discoverer ®

Touring Snow Claw

CS5 Grand Discoverer ®

Touring True North

Evolution

Winter

$

50 $ 40

South Burlington

1877 Williston Rd.

658-1333

1800-639-1901

Winter tires are in

short supply this year

Buy now

& Install l

later

Cooper

Endeavor

Cooper

Endeavor

Plus

Nordman 7 Studded Nordman 7

*NEW*

page 30 The WORLD November 3, 2021

Evolution Winter

NEXT G E N E R AT I O N SAFETY

- Top-Class Grip In Varying Winter Weather.

- Air Claw Technology, A Combination Of A Sturdy

Steel Stud And Air Dampers.

Hakkapeliitta 10

The best just got better!

The new Nokian Hakkapeliitta 10 SUV is tailored to meet the

needs of powerful and tall SUV’s. Nokian Hakkapeliitta SUV

offers more durability and stability while managing the high

wheel loads precisely and reliably. The unique Double Stud

Technology offers maximum safety on ice and snow, as the

center studs specifically improve acceleration and braking

grip, while the studs on the shoulder areas maximize grip

during turning and lane changes

Mon.- Fri. 7:30am-5pm Sat. 8am-4pm

Introducing our

Cooper Endeavor line

Excels in treadwear,

wet performance, and

steering response.

Montpelier

90 River St.

229-4941

1800-639-1900

LIVE BROADCAST

Adventure

is calling.

Get more details.

Scan the code.

YOKOHAMA GOODYEAR MICHELIN PIRELLI

FIRESTONE GENERAL UNIROYAL NOKIAN

Fight back with a Fisher

33 WATERMAN RD.

EXIT 3 OFF I-89

SOUTH ROYALTON, VT

(802) 764-8150

www.bigtextrailerworld/royalton

PARTS . SALES . SERVICE

New & Good Used Tires

ALL SEASON & WINTER TIRES

TIRE

CHANGEOVERS

Mounted & Computer Balanced

YOUR TIRES OR OURS

WE DO FLAT REPAIR

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

Mon. - Fri. 8:30-4:30 • Saturday 8:30-1:00

Closed Sunday

FRED BUDZYN

TIRE

Corner No. Main &

Seminary Sts., Barre

479-1819

CALL FOR PRICES

WE DO

FLAT

REPAIR

WE

ACCEPT

EBT

WRANGLER HANKOOK COOPER

ALL SIZES BF GOODRICH GENERAL


PUBLISHER’S

NOTICE

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this

newspaper is subject to the fair housing

act which makes it illegal to advertise

“any preference, limitation or discrimination

based on race, color, religion,

sex, handicap, familial status or

national origin, or an intention, to make

any such preference, limitation or discrimination.”

Additionally, Vermont’s Fair Housing

and Public Accomodations Act prohibits

advertising that indicates any preference,

limitation or discrimination based

on age, marital status, sexual orientation

or receipt of public assistance.

This newspaper will not knowingly

accept any advertising for real estate

which is in violation of the law. Our

readers are hereby informed that all

dwellings advertised in this newspaper

are available on an equal opportunity

basis.

To file a complaint of discrimination,

call the Vermont Human Rights

Commisson toll-free at 1-800-416-2010

(voice & TTY) or call HUD toll

free at 1-800-669-9777 (voice)

or 1-800-927-9275 (TTY).

Hi, I wanted to let all the

followers of Bear Naked Growler

know that I have decided to sell

the business. I plan on retiring

at some point and would like

to be on other side of the bar.

The business will still operate as

normal through the process.

All equipment is approximately

4 years old. I am asking $135,000.

Any serious inquiries can be

sent on messenger, emailed to

dahadickinson@msn.com Community Natl 3.250% or 3.267% 30 YR Fixed 0

call 5% me at 802-522-9018.

Thank you for all your support 2.500% 2.531% 15 YR Fixed 0

5%

and NE Fed I am CR sure UN we will see 3.000% you 3.023% 30 YR Fixed 0

again 5% before any changes happen.

-Floyd

2.250% 2.291% 15 YR Fixed 0

5%

Bear Naked Growler

REAL ESTATE

Northfield Savings 3.000% 3.037% 30 YR Fixed 0

5%

2.375% 2.441% 15 YR Fixed 0

5%

186 River St., Montpelier

www.bearnakedgrowler.com

APARTMENTS

ROOMS/HOUSES

FOR RENT

RULE OF THUMB......

Describe your property,

not the “appropriate” buyer or

renter, not the landlord,

not the neighbors.

Just describe the property

nd oll lot l oe

the law.

HOMES

WORRIED ABOUT

FORECLOSURE?

Having trouble paying your

mortgage? The Federal Trade

oiion dont

any fees in advance to people

who promise to protect

your home from foreclosure.

Report them to the FTC, the

ntion oner rotetion

agency. For more information,

call 1-877-FTC-HELP or click

on ftc.gov. A message from

The World and the FTC.

BUSINESS FOR SALE

VACATION

RENTALS/SALES

TRAVELING TO DISNEY?

Enjoy multiple pools, miniature

golf, water park and more

in 2-bedroom condo at Orange

Lake Country Club. Christmas

weeks 51 & 52 available.

Email carol@actionunlimited.

com for more information.

Updated Weekly

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

AFFORDABLE

APARTMENTS

WITH HEAT

INCLUDED

Highgate

Apartments

located in Barre, is currently accepting applications

for our 1, 2 & 3 bedroom apartments waiting lists.

Hardwood floors, fresh paint, modern kitchen & baths, yard space,

ample closets, & washer/dryer hook-ups. Laundry room on site.

Rent includes heat/hot water, 24-hour emergency maintenance,

parking, snow removal, & trash removal. Income limits apply.

To request an application, call 476-8645 or stop by the on-site

rental office at 73 Highgate Drive, #121, Barre, VT.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Home Mortgage Rates

LAST

DOWN

LENDER UPDATE RATE APR TERM PTS PAYMENT

Community National 10/15/21 3.250% 3.267% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Bank 1-800-340-3460 2.500% 2.531% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

New England Federal 10/15/21 3.000% 3.023% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Credit Union 866-805-6267 2.250% 2.291% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

Northfield Savings 10/15/21 3.000% 3.037% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Bank (NSB) 2.375% 2.441% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

802-485-5871

WINDY WOOD – BARRE TOWN

WINDY WOOD – BARRE TOWN

“A common interest community”

VIEW “A HOMES common BEING interest BUILT SUNDAYS community”

1 PM – 3 PM

SHOWN BY BY APPOINTMENT

ANYTIME

CALL CALL 802-249-8251 OR 802-734-1920

One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, full basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

Single family homes priced from $267,000 and Duplex homes priced from $229,000

One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, full

basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile on Hill Street, left onto

Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into Windy Wood.

Single family homes priced from $335,000

and Duplex homes priced from $269,000

Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile

on Hill Street, left onto Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into

Windy Wood.

Help Us Welcome Patty Pirog!

The staff at the Montpelier Branch of Berkshire

Hathaway HomeServices, Vermont Realty Group, is

pleased to welcome Patricia “Patty” Pirog to their

roster of professional real estate sales associates!

atty as a ealt of eperence elpn oters find

what they seek, with her background within the NY

State Senate and Legislature, as well as SW Florida

Board of County Commissioners, owning her own

business and managing a $1.25M retail store for a

national chain. Now, as a resident of Montpelier,

sed rater elp yo find yor on specal corner of

Central Vermont where the air is clear, the mountains

vast, the lakes pristine and people are as friendly as

can be. She’d enjoy hearing from you. 802-262-1175

or PattyPirog@VTREGroup.com

VSECU 3.000% 3.038% 30 YR Fixed 0

5%

2.250% 2.317% 15 YR Fixed 0

5%

REACHING

OVER

23,000

READERS

WEEKLY

Montpelier, Barre,

Northfi eld, Hardwick

Waterbury &

Surrounding Towns

Always Good News

BIGGEST

CIRCULATION

EACH WEEK!

403 U.S. Rt. 302-Berlin • Barre, Vt 05641-2274

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • Fax: 802-479-7916

e-mail: sales@vt-world.com or editor@vt-world.com

VT State Employees 10/15/21 3.000% 3.038% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Credit Union (VSECU) 2.250% 2.317% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

1-800-371-5162 X5345

Rates can change without notice.

***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some products are available with as little as

5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not

included in the APR calculations.

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

Fax:

(802)479-7916

403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

Patty Pirog

317 River Street | Montpelier, VT 05602

PattyPirog@VTREGroup.com 802-262-1175

© 2020 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of

BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway

HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America,

Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.

BECKLEY HILL MEADOWS

BARRE TOWN

MANSFIELD LANE CONDOMINIUMS

BERLIN

Single family & duplex

ranch style homes

Call for Pricing

Brand new, energy effi cient homes on private or

shared lots. Two or three bedroom, two baths,

full basement, covered porch, attached two car

garage on town paved road. Town sewer and

water. No association fees!

TownHOUSE UNITS AVAILABLE

$284,500

Brand new, energy-effi cient condos in the

heart of Central Vermont. Two bedroom plus

den, 2 bathrooms, basement garage. Quick

access to Montpelier, I-89 and more!

Monthly association fee ONLY $220!

802-229-2721

www.fecteauhomes.com

November 3, 2021 The WORLD page 31


We found out that help

with vaccine registration

and a ride to get it is

available and free.

Learn more about the COVID vaccine

and how easy it is to get vaccinated.

Call our Helpline at 1-800-642-5119

or visit Vaccine4Vermont.com

Helping older Vermonters age well.

page 32 The WORLD November 3, 2021

VT4A001-21_World_ad_9.5x15_R2.indd 1

10/20/21 3:02 PM

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