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Hunt Institute for Engineering & Humanity: 10 YEARS OF IMPACT

Much of our current economy, institutions and approaches to addressing societal problems predates what Stephen Hawking termed the “century of complexity.” A hallmark of this era of complexity is interconnectivity, rendering the dichotomies of developed vs. underdeveloped countries increasingly meaningless. Complex societal challenges such as poverty, inequality, food insecurity, climate change, deteriorating health, gender disparity, educational divide and environmental degradation, just to name a few, are deeply interconnected and shared across rich and poor countries alike. Over the past decade we tested, piloted, and implemented novel approaches to holistically tackle these interconnected problems to foster climate-smart inclusive economic development. Our ultimate goal is to ensure that access to opportunities and economic prosperity is shared and we leave a healthy planet for future generations. Our approach has been operational for only a few years but its impact has already been noteworthy and we are proud to share some of the highlights in this report.

Much of our current economy, institutions and approaches to addressing societal problems predates what Stephen Hawking termed the “century of complexity.” A hallmark of this era of complexity is interconnectivity, rendering the dichotomies of developed vs. underdeveloped countries increasingly meaningless. Complex societal challenges such as poverty, inequality, food insecurity, climate change, deteriorating health, gender disparity, educational divide and environmental degradation, just to name a few, are deeply interconnected and shared across rich and poor countries alike. Over the past decade we tested, piloted, and implemented novel approaches to holistically tackle these interconnected problems to foster climate-smart inclusive economic development. Our ultimate goal is to ensure that access to opportunities and economic prosperity is shared and we leave a healthy planet for future generations. Our approach has been operational for only a few years but its impact has already been noteworthy and we are proud to share some of the highlights in this report.

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IMPACT REPORT

10 YEARS OF IMPACT


Communities around the world are experiencing increasing

uncertainties with respect to livelihoods, inequality and

environmental degradation. Dallas exhibits the paradox of

being home to Fortune 500 corporations along with vast food

deserts, a digital divide, severe neighborhood inequality and

urban heat islands.

Photo: Melody Hamilton

2


Hunt Institute Impact Report

TABLE OF

CONTENTS

1

2

TEN YEARS OF IMPACT

• Our Mission

• Translating Global Goals into Local Action

• Letter from the Executive Director

• Our Milestones

AGGREGATING FOR IMPACT

• Igniting Collective Action

• Leveraging Market Forces

• Our Focus

• Our Approach

3

OUR PROGRAMS

• Building the Ecosystem

• Engaging the Community

• Incubating Solutions

4

EMPOWERING THE NEXT

GENERATION OF CHANGEMAKERS

5

PIONEERING CLIMATE-SMART INCLUSIVE

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION

6

OUR PEOPLE

3


01

Hunt

Institute Impact Report

TEN YEARS OF IMPACT


OUR MISSION

• Develop and scale sustainable and affordable technologies and solutions

addressing the challenges facing under-resourced communities

• Foster market-based mechanisms that create sustainable livelihood

opportunities that respect the dignity of individuals and communities

• Serve as a national and international hub and convening platform for

business, academia, NGOs and governmental organizations

• Leverage talent from various disciplines and focus on the education of

engineering and non-engineering students alike


Hunt Institute Impact Report

10 YEARS OF IMPACT

TRANSLATING GLOBAL GOALS INTO LOCAL ACTION

Scaling social impact with climate-smart inclusive economic development

During its first decade of operation, the Hunt Institute’s

work has impacted all 17 Sustainable Development Goals

(SDGs) set forth in 2015 by the United Nations and

subsequently adopted by 193 countries. The SDGs call

for action by all countries to promote prosperity while

protecting the planet. These goals reflect the important

recognition that ending poverty must go hand-in-hand

with strategies that build economic prosperity and address

a range of social needs including education, health, social

protection, and job opportunities, while tackling climate

change and protecting the natural environment.

The Hunt Institute’s work touches each of the 17 SDGs

through its holistic approach to fostering climate-smart

inclusive economic development. We thank all of our

partners and supporters who have empowered our work

over the past ten years.

The United Nations’ Sustainable Development

Goals (SDGs) are a call for action by all countries

to promote prosperity while protecting the planet.

6


Hunt Institute Impact Report

10 YEARS OF IMPACT

LETTER FROM

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EVA CSAKY

Much of our current economy, institutions and approaches to addressing societal problems predates what Stephen Hawking termed the

“century of complexity.” A hallmark of this era of complexity is interconnectivity, rendering the dichotomies of developed vs. underdeveloped

countries increasingly meaningless. Complex societal challenges such as poverty, inequality, food insecurity, climate change, deteriorating

health, gender disparity, educational divide and environmental degradation, just to name a few, are deeply interconnected and shared across

rich and poor countries alike.

Over the past decade we tested, piloted, and implemented novel approaches to holistically tackle these interconnected problems to foster

climate-smart inclusive economic development. Our ultimate goal is to ensure that access to opportunities and economic prosperity is shared

and we leave a healthy planet for future generations. While that might sound like a Utopian aspiration and a theoretical exercise, it is not.

The hundreds of scaled best practices from around the world that we have collected and analyzed clearly indicate that there are possible

solutions, driving our persistence to find the most effective and efficient approach for fostering such solutions in our era. The novel approach

we utilize simultaneously leverages international best practices, the ingenuity of our close to one hundred expert affiliates, the passion and

talent of students from across disciplines, and the insights and wisdom of communities.

Our approach has been operational for only a few years but its impact has already been noteworthy and we are proud to share some of the

highlights in this report. Perhaps even more importantly, as we focus our attention on building back better from the pandemic, we hope that these

experiences offer an actionable roadmap for scaling impact and deliberately transitioning towards a climate-smart and inclusive economy.

Thank you for your partnership.

Eva Szalkai Csaky, PhD MSF

Executive Director

7


Hunt Institute Impact Report

10 YEARS OF IMPACT

OUR MILESTONES

E&H Week:’From

Innovation to Impact‘

Opening of

James Pratt Library

Design of new

operational and

programmatic structure

to support scaling the

Institute’s impact

Launch of Blockchain

and Transformational

Technology Hub

Launch of MASD CIED

course & concentration

Launch of Social

Enterprise Program

‘Intrapreneurs’ cohort

2011 2013 2015 2017 2019

2012 2014 2018 2020

Hunt Institute becomes

operational with launch

of Engineering &

Humanity (E&H) Week

called ‘ReFrame’ to

highlight affordable and

sustainable housing

E&H Week: ‘Water:

Ripple Effects’

Climate Extremes

conference leading

up to COP21 Launch

of Inclusive Economy

Consortium Testing of

innovation incubation

approaches

Launch of Global

Development Lab

and Social Enterprise

Program Pilots

Launch of

ImpactNights TM

& Satellites

AWARENESS RAISING PHASE

CLIMATE—SMART INCLUSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

(CIED) TEST & PILOT PHASE

CIED SCALING PHASE

8


Photo: The 2014 ribbon-cutting ceremony for the James Pratt library, donated to and housed in the Hunt Institute, included James and Joan Pratt, Alexandra, Ilya and Sabrina Pratt, Dr.

Bobby Lyle, Stephanie and Hunter Hunt, Dr. Eva Csaky, Peter Brown and others.

“James Pratt was a celebrated mid-century Texas architect with many significant buildings to his name. His even greater legacy is as an early, thoughtful and provocative

thinker about the urbanism of the city of Dallas. His book, ‘Dallas Visions’, beautifully illustrated with his drawings and plans, laid out a conceptual structure not only for

Dallas city planning, but also for the ambitious quality of urban life that Pratt imagined for the whole city.”

—Dr. Jessie Marshall Zarazaga, PhD, RIBA leed AP, Curator of the Pratt Collection

9


02

Hunt Institute Impact Report

AGGREGATING FOR IMPACT


Hunt Institute Impact Report

AGGREGATING FOR IMPACT

IGNITING COLLECTIVE ACTION

The Hunt Institute's novel multiplier approach forges connections across geographies, stakeholders, sectors, disciplines and even generations to ignite collective

action. These include a core leadership team, an international multidisciplinary group of experts who serve the Institute as fellows and affiliates, students from

across disciplines, partners from every community where we work, both locally and internationally, and a professional network of interested parties.

Networked Impact+

Partners

Our Network

Collective

Action

Core Team

Fellows &

Affiliates

Student Team

NETWORKED IMPACT + is accomplished through

the Hunt Institute’s novel multiplier approach

Photo: The Hunt Institute hosts regular convenings to foster connections,

knowledge sharing and collaborations.

11


Hunt Institute Impact Report

AGGREGATING FOR IMPACT

LEVERAGING MARKET FORCES

Solving social and environmental problems while creating

economic opportunities

Five billion people who earn less than $8 a day around the world spend $5 trillion a year on food, housing, energy, water, information and communication technology (ICT),

transportation, and health. Businesses that address those needs with quality products and services have an opportunity to profit while positively impacting low-income

communities. This is the essence of “base-of-the-pyramid” (BOP) strategies.

Despite the influence of BOP strategies over the

past 15 years, they have gained little ground in

industrialized economies. The Hunt Institute estimates

the size of the BOP market in the United States at

$1 trillion, representing 25% of U.S. households

and 13% of all U.S. consumer expenditures. These

households are more likely to be headed by a woman

and to have a dependent (child or elderly), more

likely to be African American, and less likely to own

a home or hold a college education. Not surprisingly,

the demand is concentrated in the same areas

as internationally: housing, food, transportation,

healthcare and energy. The Hunt Institute’s work

focuses on these sectors to generate economic

opportunities and jobs while meeting people’s

most important needs in a sustainable and

climate-smart fashion.

$5 TRILLION GLOBAL BOP MARKET

HEALTH

WATER

ENERGY

HOUSING

ICT

TRANSPORTATION

OTHER

Source: World Resources Institute

FOOD

WATER

$1 TRILLION US BOP MARKET

HOUSING

FOOD

HEALTHCARE

OTHER

Source: Hunt Institute for Engineering & Humanity

TRANSPORTATION

ENERGY

APPAREL &

PERSONAL

CARE

INSURANCE &

PENSIONS

ICT

EDUCATION

WATER &

PUBLIC SERVICES

Low-income and under-resourced communities collectively represent an significant and often untapped market at the “base-ofthe-pyramid”

(BOP). Most of this purchasing power represents demand for food, housing, transportation, energy and healthcare.

2%

12


R FOCUS

Hunt Institute Impact Report

AGGREGATING FOR IMPACT

RK FOCUSES

OUR

ON LEVERAGING

FOCUS

TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE

IC OPPORTUNITIES AND ACCESS. WE DO SO WITH AN

IS ON TWO SECTORS IN PARTICULAR: SUSTAINABLE FOOD

AND RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE, SUCH AS HOUSING,

AND ICT. THESE ARE TWO AREAS FACING SOME OF THE

ESSING CHALLENGES AS WELL AS OPPORTUNITIES TO

E HUMAN The WELL Hunt Institute’s BEING, work CREATING focuses on two critical ENTREPRENEURIAL

areas; sustainable food systems and

UNITIES AND resilient DECENT infrastructure (housing, JOB IN energy THE and ICT). PROCESS. We develop technologies IN ORDER and solutions TO

THAT THESE OPPORTUNITIES ARE INCLUSIVE AND

LE, HOWEVER, in these areas WE that ALSO not only mitigate NEED the TO risks of PRIORITIZE climate change, but HUMAN simultaneously meet

IN EVERY basic ASPECT needs and create OF decent OUR jobs WORK and entrepreneurial AND FOSTER opportunities. THE To ensure that these

RY FINANCIAL INNOVATIONS TO ENABLE IMPACT AT SCALE.

opportunities are inclusive and equitable, we develop human capital through education

and training. To guarantee the scalability of these solutions, we foster innovative impact

finance approaches.

HUMAN

CAPITAL

sustainable

food

system

SUSTAINABLE

RESILIENT

FOOD

FINANCE TECHNOLOGY TECHNOLOGY INFRA-

SYSTEM

STRUCTURE

HUMAN

CAPITAL

FINANCE

RESILIENT

INFRASTRUCTURE

Photo: Melody Hamilton

13


Hunt Institute Impact Report

AGGREGATING FOR IMPACT

OUR APPROACH

A holistic model for tackling

complex problems

Making sense of the complexity that influences the work of social

entrepreneurs & climate-smart inclusive economic development

BUILD

ECOSYSTEM

Best Practice & Ecosystem Analysis

Blockchain & Transformational Technology Hub

Financial Innovation & Inclusion

Convening stakeholders

across sectors and disciplines

to connect, share and act

Inclusive Economy Consortium

ImpactNights

Outreach

ENGAGE

COMMUNITY

INCUBATE

SOLUTIONS

Transforming the best

ideas into actionable

projects and solutions

Social Enterprise Program

Global Development Lab

Special Initiatives

14


03

Hunt

Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

Photo: In front of the Meadows Museum on SMU’s Dallas campus is Santiago Calatrava’s dynamic sculpture,“The Wave,” the artist’s first large-scale sculpture to be permanently installed

in the United States.


BUILDING THE

ECOSYSTEM

Photo: Launch of the Blockchain & Transformational Technology Hub in 2018


Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

BEST PRACTI CE & ECOSYSTEM ANALYSIS

For climate-smart inclusive economic development

The forces of globalization, technological advancement, and climate

change have created new and often complex challenges when it comes

to economic inclusion and livelihoods. To address these issues, the Hunt

Institute team and fellows have been studying innovative solutions and

best practices in climate-smart inclusive economic development from

around the world.

While solutions often cannot and should not simply be replicated

across different geographies, there is much to learn from studying the

experiences of others. We document and analyze best practices and

the ecosystems they have succeeded in to identify key patterns to help

empower all relevant stakeholders.

PHASE 1

105

INTERNATIONAL

BEST PRACTICES

PHASE 2

418

INTERNATIONAL

BEST PRACTICES

Photo: Executive Director Dr. Eva Csaky and Hunt Institute Fellow Anna Clark were

invited to present "Pathways to Scaling Social and Environmental Impact towards

Inclusive and Sustainable Economic Development” at the Disruptive Innovation,

Value Chains and Rural Development Conference hosted by the World Bank. The

key findings of this work arecaptured in the CAISE model and the subject of an

upcoming book (see page 18).

17


COLLECTIVE ACTION FOR AN

INCLUSIVE SUSTAINABLE

ECONOMY (CAISE) MODEL

The aim of this work is to demystify the paradigm of climate-smart

inclusive economic development for all stakeholders. Our analysis of

best practices from around the world reveals key features that successful

climate-smart inclusive economy efforts share, including:

• Systems approach to

complex problems

• Multi-sector and multistakeholder

partnerships

• Leveraging of private sector

value chains

• Aggregation of small

economic actors

• Ongoing knowledge and

skill development

• Communities empowered

to lead

• Policies with ongoing data

collection and feedback loops

Source: “Scaling Social and Environmental Impact Through Inclusive Value Chains and Disruptive Collaboration” (Csaky, E.;

Clark, A.; Rivera, S., 2018)

• Innovative risk assessment

and financing approaches

18


Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

BLOCKCHAIN HUB

In partnership with:

The Blockchain Hub was created in 2018 in partnership with FinTech4Good and the Blockchain Frontier Group to promote the understanding of the potential

applications of blockchain and adjacent technologies for social and environmental impact and to serve as a multi-disciplinary and multi-stakeholder hub for those solutions.

Data aggregation

& mapping

The Hunt Institute and its partner

organizations are working to

improve access to information and

resources through the ecosystem

mapping of the climate-smart

inclusive economy and the innovative use

of technology. The Hub aggregates data through multiple

mechanisms and disseminates relevant information as well

as analytics to different audiences. This approach helps

empower individuals, businesses and service providers alike

while generating policy-relevant analytics.

10

USE

CASES

FROM

SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL

IMPACT AREAS

CATALOGUED

Graphic: Blockchain Hub and adjacent technologies have proven to have high potential for transformational impact.

19


In 2020, during the pandemic, the Veteran Women

Enterprise Center (“VWEC”), led by Hunt Institute

Fellow and Navy veteran VR Small, successfully

piloted the Financial First Bootcamp, an innovative

and comprehensive capacity-building program

aimed at financial empowerment, developed by

the Hunt Institute and FinTech4Good. Beyond

financial management, the program includes

training on access to finance, climate-smart

strategies and their financial benefits, as well as the

latest insights about innovative financing options

such as crowdfunding and fintech. Based on the

success of the pilot, the partners are in the process

of expanding the program, which will be offered by

VWEC across the United States in 2022.

“The 4th industrial revolution can both empower

and leave behind small businesses. This is especially

the case for under-resourced entrepreneurs. Training

curriculums become outdated quickly and small

businesses often do not have access to the latest

knowledge that can help them succeed. This novel

dynamic program that is designed to connect to cuttingedge

knowledge resources in our fast changing world

greatly benefi ts our entrepreneurs.”

VR Small,

CEO of the Veteran Women

Enterprise Center

20


Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

IMPACT FINANCE &

FINANCIAL INCLUSION

The Hunt Institute’s team and fellows have been pioneers in the impact

finance field and are focused on developing innovative solutions to solve

the significant funding gap for climate change, especially as it relates to

underserved groups such as farmers, small businesses, low-income families

and female-owned businesses. Despite its growing importance, impact

finance only meets a small fraction of this need and has relied heavily on

public funding sources. The Institute is addressing this challenge through

multiple fronts. We developed programs to address critical demand-side

barriers to financial inclusion such as financial literacy. Additionally, we have

created innovative tools to assist social entrepreneurs in accessing financing

and implemented capacity building regarding crowdfunding and fintech.

Critically, our team has developed unique expertise in designing

and implementing novel financial structures and approaches that

reduce the barriers and has shown to significantly increase the

engagement of private capital in impact financing.

Partner:

Chart: The World Bank estimates that $90 trillion is necessary in the

next 10 years just to mitigate the risks of climate change. Annual impact

finance flows are not on track to meet this need. Innovative financial

mechanisms have proven to be able to mobilize private capital with a

strong multiplier effect.

21


As part of a collaboration with the George W. Bush Presidential

Center’s WE Lead Scholars program, an initiative for women

leaders from the Middle East, North Africa, and Afghanistan

(”MENA”), the Hunt Institute convened an Impact Finance

workshop in Washington, DC with international experts in

sustainable finance and impact investing.

Hunt Institute Executive Director Dr. Eva Csaky and Hunt

Institute Fellows Dr. Yasmin Saadat, Dr. Debra Perry, Xiaochen

Zhang, Alison Harwood designed a workshop to share the latest

knowledge about the global impact finance ecosystem and

opportunities and challenges for social entrepreneurs seeking

alternative sources of financing.

As Dr. Nadia Zrelli Ben Hamida, a Tunisian economist and

WE Lead Scholar, remarked, “the workshop was very beneficial

and unique in its dichotomy of offering both practical insights

to social entrepreneurs in MENA as well as a comprehensive

overview of the global impact finance ecosystem, including

discussions about different types of funders, financial

instruments, innovative financing mechanisms and the fastevolving

crowdfunding and fintech impact finance landscape.”

Photo: Hunt Institute Impact Finance workshop for the

George W. Bush Presidential Center’s WE Scholars at the

White House Historical Association in Washington DC

22


ENGAGING THE

COMMUNITY

Photo: Community Innovation Lab 2017. The Hunt Institute and its partners convened more than 30 organizations to co-create solutions for equitable healthy food access.

23


Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

CLIMATE

EXTREMES

A forum on adaptation

and resilience in Texas

In 2015, the Hunt Institute hosted Climate Extremes, an official conference of

COP21 Paris, the United Nations Conference on Climate Change. The largest

convening for climate change ever held in Texas until that time, the Climate

Extremes conference was also part of the French American Climate Talks of the

French Embassy in Washington on the road to COP21. Held in Paris, COP21

was a truly global and local collaboration among countries and cities as well as

the public, private and third sectors..

Above left: Mayor Mike Rawlings. Above right: Conference was sold out with over

300 participants and broadcast live online for those unable to attend in person.

The Climate Extremes conference had a unique

focus on the intersection of climate change and

economic inclusion. It offered a unique opportunity

to understand why mitigating climate extremes is

important, and redefined what is possible in using

collaboration and collective action to address climate

change at home and abroad.

Above: Other speakers included Garrett Boone, Container Store Co-Founder

and Chairman Emeritus, Drew Byrd, Schneider Electric executive, Trammell S.

Crow, founder of EarthX, Dr. Eva Csaky, Executive Director of the Hunt Institute,

Jill Jordan, Dallas’ Assistant City Manager, Russell Laughlin, Hillwood Properties

executive, Dr. Bruce McCarl, Nobel Peace Prize-winning economist, Janette

Monear, President and CEO of the Texas Trees Foundation, with renowned

journalist Lee Cullum moderating the discussion.

24


Photo: The Climate Extremes conference generated connections and conversations across the private, public and nonprofit sectors, leading to requests for the creation of an ongoing

forum to facilitate the continuation of these conversations, collaboration and collective action. This led to the birth of the Inclusive Economy Consortium and its flagship regular

gatherings, ImpactNights TM . Pictured is Hon. Sujiro Seam, Consul General of France, giving his opening remarks.

25


Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

INCLUSIVE ECONOMY

CONSORTIUM

By popular demand, the Inclusive Economy Consortium was created as

an outcome of the Climate Extremes conference to support the ongoing

collaboration of all stakeholders towards climate-smart inclusive

economic development.

The Inclusive Economy Consortium (IEC) is an interdisciplinary

community of diverse stakeholders who are dedicated to creating

an economy that works for all. A collaborative platform for social

entrepreneurship, thought leadership, and collective action, our network

empowers change makers from the private, public and nonprofit sectors

to connect, share and act in order to help build the ecosystem for a

climate-smart inclusive economy.

20+

COALITION OF ITS

KIND IN TEXAS

PARTNERS

1 ST

26


www.insightintodiversity.com

September 202

$3.99

Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

Impact NightsTM

As a multidisciplinary, peer-based network, the Inclusive Economy

Consortium hosts monthly convenings via ImpactNights in which likeminded

people come together to share experiences and knowledge, and

build relationships and collaborations. Sessions are kept small to promote

conversations and led by topic experts.

Topics covered include:

• Social enterprise vs. social entrepreneurship vs. social innovation

• What is social intrapreneurship and why it is more important than ever

• AI, IOT & blockchain

• Climate change: challenges & opportunities

SEPTEMBER 2021

• Role of corporations in climate-smart inclusive economic development

• Economic lives of refugees

• How can we build back better?

• Sustainable & inclusive finance

• Forgotten fuel: energy efficiency

• Trees: a prescription for Dallas

• How civic journalism can restore trust & create a more inclusive economy

with support from

37

EXPERT-LED

SESSIONS

Inspiring Programs in

STEM Award Recipient

INSIGHT Into Diversity recognizes the immense

importance of increasing the number of leaders from

underrepresented groups working in STEM professions

and is proud to announce its 2021 Inspiring Programs

in STEM Award recipients. We recognize colleges,

universities, and organizations for programs that are

improving access to STEM fields for students from

underrepresented groups.

This award is being presented to institutions whose

programs inspire a new generation of young people

to consider STEM careers as well as support working

professionals in these fields. These remarkable initiatives

are making a significant difference by providing mentoring,

academic and professional support, hands-on activities,

research opportunities, and more. For these efforts, they

are worthy of national recognition. We congratulate these

institutions on their accomplishments and offer support for

their future endeavors.

202

INSPIRING PROGRAMS

IN S

AWARD

2021 Inspiring Programs

in STEM Award Recipient

FROM

Your Program Name

27


Photos: ImpactNights TM is a regular gathering of social entrepreneurs from across sectors and disciplines, and the manifestation of the Inclusive Economy Consortium’s mission to

“connect-share-act”. The event connects interested professionals, facilitates the sharing of knowledge and experiences, and fosters collective action towards a more climate-smart,

inclusive and equitable economy. In addition to professional networking, each ImpactNights TM offers interactive knowledge-sharing sessions led by 2-3 experts. Topics are crowdsourced

from the Hunt Institute’s expert network, and sessions that generate the most interest are followed by collective action sessions designed to implement specific collaborative initiatives.

28


Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

OUTREACH

In collaboration with community partners, asset-based community

research was completed in 2015-16 to improve our understanding of

challenges and opportunities in Dallas’ under-resourced communities.

The results helped inform our outreach priorities around sustainable

food system, food justice, and community resilience.

We learned early on that the Institute’s mobile greenhouse and

science center, “Evie”, fascinated children and youth as much as our

students who helped design and retrofit the old trailer. Evie became a

beloved fixture during the Texas State Fair educating the public about

the sustainability of the food system. Evie’s popularity led to “Eviein-a-Box”,

instructions and related educational content developed

in collaboration with the Caruth Institute for Education for their

renowned summer camps (see next page), which has since been used

as far away as Tunisia.

STEM

EDUCATION FOR GIRLS

FROM TEXAS TO TUNISIA

WITH “EVIE”

15

INTERVIEWS WITH UNSUNG

HEROES DURING

THE PANDEMIC

The Sages & Seekers podcast shares the stories of innovative social

leaders, the resilient communities that have shaped them, and how they

are carrying that legacy forward for themselves and others. The series

explores guests' personal experiences with social issues ranging from

inequity in the arts and school segregation to climate change and police

violence. Through conversations with these agents of change, listeners

gain insights into the history of pressing social problems and discover

how we as a global community can work to solve them.

29


Photo: In partnership with the Caruth Institute for Engineering Education, rising 7th and 8th graders visited the Hunt Institute to learn about sustainable food systems and

build a “mini-Evie” aquaponic system. Pictured are SMU students Wilkie Stevenson (SMU 2020, BS in Mechanical Engineering) and Anna Grace Carey (SMU 2019, BA in

Journalism, Political Science and Fashion Media) offering a multidisciplinary perspective on sustainable food systems.

30


INCUBATING

SOLUTIONS

Photo: Earthen construction has been used for over 6,000 years. Compressed earth blocks, with the integration of modern technology while still using primarily local

soil, have the potential to be a leading affordable solution for sustainable housing construction if some technical and scaling challenges are addressed. Dr. Story and

his research team have successfully tackled some of these challenges in the Global Development Lab and continue to work on others.

31


“The Hunt Institute’s support has been

critical to Break Bread Break Borders’

success. They were willing to engage with

us at an early stage. Beyond their toolbox,

we benefi ted from the involvement of

many experts, student interns and exposure.

Theirs is not simply a fi nite program

but a permanent hub for empowerment

and a community for impact. Initially

we were simply focused on learning and

creating a solid business plan. Now we are

sharing our experiences, mentoring others

and forging partnerships, including for

replicating our model in other parts of the

world. You don’t graduate but evolve in this

approach and in the process our collective

impact is being scaled exponentially.”

Jin-ya Huang,

Founder & CEO

>80,000

LIVES

IMPACTED

32


Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE PROGRAM

Social entrepreneurs take on social and environmental problems

head-on, and they are the link between the Institute and under-resourced

communities. Social entrepreneurs build resilience in the communities

they work in by creating economic opportunities for under-resourced

communities while tackling societal challenges including access to healthy

food, renewable energy, education and waste reduction.

Social entrepreneurs are catalytic innovators who produce disruptive

innovations, using entrepreneurial and earned income strategies. Social

entrepreneurs often face momentous obstacles, especially in the prescaling

stages of their development. Our program was designed to provide

hands-on and comprehensive support to some of the most innovative

early stage social entrepreneurs and empower them to fulfill their

potential for transformative impact.

Social intrapreneurs represent a key, but often neglected, type of

social entrepreneur. They embody all key traits of social entrepreneurs

but within large organizations, companies or governments. Social

intrapreneurs can bring together the best of both worlds: the innovation

and dynamism of entrepreneurship with the market platform, reach and

expertise of large companies and organizations.

Left: Tyrone Day of Restorative Farms Top Right: Break Bread Break Borders community

dinner Bottom Right: solar panels installed in the Gambia”

33


Photo: Restorative Farms, a Hunt Institute Social Enterprise Program alum, is transforming the Dallas food system. Growing food in the lowest income neighborhoods of Dallas, using

sustainable intensive farming methods while training urban farmers and creating decent jobs. But the vision of Dr. Owen Lynch, Restorative Farms co-founder is much larger. It is creating a

network of small farms and food producers so they can better compete in the complex market dominated by very large players, through improving their access to inputs, information and

markets at the most favorable terms possible. Restorative Farms is the result of Dr. Lynch's pioneering research into food deserts over a decade ago and his community research with the

Hunt Institute to better understand the needs, desires and aspirations of those living in under-resourced communities in Dallas. But, according to Dr. Lynch, “Restorative Farms would not

have become the success it is without the dedicated efforts of co-founders Brad Boa, Tyrone Day and Dr. Doric Earl along with the multidisciplinary group of experts at the Hunt Institute.”

Restorative Farms is on track to scale its operations in Dallas and is in discussions about replication in other locations. They are also embarking on incorporating emerging technologies in

their operations as they are scaling production continuing to be at the forefront of innovation towards a more climate-smart and inclusive food system.

34


Photograph by Mohammed Njie, SMU/Lyle student, Hunt Institute Social Entrepreneur, and founder of Janta, a social enterprise with the mission to bring clean energy to the Gambia.

35


Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

GLOBAL

DEVELOPMENT LAB

The Global Development Lab (GDL) was launched to empower

transformational ideas in their early stages when many fall through the

cracks. In the GDL theory meets practice with the goal of creating

innovative solutions for a resilient humanity addressing the UN’s

sustainable development goals.

Dr. Ali Beskok and Dr. J.C. Chiao, along with their research group, are

developing a novel low-cost, fast and accurate diagnostic device for the

detection of malaria, tuberculosis and Covid-19 human antibodies.

A crucial aspect of this approach involves partnerships with local social

entrepreneurs or other entities with systemic community engagement.

The other key pillar of the GDL is the interdisciplinary network of

experts supporting the development and testing of ideas, to help

maximize the viability of the solutions.

PROJECTS

LED BY

HUNT INSTITUTE

FELLOWS FROM

20 3

11

PATENTS

DISCIPLINES

Dr. Zarazaga and her team developed the design and booklet to convey

the vision for the retrofit of a South Dallas building into a multi-purpose

community and arts center.

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Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT LAB —PROJECT HIGHLIGHTS

Testing artificial intelligence-based legal app to reduce

the justice gap

Developing low-cost biodegradable plastic for

3D printing

Using biopolymer to enhance the nutrient absorption

and productivity of food crops

Developing a novel low-cost seismic protection in

Peru, with potential for replication in multiple countries

Exploring market access for handicrafts, the 2nd most

important source of livelihoods for the global poor

ijiKji (Tanzania): Participatory visioning for rural

development, empowerment and related

sustainable community center design

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Dr. Candice Bledsoe is the Founder and Executive

Director of the Action Research Center

(“ARC”). ARC’s flagship program, the Cutting

Edge Youth Summit (CEYS), has been running

for twelve years, having trained thousands of

youth in leadership skills, innovation and social

entrepreneurship, with 99% of participating

students graduating from high school and 90%

going on to college.

Dr. Bledsoe’s project in the Global Development

Lab focused on creating a toolkit, called Youth

Up Next, for youth social entrepreneurs to

empower them in their entrepreneurial aspirations.

According to Dr. Bledsoe, “the shift to virtual

activities in the past year has proven the universal

appeal of these programs, with many from around

the US and even internationally attending virtually.

In response to the demand, we are in the process

of replicating our programs in several locations

on three continents. The Youth Up Next toolkit

plays an instrumental role in our ability to scale

and replicate our programs in order to address the

need of youth entrepreneurs and innovators at this

critical time.”

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Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

SPECIAL

INITIATIVES

Empowering rural development

through technology

Tintinto School in The Gambia before and after the installation of solar panels by the Hunt Institute

Stem-Up is a low-cost, solar-powered wifi, server and multi-user

network, empowering access to education and computer literacy in

rural communities, even in the absence of electricity and internet

access. The server is pre-loaded with vast amounts of open-source

educational content that teachers are able to curate and customize

for their students. To be piloted in The Gambia with the Tintinto

School, in collaboration with the Gambian Ministry of Education.

Stem-Up demonstration to seek the input of international development expert Haddijatou Lamin Njie,

Stem-Up demonstration to seek the

input of international development

expert Haddijatou Lamin Njie, visiting

from The Gambia.

Stem-Up follows the successful installation of solar panels in the

Tintinto School, allowing students to study in the school until 9 PM

as most homes in rural Gambia do not have access to electricity.

As a result, students have 3 extra hours for learning each day. The

number of students taking advantage of after-school studying in the

school building has increased significantly as a result and just a year

after the installation of the solar panels students outperformed other

schools on standardized tests. The solar panel generated electricity

also helps power computers and mobile phones.

The Stem-Up Technical Team (from

left to right): Dr. Suku Nair, Dr. James

Olivier, Derek Phanekham, Mohammed

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Njie, Wilkie Stevenson


Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PROGRAMS

SPECIAL INITIATIVES

Growing Sustainable Food Systems

Evie joined the Institute in 2017 when she was transformed from an old camping trailer into an experimental mobile greenhouse. Evie has since hosted scientific

experiments aimed at improving the sustainability and economic viability of urban agriculture, supported various STEM education programs and starred in an

award winning documentary. Starting in the Spring of 2022, in partnership with Frasier Revitalization, Restorative Farms, and food entrepreneurs, Evie will serve

as a temporary produce and fresh food storefront in South Dallas to help analyze customer preferences, demand and value chain dynamics. The ultimate goal

of this new phase of Evie’s journey with the Hunt Institute is to assess the community appeal and economic viability of permanent fresh food store options in a

community that is considered to be a food desert by the USDA.

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04

Hunt Institute Impact Report

EMPOWERING THE NEXT

GENERATION OF CHANGEMAKERS

41


Hunt Institute Impact Report

EMPOWERING THE NEXT GENERATION OF CHANGEMAKERS

STUDENT

EXPERIENCE

Students play an integral part of the Hunt Institute’s work. Undergraduate

and graduate students apply the knowledge and skills they have been

learning at the university and contribute to programs and projects in

interdisciplinary teams under the guidance of faculty and Fellows.

They work as part of interdisciplinary teams in a variety of professional

roles such as project managers, program managers, research analysts,

communication specialists, graphic designers and videographers, just to

mention a few. While they work for the Institute part time, most of them

stay engaged for 2-3 years, allowing them to gain invaluable professional

experience and exposure to the impact field.

43

STUDENT TEAM

MEMBERS

IN 2020

41%

HAVE TWO OR

MORE MAJORS

100% 100%

OF ACADEMIC

OF ENGINEERING

DISCIPLINES

SUB-DISCIPLINES

REPRESENTED

REPRESENTED

99%

RECEIVE JOB OFFERS

PRIOR TO

GRADUATING

STUDENT TEAM MEMBERS REPRESENTED

THE FOLLOWING MAJORS IN 2020

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Photo: There are students from across all disciplines involved with the Institute’s work on a regular basis. Under a novel organizational structure and approach, students

work at the Institute part time and take on various professional roles in the areas of their studies, under the guidance and supervision of Institute faculty, staff and fellows.

Many students get “hooked” by the nature of our work and the spirit of our community and stay involved in a range of different capacities after graduation.

43


Hunt Institute Impact Report

EMPOWERING THE NEXT GENERATION OF CHANGEMAKERS

STUDENT TESTIMONIALS

Manuela Murillo Sanchez

’21, BS in Mechanical Engineering

& Mathematics

DeVincent Martin

’18, MA in Sustainability

& Development

Anna Grace Carey

’19, BA in Political Science,

Journalism & Fashion Media

Harshada Pednekar

’21 MS in Environmental

Engineering

Wilkie Stevenson

’20, BS in Mechanical Engineering,

EMIS & Entrepreneurship

“I never would have imagined

that I would have the opportunity

to help expand access

to education in rural parts of

The Gambia. Education is the

basis for development, enabling

thousands to impact their communities

& beyond.”

“I understood the depth of

mistrust [and] I knew that

participatory mapping [with

respect to food deserts] in the

traditional format was not going

to happen. Once I realized

my unique position within the

community of South Dallas, I

took on the challenge of getting

a better understanding of

the problems that have blocked

certain types of research.”

“Nothing is more rewarding

than doing work in the impact

space. Contributing to initiatives

that move us towards a

more sustainable, inclusive

and conscientious future is

such a gift.”

“I am really grateful for the opportunity

to work on the ‘“Waste to

Energy”’ report at the Hunt Institute,

in collaboration with Toyota,

analyzing organic waste to energy

solutions and their potential for

economic viability and implementation

around the world.”

“What motivates me is making

education more accessible.”

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05

Hunt Institute Impact Report

PIONEERING CLIMATE-SMART INCLUSIVE

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION

Photo: Dr. Zarazaga’s Sustainability and Development graduate class is collecting primary data in under-resourced communities and learning analytical methods and GIS to better

understand the problems and to empower the students to design inclusive and participatory solutions.

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Hunt Institute Impact Report

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

PIONEERING CLIMATE-SMART INCLUSIVE

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION

Over the past decade the Institute has held educational,

awareness raising and collaborative programs in the area

of climate-smart inclusive economic development (CIED).

During the pandemic the interest in a more formal educational

offering became apparent and a first of its kind interdisciplinary

graduate course was launched in 2020 focusing on CIED, as

part of SMU’s Sustainability & Development Program (SDP).

Through in-depth investigation of the interconnected social

and environmental challenges facing our society, best practices

from around the world for tackling them and tested approaches

for designing and implementing solutions, the course empowers

students to be problem solvers and contributors in this critically

important new field. Students also learn to apply technological

and financial innovations to create market-based solutions that

can achieve scale and economic viability.

In response to popular demand, students can now choose to

complete their SDP with a CIED concentration.

Photo: The extensive firsthand climate-smart inclusive economic development experiences of

Dr. Csaky and several Hunt Institute Fellows are empowering the Institute to play a pioneering

educational and thought leadership role in the emerging CIED field.

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06

Hunt

Institute Impact Report

OUR PEOPLE

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Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PEOPLE

LEADERSHIP TEAM

Eva Csaky, PhD MSF

Executive Director &

Research Professor

Corrie Harris, MA MBA

Assistant Director

Candice Bledsoe, PhD

Adjunct Professor & Expert In

Residence

Anna Clark, MA

Co-founder, Inclusive Economy

Consortium & Expert In Residence

Valencia Harris, MA

Social Enterprise Program Lead

James Olivier, PhD

Adjunct Professor &

Expert In Residence

Jessie Zarazaga, PhD

Associate Clinical Professor &

Expert In Residence

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Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PEOPLE

OUR EXPERTS

Fellows & Associates

Hunt Institute Fellows and Associates play an active role in the work

of the Institute. Fellows are scholars and industry experts whose

work furthers the state of knowledge about effective inclusive and

sustainable economic development. Associates are early career

practitioners dedicated to help build a more climate-smart inclusive

economy and contribute to the work of the Institute in various ways.

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AFFILIATES FROM

5 CONTINENTS

20

GOVERNMENTAL

ACADEMIC

EXPERTS FROM

16

PRIVATE SECTOR

INDUSTRY

DISCIPLINES

EXPERTS

10

&

INTERGOVERNMENTAL

EXPERTS

49


Hunt Institute Impact Report

OUR PEOPLE

FELLOWS & ASSOCIATES

Dr. Khaled Abdelghany

Tammy Adams

Dr. Michael Adler

Susan Alvarez

Pharr Andrews

Dr. Ali Beskok

Dr. Candice Bledsoe

Juilanna Bond

Tynesia Boyea-Robinson

Ryan Brook

Mike Brown

Paola Buckley

Jessica Burnham

Stephanie Byrd

Dr. Maryann Cairns

Anna Grace Carey

Dr. Sila Cetinkaya

Anna Clark

Dr. DeeDee Conway

Jeff Corkran

Adam De Jong

Betsy Del Monte

Kunthear Douglas

Dr. Scott Douglas

Sienna Dugan

Dr. Doric E. Earle

Clara Ford

Dr. Bruce Gnade

Alison Harwood

Eric Hinton

Dr. James Hollifield

Jin-Ya Huang

Kathy Hubbard

Dr. Robert Hunt

Dr. Kathy Jack

Chris Kelley

Dr. Mohammad Khodayar

Dr. Paul S. Krueger

Haddijatou Lamin Njie

Dr. Eric Larson

Dr. Owen Lynch

Dr. Duncan MacFarlane

Dr. Simon Mak

Dr. Nicos Makris

Srikanth Mangalam

Dr. Olga Martinez Hickman

Miguel Martins

James McGuire

Dr. Barbara Minsker

Janette Monear

Regina Montoya

Dr. Suku Nair

Ajay Narayanan

Lillie Noe

Dr. James Oliver

Dr. Evelyn L. Parker

Dr. Debra Perry

Dr. Andrew Quicksall

Dr. Alex Radunsky

Dr. Dinesh Rajan

Ana Rodriguez

Dr. Yasmin Saadat

Dr. Ahmet Can Sabuncu

Mohan Seneviratne

Dr. Sevinc Sengor

Matthew Sheldon

VR Small

Suzanne Smith

Dr. Jeff Snell

Elizabeth Sobel Blum

Dr. David Son

Jolanta Stankeviciene

Wilkie Stevenson

Meghna Tare

Jamila C. Thomas

Dr. Halit Üster

Clyde Valentin

Benjamin Vann

Meredith M. Walker

Yulise R. Waters, Esq.

Paul Westbrook

Dr. Jessie Zarazaga

Michael Zaretsky

Xiaochen Zhang

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51


Hunter & Stephanie Hunt Institute for

Engineering & Humanity

Lyle School of Engineering

Southern Methodist University

3451 Dyer Street, Caruth Hall Suite 206

Dallas, Texas 75205

214-768-3360

www.smu.edu/HuntInstitute

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