Mosaics of Central New Mexico

jamsdavidson1969

Mosaic New Mexico, a collective of mosaic artists, has produced Mosaics of Central New Mexico - a Self-Guided Tour, in both digital and paper form. With forty full-color pages, it celebrates 65 sites that are accessible to the public located in Albuquerqe, Rio Rancho, Tijeras, Mountainair, Edgewood, Placitas and Bernalillo. The guide books are available free of charge at the mosaic locations and elsewhere. The goal of the guide is to bring attention to the wide array of creative public mosaic in our community and include individual and group endeavors funded through private businesses, churches, various organizations, volunteers and government agencies.

Mosaics

of Central New Mexico

A Self-Guided Tour

Mosaic New Mexico

a collective

www.mosaicnewmexico.com


contents

04

06

10

14

22

29

35

37

38

Maps

Central New Mexico and Albuquerque

South Albuquerque

South of Bridge and Coal/Zuni on the East, South of I-40 on the West

Central Albuquerque

East of Broadway, North of Coal/Zuni, South of Menaul Blvd

Downtown Albuquerque

Old Town/Mountain Road on the West, to Broadway on the East

North Albuquerque

North of Menaul Blvd on the East, North of I-40 on the West

Out North

North of Albuquerque: Communities of Bernalillo, Rio Rancho, Placitas

Out South & East

East and South of Albuquerque: Edgewood, Tijeras, and Mountainair

Horizon

A few projects in process

Around Town

Inspiring mosaics in non-public places

ABOUT THE FRONT COVER: Our cover is a detail from a mosaic by Beverley Magennis: Tree of Life located at 4th and Montaño NW in

Albuquerque. The original and iconic black and white pottery designs are of the Native American people who lived along the Mimbres River of

the Gila mountains and nearby Rio Grande Valley over one thousand years ago. We are grateful for the inspiring vision of these original caretakers

of the Mimbres Valley in Southwestern New Mexico. TOP PHOTO CREDIT: Cassandra and Paz. BACK COVER: A photo by Jade Leyva shows

hands creating a seed mural in The SEEDS: A Collective Voice project.

Copyright © 2021 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or duplicated or sold.

2 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


Mosaics have decorated our world, leaving

stories and images that represented and survived

successions of civilizations and natural upheavals

so that we can enjoy them in our own time.

Perhaps you have had the opportunity to marvel at the interior

of San Vitale Church and Mausoleum in Ravenna, Italy. Or the

majestic murals, floors and mosaic angels by Michelangelo at the

Vatican in Rome. Perhaps you’ve seen Gaudi’s magnificently imaginative

constructions in Barcelona, or the Alhambra in Granada, Spain, the

ancient mosaics in Pompeii and Tunisia or the contemporary Niki La

Salle sculptures in France.

But did you know that Albuquerque and our surrounding areas are rich

with creative mosaics? This guide — Mosaics of Central New Mexico

celebrates more than sixty sites that are accessible to the public located

in Albuquerque, Rio Rancho, Tijeras, Mountainair, Edgewood, Placitas

and Bernalillo.

They include individual and group endeavors. The mosaics have

been funded through private business, churches, schools, various

organizations, volunteers, individuals and government. Development

groups such as the BioPark Society have fostered donations through

mosaic art. Currently, Rio Rancho, the City of Albuquerque, the town of

Mountainair, Bernalillo County, and the State of New Mexico implement

public art funding via “1% for the Arts” and other similar formulas.

Bernalillo County and the City of Albuquerque have extensive public art

collections. You can view their websites at:

Albuquerque https://www.cabq.gov/artsculture/public-art

Bernalillo County https://ash.bernco.gov/PublicArt/index.html

Manzano Mountain Art Council https://manzanomountainartcouncil.org

Rio Rancho https://www.rrnm.gov/1593/1-for-the-Arts

New Mexico is a state of natural beauty and wonderful art. Communities

all around our largest urban area have had citizens step up in support of

the natural world with grassroots efforts to conserve open space. Mosaic

projects have showcased this concern for the surrounding environment

and its inhabitants. You will find them focused on the river, the landforms,

the trees and much more in this booklet. There are three mosaics with the

title “Tree of Life.” Numerous are the mosaics that depict the river and

its pathways, or showcase wild animals in their habitat. Hand-in-hand

with this concern for protection of land is the governmental agencies’

dedication to public art.

There are many more mosaics than listed here in this guide. We

acknowledge that we have not included many delightful school mosaics

that have been facilitated by dedicated and brilliant teachers. We are

not showcasing the wealth of mosaics incorporated in the interiors and

exteriors of private homes and some businesses. The “Around Town”

section, found on pages 31, 38, and 39, highlights some that might

surprise you when driving by or walking in your neighborhood.

ABOUT MOSAIC

Traditionally, mosaic is a style of art where a larger image is created

by arranging and attaching bits of clay, glass, stone or other materials

directly to non-flexible surfaces with cement and mortar to last through

the ages. Today polymer cements, silicone, and other glues are frequently

used as adhesives. In New Mexico, many artists work on walls of stucco

as well as dense foam covered with fiberglass mesh. Grout (a cement

product) is applied between small pieces to set them into place.

Mosaic has limitations and infinite possibility, as do all medias of art.

It is an inherently labor intensive process. Long ago, artistic designers

employed craftspeople to cut and lay the stone or glass in mortar. The

process today can involve an entire community or smaller collaborative

endeavors. Alternatively, some artists work primarily alone or with

partners to create their images. Most often, helpers are involved, one way

or another.

This guide comes to you with the initial financial support of 35 members

of the artist collective Mosaic New Mexico. Current members at time of

publication are: Bosha Gordon, Jill Gatwood, Caroline LeBlanc, Tomás

Wolff, Helen Juliet Atkins, Barb Belknap, Cate Clark, Jenny Davidson,

Joel Davis, Nova Denise, Lisa Domenici, Kyle Erickson, Roger Evans,

Patricia Halloran, Erika Harding, Manuel Hernandez, Nancy Holt, Erica

Hoverter, Holly Kuehn, Erin Magennis, Kay McInnes, Lydia Piper, Ginger

Quinn, Marina Rabinowitz, Kyle Ray, Laura Robbins, Riha Rothberg,

Elaine Scott, Scottie Sheehan, Bill Simpson, Cirrelda Snider-Bryan,

Terry Storch, Erica Wendel-Oglesby, Perri Yellin, Debra Yoshimura. You

will notice member names as you page through this tour guide because

many members have created projects and have supplied photos and text.

Mosaic New Mexico – an artist collective - enjoys a great camaraderie

from annual shows and membership meetings. Mosaic artists of

all levels of expertise are invited to join. Read more at https://www.

mosaicnewmexico.com

Special thanks to Erica Wendel-Oglesby for much of the photography.

We greatly appreciate Mary Lambert of Studio 9 for the layout and

design. Thank you to all who have supported and encouraged the work

of local mosaic artists! And a heartfelt thanks to Steve Palmer and Avi

Kriechman for their friendship and financial support.

Through art we find unity!

Enjoy,

Cirrelda Snider-Bryan and Laura Robbins

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 3


C e n t r a l New Mexic o

Rio Rancho, Bernalillo & Placitas, East Tijeras, Edgewood & Mountainair

347

528 313

556

423

165

45

556

47

217

337

45

337

CENTRAL NEW MEXICO

Each mosaic site in this guide

is identified by a white number

within a black circle. There are

six color-coded geographic

sections: South Albuquerque,

Central Albuquerque,

Downtown Albuquerque,

North Albuquerque, Out North,

and Out South & East.

47

Out North

Out North is Rio Rancho,

Bernalillo, Placitas

Out South

& East

Out South & East is Tijeras,

Edgewood, Mountainair

You can also find a map with

these numbered mosaic sites

by visiting our website homepage,

www.mosaicnewmexico.com,

and clicking on the link

to Google Maps.

55

47

4 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


Albuquerque City Limits

528

448

313

A l b u q u e r q u e

556

556

528

423

45

423

528

556

47

423 423

45

556

345

47

45

500

314 303

47

North

Albuquerque

North of Montaño

on East, North of

I-40 on West

Downtown

Albuquerque

West of Broadway (47), East

of the Rio Grande, South of

Menaul, North of Bridge

Central

Albuquerque

East of Broadway (47), West

of Tramway (556), North of Coal/

Zuni, South of Menaul

South

Albuquerque

South of Coal/Zuni

East of Bridge, South of the

Rio Grande, West of I-40

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 5


S o u t h Albuquerque

South of Bridge and Coal/Zuni on the East, South of I-40 on the West

There are many mosaics that adorn

public spaces in South Albuquerque

- on both sides of the Rio Grande.

Visit a park, bus stops, a fire station,

a restaurant, the South Valley

Economic Development Center,

Los Volcanes Senior Center, a

Catholic church, Animal Humane

New Mexico, and on Gibson and

San Mateo, “Cruising San Mateo.”

Neighborhoods hold treasures, such

as the piece from the Vecinos del

Bosque neighborhood on this page.

ABOVE: Valley Gardens by Cassandra Reid. Assistant artists: Angelica Lucero, Jen Horne, and Kate

Kennedy - 4629 Sorrel SW. A View of Valley Gardens 2004 by Cassandra Reid (from lotustileworks.com/

projects/valley-gardens/). Valley Gardens is a neighborhood in Albuquerque’s South Valley. The area is now

home to several hundred people. About two hundred neighborhood residents helped develop the design.

The community wanted one side of the sculpture to show the area as it had been in the past – a marsh with

wildlife and the remains of earlier cultures. The other side shows aspects of the community in the present

and the recent past. People in the neighborhood helped make tiles for the mosaic during a month of

outdoor workshops in the park. The sculpture was funded by the City of Albuquerque 1% for Art Program.

PHOTO CREDIT: Cassandra Reid.

LEFT: The Tools of Heroism by Sheri Crider - Fire Station 14, 9817 Eucariz SW. Ceramic tile mosaic

mural with bright colors and forms honoring firefighters. Funded by the City of Albuquerque Public Art

Program. PHOTO CREDIT: City of Albuquerque Public Art.

ABOVE: Views of the Volcanoes, #1 Entry by Daisy

Kates and Ceramics Students at the Center in 2000 Los

Volcanes Senior Center, 6500 Los Volcanes Rd NW. Funded

by the City of Albuquerque Public Art Program. Originally

a triptych of a continuing profile of the volcanoes in three

different moods. The members of the pottery class did the

illustrative surround tiles and glazed them in the same palette

as Daisy’s interior piece. The colored surround tiles are all

handmade. PHOTO CREDIT: Daisy Kates.

ABOVE: Brother Sun Sister Moon by Manuel Hernandez, Trinity House Catholic Worker - 1925 Five Points Road SW. In this wall mural, visible from the

street, Manuel Hernandez, Mosaic New Mexico Member, created this mosaic for the Trinity House. He also sculpted the “bulto” of St. Francis over the doorway.

Manuel uses broken dishes, things that would otherwise be thrown away. PHOTO CREDIT: Manuel Hernandez.

6 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


South of Bridge and Coal/Zuni on the East, South of I-40 on the West

S o u t h Albuquerque

FROM TOP LEFT CLOCKWISE: Isleta Boulevard “River of Life” Bus Stops by PAZ, Cassandra Reid, and Deborah Jojola, Isleta Blvd SW at Lopez - SE

corner of Isleta Blvd and Lopez Road SW (Armijo Plaza), Isleta Blvd SW at Arenal - east of Arenal Road SW. BOTTOM ROW, LEFT TO RIGHT: Isleta

Blvd SW at Bridge - south of Bridge Blvd SW (two mosaics), Isleta Blvd SW, at Hardy - south of Hardy Ave SW (two mosaics), and Isleta Blvd SW at St.

Anne - near St. Anne Church SW (two mosaics).

Located on Isleta Boulevard in Albuquerque’s South Valley, this series of double-sided sculptures honors the Rio Grande and the life it sustains in its valley. A

fourteen-foot tall central sculpture at Armijo Plaza (TOP LEFT & RIGHT) contains winter and summer views of the river and its wildlife. It is essentially a prayer

to the Rio Grande. Smaller “guardian” sculptures (CENTER RIGHT & BELOW) are located at bus stops north and south of the main sculpture. These sculptures

honor different phases of human history in the river valley: early settlement by Clovis and Folsom people; Pueblo culture; the ancient people of Mexico; Spanish

settlement; the Route 66/Art Deco era; and the future of life in the valley. Jesse Williamson, David Zamora, Kathleen Garcia, and Deborah Montoya were assistant

artists. This project was funded by the Bernalillo County 1% for Art Program (2006). PHOTO CREDIT: Bernalillo County Public Art Program and Laura Robbins.

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 7


S o u t h Albuquerque

South of Bridge and Coal/Zuni on the East, South of I-40 on the West

RIGHT: Twelve Stations of the Cross – Holy

Ghost Church mosaics Artist unknown - 833

Arizona Street SE, church office. The Twelve

Stations of the Cross mosaics were installed

in the new church under the direction of Msgr.

Stadtmueller, and dedicated in 1975. For a schedule

of Masses, visit holyghost.weconnect.com as this is a

good time to be able to view the mosaics prior to

and following Mass. PHOTO CREDIT: Cirrelda Snider

FAR RIGHT: Sunflowers Across Burque by

A.L.M.A. (Apprenticeships for Leaders in the Mosaic

Arts). Lead Artists: Vanessa Alvarado and Margarita

Paz-Pedro - Kathy’s Carry Out, 823 Isleta Blvd

SW. ALMA’s gift to the South Valley, Sunflowers

Across Burque is a collaboration that creates

singular handmade mosaic sunflowers and painted

sunflowers across Burque. We see the sunflower as

a prominent and symbolic flower in our state. For

us, it is a reference to Tupac Shakur’s poem ‘The

Rose Through the Concrete.’ Here in Albuquerque,

NM, it is the sunflowers through the concrete/dirt,

there is beauty and strength that can come from

the grittiness of life. We chose ALMA as our name

because, besides being an acronym, it means soul in

Spanish. We are a creative community that supports

and empowers artists of all ages and creates worldclass

artwork through an apprenticeship model that

develops leaders in a diverse and inclusive way.”

Visit almatile.org for more info. PHOTO Credit: Vanessa

Alvarado

ABOVE: Seed Love Seed Mural by Jade Leyva and Noel Chilton & Community Participants - Open Space at the South Valley Economic Development

Center - 318 Isleta Blvd SW. Donated in 2016 to Rio Grande Community Development Corporation for the SVEDC collection. Funders are Avocado Artists and

the McCune Charitable Foundation. Visitation hours 9am - 3pm M-F. Estimated Community Participation: 700 people at public events and schools. Size: 12’x7’.

Seeds used: Corn, Pumpkin, Squash, Beans. SEEDS: A Collective Voice/Community Seed Mural Project started in the beginning of 2013 as the brainchild of

Mexican born-New Mexico based Artist Jade Leyva. This multi-media art exhibit brings attention to ancient and organic seed preservation. PHOTO CREDIT: Jade Leyva.

8 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


South of Bridge and Coal/Zuni on the East, South of I-40 on the West

S o u t h Albuquerque

RIGHT: Cruising San Mateo

aka Chevy on a Stick by Barbara

Grygutis - San Mateo and Gibson

SE, City of Albuquerque Public Art

Program 1991, Funded by the City

of Albuquerque Public Art Program.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erica Wendel-Oglesby.

LEFT: Mosaic Horses by Roger Evans -

Animal Humane New Mexico, 615 Virginia

St. SE. A gift to AHNM from Jean Bernstein,

owner of Flying Star Cafes. Roger is one of

our pioneer mosaic artists. Entering his ninth

decade of life, he has inspired and taught

many the craft. PHOTO CREDIT: Erica Wendel-Oglesby

and Karolyn Winge of AHNM.

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 9


C e n t r a l Albuquerque

East of Broadway, North of Coal/Zuni, and South of Menaul

Throughout Albuquerque,

groups of adults and children

have worked with lead artists

to create unique and decorative

mosaics. One Percent for the

Arts and other organizations

have helped with support and

funding, as well as many

business owners. Individual

mosaic artists have also created

works of joy for the public.

ALL PHOTOS: Migration by Lead artist Susan Linnell - San Mateo Blvd. from Constitution to Lomas,

east side. TOP RIGHT: River ABOVE LEFT TO RIGHT: Sun, Mountain BOTTOM RIGHT: Detail of

Mountain Susan Linnell worked with landscape architects and three groups of school children (95 in all) on

the six-block long project. Three free-standing forms are Sun, River, and Mountain. The migratory pathway

of the birds and animals of our region are depicted. Tiles by children represent animals in their habitat. The

Mountain can be found between Constitution and Summer; The River can be found between Summer

and Mountain; The Sun Sculpture can be found between Mountain and Marble. Funded by the City of

Albuquerque Public Art Program. PHOTO CREDIT: Susan Linnell.

10 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


East of Broadway, North of Coal/Zuni, and South of Menaul

C e n t r a l Albuquerque

TOP LEFT: Tree of Life at St. Mark’s by Lead Artists Manuel Hernandez and Lisa Domenici - St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 431 Richmond Place NE.

In 2019, 60+ church member volunteers made and glazed clay leaves, tiled birds, cracked dishes and assisted in the installation. PHOTO CREDIT: by Lisa Domenici.

TOP RIGHT: Our Lady of Guadalupe by Lead Artists Lisa Domenici, Manuel Hernandez and with assistance from Jill Gatwood, Susan Linnell, and Fr. Daniel

Williamson - Friary of San Juan Diego, 404 San Mateo Blvd NE. BOTTOM RIGHT: Over 70 volunteers and friars from San Juan Diego Friary and the community

at large worked over multiple weekend workshops to create and install this mosaic. Materials include vitreous glass tiles and gold glazed glass. The phrase “Truly

I am your merciful mother” is translated in Navajo, Spanish and Nahuatl. Funded by the Raskob Foundation. BOTTOM LEFT: Tree of Life at La Mesa

Presbyterian led by Lisa Domenici. 25 church members made leaves. - La Mesa Presbyterian Church, 7401 Copper Ave. NE.

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 11


C e n t r a l Albuquerque

East of Broadway, North of Coal/Zuni, and South of Menaul

FAR LEFT: Uptown Girl by Kyle Ray - ABQ

Uptown Shopping Center, 2200 Louisiana Blvd

NE. Funded by the City of Albuquerque Public

Art Program. LEFT & BELOW: Rabbit with Hat

by Roger Evans - ABQ Uptown Shopping Center,

2200 Louisiana Blvd NE. Funded by the City of

Albuquerque Public Art Program. PHOTO CREDIT: by

Erica Wendel-Oglesby.

ABOVE & RIGHT: GAAR Magical Donor Wall by Marina Rabinowitz and Laura Robbins - Greater Albuquerque

Association of Realtors, 1635 University Blvd. NE. This two column wall honors individual and corporate donors to GAAR’s

program that distributes money to area non-profits. PHOTO CREDIT: Erica Wendel-Oglesby.

12 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


East of Broadway, North of Coal/Zuni, and South of Menaul

C e n t r a l Albuquerque

TOP: March of the Flowers by Robert Stout and Stephanie Jurs - East Central Center for Family

and Community Services, 306 San Pablo SE. These mosaics at East Central used children’s images that

were generated during a workshop at the Center by Stephanie Jurs. Funded by the City of Albuquerque

Public Art Program. CENTER: Home on the Rainbow by Robert Stout and Stephanie Jurs - East Central

Center for Family and Community Services, 302 San Pablo SE. Funded by the City of Albuquerque Public

Art Program. BELOW: Pinwheel by Robert Stout and Stephanie Jurs -East Central Center for Family and

Community Services, 7525 Zuni SE. Funded by the City of Albuquerque Public Art Program.

PHOTO CREDIT: Laura Robbins.

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 13


D o w n to w n Albuquerque

Old Town/Mountain Road on the West, to Broadway on the East

Downtown Albuquerque extends from Old Town/Mountain Road on the west, to Broadway on the east.

Visit NM Lowrider Bench over on Broadway during business hours. Then head over to the Old Town Entrance,

walkways at the Art Museum, Church Street Café, and a long public mosaic along a bike path. Much more

awaits downtown, at Washington Park Pillars, at Immaculate Conception Church, and with the awe-inspiring

twenty-plus years of mosaic walls at the Convention Center. Wind down Mountain Road for ALMA Studio

sunflower, Poet’s Plaza, children’s work at the Kiwanis Learning Garden by the Natural History Museum.

The Albuquerque Zoo and Botanic Gardens round off this large section.

LEFT: NM Lowrider

Bench by Pedro Romero

- Vehicle Pollution

Management, 1500

Broadway NE.

Funded by the City of

Albuquerque Public

Art Program. Viewing

possible during business

hours only — M-F 8:30am-

4:30pm, excluding federal

holidays. Pedro Romero

created press tiles to

make his own relief tiles,

used over and over again,

in this detailed, functional

sculpture (it is a bench!).

PHOTO CREDIT: Cirrelda Snider.

TOP: Squash Blossoms for Burque by Lead Artist Cassandra Reid - East entrance to Old Town by Art

Museum. In 2004, the Mayor’s Art Summer Institute was asked to create a mural for the city’s Tricentennial.

The mural decorates the east entrance to Old Town. Funded by City of Albuquerque Public Art Program.

PHOTO CREDIT: Laura Robbins. LEFT: Pathway I by Beverley Magennis.

TOP LEFT OPPOSITE PAGE: Pathway II by Robert Stout and Stephanie Jurs - Along the west side

of the Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Road NW. Pavement mosaic in the sculpture garden, two

sections done by Bev Magennis, two sections done by Robert Stout and Stephanie Jurs, imagery based on

patterns found in nature. Funded by Albuquerque Museum purchase. PHOTO CREDIT: Erin Magennis.

14 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


Old Town/Mountain Road on the West, to Broadway on the East

D o w n to w n Albuquerque

TOP LEFT: Pathway II by Robert Stout and

Stephanie Jurs. PHOTO CREDIT: Stephanie Jurs.

TOP RIGHT & MIDDLE: Desert Flowers -

Outdoor wall mural, Our Lady of Guadalupe

- Fireplace 1, Indian Pot - Fireplace 2 by Erin

Magennis - Church Street Café, Old Town, 2111

Church St. NW ABQ. A great place to appreciate

mosaic, while enjoying a delicious meal.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erin Magennis.

LEFT: El Agua es la Vida Led by Lisette Ledue.

Artists include: Isaac Burleigh, Hugo Hernandez,

Roxy Aragon, etc. Along the bike path just south

of I-40 from Rio Grande Blvd, east. Funded in part

by the City of Albuquerque Public Art Program.

PHOTO CREDIT: City of Albuquerque Public Art

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 15


D o w n to w n Albuquerque

Old Town/Mountain Road on the West, to Broadway on the East

The ALMA Summer Institute,

formerly called the Mayor’s

Art Institute, was created in

1999 to provide paid training

and mentorship for artistically

talented youth and adults.

Apprentices work with the Lead

Artists to create handmade tile

mosaics, helping with every

aspect of making a public

artwork. They assist with design,

carve tiles from wet clay, glaze

tiles, fire a kiln, cement tiles

to the wall, and grout the

finished artwork. The designs

are conceptualized, researched,

and drawn collaboratively

to create rich, multi-layered

representations of our place, our

culture, and our history.

BOTH PAGES: ALMA Summer Institute (formerly Mayor’s Art Institute) Convention Center Murals Lead Artists have included Cassandra Reid,

PAZ, Vanessa Alvarado, Staci Drangmeister, Rey Gaitan, Daisy Kates, Margarita Paz-Pedro, Lia Rosen, and Mark Woody - Albuquerque Convention Center,

401 2nd St. NW. PHOTO CREDIT: City of Albuquerque Public Art and Cassandra Reid.

16 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


Old Town/Mountain Road on the West, to Broadway on the East

D o w n to w n Albuquerque

Over 150 young people and adults from

Albuquerque have participated in the Institute.

Apprentices have gone on to universities, colleges,

and art schools around the country, and some

have become professional artists. The Institute has

created mosaics at the Albuquerque Convention

Center, the Albuquerque Museum, and Juan Tabo

Public Library. The Institute has received funding

from the New Mexico Youth Conservation Corps,

the City of Albuquerque Public Art Program, the

Heart Gallery of New Mexico Foundation, the

McCune Foundation, the Albuquerque Community

Foundation, the Mayor’s Office, Albuquerque

City Council, Family and Community Services

Department, Cultural Services Department,

Bank of the West, French Mortuary, American

Home Furnishings, Don Chalmers Ford, LEF

Foundation, and the Urban Enhancement Trust

Fund. This program was administered by the City of

Albuquerque from 1999-2004, and was sponsored

by the Harwood Art Center from 2005-2015. ALMA:

Apprenticeships for Leaders in Mosaic Arts was

formed as an independent, non-profit organization

in 2015 to run all successive years. Visit almatile.org/

about-asi/ for more info. PHOTO CREDIT: City of Albuquerque

Public Art and Cassandra Reid.

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 17


D o w n to w n Albuquerque

Old Town/Mountain Road on the West, to Broadway on the East

TOP: Pillars of the Community by Eddie Dominguez - 10th Street and Park Ave. Funded by the

City of Albuquerque Public Art Program. Pillars of the Community is a series of three tile sculptures that

are in Washington Park. These artworks were a collaboration between the artist, students, and elders

from the historic neighborhood. Students interviewed older people in the neighborhood – many were

the age of their grandparents – and then made tiles with stories from the elders. PHOTO CREDIT: Erica Wendel-

Oglesby. ABOVE: Altar Mosaic at Immaculate Conception Church Artist unknown - Immaculate

Conception Church, 619 Copper Ave. NE. Under Pastor Patrick J. Kelleher, the current building was built

and dedicated in 1960, including the entire mosaic wall behind the altar. For schedule of Masses, visit

www.iccabq.org, as this is a good time to be able to view the mosaics prior to and following Mass.

PHOTO CREDIT: Cirrelda Snider. CENTER LEFT: Garden Lady by Beverley Magennis - 1st Floor Atrium South

Entrance Assessor’s Office Building, 501 Tijeras Ave NW. Funded by Bernalillo County 1% for Art Program.

PHOTO CREDIT: Bernalillo County Public Art. BOTTOM LEFT: Sunflowers Across Burque at ALMA Studio by

Lead Artists: Vanessa Alvarado, and Margarita Paz-Pedro, Apprentice Artists: Jaqueline De La Cruz, and

Jacquelyn Yepa - ALMA Studio, 1224 Mountain Rd NW. Funder SOMOS ABQ. See more info about this

project on map number 11. PHOTO CREDIT: Vanessa Alvarado.

18 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


Old Town/Mountain Road on the West, to Broadway on the East

D o w n to w n Albuquerque

TOP LEFT TO RIGHT: Synergy of Animals

& Plants by 17 children and 2 adults, lead artist

Cirrelda Snider-Bryan - Kiwanis Learning Garden

at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History

& Science, 1000 18th St. NW. Funded by Project

Learning Tree, Kiwanis Club of ABQ, NMMNHS.

Children researched a chosen animal, then created

a clay tile surrounded with mosaic outdoors in the

garden. Each child also researched how their animal

interacts with plants to make texts to accompany

in the outdoor exhibit. Cirrelda taught the process

of mosaic and was joined by Mosaic New Mexico

members Scottie Sheehan, Perri Yellin and, Jill

Gatwood on a few of the days.

PHOTO CREDIT: Cirrelda Snider.

CENTER & ABOVE LEFT & RIGHT: Poets Plaza by Cassandra Reid - Escuela del Sol / Harwood Art Center, 1114 7th St. NW (corner of 7th and Mountain).

Four benches arranged in a circle to form an outdoor gathering and performance space. Each bench is dedicated to the four elements - air, earth, fire, water. Lines

of poetry by four famous poets - Rumi, Mary Oliver, Joy Harjo, and Jimmy Santiago Baca - decorate the benches. Funded by the City of Albuquerque Public Art

Program in 2005. PHOTO CREDIT: Erica Wendel-Oglesby.

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 19


D o w n to w n Albuquerque

Old Town/Mountain Road on the West, to Broadway on the East

The Albuquerque BioPark has a tradition of

it is mosaic art that most closely aligns with the

incorporating art with nature. Catherine Hubbard immersion aspect of the BioPark. The BioPark takes

supported this vision as BioPark Botanic Garden an engaging approach to conservation, encouraging

Manager from 2001-2017: “Nature is art and both close observation of living organisms. All living

inspire wonder and appreciation. While the ABQ organisms are a part of the larger whole that makes

BioPark’s Botanic Garden, Zoo, Aquarium and up the mosaic that is our planet Earth. Mosaic art on

Tingley Beach all have a history of displaying art, the grounds of the BioPark plays a role in educating,

TOP & RIGHT:

Education Center

Zoo Wall. Dee’s

Garden in honor of

Dee Trester and all

Education Volunteers,

by Laura Robbins-

ABQ BioPark Zoo,

Colores Education

Building, 903 10th

St. SW. Funded by

the BioPark Society

through the Dee

Trester estate.

ABOVE LEFT: Throne of Nyoman by Keith Oliver- ABQ BioPark Zoo in “Africa” - 903 10th St. SW. Funded by the City of Albuquerque

Public Art Program. ALL PHOTO CREDIT: Laura Robbins.

20 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


Old Town/Mountain Road on the West, to Broadway on the East

as well as delighting, visitors. Carefully placed pieces a throne or can be dazzled at the sweep of the planet’s

make up a larger story for each mosaic art piece. At the diversity near the Education building. The art has been

Botanic Garden, viewers are reminded of the delicate, made possible by public monies, as well as private,

iridescent colors of dragonflies; can rest on Spanish thanks to the generous support of the NM BioPark

Moorish benches under pomegranates; or imagine life Society. People are a part of nature, not apart from

in the Rio Grande valley next to a flowing water feature. nature, and beautiful, compelling mosaic art reminds

At the Zoo, children feel like African royalty perched on us that each piece has its place.”

D o w n to w n Albuquerque

LEFT & ABOVE (detail): ABQ Botanic Garden

Dragonfly Sanctuary by Laura Robbins - ABQ

BioPark Botanic Garden Bugarium, 2601 Central

Ave. NW. Funded by the BioPark Society and many

generous donors. PHOTO CREDIT: Laura Robbins and Joan

Fenicle (detail).

MIDDLE LEFT & RIGHT: Entrance Fountain by Shel Neymark -

ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden, 2601 Central Ave. NW. Funded by City of

Albuquerque Public Art Program. PHOTO CREDIT: Shel Neymark. LOWER LEFT:

Spanish Moorish Benches by Robert Stout and Stephanie Jurs - ABQ

BioPark Botanic Garden. Funded by City of Albuquerque Public Art Program.

PHOTO CREDIT: Jill Gatwood

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 21


N o rt h Albuquerque

North of Menaul Blvd on the East, North of I-40 on the West

There are many mosaics to visit

on the north side of metro ABQ

- either side of the river. Begin at

International Balloon Museum

and wind into the Valley to

Raymond Sanchez Community

Center and Los Ranchos Railrunner

station. Continue on 4th street

south from Plants of the Southwest

to St. Therese of the Infant Jesus

Church and don’t miss Bev

Magennis’s Tree of Life at 4th and

Montaño. Across the Rio, have

lunch at the Cottonwood Range

and follow Coors to the Open

Space Visitor Center and US Eagle

Credit Union. From there, venture

further west to the corner of Unser

and Dellyne. End with a tour of

five mosaics in the east Heights,

from Palo Duro Senior Center

to Juan Tabo Library, the Hahn

Arroyo, office on Montgomery,

and the Wyoming Range Cafe.

TOP: Mont-Au-Ciel et Ses Amis/Climb to the sky and his friends led by Lisa Domenici, and created with help by participants in the Community Mural

Class - Anderson Abruzzo International Balloon Museum, 9201 Balloon Museum Dr. NE. PHOTO CREDIT: Nan Masland. MIDDLE: Los Ranchos Rail Runner Station

by Erin Magennis and Kyle Ray - Los Ranchos Rail Runner Station, 101 El Pueblo Road NE. Bernalillo County Public Art Program. PHOTO CREDIT: Erin Magennis.

BOTTOM: “Spirit of the Alameda” Mosaic Tile Mural by Sam Leyba - South-Facing Wall at Entrance of Raymond G. Sanchez Community Center -

9800 4th St, NW. A lot of Community Centers have embraced mosaic as an art form! Bernalillo County Public Art Program. PHOTO CREDIT: Bernalillo County Public Art Program.

22 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


North of Menaul Blvd on the East, North of I-40 on the West

N o rt h Albuquerque

TOP LEFT & RIGHT COLUMN: Tree of Life by Beverley Magennis -

SE Corner of 4th Street and Montaño NW. Funded by the City of Albuquerque

Public Art Program. Forerunner of mosaic art in Albuquerque, Beverley

inspires so many of us with her harmonious style with broken tile. She taught

the process of mosaic to multiple artists who went on to make mosaics their

own. Tree of Life was installed with help from Jim Kraft and Judy Booth in the

summer of 1999. PHOTO CREDIT: Erin Magennis

LEFT: Daphne or Sacred Datura with Woman by Mosaics of Ravenna/

Twin Dolphin Mosaics (Stephanie Jurs and Robert Stout) - Plants of the

Southwest (indoors), 6680 4th St. NW. This indoor wall piece incorporates

the myth of Daphne escaping Apollo and being turned into a tree.

PHOTO CREDIT: Cirrelda Snider

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 23


N o rt h Albuquerque

North of Menaul Blvd on the East, North of I-40 on the West

TOP LEFT, RIGHT & ABOVE: Doorways to the Imagination by

Cassandra Reid in collaboration with apprentice artists and teachers.

North Fourth Arts Center, 4904 4th St. NW. Funded by the City of Albuquerque

Public Art Program in 2004. PHOTO CREDIT: City of Albuquerque Public Art.

RIGHT: St. Therese of the Infant Jesus Church Mosaics St. Therese

of the Infant Jesus Catholic Church and Shrine of the Little Flower, 3424 4th

Street NW. Mosaics are numerous at Saint Therese of the Infant Jesus Parish,

Church building formally known as The Shrine of the Little Flower—an actual

Shrine to Saint Thérèse of Lisieux (housing her bone relics). This Catholic

Parish and School were established in 1947. The Shrine, built in 1954 at the

cost of 3.2 million dollars, is filled with religious symbolism in art windows,

marble furnishings, linden statues designed by the Santa Fe Studios of Church

Art designer Maurice Lucien Loriaux, and fabricated in France, Italy and New

Mexico. The 2 large and 12 smaller mosaic panels were created at mosaic

studios in Rome and depict the tenets of the Apostles Creed, Eucharist and

Saint Therese. Currently, the parish is a strong advocate for peace and justice

causes, the performance arts, and also devotional art inside and in gardens

throughout the Parish and School Campuses. Grateful to Father Vincent Paul

Chávez, current pastor of the parish since 2009, who gave us information

about more ecclesiastical mosaics, located at other Catholic Churches in

Albuquerque. For schedule of Masses, visit http://www.littleflowerabq.org as this

is a good time to be able to view the mosaics prior and following Mass.

PHOTO CREDIT: Cirrelda Snider

24 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


North of Menaul Blvd on the East, North of I-40 on the West

TOP & MIDDLE LEFT: From Fish to Flowers/

Details by Laura Robbins - Cottonwood Range

Cafe, 10019 Coors Blvd NW. PHOTO CREDIT: Laura Robbins

N o rt h Albuquerque

TOP RIGHT: Star Tree by Holly Kuehn - Albuquerque Open Space Visitor

Center, 6500 Coors Blvd. NW. Gift of the artist. PHOTO CREDIT: Erica Wendel-Oglesby.

LEFT & ABOVE: Recycling Mandalas at the Open Space by lead

artists Laura Robbins, Patricia Halloran, Cirrelda Snider-Bryan - Albuquerque

Open Space Visitor Center, 6500 Coors Blvd. NW. Funded by Open Space

Alliance. A collaborative project of Mosaic New Mexico with many volunteers.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erica Wendel-Oglesby and Laura Robbins.

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 25


N o rt h Albuquerque

North of Menaul Blvd on the East, North of I-40 on the West

TOP: Pond Scene by Laura Robbins - Office

of Jennifer Ridgeway, Penn Mont Plaza, 7520

Montgomery Blvd NE. PHOTO CREDIT: Laura Robbins.

LEFT: River of Life by lead artist Susan

Linnell - SE corner of Unser Blvd. and Dellyne

near Petroglyph National Monument. Five Pueblo

schools and five APS schools participated in a

cross-cultural exchange on the cultural history of the

region. Natural stone materials were collected by

children who collaborated on the project.

Funded by the City of Albuquerque Public Art

Program. PHOTO CREDIT: Susan Linnell.

ABOVE: Eagle by Cassandra Reid - US Eagle

Federal Credit Union, 5201 Antequera NW.

PHOTO CREDIT: Cassandra Reid

26 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


North of Menaul Blvd on the East, North of I-40 on the West

N o rt h Albuquerque

TOP & ABOVE LEFT: Rain to River by Hahn Arroyo 2011 by Lead Artist Nan Masland - Hahn Arroyo at San Pedro NE, 3498 San Pedro Dr NE. The

project included 15,000 sq. yards of concrete channel and 3,000 square yards of bike trail to rehabilitate the Hahn Arroyo. The artwork was created by over 160

participants in workshops by neighbors near the Hahn Arroyo, middle school and high school students, with seven mosaic murals in total. The large stretch of

the Hahn Arroyo was renovated and incorporated with the tile mosaic technique, Lithomosaic. The design references the wildlife and natural forms along the

arroyo, including leaves, flowers, fish, insects and birds. Text from Muros ABQ murosabq.com More info: https://www.cabq.gov/artsculture/public-art/events/hahn-arroyodedication-ceremony.

Funded by City of Albuquerque Public Art Program, AMAFCA, and the Harwood Art Center. PHOTO CREDIT: Cirrelda Snider.

LOWER RIGHT: Palo Duro Mosaic by Robert Stout and Stephanie Jurs - Palo Duro Senior Center, 5221 Palo Duro NE. Funded by the City of Albuquerque

Public Art Program, AMAFCA, and the Harwood Art Center. Exterior pavement mosaic incorporating pottery designs from Laguna Pueblo and the Mescalero

Apache, encircling a Navajo wedding basket motif. PHOTO CREDIT: Cirrelda Snider.

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 27


N o rt h Albuquerque

North of Menaul Blvd on the East, North of I-40 on the West

TOP LEFT, RIGHT & ABOVE: Once Upon a Storytime by Lead Artists Hakim Bellamy and

Cassandra Reid and the apprentice artists of the Mayor’s Art Institute - Juan Tabo Public Library,

3407 Juan Tabo NE. Funded by Youth Conservation Corps, City of Albuquerque Public Art Program,

Bernalillo County Public Library, and The Heart Gallery. Dedicated to NM Authors and Oral Tradition.

PHOTO CREDIT: Erica Wendel-Oglesby.

LEFT: Hollyhock Fireplace/Detail by Laura Robbins - Range Cafe, Wyoming, 4401 Montgomery

Blvd NE. PHOTO CREDIT: Erica Wendel-Oglesby.

28 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


Communities of Bernalillo, Rio Rancho, Placitas

Outside of Albuquerque to the North —

Communities of Bernalillo, Rio Rancho, Placitas.

Go further north on 4th street and it will veer

east and become State Highway 313. At the

roundabout just past the diversion canal, turn

north, and continue on 313 past the Pueblo of

Sandia Village to Bernalillo where mosaics are

found at the original Range Cafe. Continue north

on 313 to junction with US Highway 550, and

turn west to cross the Rio Grande and arrive in

Rio Rancho, where you will find mosaics at a

public park as well as west of Rust Medical Center.

For Placitas, take 550 east and continue over

I-25 as 550 turns into State Highway 165,

climbing the hill look for the Pathways murals

on your left. Continue east to view more mosaic

signs along the highway towards the Village.

O u t Nort h

TOP LEFT: Mosaic Fireplace Laura Robbins - The Range Cafe, 925

Camino del Pueblo. PHOTO CREDIT: Bruce Shortz

LEFT & RIGHT: Entrance Mosaics by Tony Panera - The Range Cafe,

925 Camino del Pueblo. Long live The Range founders/owners Matt DiGregory

and Tom Fenton — their imaginative dedication to supporting artists is unique

and wonderful! PHOTO CREDIT: Laura Robbins

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 29


Communities of Bernalillo, Rio Rancho, Placitas

O u t Nort h

30 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


Communities of Bernalillo, Rio Rancho, Placitas

OPPOSITE PAGE: Gateway Rio Rancho by

Erica Hoverter - West side of Unser Blvd SE across

from Rust Presbyterian Hospital, along sidewalk.

Funded by SSCAFCA and The City of Rio Rancho.

Playful depictions of endangered, threatened, and

prolific land and animal species of Sandoval County,

NM. Erica responded to Sandoval County’s call for

art of animals and plants of the area. Completed in

2012. You can park at the shopping center at 1912

Wellspring SE, and take a long walk to be able to

look at the mosaics closely. PHOTO CREDIT: Erica Hoverter.

LEFT: A Dream Come True by Maggie Y.

Robinson and student apprentice artists of Rio

Rancho middle schools - A Park Above, public

park, 2441 Westside Blvd, Rio Rancho. Art students

felt joy to create this mural for the inclusive public

community. A wonderful civic happening! Funded

by the City of Rio Rancho. PHOTO CREDIT: Maggie Y.

Robinson

A r o u n d Town

O u t Nort h

ABOVE RIGHT & BOTTOM: Can you

find these mosaics by Patricia

Halloran around town?

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 31


Communities of Bernalillo, Rio Rancho, Placitas

O u t Nort h

BOTH PAGES: Protect Our Wildlife Corridors Community Mosaics -

A project of Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of New Mexico by lead artists:

Laura Robbins and Cirrelda Snider-Bryan. Special thanks to Patricia Halloran,

Lydia Piper, Patrice Schooley, Riha Rothberg and many, many more. NM State

Highway 165 - 1/4 miles east of I-25 exit 242. Drive slowly and you will see

them adorn seventy feet of what was the Placitas Recycling Center wall.

Hundreds of hands joined in to create the Placitas community mural entitled,

“Protect Our Wildlife Corridors”-a project of Pathways, Wildlife Corridors of

New Mexico. Envisioned by Laura, she asked Cirrelda to join her in coordinating

a core group of artists mostly from Placitas who began by creating clay animals

approximating life size. Neighbors who had never worked in clay or mosaic

also had the opportunity to be full participants. Cirrelda led students from

local schools. Working with community over a period of four years resulted in

multiple 6 x 9.5 ft. mosaic panels depicting animals and plants from local life

zones. With a great deal of work, the overall designs happened organically and

magically. All participants are honored on the “Name Panel.” Located 1/4 mile

east from 125 exit 242 on HWY 165. Website: https:// pathwayswc.wordpress.com.

PHOTO CREDITS: Clea Smith Hall (long view and panel portraits), Peter Callen (grouting view).

32 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


Communities of Bernalillo, Rio Rancho, Placitas

O u t Nort h

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 33


Communities of Bernalillo, Rio Rancho, Placitas

O u t Nort h

TOP LEFT: Placitas Heights sign by Gayle

Elaine Scott - NM State Highway 165. PHOTO CREDIT:

Gayle Elaine Scott. MIDDLE LEFT TO RIGHT: Pat

and Bill Bennett Fire Station sign by Daisy Kates

- Sandoval Fire Station #41, 463 NM State Highway

165. Created by Placitas ceramic artist Daisy who

was a volunteer with the fire department as well.

Installed when the new fire station was built in 1994.

PHOTO CREDIT: Laura Robbins. Library sign by Laura

Robbins - NM State Highway 165. Commissioned

by the Placitas Library board the year the first stage

of the library was finished: 2012. PHOTO CREDIT:

Laura Robbins. Wild Hearts Gallery sign by

Laura Robbins - Merc Shopping Center, NM State

Highway 165. PHOTO CREDIT: Laura Robbins.

BOTTOM: Curbside section at The Merc

by Cate Clark - Merc Shopping Center, NM State

Highway 165. PHOTO CREDIT: Laura Robbins.

34 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


Communities of Edgewood, Tijeras, and Mountainair

Outside of Albuquerque to the

East and South — communities of

Edgewood, Mountainair, Tijeras.

Miles to the east and south are

three communities with public

mosaics – all outdoors. Travel east

on I-40 to Edgewood to view the

big mosaic signs at Wildlife West

Nature Park, then backtrack on

I-40 to Tijeras to see their Public

Safety Memorial Park. To arrive

in Mountainair, follow I-40 west

to I-25 south and exit at State

Highway 47 which turns into

US Highway 60 – keep going

east to Mountainair. Or,

directly from Tijeras, travel State

Highway 337 south, then take

State Highway 55 west when

337 ends east of Tajique, for the

“backroads route” to Mountainair.

TOP: Common Ground by Cassandra Reid - Public Safety Memorial Park, 49 Public School Road

87059, Tijeras, NM. Bernalillo County Public Art Program https://www.bernco.gov/community-services/publicart-program.aspx.

PHOTO CREDIT: Bernalillo County Public Art Program. BOTTOM: Wildlife West title sign by a

group of 8 artists, names unknown - Wildlife West Nature Park, 87 N. Frontage Road 87015, Exit 187,

Edgewood, NM. Visit their website for admission, directions, and hours https://wildlifewest.org/wwblog/hoursand-location.

PHOTO CREDIT: Bosha Gordon

O u t South

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 35


Communities of Edgewood, Tijeras, and Mountainair

O u t South

In 2009, the Manzano Mountain

Art Council began an extensive

community mural program which

over the last 12 years has resulted

in the construction of more than

15 community murals. All grace

Mountainair, a rural town of about

950 people in the middle of New

Mexico. Some 50 community artists

and local volunteers collaborated

in the design and construction

of these murals over the years,

contributing to the beauty and

community spirit of the town

and a revival of the tourist trade.

Included here are 5 of the 15

murals. These town businesses,

organizations, and state entities

have supported this effort:

Manzano Mountain Art Council,

Town of Mountainair, Torrance

County, B Street Market, New

Mexico Arts, and the Western

National Parks Association.

36 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico

TOP: Tribute to Mountainair 2012 by Tomás Wolff, project director; Danielle Norris-Gardner,

principal artist; Marianne Hall, design; associate artists: Donna Deiner, Karen Smith, Liz Frackes, Anne

Adams, Anna Hopping, and Wanda Maldonado - East wall of B Street Market, 204 W. Broadway.

MIDDLE LEFT: Basket of Vegetables 2009 by Celeste Simon, Addie Draper, and Tomás Wolff,

coordinator - Front of the B Street Market , 204 W. Broadway, Mountainair.

MIDDLE TOP RIGHT: Reptile Rendezvous 2014 by Samantha Baumgartner, Rebecca Anthony,

and Tomás Wolff project coordinator, plus 12 more associate artists - Visitor Center of the Salinas Pueblo

Missions National Monument, 206 W. Broadway. MIDDLE BOTTOM RIGHT: Maria De Agreda by

Rebecca Anthony, Lore Wills, Anne Ravenstone, Samantha Baumgartner, and Tomás Wolff, coordinator - Art

Council Building at the intersection of US 60 and NM 55 in Mountainair. Originally installed 2016.

ABOVE: Modern Petroglyphs 2010 by Celeste Simon, Kathy Baur, Susan Aulde, Deb Weinman,

Christine Franks, Mary Schultz, Kate Sullivan, Ann Adams, Kathleen Davies, Anita Soluna, Barbara Dinovo,

and Tomás Wolff project coordinator Mountainair Senior Center, 107 North Summit. PHOTO CREDIT: Tomás Wolff.


A Few Projects in Process

These two public projects are currently in process, both at Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge,

south on 2nd street in Albuquerque’s South Valley.

H o r i zo n

ABOVE & LEFT: ALMA Sculpture Project at Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge ALMA Summer Institute is working on a multi-year project at The Valle

de Oro National Wildlife Refuge. Along with returning apprentices they will be hiring youth directly out of the Mountain View Community, South Valley, and Isleta

Pueblo. During the program, apprentices will help finalize a large-scale mosaic design on free-standing concrete sculptures, cut tiles from wet clay, glaze and fire

tiles, install, and grout the large-scale mosaic mural. There will be a total of four free standing sculptures done over the course of two summers (2021 & 2022).

The designs for the forms and the mosaic mural that will cover the facade is 100% influenced by community consultations that were done via Zoom interviews

from people out of the Mountain View Community and Isleta Pueblo. ALMA believes in place keeping and highlighting the beauty that already exists within

communities. These sculptures will reflect the people, plants, animals and histories of the land that is now protected from becoming another industrial site.

Please contact the staff at Valle De Oro to inquire about best visiting times: https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Valle_de_Oro/contact.html PHOTO CREDIT: Margarita Paz-Pedro

ABOVE: Bee the Change by Jade Leyva. Other artists include: Endion Schichtel, Priscilla Garcia, Noel Dora Chilton, Ashley Cummings, Cate Clark, Christian

Michael Gallegos, Donna Dowell, Dennie York, Emily Schuyler - Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge classroom (not open to the public on regular basis) - 7851

2nd St. SW. Each of the 9 hexagons measures 3’ wide, and was created with seeds and the community to raise awareness about the importance of bees and their

deep connection to everything else. These panels will be integrated into curriculum for students and youth. This was donated to Valle del Oro Wildlife Refuge and will

be displayed in the classroom adjacent to new Visitor Center, which will not be open to the public on regular basis. Please contact the staff at Valle De Oro to inquire

about best visiting times: https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Valle_de_Oro/contact.html PHOTO CREDIT: Jade Leyva

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 37


Inspiring Mosaics in Non-public Places

A r o u n d Town

38 | Mosaics of Central New Mexico


Inspiring Mosaics in Non-public Places

Inspiring mosaics abound in non-public spaces — residences, hospitals, schools.

Perhaps you’ll see these around town.

A r o u n d Town

OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP: Tile House by Beverley Magennis and Erin

Magennis. MIDDLE RIGHT: “No doubt the universe...” by Kimberly

Humphries and students. LOWER LEFT: Spiral Tree by Elizabeth Hogan,

Jose Simbana, and students. LOWER RIGHT: Trolls by Maggie Y. Robinson,

and students.

THIS PAGE, TOP LEFT: Origins by Marina Rabinowitz.

TOP RIGHT: Tree House by Ophelia Adelai Cornet and students.

ABOVE RIGHT: Turquoise Cloud House façade by Julianna Kirwin.

LOWER LEFT: Heart and Hands by Ann Dunbar and students.

Mosaics of Central New Mexico | 39

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