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Chaldean News – November 2011

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CIA_DC008536B_ChalNews


CONTENTS NOVEMBER 2011

THE CHALDEAN NEWS VOLUME 8 ISSUE X

40

On the Cover:

Wayne State

University has a

slew of Chaldean

medical students,

among them:

Front row left:

Tassia Mekani

Rachel Ransom

Nena Auraha

Candice Mansoor

Julie Kado

Maria Kashat

Second row left:

Bianca Jiddou

Lawrence Bahoura

Amanda Jiddou

Johnathon Markus

Ramy Alosachie

Karam Asmaro

Shawn Gappy

Sarah Gorgis

Top row left:

Patrick Atisha

Branden Yaldou

Jeremy Farida

Brandon Mansoor

Photo by

David Reed

departments

10 From the Editor

12 Noteworthy

14 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

16 Chai Time

18 Guest Columns

By Michael Sarafa

October news frenzy is cause for

hope, caution, frustration

By N. Peter Antone

When voting, look at the big picture

By Fr. Anthony Kathawa

Why we must attend the Chaldean Church

21 Religion

21 Obituaries

42 Arts and Entertainment

By Joyce Wiswell

Detroit in Focus: Photographer shares

his love for the city

44 Boushala

By Hayat Sepo

Hameth Kibbee ‘d Girsa: Wheat Kibbee

in Traditional Sauce

46 In Good Health

By Vanessa Denha Garmo

The Cold Facts: How to avoid the ‘SAD’

winter blues

48 Iraq Today

U.S. drops plans to keep troops in Iraq

50 The Counselor Is In

By Iklas J. Bashi

10 keys to healing overindulgence

52 Classified Listings

54 Events

Chaldean Idol

on the cover

22 Doctors in the House

By Joyce Wiswell

Chaldeans are flooding the medical field

23 A Long Road

By Weam Namou

Iraqi-born physicians face many hurdles

features

26 Executive Approach

By Vanessa Denha Garmo

Ficano, Patterson and Jackson talk business

30 One for the Books?

By Joyce Wiswell

Attorney advocates for Kwame Kilpatrick

32 Last Stop: Justice Town

By Vanessa Denha Garmo

Chaldean prevails in SMART case

34 Unity at Last

By Weam Namou

Many groups back Nineveh plan

36 Fairest of Them All

By Joyce Wiswell

Kristen Danyal wins state title

38 Detroit’s Brand

Ambassador

By Crystal Kassab Jabiro

Lauren Bacall shines on Fox Sports

40 Sports

By Steve Stein

Roundup

NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 9


from the EDITOR

Published By

The Chaldean News, LLC

Editorial

Editor in Chief

Vanessa Denha-Garmo

managing Editor

Joyce Wiswell

Contributing Writers

N. Peter Antone

Iklas Bashi

Crystal Kassab Jabiro

Fr. Anthony Kathawa

Weam Namou

Michael Sarafa

Steve Stein

PROOFREADER

Valerie Cholagh

art & production

creative director

Alex Lumelsky with SKY Creative

graphic designers

Zina Lumelsky with SKY Creative

Joseph Sesi

Photographer

David Reed

Time will tell

On the day President

Barack Obama announced

that all

American troops will leave

Iraq and be home for Christmas,

I could not help but

think what this means for the

Christians left behind — the

ones who have been persecuted

since the war began.

Who will protect them?

Coincidently the war coincided

with the launch of the

Chaldean News and so since

our inception and the invasion

in Iraq, we have covered the situation

in our homeland extensively and from

various angles. We will continue to bring

Vanessa

denha-garmo

editor in chief

co-publisher

Lunch. The FBI investigation

into Wayne County fortunately

did not dominate the discussion

at the event. Major issues

regarding incentives for

businesses developing in Detroit,

mass transit and right to

work zones were addressed

by panelists Ficano, Oakland

County Executive L. Brooks

Patterson and George Jackson

from the Detroit Economic

Growth Corp.

As the panelists were

asked questions, we wait for

the answers because at this point only

time will tell.

As time passes, truths brought to

for people during the winter season. It

is an illness that I have covered numerous

times over the years while working

as a health reporter for WJR. I drafted a

short feature on the issue packed with

valuable information about the ailment

and what can be done about it.

So many people are anxiously waiting

for the day we spring the clocks forward

because for them it is truly time

that will tell how they will feel from one

day to the next.

As we enjoy the holiday season and

hope January and February will whiz by,

some of our readers have been waiting

for part two of Iklas Bashi’s piece

on indulgence. She takes an in-depth

look into this issue of giving our kids

operations

Interlink Media

director of operations

Paul Alraihani

circulation

Paul Alraihani

CLASSIFIEDS

Joyce Wiswell

So much in world today is unknown; it is the reason Scripture tells us

as Christians to take it one day at time. We wake up every morning

and we face the day at hand.

sales

Interlink Media

sales representativeS

Interlink Media

Lisa Kalou

Lamya Kory

managers

Vanessa Denha-Garmo

Martin Manna

Michael Sarafa

subscriptions: $25 per year

The Chaldean News

29850 Northwestern Highway, Suite 250

Southfield, MI 48034

www.chaldeannews.com

Phone: (248) 996-8360

Publication: The Chaldean News (P-6); Published

monthly; Issue Date: November 2011 Subscriptions:

12 months, $25. Publication Address: 29850 Northwestern

Hwy., Suite 250, Southfield, MI 48034; Application

to Mail at Periodicals Postage Rates is Pending at

Farmington Hills Post Office Postmaster: Send address

changes to “The Chaldean News 29850 Northwestern

Highway, Suite 250, Southfield, MI 48034”

you stories as they develop about the

displaced Christians and refugees and

the on-going discussion of the Nineveh

Plains region among many other stories

that I am sure will arise as time goes by.

As you know, time will tell the fate of

others. Therefore, we wait.

As the troops pack up and head

home, we bring you a couple of stories

about Iraq. As this issue hits the stands

and is delivered to your homes, we are

already working on Iraq-related stories

for December.

As Christians in Iraq await their

fate so does Wayne County Executive

Robert Ficano, who was a panelist

last month at the Chaldean American

Chamber of Commerce Business

light and programs develop in the political

arena, more and more Chaldeans

are entering medical school. We found

this fact of such interest that the story

is this month’s cover feature. As they

learn about the human anatomy, what

type of medicine they end up practicing

or where they will practice — for the

most part — is an unknown.

In fact, so much in the world today is

unknown; it is the reason Scripture tells

us as Christians to take it one day at time.

We wake up every morning and we face

the day at hand. In the winter months, the

days may be tougher to face for some

people than they are for others.

Seasonal Affective Disorder, also

known as SAD, is a serious problem

too much. She also includes a valuable

list of reading materials that can help

parents in their most important vocation

— raising a child.

As you read this issue, taking in every

story and the wealth of information,

we work diligently on the next issue as

you will wait for it to be delivered. What

will be inside? I don’t know even yet.

Like so many unknowns in life, time

can only tell!

Alaha Imid Koullen

(God Be With Us All)

Vanessa Denha-Garmo

vdenha@chaldeannews.com

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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN 9/21/11 NEWS 9:25 AM11


noteworthy

Auto Accidents Claim

Young Lives

Recent car accidents in Metro Detroit

have claimed the lives of three Chaldeans

in their 20s.

Two Chaldeans in their 20s were

killed on I-75, just north of Eight Mile in

Hazel Park, on October 12.

21-year-old Feras Salem and 26-yearold

Madonna Jarbo, both from Sterling

Heights, died at the scene. Madonna’s

sister, 20-year-old Marietta Jarbo, was

critically injured. Family members said

she was not wearing a seat belt because

it was stuck between the back seats. As

a result, she was thrown through a window,

which may have saved her life.

The three were traveling in a Lincoln

that skid off the freeway and slammed

into a retaining wall. They were reportedly

returning home after a Detroit Tigers

game.

A few weeks earlier, on September

27, Karam Khalil Hanna, 22, was killed

when his auto was hit by a truck at 12

Mile and Novi roads in Novi. He had

just graduated in August from Lawrence

Tech University and was driving

home after studying at the library.

Grocers Hail Food

Stamp Changes

In a state where 1.9 million people

receive food stamps, a new system

that expands food-stamp distribution

throughout each month has stabilized

Michigan’s grocery business, according

to the state’s largest association of

independent grocers.

November marks the completion of

the 11-month transition of the new food

stamp distribution, which had been an

issue for the state of Michigan for more

than a decade.

AFPD and its members spent several

years trying to solve an ongoing

problem for businesses that accept

food stamps. In November 2010, an

agreement was reached to solve a

major operating problem. The old food

stamp distribution system resulted in

stores being extremely busy during

the first 10 days of the month when

the food stamps were distributed, then

turning into near ghost towns the last

15 to 20 days of the month.

The new plan migrated from a “3rd

and 10th day of each month” distribution

to a strategic distribution encompassing

a nearly three-week period — from the

3rd through the 22nd of each month.

expected to host 17,000 Syriacs who

live in Istanbul.

“Half of our community lives in and

around Yesilköy. We rent churches for

Sunday rites, but we can only start

morning mass at 11:30, whereas we

are supposed to finish our Sunday rites

before 10:30 in accordance with our

tradition,” Kenan Altınısık, a prominent

Syriac community leader, told the Hürriyet

Daily News via e-mail.

The church site will be allocated to the

ancient community by the Istanbul Metropolitan

Municipality, while construction

expenses will be paid for by the Syriacs.

New Cars Drive

Church Raffles

Fancy a new car? Two Chaldean

churches are raffling off luxury vehicles

as fundraisers.

Mother of God in Southfield has a

raffle to win a 2012 Audi A4. The drawing

is December 9 at the Farmington

Hills Manor.

In Sterling Heights, Holy Martyrs’

raffle has a 2012 BMW X3 2012 as a

grand prize. Its drawing is on December

17 at Bellagio (Bella) Banquet Hall

in Warren.

The two churches had unwittingly

each scheduled their drawing for the

same day. Holy Martyrs offered to

change its Christmas party and drawing

date until a week later.

Each raffle has a second prize of

$1,000 and a third prize of $500.

For tickets ($10 each), call Mother

of God at (248) 356-0565 and Holy

Martyrs at (586) 803-3114.

ECRC Celebrates

10 Years

The Eastern Christian Re-Evangelization

Center (ECRC) celebrates its

10th anniversary with a dinner on November

18.

The group is comprised of lay

people dedicated to helping fellow

Chaldean community members grow

in faith and build a stronger, more intimate

relationship with Jesus Christ.

The ECRC offers Bible study, youth

programs, prison ministries, vacation

Bible school, a women’s group, spiritual

retreats and more. All programs

are funded by private donations.

Sponsors are sought for the dinner,

which will also benefit the next phase of

evangelization, the Mar Toma Production

Studio.

Contact the ECRC at (248) 538-

9903 or visit ECRC.us for more information.

Building Community

Event Addresses

Women’s Health

“Myths, Facts and Secrets: Issues in

Women’s Health” is the topic of an event

sponsored by the Chaldean/Jewish

Building Community Initiative and Providence

Park Hospital on November 1.

The event includes health screenings,

a tour of the Temple Israel sanctuary

and panel discussions on menopause,

stress, breast and ovarian

cancers and nutrition. It takes place

from 8-11:30 a.m., Temple Israel, 5725

Walnut Lake Road, West Bloomfield.

Call (866) 501-3627 to register.

People

Warren Brandes, DO,

has been named a Top

Doc by Hour Magazine in

the field of Otolaryngology

(ear, nose and throat).

He practices at ENT Surgical

Associates, PC.

The 2011 edition

of Super Lawyers has

Warren

Brandes, DO

named John Hindo as a Rising Star

in the areas of business and corporate

law. Hindo is a partner in the law firm

of Mekani, Orow, Mekani, Shallal &

Hindo, P.C., in Birmingham.

Turkey’s Syriacs

Will Get Church

Turkey’s Syriac Christian community

has secured approval from officials for

the construction of its first church. It is

Friends and family celebrate in Greektown after competing the Detroit Half Marathon of October 16 – a 13.1 mile feat. The team ran

in honor of Lana Atto and to raise money for the Lupus Foundation of America. “Lana was one of a kind. If you were one of the lucky

people who knew Lana, then you knew how she inspired everyone,” said her sister, Paulette George.

12 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 13


VOL. 8 ISSUE X

VOL. 8 ISSUE IX

VOL. 8 IssUE V I

VOL. 8 ISSUE V I

METRO DETROIT CHALDEAN COMMUNITY NOVEMBER 2011

$ 2

Community Bulletin Board

Women Warriors

Can We Talk?

Joan Rivers was the

headliner at a DMC fundraiser

on September 17 at

Andiamos Warren. Leila

Kello and Mariann Sarafa

managed to grab a moment

with the comedian.

It takes more than cold, rainy, windy weather to

scare these ladies. Valerie Cholagh, Sharon

Hannawa and Sathab Abbo-Ousachi braved

the rotten elements on October 15 to represent

the Chaldean American Chamber of Commerce

in the Making Strides Against Breast

Cancer event on Belle Isle. The chamber team

raised nearly $2,000 for the cause.

Flying High

Helda Gabrial Sinawi Durham has been named to the

2011 Chairman’s Club for Delta Airlines — the highest

honor an employee can accomplish. As a Performance

Leader (Customer Service Manager), Durham supervised

frontline employees including gate agents. Durham started

with Northwest Airlines 16 years ago as an Arabic Customer

Service Agent at Detroit Metro Airport and was just

promoted to ATW Station Manager/Department Head.

She is seen here at the Delta awards ceremony in Atlanta

with her husband, Gregory, on October 6. The couple

lives in Novi and has three children.

Have an item for the Bulletin Board? Send it to

Chaldean News, 29850 Northwestern

Highway, Southfield, MI 48034, or e-mail

info@chaldeannews.com.

METRO DETROIT CHALDEAN COMMUNITY AUGUST 2011

INSIDE

We’re Everywhere!

Find the Chaldean News at

these and other fine retail

locations.

Birmingham Drugs

33877 Woodward

Birmingham

Busch’s Food Market

33300 W. 14 Mile

West Bloomfield

Efro’s Drugs

6427 Orchard Lake

West Bloomfield

Farm Fresh

13151 10 Mile

Oak Park

Heartland Market

32350 W. 12 Mile

Farmington Hills

Lincoln Drugs

25901 Coolidge Highway

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Mills Pharmacy

1740 W. Maple

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Orchard Market

31511 13 Mile

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Park Place

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Novi

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INSIDE

INsIDE

DETECTING WITH JASON ABRO

FR. PIERRE JOINS THE RANKS

NEWS FROM IRAQ

CRUSHING

COMPETITION

MONEY MATTERs

pOLs COME TO TOwN

bACK TO sCHOOL TIME

sCALINg

NEw

HEIgHTs

PARENTING TIPS

WELCOMING HALLOWEEN

ART FROM E’ROOTHA

Corporate

welfare could

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independents

Ain’t no mountain

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Rob McKany

NEIGHBORHOOD

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METRO DETROIT CHALDEAN COMMUNITY sEpTEMbER 2011

METRO DETROIT CHALDEAN COMMUNITY OCTOBER 2011

www.chaldeannews.com

www.chaldeannews.com

RECALLING LIFE-CHANGING JOURNEYS

DOCTORS IN THE HOUSE

INSIDE

MEET MISS MICHIGAN USA

U.S. LEAVING IRAQ FOR GOOD

FR. ANTHONY ON THE IMPORTANCE

OF CHALDEAN MASS

Chaldeans are flooding

the medical field

www.chaldeannews.com

$ 3

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www.chaldeannews.com

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CATHOLIC

SCHOOLS:

THE COMPLETE LIST

14 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 15


Sat. Nov. 5th Sun. Nov. 6th

CHAI time

chaldeans conNecting

community events in and around metro detroit NOVEMBER 2011

[Tuesday, November 1]

Health: “Myths, Facts and Secrets: Issues

in Women’s Health” is the topic of

an event sponsored the Chaldean/Jewish

Building Community Initiative and

Providence Park Hospital. The event

includes health screenings, a tour of

the Temple Israel sanctuary and panel

discussions on menopause, stress,

breast and ovarian cancers and nutrition.

8-11:30 a.m., Temple Israel, 5725

Walnut Lake Road, West Bloomfield.

(866) 501-3627.

[Thursday, November 3]

Shopping: Chaldean American Ladies

of Charity hold their annual Holiday

Shopping Extravaganza. 6-10 p.m.,

Shenandoah Country Club. Tickets

are $20 and must be purchased in advance.

(248) 538-8300.

[Friday, November 4]

Health: The American Heart Association

and Detroit Medical Center’s

Cardiovascular Institute launch the

first-ever “My Heart. My Life.” free

community health screening event,

which aims to provide free heart health

screenings to 1,000 men and women.

In addition to blood pressure, cholesterol,

Body Mass Index and glucose

screenings, the event includes fitness

demonstrations, healthy cooking demos,

health panels and local celebrity

guest appearances. 7:30 a.m.-3:30

p.m., GM Wintergarden, 400 Renaissance

Center, Detroit.

[Sunday, November 6]

Forum: Community Forum is geared

toward Chaldean and Arab communities

and will include free medical

testing, legal and immigration

advice and information on civic and

civil services. 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Bradley

Hall (located between Our Lady

of Fatima and Mar Addai churches),

13500 Oak Park Boulevard, Oak

Park. Sponsored by Oak Park Medical

Clinic, (248) 546-9100.

[Thursday, November 10]

Chamber: The annual meeting and

elections to the board of directors

takes place at 6 p.m. at Shenandoah

Country Club. Open only to

members of the Chaldean American

Chamber of Commerce. RSVP to

lkalou@chaldeanChamber.com or call

(248) 996-8340.

[Friday, November 11]

Women: It’s Ladies Night at the Regency

Manor in Southfield. Tickets are

$40. (248) 353-1133.

[Friday, November 18]

Anniversary: The Eastern Catholic

Re-evangelization Center (ECRC) celebrates

its 10th anniversary with a party

at Shenandoah Country Club. The

theme is “Lights, Camera, Evangelize”

and cocktails begin at 6:30 p.m.

Neran@ecrc.us or (248) 538-9903.

[Thursday, November 24]

Thanksgiving: “So Much to Believe

In” is the theme of the 85th annual

Thanksgiving Parade, one of the country’s

oldest. It steps off at 9:20 a.m.

on Woodward Avenue and Mack and

ends at Woodward and Congress in

downtown Detroit. The Parade.org.

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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 17


GUEST columns

October news frenzy is cause for hope, caution, frustration

“Remembering that you are

going to die is the best way

I know to avoid the trap of

thinking you have something

to lose. You are already

naked. There is no reason

not to follow your heart.”

– Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs

October began with the

passing of Steve Jobs, a

great American whose

legacy puts him in the ranks of Benjamin

Franklin, Thomas Edison and

Henry Ford. He changed the way

the world works, plays and communicates.

His technological and

business leadership during life is

unrivaled for its brilliance and success.

But it was through the news

coverage of his death that we learned

about his clairvoyant approach to

life. We’ll never know for sure how

his approach, the essence captured in

Michael G.

Sarafa

SPECIAL TO THE

CHALDEAN NEWS

the quote above, improved

his faith, family and business

life. But it obviously

did. As one of the richest

men in the world, he may

be the best example ever

that material goods do not

accompany you to your

resting place.

Detroit Sports

The week of October 9

was one for the local sports

history books. It was emotional and

physically exhausting for sports fans

and non-fans alike. That Sunday,

the Lions had an exciting win over

the Bears and the Tigers were rained

out. The next day, however, the

Tigers lost game 2 of the ALCS in

11 innings, returning to Detroit for

a three-game home stand down 2-0

to the Rangers. Four days later, they

were knocked out of the playoffs in

a week that included another 11-inning

game. The Tigers and their fans

were spent. But what a season and

what great fun in the playoffs! By

October 15, the Red Wings were off

to a 4-0 season start and the Spartans

and Wolverines were getting ready to

rumble in East Lansing.

The Economy

No doubt that the sports environment

has contributed to a positive

mood in Michigan but there are other

signs of improvement too. Michigan’s

unemployment rate is coming down,

the auto companies are profitable and

the state budget is in the black thanks

to greater than expected revenues.

Franchise companies are showing renewed

interest in southeast Michigan

while office occupancy rates seem to

have stabilized. In Detroit, Dan Gilbert

and his various enterprises are almost

singlehandedly creating another

downtown rebirth. Whether these

and other efforts prove sustainable

remains to be seen. But lots of good

stuff is happening and the important

indicators are moving in the right direction.

Most importantly, there is a

change in attitude of our corporate,

civic and business leadership. Detroit

News columnist Daniel Howes put

it best in a recent column in a line

that sounds like he’s referring to Jim

Schwartz and the Lions. But he’s really

talking about something more important.

“For what I see, and the growing

evidence supports, are entrenched

institutions finally burying denial and

apathy, passing through resignation

and arriving at renewal. New leadership

is managing the broken pieces of

the past that has ‘chronic loser’ written

all over them, and their people are

no longer playing not to lose.”

Wayne County

This new attitude is apparent everywhere

except in the Wayne County’s

Executive office. A story that started

18 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


with an overly generous and imprudent

severance package has evolved

into a potentially major scandal. As

history has shown us over and over,

the cover-up appears to be worse

than the crime. The daily dose of

media stories and the frenzy surrounding

Robert Ficano and his staff

reminds us all of an episode that the

city would rather not be reminded

about. Just when it seems we can

move on, we get another poison brew

of authority, entitlement and cozy relationships.

I am sure some of what

has been laid out is unfair and maybe

even untrue. But I am also sure we

have not seen the end of this saga.

At a time when people are feeling

a little better and things are looking

up, the Wayne County Executive

needs to resolve this situation, quickly,

transparently and decisively. It’s

very frustrating to the citizenry. We

deserve more and better. But in the

end, it’s not that big of a deal. We

are already naked.

Michael Sarafa is the president of the

Bank of Michigan and a co-publisher

of the Chaldean News.

When voting, look at the big picture

Many in our community

view the

issue of abortion

as a struggle between good

and evil. For some, the antiabortion

stance of a politician

is the sole criteria for

voting for the candidate.

They assume that if a politician

claims to be anti-abortion,

he or she must be good

enough to vote for.

But, what if a politician

adopts an anti-abortion position,

simply to gain more votes, while at

the same time, advocating wars or

military expansion? What if he disregards

issues of social fairness and

justice? What if a politician’s true

motive is not the preservation of life,

but merely to garner financial support

and campaign contributions?

How do we know if such a politician

would not seek to obtain an abortion

for an unwed teen daughter?

N. Peter

Antone

special to the

chaldean news

We should examine

a candidate on every issue

and see if the position

he or she espouses

truly reflect our values

in other respects as well.

We should be concerned

about being taken advantage

of by those whose

sincerity we can never be

sure of.

No one I know, including

many who are

pro-choice, enjoys or celebrates

abortion. Most people agree that in

any instance, abortion is a tragedy.

Should we not open dialogue with

those politicians with whom we

might disagree, but who are willing

to adopt policies aiming at reducing

unwanted pregnancies, such as

by improving education?

In any case, regardless of one’s

position, we need to watch politicians

who claim to be against abortion

only to gain votes and support,

when in their own private affairs and

in many other positions, they act in

ways opposed to Christian values.

The way to do that would be to judge

Be concerned

about being taken

advantage of by those

whose sincerity we

can never be sure of.

our politicians not on a single issue,

but on their overall stands and on

the content of their character and

their actions.

N. Peter Antone is an immigration

attorney in Farmington Hills and an

adjunct professor of Immigration and

Nationality Law at Michigan State

University School of Law.

NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 19


GUEST column

Why we must attend the Chaldean Church


We are all Catholic

… does it matter

which church I

go to?” This is a question

that I hear from many people

within the Chaldean

community.

I decided to survey a

number of people of all

ages and backgrounds and

asked why they as Chaldeans

go to Roman Catholic

Churches — the Church

more commonly known

as the “American Church.” Many

people stated various reasons in the

survey. Simply stated, Chaldeans

choose to go to Roman Catholic

Churches because the church is

closer to their house, they go to that

particular Catholic school so they go

to Mass there, or there is no traffic

jam in the parking lot at the Roman

Catholic Church.

Although the reasoning may

seem sound, it is not justified. We

need to belong to the Church that

we originated from, the Chaldean

Catholic Church. We are immensely

blessed to have a Church that

holds wonderful traditions, meaning,

spirituality and history. All these

were preserved because of the enormous

efforts and bloodshed given

by our ancestors. In our family trees,

there are many grandparents, great

grandparents and their parents who

fought and struggled to keep our faith

and the Chaldean Church alive.

From the start of the Chaldean

Church, which began immediately

after the death of Christ, until now,

the Chaldean Church has been the

only Church called the Church of

Fr. Anthony

Kathawa

special to the

chaldean news

Martyrs. From the beginning

until now, the faithful

of the Church have been

constantly persecuted and

constantly shedding their

blood to keep our Church

alive. Even today in Iraq,

Chaldeans are in a religious

battle trying to keep their

religion alive for themselves

and the next generations. It

saddens me when Chaldeans

abandon their Church for

the sake of convenience. We

need to honor our family, honor our

ancestors, honor our martyrs, and do

our best to keep our Church alive by

practicing our faith inside our Chaldean

Churches in America. We need

to continue to strive and keep our

Church going by supporting it.

We need to be active in our parishes

and support our Church. We

should not let ourselves stray away

for any reason. Some of the other

reasons for not going to Church

raised by Chaldeans is that they feel

they must dress up because they are

attending a fashion show, the Mass is

too long, it is difficult to understand

the Mass, or other people who attend

Mass attend for the wrong reasons.

These artificial reasons are the

works of the devil. They stand to

keep us away from our home — the

Chaldean Church. As Jesus said in

Matthew 7:15, “beware of false prophets

who come to you in sheep’s clothing,

but underneath are ravenous

wolves.” These falsehoods for not attending

Chaldean Mass are the devil’s

way of rationalizing why it is OK to

not attend. However, the reasons are

clothed in sheep’s clothing — seemingly

justifiable yet detrimental to a

Church that has withstood the test of

time. We need to have a stronger focus

on our faith and love for God without

distraction and recognize who we are

as God created us … Chaldeans.

Therefore, Chaldean Church

Law — Eastern Code of Canon Law

approved by Rome — states, “they

[Catholics] are to fulfill with great

diligence the duties which they owe

to the universal Church and to their

own Church of their own Rite.” (Eastern

Code of Canon Law, can.12, par.2)

Notwithstanding what the Chaldean

Church Law states, it is the Roman

Catholic Church that mandates

we must attend Mass at the Chaldean

Church. The Second Vatican

Council, a council of the Roman

Catholic Church states, “each and

every Catholic must retain each his

own Rite wherever he is, and follow

it to the best of his ability.” (Vatican

II Council, par. 4) In other words, attending

Chaldean Mass is not only

prescribed by the Chaldean Church,

it is a mandate of the Roman Catholic

Church. Thus, the Roman Catholic

Church that you may attend

prescribes, through authority of the

Pope, that you attend your own Rite.

Therefore, we must renounce the

traps of the devil that prohibit us from

attending the Chaldean Church. Our

Church is the defining element of who

we are. We are Chaldean not only

because of a language or culture, but

because of the Church! It is the common

thread that unites us together as

one community in Christ. Your participation

in the Chaldean Church

honors, exemplifies and resurrects the

bloodshed and glory of the past and

symbolizes the continuation of a unified

Chaldean Church. We must stand

strong and dedicated to our Church.

Chaldean Church Law — Eastern Code of Canon Law approved by

Rome — states, “they [Catholics] are to fulfill with great diligence the

duties which they owe to the universal Church and to their own Church

of their own Rite.”

As Saint Paul emphasized, “We

should not stay away from our assembly,

as is the custom of some.” (Hebrews

10:25) We should all encourage

one another to remain as one

strong Chaldean Church body with

no division. For God has so constructed

the body (our Church) so as

to not allow division among its parts.

(1 Cor. 12:24-25)

Fr. Anthony Kathawa of Mother of

God Chaldean Catholic Church in

Southfield was ordained in May 2010.

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20 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


eligion

places of prayer

chaldean churches in and around metro detroit

THE DIOCESE OF ST. THOMAS THE APOSTLE

IN THE UNITED STATES

St. Thomas Chaldean Catholic Diocese

25603 Berg Road, Southfield, MI 48033; (248) 351-0440

Mar (Bishop) Ibrahim N. Ibrahim

www.chaldeandiocese.org

HOLY MARTYRS CHALDEAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

43700 Merrill, Sterling Heights, MI 48312; (586) 803-3114

Rector: Rev. Manuel Boji

Parochial Vicar: Rev. Ayad Khanjaro

Mass Schedule: Weekdays, 9 a.m. in Chaldean; Saturday, 5

p.m. in English; Sunday: 9 a.m. in Chaldean and Arabic, 10:30

a.m. in English, morning prayer at noon, high mass at 12:30 p.m.

in Chaldean.

MAR ADDAI CHALDEAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

24010 Coolidge Highway, Oak Park, MI 48237; (248) 547-4648

Pastor: Rev. Stephen Kallabat

Parochial Vicars: Rev. Fadi Habib Khalaf, Rev. Suleiman Denha

Mass Schedule: Weekdays, 12 noon; Sunday, 10 a.m. in Sourath

and Arabic, 12:30 p.m. in Sourath

MOTHER OF GOD CHALDEAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

25585 Berg Road, Southfield, MI 48034; (248) 356-0565

Rector: Rev. Wisam Matti

Parochial Vicar: Rev. Anthony Kathawa

Bible Study: 7-9 p.m. for High School Ages in English; 7-9 p.m.

College/Young Adult in English

Mass Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 8 a.m. mass in

English; Tuesday, 9 p.m. mass in English; Wednesday, noon-midnight,

adoration; Saturday, 5:15 p.m. in English; Sunday: 8:30

a.m. in Arabic, 10 a.m. in English, noon in Chaldean,

7 p.m. in English

OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP MISSION

Located inside St. Sylvester Church

11200 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48093; (586) 804-2114

Pastors: Fr. Fadi Philip and Fr. Fawaz Kako

Mass Schedule: Sunday 12:30 p.m. in Arabic and Chaldean

SACRED HEART CHALDEAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

310 W. Seven Mile Road, Detroit, MI 48203; (313) 368-6214

Pastor: Fr. Sameem Belius

Mass Schedule: Friday, 6 p.m. in Chaldean; Sunday

11 a.m. in Chaldean

ST. GEORGE CHALDEAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

45700 Dequindre Road, Shelby Township, MI 48317; (586) 254-7221

Pastor: Msgr. Emanuel Hana Isho Shaleta

Assistant Pastors: Fr. Pierre Konja, Fr. Basel Yaldo

Mass Schedule: Weekdays, 10 a.m. in Chaldean; Wednesdays, 7

p.m.; adoration and confession from 8-10 p.m.; Saturday, 6:30 p.m.

in English (during the school year); 6:30 p.m. (in Chaldean during

the summer); Sunday: 8:30 a.m. in Chaldean, 10 a.m. in Arabic,

11:30 a.m. in English, 1:15 p.m. in Chaldean; 7:30 p.m. in English.

Tuesdays: Circle of Friends (teenage girls) 6:30 p.m.; Wednesdays,

Adult English Bible Study at 8 p.m.; Thursdays, Teen Bible Study at

6:30 p.m.; Fridays, Arabic Bible Study at 8 p.m.

ST. JOSEPH CHALDEAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

2442 E. Big Beaver Road, Troy, MI 48083; (248) 528-3676

Pastor: Msgr. Zouhair Toma (Kejbou)

Parochial Vicar: Fr. Rudy Zoma

Mass Schedule: Weekdays, 10 a.m. in Chaldean; Saturday,

5 p.m. in English and Chaldean; Sunday, 8 a.m. in Chaldean, 9:30

a.m. in Arabic, 11 a.m. in English, 12:30 p.m. in Chaldean, 2:15 in

Chaldean and Arabic. Baptisms: 3 p.m. on Sundays.

ST. MARY HOLY APOSTOLIC

CATHOLIC ASSYRIAN CHURCH OF THE EAST

4320 E. 14 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48092; (586) 825-0290

Rector: Fr. Benjamin Benjamin

Mass Schedule: Sunday, 9 a.m. in Assyrian; 12 noon in Assyrian

and English

ST. THOMAS CHALDEAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

6900 Maple Road, West Bloomfield, MI 48322; (248) 788-2460

Pastor: Rev. Frank Kalabat

Rev. Emanuel Rayes (retired)

Parochial Vicar: Rev. Jirgus Abrahim

Mass Schedule: Weekdays, 10 a.m. in Sourath; Saturday, 5

p.m. in English; Sunday 9 a.m. in English, 10:30 a.m. in English,

12:30 p.m. in Sourath, 2 p.m. in Arabic. First Thursday and Friday

of each month, Holy Hour 10 a.m., Mass 11 a.m. in Sourath.

Saturday 3 p.m., Night Vespers (Ramsha) in Sourath. Every

Wednesday from midnight to Thursday midnight, adoration in the

Baptismal Room. Grotto is open 24/7 for prayer and reflection.

ST. TOMA SYRIAC CATHOLIC CHURCH

25600 Drake Road, Farmington Hills, MI 48335; (248) 478-0835

Pastor: Rev. Toma Behnama

Fr. Safaa Habash

Mass Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 6 p.m.; Sunday

12 p.m. All masses are in Syriac, Arabic and English

Love thy enemy

Words from Christ Jesus about

enemies in this world:

“But I say to you who hear: Love

your enemies, do good to those who hate

you, bless those who curse you, and pray

for those who spitefully use you ... But if

you love those who love you, what credit

is that to you? For even sinners love those

who love them. And if you do good to

those who do good to you, what credit

is that to you? For even sinners do the

same.” (Luke 6:27, 28; 32, 33)

Ten ways to love thy enemy

• Pray for them

• Be kind even when they are hurtful

• Say something nice about them

even when others are criticizing

• Think positive thoughts about

them

• Share advice with them that has

helped you in the past

• Find goodness in them every day

• Share Christ with them by using

Him as an example during a discussion

• When things between you are at

their worst ask yourself, What would

Jesus do?

• Stay silent at the moment you want

to scream the loudest at the person

• Ask God for strength to do all the

above!

Prayer for Our Enemies

Jesus, Prince of Peace,

you have asked us to love our enemies

and pray for those who persecute us.

We pray for our enemies and those

who oppose us.

With the help of the Holy Spirit,

may all people learn to work together

for that justice which brings true and

lasting peace.

To you be glory and honor for ever

and ever.

OBITUARIES

Karam Khalil Hanna

Karam Khalil Hanna was killed in a car accident

in Novi on September 27, 2011. He

was born July 13, 1989 in Bakhdida, Iraq.

After he finished elementary school in

Bakhdida, Karam and his family moved

to Jordan for a few years. He came to

Michigan in 2003.

An excellent student, Karam graduated from Lutheran

High School and then applied for the engineering program at

Lawrence Tech University. He just graduated in August 2011,

and had applied for a master degree program in architecture.

Karam worked as a manager at the Holiday Inn & Suites

in Farmington Hills. He enjoyed working out, playing soccer

and hanging out with friends. He was one of the smartest

students in his class, and was very kind.

Karma was the only son of Khalil Hanna and Faeza Anton.

He is also survived by his sisters, Hiba, Zina and Lucy.

Recently deceased

Community members

Sami Tobia

Roumayah

November 24,

1933 - October

17, 2011

Dalia Dabish

Salem

March 16, 1975

- October 17,

2011

Shawkat Jarjis

Etta

July 1, 1922

- October 14,

2011

Jameel Hana

Sheena

July 1, 1930

- October 6,

2011

Fuad Atto

March 28,

1930 -

October 13,

2011

Abraheem

Murad Abbo

July 1, 1943 -

September 27,

2011

Hasena Hajjar

Zaitona

January 1, 1927 -

October 6,

2011

Ablahad Salim

Dawood

July 1, 1929 -

September 27,

2011

Najeeba

Bachuwa

July 1, 1932

- October 1,

2011

NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 21


photo by david reed

Wayne State

has a few dozen

Chaldeans in its

medical school.

doctors in the house

Chaldeans are flooding the medical field

By Joyce Wiswell

Nena Auraha knew what her future

held from the age of 5.

“I had the coolest pediatrician

ever and I wanted to be like him,”

she said. “I was also really close with my

grandma, who had Alzheimer’s. I realized

I wanted to help.”

Now 26, Auraha is a fourth-year medical

student at Wayne State University.

She’s doing rotations at Beaumont Hospital

in Royal Oak and plans to specialize in

internal medicine.

When he was 5, Ramy Mansour moved

to Michigan with his family from Baghdad.

He sometimes tagged along with his

physician father, Faiz, who needed to redo

his residency to become certified in the United

States.

“The hospital was never a scary place for me

— it was where they help people,” Ramy Mansour

said. “I was intrigued by it.”

Mansour, 25, is a third-year student at Michigan

State and doing his clinical studies at Henry

Ramy Mansour plans to

brush up on his Arabic.

Nick Yeldo is doing his

residency at Harvard.

Nadine Roumaya plans to

become an obstetrician.

Ford Wyandotte Hospital. He’s thinking of specializing

in ear, nose and throat medicine.

Nicholas Yeldo, a senior resident at Harvard Medical

School, said he also felt the calling as a child.

“Even at a young age, I spent my time volunteering

for the underserved,” he said.

Auraha, Mansour and Yeldo are among the dozens

— some say hundreds — of Chaldeans who are

attending medical school. It’s a fairly

new trend in a community where joining

the family business was always the

norm.

“It’s very encouraging,” said Nahid

Eylas, MD, the president of the Chaldean

American Association of Health

Professionals (CAAHP). “We have a

shortage of physicians and health professionals

because our community is

growing very fast with all the immigrants

and refugees.”

CAAHP’s Project Bismutha is a

volunteer group of physicians who provide

medical help to the community’s

uninsured. “We need the new generation

to join us,” Elyas said. “The future is for them to

continue to support this project.”

The future is just what these students are focused

on. Nadine Roumaya just graduated from the

American University of the Caribbean after a twoyear

residency at St. John Providence Hospital in

Southfield and is now doing her four-year residency

22 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


a long road

at St. John’s Detroit location. She plans to become

an OB/GYN.

“It’s a really happy field and delivering babies

is really exciting,” said the 26-year-old, who had

several Chaldeans as classmates in the Caribbean.

“I like obstetrics more than pediatrics because you

get to do some surgical procedures.”

Yeldo, 31, is currently in Harvard’s Anesthesia

Residency Program at Brigham and Woman’s Hospital

in Boston, where he said he believes he’s the

only Chaldean — “If not, I’d love to meet them.”

Becoming a doctor is all about others, he said.

“For me, it’s a lot about helping people overcome

their fear of illness and giving them hope

and confidence that someone out there will fight

for them and do everything in their power to provide

the best care possible,” Yeldo said. “Many

times we cannot offer a cure and many times we

don’t have the answer. But we can always give

love and support.”

All in the Family

The medical field seems to be coming a new family

business for many Chaldeans. Roumaya’s sister,

Justine, is a second-year dental student at the University

of Puerto Rico. In addition to his physician

father, Mansour has a mother, sister, and sister-inlaw

who are all dentists.

“When I tell people that they think I was forced

into medicine, but really, they never said a word,”

Mansour said of his parents. “They just wanted me

to do what I wanted.”

Jessica Kado insists that was the case for her,

too, though it’s easy to imagine that she was raised

with some expectations. After all, eight of the nine

Kado kids are doctors or plan to become one. The

youngest daughter Nicole, a college freshman,

hasn’t made up her mind yet. “We could use a lawyer,”

joked her mother, Julie.

“We were just encouraged to get an education

but we were never directed towards anything but

our own interests,” said Jessica Kado, 28, who is a

dermatologist and married to an anesthesiologist.

The Kados seem to have virtually every specialty

covered. Rachel Kado-Acker is a pediatrician

allergist and married to an orthopedic. Herman

is a cardiologist married to a rheumatologist,

and Karl Jr.’s specialty is radiology. Julie Ann is in

her fourth-year and plans to go into ophthalmology

or anesthesiology. Kimberly and Stephanie are in

medical school or pre-med.

The family has become a bit of a dynasty at

Wayne State, which has a few dozen Chaldean

medical students. Julie and Karl Kado have contributed

financially to Wayne State helping to

fund, among other things, the new Kado Family

Clinical Skills Center.

The two are former teachers who “like every

other Chaldean shifted to business,” said Julie.

“As teachers we always emphasized education

over everything else. The standards were set very

high since they were little so they knew we expected

them to do well. For instance, there was

no TV except on Fridays,” Julie Kado said. “We

lived in a very small house in Oak Park so we

DOCTORS continued on page 24

Iraqi-born physicians face many hurdles

By Weam Namou

For a foreign doctor, it’s

a long way to become a

physician again in the

United States. Just ask Alaa

Toma, a medical doctor from

Iraq who has been in the United

States for three years.

Doctors in any healthcare

specialties have to first complete

appropriate training and

licensure, such as the USMLE

(United States Medical Licensing

Examination), which consists

of three steps.

“It has taken anywhere

from two to five years for the

doctors I’ve spoken to to complete

the long process,” said

Toma, 35, who has been studying

online for the USMLE and

will take his first exam within

five months or so. “But I’m determined

as hell to pursue it,

even if it takes years. I like my

career.”

A number of doctors do not

even make it. Those who do

finish the exams successfully

then have to enter a residency

program. But Toma said that

that does not mean their work

to re-establish themselves in

the field is done.

“The medical profession

has become more and more

competitive, with a lot of international

doctors coming

here from India, Korea and

other countries,” he said.

Despite the grueling process,

Toma said he likes studying

because it updates his

knowledge about the medical

field.

“I studied medicine in the

1990s and since I graduated in

2000 there have been a lot of

differences, many innovations

that took place.”

Toma has an older and

younger brother, Ghazwan

and Marwan. Both doctors,

Marwan lives and practices

in Australia and Ghazwan is

in Michigan, having moved

here after getting his master’s

through a Fulbright Scholarship

in New York. While

it seems like careers in the

medical field run in the family,

Toma said that’s not the

case at all.

“My parents came from

rural areas,” he said. “They

didn’t even complete their

high school education. As a

child, my father worked on the

farm in Iraq and here, most of

his side of the family is in the

store business.”

Excelling in school is what

got the Toma brothers into

medical school, where they felt

they naturally fit in.

“Of course I liked the scientific

part of the work, but when

we started going out to hospitals

to visit patients, I found

this was my favorite aspect,”

he said. “I liked listening to

peoples’ personal problems and

being able to comfort them, to

give them hope. I think this is

a crucial part of the job.”

Given the time spans that

Toma worked in Iraq, during

the sanctions and the 2003

war, he had a lot of comforting

to do. The widespread corruption,

poverty of the Iraqi citizens

and lack of hospital equipment

were horrifying.

“There were a lot of malnourished

and starving children,”

he said. “Many people

couldn’t eat any meat, not

even fish or eggs.”

Toma’s salary as a new graduate

doctor during the sanctions

was 3,000 dinars — $1 a

month. After the Oil for Food

program was established in

1995, the situation improved a

bit and Toma’s salary went up

to $10 per month. When the

2003 war began, Iraq “went

from poverty to violence,” he

said.

“There was no government,

no authority, and the situation

with the insurgents grew worse

and worse,” he said.

Toma told the story of how

once while serving in the military

as a doctor, there were so

many dead bodies that they began

burying them in the hospital’s

garden.

“At one point, there were

several homes approximately

100 yards from where I lived

that were hit by American

military rockets because it was

suspected that Saddam was

hiding in these residences,” he

said. “The homes and the families

in them were completely

destroyed.”

Toma, as a doctor and a

Christian, was constantly

threatened.

“Back then, insurgents’

main targets were politicians

and doctors,” he said.

Others with his education

and religious background were

kidnapped, beaten and killed

as his neighborhood and workplace

became more and more

violent. The majority of his

family by then had left Iraq

and given the risks and dangers

surrounding his daily life, he finally

decided to seek asylum in

the United States through the

UN Refugee Program.

“The situation in Iraq was

very sad,” recalled Toma. “But

still, it was a rich experience

which benefited me as a human

being and a doctor and which I

was able to live through due to

my faith in God.”

Toma left Iraq in October

of 2006 and lived in Jordan for

two years, where he worked for

a year and a half as a general

practitioner in a nursing home.

Since his arrival in the United

States in September 2008, he

feels optimistic about the new

culture and is grateful for everyone

who has helped him

transition, for instance Neil

Jaddou, MD, who allows Toma

to assist him at his clinics in

Troy and Sterling Heights.

Part of the requirements for international

doctors, especially

those from the eastern world,

is to gain U.S. experience in

hospitals or clinics in order to

better understand the western

system.

“I like it here,” Toma said.

“It helps that I am surrounded

by a large family and good people

and while I can’t predict the

future, I pray that I can move

forward with my career.”

NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 23


DOCTORS continued from page 23

could pay for their education.”

Jessica Kado said talking shop

is a natural when the siblings get

together. “My mom and dad put

their two cents in as much as we

do,” she said. “And when my sister

and I were pregnant, being a doctor

did not help us at all. We just

did whatever our mom told us to.”

Giving Back

Auraha helped found the Chaldean

American Medical Student

Association (CAMSA) during

her sophomore year. The group

has held several fundraisers for

Adopt-a-Refugee-Family and,

most recently, Project Bismutha.

Their latest effort, held on August

28, included some 60 medical

students doing a 5K run/walk

on Belle Isle. The event raised

$2,500 for Project Bismutha.

“It seems like there is an increase

in Chaldean medical students,

and the older ones are giving the new ones

support and advice,” said Auraha.

Over at Michigan State, Mansour and fellow

student Devone Mansour (no relation) also started

a CAMSA chapter. Ramy Mansour said he had

about six or seven fellow Chaldeans in his class on

the Detroit campus.

Jessica Kado noted that earlier generations

The physician-heavy Kado family celebrates the medical school graduation of Karl Jr (in hat)

last June. Pictured are Stephanie (front left), Nicole, Jenna, Julie Ann, Jessica, Rachel (second

row left), family friend St. Mahdoukh (a nun visiting from Iraq), parents Karl and Julie, Karl Jr.,

Kimberly, Herman, Ruba; Brian (top row left) and Luke.

often did not emphasize higher education as

they struggled to make ends meet.

“It seems like the community has just made

that transition over to medical school. There is

a whole wave of people being educated instead of

doing the family business,” she said.

Elyas sees more families encouraging their children

to become doctors. “Medical school is free in

Iraq but here it is very expensive,” he noted. “We

have been here long enough to support

our kids to go to medical school because

financially we are doing much better.”

The future physicians hope to incorporate

their language skills into

their practices. Many are first generation

so have a decent grasp on

Chaldean and/or Arabic.

“I speak a little Arabic and when I

absolutely need to use it, it comes out

naturally. I don’t know how,” laughed

Mansour. “I may make my parents

speak only Arabic to me so I can

learn it better. Because I was born in

Iraq, I don’t want language to be the

reason I can’t help someone.”

Roumaya knows some Chaldean

from speaking with her grandmother.

“I’ve tried some translating in the hospital,”

she said. “I can ask what I need

to ask, but I have to pause to think.”

Auraha also speaks Chaldean and

has taken three years of Arabic. It’s

already coming in handy.

“Even at Beaumont I come across

many Chaldeans who don’t speak

English,” she said. “I recently did a

full history and exam in Chaldean. I surprised myself

that I could do it.”

Yeldo said he is looking forward to returning

to his native Michigan. “I miss working with my

community, Chaldean and otherwise,” he said.

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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 25


Charlie Langton, Robert Ficano, George Jackson and L. Brooks Patterson.

executive approach

Ficano, Patterson and Jackson talk business

By Vanessa Denha Garmo

Business talk at Shenandoah

Country Club last month

was not overshadowed by the

myriad reporters huddled to talk to

Wayne County Executive Robert

Ficano about the FBI subpoenas into

county severance deals. However,

the controversy did spark talk around

the luncheon and was subtly addressed

during the panel discussion.

At the Chaldean American

Chamber of Commerce’s annual

business luncheon on October 20,

Ficano sat on a panel moderated

by Charles Langton of Fox 2 News.

Other panelists were Oakland County

Executive L. Brooks Patterson and

George Jackson, president and CEO

of the Detroit Economic Growth

Corp.

Although the FBI’s look into

Wayne County made headline news

that day, serious issues about business

and the region were discussed at the

luncheon. The discussions started

out as a civil conversation but heated

up towards the end.

Langton himself could not resist

making note of the saga. He directed

the first question to Ficano: “What

has been the most exciting thing

that has happened to you this week?”

“It isn’t my golf game,” joked Ficano.

“On a more serious note, Trinity

Health just announced it was

moving 1,400 jobs to the Quicken

Loans building in Wayne County.”

This announcement also means

a loss of 1,400 jobs from Oakland

County, which Patterson quickly

noted.

“You don’t want to see business

go from one county to another,” said

Ficano, adding that the developments

in Wayne County and along I

-275 are what attract business to his

county.

George Jackson will manage the

$500-million light rail project along

Woodward Avenue. “For this to be

effective it needs to go beyond 8 Mile

Road,” he said. “It has to be cost effective.

It is a public service and

quality-of-life issue and transportation

issue good for the community

but we will look at the financial perspective.”

Langton addressed the issue of

tax abatements in luring businesses

such as Whole Foods and Meijer to

Detroit. He noted some have been

given tax abatements and then left

the city and “perhaps this is to the

detriment of small business.”

“I question to the detriment,” said

Jackson. “One of the roles we play

is giving people choice and choices

they demand. When we target something

with incentives, it tends to be

something we don’t already have in

the city. Every urban city uses incentives

to go after certain targets they

believe would be beneficial.”

He added that they are attracting

businesses that city residents go outside

the city to shop in.

“What would you say to a small

business owner that has an operation

in Detroit, weathered the storm, did

not get help from the government

and [then DEGC] give incentives to

a big store that perhaps takes away

business from that small business?”

Langton asked.

“This is a consumer-driven issue,”

said Jackson. “I have a Meijer

and Kroger that are close to me but

I do my shopping at Market Fresh at

Southfield and 13, at Plum and in

Royal Oak I go to Holiday Market.

I go there because they have what

I want. That is the driver here. You

use incentives as a temporary thing

Photos by David Reed

to develop a market. You are only

a failure if you have to keep doing

that.”

The question that sparked a

heated debate between Ficano and

Patterson came from audience member

Jeff Denha, who asked if right

to work zones would help Michigan

economically.

“I don’t think right to work is the

win-win proposition some believe it

is. It will change the dynamics. However,

I don’t know much about the

bill and I would need more detail

before I can comment,” said Jackson.

“Is that a cop-out answer?” asked

Langton. “Is that a non-answer?”

“Charlie, I will give you a more

definite answer,” chimed in Ficano.

“I would be opposed to right to work

legislation. The way the legislation

works in this state, it would divide

the state black and white. Even after

the bill is passed you can do a petition

drive until the next election.

You are looking at a year or year and

a half of stagnation. Investment is

going to look at the state asking what

are you doing and as this raging debate

is going on the investment starts

going someplace else.”

“But Bob, doesn’t it show that

this would be good for business?”

asked Langton.

“No,” said Ficano. “It is cheaper

now to pay [workers] at Detroit automotive

companies than it is at

Toyota down south. What we should

show is how we can work together.

Look at negotiations between automotives

here. Management and

unions are working together and seeing

an added value to do so.”

“Charlie, what my friend Bob

just did was an old debating trick,”

said Patterson. “He changes the context

of the question and answers a totally

different question. The question

was about right to work zones, not a

right to work state. A zone here or a

zone there, I am for it big time. Let

us test if the zones are growing faster

than the rest of the state.”

Ficano replied, “You would go

through the same thing — a prolonged

time period whether it is a

zone proposal or a state proposal.” He

argued that businesses looking to locate

in Michigan would be wondering

what was going on with the zones

and may choose to locate elsewhere.

“We don’t do it because we are

going to be intimidated or bullied

by unions. Is that your position Bob?

We have to try it. Where we are now

EXECUTIVE continued on page 28

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EXECUTIVE continued from page 26

is not a good place, “said Patterson.

“I don’t think Ford, GM or Chrysler

are being bullied by unions and I

see a lot of cooperation happening between

the groups,” responded Ficano.

Huda Fadel from Blue Cross

Blue Shield then asked about infant

mortality rates. She recapped

an earlier statement and noted that

Southeast Michigan is the healthcare

capital of the world but yet infant

mortality is on the rise in the

region. “What are we doing about

infant mortality?”

“Infant mortality was the focus

of attention in Pontiac nine years

ago and the numbers are improving

but we still need to get better,” said

Patterson. “Bob has mentioned that

he and the city have competing programs

and probably will get merged

some day. It is an important thing

the government does provide and it

is one of the essential services that

have to be funded. It is not in line

for any cuts.”

“I am really in favor of the merger

between the City of Detroit and

Wayne County in terms of health

departments,” said Jackson.

“Public health is very important,”

said Ficano. “We just got a

grant for the New Me program. How

many mothers do we have whose

child, sick at 2 in the morning, will

walk into the ER even if you don’t

have insurance?”

Ficano also noted that there are

many great programs that people

don’t know about or how to get to.

Martin Manna, executive director

of the chamber, posed the last

question of the day, going back to

the issue of incentives to chains like

Whole Foods.

“What type of incentives will be

given to those who have been servicing

the city for 30 to 40 years?”

he asked.

“Not all utilize what is there,”

said Jackson. “There are different

incentives depending on the industry

and size of the deal. That target

is what the people of the city and

the mayor are asking us to do. All of

these developers in these deals are

local people. Go in as a developer

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these developers are getting. All

of these deals have local developers;

they are not coming from other

states. They are all local people.”

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one for the books?

Attorney advocates for Kwame Kilpatrick

By Joyce Wiswell

Dan Hajji accompanied Kwame Kilpatrick as the

ex-mayor was released from jail in August 2.

The question of whether Kwame

Kilpatrick gets to profit from

his book has little to do with

the former Detroit mayor and everything

to do with the First Amendment

of the United States Constitution.

That’s the point Dan Hajji stresses

over and over when speaking on

his role as Kilpatrick’s attorney in his

restitution case against the city.

Now Hajji, 44, has taken the issue

to the Michigan Supreme Court,

which is scheduled to begin deciding

it on November 1.

“If our justices are believers in the

Constitution and love it as much as I

do they’ll look at this with seriousness,”

said Hajji, who was born in Telkaif and

came to the U.S. as a young child.

Kilpatrick owes the City of Detroit

$860,000 (which he’s whittled down

from $1 million) in restitution for

obstruction of justice, in addition to

$12,000 to the State of Michigan for

incarceration costs. Hajji insists that

Kilpatrick faithfully paid every cent

each month that he was required to

until he was incarcerated in May 2010

for violating the terms of his probation

— for not paying what he owned.

Proceeds from Kilpatrick’s memoir,

Surrendered: The Rise, Fall & Revelation

of Kwame Kilpatrick, are being held in

escrow while its decided if Kilpatrick

can keep the money or if it is forfeited

under a state law that forbids criminals

from making money off their crimes.

The Michigan Court of Appeals

on August 30 rejected Hajji’s claim

that Kilpatrick’s free-speech rights

are being violated.

Prosecutors used New York’s socalled

Son of Sam law that says criminals

can’t profit from their crimes,

Hajji said, but the U.S. Supreme

Court unanimously overturned that

decision, finding it “unconstitutional,

over-inclusive and restrictive on

speech.” However, the U.S. Supreme

Court has allowed the Son of Sam

principle to hold when the law is

written very carefully in regards to

First Amendment rights.

Hajji insists that Kilpatrick did

not even commit a crime when he

lied on the witness stand in a civil

trial about having an affair with former

aid Christine Beatty.

“There is a big misconception out

there that Kwame has done this and

Kwame has done that. What has he

done? He was a witness in a civil lawsuit,

and he should have taken the

Fifth,” Hajji said. “They were asking

him if he committed adultery. It was

an improper question that had no

bearing on anything with regard to a

civil matter. Everyone thinks he was

convicted to perjury, but he pled guilty

to obstruction of justice.”

Hajji added, “He took a plea so the

city can move on and move forward.

It was in the best interest of the city.”

As part of his plea deal, Kilpatrick

agreed to pay the city $1 million

in restitution. The accusation that he

claimed he could only afford to pay $6

a month is unfounded and a myth construed

by the media, Hajji said.

“What he was saying is that after he

pays for everything, including his restitution,

he has only $6 left — not that

he wants to pay only $6,” Hajji said.

Kilpatrick was sent to jail in May

2010 for violating his probation for

hiding assets and failing to turn over

an income tax refund of $11,000.

Kilpatrick was treated much more

harshly than the norm, his attorney

said. “You don’t see people locked up

for failing to pay restitution,” Hajji

said. “You work it out; that’s what the

court does.”

Hajji said that while the media

have vilified the former mayor, “he has

many supporters, more than we see. I

think he’s very popular.” In fact, Hajji

said, he believes Kilpatrick could be

reelected as Detroit’s mayor. “I think

he was a great mayor, but then at the

same time, I’m apolitical.”

“The media have done a very

good job of painting a very nasty

picture. This has really come down

to a political case. But all my fights

have dealt with the law and the Constitution,”

Hajji said. “We’re talking

about the First Amendment. Take

Kwame out of the equation and look

at the big picture.”

Hajji said he has “absolutely not”

suffered any backlash for representing

Kilpatrick. The former mayor is

generally not well-regarded in the

Chaldean community; many believe

he unfairly targeted independent

grocery stores for bogus Health Department

violations.

“He’s been portrayed as a liar and a

villain; for me it’s an honor to be representing

him,” Hajji said. “There are

thousands of attorneys he could have

chosen and he has chosen me.”

Hajji declined to say if Kilpatrick

has paid him for his services saying

only, “Just because you can’t afford an

attorney doesn’t mean family or friends

can’t hire an attorney for you.”

The currently unemployed Kilpatrick

now pays about $150 a month in

restitution. “Isn’t it ironic that he was

making $3,000 payments when fully

employed?” Hajji said.

Hajji said his famous client has

not changed him or his legal practice.

“It doesn’t matter if a case is high profile

or a simple misdemeanor,” he said.

“I am here to serve all clients, small or

big, I treat them all the same.”

People should realize that this case

is much bigger than Kilpatrick, Hajji

said. “This is not just about Kwame

anymore. It’s about the Constitution

and our children and their children.”

Kilpatrick has many more woes

than possible book proceeds. He faces

trial next year in federal court on charges

of corruption and has declared indigence

to get the public to pay for his

defense. “I have my hands full,” Hajji

said to explain why he is not representing

Kilpatrick on that matter.

30 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 31


last stop: justice town

Chaldean prevails in SMART case

By Vanessa Denha Garmo

Mazyn Barash has been on a

bus ride of legal wranglings

for seven years that finally

stopped last month inside the Michigan

Civil Rights Commission.

They ruled in favor of Barash, a

Farmington Hills bus mechanic who

in 2004 filed a suit against Suburban

Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation

(SMART), its agents and officers,

members and employees for unlawfully

discriminating against him.

Barash claimed that around the

time the war started in Iraq, co-workers

began to verbally attack him. He

said that he was insulted and threatened

repeatedly at work because of

his Iraqi background and last month

the commissioners reported that

there was clear evidence that the

53-year-old did in fact have racial

slurs hurled at him by colleagues who

worked for SMART in 2003.

After months of abuse, Barash —

a Chaldean from Iraq — left SMART

in 2004 saying he just couldn’t cope

anymore.

Although officials from SMART

have not commented on this case,

the company did defend itself against

Barash’s claims. Over a two and a

half-year period, there were 17 days

of hearings; the hearing referee recommended

a dismissal of the matter.

However, the commission eventually

ruled in favor of Barash and according

to documents by the Civil Rights

Commission, Barash endured a list of

ethnically motivated attacks.

The attacks include: threatening

phone calls, a poster at the workplace

depicting a camel in a crosshairs with

words, “I’d Fly 10,000 Miles to Smoke

a Camel,” and a letter referring to

Barash as a “Sand N-ger.” There was

also outrageous conduct by one coworker

in particular which included

calling Barash a “raghead,” wearing a

towel on his head, telling Barash that

he smokes camels, telling Barash that

he wished he could “kill all Iraqis”

and calling him a “Saddam lover.”

Also, there was a website created

shortly after Barash left his job that

was distributed via email.

“It clearly targeted Chaldeans,”

said Barash. “The guy who created

it even put up a picture of the Chaldean

Church and the Pope with Hitler’s

mustache.”

In the documents, the hearing

referee opined that the communication

and conduct listed was “simply

locker-room trash talk” or the result

of the political climate in Iraq. But

in the end, the commission ruled in

favor of Barash.

“Justice at last,” said Barash. “It

is gratifying to know that the commission

looked at this seriously and

did the right thing. It is very hard for

anyone to see it any other way. I am

grateful that the commission took

the time and effort to review the information

and all the testimonies. I

was finally vindicated.”

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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 33


unity at last

Many groups back Nineveh plan

By Weam Namou

The push to establish the Nineveh Plains as a

governorate for Iraq’s Christians and other

minorities continues to move forward and

is being aided by a new unity among Christian organizations.

On September 15, another meeting about the

topic of Nineveh took place at Bellagio Banquet

Hall in Warren. Four politicians who arrived from

Iraq several days prior spoke on the progress of establishing

the Nineveh Plains as a governorate,

rather than an autonomous region. What does this

mean exactly?

“This means taking three districts, actually

three and a half, and turning them into a new state,

independent from certain laws that apply to other

areas and yet entitled to the country’s resources

[which are] allocated based on the number of

people that reside there,” said Michael Youash, executive

director of the Iraq Sustainable Democracy

Project. “This proposal has a chance for success but

it must first demonstrate that it is a good project for

all of Iraq, not just for a particular group of people.”

What is the difference between this attempt

and other attempts that have not yet succeeded?

“After the attack on Our Lady of the Salvation

Church in October 2010, various political organizations

from different backgrounds held a meeting

and decided to put our differences aside and come

together as one political voice,” said Abed Francis

of the group Iraqi Human Rights.

“There is really no difference between us to begin

with,” said Manhiel Razoky, district director of the

Assyrian Democratic Movement. “It’s the Church

that sees these differences, and only in recent times.

Three hundred years ago we were together.”

Whoever initiated these differences, it was Iraqi

President Jalal Talabani, a Kurd, who in November

2010 called for establishing a governorate for

Christians in the Nineveh Plain. But the Chaldean

Assyrian Syriac Council of America (CASCA)

and the Chaldean Syriac Assyrian Popular Council

emphasize that they want an administrative and

geographical area for all minorities and not a religious

or sectarian area solely for Christians.

“Ninety-five percent of Nineveh’s present inhabitants

are Yezidis, Christians and Shabaks,”

said Emmanuel Koshaba, secretary of the Assyrian

Patriotic Party. “We’re not trying to relocate these

people. We actually want the area for the people

who are already there.”

Once among the largest settlements worldwide,

Nineveh’s greatness was short-lived when around

627 BC, Assyria was attacked by the Babylonians

and Medes. Following the defeat in 612 BC, the

site remained largely unoccupied for centuries with

only a scattering of Assyrians.

“Since the formation of Iraq this area has been

largely neglected,” said Francis. “And today, statistics

show that only 5 percent of the funds allocated

for Nineveh are being used.”

“The province is poor, even though it is a historical

area,” said Koshaba. “There are no streets;

services are below zero. With a population of more

than 300,000, there is no hospital for [birth] delivery.

One must go to either Mosul or Arbil for that

and in a few cases women have died on the way.”

Given the president’s approval, what’s holding

up the process of handing over Nineveh to the minorities

who want to revitalize it?

“The Parliament has to vote for this to happen,”

said Joseph Kassab, director of the Chaldean

Federation of America. “There are more than 300

factions and the majority of powerful officials are

for this process. The problem is the president of the

Parliament, Osama Al Najafi. He is opposing it.”

Since Osama Al Najafi’s brother, Atheel al-

Nujaifi, is the governor of Ninawa Province, it’s

speculated that Osama’s opposition deals with pure

self-interest.

“The opposition doesn’t want minorities to be independent,”

claimed Koshaba. “They want to control

the people and have them do what they want.”

One way this agenda is being done is by attempting

to build, for example, 3,000 housing

units with non-locals of Nineveh registering for

the dwellings.

“This is changing demographics,” said Youel

Isho of the Assyrian Universal Alliance. “It’s a

fraudulent process that helps those in power force

their presence.”

“Once the minorities have control of this province,

they will have control of their destiny,” said

Kassab. “They will be self-ruled, self-administered.

The opposition is afraid of that.”

One person won’t be able to stop this project

from advancing, Koshaba said.

“We are not asking for more than what the constitution

allows us,” he said, “but it seems that for

Al Najaifi, it’s hallal [lawful] to pursue a province

for the Sunnis of Iraq, not for us to do the same.

There should be equality in this matter.”

But Youash sees a bigger picture to this problem.

“There is much sensitivity over the area of

Nineveh because Kurdistan wants to take it over

as, according to Article 35 of their constitution,

it belongs to them,” he said. “So the Nationalist

Iraqis, the Sunnis, will put their guards up when it

comes to anything that would empower and serve

the KRG. They will look at the situation as losing

land. Therefore, it’s crucial that our policy framing

is done properly.”

In the meantime, the Council’s goal is to continue

to meet with various officials in both the

Iraqi and U.S. government and others in the international

community to help them comprehend the

urgent need for minorities to be granted an area

that would protect them.

The Iraqi delegation clearly states that the development

of this governorate does not mean an

absolute separation from Iraq. On the contrary, they

say they want to give people more determination to

stay in the land of their fathers and grandfathers,

and to reduce “the bleeding of serious immigration”

for all components that coexist in the region.

“This is about having the area become a thriving

area in the new Iraq,” said Koshaba, “to the

point where even people who fled Iraq could return

to it.”

34 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


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fairest of them all

Kristen Danyal wins state title

By Joyce Wiswell

Kristen Danyal of Sterling

Heights trusts her gut. When

everyone was offering advice

in preparation for the Miss Michigan

USA pageant, she stayed polite – and

then did exactly what she wanted.

Her instincts were obviously right

on, as she won the state crown on October

1 at a pageant in Port Huron.

Though she was crowned Miss

Michigan Teen USA in 2008, Danyal

wasn’t sure she wanted to enter

this latest contest. She ended up deciding

to go for it just two weeks before

the pageant, which meant a giant

scramble to find the perfect dress.

She even flew to New York to look.

But nothing seemed right until

she decided to alter the gown a friend

wore to a wedding. Danyal had a

seamstress modify the hemline, add a

belt and make other changes – a task

completed just the night before the

pageant.

Even after she signed up for Miss

Michigan USA, the 21-year-old tried

to keep it a secret from friends and

family. But with four other Chaldeans

in the contest – Chanell Hana, Reem

Goria, Elin Shammas and Rasha

Yousif – word soon got out and the

unsolicited opinions came pouring in.

“People started coming up to me

and telling me what to do – smile

like this or walk like that,” she said.

“Everyone was giving me advice that

was getting away from who I really

am. I said, ‘I’m just going to do it like

I did it last time.’”

Those suggestions included

checking online to see the questions

the judges would be asking.

“I knew that if I knew what the

questions were I would have tried to

create an answer in my head beforehand

and then stumble when I tried

to repeat it,” Danyal said. “So I tried

to void everything and go in with a

very fresh mind.”

The strategy worked, and when

Danyal was asked the final question

– what are the most important values

parents can teach their children? –

she nailed it.

“I answered respect, because it is

the foundation of every value children

learn as they grow up. Treat

others as you want to be treated and

you’ll get very far in life.”

Besides nerves, her biggest challenge

at the pageant was keeping

from crying and ruining her makeup

when she made it to the top five.

“My tears were stuck in my eyes

so I just looked up to make sure the

tears didn’t roll down,” she said.

“And I tried to make myself laugh.”

When the big moment came,

hearing the names of the runners-up

grew increasingly surreal as she realized

she was winning, Danyal said. “I

kept thinking, ‘oh my God I’m still

here, I can’t believe I’m still here.’ I

finally realized where this title was

taking me – to Miss USA.”

That Donald Trump-produced

pageant takes place next summer,

most likely in Las Vegas. It’s a threeweek

process for the 50 contestants.

Meanwhile, Danyal has plenty to

keep her busy. She’s making pageant

appearances, especially those for

breast cancer awareness. She’s working

toward a marketing degree at

the University of Detroit Mercy and

works part time at Nordstrom in the

Somerset Mall. She hopes to one day

have a career as a wedding planner.

“I love chaos and I work well under

pressure,” she said.

But for now, Danyal is looking no

Kristen Danyal reacts

to hearing her name

called ... and walks

the runway in victory.

further than graduation in May and

prepping for the Miss USA pageant.

“I have a one in 50 chance,” she

said. “So I want to put into my head

that I can win it.”

Danyal said she was buoyed by her

fellow Chaldean contestants, two of

whom, Shammas and Yousif, made it

into the top 15. She appreciates the

support of her extended family – 25

to 30 people traveled to Port Huron

to cheer her on – and said she’s seen

nothing but enthusiasm from the

community.

“I love how supportive the community

has been. Everyone knows it

can be a really big competition between

Chaldeans, but everyone has

been so nice,” she said. “It has reaffirmed

my faith in human nature –

and in Chaldeans.”

Kristen Danyal is blogging about her

journey to Miss USA. Follow her at

MissMIUSA2012.BlogSpot.com and

on Twitter at RealMissMIUSA.

36 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 37


Above: Lauren Bacall: “This is my primetime.” Left: Allison Ochmanek and Lauren Bacall – obviously not in game attire.

detroit’s brand

ambassador

Lauren Bacall shines on Fox Sports

By Crystal Kassab Jabiro

Lauren Bacall proves that honesty can get you

very far in a job interview. Just ask her boss.

While auditioning to work for a major

sports syndicate, she told him that she did not

know much about sports. He hired her anyway.

While Detroit made news in the national sports

arena this past fall, Bacall could be seen and heard

everywhere sparking up the action with her commentaries,

live tweets and video blogs. She is a Fox

Sports Detroit Girl, one of two brand ambassadors

to the franchise that is everything sports.

Bacall and her partner, Allison Ochmanek, attend

home games and other local events to rev up

the spirit of sports in the city. The two were the

first representatives of the local Fox affiliate, and five

regions have now duplicated Detroit’s success based

on the solid foundation the women have laid.

“From the moment we interviewed and met

with her, we knew she would be an ideal connector

with the loyal sports fans in Detroit,” said Greg

Hammaren, general manager of Fox Sports Detroit,

of Bacall. “She brings a vibrancy and energy

that the fans have grown to adore.”

Before her Fox Sports Detroit gig, Bacall modeled,

Lauren’s Favorites

Restaurant | Pegasus Downtown Detroit

Sports Arena | Comerica Park

Local Charity | Adopt-a-Refugee-Family

Detroit Native | Eminem

Starbucks Coffee | Two-pump Skinny Vanilla Latte

mostly for the auto industry. A couple of years ago,

she traveled with the North American Auto Show to

introduce the Chrysler concepts to car buffs. She also

acted locally, working as a featured extra alongside

Patrick Dempsey and Shia Lebeouf in Transformers 3,

and most recently with Hugh Jackman in Real Steel.

Though she has always loved the entertainment

industry, Bacall, 27, contends she would

never leave Detroit unless she got an undeniable

opportunity.

“This is my prime time and I should take advantage

of it,” said Bacall, who graduated from Oakland

University with a BA in Communications.

“But I can’t leave my family. They are my No. 1

fans. And I don’t want to leave my city. I’m content

with what I can do in Detroit.”

The Fox Detroit Sports Girls Facebook page

boasts nearly 20,000 fans, and the women really do

try to read and respond to every single commentary.

After all, if it was not for the sports lovers,

they would not be where they are today.

“Our fans are so supportive,” said Bacall, a West

Bloomfield resident. “We’re not sports broadcasters,

but brand ambassadors for Detroit. We’re here to connect

with them and keep the energy going in Detroit.”

Detroit fans are truly special because of their

loyalty to sports, and in Detroit there is no running

away from it, Bacall said. Even the college teams

are big. The Sports Girls can be seen lightheartedly

touting their favorites — Bacall as a Wolverine

and Ochmanek as a Spartan.

It is not only their presence on TV that has catapulted

them into Fox Sports success, but also their

social media power. They are constantly updating

their Facebook page and Twitter account and can

occasionally be seen on the Fox Sports website

with live commentaries and interactions with fans.

“It’s how we connect. People want to know we’re

real — and we are,” Bacall said. “We’re just like them!”

The job is certainly not about looking pretty for

the cameras and sitting behind a name on a Twitter

account. When Fox Sports is taping, Bacall works

12 hours a day. For game days, she has to educate

herself about the players, the opposing teams, their

records and up-to-date sports news. The job requires

constant learning.

“I used to enjoy going to games because I had

to — it’s Detroit,” she said. “But now I appreciate

it on another level.”

Follow the Detroit Sports Girls on FoxSportsDetroit.

com, twitter.com/FSDetroit_Girls and on Facebook.

38 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 39


Photos by James WallacE

sports

1

Chaldean Ryder Cup

rematch ends in a draw

Young Guns still haven’t

beaten their elders

By Steve SteiN

The Young Guns aren’t so

young anymore and the Older

Guys are, well, older. But

their competitive fires on the golf

course are still burning brightly.

In a rematch of the inaugural

Chaldean Ryder Cup competition

held in 2000, the 16-man teams

played to a 12-12 draw in the rain

September 29 at The Orchards Golf

Club in Washington before heading

off to a post-match get-together at a

Bloomfield Township restaurant.

It was the first time the Ryder

Cup was held at The Orchards since

2000. Both rosters closely resembled

the rosters from 11 years earlier. If

there’s another rematch between

the original Ryder Cup teams in the

spring — and there’s talk about it

— it would probably be at The Orchards.

“I can see it happening. We all

enjoy the Ryder Cup,” said John

Kello, co-captain of the original

Young Guns along with Michael

Sarafa. “I don’t think it would be

a stretch to say we’d like to do this

one more time.”

The Ryder Cup has moved

around to different courses and

gotten bigger through the years

and there’s been a turnover in the

teams. So the originals feel a special

kindred toward each other and the

uniquely Chaldean event.

The regular annual Ryder Cup

match was played in August at

Shenandoah Country Club in West

Bloomfield, its permanent home.

The rematch at The Orchards was

put together by the original teams.

“All of us on the 2000 teams are

friends, and we all want to win. That’s

how the Ryder Cup got started,” Kello

said. “There’s nothing better than

beating your friends in sports.”

The original Young Guns have

yet to beat their friends on the original

Old Guys team.

“We kicked their butts the first

time we played them,” said John

Loussia, co-captain of the original

Older Guys along with Johnny

Karmo.

“We won in a romp,” Karmo

said. “I think there was a four- to

six-point differential.”

The rematch went right down to

the wire. Needing all six available

points in the final individual and

two-man best-ball matches to win,

the Young Guns came up with 5.5

points and earned the tie.

40 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


1. Young and old, together again

2. Frank Jonna, John Loussia,

John Karmo and Terry Farida

3. Ramzy Kizi, Tom George

and George Kalabat

4. Jonathon Toma and

Sam Yono Jr.

2

3

Chaldean

Hockeytown

The puck has dropped for another

Chaldean Hockey League

season at the Orchard Lake St.

Mary’s Ice Arena, the league’s

home since its inaugural 2006-

07 campaign.

Seven teams, each with

about a dozen players, are skating

on Sunday nights. Six teams

will make the playoffs, with the

top two earning a first-round

bye. The league champion will

win the Telga Cup, which looks

a lot like the NHL’s iconic Stanley

Cup.

Raad Kello, the league’s cocommissioner

along with David

Kouza, said there are 13 new

players this season. They were

selected by team captains after

a tryout.

Despite the infusion of new

talent, don’t look for the league

to expand.

“We’d like to keep it at seven,

or even six, strong teams,”

Kello said.

The league is competitive,

but checking isn’t allowed and

there are severe penalties for excessive

physical play and fighting.

A face mask, shield or halfshield

is mandatory equipment.

Bank of Michigan, Uptown

Grille, Value Center Marketplace

and Value Wholesale are

sponsoring league teams this

season.

“I enjoy playing in the league

because hockey is a great game,

and it seems like I meet new

people every Sunday,” Kello

said. “It’s good for our community.”

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They almost got the six points

they needed. Karmo sank a par putt

on the 18th green to win the hole

and tie his individual match against

the Young Guns’ Jonathon Toma.

The original age ranges for the

teams were 40-and-under for the

Young Guns, and 41-and-older for

the Older Guys. For the rematch,

the ages were 49-and-under and

50-and-older.

Here’s the complete rematch

roster for the Older Guys: Frank

Awdish, Jimmy and Johnny Bahoura,

Dominic Belcastro, Sam Dallo,

Gene Dickow, Terry Farida, Tom

George, Raymond Hesano, George

Kalabat, Ronnie Jamil, Frank Jonna,

Ed Najor, Jerry Rabban, Johnny

Karmo and John Loussia.

The Young Guns: Michael Esshaki,

Steven Dalloo, John Kello,

Raad Kello, Sal Kesto, Ramzy Kizy,

Martin Manna, Brian Najor, Maher

Sarafa, Mark Sarafa, Michael

Sarafa, Mark Sheena, Bruce Toma,

Jonathon Toma, Sam Yono and

Mike Zeer.

Players must be members of the

men’s golf league at Shenandoah

to play in the regular Ryder Cup

matches.

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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 41


ARTS & entertainment

1

detroit in focus

Photographer shares his love for the city

By Joyce Wiswell

Some people view Detroit’s

abandoned buildings as a depressing

symbol of what once

was. Photographer Geoff George

sees them as an opportunity to learn

about the city’s history.

“The city keeps knocking these

buildings down, and I have a feeling

of responsibility in a way to

catch them before they’re gone,” said

George. “People say that I make Detroit

look sad and depressing, but I always

find it amazing and fascinating.

What is the history of this place, and

can it be saved? I’ve always had more

positive feelings associated with it.”

The 25-year-old believes in Detroit

so much that he can’t imagine

living anywhere else. “I’ve lived

here three and a half years now and

I really love it here,” said the West

Bloomfield native.

While his still photography work

is thriving, George does worry that

he may have to leave Michigan to

pursue his career as a motion picture

camera operator. After receiving a

degree in film from the University

of Michigan, he’d been successful in

the state’s once-burgeoning film industry,

working as an assistant cameraman

in films with budgets as large

as $5 million.

“Independent movies are tough

work and not the most glorious thing

in the world,” he said, “but I learned

a lot.”

Things are not looking as bright

for the industry since Gov. Rick Snyder

slashed the state’s tax incentives

for filmmakers, a move George said

he does not understand.

“People were really making money

on this thing. Young people like

me were so excited, and I had friends

who either decided to stay in Michigan

or moved here from LA,” George

said of film’s boom time several years

ago. “For the first time ever Michigan

was a cool place to live for young

people. The Wall Street Journal was

calling Detroit the new Hollywood

of the East.”

Now, George said, five other

states are luring film producers with

aggressive incentives, and Michigan

has “just a skeleton of a film industry

here.”

He and other advocates have

contacted state legislators and spoken

at Michigan Film Office meetings.

But George believes the ship

has sailed for Michigan to capitalize

on the interest it created. “A lot of

the momentum is gone, and even if

we do figure something out, I don’t

think it will have the same buzz. But

I am sticking it out longer than most

people.”

With his background, George is a

self-described “big fish in a mediumsized

pond.” He’s carved out a niche

as someone who knows Detroit in

and out and can help producers find

unique locations and talented workers.

“I love being able to pass a job to

a friend,” he said.

Meanwhile, he continues his still

photography, which is largely devoted

to chronicling Detroit and its

crumbling infrastructure. That talent

netted George an ongoing gig

as the Detroit photographer for the

Detroit-Torino Urban Jazz Project, a

musical and multimedia project held

in May in Turin, Italy.

Detroit and Turin are sister cities

that share a background in automotive

production, an economic decline

Geoff George

and hopeful signs of a renaissance.

An Italian photographer named Piero

Ottaviano searched the Internet

for his Detroit counterpart and liked

what he saw on George’s website —

not realizing that George had already

studied Italian in college and spent a

summer studying in Italy.

The two men’s photographs of

their respective cities and the eerie

beauty of their abandoned buildings

were projected onto a screen behind

jazz performances in Turin and featured

in a formal exhibition. Ottaviano

and George each also photographed

the other’s city as part of the

project.

Now George hopes to bring Urban

Jazz in some form to Detroit next

year. “That’s my dream,” he said.

It’s certainly not his only one.

While actively rooting for Detroit

to get its film mojo back, he’s staying

busy with music videos, commercials

and independent films while continuing

his still photography. One of

his projects, “Troubled Assets,” is a

photo series that documents Detroit’s

many former bank buildings, a testament

to the city’s wealth between

1920 and 1950. Some have morphed

into pawn shops, churches or retail

operations. The “People” section of

his website includes a colorful cast of

characters (some in black and white)

while “Detroit Dawn” invites viewers

to watch the sun rise over Detroit,

which George writes is “on the

dawn of a new era of prosperity and

progress.” The website also includes

a blog and a number of short films

2

42 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


3

4

5

1. Detroit at dusk

2. Part of the “Troubled Assets” series

3 & 4. The abandoned Michigan

Central Station inside and out

5. A rotting dynamite factory

in Turin, Italy

6. The old Model T plant

George has written, directed and/or

shot.

It’s ironic that a man who devoted

so much time to documenting opportunities

lost has become enmeshed

in a huge one — Michigan’s fall from

favor in the film industry. The state

legislature is considering a bill that

would earmark $100 million in tax

breaks for filmmakers, but George is

not terribly optimistic.

“I’m trying not to worry about it

too much,” he said. “But I’m not 100

percent enthusiastic about Snyder’s

interest in this film thing.”

Check out more of Geoff George’s

work at GSGFilms.com.

6

NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 43


oushala

Hameth Kibbee ‘d Girsa

Wheat Kibbee in Traditional Sauce

By Hayat Sepo

From CALC’s Ma Baseema

For the Stuffing

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 large onion, chopped

3 pounds ground beef

1 teaspoon allspice (baharat)

Salt to taste

Heat oil in a frying pan and sauté

onions until golden. Add beef and

brown. Sprinkle allspice (baharat)

and salt over meat. Cook until meat

is tender and juices evaporate. Cool

beef completely.

For the Outer Shell

1 cup fine ground bulghur #1

2-3 cups water

3 cups cream of wheat

Salt to taste

Wash bulghur and soak in cold water

for 30 minutes. Add cream of wheat

and salt and mix well. Knead to form

a smooth paste, adding water gradually

as needed.

For Assembly

Take a small portion of paste (the

size of a small egg) and shape into a

ball. Make a hole inside the ball with

your finger. Please some stuffing inside

the hole and close the opening

tightly. Shape into balls, flatten into

discs and place on a tray. Repeat until

stuffing and paste is finished.

Traditional Sauce for

Hameth Kibbee

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 large onion, chopped

8-10 leaves Swiss chard, chopped

3 tablespoons tomato paste

3 cups water

2 tablespoons lemon juice

Salt to taste

1 teaspoon dried mint (optional)

Heat vegetable oil in a large saucepan.

Add chopped onions and sauté

until golden. Add chopped Swiss

chard leaves and continue to sauté.

Dilute tomato paste with the water

and add to saucepan. Add lemon

juice and salt and bring to a boil.

Cook for 10-15 minutes until sauce

begins to thicken. When the sauce is

boiling, add the Kibbee balls one at

a time. Stir, then cover and put on

medium heat until Kibbee is cooked

and begin to float to top, about 20

minutes. Serve warm. Serves 10-12.

Variation

Add more lemon juice for tartness.

Roughly chop 1-2 celery sticks or

yellow squash to use instead of Swiss

chard, if desired.

Tip

Kubba will come part or disintegrate

if cooked too long.

Reprinted with permission from Ma

Baseema, Middle Eastern Cooking with

Chaldean Flair.

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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 45


in good health

the cold facts

How to avoid the ‘SAD’ winter blues

By Vanessa Denha Garmo

During the winter season, some people’s

bodies undergo serious changes to the

point that it affects their mood and

personality.

If you are someone who gets sad often in

the winter it may be because you have SAD,

which is the acronym for Seasonal Affective

Disorder. It is also sometimes called winter

depression, winter blues, or the hibernation

reaction.

“The most pronounced signs and symptoms

include loss of energy, irritability, overeating,

weight gain, increased sleep and sleepiness

and feelings of depression and joylessness,”

explained Laurie Mastrogianis, PhD, LP, LPC,

a licensed psychologist with S.T.A.R.S. of

Wellness.

SAD has been referred to as a type of depression

that tends to occur as the days grow

shorter in the fall and winter. It is believed

that affected people react adversely to the decreasing

amounts of sunlight and the colder

temperatures as the fall and winter progress.

“Most everybody living in the cold-weather

states is affected by the sense of cabin fever

during the winter months,” said Mastrogianis.

However, some people experience a more

severe version, which is SAD. “Also, people

who are just sub-threshold for major depression

and/or generalized anxiety disorder

usually experience an exasperation of their

symptoms that can take these conditions over

the edge, so to say.”

The symptoms of SAD vary from person to

person. Although there is no specific diagnostic

test for the illness, symptoms include tiredness,

fatigue, depression, crying spells, irritability, trouble

concentrating, body aches, loss of sex drive,

poor sleep, decreased activity level, and overeating,

especially of carbohydrates, with associated

weight gain.

When the condition presents in the summer,

the symptoms are more commonly insomnia, poor

appetite and weight loss in addition to irritability,

difficulty concentrating and crying

spells. In severe instances, seasonal affective

disorder can be associated with thoughts of

suicide.

The symptoms of SAD typically tend

to begin in the fall each year and last until

spring. The symptoms are more intense during

the darkest months. Therefore, the more

common months of symptoms will vary depending

on how far away from the equator

one lives.

“The symptoms usually start in the fall

when daylight decreases — usually most noticeable

when we move the clocks back at the

end of Daylight Savings Time,” said Mastrogianis.

There are various remedies for SAD.

“Light therapy, where you sit a few feet from

a light box for 20 minutes a day, can help,”

explained Mastrogianis. “Also, natural, drugfree

strategies for increased energy and enhanced

mood, such as cardiovascular exercise,

can make a big difference. Talking with

a mental health professional to identify and

manage SAD symptoms and triggers can help.

A popular antidote in our culture also tends

to be use of antidepressant medications.”

However, Mastrogianis notes that a problem

with the popular use of antidepressants is

the unfortunate side effects of weight gain and

loss of libido. This can exacerbate the symptoms

of SAD — especially for women, who struggle

with self-esteem issues around these side effects.

“Therefore,” she said, “I believe as a holistic

psychologist that it’s best to pursue non-pharmacological

measures first.”

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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 47


Iraq today

U.S. Drops Plans to Keep Troops in Iraq

The U.S. is abandoning plans to keep U.S.

troops in Iraq past a year-end withdrawal

deadline, The Associated Press reports.

The decision to pull out fully by January will effectively

end more than eight years of U.S. involvement

in the Iraq war, despite ongoing concerns

about its security forces and the potential

for instability.

The decision ends months of hand-wringing

by U.S. officials over whether to stick to a Dec.

31 withdrawal deadline that was set in 2008 or

negotiate a new security agreement to ensure

that gains made and more than 4,400 American

military lives lost since March 2003 do not go

to waste.

In recent months, Washington has been discussing

with Iraqi leaders the possibility of several

thousand American troops remaining to

continue training Iraqi security forces.

But a senior Obama administration official in

Washington confirmed on October 15 that all

American troops will leave Iraq except for about

160 active-duty soldiers attached to the U.S.

Embassy.

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A senior U.S. military official confirmed the

departure and said the withdrawal could allow future

but limited U.S. military training missions in

Iraq if requested.

Both officials spoke on condition of anonymity

because of the sensitivity of the issue.

Throughout the discussions, Iraqi leaders

have adamantly refused to give U.S. troops immunity

from prosecution in Iraqi courts, and the

Americans have refused to stay without it. Iraq’s

leadership has been split on whether it wanted

American forces to stay. Some argued the further

training and U.S. help was vital, particularly to

protect Iraq’s airspace and gather security intelligence.

But others have deeply opposed any American

troop presence, including Shiite militiamen

who have threatened attacks on any American

forces who remain.

Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has told U.S.

military officials that he does not have the votes

in parliament to provide immunity to the American

trainers, the U.S. military official said.

A western diplomatic official in Iraq said al-

Maliki told international diplomats he will not

bring the immunity issue to parliament because

lawmakers will not approve it.

Iraqi lawmakers excel at last-minute agreements.

But with little wiggle room on the immunity

issue and the U.S. military needing to move

equipment out as soon as possible, a last-minute

change between now and December 31 seems almost

out of the question.

Regardless of whether U.S. troops are here or

not, there will be a massive American diplomatic

presence.

The U.S. Embassy in Baghdad is the largest in

the world, and the State Department will have

offices in Basra, Irbil and Kirkuk as well as other

locations around the country where contractors

will train Iraqi forces on U.S. military equipment

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sales to Iraq. Those are standard functions at

most American embassies around the world

and would be considered part of the regular

embassy staff.

When the 2008 agreement requiring all

U.S. forces leave Iraq was passed, many U.S.

officials assumed it would inevitably be renegotiated

so that American forces could stay

longer.

The U.S. said repeatedly this year it would

entertain an offer from the Iraqis to have a

small force stay behind, and the Iraqis said

they would like American military help. But

as the year wore on and the number of American

troops that Washington was suggesting

could stay behind dropped, it became increasingly

clear that a U.S. troop presence was not

a sure thing.

The issue of legal protection for the Americans

was the deal-breaker.

Iraqis are still angry over incidents such as

the Abu Ghraib prison scandal or Haditha,

when U.S. troops killed Iraqi civilians in Anbar

province, and want American troops subject

to Iraqi law.

American commanders don’t want to risk

having their forces end up in an Iraqi courtroom

if they’re forced to defend themselves in

a still-hostile environment.

It is highly unlikely that Iraqi lawmakers

would have the time to approve a U.S. troop

deal even if they wanted to. The parliament is

in recess on its Hajj break until November 20,

leaving just a few weeks for legislative action

before the end of year deadline.

Going down to zero by the end of this year

would allow both al-Maliki and President

Barack Obama to claim victory. Obama will

have fulfilled a key campaign promise to end

the war and al-Maliki will have ended the

American presence in Iraq and restored Iraqi

sovereignty.

The Iraqi prime minister was also under intense

pressure from his anti-American allies,

the Sadrists, to reject any American military

presence.

An advisor close to al-Maliki said the

Americans suggested during negotiations that

if no deal is reached in time, U.S. troops could

be stationed in Kuwait.

With the U.S. military presence in Iraq

currently at about 41,000 and heading down

to zero, almost all of those forces will be flowing

out of Iraq into Kuwait and then home or

other locations.

A western expert in Iraq said it is conceivable

that if the Iraqi government asks early

next year for U.S. troops to return, there will

be forces still in Kuwait able to come back and

do the job.

But he stressed that the core problems still

remain on the Iraqi side about what types of

legal immunity to give the American troops

and whether parliament can pass it.

– Associated Press

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COUNSELOR is in

10 keys to healing overindulgence

Iklas J. Bashi, LPC, NCC

“Whatever is true, whatever

is honorable, whatever is just,

whatever is pure, whatever is

lovely, whatever is gracious,

if there is any excellence and

if there is anything worthy of

praise, think about these things

… then the God of peace will

be with you.” Philippians 4:8

Overindulgence is

about giving children

too much of what they

want and not enough of what they

need. The focus is often on materialism,

performance and immediate

gratification and the fruits are often

anguish and a sense of emptiness.

The following insights are meant

to be a starting point for parents. If

any of them resonate with your experience,

spend some time reflecting

on them and how you may integrate

them more fully into your family life.

1. Whole Parent, Whole Child

As parents, it is critical for us to be

emotionally and mentally healthy.

What does this mean? It means

looking at our own issues and limitations

and working through them.

For example, if you have unresolved

anger issues, these will be projected

onto your children. Do you have

unresolved shame and guilt from

your own childhood? Perhaps you

fill those spaces up by overindulging

your children.

If there are places in your life

that are broken, consider therapy,

marriage counseling, talking with a

priest, attending a retreat, working

out, going to confession, quitting

smoking/drinking, etc. Begin to look

at those aspects of your life that need

healing. The healthier we are, the

better equipped we will be to raise

well-rounded, healthy children.

2. Examine Family Values

Create a family meeting where you

and your children write down your

values and beliefs. Children, regardless

of their age, should be given an

opportunity to voice what they value

as well. This has been referred to as a

Family Constitution. It will become

the guide for living for each family

member.

Iklas J. Bashi,

LPC, NCC

special to the

chaldean news

The goal is to strive in

our daily life toward living

according to our values and

beliefs. All family members

can sign their name at the

end of the Family Constitution

pledging to model

what the family holds to

be valuable. These may include

kindness, faith, honesty,

generosity and peace.

When we seek to live our

values, we often decrease

the likelihood to overindulge

ourselves and our children.

3. Accept Joy and Sorrow

Life is difficult. We must be diligent

about helping our children accept

that joy and sorrow or suffering are

real and a natural part of life. We

cannot shield our children from the

pain of life. This goes against the

very fiber of our faith. Without pain,

our children cannot grow strong.

They will experience life from the

lens of your protection and safety net

and will be ill equipped for school,

work, relationships and the sorrow

that is inherent in life.

If you are a parent who tends to

rescue or prevent your children from

experiencing any suffering, you prevent

the opportunity for them to become

self-reliant.

4. Be Honest

There is a tendency in our culture

to conceal, minimize and/or sugarcoat

the truth to protect our children

and other family members from pain.

Keeping things in the dark increases

their power and control over us. On

the contrary, bringing things into the

light allows God to work his graces

into the situation to bring about

restoration, healing and His will.

Children learn that they can count

on their parents when they are honest.

Parents are free to be realistic in

terms of what they can and cannot

do for their children.

5. Recognize Strengths and Limitations

Exaggerating your children’s strengths

and ignoring their limitations cripples

them. Many parents glorify and

pamper their children, who will be ill

equipped to handle constructive criticism

from others in the future. They

can become easily angered and ignore

those important people in their

life who may be pointing out their

shortcomings in order to help them

grow. This kind of honesty will help

children realize they do not need to

be the constant center of attention.

It also helps them cultivate a sense of

personal identity.

6. Encourage Self-Care Skills

Overindulged children often lack

self-care skills and have difficulty

relating to others. They become

accustomed to Mom or Dad doing

things for them that they are capable

of doing themselves. The unintended

message we give our children is

that he or she doesn’t have what it

takes to do it alone. This area often

reveals a parent’s need for control

or obsessive-compulsive tendencies

that need to be examined.

Overindulged

children often lack

self-care skills

and have difficulty

relating to others.

7. Teach Patience and Longing

Children who are accustomed to getting

what they want, when they want

it, are not given the chance to appreciate

what they do have. Granting

their every wish and desire does not

teach them gratitude or how to be

content. Gratitude manifests itself

through waiting, longing and anticipating.

Create opportunities for

them to practice gratitude and delay

gratification.

8. Take Personal Responsibility

Whether it is doing chores, taking

care of their belongings or making

sure they do not lose their things,

children need to learn the value of

taking personal responsibility. With

their hectic schedules filled with

sports and other activities, it is becoming

increasingly more challenging

for parents to enforce chores on

children. But this is a necessary key

to their healthy development. Doing

chores is an opportunity for them

to grow. By insisting they do chores,

we give them the message that they

are needed by their family.

9. Understand Impact

Children need to know they have

been given the gift of free will and

they need to be made aware that

their behaviors, whether good or

bad, impact others around them.

Often children do not realize the impact

of bad choices. Instead of shaming

and blaming them, our goal is to

increase their awareness, to see the

big picture. This will increase their

empathy and concern for others.

10. Be an Authority,

Not a Friend

Because many parents feel they weren’t

given a chance to voice their opinions

or feelings during their own childhood,

they overindulge children by overvaluing

their need for self-expression.

Children turn into young negotiators

and parents fall into the trap of allowing

a constant tug-of-war dialogue to

rule the home. Parents need take back

their role as authority figures. Children

need to express themselves but not to

point where they argue until they get

their way. This is manipulation, not

self-expression.

Whether in therapy sessions,

workshops, or parenting groups, a

common phrase I have heard from

parents in our community is that

they lack the wahess or motivation

to parent. We cannot neglect giving

our children the guidance, instruction

and formation they need

to grow into responsible members of

society equipped with an awareness

of who they are and why God created

them. It is our obligation as parents

to make our home the first school for

our children.

Iklas J. Bashi, LPC, NCC, is a

writer, life coach and speaker. She

offers group workshops, seminars and

presentations on a wide variety of

topics that combine her training and

experience in psychology as well as

Catholic spirituality. Email questions

and comments to ahigherwayllc@gmail.

com. Visit ChaldeanNews.com to read

part one of this series, “The Damaging

Effects of Overindulgence,” which

appeared in our October issue.

50 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


Iklas’ Booklist

for Parents

“Children do not come with an instruction manual.”

As parents, we cannot give our children what we do not possess. I

encourage all parents, fathers and mothers, to read more to gain

the knowledge and skills necessary to parent to the very best of

their ability. Gone are the days when parenting was a mother’s job only.

Now more than ever, children need their fathers because there are life lessons

that only a father can teach his children. Children need the time and

presence of both parents to thrive.

The extensive offerings on the subject of overindulgence are indicative

of the struggles we face as parents. I have added titles that may not necessarily

cover the topic of overindulgence but are worth reading. Consider

renting any of these titles at your local library or purchasing them for your

home library. And don’t forget: pray, pray, pray, for your children and all

children of this generation. After all, prayer changes things!

YOUCAT: Youth Catechism of the Catholic Church

Guiltless Catholic Parenting from A to Y, by Bert Ghezzi

Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters:

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How Much Is Enough?: Everything You Need to Know to Steer Clear

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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 51


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52 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


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NOVEMBER 2011 CHALDEAN NEWS 53


events

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9

10 11 12

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chaldean idol

It was a packed house at Southfield’s Regency Manor on October 21 as 10 singers

competed to become the new Chaldean Idol. Christopher “Slim” Arafat from 95.5

served as host and Renee Murad from My Cuzin’s Radio Show was in the back doing

interviews. Hundreds of friends and family members were on hand to cheer on

their favorites. Candice Nofar won the title; runners-up were Danielle Bahoora

and Lennon Kyriakoza. Proceeds from the event benefitted COACH.

– Crystal Kassab Jabiro

1. Candice Nofar –

The Chaldean Idol

2. Sarah Markus

3. Anglia Kassab,

Reem Samona and

Antonia Kassab

4. Chanel

Shamami

5. George Georgis

and his mom,

Hanan Setto

6. Lennon

Kyriakoza

7. Karin Gibrael

8. Maryam Bajawa

9. The judges:

Martin Khemurro,

Fay Samona and

Peter Zora

10. Sydney Yaldo

11. Loyes Bitti

12. Channtall

Asmaro

13. An enthusiastic

audience

54 CHALDEAN NEWS NOVEMBER 2011


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