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WINTER 2022

Distributor's Link Magazine Winter 2022 / Vol 45 No 1

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in the Winter <strong>2022</strong> issue of<br />

6 WE’RE CELEBRATING 45 YEARS!<br />

8 HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT TESTING ON INTERNALLY<br />

THREADED PRODUCTS – ARE YOU NUTS?<br />

Rob LaPointe<br />

10 IT’S A MAD, MAD, TRANSPORTATION WORLD<br />

Chris Donnell<br />

12 DRIVING SYSTEMS FOR FASTENERS – EXTERNAL DRIVES<br />

Bruno Marbacher<br />

14 WHAT FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS NEED TO KNOW<br />

ABOUT STRESS FAILURES<br />

Guy Avellon<br />

16 [COVER FEATURE] BAY SUPPLY: THE FUTURE OF<br />

SELLING FASTENERS IS HERE<br />

24 GAGING SYSTEMS PART 1: SYSTEM 21<br />

Larry Borowski<br />

26 FIVE SIGNS IT IS TIME TO CHANGE SOFTWARE<br />

Dennis Cowhey<br />

28 LINDFAST + SOLUTION INDUSTRIES: TWO LEADERS<br />

IN VALUE-ADDED SERVICE, NOW UNITED<br />

30 OPTIMIZING VERY NARROW AISLES<br />

Robert Footlik<br />

32 FREE SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING TOOLS: CHOICE<br />

PICKS FOR FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS<br />

Joe Dysart<br />

34 RETURNING BACK TO THE OFFICE – WILL IT BE DIFFERENT?<br />

Jim Truesdell<br />

36 CONNECTED FOR LIFE: RCSC HONORS ITS LATEST LIFE MEMBERS<br />

Dani Friedland<br />

40 HOWMET FASTENING SYSTEMS: STRUCTURAL BLIND<br />

FASTENERS HELP ENGINEERS WITH LIGHTWEIGHTING<br />

44 MWFA AWARDS $42,500 IN SCHOLARSHIPS<br />

Nancy Rich<br />

45 MWFA SCHOLARSHIP PHOTOS<br />

46 CAN SOMEONE SLOW THIS ROLLER COASTER DOWN?<br />

Laurence Claus<br />

48 DISTRIBUTION ONE:<br />

FUELING <strong>2022</strong> SUCCESS<br />

THROUGH DISTRIBUTION<br />

TECHNOLOGY AND<br />

E-COMMERCE INVESTMENT<br />

50 PHILLIPS SCREW CO:<br />

HOW TO ACHIEVE A<br />

“STICKING” FASTENER RECESS<br />

TO DRIVER BIT CONNECTION<br />

52 5 WAYS TO THRIVE IN A SHIFTING INDUSTRY WITH<br />

CONSOLIDATING DISTRIBUTORS<br />

Nelson Valderrama<br />

54 PARKER FASTENERS & BTM MANUFACTURING:<br />

#FASTENERBEDCHALLENGE – WHO’S NEXT?<br />

56 IN-PERSON TRAINING EVENTS RETURN FOR <strong>2022</strong><br />

Jo Morris<br />

58 BLIND RIVET FAILURES & SOLUTIONS<br />

Anthony Di Maio<br />

60 ACE BOLT & SCREW: OLD SCHOOL IN A GOOD WAY –<br />

SERVING THE SOUTHEAST SINCE 1969<br />

Dennis Cowhey<br />

62 CLAY WEAVER ELECTED PAC-WEST PRESIDENT<br />

Amy Nijjar<br />

63 PAC-WEST/SFA JOINT CONFERENCE PHOTOS<br />

64 TAX MINIMIZATION ANALYSIS: HOW TO ADVOCATE FOR<br />

CLIENTS SELLING THEIR BUSINESS – PART 1<br />

Roman Basi<br />

66 IFE 2021 RECAP AND <strong>2022</strong> PREVIEW<br />

67 INTERNATIONAL FASTENER EXPO 2021 PHOTOS<br />

68 UNIVERSAL FASTENING SYSTEM ANNOUNCES<br />

REVOLUTIONARY SYSTEM<br />

70 SELLING FASTENERS “IS KIND OF A BIG DEAL”<br />

AT VENTURA INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS<br />

72 SPIROL: SOLID PIN RETENTION FEATURES<br />

Jeff Greenwood<br />

74 FAB GROUP CONDUCTS SUPPLY CHAIN SYMPOSIUM<br />

75 DAGGERZ DELIVERING THROUGH THE SUPPLY CHAIN CRISIS


volume 45 // issue #1<br />

76 THORNBERG TELLS PAC-WEST/SFA – “THIS ECONOMY<br />

HAS MOMENTUM”<br />

John Wolz<br />

80 RECAP OF STAFDA’S ORLANDO 2021 CONVENTION<br />

AND TRADE SHOW<br />

Georgia H. Foley, CEO<br />

81 STAFDA ORLANDO CONVENTION & TRADE SHOW PHOTOS<br />

82 GOEBEL FASTENERS: A LOOK AT THE NEW 18V<br />

LITHIUM-ION CORDLESS TOOL LINE<br />

86 PAC-WEST/SFA PANELISTS: SHORTAGES WILL CONTINUE<br />

John Wolz<br />

88 FASTENER FAIR USA CELEBRATES A SUCCESSFUL<br />

IN-PERSON EVENT IN CLEVELAND, OHIO<br />

89 FASTENER FAIR USA SHOW PHOTOS<br />

90 RAMCO EXPANDS PRODUCTION CAPACITY IN MICHIGAN<br />

90 NCFA SCREW OPEN A SUCCESS!<br />

Dave Audia<br />

121 SUBSCRIPTION FORM<br />

124 NFDA SETS <strong>2022</strong> EVENT CALENDAR<br />

Amy Nijjar<br />

134 FASTENER INDUSTRY WEB LINKS<br />

138 JOIN THE SEFA FOR THE <strong>2022</strong> SPRING CONFERENCE<br />

Nancy Rich<br />

148 SFA HAVING THEIR BEST YEAR EVER!<br />

Baron Yarborough<br />

152 WIFI 2021 ‘WOMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD’ WINNER<br />

156 NEFDA VIRTUAL HOLIDAY PARTY<br />

Nancy Rich<br />

165 MWFA <strong>2022</strong> BOARD OF DIRECTORS & EVENT SCHEDULE<br />

Nancy Rich<br />

183 DON’T MISS OUR BIG SPRING ISSUE


8<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Rob LaPointe AIM TESTING LABORATORY<br />

Rob LaPointe is a noted authority in materials and fastener technology. With extensive experience<br />

in the management and science of materials testing laboratories combined with master’s degrees in<br />

physics and education, he excels at bringing solutions to the client. Working specifically in the fastener<br />

testing industry, he has developed expertise in mechanical, nondestructive, metallurgical and chemical<br />

testing. With a background of 20 years in physics education, Rob is effective at communicating complex<br />

ideas in a simple and understandable manner, communicating well with clients enabling them to make<br />

informed decisions about their products and business. AIM is located at 1920 Cordell Court #101, El<br />

Cajon, CA, 92020. Tel: 909-254-1278, email: sales@aimtestlab.com or online at www.aimtestlab.com<br />

HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT TESTING ON<br />

INTERNALLY THREADED PRODUCTS - ARE YOU NUTS?<br />

Internal Hydrogen Embrittlement (IHE) in fastener<br />

products can be a serious concern for the safety<br />

of structures and people in or around them. Many<br />

documented cases of unexpected and catastrophic<br />

failure have been linked to hydrogen’s embrittling effect<br />

in high-strength steel fasteners such as A574 and Class<br />

12.9 plated cap screws. Product standards, including<br />

ASTM A574 and plating standards including ASTM F1941<br />

and B633 provide hydrogen embrittlement mitigation and<br />

testing requirements for plated high-strength products.<br />

In nearly all specifications that mention hydrogen<br />

embrittlement as either a warning, mitigation procedure<br />

or testing methodology, the reference to IHE implicitly<br />

or explicitly is referring to externally threaded fasteners<br />

such as bolts and screws.<br />

So why don’t we see more IHE mitigation and<br />

FIGURE 1 - A PLATED HEAVY HEX<br />

NUT COULD BE HARBORING ENOUGH<br />

HYDROGEN TO EMBRITTLE THE STEEL.<br />

TECHNICAL ARTICLE<br />

testing mentioned in<br />

specifications relating<br />

to nuts? Are nuts<br />

capable of failure due<br />

to the presence of<br />

hydrogen?<br />

To answer these<br />

questions, let’s first<br />

go over some of the<br />

basics, including what<br />

hydrogen embrittlement<br />

FIGURE 2 - INTERNAL HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT FAILURE<br />

OCCURRING AT THE FILLET RADIUS OF THE CAP SCREW.<br />

is, its effects on high-strength steel when under a load,<br />

and the application of force when loading internally and<br />

externally threaded fasteners.<br />

Hydrogen embrittlement is a permanent loss of<br />

ductility in a metal or alloy caused by hydrogen in<br />

combination with stress, either externally applied or<br />

internal residual stress [1]. In more basic terms –<br />

when a high-strength steel fastener is under a tensile<br />

(pulling) load and there is sufficient hydrogen in the<br />

metal, it can suddenly fracture even if the load on it is<br />

less than the rated breaking strength of the fastener. A<br />

fastener failure due to IHE is sudden and unexpected.<br />

The fracture occurs where stress in concentrated. For<br />

externally threaded fasteners, the stress is usually<br />

concentrated at the head-body junction, known as the<br />

fillet radius, or at the first exposed thread between the<br />

engaged threads and the head. Figure 2 shows an IHE<br />

failure of a fully threaded cap screw where the fracture<br />

occurred at the fillet radius, which is the location of<br />

greatest stress concentration when tightened.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 92


10<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Chris Donnell<br />

Chris Donnell is the National Sales Director for Scanwell Logistics International (CHI)<br />

Inc., specializing in Supply Chain Management, Inventory Control, Logistics Sales and<br />

Management. Chris excels at selling the “Solution” to advanced program analysis and<br />

implementation. A highly ambitious and effective team leader who thrives on the challenges<br />

of this industry, Chris currently oversees a National Sales and Partnership Program consisting<br />

of more than 100 Sales executives who focus primarily on SCM and Logistics development in<br />

most vertical markets. Contact Chris at 847-228-6789 or email: chrisdonnell@scanwell.com.<br />

IT’S A MAD, MAD, TRANSPORTATION WORLD<br />

For the past 24 months, the logistics world has<br />

suffered through the worst trade “bottleneck” on<br />

record. Cargo owners, whether in the international or<br />

domestic markets, faced a mountain of challenges and,<br />

unfortunately, <strong>2022</strong> (for the most part) will mirror 2021.<br />

The new year will bring new<br />

challenges, but make no<br />

mistake about it, we are on<br />

the road to recovery. Things<br />

will eventually return to a new<br />

normal. Logistics will never go<br />

back to the way things were<br />

pre-pandemic, and that’s for<br />

the stability of the global supply chain, which is a good<br />

thing.<br />

It is important to understand and to adapt to these<br />

critical challenges, otherwise we are bound to repeat<br />

them. I must admit, some of these challenges lack<br />

common sense and some are outside the scope of one’s<br />

control; but, in the end, these challenges will make you<br />

and your company stronger. This is also a good thing.<br />

The first challenge we face entering the new year<br />

is the “Emergency Container Dwell Fee.” You have to<br />

hand it to the logistics world, it never fails to add catchy,<br />

scary names to things in order to stir public opinion.<br />

This fee, introduced by the terminal councils of the ports<br />

of Los Angeles and Long Beach, and backed by the<br />

Biden Administration’s transportation Envoy, assigns a<br />

compounding cost of $100.00 per day to each container<br />

CONTRIBUTOR ARTICLE<br />

sitting past its determined timeline: 9 days for containers<br />

being pulled from the port by truck; and, 6 days for those<br />

moving by rail. Historically, the average dwell time at<br />

these ports pre-pandemic ranged from 4-6 days by truck<br />

and 2 days by rail; however, as of October 2021, that time<br />

increased to 16 days by truck<br />

and 19 days by rail.<br />

Most will see these<br />

costs as another way for the<br />

terminals to take advantage<br />

of the market, to make more<br />

money since the charges<br />

seem out of the control of<br />

the actual cargo owners. But are they, really? As the<br />

saying goes, a few bad apples spoil the bunch. There<br />

are some companies out there that were using the<br />

terminals as a make shift warehouse or staging area<br />

since their own warehouses are over-flowing with cargo.<br />

The enaction of these fees have already made a dramatic<br />

impact - dwell times have been reduced by almost half<br />

and are continuing in a downward trend. The impact<br />

has been so drastic that the terminals have postponed<br />

these fines until the end of November. It’s important to<br />

note, however, that the terminals have already calculated<br />

the fines since November 1 to be in excess of 6 million<br />

dollars. November 1 was supposed to be the date the<br />

fines were enacted, so if the fee was being used by the<br />

terminals solely to make more money, why would they<br />

postpone them?<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 94


12<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Bruno Marbacher<br />

Bruno Marbacher earned his mechanical engineering degree in Switzerland, he also holds a<br />

business degree. He started out as a tool and die maker (poly-mechanic) and over the years he<br />

has held various management positions in quality and engineering. During his time in America<br />

he has developed and given numerous seminars on topics related to the proper use of mechanical<br />

fasteners and machine elements, and assists engineers in solving fastening/assembly issues. His<br />

has groomed and directed many young engineers in fastening/assembly technology. He now<br />

offers his 40 years of experience through writing and lecturing.<br />

DRIVING SYSTEMS FOR FASTENERS –<br />

EXTERNAL DRIVES<br />

Dear Reader - In this issue we cover external drives,<br />

there are fewer options with these types of drive.<br />

Whether a bolt or screw works in a certain application<br />

usually comes down to preference. Practicality and<br />

efficiency play a vital role in choosing the right drive.<br />

Again, we list the critical functional features for<br />

reference.<br />

Critical Drive Features<br />

To choose a screw with certain drive there are several<br />

things to be consider. The Critical Functional Features are:<br />

¤ Amount torque it can absorb.<br />

¤ Off-angle driver to drive.<br />

¤ Ease off alignment/engagement<br />

¤ Cam-out, tendency to push driver out.<br />

¤ Durability of drive, repeated assembly<br />

¤ Good Stick fit, hold driver in drive.<br />

¤ The effect of the coatings on driver engagement<br />

¤ Tamperproof, preventing unauthorized access.<br />

¤ Its worldwide availability<br />

External Drives<br />

TECHNICAL ARTICLE<br />

External drives typically do not have a recess in the<br />

head, which can collect water, dirt, or paint, that could<br />

interfere with the insertion of a driver. Some external<br />

drives can be engaged and tightened from the side,<br />

without requiring much clearance for wrenches, Thus,<br />

they can be used in tight spaces. Because the heads<br />

must stand out from the surface of the clamped parts,<br />

they are rarely available in countersunk or flush designs.<br />

Cam-out effect does not apply to external drives.<br />

However, If the head is tapered, it may have a slight<br />

tendency to cam-out.<br />

Square Drive<br />

A square drive is four-sided it can be tightened with an<br />

open-end wrench or an adjustable wrench, they can also<br />

be rotated with 8 or 12-point sockets. Square drives<br />

were common in the 19th and early 20th centuries when<br />

it was easier and cheaper to manufacture them, than<br />

other drives. They are not very common anymore.<br />

Features & Concerns: Square drives can still be<br />

found on pipe plugs and lag bolts that are used for<br />

antique items; some double end studs may be furnished<br />

with a square drive to prevent studs from turning while<br />

the nut is being tightened. Instead of a square, studs<br />

may be provided with a dog point with only to 2 flats,<br />

180° apart. External hexes are now cost-competitive,<br />

they have replaced square drives. Also, railway screw<br />

spikes are furnished with a square drive, the square is<br />

slightly tapered.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 96


14<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Guy Avellon<br />

Guy Avellon has been in MRO and Fastener Distribution for over 30 years, in such positions Sales<br />

Engineer, Chief Engineer, Manager of Product Marketing, Product Engineering & Quality and<br />

Director of Quality & Engineering. He founded GT Technical Consultants where he performs failure<br />

analysis, lectures on fastener safety, works for law firms and designs/audits Quality systems. He is a<br />

member of SAE, is Vice Chairman of the ASTM F16 Fastener Committee, Chairman of the F16.01 Test<br />

Methods Committee and received the ASTM Award of Merit in 2005. Guy can be contacted at 847-<br />

477-5057, Email: ExpertBoltGuy@gmail.com or visit www.BoltFailure.com.<br />

WHAT FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS NEED<br />

TO KNOW ABOUT STRESS FAILURES<br />

There are many different ways a fastener can fail<br />

and the most common is metal fatigue, however, many<br />

stress failures can be attributed to being environmentally<br />

assisted. These are premature failures that are under<br />

the influences of tensile stress and some type of<br />

chemical or harmful environment. The predictive failure<br />

mechanisms are predicated on the types of affected bolt<br />

material employed and the environment, or corrosive<br />

media, subjected to the bolt and joint.<br />

Stress Corrosion Cracking<br />

Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) is one form of<br />

failure to fasteners and bolted joints whose crack<br />

propagation occurs unnoticed until the final catastrophic<br />

failure. As the name implies, this phenomenon occurs<br />

under the combined conditions of tensile stress and a<br />

corrosive environment.<br />

The environment is of critical importance as it only<br />

takes very small amounts of highly active chemicals to<br />

produce the initiation of cracking sites. These chemicals<br />

include nitrates, alkalis (hydroxides) and sulfides or<br />

ammonia. During the action of SCC, many times the<br />

exterior surface of the fastener material is relatively<br />

unaffected. The corrosive media will attack stress<br />

initiation sites and any corrosion pitting sites. SCC is<br />

basically an anodic cracking mechanism.<br />

Stress concentrations initiate crevice loading<br />

due to high tensile stresses or residual internal<br />

CONTRIBUTOR ARTICLE<br />

stresses from cold working. Fine cracks, which may<br />

be either intergranular or transgranular, will propagate<br />

perpendicular to the applied stress.<br />

A brittle fracture occurs without any plastic<br />

deformation and normally ductile materials will sustain<br />

a brittle fracture at lower stress levels when subjected<br />

to SCC. This is especially true of Body-Centered-Cubic<br />

(BCC) metals which are less densely packed than Face-<br />

Centered-Cubic (FCC) materials.<br />

Typically, your BCC metals include ferritic steels,<br />

alpha irons, chromium and tungsten. The FCC common<br />

metals include aluminum, copper and austenitic steels.<br />

Alloy steels are more susceptible to SCC than just the<br />

base metal and will propagate more rapidly, as these<br />

fasteners will generally be stressed to higher limits.<br />

Other examples would include copper alloys and<br />

bronze which have a tendency to adversely react to<br />

ammonia. Since many pipe fittings and valves are made<br />

of these materials, it is best to avoid their usage on<br />

tanks containing ammonia and some farm implements.<br />

Grade 8 fasteners on a cement mixing truck were<br />

found failing due to SCC. Typically, cement trucks are<br />

washed down with muriatic acid, which is 70% diluted<br />

hydrochloric acid. The trucks are rinsed off with water,<br />

however the fasteners were located in an area that did<br />

not receive a full neutralizing water rinse and which<br />

retained some liquid in the area which initiated the<br />

pitting and subsequent failure.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 98


24<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Larry Borowski President<br />

GREENSLADE & COMPANY INC.<br />

2234 Wenneca Avenue, Fort Worth, TX 76102<br />

TEL 817-870-8888 FAX 817-870-9199<br />

EMAIL sales1@greensladeandcompany.com<br />

WEB www.greensladeandcompany.com<br />

GAGING SYSTEMS PART 1:<br />

SYSTEM 21<br />

Oftentimes we get phone calls or E-mails asking<br />

for help determining how to measure fastener<br />

characteristics. Many times the print specifies a “Gaging<br />

System” that further confuses the customer because<br />

they are unfamiliar with that terminology and what it<br />

means. Others are familiar with the terminology, but<br />

are still unsure about the requirements and differences<br />

between the Gaging Systems. I’d like to help clarify<br />

what a “Gaging System” is as defined by the ASME<br />

B1.3 – 2007 standard, as well as explain the different<br />

Gaging Systems as it applies to product threads. These<br />

systems apply to both internal and external threads.<br />

ASME B1.3 – 2007 is the foundation of “Gaging<br />

Systems”. Both the FED-STD-H28, as well as the<br />

SAE AS8879 standards, refer back to the ASME B1.3<br />

standard for definition on gaging systems. Not only<br />

does it define the various systems, but also includes<br />

detailed charts on what gages are acceptable for each<br />

thread characteristic to be measured. In this Article we<br />

will deal with the simplest of the them, System 21, and<br />

future articles will cover System 22, and System 23 in<br />

the same manner.<br />

ASME B1.3 – 2007, Section 1 defines a gaging<br />

system as: a list of screw thread characteristics<br />

that must be inspected/evaluated to establish the<br />

acceptability of the screw threads on a threaded product<br />

and the gage(s) which shall be used when inspecting/<br />

evaluating those characteristics. In other words, what<br />

needs to be checked and what gage we need to use.<br />

The standard also states that a gaging system SHALL be<br />

defined, and if it is not the supplier and customer MUST<br />

agree on one. We all know that this does not always<br />

happen, but it is a good practice for a customer to be<br />

aware of these gaging systems and demand some kind<br />

of formal inspection procedure for the product they are<br />

purchasing.<br />

When no system is defined, and no inspection is<br />

performed, you get folks after the fact asking whether<br />

there is a default procedure. Just to make it clear, there<br />

is no “default” procedure for an undefined inspection<br />

plan or Gaging System. ASME B1.3 – 2007, section 5(b)<br />

specifically states: There is no implied default gaging<br />

system. Because of this, ASME B18 standards have<br />

specifically addressed this issue and require system 21<br />

inspection on all associated products, with the exception<br />

of Socket products, which require system 22 inspection.<br />

Borrowing the statement from ASME B18.2.1, Section<br />

2.5.5: Thread Acceptability. Unless otherwise specified<br />

by the purchaser, screw threads shall be determined<br />

using thread gaging System 21 in ASME B1.3. This is<br />

why it is important to work that out upfront, rather than<br />

assuming it will just get done.<br />

TECHNICAL ARTICLE<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 100


26<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

COMPUTER INSIGHTS INC.<br />

108 Third Street, Bloomingdale, IL 60108<br />

TEL 1-800-539-1233 EMAIL sales@ci-inc.com WEB www.ci-inc.com<br />

FIVE SIGNS IT IS TIME TO CHANGE SOFTWARE<br />

by Dennis Cowhey<br />

[1] Your Company Has Grown<br />

Starting a new company is both exciting and<br />

challenging. In the early stages, a substantial amount<br />

of time is often spent choosing best practices and<br />

procedures. During this trial and error phase, you learn<br />

what you need and what is not necessary. When dealing<br />

with a relatively small number of customers, products,<br />

and vendors, you might effectively handle everything<br />

without a sophisticated system. In the beginning,<br />

manual procedures, spreadsheets, one-size-fits-all offthe-shelf<br />

software, or a mix of the three can be enough<br />

to get through the day. Successful companies commonly<br />

start off this way. In the second or third year, they reach<br />

a tipping point where the owners spend more time<br />

keeping track of internal things and less time growing<br />

their business.<br />

Suppose you are at a point where you feel like<br />

you need to hire more people to keep up with your<br />

company’s growth. In that case, it is time to consider if<br />

a better system will help your existing people be more<br />

efficient and accurate.<br />

Stop chasing paperwork and free up your time<br />

to pursue new sales and work on your company with<br />

The Business Edge TM<br />

by Computer Insights, Inc. The<br />

Business Edge, TM<br />

from the start, has been designed to<br />

help fastener and industrial distributors<br />

do more, in less time, with fewer people.<br />

Twenty-five years of industry focus<br />

makes a difference. Whether you need<br />

to keep track of 30,000 SKU’s or<br />

over 500,000, if you have 2,000<br />

customers or over 50,000 - The<br />

Business Edge TM<br />

will help you<br />

stay on top of everything.<br />

Every part of The Business Edge TM<br />

is truly integrated<br />

with every other aspect. As people perform their daily<br />

tasks, the general ledger and financial reports update<br />

automatically. Product locations, lot numbers, and<br />

quality documents are tracked at every step and are<br />

always easy to access. Customer notes and CRM<br />

Actions are available on every screen you need them. A<br />

single system eliminates double entry and time wasted<br />

searching for answers to both common and unique<br />

questions.<br />

[2] Not Getting The Support You Need<br />

You can waste valuable time playing phone tag. You<br />

have work to do; your ERP software system should make<br />

your life easier, not more complicated. Do you get a ticket<br />

number instead of a solution when you call your software<br />

provider? When your calls are answered by someone<br />

who immediately sends you into a complicated ticketing<br />

system, you have more problems than the question that<br />

prompted your call.<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE CONTINUED ON PAGE 102


30<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Robert Footlik<br />

Robert B. Footlik, PE is a retired Professional Industrial Engineer. With over 50 years’<br />

experience as a Warehouse and Logistics Consultant to a wide variety of clients including<br />

Fastener Distributors, Bob has a wealth of valuable information for our industry and he is<br />

willing to share it. While Footlik & Associates is now closed, his expertise is still available<br />

to his friends and our readers. For friendly advice, a second opinion or just to start a<br />

conversation, he can be reached at robert@footlik.net.<br />

OPTIMIZING VERY NARROW AISLES<br />

Materials Handling and warehouse layout involves<br />

balancing and trading time, manpower, capital and<br />

aggravation. For any distributor, with a limited budget of<br />

these four factors, designing an efficient operation will<br />

always involve compromises.<br />

Let’s Start With A Quiz<br />

[1] Does your operation<br />

service an active counter or will<br />

call trade?<br />

[2] Is there still space available<br />

for storage and operations?<br />

A yes answer to either of these<br />

questions means that you should<br />

turn the page and go to another<br />

article. Very Narrow Aisles (VNA)<br />

are not going to be an appropriate<br />

solution in your context.<br />

Conventional fork trucks<br />

require aisles of 12’-0” to 15’-0”, depending on wheel<br />

configuration, driver position and capacity. Any aisle<br />

width under 9’-6” is regarded as “narrow aisle.” Reducing<br />

the rack storage spacing to less than 8’ is considered a<br />

VNA layout. Analyzed strictly on the basis of minimizing<br />

space, VNA will usually optimize the theoretical utilization<br />

of space. In the real world, however, cramming the<br />

maximum inventory into a tighter configuration can be<br />

efficient only under the right marketing conditions.<br />

Ċan VNA Be Implemented In Your Space?<br />

The minimum requirements are:<br />

¤ Ceiling heights of 26+ feet clear.<br />

¤ Floor thickness of 8” unless on highly compacted soil.<br />

CONTRIBUTOR ARTICLE<br />

¤ Fibre-Mesh or properly placed steel reinforcing<br />

in the concrete.<br />

¤ Early suppression, fast response (ESFR) fire<br />

protection sprinkler system.<br />

¤ Aisle length in excess of 150’.<br />

If any of these basic conditions are missing turn the<br />

page and go on to next article.<br />

Some Basic Considerations<br />

VNA falls into two distinct<br />

systems, man-aboard and fully<br />

automated. A case can be made for<br />

both operationally and use the same<br />

underlying principles for optimal<br />

operation. Over the years I have<br />

often referred to “family groups” of<br />

products as an appropriate place to<br />

start any warehouse improvement<br />

project, but VNA is most viable for<br />

Fastener Distributors who specialize in Original Equipment<br />

Manufacturer (OEM) supply. In this context traditional<br />

family groups such as stove bolts, machine screws, Grade<br />

8, stainless, etc. are irrelevant. What counts is how your<br />

customers group their purchases.<br />

While manufacturing farm equipment, heavy<br />

construction machinery and military hardware might<br />

have some fastener commonality, each product line has<br />

uniquely engineered components that are purchased in<br />

accordance to contracts and forecasts. This can work<br />

for you or against you operationally. Data mining for<br />

customer order trends is both an opportunity to partner<br />

with your customers and an excellent starting point for<br />

optimizing product placement.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 104


The DPA Buying Group<br />

welcomes 14 new distributor<br />

members to its industrial &<br />

contractor supply division:<br />

*Contractors Supply of<br />

Central Florida, Inc, FL<br />

*Corbitt Safety Surplus, AL<br />

*CW Supply & Logistics LLC, OH<br />

*Darrell Ifft (dba Fairbury<br />

Fastener & Supply, IL<br />

*Eastman Products, IN<br />

*Empire Hardware &<br />

Machinery Co, NY<br />

*Metro Products, Inc, MN<br />

*Pioneer Products, Inc, NY<br />

*Radco Supply, KY<br />

*Royal Brass & Hose, TN<br />

*Savage Surplus, MN<br />

*Southwestern Supply<br />

Company, AZ<br />

*Stanley Industries, Inc, MI<br />

*Tri-J Tool & Fastener, Inc, TX<br />

DPA has also added nine<br />

new preferred suppliers since<br />

the beginning of the year:<br />

*Alliance Hose & Rubber Co, IL<br />

*BESSEY Tools North<br />

America, ON<br />

*Bon Tool Co, PA<br />

*Energizer Canada, ON<br />

*Jobsite Caddy, IN<br />

*Komelon USA, WI<br />

*Mi-T-M Corporation, IA<br />

*Precision Staffing Services, OH<br />

*Rust-Oleum Corporation, IL<br />

The DPA Buying Group<br />

is a North American buying<br />

and networking organization<br />

comprised of more than<br />

1100 distributors and 200<br />

preferred suppliers in the<br />

Industrial, Janitorial, Safety,<br />

Public Safety, Packaging<br />

and Restoration product<br />

industries.<br />

For more info contact<br />

DPA Toll-free at 1-800-652-<br />

7826, or visit them online at<br />

www.DPAIndustrial.com.<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 31


32<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Joe Dysart<br />

Joe Dysart is an Internet speaker and business consultant based in Thousand Oaks,<br />

California. A journalist for 20 years, his articles have appeared in more than 40<br />

publications, including The New York Times and The Financial Times of London.<br />

During the past decade, his work has focused exclusively on ecommerce.<br />

Telephone: 631-256-6602; web: www.joedysart.com; email: joe@dysartnewsfeatures.com<br />

FREE SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING TOOLS:<br />

CHOICE PICKS FOR FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS<br />

Fastener distributors looking to engage customers<br />

on social media without adding another expense to their<br />

marketing budgets are in luck: There are plenty of prograde,<br />

social media marketing tools you can use that are<br />

absolutely free -- forever.<br />

Of course, these top-level solution providers -- some<br />

of the most popular in the<br />

digital space -- are offering<br />

free plans to entice you to<br />

ultimately trade-up to their<br />

paid offerings.<br />

But if your plan right<br />

now is simply to engage in a<br />

moderately aggressive social<br />

media marketing campaign<br />

-- or to get a feel for social<br />

media marketing before it<br />

becomes an expense line in<br />

your marketing budget, these<br />

tools are the perfect solution.<br />

Says Daniel Ku, CEO,<br />

PostBeyond, a social media<br />

marketing firm: “If you want to<br />

connect and engage with your<br />

future customers, you have to<br />

be where they are. And that’s largely on social media.”<br />

Probably the number one reason fastener distributors<br />

will most likely be attracted to free social media marketing<br />

tools is that they enable you to schedule multiple posts<br />

about your business during a single, log-on session.<br />

That’s an incredible time-saver when you consider the<br />

alternative: Logging onto Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or<br />

another social media network every single time you want<br />

THERE ARE PLENTY OF PRO-GRADE SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING TOOLS<br />

YOU CAN USE THAT ARE ABSOLUTELY FREE<br />

IT’S DIFFICULT TO REMEMBER A TIME WHEN PEOPLE WERE NOT<br />

OBSESSED WITH SMARTPHONES AND SOCIAL MEDIA<br />

to make a marketing post about your business.<br />

You’ll also find that the free plans are fairly generous<br />

when it comes to scheduling posts. AgoraPlus, for example,<br />

enables you to schedule up to 40 posts-per-month,<br />

absolutely free. And Buffer, Crowdfire and Later each<br />

enable you to schedule up to 30 posts-per-month for free.<br />

Indeed, should you<br />

decide to try out all four of<br />

those social media marketing<br />

tools simultaneously, you’ll<br />

be able to schedule a total<br />

of 120 posts-per-month -- or<br />

four marketing posts-per-day<br />

-- absolutely free.<br />

For fastener distributors,<br />

the ability to log on once-amonth<br />

to four free tools so<br />

they can schedule four-postsper<br />

day for the next 30 days<br />

may be all the social media<br />

management they ever need.<br />

Besides post scheduling,<br />

many of these social media<br />

marketing tools also offer<br />

analytics on your posts, in<br />

terms of who’s clicking on them, whether or not your<br />

posts are driving more traffic to your Web site or other<br />

digital property, which social media network is delivering<br />

the most traffic for you -- and more.<br />

Plus some of the tools -- such as Crowdfire -- will help<br />

you find articles and other content on the Web, which<br />

you can summarize and turn into posts to help keep your<br />

brand top-of-mind with your customers on social media.<br />

CONTRIBUTOR ARTICLE<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 106


34<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Jim Truesdell<br />

James Truesdell is President of Brauer Supply Company, a distributor of specialty<br />

fasteners, insulation, air filtration, and air conditioning with headquarters in St. Louis.<br />

Mr. Truesdell is adjunct professor at Saint Louis University and Webster University.<br />

An attorney and frequently published writer, he is the author of “Total Quality<br />

Management: Reports From the Front Lines”.<br />

RETURNING BACK TO THE OFFICE -<br />

WILL IT BE DIFFERENT?<br />

Over the past few months companies have been<br />

calling their workers back to their offices after a year<br />

or more of remote work necessitated by the pandemic.<br />

Many distributors and supply chain participants look at<br />

the anxieties and problems of these companies and<br />

their workers with a bit of a smile. As people who are<br />

responsible for putting the goods on the shelves across<br />

America, they and their employees have generally<br />

been the “essential employees” who never stopped<br />

coming to the physical workplace. Adopting the requisite<br />

protocol for masking, social distancing and the like,<br />

they have answered the bell every morning to keep the<br />

pipeline flowing and the parts counters open. While<br />

supply chain salespeople have often been unable to<br />

make in person calls on their customers, many have<br />

adapted their routines to a more customer service<br />

troubleshooting style to help their customers cope with<br />

the challenges presented by the pandemic and all the<br />

chaos and confusion it has wrought. Sometimes this<br />

has meant making up for the declining customer service<br />

support from manufacturers and financial, marketing<br />

and collateral services who have gone remote or laid off<br />

staff, or whose production lines have been pared down<br />

due to labor shortages as workers were able to exist on<br />

enhanced government benefits for the duration.<br />

During this period we have all learned to navigate<br />

the world of remote meetings, electronic communication<br />

and Power Point to a far greater degree than previously.<br />

CONTRIBUTOR ARTICLE<br />

Large segments of the country have had a crash course<br />

in digitalization, especially due to their children’s being<br />

educated remotely and the learning curve all parents<br />

had to climb to make this possible. As a result, many<br />

people have discovered that much of their actual work<br />

can be done remotely (though the jury is still out as<br />

to whether or not their companies and customers are<br />

better off). Obviously a lot of companies have made<br />

the determination that a collective office environment is<br />

best, which is why they are calling people back despite<br />

a goodly number of those workers pushing back, having<br />

become comfortable with the flexibility and freedom of<br />

working from home in whatever location that may be.<br />

The result seems like it will be a hybrid with<br />

workers coming into their offices a certain number of<br />

days per week with other days plugged in remotely. In<br />

an environment where there is a worker shortage and<br />

employees have more leverage, companies have to<br />

offer this solution as a necessity to keep and retain<br />

employees. Remote work and flexibility appears to be<br />

particularly attractive to younger workers who are raised<br />

on digital communication and who balk at the structure<br />

of the eight hour workday and daily commute. Companies<br />

may want their workers to be in the office because it<br />

promotes collaboration, commitment, networking and<br />

loyalty-----but forcing workers to come in against their<br />

wishes breeds hostility and disengagement. It is a<br />

quandary that needs to be resolved.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 108


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 35


36<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Dani Friedland<br />

Dani Friedland is the Director<br />

of Marketing Communications<br />

for the American Institute of<br />

Steel Construction. She can<br />

be contacted by email at<br />

friedland@aisc.org<br />

Reproduced<br />

from AISC’s Modern Steel<br />

Construction, November 2021 Issue<br />

CONNECTED FOR LIFE:<br />

RCSC HONORS ITS LATEST LIFE MEMBERS<br />

The next time you look at a bolted connection,<br />

be sure to take a moment to thank Larry Kloiber, Tom<br />

Murray, Bill Thornton, Ray Tide, and Joe Yura.<br />

The Research Council on Structural Connections (aka<br />

the Bolt Council) recently named them Life Members—<br />

i.e., active Council members whose extraordinary<br />

contributions have earned them honorary memberships<br />

for life. RCSC has now bestowed this honor upon only<br />

eight individuals, total.<br />

“We write a document that’s fundamental to steel<br />

construction,” said RCSC Chair Salim Brahimi, PEng,<br />

PhD, who is also director of engineering and technology<br />

at the Industrial Fasteners Institute. “It’s a very important<br />

document, way beyond our immediate vision in North<br />

America or in the U.S. The contributions of these five<br />

new Life Members have to be seen as foundational to<br />

the bolting aspect of steel construction.”<br />

And that foundational document covers a lot of<br />

ground. Each new version of its specification tackles not<br />

only technological innovations—recent changes have<br />

involved coatings and a new tightening method—but<br />

also constant efforts to refine the existing code to make<br />

it more helpful.<br />

“We continually try to look at issues that happen<br />

on the job and try to clarify and write more stringent<br />

code to reduce the problems that happen in the shop<br />

and in the field,” said RCSC director and AISC chief of<br />

engineering staff Tom Schlafly. “These five members<br />

have all worked on various AISC committees and task<br />

forces throughout the years, contributing to several key<br />

specifications, and several of them have won AISC’s<br />

highest honors.” “Building things is often taken for<br />

CONTRIBUTOR ARTICLE<br />

granted,” said Brahimi. “We’ve taken for granted the fact<br />

that we can build our roads, our bridges, anything—just<br />

building, making things—is such a basic thing. It doesn’t<br />

happen without a lot of expertise and work. It’s not just<br />

worthwhile. It’s a noble thing to do, to be the builders in<br />

our society. These people are among the leaders of that<br />

field.” Read on for profiles of each of the five new RCSC<br />

Life Members.<br />

Lawrence A. Kloiber, PE,<br />

Former Chief Engineer and<br />

President, LeJeune Steel<br />

Company<br />

Larry Kloiber has been<br />

involved in designing,<br />

fabricating, and erecting<br />

structural steel for over 55<br />

years, first as an AISC engineer and then with the<br />

LeJeune Steel Company as chief engineer and president.<br />

While at LeJeune, he directed connection design<br />

and fabrication on projects such as the Minneapolis<br />

Convention Center and the Mall of America, along with<br />

work on numerous high-rise office buildings, arenas, and<br />

industrial buildings.<br />

Larry is the author of numerous papers on the<br />

design, fabrication, and erection of structural steel and<br />

has lectured in more than 50 cities in the U.S., Canada,<br />

and Europe. He is a co-author of the Handbook of<br />

Structural Steel Connection Design and Details as well<br />

as the second edition of AISC Design Guide 1: Base<br />

Plate and Anchor Rod Design and AISC Design Guide 36:<br />

Design Considerations for Camber.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 112


40<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

HOWMET FASTENING SYSTEMS<br />

800 S State College Boulevard, Fullerton, CA 92831 USA<br />

TEL 714-871-1550 EMAIL info@howmet.com WEB www.hfs.howmet.com<br />

STRUCTURAL BLIND FASTENERS HELP ENGINEERS<br />

WITH LIGHTWEIGHTING<br />

The call for lightweighting has led<br />

to significant advancements in how<br />

we design and construct vehicles.<br />

Technology gains have resulted in<br />

new and exciting possibilities, but they<br />

have also created unique problem<br />

sets. The move toward increased<br />

aluminum usage in vehicles is one<br />

example. While it is widely accepted<br />

that aluminum improves fuel economy<br />

and agility, aluminum also poses joint<br />

design challenges. The lessons learned<br />

while fastening steel bodies do not<br />

translate to the new aluminum joints,<br />

since aluminum behaves differently<br />

than steel. Based on this fact, even accepted practices<br />

like welding must be re-thought. Fortunately, proven<br />

technologies already exist to replace, and even improve<br />

upon, now incompatible practices.<br />

Enter structural blind fasteners. They have been used<br />

in many critical joint applications for decades, including<br />

widespread usage in aerospace, proving their reliability.<br />

The availability of carbon steel, aluminum, and stainless<br />

steel variations make structural blind fasteners a viable<br />

option for joining a multitude of materials, including<br />

aluminum. Installation of structural blind fasteners does<br />

not require the extensive training required for other<br />

joining technologies, and their captive subcomponents<br />

eliminate the “squeak-and-rattle” caused by other types<br />

of fasteners.<br />

You may ask: “Why try something new, when I know<br />

and trust adhesives or welding?” This article will explore<br />

the benefits and drawbacks of these technologies, and<br />

compare them to the benefits of structural blind fastening.<br />

Adhesives<br />

For manufacturers who must join dissimilar<br />

materials, adhesives are an attractive option.<br />

Application is usually simple and straightforward. These<br />

adhesives form consistent bonds between both similar<br />

and dissimilar materials, while only nominally adding<br />

to the weight of the structure. Additionally, adhesives<br />

can be applied along the perimeter of a joint to lend<br />

additional strength and provide a measure of protection<br />

from contaminants.<br />

One can choose from a broad selection of adhesive<br />

products for use in a number of applications. However,<br />

these options must be carefully evaluated, as many can<br />

be costly. Also, bonding times can be extensive, and<br />

if the adhesive is not applied consistently and cured<br />

properly, the resulting bond could be unreliable. When<br />

adhesives are used, a careful review of each joint must<br />

be performed.<br />

TECHNICAL ARTICLE CONTINUED ON PAGE 114


44<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

MID-WEST FASTENER ASSOCIATION<br />

PO Box 5, Lake Zurich, IL 60047<br />

TOLL-FREE 1-800-753-8338 TEL 847-438-8338 EMAIL mwfa@ameritech.com WEB www.mwfa.net<br />

MWFA AWARDS $42,500 IN SCHOLARSHIPS<br />

By Nancy Rich<br />

The MWFA held their annual Scholarship awards on<br />

November 4th. Ryan Sweeney, former Major League<br />

Baseball outfielder joined the group to address the<br />

attendees especially students sharing his experiences<br />

leading to his profession. He played in Major League<br />

Baseball for the Chicago White Sox, Chicago Cubs,<br />

Oakland Athletics, and Boston Red Sox.<br />

Awarding scholarships and helping to further education<br />

has always been very important to the MWFA. We thank<br />

Glen Brin/Innovative Components, Wayne Wishnew/<br />

XL Screw, Matt Delawder/SWD & Jake Davis/BTM Mfg.<br />

for taking the time to serve on this committee. We<br />

appreciate their dedication in reviewing the applications!<br />

To date the MWFA has awarded $854,500 in<br />

scholarships. In addition to the MWFA fund raising efforts,<br />

we thank companies and families donating scholarships<br />

making it possible to award larger scholarships to several<br />

applicants.<br />

$1,500 Scholarships<br />

Ryan Baxter, son of Lisa Baxter of Crown Screw &<br />

Bolt. Corp. Ryan is a high school senior planning to go into<br />

Technical/Civil Engineering.<br />

Natalie Brett, daughter of Marty Brett of World<br />

Washer & Stamping and Dolly Brett. Natalie is a freshman<br />

at the University of Mississippi studying Dietetics and<br />

Nutrition.<br />

Issayana Camacho, daughter of Guillermo Delgado<br />

of Kanebridge Corp. She is a junior at Rutgers University<br />

majoring in Marketing and minoring in International<br />

Business.<br />

Madison Davis, daughter of Rebeka Davis of<br />

Eurolink. Madison is currently at the University of South<br />

Carolina Upstate working on her bachelors in Exercise<br />

Science.<br />

Jillian Lesieur, daughter of Brian Lesieur of Crescent<br />

Manufacturing. Jillian attends Lesley University where she<br />

is pursuing her degree in Fine Arts in Graphic Design.<br />

ASSOCIATION ARTICLE<br />

Cailean Nolan, daughter of Adam Nolan of Metric<br />

& Multistandard Components. Cailean is a college<br />

freshman in the Nursing Program at Mount Saint Mary<br />

College.<br />

Olivia Wesling, daughter of Paul Wesling of SWD<br />

Inc. Olivia is a high school senior planning to study<br />

computer animation and Graphic Design in college.<br />

$2,000 BTM Manufacturing Scholarship<br />

Anika Woelffer, daughter of Kurt Woelffer of<br />

Endries International. Anika is a college freshman at<br />

the University of Alabama where she is majoring in Pre-<br />

Physical Therapy, a career she chose after dealing with<br />

her own challenges after a knee surgery.<br />

$2,000 Abbott Interfast Scholarship<br />

Skylar Dorsey, daughter of Kameron Dorsey<br />

of Beacon Fasteners and Components. Skylar is a<br />

high school senior planning to study Accounting and<br />

Environmental Science in college. She’d like to pursue a<br />

career that combines both her love of math and science.<br />

$2,000 Mike & Carol O’Connor Scholarship<br />

Mike and Carol O’Connor owned and operated<br />

Innovative Components for more than 25 years. As<br />

strong supporters of apprentice programs and continuing<br />

education, they are pleased to fund this MWFA<br />

scholarship. The scholarship is intended specifically to<br />

benefit individuals who are interested in manufacturing<br />

and want to build a long-term career in the Fastener<br />

Industry.<br />

This scholarship was awarded to Philip Minniti<br />

Jr. employee of Buckeye Fastener. Philip is pursuing a<br />

degree in Business Administration. His plan is to utilize<br />

his education to being able to make a significant change<br />

follows a quote from Henry Ford: “Coming together is<br />

a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working<br />

together is success.”<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 116


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 45<br />

MID-WEST FASTENER ASSOCIATION<br />

SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS DINNER - NOVEMBER 4, 2021


46<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Laurence Claus<br />

Laurence Claus is the President of NNi Training and Consulting, Inc. He has 25 years of<br />

experience with a medium sized automotive fastener manufacturer, holding positions<br />

including Vice President of Engineering, General Manager, Director of Quality, Director<br />

of New Business Development and Applications Engineer. In 2012 he formed NNi<br />

offering technical and business training courses as well as technical consulting, expert<br />

witness and consultation work. He can be reached at 847-867-7363 or by email:<br />

Lclaus@NNiTraining.com. You can learn more about NNi at www.NNiTraining.com.<br />

CAN SOMEONE SLOW THIS ROLLER<br />

COASTER DOWN?<br />

As Fastener Fair 2021 wrapped up, it was wonderful<br />

to see the fastener community coming back together<br />

again. Old friends and acquaintances were able to chat<br />

with one another and attendees were able to visit with<br />

potential new business partners. Although masks were<br />

mandated, few attendees showed fear that the COVID<br />

virus could be raging amongst the aisles and booths.<br />

Overall it heralded a feeling that normalcy, at least related<br />

to the pandemic, might be on the horizon.<br />

As wonderful as this felt, as we emerge from this<br />

pandemic, the fastener industry is facing some absolutely<br />

momentous and unprecedented challenges. In fact, after<br />

hearing months of experts predict when and how we<br />

would emerge from the pandemic, I’m not sure anyone<br />

was prepared for some of the challenges we have before<br />

us today.<br />

In the 2000 movie, “The Perfect Storm”, an all-star<br />

cast memorialized the true story of the Andrea Gail, a<br />

commercial fishing trawler lost at sea in a massive and<br />

powerful storm that hit the east coast in October of 1991.<br />

The storm, a confluence of Hurricane Grace moving from<br />

the south and a massive low pressure system from the<br />

north, would spawn a greater and even more powerful<br />

storm than either system alone. Sebastian Junger, the<br />

author of the 1997 book from which the movie was based<br />

and its title taken, unknowingly birthed a new term, “a<br />

perfect storm”, we commonly use in our vocabulary today<br />

to describe any time separate and powerful forces come<br />

together to create a devastating and memorable event.<br />

It would seem that just such an event is currently<br />

occurring in the fastener world. Confluences of multiple<br />

CONTRIBUTOR ARTICLE<br />

business forces, political and governmental oversight,<br />

and unintended consequences of the pandemic have<br />

come together, provoking an awkward and difficult time<br />

for fastener distributors and manufacturers alike.<br />

Raw Material Shortages<br />

About a month ago I reached the five thousand<br />

mile mark on my car since its last oil change, and so<br />

scheduled an appointment with the dealer to get it in for<br />

this simple preventative maintenance measure. I look<br />

forward to bringing the car in for an oil change because<br />

it gives me an opportunity to check out the new cars<br />

and pick-up trucks displayed in the dealer’s showroom.<br />

I’m especially fond of pick-up trucks, so was looking<br />

forward to being able to check out the new models. To<br />

my utter amazement I walked from the service area into<br />

the showroom and was greeted by a long, empty room.<br />

In fact, I could have thrown a ball from one end of the<br />

showroom to the other without hitting anything, except<br />

perhaps a hapless sales person, in-between. Where<br />

were the cars, I wondered? I wandered outside and only<br />

then noticed that almost every car had a previous model<br />

year sticker in the windshield and they were parked at<br />

strategic angles to make the lot look fuller than in reality<br />

it was. I could not believe my eyes, not a new car in<br />

sight.<br />

Of course I had been hearing about the impact on new<br />

car production because of the shortage of semiconductor<br />

computer chips needed to control important systems<br />

and functions on the car. I had not realized, though, how<br />

widespread the problem had become.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 118


48<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

DISTRIBUTION ONE<br />

4004 Church Road, Mount Laurel, NJ 08054<br />

TEL 856-380-0629 FAX 856-222-0061 EMAIL info@distone.com WEB www.distone.com<br />

FUELING <strong>2022</strong> SUCCESS THROUGH DISTRIBUTION<br />

TECHNOLOGY AND E-COMMERCE INVESTMENT<br />

<strong>2022</strong> is finally here. While there’s increased<br />

optimism for the new year, the supply chain is expected<br />

to be an ongoing balancing act. How do you prepare and<br />

what changes can you make now to overcome these<br />

challenges moving forward?<br />

Since 2019, most distributors have experienced<br />

distribution process disruptions related to everything<br />

from inventory stock outs and purchasing availability<br />

to fulfillment delays and user productivity declines.<br />

Couple that with staffing reductions and inconsistent<br />

customer sales, and it’s easy to see that distributors are<br />

desperate for a return to stability. Yet, as the pendulum<br />

swings back and companies are returning to hiring<br />

mode, they cannot afford to place new employees into<br />

the same outdated legacy systems with acknowledged<br />

weaknesses.<br />

According to the report “Adding Value in a Post-<br />

Pandemic World,” wholesale distributors generally<br />

have positive expectations on <strong>2022</strong> but with some<br />

caveats related to ongoing product availability and labor<br />

shortages. A direct result of the pandemic is that 53% of<br />

respondents “plan to invest more in digital capabilities<br />

than previously expected.”<br />

This Statistic Highlights 2 Important Truths<br />

[1] The pandemic is forcing a significant number<br />

of companies to reevaluate their current business<br />

strategies.<br />

[2] Increased investments in digital capabilities<br />

are the only viable way ahead for a majority of the<br />

companies surveyed.<br />

This change in mindset is both telling and expected.<br />

Normally, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” is the typical<br />

guiding mantra companies use to put off needed<br />

technological investments. However, the aftershocks<br />

from the pandemic have proven that more can and<br />

should be done quickly in order for companies to<br />

position themselves to prosper.<br />

More than ever, fastener industry wholesalers and<br />

distributors understand that success in <strong>2022</strong> relies on<br />

implementing whole-company ERP (Enterprise Resource<br />

Planning) technologies to alleviate their existing pain<br />

points, enhance user productivity, deliver data-driven<br />

analytics, and expand selling opportunities. In addition<br />

to the benefits of a unified, end-to-end distribution<br />

process system, ERP business software needs to deliver<br />

these crucial tools for succeeding in <strong>2022</strong>.<br />

User Experience And Productivity<br />

Working with a smaller staff requires productivity<br />

gains provided by ERP technologies. When navigating<br />

business system screens, users require access to<br />

accurate business data as well as operational simplicity.<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE CONTINUED ON PAGE 120


50<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

PHILLIPS SCREW COMPANY<br />

1 Van De Graaff Drive, Burlington, MA 01803<br />

TEL 781-224-9750 WEB www.phillips-screw.com<br />

HOW TO ACHIEVE A “STICKING” FASTENER<br />

RECESS TO DRIVER BIT CONNECTION<br />

We all know the<br />

frustration of trying to hold<br />

a screw on to a screwdriver<br />

or driver bit along with trying<br />

to hold a bracket or hinge in<br />

place, nine times out of ten<br />

one of the components drops<br />

on the floor and the process<br />

starts again. In an industrial<br />

automation environment, it’s<br />

slightly different in that you<br />

need a different method to<br />

hold onto the screw without it<br />

dropping off and having a hole<br />

with a missed fastener.<br />

Traditionally magnetic bits or vacuum suction<br />

systems have been used, but they have their own<br />

drawbacks. You can’t use magnetic bits with stainless<br />

or non-ferrous screws and vacuum systems can wear<br />

needing constant attention with associated assembly<br />

downtime. So, how do you “stick” a screw to a bit so that<br />

it doesn’t drop onto the assembly area or factory floor?<br />

Well, it’s all in the geometry. The images below show the<br />

geometric interference between the driver bit and screw<br />

recess. This interference creates the “stick” effect.<br />

A combination of clever tolerancing, precision tooling<br />

and heading and strict quality control, combine together<br />

to create drive systems with the following benefits:<br />

¤ no dropped fasteners in the assembly area<br />

and on factory floor<br />

¤ reliable one-handed application of screws at<br />

point of assembly<br />

¤ magnetic bits or vacuum screw holders not<br />

necessary<br />

The regions of interference are located on the inner<br />

surfaces of the driver bit, this negates wear on the<br />

wings/lobes of the bit ensuring that it does not wear<br />

prematurely and slip out of the recess. The slip effect is<br />

known as “cam-out”.<br />

There are other geometric interference systems that<br />

use a button at the end of the driver bit which interferes<br />

with an extended recess in the bottom of the primary<br />

recess. This system works but, has the drawback of<br />

increasing the total recess depth thus reducing the wall<br />

thickness between the recess and the screw shank<br />

creating a weaker screw.<br />

If you want to save time and have less waste (who<br />

doesn’t) contact the Phillips Screw Company!<br />

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br />

Illustrated designs are covered by one or more patents held by Phillips Screw Company.<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE<br />

PHILLIPS SCREW COMPANY


52<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Nelson Valderrama<br />

Nelson Valderrama is the CEO of Intuilize, a software Service platform that specializes<br />

in helping mid-sized distributors transform data into profits. With more than 22 years’<br />

experience as P&L manager executive for major PE firms and industrial distributors.<br />

Nelson has dedicated his career to help business uncover hidden competitive advantages<br />

and unleash the power of data in the new Digital Economy. For more information<br />

contact by email nelson@intuilize.com or visit www.intuilize.com<br />

5 WAYS TO THRIVE IN A SHIFTING INDUSTRY WITH<br />

CONSOLIDATING DISTRIBUTORS<br />

For many decades, our industry has been rife<br />

with small family-owned distributors. Today we see<br />

consolidation as large players buy up smaller competitors<br />

or private equity firms take over for these companies in<br />

acquiring other businesses to expand their reach across<br />

different regions of expertise. However, within the last<br />

decade or so merger and acquisitions have accelerated at<br />

an even more rapid pace than before - this trend will likely<br />

continue because there are still plenty opportunities left<br />

out on both sides of town that offer new challenges.<br />

Small distributors receive calls or emails practically<br />

every day from parties interested in purchasing or<br />

partnering with the family business.<br />

There are many reasons why this is happening. Some<br />

people just want to retire and have their estate plan in<br />

place, while others might lack resources or the energy<br />

required for competition with companies that excel online<br />

(i.e., e-commerce, Artificial intelligence, marketplaces,<br />

etc). This consolidation has put increasing pressure on<br />

many small and midsize distributors, pushing them to find<br />

ways to counter shrinking margins and competition from<br />

much larger players.<br />

This article gives a list of tips for CEOS and GMs<br />

in forward-thinking companies that want to collaborate<br />

well with their distribution businesses. It also provides<br />

information on how they can effectively harness<br />

innovations while aligning both organization behind it<br />

as well so there’s no risk or hesitation when taking<br />

risks needed within the company due this consolidating<br />

industry trend.<br />

CONTRIBUTOR ARTICLE<br />

Tip #1- Attract And Retain Talent, Your<br />

Ultimate Competition Advantage<br />

Legendary coach Vince Lombardi once said: “Coaches<br />

who can outline plays on a blackboard are a dime a<br />

dozen. The ones who win get inside their player and<br />

motivate.” As in so many instances, sports personnel is<br />

a perfect microcosm of the business world. Right now,<br />

there’s a highly competitive market out there for great<br />

talent, and if any team wants to keep them for the long<br />

term, it takes motivation, direction, conditioning and a<br />

proper investment in them!<br />

Steve Jobs famously claimed that a small team of<br />

“A+” players can run circles around a giant team of “B”<br />

and “C” players. Jack Welch (who I had the tremendous<br />

privilege to work for) said that “no company, small<br />

or large, can win over the long run without energized<br />

employees who believe in the mission and understand<br />

how to achieve it”.<br />

All of this is to point out something fairly obvious but<br />

something we are all overlooking far too casually: COVID-<br />

19 has flooded pool of available talent and suddenly a<br />

huge wave of motivated forward thinkers are ready to join<br />

new businesses and drive growth. As management guru<br />

Jim Collins has shown us, making the leap from good to<br />

great starts with getting the right people on the bus.<br />

If you want your team to operate at its peak potential,<br />

you need to think about how each piece fits together. Your<br />

need to develop, hire and align your talent to ensure that<br />

the stars can shine — and that means putting the right<br />

support systems in place.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 122


54<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

PARKER FASTENERS<br />

TEL 623-925-5998<br />

EMAIL sales@parkerfasteners.com<br />

WEB www.parkerfasteners.com<br />

BTM MFG<br />

TEL 1-800-369-2658<br />

EMAIL sales@btm-mfg.com<br />

WEB www.btm-mfg.com<br />

#FASTENERBEDCHALLENGE - WHO’S NEXT?<br />

Parker Fasteners, cold forging<br />

manufacturer of socket head cap screws and<br />

related products, held their first annual Sleep<br />

in Heavenly Peace build in August 2021.<br />

Sleep In Heavenly Peace (www.shpbeds.<br />

org) is a national service organization who<br />

partners with businesses and organizations<br />

to organize bed building events for children who do not<br />

have beds to sleep in. Parker Fasteners donated over<br />

$14,000, hosted over 130 volunteers and successfully<br />

built over 90 beds at their facility. The staff at Parker<br />

Fasteners was so impressed with the outcome and<br />

the difference made in the community, that the<br />

#fastenerbedchallenge was born. The idea being, get as<br />

many fastener related companies as possible involved in<br />

the wonderful organization to end<br />

bedlessness throughout the United<br />

States. The first company who<br />

answered the call, to act for kids in<br />

need was BTM Manufacturing and<br />

ISSCO, Inc., in the Kansas City area. Jake<br />

Davis quickly contacted his local chapter of<br />

Sleep in Heavenly Peace and in the matter<br />

of two months, completed a build of their<br />

own, on October 30th.<br />

On a brisk, but sunny, Saturday<br />

morning, BTM Manufacturing and ISSCO,<br />

Inc. officially accepted the #fastenerbedchallenge. With<br />

over 60 co-workers and community volunteers on-hand,<br />

50 beds were made in just a few hours. All of us enjoyed<br />

lunch together too. This opportunity would not have<br />

happened without being pushed by our friends at Parker<br />

Fasteners and we are already looking forward to hosting a<br />

much larger build in the spring of <strong>2022</strong>. It was an amazing<br />

opportunity to help a great organization that continues<br />

to fight child bedlessness<br />

throughout this country. Now,<br />

who is next in accepting the<br />

#fastenerbedchallenge?<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE CONTINUED ON PAGE 55


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 55<br />

PARKER FASTENERS & BTM MANUFACTURING #FASTENERBEDCHALLENGE - WHO’S NEXT? from page 54<br />

All three companies, Parker Fasteners, BTM<br />

Manufacturing and ISSCO are eager to plan their next<br />

building events in <strong>2022</strong>. Nothing would be better than<br />

to see other fastener companies join their local Sleep<br />

in Heavenly Peace Chapter and continue the fight to end<br />

bedlessness in their own communities. The events are<br />

not hard to host. All that is needed is 30-50 volunteers,<br />

a decent sized<br />

parking lot and<br />

the team at SHP<br />

will provide all<br />

necessary tools<br />

and supplies. A<br />

donation from the<br />

hosting company<br />

or from other local<br />

companies will also be required to allow for the purchase<br />

of lumber and bedding for the children in need. This is<br />

a great teambuilding opportunity and can make a great<br />

impact in local communities.<br />

For more information visit Sleep in Heavenly<br />

Peace at www.shpbeds.org to find your local chapter<br />

and hold your own #fastenerbedchallenge event<br />

PARKER FASTENERS & BTM MANUFACTURING


56<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Jo Morris Marketing Director, Fastener Training Institute ®<br />

FASTENER TRAINING INSTITUTE ®<br />

5318 East 2nd Street #325, Long Beach, CA 90803<br />

TEL 562-473-5373 FAX 661-449-3232<br />

EMAIL info@fastenertraining.org WEB www.fastenertraining.org<br />

IN-PERSON TRAINING EVENTS<br />

RETURN FOR <strong>2022</strong><br />

The Fastener Training Institute (FTI), the leading<br />

nonprofit provider of fastener product and technical<br />

training, has a combination of in-person, virtual and online<br />

training opportunities for companies and students in<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.<br />

Fastener Training Week Program<br />

FTI is offering four in-person sessions of its Fastener<br />

Training Week, an accelerated training for the FTI Certified<br />

Fastener Specialist (CFS) designation:<br />

¤ February 21-25. <strong>2022</strong>: Cleveland, OH<br />

¤ May 2-5: Charlotte, North Carolina<br />

¤ August 22-26: Chicago, IL<br />

¤ November 14-18: Los Angeles, CA<br />

Fastener Training Week offers five intensive days of<br />

education covering manufacturing processes, consensus<br />

standards and quality control, as well as plant tours.<br />

The week features a refreshed curriculum with even<br />

more learning labs and more hands-on interactive class<br />

exercises and quizzes to reinforce learning. Courses<br />

are taught by industry experts including Salim Brahimi,<br />

Industrial Fasteners Institute; Laurence Claus, NNi<br />

Training and Consulting; Carmen Vertullo, AIM Testing<br />

Lab; and John Medcalf, Peak Innovations Engineering.<br />

After completing this small group training and passing a<br />

final exam, attendees are eligible for the CFS designation.<br />

Fastener Training Week Scholarships<br />

Scholarship opportunities are available through WIFI,<br />

SFA, NFDA and Pac-West Fastener Associations. In<br />

addition, a $500 discount is available for Pac-West,<br />

NFDA, IFI, MWFA, NCFA, SFA and AIM Prime members.<br />

TECHNICAL ARTICLE<br />

Fastening 101 at Fastener Fair USA<br />

May 17 in Detroit, MI<br />

Industry expert Laurence Claus leads this intensive<br />

training for fastener users, distributors, purchasers,<br />

engineers, salespersons, and manufacturers. This class<br />

covers manufacturing processes, consensus standards,<br />

quality control product and design fundamentals.<br />

Fastening 101 offers a thorough understanding of<br />

the fastener industry, including products, applications,<br />

industries and more, and is ideal for industrial,<br />

automotive, aerospace, and military attendees.<br />

Fastener Technology Workshop at<br />

International Fastener Expo<br />

October 17 in Las Vegas, NV<br />

This full day seminar focuses on the practical<br />

aspects of working in the fastener industry. You’ll learn<br />

how to respond to technical questions from engineers<br />

and technicians and how to find the appropriate answers.<br />

You’ll gain a lot of practical fastener knowledge and<br />

increase your professional value and industry status<br />

by sharing this day with industry experts and business<br />

colleagues.<br />

Single Day CFS Classes<br />

FTI will offer two single-day classes that qualify toward<br />

a Certified Fastener Specialist (CFS) designation. The<br />

classes will be Quality Assurance - Print Reading &<br />

Inspection and Understanding the Bolted Joint.<br />

Visit www.fastenertraining.org for more information.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 124


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 57


58<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Anthony Di Maio<br />

Anthony E. Di Maio attended Wentworth Institute and Northeastern University. In 1962 he<br />

started working with Blind Fasteners as Vice-President of Engineering & Manufacturing for two<br />

blind rivet manufacturers. He has been Chairman of the Technical Committee of the Industrial<br />

Fasteners Institute (IFI) and is still involved in the writing of IFI specifications. In 1991, he<br />

started ADM Engineering and is working with Fastener Manufacturers developing new fasteners<br />

and special machinery. He can be reached at ADM Engineering, 6 Hermon Ave., Haverhill, MA<br />

01832; phone and fax 978-521-0277; e-mail: tdimaio@verizon.net.<br />

BLIND RIVET FAILURES & SOLUTIONS<br />

Blind rivet failures can be caused by many reasons<br />

that can cause delay in production schedules. These<br />

blind rivet failures can be avoided by the proper blind<br />

rivet set-up conditions and operator training. Below are<br />

the blind rivet failures and solutions.<br />

Rivet Body Length Is Too Long<br />

fastening the work pieces together. Note the correct<br />

blind rivet body length the mandrel head is locked in the<br />

upset side of the set blind rivet and the rivet body has<br />

compressed and fastened the work pieces together with<br />

the maximum clamp load. The “correct length” drawing<br />

shows what a properly set blind rivet should look like<br />

SOLUTION - Always use the work thickness listed by<br />

the blind rivet manufacturer.<br />

Rivet Body Length Is Too Short<br />

TOO LONG<br />

CORRECT LENGTH<br />

Blind rivet manufacturers list the minimum and<br />

maximum work thickness range that the blind rivet is to<br />

be used.<br />

The drawing illustrates the failure of the set blind<br />

rivet when the length of the rivet body is too long for<br />

the work thickness. Example:- using a size 48 blind rivet<br />

that has a minimum work thickness of .375 (9.5mm)<br />

and a maximum work thickness of .500 (12.7mm) and<br />

use this blind rivet in a work thickness of .187 (4.7mm).<br />

In the .187 (4.7mm) work thickness the mandrel head<br />

is not trapped in the upset side of the rivet body and the<br />

mandrel head can become loose and fall out of the set<br />

rivet body. You also will not achieve a high clamp load<br />

CONTRIBUTOR ARTICLE<br />

TOO SHORT<br />

CORRECT LENGTH<br />

The drawing illustrates the failure of the set blind rivet<br />

when the rivet body is too short for the work thickness.<br />

Example:- using a blind rivet that has a maximum work<br />

thickness of .500 (12.7mm) and you use this blind rivet<br />

in a work thickness of .562 (14.2mm). There is not<br />

enough rivet body to lock the mandrel head and also not<br />

enough rivet body to clamp and fasten the work pieces<br />

together. This is a blind rivet failure.<br />

SOLUTION - Use the blind rivet with the work<br />

thickness listed by the rivet manufacturer.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 126


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 59


60<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

ACE BOLT & SCREW CO, INC<br />

530 Julienne Street, PO Box 22533, Jackson MS 39225<br />

TEL 601-355-3448 FAX 601-355-7100 EMAIL jacksonsales@acebolt.net WEB www.acebolt.net<br />

OLD SCHOOL IN A GOOD WAY - SERVING THE<br />

SOUTHEAST SINCE 1969 by Dennis Cowhey, President, Computer Insights<br />

Third Generation Strong<br />

Ace Bolt & Screw Co., Inc. was co-founded on July<br />

1, 1969, by Randal and Tom, who moved to Mississippi<br />

to open a fastener company. With Tom’s death in 2003,<br />

Randal bought out his friend’s share. Ace Bolt & Screw<br />

has become a 3rd generation family business that now<br />

employs Randal’s sons, Randy and Mike, and his three<br />

grandkids.<br />

With much enthusiasm, in July 2007, Ace Bolt<br />

& Screw opened its first branch location in Tupelo,<br />

Mississippi. As the business grew, so did the dreams<br />

for the company. Ace Bolt expanded even farther into the<br />

Southeast in August 2017 and opened another branch in<br />

Atlanta, Georgia. In the summer of 2017, their flagship<br />

location in Jackson, Mississippi, remodeled its sales<br />

counter, adding 3,000 square feet and numerous new<br />

products. In 2020, amidst the pandemic, their latest<br />

store opened in Gluckstadt, Mississippi.<br />

Long-Lasting Quality Relationships<br />

Over the last half a century, they have built long-lasting<br />

quality relationships with their customers, employees, and<br />

vendors. These relationships have always been crucial to<br />

the success of their business. Everyone at ACE prides<br />

themselves in being one of the most significant wholesale<br />

fastener businesses in the Southeast.<br />

As one of the Southeast’s largest and most<br />

significant fastener distributors, they offer their<br />

customers excellent prices and unparalleled service.<br />

Treating customers and employees as part of their<br />

extended family is baked into their company culture.<br />

Everyone at ACE prides themselves in being “old<br />

school” in customer service, and they treat customers<br />

the same as they did in 1969 – no matter if they are<br />

a mom and pop or a large corporation. They mix their<br />

traditional service with the latest technology to offer<br />

complete product tracing, vendor-managed inventory,<br />

fully customizable billing, and much more.<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 128


62<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

PACIFIC-WEST FASTENER ASSOCIATION<br />

3020 Old Ranch Parkway #300, Seal Beach CA 90740<br />

TEL 562-799-5509 FAX 562-684-0695 EMAIL info@pac-west.org WEB www.pac-west.org<br />

CLAY WEAVER ELECTED PAC-WEST PRESIDENT<br />

by Amy Nijjar<br />

Clay Weaver of Industrial Threaded Products (Brea,<br />

California) was elected to serve as president of the<br />

Pacific-West Fastener Association at a recent meeting of<br />

the Pac-West Board of Directors.<br />

Jo Morris of Desert Distribution (Castle Rock,<br />

Colorado) was elected as the association’s vice<br />

president, and Mark Thomas Cordova of Centennial Bolt<br />

(Denver, Colorado) was elected as secretary/treasurer.<br />

David Palmquist of N-D Industries (Santa Fe Springs,<br />

California) stays on the Board as immediate past<br />

president.<br />

Mark Thomas Cordova of Centennial Bolt (Denver,<br />

Colorado), Eunice Hajek of M & M Fasteners Supply<br />

(Valencia, California), and George Martinez of Brighton-<br />

Best International (Santa Fe Springs, California) were<br />

elected by the Pac-West membership to serve three-year<br />

terms on the Board of Directors.<br />

Other members of the Pac-West Board are Craig<br />

Beaty of Beawest Fasteners (Kent, Washington), John<br />

Butler of The Olander Co. (Sunnyvale, California), Hans<br />

Fuller of Fuller Metric (Langley, British Columbia), John<br />

Gaudette of Metric & Multistandard (Sparks, Nevada),<br />

Marisa Mudge of Mudge Fasteners (Corona, California),<br />

and Ken Rosenblatt of Hi-Q Fasteners (Santa Fe Springs,<br />

California).<br />

At the association’s recent fall conference, tribute<br />

was paid to retiring Board members Gigi Calfee of<br />

Copper State Bolt & Nut (Phoenix, Arizona), Ed Smith<br />

of Wurth Timberline (Commerce City, Colorado) and Ron<br />

Stanley of Empire Bolt & Screw (Spokane, Washington).<br />

Pac-West’s 2021 Joint Fall Conference with the<br />

Southwestern Fastener Association took place October<br />

20-23 at the Hilton Palacio del Rio in San Antonio,<br />

Texas. The conference featured the perfect mix of<br />

stimulating educational programs and fun events.<br />

ASSOCIATION ARTICLE<br />

Offerings at the conference included:<br />

¤ Economic Update presented by Dr. Chris Thornberg<br />

¤ Fastener Industry Update by Tim Roberto Jr.<br />

(Star Stainless Screw), Danielle Riggs<br />

(Würth Industry North America), and Mike Bailey<br />

(Nucor Fastener)<br />

¤ Grow Your Company and Its Capabilities presented<br />

by Dr. Barry Lawrence and Dr. Esther Rodriquez-<br />

Silva of Texas A&M<br />

¤ Craft Brewery Tour with Texas Barbecue<br />

¤ Cookie Decorating Tips spouse program by the<br />

award-winning Suzy Cravens (Advance Components)<br />

¤ Dinner at The Buckhorn Saloon and Museum<br />

Pac-West’s next conference will be March 16-18 at<br />

the Westin Anaheim Resort in Anaheim, CA. The meeting<br />

will feature a tabletop show and educational programs.<br />

Don’t Miss These Pac-West Events In <strong>2022</strong>!<br />

February 10 After Hours, San Diego CA<br />

March 16-18 Spring Conference and Tabletop<br />

Westin, Anaheim CA<br />

April 12<br />

Spring Dinner Meeting<br />

Holiday Inn, La Mirada CA<br />

May 19<br />

After Hours, LA/OC Line<br />

June 9<br />

After Hours, Denver CO<br />

August 18 After Hours, Vancouver B.C.<br />

September 14-17 Fall Conference<br />

The Brown Palace, Denver CO<br />

October 6 Fall Dinner Meeting<br />

Holiday Inn, La Mirada CA<br />

November 17 After Hours - Bay Area CA<br />

December 8 Holiday Party<br />

Holiday Inn, La Mirada CA<br />

Please check our website www.pac-west.org for more<br />

information and to sign-up for these events.<br />

PACIFIC-WEST FASTENER ASSOCIATION


PAC-WEST FASTENER ASSOCIATION/SOUTHWESTERN FASTENER ASSOCIATION<br />

JOINT CONFERENCE - SAN ANTONIO, TX - OCTOBER 20, 2021


64<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

Roman Basi<br />

Roman Basi is the President of The Center for Financial, Legal & Tax Planning, Inc. Roman<br />

graduated from Milliken University obtaining a Bachelor’s of Science Degree with a minor<br />

in Psychology. He earned an MBA from Southern Illinois University with an emphasis<br />

in Accounting and recevied his JD degree from Southern Illinois University. Roman is a<br />

licensed CPA as well as being a licensed attorney in Illinois, Missouri and Florida and is<br />

in high demand for his expertise in financial, legal and tax matters. His areas of expertise<br />

include mergers and acquisitions, contracts, real estate law, tax and estate planning.<br />

TAX MINIMIZATION ANALYSIS: HOW TO ADVOCATE<br />

FOR CLIENTS SELLING THEIR BUSINESS - PART 1<br />

If your business was to sell today, how much cash<br />

would you walk away with? Moreover, what is the tax<br />

impact you would incur, and what is the best structure<br />

and purchase price allocation to avoid such tax impact?<br />

Essentially, how do you reap the maximum return on<br />

selling a business you’ve spent your life building? A Tax<br />

Minimization Analysis (TMA) is the answer. A TMA analyzes<br />

a multitude of factors that play a vital role in the outcome<br />

of selling a business. When executed properly, a TMA will<br />

allow a seller to understand the financial breakdown on<br />

every level of a merger, acquisition, or business succession.<br />

Additionally, the TMA will provide an accurate calculation<br />

taking into account all transaction factors and variables<br />

that affect the cash a seller obtains at closing and postclosing.<br />

At The Center for Financial, Legal & Tax Planning,<br />

Inc., (The Center) we have found the TMA to revolutionize<br />

M&A transactions as it provides the transparency a seller<br />

deserves and the information necessary for our team to<br />

best advocate for your desired outcome.<br />

As many know, an M&A transaction can be<br />

overwhelming with the multitude of variables that<br />

drastically influence the outcome. The variables include,<br />

but are certainly not limited to the overall structure of the<br />

transaction, the asset/stock basis of the selling company,<br />

ownership configurations, real estate involvement, multiple<br />

entity involvement, liabilities paid at closing, purchase<br />

price adjustments, earn-outs, consulting fees, recaptured<br />

depreciation, and the federal, state and local tax impact.<br />

Each variable listed can severely impact the outcome of<br />

CONTRIBUTOR ARTICLE<br />

a transaction and each must be taken into account as<br />

early in the transaction as possible. When all variables<br />

are understood early in the transaction, your counsel is<br />

best equipped with the knowledge to understand how to<br />

best combat or strategically use such variables to obtain<br />

an outcome that not only protects a seller legally but<br />

minimizes their tax burden to the fullest extent possible.<br />

After all, we did not invest our lives into a business to give<br />

thirty to fifty percent of the closing proceeds to Uncle Sam<br />

when it’s sold! The example below provides some insight<br />

into the value of a TMA.<br />

A TMA can not only pay for itself through the tax<br />

savings it will discover, but potentially pay for the<br />

merger and acquisition (M&A) team you engage for your<br />

transaction. For example, you’re selling a business in an<br />

industry that deals with complex licensing or regulation<br />

(transportation, sand & gravel, chemicals, etc.), and the<br />

Buyer seeks an asset sale for the benefits of immediate<br />

depreciation. Through proper execution of a TMA, your<br />

counsel can analyze and determine the best structure<br />

of the transaction, whether it be an asset, stock, or<br />

in this case a potential 338(h)(10) sale. The TMA will<br />

calculate the tax effect of each sale type (asset, stock,<br />

and 338(h)(10)) to determine what structure best suits<br />

the seller from a tax standpoint. Under this example, the<br />

TMA may determine the 338(h)10 will best overcome the<br />

complexities of assigning licenses or permits while also<br />

providing the paramount tax outcome for not only the<br />

seller but in this example the buyer too.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 131


66<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

TEL 323-817-2226 EMAIL morgan.wilson@fastenershows.com<br />

WEB www.fastenershows.com<br />

IFE 2021 RECAP & <strong>2022</strong> PREVIEW<br />

International Fastener Expo (IFE), North America’s<br />

most extensive business-to-business tradeshow for all<br />

types of fasteners, machinery & tooling and other<br />

industrial products, successfully staged the 40th edition<br />

of the event September 21 – 23 at Mandalay Bay in Las<br />

Vegas, Nevada. The three-day event was packed with<br />

special events, opportunities to network and a robust<br />

conference agenda. Despite a different year, the feedback<br />

from exhibitors and attendees was largely positive and<br />

many were thrilled to be back and connect as an industry<br />

in-person. Morgan Wilson, Show Manager of International<br />

Fastener Expo provided additional insight. “Exhibitors<br />

and Attendees both commonly stated they experienced<br />

high-quality interactions and it was clear those who<br />

participated this year were focused on doing business.”<br />

Day one of the event kicked off Tuesday morning with<br />

the 2nd annual golf tournament at Bali Hai Golf Club.<br />

More than 90 players across 23 teams enjoyed friendly<br />

competition, networking and good times. First place,<br />

second place and third place teams were awarded prizes.<br />

Participants were also awarded prizes for longest drive<br />

and closest to the pin. Congratulations to the winners!<br />

First Place Team:<br />

Erik Mason, Tim Quick, Dennis Doyle and Jack Dobek<br />

Second Place Team:<br />

Michael Morrissey, Chris Berner, Dan Finucan and Jason<br />

Shortt<br />

Third Place (tie):<br />

Kyle Lang, Zachary Schihl, Brad Burel and Erik Lang<br />

Aaron Dollenmeyer, Mike Weishaar and Ted Grove<br />

Women Closest to the Pin: Jamie Ausec<br />

Men Closest to the Pin: Dennis Doyle<br />

Women Longest Drive: Tara Rinkdskopf<br />

Men Longest Drive: Mike Shall<br />

SHOW EVENT ARTICLE<br />

Day one concluded with the annual Welcome<br />

Reception at Mandalay Bay’s Daylight Pool, where more<br />

than 500 industry leaders gathered to celebrate the<br />

Golf Tournament winners and enjoy an open bar, light<br />

appetizers and live DJ entertainment.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 130


INTERNATIONAL FASTENER EXPO<br />

MANDALAY BAY, LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 22-23, 2021<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 127


68<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

UNIVERSAL FASTENING SYSTEM<br />

300 Jeffords St. Suite C, Clearwater FL, 33756 TEL 727-386-5374<br />

EMAIL info@universalfasteningsystem.com WEB www.universalfasteningsystem.com<br />

UNIVERSAL FASTENING SYSTEM<br />

ANNOUNCES REVOLUTIONARY SYSTEM<br />

A true engineering breakthrough by Universal<br />

Fastening System (UFS), announcing versatile designs<br />

for the fastener Industry. UFS is a leader in design<br />

and engineering of proprietary technology including high<br />

performance drive systems for fastening applications<br />

in ALL industries; medical, automotive, aerospace,<br />

construction, marine, furniture, electronics using manual<br />

as well as robotic processes. This concept is a true<br />

game-changer.<br />

Imagine this: The best qualities of a screw, a bolt, a<br />

nut, and a nail - all combined into one system, which can<br />

come in three-, two-, or one-piece fasteners depending<br />

on the application. Imagine a screw that can be guided<br />

from an angle into their final position, a nail that can<br />

be inserted with built-in resistance to bending. Imagine<br />

fasteners that can be secured and tightened using nonskid,<br />

no-slip, dual internal and external hybrid connections<br />

that mesh closely together in motion with their driver<br />

counterparts to resist stripping.<br />

There is no need to imagine! This versatile fastener<br />

exists today as part of a universally applicable system and<br />

is available for licensing and use. Dr. Kianor Shah, inventor<br />

of the Universal Fastening (UFS) System, states “Now,<br />

engineers and manufacturers can design better products<br />

and structures by placing fasteners in more desirable<br />

locations versus the conventional need for straight-line<br />

access. Furthermore, failing, or existing fasteners can be<br />

replaced to improve functionality and longevity.”<br />

UFS components can be made from any solid<br />

material such as metals, plastics, ceramics, and rubbers<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE<br />

in micro and macro sizes with various methods. The<br />

fasteners can be driven or accessed from angles of up<br />

to 180-degrees and in the tightest of places with an<br />

effectively designed head that can act as a carrier for<br />

manual or automated use or as an anchor for a secondary<br />

process such as a permanent or nonpermanent joint.<br />

Its tamper-proof qualities can also be hidden for added<br />

security, restoration of esthetic features, or simply away<br />

from environmental exposure that may result in rusting<br />

and corrosion.<br />

Universal Fastening System, LLC is a Florida entity<br />

headquartered in Clearwater, Fl, for IP licensing and contract<br />

manufacturing (OEM inclusive).<br />

UNIVERSAL FASTENING SYSTEM


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 69


70<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

VENTURA INDUSTRIAL<br />

PRODUCTS, LLC<br />

TEL 330-467-0102 CELL 216-338-8485 EMAIL jv@jackieventura.com WEB www.jackieventura.com<br />

SELLING FASTENERS “IS KIND OF A BIG DEAL!”<br />

AT VENTURA INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS<br />

My rep agency, Ventura Industrial Products, LLC was<br />

established 10 years ago, in August of 2011. However,<br />

I have been working in the fastener industry for over 38<br />

years. I started my career in 1983 working as a secretary<br />

for a fastener rep agency, Briggs Industrial Sales, Inc. of<br />

Cleveland, Ohio and continued to work with them for 14<br />

years advancing my way through the company as office<br />

manager, inside sales, and finally landing a position in<br />

outside sales.<br />

When I first went out on my own<br />

as an independent rep in 1997, I<br />

was one of the first women-owned<br />

manufacturer’s rep agencies in the<br />

country. I opened my agency with<br />

one line, Sems and Specials, and<br />

a whole lot of courage! Because I<br />

was a woman in a man’s industry,<br />

I faced many challenges along the<br />

way, but the people who tested and<br />

challenged me helped me become<br />

a better, more well-informed sales<br />

person. Fortunately, with the support<br />

and recommendations of many<br />

industry connections, numerous<br />

companies gave me the opportunity<br />

to rep them when I was starting up<br />

and I was able to build a successful agency, JV Industrial<br />

Sales. The territory I covered then and still cover today is;<br />

Ohio, Western Pennsylvania, Upstate New York, Michigan,<br />

Eastern Indiana, and Northern Kentucky.<br />

I ran that agency until I got married and moved to<br />

Arizona where I lived for five years and also had a fastener<br />

rep agency in the Southwest. Basically, I have worked as<br />

a rep for my entire career with the exception of five years<br />

when I worked as a direct sales person for Infasco after<br />

moving back to Ohio in 2006. Infasco is a great company,<br />

but my passion is working independently as a rep. So,<br />

in 2011 I got back to it and formed Ventura Industrial<br />

Products, LLC.<br />

I love working with the people in this industry, many of<br />

whom have become great friends! I get great satisfaction<br />

when I can help a customer source a part, either through<br />

one of my Principal’s product lines, or by referring them to<br />

someone else who might be able to assist them. It really<br />

is about helping each other and building relationships.<br />

Some of the biggest challenges<br />

many reps face is territory overlap<br />

with other agencies and finding noncompeting<br />

lines. There are many<br />

great agencies out there, several of<br />

whom rep the same companies I do<br />

in their respective territories, and they<br />

may have states that intersect with<br />

my region. Therefore, I am unable<br />

to represent some of my lines in all<br />

of my territory. But, most of us reps<br />

have all gotten to know one another<br />

through sales meetings and other<br />

industry events and have learned to<br />

work together as a team and help<br />

each other out across territory lines.<br />

If the companies we represent are<br />

successful, then so are we!<br />

The benefits manufacturers get in hiring an<br />

independent rep compared to a direct sales person lies<br />

primarily in the cost differences. Reps pay all of their<br />

own expenses; vehicles, phones, travel, health and auto<br />

insurance, taxes, as well as meals and entertainment.<br />

Plus, since we work on commission there is generally<br />

no fixed salary involved. The more we sell, the more<br />

our Principals should earn. Additional benefits include<br />

industry experience and qualified contacts, which results<br />

in less training or the need for lead generation to be<br />

provided by the manufacturer.<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE CONTINUED ON PAGE 71


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 71<br />

VENTURA INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS SELLING FASTENERS IS “KIND OF A BIG DEAL” from page 70<br />

I am truly blessed to be working with some of the<br />

most excellent companies in the fastener industry! I<br />

pride myself in utilizing my strong work ethic and many<br />

years of experience to provide exceptional service and a<br />

clear channel of communication between the distribution<br />

companies I serve and the companies I sell for. The<br />

companies I represent are quality partnerships with the<br />

same dedication and commitment to our customer’s<br />

requirements, enabling us to meet the demanding needs<br />

of today’s market. My Principals are listed below and<br />

you will see ads from many of them right here in Link<br />

Magazine!<br />

AIM Testing Laboratory - Testing, Consulting & Training<br />

Services<br />

C & H International - Import Brokerage Service Provider<br />

Choice Fasteners - Studs & Stud Bolting<br />

Couplings Company - Brass Fittings<br />

Dale Company - U-bolts, J-Bolts, Eye Bolts, Anchor Bolts<br />

Disc & Belleville - Belleville, Disc & Spring Washers<br />

EFC International - Specialty Engineered Components<br />

Eastern Industrial Products – Gaskets, O-rings & Custom<br />

Rubber Products<br />

Eurolink Fastener Supply Service - Hard-to-Find Metric<br />

Fasteners<br />

Fascomp - Electronic Hardware, Panel Nuts, and Custom<br />

Parts<br />

Goebel Fasteners - Blind Rivets, Rivet Nuts, Threaded<br />

Inserts, G-Grip Lockbolts and Installation Tools<br />

One Stop Packaging - In-House Packaging Company<br />

SmartCert - QR Code based Certificate Management<br />

System<br />

Spring Bolt & Nut - Exotic materials specialist, short run,<br />

hot forged, machined.<br />

Tool-X - Nano Fluid Technology that improves machine tool<br />

life and production speeds.<br />

Triem Industries – Semi-Standard & Special Screws/Sems<br />

Wyandotte Industries - Special Nuts, Locknuts, Screw<br />

Machine & CNC products<br />

We look forward to working with you and assisting<br />

you with your fastener requirements!<br />

VENTURA INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS


72<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

SPIROL INTERNATIONAL CORP.<br />

30 Rock Avenue, Danielson, CT 06239<br />

TEL 1-860-774-8571 FAX 1-860-774-2048 EMAIL info@spirol.com WEB www.spirol.com<br />

SOLID PIN RETENTION FEATURES<br />

by Jeff Greenwood, Product Sales Engineer<br />

Solid Pins are commonly used as permanent<br />

fasteners in a wide range of applications. They are<br />

retained by the harder Solid Pin displacing material in the<br />

softer host component(s). There are two primary methods<br />

of accomplishing this:<br />

[1] Press-fit: Press-fit dowels and straight pins are<br />

typically retained in the assembly by being pressed into<br />

holes that are smaller than the pin diameter. The pins are<br />

retained by compressing the host material.<br />

[2] Retention features: Retention features (i.e.<br />

knurls and barbs) are often preferred over press-fit dowels<br />

because they allow for wider hole tolerances and lower<br />

insertion forces during assembly. Knurls and barbs<br />

carve into the softer host component, and displace the<br />

host material into the valleys of the knurls and barbs.<br />

This results in more frictional contact area between the<br />

pin and hole, and thus higher retention as compared to<br />

simple press-fit doweling.<br />

This White Paper describes the common types of<br />

retention features and can serve as a reference tool when<br />

designing a new product. There are several types of Solid<br />

Pin retention features, and it’s beneficial for designers<br />

to take advantage of the characteristics associated with<br />

each retention feature. The four most common retention<br />

features are described below.<br />

Straight Knurls<br />

Straight knurls provide strong resistance to rotational<br />

forces but minimal resistance to axial loads. Therefore,<br />

straight knurls are often recommended when the pin<br />

is used to transmit torque, such as when used as an<br />

axle to rotate a wheel. In this type of application, the<br />

pin would have a partial knurl equivalent (or shorter) to<br />

the thickness of the retaining component. The mating<br />

component could then<br />

rotate about the pin’s<br />

APPLICATION<br />

EXAMPLE -<br />

SPIROL LP500<br />

LATCH PIN IN<br />

AUTOMOTIVE<br />

DOOR HANDLE<br />

“blank” (non-knurled) section.<br />

Helical Knurls<br />

Like a screw, Solid Pins with helical knurls rotate<br />

as they enter the hole and cut into the host component.<br />

The helical knurls provide greater surface contact than<br />

straight knurls, therefore providing greater resistance to<br />

back out. Helical knurls provide resistance to both axial<br />

loads and rotational forces. In dynamic applications with<br />

solely rotational loads (like the wheel and axle mentioned<br />

above), straight knurls are preferred because helical<br />

knurls subjected to torque have a propensity to rotate<br />

further into or out of the hole - depending on the direction<br />

of rotation. In general, helical knurls are the most<br />

versatile among the<br />

Solid Pin retention<br />

features.<br />

TECHNICAL ARTICLE CONTINUED ON PAGE 140


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 73<br />

The Swedish-based Nord-<br />

Lock Group has inaugurated<br />

the core of its business,<br />

Nord-Lock’s production<br />

facility in Mattmar, Sweden,<br />

where everything started<br />

almost 40 years ago. The<br />

inauguration is the third in<br />

2021, a result of the Group’s<br />

focus on expansion to meet<br />

increasing demand.<br />

In 2019, the first sod was<br />

laid for the Group’s most<br />

extensive expansion project<br />

ever, by upgrading and<br />

expanding the three largest<br />

production units in the<br />

business, the foundation is<br />

created for more future-proof<br />

production and development<br />

for the company.<br />

In February, the Group’s<br />

CEO Fredrik Meuller<br />

inaugurated Expander’s<br />

operations in Åtvidaberg,<br />

Sweden, with a doubled<br />

production area to meet<br />

market demand for, among<br />

other things, pivot pins.<br />

In October, the Group’s<br />

brand-new unit was<br />

inaugurated in Pittsburgh,<br />

USA, which will be the base<br />

for the company’s Superbolt<br />

production and US sales<br />

offices.<br />

`The expansion of<br />

Nord-Lock’s operations<br />

in Mattmar, Sweden, is<br />

inaugurated together with<br />

Governor Marita Ljung,<br />

Investment AB Latour’s CEO<br />

Johan Hjertonsson and the<br />

Group’s CEO Fredrik Meuller.<br />

The facility is the heart of<br />

Nord-Lock Group and has<br />

now a significantly larger<br />

production area and a new<br />

office building.<br />

“We are seeing a sharp increase<br />

in demand for our solutions from<br />

customers all over the world, and<br />

to ensure future needs, we have<br />

expanded our three largest units<br />

during the pandemic and invested<br />

in state-of-the-art equipment. Today<br />

we are very happy and proud to be<br />

able to inaugurate our expanded<br />

business right here in Mattmar.<br />

The new facility ensures longterm<br />

production capacity and<br />

provides us with a good<br />

basis for continued<br />

focus on innovation<br />

and development of<br />

world-leading bolting<br />

solutions. The focus for<br />

the expansion has been<br />

to create sustainable<br />

production capacity and<br />

provides us with a good<br />

basis for continued focus<br />

on innovation and development of<br />

world-leading bolting solutions. The<br />

focus for the expansion has been to<br />

create sustainable production and<br />

create a better working environment<br />

for our employees,” says Fredrik<br />

Meuller, President and CEO of Nord-<br />

Lock Group.<br />

For more information contact Nord-<br />

Lock, Inc. by Tel: 412- 279-1149,<br />

email: bolting@nord-lock.com or visit<br />

them online at www.nord-lock.com.


74<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

FAB GROUP CONDUCTS SUPPLY CHAIN SYMPOSIUM<br />

The Fastener Advisory Board (FAB Group) met in<br />

Chicago, IL, on October 28 to review supply chain and<br />

inventory management best practices. The FAB Group<br />

is a 30-year-old peer review group first started through<br />

a sponsorship by the NFDA that currently consists of<br />

member firms AIS – an MSC Company, TR Falcon, Sherex<br />

Fastening Solutions, Martin Fastener – a Division of<br />

Martin Supply, AMPG, and G.L. Huyett. With multiple<br />

industrial fastener distribution channel participants,<br />

members benefit from viewing the current supply chain<br />

state of affairs from an array of lens’ and perspectives.<br />

Key highlights included a group benchmarking survey<br />

that looked at total transit time from various origin<br />

and destination ports, with an eye on finding clues<br />

to compressing transit times, especially given current<br />

congestion and shortages of transportation workers; and<br />

total costs benchmarked to LCL and FCL shipments,<br />

along with freight broker and forwarder performance<br />

reviews. Adam Pratt of Sherex noted some recent<br />

successes in routing shipments to the east coast, and<br />

away from congestion out west. G.L. Huyett presented<br />

inventory replenishment practices using data analytics,<br />

encompassing a tools and benefits assessment from a<br />

sponsorship of a doctoral thesis at the Massachusetts<br />

Institute of Technology in early 2020 on the variations<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE<br />

in demand planning and setting inventory values. AIS<br />

presented a concept of a sourcing tool which led to<br />

extensive peer group discussions about the formation of<br />

networks of suppliers and distributors that focus on team<br />

wins of new business while largely eliminating the nonvalue-added<br />

activity associated with quoting and RFQs.<br />

There were many sidebar discussions and many of<br />

the participants came away impressed and equipped with<br />

new ideas. Laurie Massengill, Purchasing Manager at<br />

Martin noted, “This meeting drew upon best practices and<br />

has given me significant context to improve our practices<br />

at Martin, as I learn about this industry in contrast to my<br />

many years of experience in supply chains associated<br />

with the elevator manufacturing industry.”<br />

NICK RUETZ OF AIS, AN MSC COMPANY, DISCUSSES BEST PRACTICES WITH<br />

MEMBERS OF THE FASTENER ADVISORY BOARD (FAB GROUP) DURING A RECENT<br />

SUPPLY CHAIN AND INVENTORY MANAGEMENT SYMPOSIUM IN CHICAGO, IL.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 142


INTERNATIONAL FASTENERS, INC.<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 75<br />

Tampa . Charlotte . Chicago . Dallas . Los Angeles . Philadelphia<br />

TEL 1-888-241-0203 FAX 1-888-241-2096 EMAIL sales@daggerz.com WEB www.daggerz.com<br />

DAGGERZ DELIVERING THROUGH THE SUPPLY CHAIN CRISIS<br />

Once a result of Covid-19 disruptions, the supply<br />

chain crisis is plaguing many industries, including the<br />

fastener industry, mainly due to an increase in demand.<br />

Did you know that this increase stems from panic buying<br />

and is equivalent to nearly 50 million new Americans<br />

joining the economy? Unfortunately, many supply chains<br />

rely on lean principles which have rendered them<br />

unable to keep up with growing demand. International<br />

Fasteners, Inc., however, has managed to rise to the<br />

challenge of meeting their customers’ needs.<br />

By making the decision early on to put inventory as<br />

their top priority, IFI has done everything possible to have<br />

stock on their shelves to meet their distributor customer<br />

needs. While prices have continued to soar, availability<br />

has been the constant their customers can rely on.<br />

It is estimated that the ships anchored off Los<br />

Angeles alone could stretch from Southern California<br />

to Chicago if laid end to end. These record backlogs<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE<br />

at the world’s largest ports combined with worker,<br />

equipment, and space shortages in getting containers<br />

to their destinations once they have reached land have<br />

forced companies like International Fasteners, Inc. to<br />

get creative. Domestic coatings and replacement boxes<br />

have all come in to play to help turn overstocked plated<br />

fasteners into much needed long life coated ones that<br />

can be put back on the shelf until containers arrive.<br />

This crisis is estimated to last well into 2023.<br />

International Fasteners, Inc. plans to face these longterm<br />

challenges through continuing to be adaptable,<br />

creative, and focused on serving its customers by any<br />

means necessary.<br />

Interested in partnering and growing with a company<br />

that will do everything in its power to continue to serve<br />

its customers through every challenge? Follow them on<br />

social media and make International Fasteners, Inc. your<br />

choice today!<br />

INTERNATIONAL FASTENERS, INC.


76<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

GLOBALFASTENERNEWS.COM<br />

by JOHN WOLZ EDITOR<br />

editor@globalfastenernews.com<br />

THORNBERG TELLS PAC-WEST / SFA:<br />

‘THIS ECONOMY HAS MOMENTUM’<br />

“ The economy is back,” Christopher Thornberg<br />

declared to the 2021 joint conference of the Pacific-<br />

West Fastener Association and Southwestern Fastener<br />

Association. “This economy has momentum.”<br />

Expect 6% growth in Q4 with unemployment below<br />

5%, Dr. Thornberg of Beacon Economics LLC predicted.<br />

And the economy will be hot for the next few years,<br />

he added. “Three years? Four years?”<br />

The current economy comes after the tragic natural<br />

disaster of the Covid-19 pandemic.<br />

“History shows natural disasters have a “limited<br />

long-run economic impact,” Thornberg said. “The crisis is<br />

gone.”<br />

Fiscal and monetary policy relations to the Covid-19<br />

pandemic “have been excessive.”<br />

The Federal Reserve responded to “over-heal the<br />

economy in the short-term” with a “rocket booster,”<br />

Thornberg suggested.<br />

Many of the day-to-day “crises” were not real,<br />

Thornberg said.<br />

“Miserableness and the pandemic” did not result<br />

in Americans “selling apples on the street corner in the<br />

snow.”<br />

The U.S. poverty rate actually fell in 2020, he pointed<br />

out. “People are tougher than we think.”<br />

Speaking to Pac-West and SFA on the topic of “Post-<br />

Covid World, Over the Hump...or Over-Stimulated?,”<br />

Thornberg cautioned that the overstimulation puts<br />

the economy at “the greatest risk of inflation in 50 years.”<br />

There are a “couple really good years in front of us”<br />

that could end with recession due to overbuilding and over<br />

expansion. The actual Covid recession was short.<br />

“Typically after a recession, there are fewer jobs so<br />

there are workers for low wages,” Thornberg said. “Not<br />

this time,” he declared, noting there are 50% more job<br />

openings. When applicants “don’t have to take the first<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE<br />

job it pulls everybody up.”<br />

Only supply chain disruptions are “holding back” full<br />

recovery, Thornberg said. The supply chain disruptions<br />

result from “a lot of things adding up.” The Just-in-Time<br />

model of the past decade meant inventories were down<br />

and “nobody was ready for a surge.” The pandemic<br />

caused “bad forecasting in 2020” and there was “excess<br />

demand by consumers.”<br />

The global shipping backlog is partially due to “slow<br />

capacity growth in recent years.” he said of supply chain<br />

problems. “It will turn. It will catch up.”<br />

Changes are coming. There is an upcoming glut in<br />

U.S. oil production. Natural gas prices up? That raises the<br />

cost of steel, Thornberg forewarned.<br />

Thornberg noted that ten million people lost jobs<br />

during the pandemic, but 110 million received checks. The<br />

U.S. government was “giving money to people who<br />

can’t spend it.” For every $1 lost in earnings the U.S.<br />

government gave out $3.50.<br />

Checking account balances doubled, Thornberg<br />

pointed out. One result has been “over-investment in real<br />

estate in response to the temporary surge in economic<br />

activity,” Thornberg observed.<br />

Subsequently “Americans are flush,” Thornberg said.<br />

They have money for autos and hot tubs. Home prices<br />

have soared, Thornberg cited a 28.3% increase in Phoenix<br />

as an example.<br />

And companies recorded record profits during Covid,<br />

Thornberg added.<br />

For both political parties, the 2020 free dollars were<br />

about “buying an election,” Thornberg said.<br />

“There is no such thing as a free lunch,” Thornberg<br />

said in reference to the trillions of dollars added to the<br />

federal debt. The federal debt has doubled in comparison<br />

to GDP in the past 20 years.<br />

“The long run still matters,” Thornberg declared.<br />

GLOBALFASTENERNEWS.COM


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 77


78<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

ND Industries is<br />

pleased to announce the<br />

hiring of Brad Gallagher<br />

as Applications Engineer<br />

and Business Development<br />

Manager.<br />

Brad will be focused on<br />

the growing electric vehicle<br />

industry, as well as the<br />

aerospace and industrial<br />

markets, while fostering<br />

ongoing relationships with<br />

clients across the Western<br />

United States. As a trusted<br />

partner, Brad will work with<br />

new and existing customers<br />

to determine how ND can<br />

help solve their problems.<br />

In 2009, Brad graduated<br />

from Kettering University<br />

with a Bachelor of Science<br />

in Mechanical Engineering,<br />

followed by a Master of<br />

Science in Engineering<br />

Management in 2011. During<br />

his time at Kettering, Brad<br />

participated in numerous<br />

co-op programs. Each<br />

program honed Brad’s skills<br />

and exposed him to all levels<br />

of an organization.<br />

continued on next page...


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 79<br />

...continued from previous page<br />

Brad’s career path<br />

allowed him to work with<br />

world-renowned chemical<br />

manufacturing companies<br />

that specialize in fasteners<br />

and adhesive technology.<br />

Starting in the lab, Brad<br />

was quickly recognized for<br />

his technical know-how and<br />

communication skills. Brad<br />

has since worked in Account<br />

Manager and Business<br />

Development roles, handling<br />

large OEM accounts.<br />

Brad intends to draw<br />

on his background in the<br />

automotive industry to<br />

collaborate with engineers<br />

and managers to develop<br />

technical solutions that meet<br />

their product requirements.<br />

With Brad’s assistance, ND<br />

Industries will continue to<br />

bring in new business and<br />

build on the established<br />

customer base. Brad is<br />

confident that ND Industries<br />

will remain on the cuttingedge<br />

with its exceptional line<br />

of products and unparalleled<br />

customer service.<br />

ND Industries is a<br />

leading chemical technology<br />

manufacturer, serving<br />

the global market with<br />

adhesives, sealants, and<br />

thread-locking technologies.<br />

ND Industries specializes<br />

in products utilized in the<br />

automotive, aerospace, and<br />

defense industries.<br />

For more information<br />

contact ND Industries by Tel:<br />

248-288-0000, Fax: 248-<br />

288-0022 Email at info@<br />

ndindustries.com or online at<br />

www.ndindustries.com.


80<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

SPECIALTY TOOLS & FASTENERS DISTRIBUTORS ASSOCIATION<br />

PO Box 44, 500 Elm Grove Rd., Ste. 2I0, Elm Grove, Wl 53122<br />

TEL 1-800-352-2981 FAX 262-784-5059 EMAIL info@stafda.org WEB www.stafda.org<br />

RECAP OF STAFDA’S ORLANDO 2021<br />

CONVENTION & TRADE SHOW by Georgia H. Foley, CEO<br />

Nearly 2,400 construction/industrial distributors,<br />

manufacturers, and rep agents met in Orlando, October<br />

24-26 for STAFDA’s 45th Annual Convention & Trade Show.<br />

Although it was only 56% of the usual attendance, it was<br />

still a solid turnout considering the continued COVID-19<br />

environment. Attendance was impacted by the inability of<br />

international attendees to gain entry into the US.<br />

However, the feedback STAFDA has received on<br />

Orlando has been nothing short of positive! Manufacturers<br />

(exhibitors) were happy to see their distributors again and<br />

vice versa. Rep agents were also pleased to see their<br />

principals and source new vendors. Twenty-one college<br />

students from five universities attended the three-day<br />

meeting. The students are upperclassmen with industrial<br />

distribution, supply chain, or construction majors who<br />

had the chance to experience a meeting within their<br />

discipline and interview with STAFDA members for a full<br />

time position or internship.<br />

The meeting led off on Sunday, October 24, with<br />

exceptional educational workshops to bring attendees<br />

current on relevant topics. Morning sessions included<br />

Kelly McDonald with “How to Work with People Not Like<br />

You”; Skip Weisman discussed how to “Overcome 7<br />

SHOW EVENT ARTICLE<br />

Deadliest Communication Sins”; Janine Driver covered<br />

how to “Decode Body Language to Increase Sales”;<br />

and Jamie Turner focused on the “Unspoken Rules of<br />

Leadership.” Sunday afternoon’s educational workshop<br />

was a preview of new outside sales trends as presented<br />

by STAFDA Sales Consultant, Paul Reilly. Earlier this year,<br />

STAFDA asked Reilly to update its 2006 outside sales<br />

training manual, Sales PRO, to take into account virtual<br />

selling, social media, technology, and how the COVID-19<br />

pandemic impacted outside sales. The revised manual<br />

will be available to STAFDA members in Q1 <strong>2022</strong>.<br />

Also Sunday afternoon, a seven-person panel led<br />

a NextGen Luncheon to talk about what they look for<br />

when hiring the younger generation and how they evolved<br />

their businesses during the pandemic to survive and<br />

thrive. The panel consisted of two distributors, two<br />

manufacturers, two rep agents, and one social media<br />

blogger. Social media exploded the past 1.5 years<br />

and STAFDA felt it was important to have this medium<br />

included on the panel.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 144


STAFDA 45th<br />

ANNUAL TRADE SHOW & CONVENTION<br />

ORLANDO, FL - OCTOBER 24-26, 2021


82<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

GOEBEL FASTENERS INC.<br />

5650 Guhn Rd Suite 110, Houston, Texas 77040<br />

TEL 713-393-7007 FAX 713-393-7084 EMAIL sales@goebelfasteners.com WEB www.goebelfasteners.com<br />

A LOOK AT THE NEW 18V<br />

LITHIUM-ION CORDLESS TOOL LINE<br />

We are excited to announce our brand new 18V<br />

Lithium-Ion Cordless Battery Tools! They are proven<br />

reliable tools ideal for demanding assembly, maintenance,<br />

general metalworking and trucking industry applications.<br />

Benefits & Features<br />

¤ Built In LED Flashlight<br />

¤ Soft Ergonomic Grip<br />

¤ Includes 2x 18V Batteries in a Compact Carrying Case<br />

¤ Adjustable Settings & Robust Design<br />

Most operators of structural blind rivets would<br />

agree that the use of the correct setting tool is crucial<br />

for a strong fastened joint. Among the main variables<br />

to be decided when selecting a riveting tool include<br />

power to weight ratio, traction power rating, stroke<br />

length, ergonomics, and ability to adapt different nose<br />

assemblies to accommodate a wide variety of structural<br />

blind rivets.<br />

Goebel Fasteners, Inc. offers a variety of tools for<br />

any application that you may encounter and our quality is<br />

proven with each and every product we offer.<br />

¤ GO-BR1<br />

Designed for Blind Rivets with 3/32” up to 3/16” Diameters<br />

Pulling Force: 2,698lbf Stroke (B/S): B= 0.83”/S= 0.59”<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE<br />

¤ GO-TR1<br />

Designed for Bulb-Tite Blind Rivets with 3/16”, 1/4”, 9/32” Diameters<br />

Pulling Force: 2,698lbf Stroke (B/S): B= 1.02”/S= 0.71”<br />

¤ GO-BR2<br />

Designed for Blind Rivets with 5/32” up to 1/4” Diameters<br />

Pulling Force: 4,046lbf Stroke (B/S): B= 1.02”/S= 0.71”<br />

¤ GO-RN1<br />

Designed for Threaded Inserts with 6-32UNC up to 5/16-18UNC Threads<br />

Traction Force: 4,046lbf Adjustable Stroke: 0.008” - 0.230”<br />

¤ GO-RN2<br />

Designed for Threaded Inserts with 10-24UNC up to 1/2-13UNC Threads<br />

Traction Force: 6,070lbf Adjustable Stroke: 0.010”- 0.350”<br />

¤ GO-SN1<br />

Designed for Pre-Bulbed Threaded Inserts with 10-24UNC up to<br />

3/8-16UNC Threads<br />

Traction Force: 4,721lbf Adjustable Stroke: 0.150” - 0.610”<br />

¤ GO-LB1<br />

Designed for Lockbolts with 3/16” up to 1/4” Diameters<br />

Pulling Force: 5,170lbf Stroke: 0.620”<br />

¤ GO-HX1<br />

Designed to Create a Hex Hole out of a Round Hole<br />

Pulling Force: 3,600lbf Stroke: 0.790”<br />

If you are looking for the best in durable and high-quality<br />

powered riveting tools, see what Goebel Fasteners, Inc. has<br />

to offer to get you and your project taken care of!<br />

GOEBEL FASTENERS INC


84<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

DDI System, a leading provider of ERP &<br />

eCommerce software for wholesale distributors,<br />

is pleased to announce David Greene has<br />

stepped into a new role with the company<br />

as Director of Business Development. David,<br />

founder and former partner of a market-specific<br />

ERP for Foodservice Equipment and Supply<br />

dealers joined DDI System as a dedicated<br />

Foodservice Market Specialist in January 2020.<br />

Greene’s wealth of industry expertise and<br />

trusted relationships strengthened DDI’s focus<br />

and growth in the Foodservice Equipment and<br />

Supplies industry over the past year and a half.<br />

Greene is now responsible for growing the<br />

company’s business in all markets, finding<br />

new business opportunities, and helping to<br />

build a strong, recognizable brand alongside the<br />

Marketing and Sales teams. David’s extensive<br />

distribution experience and interpersonal<br />

relationships will drive his ability to spot new<br />

growth opportunities and solidifying current<br />

customer, Buying Group and Association<br />

relationships.<br />

“David has proven to be an extremely valuable<br />

member of the DDI System management team.<br />

His experience and unique ability to build lasting<br />

relationships has resulted in new opportunities<br />

and greater software enhancements to serve<br />

Food Service Equipment dealers and dozens of<br />

other distributor markets,” says DDI System’s<br />

CEO Adam Waller.<br />

Greene’s prior experience includes<br />

Vice President of Business Development at<br />

AutoQuotes, where he assisted in sales, product<br />

development and implementation of the leading<br />

quoting software for Foodservice Equipment and<br />

Commercial Kitchen Design.<br />

DDI System serves over 1,200 distributors<br />

in North America, providing industry-aware<br />

ERP and eCommerce software and services to<br />

wholesalers. DDI’s leading Inform ERP platform<br />

combines operational benefits including daily<br />

operations, mobile ERP functionality, warehouse<br />

management, CRM, connected eCommerce,<br />

detailed analytics, and financial reporting.<br />

For more information conact DDI System by<br />

Tel: 1-877-599-4334, email: sales@ddisys.com or<br />

online at www.ddisystem.com.


86<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

GLOBALFASTENERNEWS.COM<br />

by JOHN WOLZ EDITOR<br />

editor@globalfastenernews.com<br />

PAC-WEST / SFA PANELISTS:<br />

SHORTAGES WILL CONTINUE<br />

“‘Just in time’ is dead,” panelist Tim Roberto<br />

declared as three panelists agreed shortages and a<br />

strong market will continue well into <strong>2022</strong>.<br />

“Relief will not be until 2023, at best,” panelist<br />

Danielle Riggs told the joint conference of the<br />

Southwestern Fastener Association and Pacific-West<br />

Fastener Association. “All signs are that the market is<br />

strong,” Mike Bailey finds. All three panelists emphasized<br />

“partnerships” as important in the current market.<br />

Who will gain? Long-term good customers who have<br />

developed partnerships with suppliers.<br />

Who will suppliers ignore? Those past customers<br />

who bought only now and then when they could get a<br />

cheap price.<br />

Nucor, a domestic manufacturer, finds that with<br />

“imports strained,” customers are looking outside<br />

traditional suppliers.”<br />

Domestic capacity is growing, added Bailey – who<br />

has been with Nucor Fastener for 18 years. Nucor just<br />

acquired an existing state-of-the-art coil processing<br />

facility in Shelbyville, IN, where four new National Bolt<br />

Headers will be installed and begin operating in <strong>2022</strong>.<br />

Supply chain problems are across the industry,<br />

Bailey pointed out. That starts with raw material.<br />

“Vendor /supplier partnerships will remain critical,”<br />

Bailey emphasized. Bailey said being a supplier has<br />

been difficult: “I don’t like not having anything to sell.”<br />

What Nucor does sell will focus on what customers<br />

need most, Bailey said.<br />

Nucor Fastener is able to buy steel from Nucor and<br />

the fastener division has increased its steel purchasing.<br />

Nucor wants to “strengthen our place as the domestic<br />

lead for fasteners.” Bailey said the heavy truck and<br />

non-residential construction industries have been strong<br />

for Nucor. He added that infrastruture is strong as is<br />

and may be more important as pending legislation “is<br />

mentioned in every newscast,” Bailey observed.<br />

Roberto, president of Star Stainless Screw, pointed<br />

to a weaker U.S. dollar plus nickel rising 30% and copper<br />

40% for stainless steel fastener price increases. He<br />

finds sea freight averages five times as expensive.<br />

The price jumps follow six years of “relative qualm”<br />

for nickel, Roberto observed. The five-year average price<br />

for nickel has been $6.09 per pound and the 20-year<br />

price $7.31. Recently it topped $9. Copper averaged<br />

$2.64 a pound over the past five years and the 20-year<br />

average is $2.96. It has reached $4.30.<br />

There is little price negotiating going on, Roberto<br />

said. There are a limited number of wire mills and “what<br />

the wire mill quotes you are stuck with it.”<br />

Danielle Riggs, managing director of Würth Logistics,<br />

summarized the current supply chain situation as a<br />

“train wreck.” For 2021 transportation rates remain<br />

high, container space constraints are a “challenge,”<br />

plus the U.S. has congestion at ports and inland has<br />

transportation shortages.<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE<br />

GLOBALFASTENERNEWS.COM


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 87


88<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

FASTENER FAIR USA CELEBRATES A SUCCESSFUL<br />

IN-PERSON EVENT IN CLEVELAND, OHIO<br />

Fastener Fair USA 2021 wrapped up its first in-person<br />

event since 2019 in Cleveland, Ohio—reuniting the<br />

industry in the leading hub for manufacturing in North<br />

America. Featuring a day-long educational program on<br />

November 8, and a productive, two-day exhibit hall on<br />

November 9 & 10—Fastener Fair USA fostered crucial<br />

business connections and sourcing opportunities for the<br />

full supply chain.<br />

Fastener Fair USA is the only exhibition in the U.S.<br />

dedicated to the full value chain – distributors, mechanical<br />

and design engineers, purchasers, wholesalers and OEMs,<br />

and for 2021, an expanded emphasis on manufacturing.<br />

Key Highlights for 2021:<br />

¤ Full-Day, Pre-Show Conference: Fastening 101<br />

Presented by Fastener Training Institute<br />

On November 8, vendors and attendees gathered in<br />

a comprehensive course presented by Fastener Training<br />

Institute—covering the basics of fastener engineering—<br />

from introduction to fastener productions, product-use,<br />

market value, business implementation, and more.<br />

¤ Exhibit Hall with Leading Suppliers<br />

The Fastener Fair USA exhibit hall welcomed leading<br />

and new vendors to the show floor specializing in<br />

manufacturing equipment, finished goods, fastener<br />

supplies, technology, services, and more.<br />

¤ Expert Knowledge<br />

The show floor featured a session from Industrial<br />

Fastener Institute and Fastener Training Institute—5<br />

Ways to Improve Quality—focusing on the importance<br />

of improving your business strategy, structure and<br />

engagement to ensure leading results. From the impact<br />

of staffing to the importance of training, Laurence Claus<br />

from Industrial Fastener Institute walked viewers through<br />

the future of business efficiencies.<br />

¤ Networking Happy Hours at the Fastener Fair USA<br />

Happy Hour on the show floor, featuring exhibitorled<br />

band, Radiate Live and reunion at the Punch Bowl<br />

Social, hosted by the North Coast Fastener Association.<br />

SHOW EVENT ARTICLE<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 142


FASTENER FAIR USA<br />

CLEVELAND, OH - NOVEMBER 8-10, 2021<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 109


90<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

RAMCO SPECIALTIES INC.<br />

5445 Hudson Industrial Parkway, Hudson, OH 44236<br />

TEL 330-653-5135 EMAIL info@ramconut.com WEB www.ramconut.com<br />

RAMCO EXPANDS PRODUCTION CAPACITY IN MICHIGAN<br />

Ramco Specialties continues to make significant<br />

investments in its Michigan facility. The company has<br />

purchased a third building, adjacent to its two existing<br />

buildings. The addition provides 10,000 square feet of<br />

production space, creating a total of 45,000 square feet in<br />

Ramco’s Michigan location.<br />

The expansion is a part of Ramco’s ongoing goal of<br />

increasing production in the United States. With the national<br />

supply chain problems and lack of timely delivery created<br />

by international trade, Ramco has made a commitment to<br />

help alleviate these issues by boosting its manufacturing<br />

capacity and ability to get product to market quicker.<br />

This addition to its Michigan production space will<br />

continue to bolster turnaround time of machining and all<br />

turned products. New machinery will be added to the third<br />

building to support growth in CNC mill and lathe production,<br />

screw machine capabilities and grinding requests. Ramco<br />

Michigan will continue to focus on its expertise in machining<br />

for precision applications, particularly for the automotive<br />

and aerospace industries.<br />

“Ramco is always interested in providing solutions.<br />

The difficulty facing so many US manufacturers to be<br />

able to source product is a serious economic issue.<br />

Our company is well positioned to improve the quantity,<br />

quality and speed for filling the manufacturing pipeline,”<br />

said Jeff Melick, Director of Sales Marketing at Ramco<br />

Specialties.<br />

Ramco Michigan can machine a variety of materials,<br />

including multiple grades of aluminum, stainless steel, cast<br />

iron, copper, brass, bronze and nylon. Common applications<br />

include hydraulic couplings, adapters with O-ring and<br />

screens, quick disconnects, spark plugs, compression<br />

tubes, fittings, plugs with assembled magnets, bushings,<br />

drive and pop shafts, nozzles, and shear pins.<br />

Ramco Michigan is certified for IATF 16949:2016 and<br />

AS9100D. In addition to IATF 16949:2016, Ramco Ohio<br />

and Europe are also certified for ISO-14001:2015 and ISO<br />

9001:2015. With engineering support and manufacturing<br />

capability, the company is ready and able to support the<br />

Tier 1 automotive market.<br />

BUSINESS FOCUS ARTICLE<br />

RAMCO SPECIALTIES INC.<br />

NORTH COAST FASTENER ASSOCIATION<br />

7737 Ellington Place, Mentor, OH 44060 TEL 440-975-9503 TEL 440-350-1676 EMAIL lgraham@ncfaonline.com WEB www.ncfaonline.com<br />

NCFA SCREW OPEN A SUCCESS! by Dave Audia, President<br />

The 2021 NCFA Screw Open returned to Valleaire<br />

Golf Club on Thursday, September 9th and the event was<br />

once again a great success. The early fall weather was<br />

perfect for the 70 golfers that spent the afternoon helping<br />

to raise money for the NCFA Scholarship Program. The<br />

refreshments were ice cold and the Winking Lizard once<br />

again provided both a delicious lunch and dinner for all.<br />

This year the team from American Ring won the<br />

scramble format event earning a cash prize of $200<br />

for their efforts. Second place went to the Solution<br />

Industries team.<br />

All golfers enjoyed various skill shot competitions for<br />

cash prizes throughout the round as well. Bill Armstrong<br />

and Robb Nardy each took home $100 for sticking their<br />

shots closest to the pin. Jackie Ventura and Michael<br />

ASSOCIATION ARTICLE<br />

Morrissey muscled up to take home $100 each for the<br />

longest drive competitions.<br />

A special shout out again this year to our beer cart<br />

teams – Kim Arnold & Krista Osborne from Brighton Best<br />

kept the teams well hydrated throughout the event as<br />

did fellow board members Kurt Triptow and Frank Devito.<br />

Brighton Best donated a great prize of tools that was won<br />

by Tyler Davis of Dunham Products.<br />

The NCFA would like to thank all of our sponsors<br />

this year who were once again acknowledged with signs<br />

throughout the course– we truly would not be able to do<br />

this without all of you. And of course a big thanks to all<br />

who participated in this event. All proceeds will benefit<br />

the NCFA scholarship program so we again say:<br />

Thanks to all!<br />

NORTH COAST FASTENER ASSOCIATION


92<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

ROB LaPOINTE HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT TESTING ON INTERNALLY THREADED PRODUCTS - ARE YOU NUTS? from page 8<br />

IHE failure has been well characterized in research<br />

studies over the last 60 years or so. There are many<br />

phenomena that can contribute to IHE. An IHE failure could<br />

involve one or more of these contributors. Although it is<br />

difficult to pin down exactly what mechanisms will contribute<br />

to a failure, it is well understood that, in the broader scope,<br />

the failure requires these principal components.<br />

[1] The material must harbor free hydrogen that is able<br />

to migrate through the crystal structure of the metal.<br />

[2] The material must be susceptible to becoming<br />

embrittled by hydrogen and be of sufficient hardness.<br />

[3] There must a sufficient tensile stress on or in<br />

the material.<br />

If these three conditions are met, a fracture will occur<br />

in the time it takes for the action of hydrogen to migrate<br />

and concentrate in the material. Figure 3 illustrates the<br />

list above and the possible triggers that lead to failures.<br />

For internal hydrogen embrittlement, the trigger is the<br />

addition of stress since the hydrogen is already present<br />

from a source related to manufacturing or processing.<br />

External hydrogen embrittlement typically is triggered<br />

by the addition of hydrogen from the environment since<br />

a mechanical stress has already been placed on the<br />

material in its service state.<br />

In a bolted joint, mechanical stress is applied to an<br />

externally threaded fasteners in a significantly different<br />

way than to an internally threaded fastener. Although both<br />

internally and externally threaded fasteners experience<br />

compression and tension loads when tightened, only<br />

externally threaded fasteners experience large-scale<br />

tensile forces during loading. Figure 4 illustrates a bolted<br />

joint. Notice that when a bolt and nut are tightened, the<br />

bolt experiences a large-scale tension or tensile load<br />

caused by stretching the bolt material between the head<br />

of the bolt and the nut, which asks like a moveable head<br />

on the other end of the joint. The atomic structures that<br />

make up the metal (atoms and molecules) are bonded<br />

together electrically through the electrical properties<br />

of the atom’s protons and electrons. This electrical<br />

attraction is analogous to magnetic attraction, which<br />

you’ve undoubtedly experienced by placing a magnet<br />

near an iron-based surface such as a refrigerator or<br />

near another magnet. Electrical force between positively<br />

charged ions (a charged atom) and negatively charged<br />

ions or electrons is attractive in the same way as a<br />

magnet is attracted to steel or another magnet. This is the<br />

force that gives metal its solidity and strength. In Figure 5,<br />

we see free electrons attracting positive metallic ions to<br />

hold the structure together. If we apply a tensile force to<br />

this structure, it will stretch, enlarging the spaces between<br />

ions. When the ions are stretched apart, electrical forces<br />

counteract the stretch to return the structure to its original<br />

shape. This restoring force gives metal its elastic features<br />

that enable a bolted joint to achieve a clamp load and stay<br />

tight when wiggled.<br />

FIGURE 3 - VENN DIAGRAM SHOWING THE THREE NECESSARY<br />

COMPONENTS REQUIRED FOR HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT FAILURES.<br />

FIGURE 4 - A BOLTED JOINT ILLUSTRATING A TENSILE LOAD ON THE<br />

EXTERNALLY THREADED FASTENER.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 146


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 93


94<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

CHRIS DONNELL IT’S A MAD, MAD, TRANSPORTATION WORLD from page 10<br />

On the surface, it would seem that the announcement<br />

of these fees is having a positive affect however hidden<br />

below them resides some troublesome issues. At first,<br />

there is a negative domino effect in play: the use of<br />

equipment. By forcing the hand of the cargo owner to<br />

move the containers from the port, it’s putting a massive<br />

strain on equipment, from trucks, to drivers and chassis.<br />

Right now, chassis, especially for 20ft containers, are in<br />

extremely limited supply. Couple that with the terminals<br />

limiting the return of empty containers due to space<br />

issues, it’s causing issues that can potentially increase<br />

the dwell times, thus making is easier for the terminals<br />

to enforce the fees onto the cargo owner.<br />

Another issue we are facing due to terminal<br />

congestion is the quick turnover of vessels being<br />

unloaded. With more than 90 cargo vessels sitting off<br />

the coast in both ports, they are working vessels faster<br />

than ever, often without loading empty or export cargo.<br />

As I write this article, there are more then 70,000 empty<br />

containers sitting at the terminals; containers which<br />

should be returned back to the origin to be used again.<br />

This is not just an isolated issue for Los Angeles. Failure<br />

to return the empty containers is causing an equipment<br />

shortage overseas and increasing the number of blank<br />

sailings with the carriers. These issues are allowing the<br />

ocean carriers, terminals, and trucking companies to<br />

keep transportation costs elevated. Dare I say ocean<br />

carriers to the rescue? Today, due to the massive<br />

amounts of empty containers sitting at our nation’s<br />

ports, ocean carriers have activated a fleet of “rescue”<br />

vessels which have the sole purpose of sailing to our<br />

ports empty and collecting these empty containers,<br />

thus giving the ports more space to accept returned<br />

containers and freeing up previously used chassis.<br />

Unfortunately, these added costs to the ocean carriers<br />

will be passed to the cargo owners by way of continued<br />

high ocean costs - but it should decrease congestion and<br />

speed up the already strained supply chain.<br />

Several other issues will ring in with the new<br />

year. Two of them are the Chinese Lunar New Year<br />

Festival (CNY) and the Beijing Winter Olympics. The<br />

CNY festival takes place every year and it happens<br />

to be the world’s largest human migration where<br />

the entire Chinese population goes on holiday and<br />

manufacturing stops. Exports start to ramp up about a<br />

month prior to this (January 31st to February 6th) but<br />

this year it also coincides with the Winter Olympics. For<br />

those that remember the 2008 Summer Olympics, the<br />

Chinese government implemented stringent controls<br />

in manufacturing to curb pollution and esthetics of the<br />

local areas hosting the games and this was done months<br />

before the games took place. It is no different this time<br />

and importers should expect the same.<br />

These events, coupled with the current manufacturing<br />

issues caused by the lack of fossil fuels throughout<br />

China, will have a dramatic impact on manufacturing<br />

and shipping from this region. While we had seen a<br />

steady drop in imports from China since mid-October,<br />

we have already seen the number of bookings increase<br />

for the final 3 weeks of 2021 and a sharp increase in<br />

those bookings leading up to the 1st week of February<br />

<strong>2022</strong>. Import rates did take a tumble in late October,<br />

especially for those port-to-port moves; however, we are<br />

predicting rates will start to climb in late December and<br />

early January. They should remain at near record highs<br />

until mid-March <strong>2022</strong> when we expect to see them take<br />

another downward turn.<br />

I also need to mention air freight. Since early<br />

November we’ve seen air freight climb in excess of 30%<br />

and more than 60% compared to the same time last<br />

year. This is due in large part to importers scrambling to<br />

get cargo moved before the holiday season. Importers<br />

should expect air rates to remain elevated until we get<br />

through CNY.<br />

One situation we are keeping a close eye on is the<br />

buying surge. Will it continue at its current blistering pace<br />

or advance as importers desperately try to replenish<br />

stock after the holidays?<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 148


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 95<br />

The National Fastener Distributors<br />

Association is now accepting nominations for its<br />

2021 Fastener Professional of The Year Award. The<br />

Fastener Professional of the Year award was created<br />

by NFDA to honor individuals and companies that<br />

make a substantial positive impact on people’s lives.<br />

The award recognizes individuals from a fastener<br />

distributor or supplier company who make exceptional<br />

contributions to their companies and to the industry,<br />

as well as, partners or consultants who demonstrate<br />

exemplary support of the fastener industry<br />

Membership in NFDA is not a requirement to<br />

be selected for the Fastener Professional of the<br />

Year award. Self-nominations are acceptable, or<br />

nominations can be submitted by others.<br />

The deadline to nominate someone for the 2021<br />

award is February 19, 2021.<br />

For more information, go to www.nfda-fastener.org/<br />

fastener-professional-of-the-year.


96<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

BRUNO MARBACHER DRIVING SYSTEMS FOR FASTENERS – EXTERNAL DRIVES from page 12<br />

¤ Fasteners with square drives require simple<br />

wrenches so they can be assembled just about anywhere.<br />

¤ Repeated tightening is typically possible; however,<br />

off-angle tightening is possible with an open-end or<br />

adjustable wrench only.<br />

Other critical features do not apply or are not<br />

prominent.<br />

External Hex<br />

Hexagon drives commonly called hex are six-sided.<br />

The fastener itself is called hex head cap screw or hex<br />

bolt. It can be turned with an open or close end wrench,<br />

adjustable wrench, and 6 or 12-point sockets.<br />

Features & Concerns: The hex head cap screws are<br />

furnished with a thick, hexagonal head with a washer face<br />

under the head, to provide a sufficient bearing surface.<br />

The washer face is needed to provide uniform friction<br />

conditions. Hex head are not 100 % perpendicular to<br />

the shank, without a washer face a given corner could<br />

dig into the material of the clamped parts. Instead of a<br />

washer face, they may be furnished with a flange that<br />

too would offer consistent tightening. Nuts as well as<br />

some hex heads can be provided with a chamfer that too<br />

ensure smooth tightening.<br />

¤ Hex heads need more clearance between screws<br />

and walls and between individual screws.<br />

¤ The socket or wrenches can typically only be<br />

engaged when not rotating, there are special sockets<br />

that makes it possible to insert the socket while the<br />

screw is rotating.<br />

¤ Screws with hex drives can be assembled just about<br />

anywhere.<br />

¤ They offer a great a stick fit characteristic. A<br />

magnetized socket can improve stick fit.<br />

¤ This drive has a poor off-angle capability. Open end<br />

wrench can be applied off angle.<br />

¤ This drive can be reused serval times. The corners<br />

may be rounded during tightening and loosening.<br />

Other critical features do not apply or are not<br />

prominent.<br />

Pentagon Drive<br />

A pentagon screw drive uses five-sided fastener<br />

heads, and the fastener is known as a penta screw<br />

or penta bolt. Since five is an odd number, it cannot<br />

be turned by open-end, adjustable wrenches or typical<br />

sockets.<br />

Features & Concerns: They are designed to be<br />

incompatible with common wrenches, can only be spun<br />

by specialized five-sided socket drivers. However, the<br />

security feature of this design can be bypassed by using<br />

some type of pliers provided enough force is applied.<br />

¤ Due to the difficulty of turning these fasteners<br />

without specialized five-point wrenches such as hydrant<br />

wrenches, they are commonly used for tamper resistance<br />

by public utilities on water meter covers, natural gas<br />

valves, electrical cabinets, and fire hydrants.<br />

¤ Applications include Manhole Covers, Waterworks,<br />

Valve Boxes, Meter Box, Ground Vaults, Polymer<br />

Concrete Enclosures & various municipal electrical<br />

junction boxes… and much more<br />

¤ They essentially have a good stick fit characteristic.<br />

Typically, not a big concern for this type of screw.<br />

¤ This drive has a poor off-angle capability.<br />

¤ This drive can be reused serval times.<br />

Other critical features do not apply or are not<br />

prominent.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 150


98<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

GUY AVELLON WHAT FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT STRESS FAILURES from page 14<br />

Stress corrosion cracking may also be found<br />

around elevated temperature applications, such as heat<br />

exchangers. Heat and some gasses will cause SCC on<br />

many steels.<br />

Austenitic stainless steels are quite susceptible to<br />

chloride SCC. As an example, a water park used type<br />

304 fasteners for assembly of the rides and base water<br />

containers. The fasteners failed from chloride SCC due<br />

to the chlorine added to the water for health safety. The<br />

fasteners had residual stresses from cold working when<br />

the wire was cold drawn and formed. The solution was to<br />

use type 316 stainless steel.<br />

Hydrogen Embrittlement<br />

Hydrogen embrittlement (HEMB), or hydrogen<br />

assisted cracking, is where the presence of ionic<br />

hydrogen makes a steel brittle and susceptible to<br />

subcritical crack growth under stress. Typically, this<br />

affects high strength steels and alloy steels whose<br />

hardness exceeds 36 Rc and material strength is 150<br />

ksi and greater.<br />

Hydrogen may be absorbed into a fastener from<br />

chemical processing the steel and by welding steel with<br />

electrodes that may contain moisture. Typical chemical<br />

processing methods include caustic cleaning, pickling,<br />

phosphating and during electroplating with the chromic<br />

acid post treatments.<br />

All of these chemical processes generate hydrogen<br />

in their chemical reaction, which makes HEMB a cathodic<br />

cracking mechanism. Decades ago, cyanide zinc and<br />

cadmium plating were replaced with more highly efficient<br />

acid or alkaline plating solutions which reduced the<br />

evolution of hydrogen from the work surface. However,<br />

baking is still recommended for high strength alloys.<br />

For hydrogen damage to occur, the fastener must<br />

be tensioned. Fractures occurring during installation<br />

tightening are not due to HEMB. Depending upon the<br />

amount of hydrogen absorption, material hardness and<br />

tensile loading, the threshold stress intensity increases<br />

the crack growth velocity of the hydrogen as it diffuses<br />

through the grain boundaries to ultimate fracture within<br />

24 hours.<br />

Fastener fractures will generally occur at the fillet, or<br />

junction of the fastener head and body. This is the area<br />

of the greatest single stress concentration. Cracks which<br />

originate at the thread roots are generally the result of<br />

metal fatigue, but when subjected to tensile stresses of<br />

a static or inherent nature while in contact with a mildly<br />

corrosive solution, hydrogen is generated and cracking<br />

begins at the grain boundaries.<br />

Sulfide stress cracking is another form of HEMB.<br />

This type of failure is predominately associated with oil<br />

and gas pipelines.<br />

Liquid Metal Embrittlement<br />

Liquid metal embrittlement (LME), or solid metal<br />

embrittlement, is when one of the metals is brought<br />

close to its melting point, under stress, at high operating<br />

temperatures. With some metals, it may be time<br />

dependent at lower temperatures. The greater the<br />

stresses the less time it will take for crack nucleation<br />

and propagation.<br />

Cadmium plated metal locking nuts (Class B and C)<br />

are very susceptible to elevated temperatures. Though<br />

the cadmium plating has been banned by the EPA and<br />

RoHS, the military still uses cadmium plating as well as<br />

some imported products. Since zinc and cadmium both<br />

appear silver in color, it was traditional to apply a yellow<br />

dichromate post treatment to the cadmium plated parts<br />

to distinguish the two.<br />

The problem with the cadmium plated lock nuts is<br />

that when exposed to elevated temperatures in excess<br />

of 400˚ F (204˚ C) the cadmium diffuses into the<br />

grain boundaries of the steel to cause intergranular<br />

cracking, even though the melting point of cadmium<br />

is 610˚ F (321˚ C). The fracture may initiate with<br />

either the bolt or the nut. In some cases, both may<br />

experience fractures.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 152


INTERNATIONAL FASTENER EXPO - WELCOME RECEPTION<br />

MANDALAY BAY, LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 21, 2021<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 176


100<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

LARRY BOROWSKI GAGING SYSTEMS - PART 1: SYSTEM 21 from page 24<br />

There are various “standard” methods of defining a<br />

gaging system on prints, procurement documents, or<br />

purchase orders. Some examples are:<br />

¤ A general note somewhere on the documentation.<br />

For example “Acceptability of screw threads shown on<br />

this drawing shall be determined based on System 21,<br />

ASME B1.3”<br />

¤ The designation can be part of the thread<br />

description. For example, “¼-20 UNC-2A(21)”, where<br />

the “(21)” indicates System 21 inspection.<br />

¤ There are also cases where you may want a<br />

standard System 21 inspection, but you also want<br />

additional features like flank angle. In this case, you<br />

would use an “S” after the gaging system number and<br />

go onto define the extra features. For example, “¼-20<br />

UNC-2A(21S): Flank Angle.”<br />

According to ASME B1.3 – 2007, section 4(1): System<br />

21 provides for interchangeable assembly with functional<br />

size inspection/evaluation at the maximum material limit<br />

within the length of the standard gaging elements, and<br />

also inspection/evaluation of characteristics identified<br />

as NOTGO functional diameter or as HI (internal) and<br />

LO (external) functional diameters. The easy way to<br />

remember this is that System 21 only requires the use<br />

of fixed limit gaging, i.e. Pass/Fail or Go/NoGo gages.<br />

The nice thing about the gaging systems is that<br />

acceptability is backward qualifying. By this I mean<br />

that if a product thread is acceptable using higher level<br />

inspections like System 22 or System 23 methods, then<br />

it automatically qualifies the product to meet System<br />

21 requirements even though you did not use Go/NoGo<br />

gaging. For example if you are inspecting a nut per<br />

System 21 and you have the Go/NoGo work plug, but you<br />

don’t have the Go/NoGo minor diameter plug, there are<br />

options. If you have an ID mic, you can use the ID mic to<br />

qualify the minor diameter to System 21. Let’s get into<br />

the particulars now, and discuss the characteristics and<br />

appropriate gaging to be used.<br />

External Threads, ASME B1.3 - 2007 Table 3<br />

In this table you will find that System 21 requires the<br />

following features to be checked. Under each feature the<br />

acceptable gages are summarized. These acceptable<br />

gages are detailed in table 1 of the standard.<br />

GO Maximum Material<br />

¤ Go threaded ring gage, split or solid.<br />

¤ Go Rolls or Segments for Thread Snap Gages.<br />

¤ Rolls or Segments for indicating gages with either<br />

120 or 180 degree contact points.<br />

Note: You are evaluating the Maximum Functional Diameter<br />

using either a Go ring gage or variable type gage that<br />

will actually provide you with a Functional Pitch Diameter<br />

reading. Functional diameter meaning that you are<br />

evaluating a group of threads all at the same time including<br />

individual elements such as flank angle, lead, taper, etc.<br />

NOT GO Functional Diameter<br />

¤ Not Go Threaded ring gage, split or solid.<br />

¤ Not Go Rolls or Segments for Thread Snap Gages.<br />

¤ Rolls or Segments for indicating gages with either<br />

120 or 180 degree contact points.<br />

¤ Pitch Micrometer with Modified Contacts<br />

(approximately pitch diameter contact) Cone and Vee.<br />

Note: You are evaluating the Minimum Functional Diameter<br />

using either a NoGo ring gage or variable type gage that<br />

will provide you with a Functional Pitch Diameter reading.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 154


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 101


102<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

COMPUTER INSIGHTS INC. FIVE SIGNS IT IS TIME TO CHANGE SOFTWARE from page 26<br />

You should not have to explain your business to your<br />

software provider. A one-size-fits-all solution does not<br />

address the nuances of your business, and that causes<br />

confusion and delays. The people at Computer Insights<br />

have decades of experience with the fastener industry.<br />

When you call Computer Insights, you do not have to learn<br />

how to talk to “computer” people. They know the language<br />

common to the fastener and industrial supply distributors.<br />

They understand what you are trying to accomplish.<br />

[3] Lacking Access To Information<br />

If your system does not store the information you<br />

need to make crucial business decisions, you cannot live<br />

up to your potential. It is almost worse when you know<br />

that the data is in your system somewhere, but it is nearly<br />

impossible to retrieve when and how you need it.<br />

Your customers expect instant gratification. Everyone<br />

involved will quickly become frustrated if your people<br />

cannot immediately answer any question because the<br />

information is not readily available.<br />

The Business Edge TM<br />

by Computer Insights has<br />

intuitive, interactive, user-modifiable screens. All of the<br />

information you need is where you need it when you need<br />

it. Information you don’t need can be hidden by unchecking<br />

a box. The Business Edge TM has thousands of combinations<br />

of existing customizable inquiries and reports. If you want<br />

to do something more, a single click of a button will create<br />

a spreadsheet out of any piece of data in the system.<br />

The Business Edge TM<br />

offers a suite of RESTful APIs for<br />

more complex projects. No one makes getting data out of<br />

a system easier than The Business Edge. TM<br />

[4] Limited Or Non-Existent Automation Options<br />

Your software should know how you want to run your<br />

company. Any extra steps or double entry is holding you<br />

back. You risk making mistakes and upsetting people if<br />

your system is not validating things as you work.<br />

The Business Edge TM offers dozens of ways to automate<br />

your processes. Automatic Replenishment System (ARS),<br />

Wireless Warehouse, Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI),<br />

Automated Direct-Shipments and Reservations, Automated<br />

Surcharges, and Vending Machine Order Replenishment.<br />

Data entry validation throughout the system as you<br />

work. Eliminate double entry and ensure accuracy with<br />

Avalara Sales Tax Calculations & Address Validation,<br />

ShipEngine Integration, Fastener Supply Chain Connections<br />

(Brighton-Best International, Kanebridge, Lindstrom,<br />

Stelfast, and XL Screw Corporation).<br />

[5] Missing Key Features Unique To Your Industry<br />

When your software provider is not focused on<br />

your industry, many things that seem normal to you are<br />

frequently overlooked or not handled properly.<br />

Since 1996, Computer Insights has worked closely<br />

with people from hundreds of fastener and industrial<br />

distributors. The Business Edge TM<br />

evolved and continues<br />

to evolve by listening to business owners, office workers,<br />

warehouse people, and master distributors.<br />

The Business Edge TM<br />

can help you manage what is<br />

required for you to be productive and successful. Things<br />

like Raw Cost vs. Landed Cost, complex customer<br />

pricing, alternate part numbers, and much more come<br />

standard.<br />

What People Are Saying<br />

“Having a partner like Computer Insights has been<br />

critical to our success. As our company grows, so does<br />

our need for technology and consequential integrations.<br />

As the pressure for efficiency builds in the American<br />

economy, we are forced to find new ways to automate.<br />

The pace of business is moving faster every day, and<br />

to keep up, we must automate. Without the right ERP<br />

provider, this can be extremely frustrating.”<br />

Joseph Stephens, CEO, Motor City Industrial<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 156


104<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

ROBERT FOOTLIK OPTIMIZING VERY NARROW AISLES from page 30<br />

Regardless of whether the VNA equipment is manual<br />

or automated horizontal travel need to be limited for<br />

overall efficiency. Man-up forklifts with a driver position<br />

on the mast have an additional limitation. At the forks<br />

rise the speed slows and most vehicles will turn off the<br />

drive motors above 12’ of lift. Therefore, vertical family<br />

grouping beats spreading related inventory horizontally.<br />

Conversely, totally random storage is always a losing<br />

proposition.<br />

High lifting, man-up swing reach forklifts cost over<br />

$100,000 each, then add another $20,000 for controls<br />

and actuators. Even on the used market a decent<br />

vehicles will cost two or three times as much as a narrow<br />

aisle reach truck. Automated equipment can cost well<br />

over $500,000/aisle. Having this equipment sitting idle<br />

or operating sub-optimally isn’t a viable option. This<br />

leads to grouping the inventory into the smallest and<br />

tightest configuration, which leads to only one vehicle<br />

in an aisle at one time. VNA, by definition means no<br />

passing in either direction and this limitation means<br />

that every aisle is a “main line track.” Waiting time is<br />

expensive.<br />

Physical Considerations<br />

Very few rental or “spec” buildings are designed for<br />

VNA operation. More lighting runs are required to meet<br />

minimal OSHA requirements of 25 foot-candles at eye<br />

level while standing on the floor. Today light fixtures<br />

would be for Light Emitting Diode (LED) lamps, ideally<br />

with occupancy sensors on every fixture, not the row.<br />

Retrofitting these in an existing building may require<br />

extensive relocations of conduit piping and existing<br />

circuitry. Fortunately LEDs require far less power and the<br />

energy saving will normally provide an excellent Return<br />

on Investment (RoI).<br />

Floors are measured in terms of both level and<br />

flatness. Think of this in terms of your desk. Obviously<br />

it is flat, but if it isn’t level pencils roll off any your<br />

coffee spills. Without getting into the esoteric technical<br />

details, the floor specifications can dictate the system<br />

limitations. Even ¼” deviation across a 4’ aisle will<br />

cause significant leaning 30’ in the air. Shimming the<br />

racks will help compensate, but cannot cure a poorly<br />

poured slab. Spilling a bucket of water can provide a<br />

rough indication of the floor quality.<br />

Often neglected are considerations of floor to ceiling<br />

temperature variations. Without sufficient air flow as<br />

hot air rises it can be trapped at the ceiling level and<br />

create temperature 20 to 30 degrees higher than at<br />

the floor level. Common individual unit heaters with<br />

relatively small fans may have to be supplemented with<br />

multiple large diameter, slow turning ceiling fans. A<br />

better alternative is a heating system that is floor or roof<br />

mounted with high airflows to turn and mix the air and<br />

eliminate stratification.<br />

For man-up systems a fan directed at the operator<br />

may help, but once the temperatures exceed about 92<br />

degrees the body will no longer reject excess heat and<br />

working becomes both physically taxing and dangerous.<br />

Discovering and recovering an operator who has feinted<br />

due to heat exhaustion can be a major consideration.<br />

As mentioned earlier, an ESFR sprinkler system is a<br />

vital component of a VNA installation, but it is possible to<br />

operate in a totally unprotected building. Your insurance<br />

carrier and OSHA may have valuable input that should<br />

be tapped. Even if an ESFR system exists, periodic flow<br />

testing is normally both an insurance and fire department<br />

requirement. Take a look at the test results and if<br />

necessary hire a professional or meet with the local Fire<br />

Marshall to review whether there is enough water to deal<br />

with what will be stored. Obviously plastic fasteners are<br />

more flammable than steel or brass products, but both<br />

come in cardboard boxes on wood pallets, wrapped in<br />

water resistive plastic wrap. The basic premise of any<br />

sprinkler system is that it will wet the goods and limit<br />

the spread of a fire. ESFR systems are designed to put<br />

out the fire. VNA limits water penetration and this may<br />

present unacceptable risk.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 158


106<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

JOE DYSART FREE SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING TOOLS: CHOICE PICKS FOR FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS from page 32<br />

Bottom line: At the price of free, it really does make<br />

sense to check-out one or more of these social media<br />

marketing tools to get a feel for everything these tools<br />

have to offer -- and how they can substantially enhance your<br />

social media marketing efforts.<br />

Here’s a representative sampling of some of the best<br />

social media marketing tools that are a great fit for fastener<br />

distributors -- all available for a song:<br />

¤ AgoraPulse (www.agorapulse.com/pricing)<br />

AgouraPulse offers 40 free scheduled posts-per-month -- as<br />

well as a content calendar to ensure that managing your<br />

social media marketing is a<br />

snap. You can auto-post to<br />

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram,<br />

LinkedIn, and YouTube on<br />

AgoraPlulse -- all from one<br />

dashboard. You’ll also be<br />

able to use AgoraPulse’s<br />

onboard analytics to assess<br />

if your social media posts are<br />

resulting in more traffic to your<br />

site. You can assess social<br />

media sentiment about your<br />

company’s name and your<br />

company’s online reputation.<br />

Power users will appreciate<br />

AgoraPulse’s ability to create<br />

custom reports, which will<br />

track just the things you’re<br />

looking to monitor.<br />

¤ Buffer (www.buffer.<br />

com/pricing) Buffer enables<br />

you to schedule up to ten<br />

posts per social media<br />

channel each month. And you’ll be able to post to up to<br />

three social media channels -- bringing your total scheduled<br />

free posts-per-month to 30.<br />

Posting to Facebook, Instagram,Twitter, LinkedIn, and<br />

Pinterest are all supported. And you can tweak Buffer to<br />

schedule your posts when your audience happens to be<br />

most active on a specific social media site -- say 9 a.m.<br />

Eastern Standard Time for your customers on LinkedIn.<br />

Plus, Buffer will even alert you when the posts you schedule<br />

go live. Its dashboard is spare by design -- and easy to use.<br />

¤ Crowdfire (www.crowdfireapp.com/pricing-page)<br />

Crowdfire replicates Buffer’s free plan: Fastener distributors<br />

can schedule up to ten posts per social media channel<br />

each month. And you’re able to post to up to three social<br />

CROWDFIRE IS GREAT FOR FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS LOOKING<br />

TO DO A LOT OF POSTING ON TWITTER -- IT AUTO-RECOMMENDS<br />

HASHTAGS FOR YOUR TWITTER CONTENT<br />

MOST FREE SOCIAL MEDIA TOOLS ALSO OFFER FREE ANALYTICS<br />

media channels -- bringing your total free scheduled postsper-month<br />

to 30. Numerous social media platforms are<br />

available for posting, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn,<br />

Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest, Etsy, Shopify, Medium,<br />

500px, Vimeo -- and a number of others.<br />

Crowdfire will also recommend hashtags that will most<br />

likely work for you when you’re posting to social media.<br />

That will be a major plus when you’re posting to Twitter. The<br />

solution will display previews of your posts for your approval<br />

before scheduling them for live publishing. Yet another<br />

bonus: Crowdfire also offers a curation feature. That which<br />

enables you to capture articles<br />

from thousands of sources,<br />

offer article summaries, and<br />

then post those summaries<br />

and links to those articles as<br />

a way to supply an unending<br />

supply of content to your<br />

customers on social media.<br />

¤ Later (www.later.com/<br />

pricing) Fastener distributors<br />

looking for volume in their<br />

posting will also like Later,<br />

which allows you to freely post<br />

up to 30 posts-per-month,<br />

using one social identity.<br />

Supported social media<br />

networks are Instagram,<br />

Facebook, Twitter, Tiktok,<br />

LinkedIn, and Pinterest. The<br />

solution also comes with easy<br />

access to high quality stock<br />

images you can use in your<br />

posts.<br />

¤ Friends Plus Me (www.friendsplus.me/pricing) This<br />

social media tool offers an interesting twist on free usage:<br />

You can schedule up to five posts at any time, with no limit<br />

on the number of posts you schedule in any given month.<br />

Plus, you can schedule posts using up to two social<br />

network identities. Friends Plus Me offers posting to<br />

Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Tumbler.<br />

¤ Socialoomph (www.socialoomph.com/pricing)<br />

Socialoomph also enables you to post as many times as<br />

you’d like for free -- as long as you limit your posts to threeper-hour<br />

using one social network identity.<br />

Social media networks supported by the tool are<br />

Discord Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Reddit, LinkedIn,<br />

Mastodon and StockTwits.<br />

JOE DYSART


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 107


108<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

JIM TRUESDELL RETURNING BACK TO THE OFFICE - WILL IT BE DIFFERENT? from page 34<br />

Some of the old indicia of worker value seems to be<br />

due for a reappraisal. We are accustomed to applauding<br />

the idea of long working hours when perhaps that has no<br />

natural relation to productivity or value to customers. We<br />

all know people who spend and waste a large percentage<br />

of their daylight hours at their office with questionable<br />

accomplishments. On the other hand, some people are<br />

able to get in and get out with all key responsibilities<br />

fulfilled, or sales results generated. Unless the job is<br />

customer service or counter sales and support which<br />

must be available during all business hours, perhaps it’s<br />

time to adjust our perceptions and our payroll systems to<br />

reflect actual output. Maybe seniority and years on the<br />

job are no longer a key measure of employee value when<br />

systems, products and procedures are changing every<br />

year. Intimate mastering of legacy systems no longer<br />

makes a person indispensible in their company.<br />

Working from home can be handled well by some<br />

people but for others it’s a poor substitute, certainly from<br />

the employer’s perspective, but sometimes also from the<br />

viewpoint of the worker. Sometimes too many elements of<br />

the home bleed over into work. Sometimes the problem<br />

is work invading the home itself. We all have learned to<br />

accept a certain amount of disruption from dogs, cats and<br />

children, interfering and uncooperative spouses/partners,<br />

as well as substandard technology and office equipment<br />

and supply shortfalls when the employee who is servicing<br />

our account is Zooming from his or her house. There is the<br />

risk that a disorganized and messy household can detract<br />

from the trust a client places in his vendor to whom<br />

he or she is entrusting a task. We have excused this<br />

because we have seen the pandemic as a disruption we<br />

have all shared together. As the world evolves to a more<br />

permanent state we might prove less forgiving. Looking at<br />

the best interests of the home and family, some people<br />

can’t “turn it off” and get into a fully committed parent or<br />

spouse role without business constantly on their mind.<br />

These people have a much better chance of living a happy<br />

life when they can draw a firm boundary between work and<br />

personal lives which going to an office and then coming<br />

home provides.<br />

Another concern about establishing a cadre of remote<br />

or partially remote workers is that it will contribute to<br />

class division in this already fractured country. Skilled<br />

office workers and professionals will work where they<br />

will and avoid constant contact with the maintenance,<br />

manufacturing, materials handling, and physical laborers<br />

who have no choice but to show up where they toil. This<br />

division will be characterized by financial class, racial and<br />

ethnic concentrations, and resentment of the privilege<br />

enjoyed by the elite who are allowed to work from home.<br />

This might be the big unspoken negative effect of a<br />

transition to a partially remote workforce.<br />

We are going through a time when there are shortages<br />

of people to fill available jobs. Some people who have<br />

gotten used to working from remote locations are biding<br />

their time in accepting job offers that require an office<br />

presence. In fact, surveys have shown that the majority<br />

of those looking for work are seeking a position from<br />

which they can work at a distance. Unfortunately, only<br />

a tiny percentage of the available positions meet those<br />

criteria. Most are service jobs in restaurant, retail sales,<br />

equipment operation and jobs requiring human contact.<br />

Once support funding dries up for these refugees from<br />

the workplace they will have to make some hard choices<br />

about the kind of job they are willing to do.<br />

What about the impact on a person’s career<br />

satisfaction and growth? Will people miss the camaraderie<br />

and social interplay of the office? Will new and younger<br />

workers feel disconnected if they cannot find mentors,<br />

learn from seasoned workers, or impress the boss with<br />

face time? Will we all begin to lose those social skills<br />

that come from daily interaction with all the challenges<br />

involved in working face to face with other people?<br />

Remote work may be the job of choice--- but it may<br />

not help companies succeed, only perhaps to attract<br />

employees. It may not be best for the customers of a<br />

company. It may show up in polls as what large numbers<br />

of people want. But, as Mick Jagger said in the Rolling<br />

Stones’ song------“You can’t always get what you want!”<br />

JIM TRUESDELL


FASTENER FAIR USA<br />

CLEVELAND, OH - NOVEMBER 8-10, 2021<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 143


112<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

DANI FRIEDLAND CONNECTED FOR LIFE: RCSC HONORS ITS LATEST LIFE MEMBERS from page 36<br />

Larry’s outstanding work has been recognized by<br />

different engineering societies and organizations. In<br />

1982, he received the James F. Lincoln Arc Welding<br />

Foundation Merit Award for the fabrication of the<br />

University of Iowa’s Carver-Hawkeye Arena, and in 1998<br />

ASCE presented him its “Certificate of Recognition of<br />

Outstanding Service as Practitioner” in recognition of<br />

his long association with and service to the University<br />

of Minnesota’s Department of Civil Engineering. In<br />

September of 2002, AISC presented Larry with a Lifetime<br />

Achievement Award in “special recognition for many years<br />

of service to the structural design, construction, and<br />

academic communities” and, in 2004, its T.R. Higgins<br />

Lectureship Award for the best paper on structural steel<br />

design for his paper “Design of Skewed Connections.”<br />

Larry received his BS in Civil Engineering from<br />

Marquette University and became a licensed professional<br />

engineer in several states. During his professional career,<br />

he worked on many committees, including the AISC<br />

Specification Committee and the Task Committee on<br />

Connection Design, the RCSC Specification Committee,<br />

the Design Task Group of the AWS D1.1 Code Committee,<br />

the ANSI Specification Review Committees for both the<br />

Steel Joist Institute and the Steel Deck Institute, and<br />

the SEI Committee on the Design of Steel Building<br />

Structures.<br />

Thomas M. Murray,<br />

PE, NAE, PhD,<br />

Emeritus Montague-Betts<br />

Professor of Structural<br />

Steel Design, Virginia Tech<br />

It’s not a stretch to say<br />

that Tom Murray’s work has<br />

improved the safety, economy,<br />

efficiency, and predictability of<br />

every building, bridge, and other structure that has been<br />

designed or built since he began his career.<br />

Bolts were almost always a feature of Tom’s<br />

research, and he has personally created the bases upon<br />

which we have advanced the design rules for bolts in<br />

the RCSC and AISC Specifications; bolted connection<br />

design recommendations in the AISC Steel Construction<br />

Manual, AISC Seismic Design Manual, and several AISC<br />

Design Guides, including a number that bear his name<br />

as author; and many other publications and resources<br />

used every day in steel design and construction. Of<br />

particular note, Tom contributed directly to:<br />

¤ Expanded capability to use snug-tightened joints<br />

instead of pretensioned and slip-critical joints.<br />

¤ Rigorous, streamlined, and simplified design<br />

procedures for every connection provided in RCSC<br />

and AISC literature, thanks in no small part to his<br />

pioneering development of expert-system connection<br />

design software in parallel with his research.<br />

¤ The viability and usefulness of bolted moment<br />

end-plate connections for a wide variety of applications<br />

in both R=3 and high-seismic applications.<br />

¤ A steady and regular improvement of the<br />

completeness and ease of application of language in<br />

RCSC and AISC standards and publications.<br />

¤ The education of the profession and the industry<br />

through countless seminars, webinars, and workshops.<br />

Tom joined the Virginia Tech staff in 1987 after<br />

17 years at the University of Oklahoma, the last<br />

year of which was spent as a Distinguished Visiting<br />

Professor at the U.S. Air Force Academy. A specialist<br />

in structural steel research and design, Tom was<br />

responsible for the construction of large laboratories<br />

at the University of Oklahoma and Virginia Tech.<br />

His research and teaching interests include steel<br />

connections, serviceability, pre-engineered building<br />

design, and light-gauge design.<br />

Tom has served with distinction as a member<br />

of the Research Council on Structural Connections<br />

and its Specifications Committee; a member of the<br />

AISC Committee on Specifications, AISC Committee<br />

on Manuals, and the AISC Connection Prequalification<br />

Review Panel; and as a lead researcher involved in the<br />

SAC Steel Project following the Northridge Earthquake.<br />

At Virginia Tech, he was named the Montague-Betts<br />

Professor of Structural Steel Design, and in 2006<br />

he received the Outstanding Faculty Award from the<br />

State Council of Higher Education in Virginia. Tom has<br />

also received several AISC awards: the T.R. Higgins<br />

Lectureship Award in 1991, a Lifetime Achievement<br />

Award in 2007, and the Geerhard Haaijer Award for<br />

Excellence in Education in 2010. He was elected to the<br />

National Academy of Engineering in 2002 and became a<br />

Distinguished Member of ASCE in 2012.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 160


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 113<br />

Perfection Chain Products<br />

is proud welcome Jackie<br />

Colamatteo as a territory<br />

manager. Jackie will be working<br />

closely with Jerry Roscoe in<br />

preparation for his retirement<br />

in June, <strong>2022</strong>, taking the Mid-<br />

West territory over as her own.<br />

Jackie joins the team with 14<br />

years of fastener experience. She<br />

started her career with BBI, where<br />

she fast-tracked her knowledge<br />

of nuts and bolts, becoming a<br />

branch manager. Jackie then<br />

moved her career to Stelfast,<br />

starting in sales and taking<br />

over the responsibility of branch<br />

manager. She credits her time<br />

at Stelfast for empowering her<br />

sales techniques while receiving<br />

the tools to be successful.<br />

“It’s always a challenge<br />

when faced with replacing a<br />

44-year veteran, such as Jerry<br />

Roscoe. However, Jackie has<br />

the persistence and the drive to<br />

make this transition seamless,<br />

and I can’t wait to see her<br />

success” Keith Burgess, VP.<br />

Perfection Chain Products is<br />

the largest producer of weldless<br />

chain products in North America<br />

and is also a prime distributor<br />

of welded chain and welded<br />

chain attachments, as well as<br />

wire rope and aircraft cable.<br />

For more information contact<br />

Perfection Chain Products by Tel:<br />

1-888-856-4864, Email: info@<br />

perfectionchain.com or visit<br />

www.perfectionchain.com.


114<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

HOWMET FASTENING SYSTEMS STRUCTURAL BLIND FASTENERS HELP ENGINEERS WITH LIGHTWEIGHTING from page 40<br />

Adhesives can also be susceptible to degradation<br />

based on atmospheric conditions or contact with<br />

corrosive elements, raising long-term durability concerns<br />

for many applications. Lastly, the environmental impact<br />

of adhesives cannot be ignored. The disposal of residues<br />

from the application and cleaning up of adhesives can<br />

present problems, as can the recycling of end-of-life<br />

vehiclesin which adhesives were used.<br />

Welding<br />

Welding is another widely accepted process for<br />

joining metals, having been used invarious forms since<br />

the Bronze Age.The twentieth and twenty-first centuries<br />

have seen a growth in new welding technologies,<br />

many in response to lightweighting objectives and the<br />

introduction of new materials.<br />

The growing use of aluminumin the automotive<br />

industry haspresented two major challenges for<br />

welding technology: electrical conductivity and surface<br />

preparation. The high thermal conductivity of aluminum<br />

means that heat must be applied four times faster than<br />

with steel in order to raise the temperature the same<br />

amount. While high current must be used to generate<br />

sufficient heat to reach melting temperatures, this heat<br />

must be carefully controlled because aluminum exhibits<br />

low strength at high temperatures. For this reason, heavy<br />

or loaded parts must be supported during and after<br />

welding.Even after cooling, these heat-affected zones are<br />

often very brittle.<br />

In addition, welding differing aluminum alloys,or<br />

aluminum to other materials, adds another challenge.<br />

Each alloy has its own specificmelting point, requiring<br />

different levels and speeds of heat application. Welding<br />

aluminum can also create complex and unpredictable<br />

microstructures in the heat-affected zones.<br />

Where welds on steel show a color change at the<br />

melting point, aluminum does not. In fact, aluminum<br />

gives no visual indication that the area next to the weld<br />

could melt, whichmay result in welds that are larger<br />

than desired. Cracks in aluminum welds are another<br />

significant challenge.Not only are aluminum welds prone<br />

to developing cracks at the outset, they will alsonaturally<br />

age-harden over time, further increasing the probability<br />

of cracking. The high coefficient of thermal expansion<br />

exhibited by aluminum means that it expands two<br />

times as much as steel, so if the part is constrained<br />

by fixturing or part design, this could also lead to<br />

cracking at the joint. When aluminum is to be joined,<br />

pre-heating and slow cooling parts havingdifferent crosssectional<br />

thicknesses can help prevent this cracking<br />

from occurring.<br />

Surface preparation is another area where the<br />

practice for aluminumdiffers from that of steel. Naturally<br />

occurring oxidation in the form of aluminum oxide must<br />

be removed from the surface prior to welding. Aluminum<br />

oxide has a higher melting point than that of the base<br />

metal, so if heat is applied whenpresent,the resulting<br />

weld could be weaker or wider than expected. Inert<br />

gas or flux are typically used to prevent oxidation from<br />

forming after the surface has been prepared. However,<br />

either of these oxidation treatmentscould cause weld<br />

imperfections. In addition, the presence offlux could also<br />

lead to future corrosion issues.<br />

Structural Blind Fasteners<br />

A third method of joining utilized by automotive<br />

manufacturers is blind fasteners. Blind fasteners are<br />

used to join dissimilar materials such as aluminum<br />

tosteel, or aluminum to carbon fiber. Current applications<br />

for these fasteners include window regulators, door<br />

handles, and trim. Blind fasteners are low cost, easy to<br />

install, and easy to inspect. There are two major classes<br />

of blind fasteners: structural and non-structural. Today,<br />

the majority of blind fasteners in use are non-structural<br />

“pop” type rivets, which limits their application to light<br />

duty-type joints, since non-structural blind rivetsare not<br />

load bearing.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 162


116<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

MWFA AWARDS $42,500 IN SCHOLARSHIPS from page 44<br />

$2,000 Morgan Ohare Scholarship<br />

Veronica Evitts, daughter of Paula Evitts of Avante<br />

Imports. Veronica is a sophomore (due to completing<br />

her freshman year while still in high school), at Belmont<br />

University, majoring in Nursing with a minor in Psychology.<br />

After completing her Bachelor’s degree, she plans to<br />

continue on for her Master’s of Science in Nursing. She<br />

looks forward to becoming a Nurse Practitioner.<br />

$2,000 Component Technologies Scholarship<br />

Nora Chernosky, daughter of Daniel Chernosky of<br />

Buckeye Fasteners. Nora is a freshman at Dayton College<br />

with plans to get a bachelors degree in Nursing. Nora<br />

has always had an interest in the medical field. She<br />

finds herself not only interested in giving care but also in<br />

the healing process as a whole, physical and emotional<br />

healing.<br />

$2,500 SWD Inc. Scholarship<br />

Madison Hunt, daughter of Tina and George Hunt III<br />

of Brighton Best International. Madison is a high school<br />

senior planning to pursue her degree in Registered Nursing.<br />

She looks forward to giving back to her community and<br />

helping people. She wants to be someone that makes<br />

people feel comfortable and someone who makes a<br />

difference.<br />

$3,000 South Holland Metal Finishing/Brian<br />

Christianson Scholarship<br />

Spencer Hyman, son of Jennifer Hyman of Kanebridge<br />

Corp. Spencer is a freshman at Eastern Carolina University<br />

where he is pursuing his degree in Education. He would<br />

like to become a History professor. He looks forward to<br />

educating the youth of tomorrow.<br />

$4,000 XL Screw Corporation Scholarship<br />

We would like to extend a special thank you to XL<br />

Screw Corporation for donating a scholarship for the 23rd<br />

year. We are very fortunate to have given out $62,500 in<br />

the name of XL Screw Corporation.<br />

The original idea of a scholarship program came out<br />

of XL Screw Corporation and has had amazing growth.<br />

Many students have benefited from this program since its<br />

inception. We appreciate XL’s continue support to this<br />

great program.<br />

It is a pleasure to award this year’s XL Screw<br />

Corporations Scholarship to Emma Pace, daughter of<br />

Kelly Grindle of XL Screw Corporation. Emma is a freshman<br />

at the University of Cincinnati majoring in Biology/Pre-Med<br />

and minoring in Business. Emma’s goal is to become<br />

a plastic surgeon as plastic surgeons give people hope<br />

from their tragedies or take away the insecurities running<br />

through their mind.<br />

$4,500 Richard S. Piskoty Memorial Scholarship<br />

(Donated by Clarcorp Industrial Sales)<br />

Richard Piskoty’s life led him in many directions and<br />

every path he took he made an impact on many people,<br />

from the kids he taught and coached to the salespeople<br />

that worked for him. It is because of his devotion to his<br />

family, dedication to his career, and desire to pass on and<br />

give back to others that this scholarship is dedicated.<br />

This scholarship was awarded to Elias Hyatt, son of<br />

Caroline Hyatt of EFC International. Elias is a freshman at<br />

Missouri University of Science & Technology. He is planning<br />

on obtaining a master’s degree in Physics as well as some<br />

form of music. While he is unsure of his future career he<br />

hopes to find something that is engaging and allows him to<br />

discover more about the world in interesting ways.<br />

$4,000 Brighton-Best International Scholarship<br />

Joshua Church, son of Barbara Newman of Brighton<br />

Best Internationall. Joshua is a high school senior planning<br />

to pursue Nursing in college. A recent surgery experience<br />

helped him realize that he wanted to be a nurse who<br />

keeps patients calm and knowledgeable of what is to<br />

come. He strives to always keep his values in mind.<br />

$4,000 Raul Torres Memorial Scholarship<br />

(Donated by Star Stainless Screw)<br />

Raul passed after spending 50 years in the fastener<br />

industry. He was a gentleman who mentored many.<br />

Raul spent several years on the MWFA Scholarship<br />

Committee. Because of Star’s generosity, this scholarship<br />

will continue.<br />

We are pleased to present this award to Ashlee<br />

Jackson, daughter of Debbie and Paul Jackson of South<br />

Holland Metal Finishing. Ashlee is a high school senior<br />

looking forward to pursuing a degree in Nursing. She<br />

plans to become a healthcare worker so she prides<br />

herself in working hard and helping others.<br />

Congratulations to all 2021 students!!<br />

MID-WEST FASTENER ASSOCIATION


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 117


118<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

LAURENCE CLAUS CAN SOMEONE SLOW THIS ROLLER COASTER DOWN? from page 46<br />

Although the “experts” originally predicted that things<br />

would be back on track by Quarter IV of 2021, clearly<br />

that is not happening and recovery will be slow and is<br />

now not estimated to occur until sometime mid-<strong>2022</strong> at<br />

the earliest. This shortage is having a dramatic impact<br />

on automotive fastener manufacturers and distributors<br />

as their customers are temporarily shuttering operations<br />

while they wait for more chips to complete thousands of<br />

incomplete vehicles currently staged in massive parking<br />

lots and hold areas of assembly plants and to bring back<br />

production to pre-shortage levels.<br />

Although this shortage has captured our attention<br />

for months, it is but one example of a component or raw<br />

material shortage currently sending ripples throughout the<br />

fastener industry. Sadly, shortages in steel, washers, and<br />

plastics have directly impacted fastener manufacturers<br />

while shortages like semiconductors, building materials,<br />

metals, and plastics have continued to indirectly impact<br />

the fastener industry through their customers.<br />

Shipping<br />

News flashes that key US ports along the West<br />

Coast have been experiencing significant delays in getting<br />

container ships unloaded have been prominent in recent<br />

days. In fact, US ports have been some of the world’s<br />

most congested with many more ships just sitting and<br />

waiting to be unloaded than are actively in the port facility<br />

being unloaded. It has gotten so bad in recent weeks<br />

that President Biden felt compelled to step in and call for<br />

round the clock operations.<br />

The reasons for these delays, however, are not as<br />

simple as one might think. Small disruptions in one part of<br />

the globe can have significant ripple effects for extended<br />

periods of time in other parts of the globe. The list of<br />

unexpected events this year is long and troublesome.<br />

A few prominent examples that have contributed to<br />

this disruption include typhoons in Asia, rolling COVID<br />

lockdowns in key Chinese container shipping hubs, and<br />

the debacle of the Ever Given, the container ship that was<br />

wedged in the Suez Canal halting all ship passage for six<br />

days in March. Add to that the shortage of dock workers,<br />

empty containers, and especially truckers, and, we have a<br />

system that is in serious disarray.<br />

Labor Shortages<br />

Perhaps one of the biggest miseries in the US is<br />

the current labor shortage. Stories abound of employers<br />

large and small that simply can’t find enough help of both<br />

skilled and unskilled labor. Just about everyone I work with<br />

in the fastener industry has shared concern and frustration<br />

in not being able to fill empty slots. Although apparently<br />

the biggest shortfall dwells in non-manufacturing sectors,<br />

there are few fastener manufacturers or distributors that<br />

are not currently feeling some degree of pain in this<br />

regard.<br />

In August and September 2021, the US Bureau of<br />

Labor Statistics reported record numbers of individuals<br />

quitting jobs. In fact, in September 4.4 Million individuals<br />

quit their job, breaking the previous record of the 4.3<br />

million made only the month before. This has been<br />

dubbed the “Great Resignation” and has many experts<br />

scratching their heads as to why. Many believe that it is<br />

the result of unintended consequences emerging from<br />

the pandemic. Remarkably, the greatest percentages of<br />

these workers are from the mid-career category, aged<br />

35 to 45. Most likely these individuals will reenter the<br />

job market, but this is neither comforting nor helpful to<br />

employers who have lost key individuals that they have<br />

invested significant time and money into training and<br />

are now confronted with hard to fill organizational gaps<br />

or prospects of having to engage in time-consuming and<br />

costly retraining. Finding ways to accelerate training and<br />

development of all these new individuals will become a<br />

real challenge for organizations in the short-term.<br />

Another problem that the labor shortage is creating is<br />

that companies have to do more with fewer people. This<br />

is leading to increased weariness and burnout among<br />

existing employees. It is one of the primary reasons<br />

cited by many of those who left their jobs in August and<br />

September. I have personally seen the impact of this as<br />

more than one organization has told me that they really<br />

need to do training but simply can’t afford to release their<br />

workforce from everyday tasks for even several hours of<br />

training. Unfortunately, although this may seem like a<br />

necessity now, it is likely to have major consequences<br />

later on.<br />

Inflation<br />

The experts keep trying to convince us that the cost<br />

pressures we all see going on around us are simply<br />

temporary. It would be very nice if they are right, however,<br />

the inflationary pressures are becoming increasingly<br />

common and more widespread. Costs associated with<br />

component and raw material shortages, transportation,<br />

and labor are all increasing daily and being passed onto<br />

businesses and consumers in higher pricing.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 164


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 119<br />

OBITUARY<br />

Ron Sackheim,<br />

former President of<br />

XL Screw Corporation,<br />

passed away December<br />

6th at age 80. Ron<br />

battled Parkinson’s<br />

disease for over 23<br />

years. Ron was a very<br />

passionate supporter<br />

of the CBNSA/MWFA.<br />

He has been on the<br />

Board of Directors ,<br />

was a past President of the CBNSA and is a<br />

member of the CBNSA Hall of Fame. Ron was<br />

a huge Cubs, Bears and Bulls fan. He enjoyed<br />

travel, tennis, jogging, bridge, and neighborhood<br />

basketball games. He especially loved music. He<br />

took piano lesson and played the piano for many,<br />

many years. Ron will be truly missed.<br />

Donations can be made to the Michael J. Fox<br />

Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.


120<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

DISTRIBUTION ONE FUELING <strong>2022</strong> SUCCESS THROUGH DISTRIBUTION TECHNOLOGY AND E-COMMERCE INVESTMENT from page 48<br />

By assigning customized roles and providing<br />

onscreen alerts to tasks needing immediate attention,<br />

users will be more productive and responsive. Order<br />

transcription automation also reduces the time and cost<br />

of manual errors enabling users to spend more time on<br />

additional responsibilities within the company.<br />

Business Analytics With Real-Time Data<br />

Real-time analytics provide key performance insights<br />

and help maintain smooth business processes by<br />

seamlessly communicating relevant data across all<br />

departments and teams. Tools like data visualization<br />

of key performance indicators deliver business health<br />

snapshots to help managers make data-driven decisions<br />

to predict trends and quickly respond to ongoing market<br />

fluctuations.<br />

E-Commerce<br />

Digital Commerce 360 reports that $791.70 billion<br />

was spent online with US merchants in 2020. According<br />

to US Department of Commerce, this represents an<br />

increase of 32.4% from the year prior which saw an<br />

increase of 15.1%. While this substantial jump was most<br />

certainly driven by pandemic-related activity, the results<br />

are too large to simply be ignored.<br />

Year over year, E-Commerce accounts for a growing<br />

portion of a company’s sales activities. This is not only<br />

due to the pandemic but also because customers are<br />

more tech savvy and prefer the speed and convenience<br />

of online purchasing. Understandably, distributors and<br />

wholesalers need to make their products available online<br />

via an E-Commerce solution in order to reach and serve<br />

larger B2B and B2C audiences.<br />

To be successful, the E-Commerce solution must<br />

fully integrate with the company’s business software to<br />

guarantee customers have the information they require<br />

to purchase your products. Blending convenience and<br />

functionality, Distribution One’s ERP-ONE integrated<br />

E-Commerce includes:<br />

¤ Sales Order Automation – Reduce costs.<br />

Eliminate manual order processes and costly transcription<br />

errors.<br />

¤ Real-time Pricing – Provide accurate pricing.<br />

The webstore can display either retail product price or<br />

the current contract pricing once the customer logs into<br />

the website.<br />

¤ Real-time Availability – Build customer trust.<br />

Because accurate inventory levels are pulled in real time<br />

from the ERP software, customers can trust that the item<br />

they are ordering is in stock and ready to ship.<br />

¤ Customer Self-Service – Reduce office calls<br />

and inquiries. Empower customers to view order status,<br />

reorder from purchase history, pay open invoices, and<br />

more at their convenience, 24/7.<br />

¤ Increase Average Order Sales – Boost<br />

per order revenue. Tools like product swatches and<br />

complementary items help customers effortlessly add<br />

additional items to an order.<br />

This is just a focused snapshot of the wide range<br />

of tools and benefits that Distribution One’s distributor<br />

E-Commerce delivers for your staff and your customers.<br />

When working in conjunction with Distribution One’s<br />

proven ERP-ONE distribution software, your company<br />

will enjoy the productivity gains and expanded sales<br />

opportunities necessary to thrive in <strong>2022</strong>.<br />

For over 25 years, Distribution One has helped<br />

hundreds of fastener distributors and wholesalers<br />

turn distribution technology investments into realworld<br />

success. We’re ready to help you reach your<br />

goals in the new year.<br />

DISTRIBUTION ONE


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 121


122<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

NELSON VALDERRAMA 5 WAYS TO THRIVE IN A SHIFTING INDUSTRY WITH CONSOLIDATING DISTRIBUTORS from page 52<br />

Let’s use a football analogy. A world class quarterback<br />

can’t win you games if he has no one to throw to, but<br />

real football fans know that more often than not, the next<br />

most important player on the team is not actually the<br />

star receiver it’s the relatively unnoticed left tackle, who<br />

protects the quarterback from things he can’t see which<br />

could injure him.<br />

Many distributors are looking for those great outside<br />

sales reps that bring in tons of new business, or key inside<br />

sales reps that keep customers happy. But when was<br />

the last time that the executive team of your organization<br />

spent the time to look at all the positions and find that “left<br />

tackle” that can help lift all the other stars on your team?<br />

Tip #2 - Add Value Or Get Out<br />

In the age where customers can find out how much<br />

an item costs and when they will receive it with just one<br />

search, on-site or local competitors cannot match up. To<br />

stay competitive in this market place, you need your service<br />

to make sure that’s something only Internet retailers don’t<br />

have access too - a value add so unique its worth paying<br />

more for!<br />

Your company has to add value to the products,<br />

typically through services that cannot be easily copied —<br />

what Warren Buffet would call a moat.<br />

Typically this process starts with knowing your customers,<br />

their needs and having your team very close to the market<br />

place. Observe your own customers fiercely, and what other<br />

companies (including the competition) is doing as well. You<br />

can start by making a list of all those special requests<br />

you had refused to do in the past like special packaging or<br />

labeling, kiting, inventory consignment, VMI, etc.<br />

Maybe you can look into your lost sales log (ERP or<br />

CRM) and find which parts or series of parts you had not<br />

bid, then find some trends of product characteristics (sizes,<br />

finishes, etc.) to give you a clue about how deep your<br />

offering really is.<br />

The most successful distributors I’ve seen are those<br />

that have a stretch communication with their vendors,<br />

and data at their fingertips to understand trends to make<br />

business judgment calls about new products or services<br />

they want to try.<br />

Tip #3 - Get Digital Or Die<br />

I am sure you will find the below information shocking<br />

and upsetting. Your customers are using digital sources,<br />

which are always turned on to solve their problems!.<br />

The days of being able to “kick the can” another<br />

year are long gone. The Millennials and Gen Xers have<br />

been eager for digital access, but now it’s time that this<br />

changed if you want your business to thrive in today’s<br />

world!<br />

In order to stay ahead of the game, distributors<br />

should provide a portal for their current customers. This<br />

allows them access everything from review available trade<br />

credit and order history, set up automatic reorders with<br />

ease all while tracking what you need next!. This portal<br />

should provide customer-specific pricing, show current<br />

inventory levels, have detailed product content that<br />

answers potential buyers’ questions.<br />

If you do not have a tier or tailored pricing in your ERP<br />

or you do not have public pricing in your e-commerce site<br />

(for prospects) you might be leaving a lot of money on the<br />

table (1-4% margin points).<br />

Tip #4 - Find Customers That Are Very Sticky<br />

All owners know by heart almost everything about<br />

their top 10-25% customers, but when I ask about the<br />

customers in the middle of their profit range, they barely<br />

have a word or two to describe them. But a simple<br />

comprehensive customer categorization (also known as<br />

segmentation or stratification) is the simple way to create<br />

a common language so anyone in a company when talking<br />

about any customer in that “middle profit range” they<br />

would know immediately if that account is a “Core”, “VIP”,<br />

“Standard” or “Drain” account.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 166


124<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

JO MORRIS IN-PERSON TRAINING EVENTS RETURN FOR <strong>2022</strong> from page 56<br />

Fastener Basics Webinar Series<br />

Sponsored by Brighton-Best International, “Fastener<br />

Basics Like Never Before” is a 22-part webinar series<br />

presented by Carmen Vertullo, CFS. Students can join anytime<br />

and still complete the full series. Carmen is a master at<br />

webinar fastener training classes and uses his talents to<br />

present Fastener Basics in an innovatively new way.<br />

Each webinar is 90 minutes including a closing<br />

30-minute Q&A session. Jo Morris moderates the program<br />

and keeps the class interactive. This fast-paced program<br />

will cover all topics relevant to new fastener professionals<br />

and get you prepared for advanced learning in our CFS<br />

track.<br />

Online Learning Library<br />

FTI has an Online Learning Library with more than<br />

40 on-demand digital training courses for fastener and<br />

manufacturing industry professionals. The videos are<br />

accessible on any device and both rental and subscription<br />

plans come with reference materials and quizzes.<br />

Corporate subscriptions are popular with large companies<br />

desiring to offer continuous educational opportunities to<br />

employees.<br />

On-Site Training Opportunities<br />

FTI also offers on-site training opportunities for<br />

companies who want an instructor to come to their<br />

location. This training is tailored specifically to a company’s<br />

workforce, industry, employee experience and needs. This<br />

option enables in-person training while eliminating the<br />

need for employees to travel.<br />

FTI thanks our Sustaining Sponsor, Wurth<br />

Industries of North America.<br />

For the latest information on FTI’s live training<br />

courses, digital training opportunities, online webinars,<br />

and exclusive deals, visit fastenertraining.org and sign<br />

up for the email newsletter, or follow FTI on LinkedIn,<br />

Facebook and Twitter.<br />

JO MORRIS | FASTENER TRAINING INSTITUTE<br />

NATIONAL FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS ASSOCIATION<br />

3020 Old Ranch Parkway #300, Seal Beach CA 90740 TEL 562-799-5509 EMAIL nfda@nfda-fasteners.org WEB www.nfda-fasteners.org<br />

NFDA SETS <strong>2022</strong> EVENT CALENDAR by Amy Nijjar<br />

The National Fastener Distributors Association has<br />

set its <strong>2022</strong> calendar with a mix of virtual and in-person<br />

events. Be sure to save the dates! Here is the <strong>2022</strong><br />

calendar of events:<br />

<strong>2022</strong> Events Schedule<br />

February 9<br />

Roundtable - Sales/Marketing, Virtual<br />

May 11<br />

Roundtable - Human Resources, Virtual<br />

June 21-24<br />

Annual Meeting & ESPS, Minneapolis, MN<br />

August 10<br />

Roundtable - Operations, Virtual<br />

ASSOCIATION ARTICLE<br />

October 12<br />

CEO Roundtable, Virtual<br />

November 9-11<br />

Executive Summit, Naples, FL<br />

December 14<br />

Roundtable – Sales/Marketing, Virtual<br />

For registration information and to ask questions about<br />

NFDA, visit www.nfda-fastener.org or call Amy Nijjar at<br />

562-799-5519.<br />

NATIONAL FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS ASSOCIATION


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 125<br />

MW Industries, a leading provider of<br />

precision components, announced today the<br />

acquisition of Fox Valley Spring Company, LLC,<br />

a principal supplier of springs, wire forms, and<br />

flat springs.<br />

The acquisition of Fox Valley Spring<br />

Company closed on October 29, 2021 and<br />

expands MW Industries’ existing automation<br />

and manufacturing capabilities for springs<br />

and wire forms. The combined company will<br />

offer extensive expertise in complex precision<br />

spring manufacturing for a variety of spring<br />

types including extension springs, torsion<br />

springs, wire forms, and die springs. Fox Valley<br />

Spring will join MW Components, the division of<br />

MW Industries focusing on manufacturing highly<br />

engineered precision components at speed and<br />

scale.<br />

“Fox Valley Spring is well-known for their<br />

experience in creating the highest quality, custommade<br />

springs. Fox Valley Spring’s technology<br />

and expertise will allow us to better support our<br />

customers as they seek custom springs made<br />

from specialty materials, manufactured to<br />

tighter tolerances,” said Simon Newman, CEO of<br />

MW Industries. “We’re thrilled to welcome Fox<br />

Valley Spring to the family and look forward to<br />

growing together as we provide more products<br />

and services to our customers.”<br />

Fox Valley Spring Company is a<br />

nationally recognized expert in custom spring<br />

manufacturing. With the latest CNC coiling and<br />

automation technology, Fox Valley Spring can<br />

manufacture complex precision springs in a<br />

single operation. The expert engineering and<br />

manufacturing professionals at Fox Valley Spring<br />

can design and manufacture custom springs<br />

to each customer’s unique requirements.<br />

“Our goal has always been to provide<br />

the best products and services to our<br />

customers – joining the MW family allows us to<br />

do more for them than ever before,” said Keith<br />

Wincentsen, President of Fox Valley Spring.<br />

“As one company, our customers will now<br />

be able to purchase products from any MW<br />

location and request specialty springs that<br />

leverage our capabilities as well as those offered<br />

throughout the MW family.<br />

We’re excited to provide those resources to our<br />

customers and bring our capabilities to serve the<br />

greater MW customer base.”<br />

As part of MW Components, existing customers<br />

from the combined companies will have access<br />

to the full portfolio of products and services from<br />

across MW Components.<br />

With over 30 manufacturing facilities worldwide,<br />

MW Industries group companies deliver the<br />

precision components today’s engineers need to<br />

do their best work. The business serves over<br />

19,000 businesses across more than 75 countries<br />

worldwide and in sectors as diverse as life sciences,<br />

automotive, aerospace, electronics, and energy. We<br />

have a no-compromise ambition to deliver exactly<br />

what our customers need, precisely when they<br />

need it. So whether they want to partner with us on<br />

developing a next-generation product or need one of<br />

our thousands of stock parts for immediate delivery,<br />

we can help.<br />

For more information contact MW Industries online<br />

at www.mw-ind.com.


126<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

ANTHONY DI MAIO BLIND RIVET FAILURES & SOLUTIONS from page 58<br />

Burr On The Hole<br />

BURR<br />

than what is recommended by the manufacturer.<br />

Setting Tool Held At An Angle<br />

Setting tools should be held approximately at a right<br />

angle to the work piece. The hole in the work piece<br />

is at right angle to the work piece. When the blind<br />

The hole in your work piece must be free of burrs. rivet is in the hole to be set and the setting tool is<br />

Burrs are caused by using drill bits that are not sharp not approximately at right angle to the work piece, the<br />

and by forcing the drill too fast through the work piece. mandrel of the blind rivet is then bent and when the blind<br />

The burr is always on the upset side of the set rivet. rivet is set, the mandrel will bend even further. After the<br />

When you set a blind rivet in a work piece that has a blind rivet is set, the setting tool then tries to eject the<br />

burr, the upset side of the blind rivet will press against mandrel from the rear of the setting tool. In many cases<br />

the burr and the burr will cut into the upset side of the the bent mandrel will not pass through the tool to eject<br />

rivet barrel. This burr will cut and crack the rivet body and and the setting tool now has to be serviced to clear the<br />

reduce the clamp loading pressure of the fastened work jammed bent mandrel.<br />

piece. This condition gives a weak fastened assembly. SOLUTION - Hold the setting tool as near a possible<br />

SOLUTION - Rivet holes should be free of burrs. at right angle to the work piece.<br />

Rivet Hole Is Too Large<br />

LARGE HOLE<br />

CORRECT HOLE<br />

Blind rivet manufacturers list in their blind rivet<br />

catalogs, the minimum and maximum hole diameter for<br />

all their sizes of blind rivets. When a blind rivet is set in a<br />

hole that is larger than the recommended hole diameter,<br />

the mandrel head will travel the complete length of the<br />

blind rivet body and come to rest at the flange of the rivet<br />

body. This condition offers the following problems.<br />

[1] Mandrel head does not clamp the upset side of<br />

the rivet to the work piece.<br />

[ 2] Reduced clamping of the work pieces.<br />

[ 3] Mandrel head burr will extend outside of the<br />

flange giving a dangerous cutting edge for<br />

someone to cut their hand.<br />

SOLUTION - Never have rivet hole diameters larger<br />

Tool Not Setting The Blind Rivet In One Stroke<br />

When a blind rivet is set in a hole that is the<br />

recommended diameter and at the specified work<br />

thickness, the setting tool will set the blind rivet in one<br />

stroke. If, for whatever reason it is necessary to take<br />

more than one stroke, the setting tool needs service.<br />

When a setting tool strokes more than one time when<br />

setting a blind rivet, the setting tool pulling jaws teeth<br />

penetrate the mandrel surface an many places and can<br />

cause the mandrel to break when the jaws are gripping<br />

the mandrel rather at the designed break point below the<br />

mandrel head and you will have a long length of mandrel<br />

protruding from flange of the set rivet. The setting tool<br />

jaws will also get mandrel material logged in the grooves<br />

of the pulling jaws and this will make the jaws slip when<br />

pulling the mandrel, thus more than one stroke will<br />

be necessary to set the blind rivet. The jaws need to<br />

cleaned and lubricated.<br />

SOLUTION - Be sure that your setting tool is<br />

serviced with Hydraulic fluid and have the recommended<br />

compressed air pressure.<br />

ANTHONY Di MAIO


INTERNATIONAL FASTENER EXPO<br />

MANDALAY BAY, LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 22-23, 2021<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 167


128<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

ACE BOLT & SCREW CO INC OLD SCHOOL IN A GOOD WAY - SERVING THE SOUTHEAST SINCE 1969 from page 60<br />

Vendor Managed Inventory<br />

Vendor Managed Inventory is more than checking<br />

bins – it takes experience and know-how. Ace Bolt &<br />

Screw uses The Business Edge, an ERP system developed<br />

by Computer Insights specifically for the fastener industry.<br />

The system allows them to set up customer bin locations<br />

with bar code labeling. A salesperson or customer can use<br />

a mobile device, like an iPhone or iPad to scan locations<br />

and upload orders directly to The Business Edge for Ace<br />

to process and deliver what is needed. Using scanners<br />

with their VMI customers has significantly boosted their<br />

speed and efficiency, a huge benefit to their customers.<br />

They never make mistakes because they scan the exact<br />

bin that needs to be replenished. They can also furnish<br />

their customers with more information than ever before<br />

with the usage reports offered in The Business Edge. They<br />

visit their customers often and become familiar with their<br />

parts and usages to ensure they do not experience any<br />

downtime.<br />

Tracking Products<br />

Ace Bolt & Screw maintains an inventory for industrial,<br />

commercial, and construction customers. They listen to<br />

customers and vendors and stock what will help get the<br />

job done. They have complete traceability of products.<br />

The Business Edge software can effortlessly track lot<br />

numbers and locations of products from the minute<br />

they are received and through every step of the process<br />

until being delivered. Bambi Wallace, Marketing Director,<br />

shared, “without The Business Edge by Computer<br />

Insights, our operations would be at a standstill. Keeping<br />

track of things has never been easier; for that, we are<br />

grateful.”<br />

Poly Bagging & Kitting<br />

Automated Poly Bagging and Kitting is another service<br />

Ace Bolt & Screw offers. When you need items packed,<br />

they are ready to help. They have an Autobag Bagging<br />

System and can cut the time it takes to count, bag, and<br />

label the parts they sell. Their system can fill up to ten<br />

bags per minute; their customers benefit significantly by<br />

receiving their bagged parts or kits in a timely fashion.<br />

Looking Forward<br />

What began as a hope and a dream among two friends<br />

has become one of the largest fastener distributors in the<br />

Southeast. Ace Bolt & Screw Co., Inc. ships products<br />

throughout the United States and beyond. They have more<br />

than tripled in size over the past few years.<br />

¤ They are now ISO 9001:2015 certified.<br />

¤ They expanded in the wholesale fastener world and<br />

are one of the Southeast’s largest Dewalt dealers.<br />

¤ They have a top-notch selection of power tools.<br />

¤ They currently have locations in Jackson, MS,<br />

Tupelo, MS, Gluckstadt, MS and Atlanta, GA<br />

¤ They will be opening a new Richland, MS<br />

branch in <strong>2022</strong>.<br />

More Information<br />

Ace Bolt & Screw Co, Inc can be reached at any of<br />

their store locations, or contact Randy Clark and Mike<br />

Clark, Owners by telephone at 601-355-3448 or visit them<br />

online at www.acebolt.net.<br />

Computer Insights, Inc. can be reached at 108 3rd<br />

Street, Unit 4, Bloomingdale, IL 60108. Contact Dennis<br />

Cowhey, President, by telephone at 1-800-539-1233, email<br />

sales@ci-inc.com or visit them online at www.ci-inc.com.<br />

ACE BOLT & SCREW


130<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

IFE IFE 2021 RECAP & <strong>2022</strong> PREVIEW from page 66<br />

With health and safety protocols in place, the<br />

expo hall was buzzing with productive business on<br />

the remaining days of the show. Noteworthy attending<br />

companies included Fastenal, Bossard North America, D.B.<br />

Roberts Company, Penn Engineering, Stanley Industries,<br />

Field Fastener, All Integrated Solutions (AIS) and ITW<br />

Shakeproof Industrial. Top exhibitors included Brighton-<br />

Best, B&D Cold Headed Products, Nucor Fastener,<br />

G.L. Huyett, American Ring, Doerken Coatings North<br />

America and Durham Manufacturing. “Our team worked<br />

tirelessly to ensure our fastener community felt safe and<br />

comfortable at IFE this year, and we are thankful for those<br />

that trusted and supported us,” added Morgan Wilson.<br />

The overall sentiment of show guests was positive with<br />

one exhibitor noting, “[International Fastener Expo is] the<br />

most important and productive fastener industry event of<br />

the year!” Many attendees echoed the sentiment, with<br />

one saying, “I really liked the smaller show as I was able<br />

to get better meetings with fewer distractions. This was<br />

excellent for me and my agenda.”<br />

Continuing the tradition, the 2021 Hall of Fame and<br />

Young Fastener Professional of the Year Award winners<br />

were celebrated at a ceremony at the Session Stage<br />

on Wednesday afternoon. The Hall of Fame and Young<br />

Fastener Professional of the Year Awards recognize those<br />

who have made lasting inputs to the fastener industry<br />

on a national or global scale, and leaders, 40 years old<br />

or younger, who already have a record of integrity and<br />

respect in the industry. Steve Andrasik of Brighton-Best<br />

International, Charlie Kerr of Kerr Lakeside and Nancy<br />

Rich of Mid-West Fastener Association were inducted into<br />

the Hall of Fame. Melissa Patel of FIELD was selected as<br />

the 2021 Young Fastener Professional of the Year.<br />

The Session Stage provided the perfect place for<br />

attendees to learn about the latest fastener trends and<br />

tools, with nine cutting-edge sessions presented over two<br />

days. Session highlights included High Demand and Longer<br />

Lead Times – Strategies to Tackle the Post-COVID Supply<br />

Chain Double Whammy with Josh Bartel, Co-Founder and<br />

CEO Hydrian Inventory Optimization. Josh explored specific<br />

strategies that can be used to minimize stockouts in the<br />

face of huge demand and supply uncertainty. Nelson<br />

Valderrama hosted another session titled, Did You Think<br />

Artificial Intelligence is Only Being Used by the Largest<br />

Distributors? Think Again. This session focused on<br />

common misconceptions surrounding AI and explored<br />

the benefits of incorporating the technology into your<br />

business. Finally, Lyndon Lattie, Chirag Patel and Mike<br />

Gray explained the benefits of adopting eCommerce in a<br />

panel discussion hosted by Mili Dutta, eCommerce for the<br />

Fastener Industry: Your Questions Answered.<br />

After a successful 2021 show, many are looking<br />

forward to bringing the industry back together next year.<br />

International Fastener Expo <strong>2022</strong> will take place October<br />

17 – 19 at Mandalay Bay, Las Vegas. Next year’s show will<br />

build on the momentum and excitement of the 2021, with<br />

special events and networking opportunities, expanded<br />

conference content and more. Exhibitors who have already<br />

signed on include Brighton-Best International, Infasco,<br />

Lindfast Group, B&D Cold Headed Products, G.L. Huyett,<br />

Star Stainless Screw Co. and more. Attending the <strong>2022</strong><br />

show will also give you access to Star Metal Products<br />

and Pacific Bolt Manufacturing Ltd., brand new exhibitors<br />

for <strong>2022</strong> and American Scale Co. Inc. and SmartCert®<br />

by Aramid, who were new to the show floor in 2021.<br />

Registration will open soon! To be the first to know,<br />

sign up here. For more information on IFE, please visit<br />

www.fastenershows.com.<br />

INTERNATIONAL FASTENER EXPO


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 131<br />

ROMAN BASI TAX MINIMIZATION ANALYSIS: HOW TO ADVOCATE FOR CLIENTS SELLING THEIR BUSINESS – PART 1 from page 64<br />

However, the example continues and the buyer now<br />

seeks to allocate more than book value to the seller’s<br />

equipment rendering the seller subject to recaptured<br />

deprecation (taxed at the rate of ordinary income). Here,<br />

the TMA would not only provide the threshold amount<br />

subject to recaptured depreciation but it would allow the<br />

seller to determine alternative negotiation strategies to<br />

help avoid the negative tax impact caused by recaptured<br />

depreciation. Then, when the purchase price allocation<br />

is agreed upon and in place, the TMA will analyze<br />

factors outside the transaction that impact its outcome.<br />

Factors such as other income within the tax year of the<br />

transaction or loss carryforwards, both of which can<br />

play a vital role in the overall tax impact. This example,<br />

while simple, displays the value in the TMA illustrated in<br />

its transparency and ability to balance each factor and<br />

variable that plays a role in the outcome of a transaction.<br />

There’s tremendous value and comfort in providing<br />

sellers with evolving transparency of their transactions.<br />

At The Center, in our forty-plus years of M&A<br />

experience, we have come to realize the value of<br />

analyzing every factor that plays a role in the outcome<br />

of a transaction. More specifically, this value is derived<br />

from the TMA’s ability to evolve such factors as the<br />

transaction progresses in order to give full insight and<br />

transparency to the seller. This insight not only provides<br />

a sense of comfort to sellers but also offers a strategic<br />

advantage in achieving the desired result. A TMA will<br />

allow open dialogue between counsel and client in regard<br />

to goals and strategy while ultimately delivering the<br />

most advantageous structure possible when selling your<br />

business. If you are thinking about selling your business<br />

or in process of selling your business, allow The Center<br />

to analyze your transaction using a TMA so we can<br />

confirm you’re obtaining the greatest outlook possible in<br />

your sale.<br />

ROMAN BASI


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SOUTHEASTERN FASTENER ASSOCIATION<br />

PO Box 448, Elba, AL 36323 TEL 847-370-9022 FAX 847-516-6728 EMAIL sefa@thesefa.com WEB www.thesefa.com<br />

JOIN US FOR THE <strong>2022</strong> SPRING CONFERENCE by Nancy Rich<br />

Southeastern Fastener Association will be holding<br />

their spring conference in Greenville, North Carolina, at<br />

the Embassy Suites Greenville Golf Resort and Conference<br />

Center. The event is scheduled to take place April 25-27,<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.<br />

The resort is located next to the Preserve at Verdae<br />

championship golf course, the conference center resort is<br />

six miles from downtown Greenville and 15 minutes from<br />

the airport via free shuttle, which can be chartered within<br />

a five-mile radius. Enjoy made-to-order breakfast, and<br />

complimentary evening receptions.<br />

It’s not too early to plan to attend. Rooms are as<br />

low as $149 with all rooms being suites. The conference<br />

will host a Welcome Reception, Panel Discussion, Golf,<br />

Awards Dinner and other events.<br />

Enjoy the conference and spend extra time enjoying<br />

Greenville. Nestled up against the foothills of the<br />

Blue Ridge Mountains in the heart of South Carolina’s<br />

ASSOCIATION ARTICLE<br />

Upcountry, you’ll find Greenville situated just about<br />

halfway between Charlotte, North Carolina and Atlanta,<br />

Georgia. Greenville’s friendly, thriving downtown pulses<br />

with things to do year-round. From one-of-a-kind shops,<br />

boutiques and art galleries to museums, tours and<br />

outdoor activities, Greenville is a welcoming retreat for<br />

visitors of every age and explorers of every type.<br />

Watch for details at www.thesefa.com.<br />

SOUTHEASTERN FASTENER ASSOCIATION


140<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

SPIROL SOLID PIN RETENTION FEATURES from page 72<br />

Diamond Knurls<br />

Although they are very common, diamond<br />

knurls provide little value compared to the<br />

other retention features. Diamond knurls<br />

shred the host apart during installation and<br />

introduce a risk of particles escaping the hole.<br />

While they do provide some retention, it is<br />

minimal. Diamond knurls should be avoided.<br />

Barbs<br />

Barbs were designed specifically for use<br />

in plastic assemblies. The raised barbs are<br />

angled backwards, opposite the direction of<br />

insertion. The plastic of the host component<br />

naturally backfills<br />

around the metal<br />

barb after installation<br />

permanently joining the components together. Barbs<br />

provide the greatest retention among the retention<br />

features discussed in this White Paper.<br />

Solid Pin Retention Features<br />

in Comparison<br />

SPIROL OFFERS APPLICATION ENGINEERING SUPPORT! SPIROL APPLICATION ENGINEERS WILL REVIEW YOUR APPLICATION NEEDS AND WORK<br />

WITH YOUR DESIGN TEAM TO RECOMMEND THE BEST SOLUTION. FOR TECHNICAL SUPPORT, FEEL FREE TO CONTACT SPIROL DIRECTLY OR<br />

START THE PROCESS BY SELECTING PINNING APPLICATIONS IN OUR OPTIMAL APPLICATION ENGINEERING PORTAL AT WWW.SPIROL.COM<br />

SPIROL INTERNATIONAL CORP.


Rotor Clip Company Inc. has once again<br />

demonstrated its dedication to continuous<br />

improvement and commitment to customer<br />

satisfaction by recently receiving its ISO<br />

13485:2016 certification.<br />

Described as the medical device industry’s<br />

most widely used international standard for quality<br />

management, compliance with ISO 13485 means<br />

that the medical device manufacturing industry can<br />

now rely on Rotor Clip as the one-stop-shop for the<br />

highest-quality retaining rings, wave springs and<br />

hose clamps for their assemblies.<br />

Rotor Clip has been a trusted supplier of the<br />

medical industry for many years. Receiving this<br />

certification reinforces the quality standards and<br />

reliability of its retaining rings, wave springs and<br />

hose clamps, so medical device manufacturers<br />

can depend on its products to perform safety<br />

critical functions every time.<br />

Companies across a broad range of industries<br />

rely on Rotor Clip products, value-added services,<br />

and expertise to build reliable and safe equipment<br />

for virtually any application. In addition to<br />

manufacturing high-quality parts for medical, Rotor<br />

Clip also meet the stringent quality standard<br />

of industries such as military, aerospace, and<br />

automotive.<br />

According to Rotor Clip’s Quality Engineer, Amir<br />

Abdalla, understanding customer requirements<br />

and working towards exceeding customer’s<br />

expectations is key to better serving the medical<br />

device industry. Abdalla stated “This is another<br />

Quality Management System to be added to our<br />

IATF, AS and ISO9001 Systems that ensure Rotor<br />

Clip continue to deliver high-quality products that<br />

exceed customer expectations. I am very proud of<br />

what our team have achieved.”<br />

Rotor Clip is a global leading manufacturer of<br />

retaining rings (circlips), wave springs and hose<br />

clamps and offers the widest range of products in<br />

the industry with manufacturing in the US and the<br />

Czech Republic and with operations in the UK. As<br />

well as being newly certified to ISO 13485, Rotor<br />

Clip also produces its products under IATF 16949,<br />

ISO 9001, AS 9100C, and ISO 14001 standard.<br />

For more information contact Rotor Clip Company<br />

Inc by Tel: 732-469-7333, Email: info@rotorclip.com<br />

or visit them online at www.rotorclip.com.<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 141


142<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

FAB GROUP FAB GROUP CONDUCTS SUPPLY CHAIN SYMPOSIUM from page 74<br />

Jason Crow, Purchasing Manager at AIS added, “Not<br />

only was the content excellent, but I was able to compare<br />

and ideate some of our work flow designs for purchase<br />

order formulation and execution that will save time and<br />

improve efficiency within our internal purchasing and<br />

supply chain management team.”<br />

There have been some recent changes in the<br />

FAB Group. In August, Falcon Fastening Solutions was<br />

acquired by Trifast, a European fastener manufacturer<br />

and distributor who viewed Falcon as a geographically<br />

strategic addition to its business development in North<br />

America. Giovanni Cespedes, Falcon’s CEO, noted that<br />

the FAB Group was supportive and insightful in providing<br />

him guidance and input on navigating the delicate<br />

issues associated with selling an intimate private family<br />

business to a public company. In September, Martin<br />

Supply closed on the purchase of Capital Bolt & Screw<br />

of Jackson, MS. Doug Ruggles was thankful for the<br />

guidance provided by the FAB Group, and during the<br />

Supply Chain Symposium, FAB members offered input on<br />

the integration of Capital’s supply chain and purchasing<br />

functions with Martin’s.<br />

As Tim O’Keeffe, CEO of G.L. Huyett noted at<br />

the opening of the meeting, “The FAB Group has not<br />

only been key advisors to me in my business, but the<br />

members and their associates have become close<br />

friends and confidants. This is one of the best things<br />

I have done in supporting my fastener career.” Matt<br />

Goldberg, CEO of AMPG added, “This group is built on<br />

trust and making one’s self personally vulnerable, and<br />

in return the members offer safe and effective feedback<br />

to help us improve our management and leadership.”<br />

The FAB Group plans to conduct future meetings with a<br />

similar format, and add various corporate functions with<br />

an eye on overall operational excellence.<br />

If you are interested in learning about the FAB Group<br />

and becoming a member, email tokeeffe@huyett.com for a<br />

confidential discussion.<br />

FASTENER ADVISORY BOARD<br />

FASTENER FAIR USA CELEBRATES A SUCCESSFUL IN-PERSON EVENT IN CLEVELAND, OHIO from page 88<br />

show floor from all the fastener industry professionals<br />

looking to reunite and get back to in-person events.<br />

Given Ohio’s renaissance in advanced manufacturing,<br />

Cleveland was the perfect location. We’re already seeing<br />

the anticipation for the May <strong>2022</strong> show in Detroit to<br />

continue the momentum.”<br />

Fastener Fair USA is continuing its momentum into<br />

<strong>2022</strong>, bringing our customers back together in Detroit,<br />

Michigan, May 17 – 19, <strong>2022</strong> at the TCF Center (formerly<br />

known as the Cobo Center). You can pre-register to<br />

¤ Cleveland: The Perfect Location<br />

“We were excited to return to Cleveland and<br />

present the first in-person Fastener Fair event since<br />

2019,” said Bob Chiricosta, Event Director for Fastener<br />

Fair USA. “You could feel the excitement on the busy<br />

attend the <strong>2022</strong> show here www.fastenerfairusa.com.<br />

Interested in becoming an exhibitor?<br />

Visit www.FastenerFairUSA.com for the most up-to-date<br />

information on Fastener Fair USA or contact Event Director,<br />

Bob Chiricosta at bob.chricosta@rxglobal.com.<br />

FASTENER FAIR USA


FASTENER FAIR USA<br />

CLEVELAND, OH - NOVEMBER 8-10, 2021<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 159


144<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

STAFDA RECAP OF STAFDA’S ORLANDO 2021 CONVENTION & TRADE SHOW from page 80<br />

Real fun happened at STAFDA’s Opening Party on<br />

Sunday night! STAFDA did a buyout of both Topgolf and<br />

Andretti Karts for three hours which allowed attendees<br />

to act like kids again! Both venues share a common<br />

parking lot so people could freely go back and forth<br />

between the two sites. At Topgolf, all three levels of the<br />

hitting bays were open and retired PGA superstar, Annika<br />

Sorenstam, spent 90 minutes visiting with members and<br />

offering golf tips. There was a DJ, caricature artists,<br />

along with other entertainment to keep the party lively!<br />

Meanwhile, over at Andretti’s, the quick moving line<br />

for the two levels of kart racing was busy all night and<br />

every arcade game was in use. Attendees also made the<br />

most of the zipline, laser tag, and bowling!<br />

Back to business on Monday morning, October 25,<br />

for STAFDA’s General Session. State of the Industry<br />

addresses were presented by STAFDA President,<br />

Brian Gersten, On Time Supply, Suffern, NY, who<br />

covered distributor topics and Don Kudlak, president,<br />

Aerosmith Fastening Systems, Indianapolis, shared<br />

the manufacturer’s perspective. Keynote speaker,<br />

Bill Taylor, co-founder of Fast Company magazine,<br />

highlighted success stories of innovative business<br />

leaders he’s interviewed in recent years.<br />

Monday afternoon was open for the Trade Show and<br />

the rush was on as soon as the doors opened! Exhibitors<br />

said traffic was heavy and distributors were busy in<br />

the hall for the five hours. Tech providers and STAFDA<br />

consultants were also available to meet with members<br />

and they too were pleased with the level of traffic on the<br />

floor. The distributors in attendance represented the<br />

leaders in the industry who haven’t seen their suppliers<br />

since STAFDA’s Nashville 2019 meeting. The ‘right’<br />

distributors were in Orlando and they made the most of<br />

their time.<br />

Tuesday, October 26 featured two educational<br />

sessions in the morning: the ever-popular economist<br />

Alan Beaulieu, and cybersecurity expert, Mark Sangster.<br />

Following their presentations, the Trade Show opened<br />

again for another five hours. STAFDA finished it’s<br />

three day meeting with a Closing Party which featured<br />

professional synchronized swimmers who performed a<br />

routine in the Hyatt Regency Orlando’s pool. The outdoor<br />

closing party was held on the Hyatt’s terrace deck and<br />

gave members another chance to reconnect after two<br />

years of being apart.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 145


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 145<br />

STAFDA RECAP OF STAFDA’S ORLANDO 2021 CONVENTION & TRADE SHOW from page 144<br />

There has already been considerable enthusiasm<br />

for STAFDA’s October 30-November 1, <strong>2022</strong> San Diego<br />

Convention & Trade Show. This will mark STAFDA’s<br />

first time using the San Diego Convention Center. Host<br />

hotels include the Marriott Marquis, Omni San Diego, and<br />

Horton Grand. Because the dates fall over Halloween,<br />

STAFDA’s private Opening Party at the San Diego Zoo will<br />

be called “Boo at the Zoo.” Members will have the option<br />

to wear a costume and STAFDA will have awards for best<br />

costume, most creative, etc. Attendees will have free<br />

reign throughout the Zoo to visit animal exhibits and talk<br />

with handlers.<br />

San Diego Convention registration opens Monday, June<br />

27 from the members-only section of STAFDA’s website.<br />

The STAFDA Convention is a member-only event and to<br />

join the Association, please visit www.stafda.org to review<br />

membership applications and see the full list of services<br />

and benefits. We hope you can join us in <strong>2022</strong>!<br />

SPECIALTY TOOLS & FASTENERS DISTRIBUTORS ASSOCIATION


146<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

ROB LaPOINTE HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT TESTING ON INTERNALLY THREADED PRODUCTS - ARE YOU NUTS? from page 92<br />

FIGURE 5 - ELECTRICAL CHARGES IN A METALLIC STRUCTURE GIVE<br />

IT SOLIDITY AND ELASTICITY.<br />

There are small-scale compressive forces being applied<br />

to the threads of an externally threaded fastener toward the<br />

non-engaged side of the thread, but these forces only act<br />

in compression on the scale of the thread and are focused<br />

on the thread’s root. What’s more, is the compressive<br />

forces contribute to the overall tensile force on the body<br />

of the fastener. Referring to Figure 3 and the list of<br />

conditions required for HE failures, we see that tensile<br />

force or stress is required for a hydrogen embrittlement<br />

failure. Externally threaded fasteners, when tightened, are<br />

under large-scale tensile stress. This enables hydrogen<br />

to migrate from areas surrounding the place of greatest<br />

tensile stress and to concentrate, causing microcracks to<br />

form and facilitating the propagation of cracks across the<br />

material.<br />

Loading an internally threaded fastener is quite<br />

different. The engagement of the nut’s threads against<br />

the bolt’s threads and against the assembly being bolted,<br />

places a large-scale compressive force on the nut rather<br />

than a large-scale tensile force. The force exerted by<br />

the bolt’s threads on the nut and the force exerted by<br />

the bolted assembly against the nut act in opposite<br />

directions, squeezing the nut in large-scale compression.<br />

Referring to Figure 3 and the list of conditions required<br />

for hydrogen embrittlement failure, we’re reminded that<br />

tensile force rather than compressive force is required.<br />

There is the possibility that a nut, having both material<br />

susceptibility and sufficient free hydrogen, could acquire<br />

enough large-scale tensile force to fail due to IHE, but<br />

not in a standard application of nut and bolt tension.<br />

When tightening a nut, since the threads have an angled<br />

interface, there is a small component of the applied force<br />

in an outward direction, causing the nut to expand and<br />

placing a tensile force on the material. A nut’s ability<br />

to hold the tensile load applied by the bolt against this<br />

outward component is call hoop strength. A properly<br />

specified nut for a tension application with a bolt will have<br />

more that sufficient hoop strength to cause the bolt to<br />

fail in ultimate tensile rather than the nut split through<br />

tensional stress. For example, if we were to tighten a<br />

class 12.9 socket cap screw with a class 12 nut to the<br />

point of failure, it will always be the screw that breaks<br />

due to tensile failure. Even at the point of ultimate tensile<br />

failure of the screw, the radial (outward) tensile force on<br />

the nut will not be sufficient to cause hydrogen migration<br />

and failure due to embrittlement.<br />

The probability of a nut failing due to IHE while<br />

serving the role of providing tension in a bolt or screw is<br />

nearly zero. This is not to say that all internally threaded<br />

fasteners in all applications are not at risk of hydrogen<br />

embrittlement, but standard application of nuts with<br />

standard bolting products have minimal risk. It is for<br />

this reason, that hydrogen embrittlement test method<br />

standards do not include methods for testing internally<br />

threaded fasteners.<br />

FIGURE 6 - DIAGRAM OF A NUT CREATING TENSION ON A BOLT<br />

THROUGH BEING SQUEEZED BETWEEN THE BOLT’S THREADS AND<br />

THE FACE OF THE ASSEMBLY.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 147


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 147<br />

ROB LaPOINTE HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT TESTING ON INTERNALLY THREADED PRODUCTS - ARE YOU NUTS? from page 146<br />

In countless IHE tests that we’ve conducted at<br />

AIM Testing Laboratory, there have been a few failures.<br />

These are always exciting for us because (1) something<br />

happened, and something is usually more exciting than<br />

nothing and (2) sometimes we get to witness the failure by<br />

sight or sound. Since the fastener being tested is loaded<br />

to 75-85 % of its ultimate tensile load (ultimate tensile<br />

is the minimum force required to break the fastener),<br />

there is a lot of force on the fastener that is causing it to<br />

physically stretch. If the failure is quick, the fastener acts<br />

like a rubber band that has been stretched and released<br />

suddenly, sending it flying across the room at high<br />

velocity. For this reason, we place fasteners under test in<br />

a metal box to protect staff and delicate measuring tools<br />

in the surrounding environment that could get hit if an IHE<br />

failure occurs. We have never seen a nut fail due to IHE.<br />

In all the IHE tests we’ve conducted at AIM,<br />

approximately 99.5 % of them have been on externally<br />

threaded fasteners and only 0.5 % on internally threaded<br />

fasteners. When we do get an IHE test on nuts, we always<br />

wonder why. In our experience, IHE tests on nuts have<br />

always been driven by customer requirements rather than<br />

drawing or specification requirements. What’s typical is<br />

that an end-user has requested testing in an effort to<br />

cover all possible conditions that a product may face,<br />

so they may have the best assurance that the delivered<br />

product is fully functional. Perhaps they have a nonstandard<br />

use for the nut that might put unusual stresses<br />

on it and they want to ensure that the product is safe for<br />

use in their application.<br />

There are several method specifications that we use<br />

routinely for IHE testing including ASTM F606, NASM 1312-<br />

5, ISO 15330, IFI-113, SAE USCAR 7-2 and ASME B18.6.3.<br />

All of these are developed for externally threaded fasteners.<br />

I do not know of any IHE method specifications written to<br />

accommodate a test on internally threaded fasteners.<br />

Because of the low risk, lack of standard requirement<br />

and lack of methodological resource, we always question<br />

customers who submit orders for IHE testing on internally<br />

threaded fasteners. At AIM, we take the position that<br />

educating our customers is part of the order process.<br />

Additionally, by reducing unnecessary testing, we can<br />

reduce a customer’s risk and save some expense for both<br />

our customer and our customer’s customer.<br />

ROB LaPOINTE / AIM TESTING LABORATORY


148<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

CHRIS DONNELL IT’S A MAD, MAD, TRANSPORTATION WORLD from page 94<br />

It is safe to assume that replenishment will add<br />

to the shipping bottleneck, but the true extent will not<br />

be known until after the holidays. Another situation<br />

that will affect the global supply chain rests on the<br />

new infrastructure bill and how quickly the spending<br />

will take place. Undoubtedly, this bill will infuse a lot of<br />

new business, cash and growth into the Fastener and<br />

Industrial sectors as it focuses on building more fluid<br />

and seamless transportation processes into our aging<br />

infrastructure. Buyer beware though, when inflation does<br />

take hold and buying slows, importers will be faced with<br />

having to trim excess inventory, otherwise they will be<br />

stuck with product they can’t sell or will be forced to take<br />

on potential losses.<br />

In closing, while we are on the road to recovery there<br />

are still may things that could hinder it. There are some<br />

positive things taking place which will help to minimize<br />

the struggles everyone is facing, but it’s going to be a<br />

long time before we get back to a more manageable<br />

level. Something to keep in mind: in 2016, when the<br />

west coast port strike took place, the strike lasted for<br />

a total of 6 weeks but the residual fall out lasted for<br />

several months. We’ve been thrust into the covid fueled<br />

bottleneck for 2 years now, so it’s really anyone’s guess<br />

as to how long the fall out will last this time around.<br />

Therefore, I think it is safe to say <strong>2022</strong> will pose more<br />

of what we saw in 2021 but there is a light at the end of<br />

the tunnel. Although this is the time of year when we all<br />

typically take a deep breath, unwind a little, and spend<br />

time with family and friends; something tells me there<br />

will be more issues, trials and tribulations that will take<br />

place. Make sure you’re investing in the relationships<br />

you have with your logistics providers, as they are in the<br />

fight with you.<br />

CHRIS DONNELL<br />

SOUTHWESTERN FASTENER ASSOCIATION<br />

292 Sugarberry Circle, Houston, TX 77024 TEL 713-952-5472 FAX 713-952-7488 EMAIL swfa@swbell.net WEB www.southwestfastener.org<br />

SFA HAVING THEIR BEST YEAR EVER! by Baron Yarborough<br />

Coming off the great succuss of the San Antonio<br />

Conference, The Southwestern Fastener Association is<br />

poised to have their best year ever! Interim Executive<br />

Director, Baron Yarborough, has worked hard with the<br />

SFA Board and Committees to ensure there are events<br />

for everyone in the fastener industry in <strong>2022</strong>. Some of<br />

the events include, Happy Hours in Dallas, Houston,<br />

and Tulsa, golf outing on March 29th, Sporting Clay<br />

Tournament on April 14th, and Distributor Appreciation<br />

Dinner, free to all distributors, also on April 14th. Not to<br />

mention their Southern Fastener Conference and Expo<br />

September 28th through October 1st.<br />

More big news for the SFA is the development of<br />

ASSOCIATION ARTICLE<br />

their Premium Supplier Program, which allows suppliers<br />

to increase their marketing footprint in the southern<br />

region of the U.S. Current Premium Suppliers include<br />

Advance Components, Star Stainless, Goebel Fasteners,<br />

Brighton-Best International, and BTM Mfg.<br />

If you have any questions about the SFA’s upcoming<br />

events or would like to join the Premium Supplier Program<br />

call or email Baron Yarborough, (817) 896-3315 info@<br />

southwesternfastener.org<br />

SOUTHWESTERN FASTENER ASSOCIATION


150<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

BRUNO MARBACHER DRIVING SYSTEMS FOR FASTENERS – EXTERNAL DRIVES from page 96<br />

12-Point Drive (Ferry Cap)<br />

A 12-point screw drive uses two overlapped hexagon<br />

shapes, one rotated by 30°. Standard 12-point socket<br />

bits and wrenches can be used for these screws. The<br />

screw heads are typically flanged and may fit into socket<br />

head cap screw counterbore.<br />

¤ This drive can be reused several times. Depending<br />

on material being used screws may have to be replaced<br />

if used in a very high temperature application.<br />

Other critical features do not apply or are not<br />

prominent.<br />

External Torx<br />

An external torx has six convex protruding lobes. The<br />

external “E” Torx nominal sizing is not compatible with<br />

the internal “T” size (for example, an E40 socket is too<br />

large to fit a T40.) These screws are most often found in<br />

the automotive industry.<br />

Features & Concerns: A 12-point bolt design offers<br />

the same bearing surface as a hex head cap screw of<br />

comparable size. There really is no difference between<br />

the two, except the top of the head makes wrenching<br />

a little different. Compared to hex head cap screws,<br />

the advantages of these screws include higher torque<br />

capability. A disadvantage is the higher cost involved in<br />

forming the heads.<br />

¤ The increased wrenching surface is a great<br />

improvement for a 12-point drive. A user can get a good<br />

grip on the outside of the head.<br />

¤ The assembler can get it into a counter bore<br />

situation when it’s hidden in a hole. Also, when there’s<br />

more wrenching surface there will be more torque to the<br />

wrench because of an increased contact area for the<br />

12-point bolt.<br />

¤ Typically, a 12-point bolt would be seen in the oil<br />

and gas industry because heads can be recessed.<br />

¤ 12-point bolts are also prevalent in engine<br />

applications. Clamp load for engine applications is<br />

typically higher than most other uses, a 12-point screw<br />

can deliver high torques.<br />

¤ This drive has a poor off-angle capability.<br />

Features & Concerns: External Torx are well suited<br />

for applications needing a “shallow” head, they require<br />

about 30 to 50% less depth.<br />

¤ They provide an excellent alternative to hex or<br />

12-point drives.<br />

¤ External TORX sockets are smaller in diameter than<br />

standard hex sockets used for the same-size fastener.<br />

¤ Screws with external Torx are typical only available<br />

in industrial nations and even there they do not have<br />

widespread use.<br />

¤ They offer a great a stick fit characteristic. A<br />

magnetized socket can improve stick fit.<br />

¤ This drive has a poor off-angle capability.<br />

¤ This drive can be reused several times. the corners<br />

may be rounded during tightening and loosening.<br />

Other critical features do not apply or are not<br />

prominent.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 168


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 151


152<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

GUY AVELLON WHAT FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT STRESS FAILURES from page 98<br />

A classic example is when an exhaust pipe to<br />

muffler was repaired on a school bus using cadmium<br />

plated lock nuts. The pipe and flange heated sufficiently<br />

to cause the bolt to fail from LME before the bus left the<br />

maintenance yard.<br />

Large grain sizes are more severely embrittled<br />

and the fracture stresses vary inversely with the grain<br />

diameter. Brittle to ductile transition temperatures are<br />

increased by increasing the grain size. Therefore, to<br />

avoid any type of metal induced embrittlement with<br />

high strength fasteners, make sure the heat treatment<br />

produces a fine grain structure.<br />

Zinc, lead, cadmium and tin can embrittle steel at<br />

temperatures below each metal’s melting point. Zinc<br />

can cause LME above temperatures of 650˚ F (343˚ C).<br />

In fact, many steels will experience loss of ductility and<br />

cracking during hot dip galvanizing.<br />

Corrosion Fatigue<br />

Corrosion fatigue is metal fatigue failure in a<br />

corrosive environment. This is a mechanical degradation<br />

of the fastener under the combined action of corrosion<br />

and cyclic loading. Unlike stress corrosion cracking,<br />

where corrosive pitting leads to the development of<br />

brittle cracks, the only requirement for corrosion fatigue<br />

is that the material is under tensile stress.<br />

Corrosion fatigue may be mitigated by the addition<br />

of alloys, cathodic protection, nitriding, plating and shot<br />

peening.<br />

Conclusion<br />

Be aware of the environment for the application<br />

and the fastener materials used for compatibility. High<br />

stresses are likely to nucleate a crack in corrosive<br />

environments.<br />

GUY AVELLON<br />

WOMEN IN THE FASTENER INDUSTRY<br />

PO Box 242, Northvale, NJ 07647 EMAIL events@fastenerwomen.com WEB www.fastenerwomen.com<br />

WIFI ‘WOMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD’ WINNER<br />

Congratulations to Nancy Rich, such an amazing<br />

Woman who has contributed to the fastener industry<br />

in so many ways. We are honored to have you as a<br />

member.<br />

Woman of the Year is an award that<br />

recognizes exemplary leadership and<br />

success in the fastener industry. The<br />

recipient will have a long and distinguished<br />

record of advocacy for the professional<br />

advancement of women. Congratulations<br />

2021 Woman of the Year – Nancy Rich, Association<br />

Executive Director.<br />

ASSOCIATION ARTICLE<br />

WOMEN IN THE FASTENER INDUSTRY


154<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

LARRY BOROWSKI GAGING SYSTEMS - PART 1: SYSTEM 21 from page 100<br />

Major Diameter<br />

¤ Maximum (Go) and Minimum (Not Go) Plain<br />

Cylindrical ring gages for Major Diameter.<br />

¤ Major Diameter Snap Gage<br />

¤ Indicating Plain diameter gages, major<br />

diameter type<br />

¤ Optical Comparator and tool makers microscope<br />

with suitable fixturing<br />

¤ Plain Micrometer and Calipers<br />

Note: You are evaluating the Major Diameter either using<br />

Go/NoGo styles of gages, or just measuring it directly<br />

using optical or hard contact means.<br />

Minor Diameter (rounded root – UNJ, MJ only)<br />

¤ Minor Diameter Snap Gage<br />

¤ Minor Diameter Indicating Gage<br />

¤ Optical Comparator and tool makers microscope<br />

with suitable fixturing<br />

Note: You are using either optical means or some<br />

other type of hard gaging that will pick up on the<br />

minor diameter and not interfere with the helix angle<br />

of the fastener. The maximum minor diameter limit is<br />

acceptable when product passes Go gage on UN, UNR,<br />

UNJ, M, and MJ threads.<br />

Internal Threads, ASME B1.3 - 2007 Table 4<br />

In this table you will find that System 21 requires the<br />

following features to be checked. Under each feature the<br />

acceptable gages are summarized. These acceptable<br />

gages are detailed in table 2 of the standard.<br />

GO Maximum Material<br />

¤ Go Threaded Plug Gage.<br />

¤ Go Rolls or Segments for an indicating gage with<br />

120 or 180 degree contact points.<br />

Note: You are checking the Functional Diameter using<br />

either a Go plug or some type of direct measurement<br />

gage that will evaluate multiple threads at the same<br />

time. The minimum Major diameter limit is acceptable<br />

when the product passes the Go plug gage.<br />

NOT GO Functional Diameter<br />

¤ Not Go Threaded Plug Gage.<br />

¤ Go Rolls or Segments for an indicating gage with<br />

120 or 180 degree contact points.<br />

Note: You are checking the Functional Diameter using<br />

either a NoGo plug or some type of direct measurement<br />

gage that will evaluate multiple threads at the same<br />

time. There are no “NoGo” segments or rolls which is<br />

why they are also listed as “Go”.<br />

Minor Diameter<br />

¤ Minimum (Go) and Maximum (Not Go) Plain<br />

Cylindrical plug gage for minor diameter.<br />

¤ Minor diameter type indicating gage<br />

¤ Optical comparator and toolmakers microscope<br />

with suitable fixturing and cast replica.<br />

¤ Linear measuring machine with required accessories<br />

¤ Coordinate measuring machine with required<br />

accessories<br />

Note: You are checking the minor diameter using either<br />

a go/nogo cylindrical plug gage, or some type of direct<br />

measurement gage.<br />

System 21 measurements are the simplest and most<br />

commonly used Gaging System. A quick way to remember<br />

System 21 is to say that it requires pass/fail evaluation<br />

only, with no actual data. Should you not have pass/fail<br />

(Go/NoGo) gages for a particular feature then a direct<br />

measure style of gage is also acceptable.<br />

LARRY BOROWSKI | GREENSLADE & COMPANY INC


156<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

COMPUTER INSIGHTS INC. FIVE SIGNS IT IS TIME TO CHANGE SOFTWARE from page 102<br />

What People Are Saying<br />

“Choosing The Business Edge TM<br />

helped us streamline<br />

all of our processes and eliminated ALL the hiccups and<br />

issues we had with previous ERP packages. If you’re in the<br />

fastener business, I’m not sure why you’d use or entertain<br />

anything else.”<br />

Steve Parham, Operations Manager, Solution Industries<br />

“When moving to The Business Edge, TM<br />

we were very<br />

pleased to find out how much better the customer support<br />

was compared to our previous vendor. The people at<br />

Computer Insights are very helpful and make our lives<br />

easier.”<br />

Eric Seiden, Chief Purchasing Officer, Interstate Screw<br />

Corporation<br />

“We have grown our business without increasing<br />

overhead because The Business Edge TM<br />

allows us to do<br />

more with fewer people. Computer Insights makes it a<br />

breeze to get support quickly and efficiently. We decided<br />

to go with The Business Edge TM<br />

almost twenty years ago.<br />

To date, we still say, one of the best decisions we’ve ever<br />

made with our business.”<br />

Rick Johnson, Executive Stewardship Officer, RC<br />

Fasteners & Components<br />

Start Saving Time & Money<br />

For more information about The Business Edge TM<br />

contact Dennis Cowhey, President, Computer Insights,<br />

Inc. 108 Third Street, Bloomingdale, IL 60108. Tel:<br />

1-800-539-1233, email: sales@ci-inc.com or visit them<br />

online at www.ci-inc.com.<br />

COMPUTER INSIGHTS, INC.<br />

NEW ENGLAND FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS ASSOCIATION<br />

PO Box 151, Lake Zurich, IL 60047 TEL 847-370-9022 TEL 847-516-6728 TEL nancy@nefda.com TEL www.nefda.com<br />

NEFDA VIRTUAL HOLIDAY PARTY by Nancy Rich<br />

Fun and Chance for Members to Unite<br />

After the success of last year’s event, the NEFDA<br />

once again kicked off the holidays with a virtual raffle<br />

on December 1st. Matthew Callahan of Callahan Sales<br />

hosted a fun evening with members and attendees<br />

while Laura Driver of D.B. Roberts coordinated our event<br />

presentation – both did a fantastic job! A big ‘THANK YOU’<br />

to the generosity of our sponsors who donated some<br />

wonderful prizes; we couldn’t have done it without you.<br />

Prizes included a fire pit, 32” TV’s, a Nest thermostat, a<br />

Yeti cooler, a backpack, an Omaha Steak gift package,<br />

Apple AirPods, an air fryer, and over $1000 in a variety of<br />

gift cards. We had a bunch of winners and all the proceeds<br />

went straight to the NEFDA scholarship fund.<br />

Members who attended the event also took part in a<br />

holiday “ugly” sweater contest and holiday drink contest.<br />

ASSOCIATION ARTICLE<br />

Corey Magyar of Smith Associates was the winner of the<br />

“ugly” sweater contest and Al Fowler of D.B. Roberts was<br />

the winner of the holiday drink contest. Congratulations to<br />

Corey and Al!<br />

A big THANK YOU to our many sponsors who<br />

made this a special event possible:<br />

¤ Arnold Supply Inc.<br />

¤ Brighton Best International<br />

¤ Cable Tie Express<br />

¤ Callahan Sales<br />

¤ Crescent Mfg.<br />

¤ D. B. Roberts<br />

¤ EFC International<br />

¤ Fall River Mfg.<br />

¤ Kanebridge Corp.<br />

¤ North East Fastener Corp.<br />

¤ Rick Rudolph Associates<br />

¤ R. W. Rundle Associates<br />

¤ Soule, Blake & Weschler<br />

¤ Sherex Fastening Solutions<br />

¤ Smith Associates<br />

¤ Spirol International<br />

¤ Star Stainless Screw<br />

¤ Stelfast<br />

¤ U.S. Fastener Sources<br />

¤ Vertex Distribution<br />

NEW ENGLAND FASTENER DISTRIBUTORS ASSOCIATION


158<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

ROBERT FOOTLIK OPTIMIZING VERY NARROW AISLES from page 104<br />

Making VNA Work In Your Context<br />

The next concern is productivity. Analyzing and<br />

potentially exploiting thisbreaks into horizontal and a<br />

vertical components. Concentrating the inventory into<br />

a tighter configuration means less horizontal movement<br />

will be required. Narrowing the aisles to VNA distances<br />

makes it impossible for two pallet loads or fork lifts to<br />

pass in a picking aisle. This implies that only one truck<br />

at a time can work in this aisle, or a very sophisticated<br />

Warehouse Management System (WMS) must be in<br />

place. If there is only one picker/vehicle working in<br />

the warehouse, this is not a problem. Adding fork<br />

lifts with aisles of less than 8’ will require some strategy<br />

for splitting the orders, then mating the pieces together<br />

prior to shipping. A good WMS given the right information<br />

and working with context specific programs can handle<br />

this. A poor system will fail. For most packaged WMS<br />

programs based solely on popularity of product placement<br />

travel times might decrease, but never optimize. In an<br />

OEM distribution environment customers inevitably order<br />

by their own defined family group which includes related<br />

part numbers that may be quite limited in both the pieces<br />

and the number of times picked.<br />

According to accepted practices of Industrial<br />

Engineering, the fastest moving items should be stored<br />

closest to the front of the warehouse, with slow-moving<br />

materials at the back of the storage area. This may be true,<br />

but only for product families. In reality, most products have<br />

an affinity for other items or families. Profiling a narrow<br />

aisle warehouse must therefore take into consideration<br />

both the vertical and horizontal travel speeds of the<br />

equipment. It is far faster to store slow moving, related<br />

items vertically, rather than spreading them throughout<br />

the warehouse. Miss-profiling the pallet racks can reduce<br />

productivity and throughput. Placing items randomly, or by<br />

rules that ignore product affinity, guarantees that there will<br />

never be a payback for the new equipment.<br />

Consider a manufactured product with flanges that<br />

require 8 cap screws, 8 washers and 8 nuts. When this<br />

is assembled a special anti-gall paste must be applied.<br />

If the chemical is sold by the tube or case of tubes the<br />

ratio between fastener and thread treatment dictates that<br />

although the items are related the quantities and picking<br />

hits will be radically different. Under VNA planning the fast<br />

moving Stock Keeping Units (SKUs) should be near the<br />

floor level and the related, slower moving inventory directly<br />

above it. “Popping up” is far faster than moving vertically,<br />

even in a fully automated system.<br />

Aisles that are 4’ to 6’ wide are too narrow for an<br />

operator to traverse without hitting the racks or pallets.<br />

Electronic guidance systems, and/or steel angle iron<br />

guide rails are an absolute necessity. With the forklift<br />

contained in the aisle, and self steering, the operator can<br />

focus on the task of moving to the right bin and picking<br />

the right materials. These systems are expensive to<br />

install, and in a rental facility the cost of installation may<br />

not be recoverable over the period of the lease. While the<br />

electronic controls and steel can be reutilized, the cost of<br />

moving these components to a new building can negate<br />

the space savings. Even with wire guidance and fail safe<br />

systems guide rails and guard posts are vital.<br />

Another important layout consideration is the width of<br />

any cross aisles. VNA equipment may require clearances<br />

of 12’-6” to 16’-0” to turn from one aisle and enter an<br />

adjacent aisle. If the picking aisles are short, then space<br />

that is saved in the narrow aisle will be squandered in<br />

the cross aisle. Some vendors have suggested that this<br />

condition can be alleviated by eliminating one, or more,<br />

of the cross aisles. On paper this looks good, but in the<br />

real world, the savings in space is traded for reduced<br />

throughput. An operator who needs to go from the rear<br />

of dead ending aisle one to the rear of aisle two must<br />

backtrack to the cross aisle. This could result in miles<br />

per year of travel to move only 12’ sideways.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 170


FASTENER FAIR USA<br />

CLEVELAND, OH - NOVEMBER 8-10, 2021<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 169


160<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

DANI FRIEDLAND CONNECTED FOR LIFE: RCSC HONORS ITS LATEST LIFE MEMBERS from page 112<br />

William A. Thornton,<br />

PE, NAE, PhD,<br />

Former President of Cives<br />

Engineering Corporation<br />

Bill Thornton’s greatest<br />

impacts on the bolting industry<br />

arguably result from the 26<br />

years he spent as chair of the<br />

AISC Committee on Manuals<br />

and Textbooks (from 1985 to 2011). During this<br />

time, the coverage of connection design and bolting<br />

related topics in the AISC Steel Construction Manual<br />

expanded significantly. Under Bill’s stewardship, the<br />

Manual focused on providing simple and practical<br />

guidance related to many common bolted connections<br />

that remain firmly rooted in first principles. This work<br />

influences thousands of engineers and likely millions of<br />

tons of structural steel.<br />

Beyond providing a guiding hand for the industry,<br />

Bill also contributed directly to the body of knowledge by<br />

formalizing the treatment of prying action for both bearing<br />

and slip-critical connections, developing procedures<br />

to evaluate the rotational ductility of bolted simple<br />

beam end connections, and shepherding the adoption<br />

of improved design procedures for single-plate shear<br />

connections and vertical brace connections. If not for<br />

Bill’s work, high-strength bolted connections would be<br />

less efficient, safe, and prevalent than they are today.<br />

As president of Cives Engineering, Bill was<br />

responsible for all structural design performed by Cives<br />

Engineering and served as a consultant to the six<br />

divisions of Cives Steel Company in matters relating to<br />

quality assurance, connection design, and fabrication<br />

practices. He has nearly six decades of experience in<br />

teaching, research, consulting, and practice in the area<br />

of structural analysis and design. He won AISC’s 1995<br />

T.R. Higgins Lectureship Award, a 2003 AISC Lifetime<br />

Achievement Award, and the 2004 Craftsmanship Award<br />

of the General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen of<br />

the City of New York. He was inducted into the National<br />

Academy of Engineering in 2013. Bill has also, obviously,<br />

been a longstanding member of the Research Council on<br />

Structural Connections.<br />

Raymond Tide, PE, PhD,<br />

Principal, Wiss, Janney,<br />

Elstner Associates, Inc.<br />

If you were to walk into Ray<br />

Tide’s office at WJE, you would<br />

sense that he is a real steel<br />

lover. His bookshelves are filled<br />

with references and reports that<br />

encompass structural steel and<br />

bolting over the past sixty years.<br />

He joined RCSC in 1982, serving on the Council’s<br />

Executive Committee multiple times and as Chair of the<br />

RCSC from 2000 to 2006. His participation on the Council<br />

resulted in significant improvements in our understanding of<br />

bolt design provisions, including his work in long joints that<br />

yielded more economical connections. He led committees<br />

on research needs as well as bolts under tension and<br />

prying action and has also been an active member of the<br />

Specifications Committee.<br />

He is a registered professional engineer in multiple<br />

U.S. states and Canadian provinces. In addition to his long<br />

history with AISC and RCSC, Ray has been closely involved<br />

with the development of the American Welding Society’s<br />

(AWS) D1.1 Structural Welding Code – Steel and the<br />

American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Subcommittee<br />

on Structural Connections, as well as the Structural<br />

Engineers Association of California (SEAOC) and Applied<br />

Technology Council (ATC) following the 1994 Northridge<br />

earthquake.<br />

A University of Manitoba and Lehigh University graduate,<br />

Ray served three years as an officer in the Canadian Army<br />

Corps of Engineers, spending some time abroad on the<br />

Sinai Peninsula. He joined AISC in Minnesota as a technical<br />

representative after completing his doctoral studies at<br />

Washington University in St. Louis in 1971. While at AISC,<br />

he is credited with compiling the first version of the steel<br />

shapes database in 1980, in conjunction with the release<br />

of the 8th edition Manual of Steel Construction. From<br />

AISC, he moved on to become manager of engineering for<br />

Paxton Vierling Steel, where he was responsible for design,<br />

fabrication, and quality control. During this time and until<br />

his retirement to emeritus status in 2014, Ray was actively<br />

involved in numerous AISC technical, special task force,<br />

and ad hoc committees. Ray joined WJE in 1982, bringing<br />

his background in structural steel to the practice of failure<br />

investigations and rehabilitation designs.<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 161


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 161<br />

DANI FRIEDLAND CONNECTED FOR LIFE: RCSC HONORS ITS LATEST LIFE MEMBERS from page 160<br />

Joseph A. Yura, PE, NAE, PhD,<br />

Emeritus Professor in Civil<br />

Engineering, The University<br />

of Texas at Austin<br />

Joe Yura’s meticulous<br />

research and skill transforming<br />

that research into practice<br />

by crafting clear specification<br />

requirements have greatly<br />

advanced the use of bolted connections in buildings,<br />

bridges, and ancillary structures. Joe stands out as a<br />

leader in developing the understanding of connection<br />

behavior and translating that knowledge through the RCSC<br />

and AISC specifications.<br />

Besides his contribution to the design of bolted<br />

connections, Joe was very active in the development of<br />

bracing provisions for columns and girders as well as<br />

composite construction, offshore tubular structures, and<br />

elastomeric bearings. He also served as director of the<br />

Ferguson Structural Engineering Laboratory.<br />

In 2000, he was elected to the National Academy of<br />

Engineering for his work in the stability and bracing of steel<br />

structures. His research in bolted connections improved<br />

understanding and design of double row shear web<br />

connections and block shear behavior of connections in<br />

coped beams. He also developed the bearing deformation<br />

limit in bolted connections, the effect of fillers upon the<br />

shear strength of bolted connections, the method for<br />

testing the slip behavior of coated surfaces, including<br />

galvanized surfaces, and the effect of lubrication and<br />

thread fit upon the tightening behavior of coated fasteners.<br />

He served 32 years as a member of the AISC<br />

Specification Committee and has received a Lifetime<br />

Achievement Award and Geerhard Haaijer Award for<br />

Excellence in Education from AISC, as well as the T.R.<br />

Higgins Lectureship Award in 1974. He also received<br />

ASCE’s Short-ridge Hardesty Award in 1997 and SSRC’s<br />

Lynn S. Beedle Award in 2006.<br />

DANI FRIEDLAND


162<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

HOWMET FASTENING SYSTEMS STRUCTURAL BLIND FASTENERS HELP ENGINEERS WITH LIGHTWEIGHTING from page 114<br />

Structural blind fasteners offer similar benefits<br />

to those of non-structural blind fasteners, while also<br />

providinga distinct advantage:quantifiable and predictable<br />

shear and tensile strength. Unlike “pop” type rivets,<br />

structural blind rivets retain their mandrel after installation.<br />

This retention of the mandrel is made possible by the<br />

interaction of the mandrel and mandrel sleeve during<br />

the installation process. The presence of the mandrel<br />

accounts for a 60-80% increase in load-carrying ability in<br />

shear and tensile over conventional non-structural blind<br />

fasteners. Structural blind fasteners can be differentiated<br />

from non-structural not only by their overall increased level<br />

of strength,but also by the fact that their published shear<br />

values will be higher than theirtensile values.<br />

Structural blind fasteners install quickly (often in under<br />

one second), by a single operator from one side of the<br />

material. Operator training is simple, and does not require<br />

any sort of certification. Also, special training is also not a<br />

requirement for inspection, since the visual inspection of<br />

structural blind fastenersis based solely on the position of<br />

the mandrel break location relative to the sleeve.<br />

CUTAWAY OF AN INSTALLED STRUCTURAL BLIND FASTENER<br />

SHOWING BOTH A RETAINED MANDREL AND A FLUSH BREAK.<br />

Many attributes make structural blind fasteners ideal<br />

for fastening dissimilar materials. These fastenersare<br />

available in a variety of materials, diameters, head styles,<br />

coatings, and structural strengths. They join material<br />

through either hole-fill or surface bearing. Hole-filling<br />

blind fasteners ensure holes remain correctly aligned<br />

after installation, preventing “sheet creep,” while surface<br />

bearing blind fasteners may be used with thin or brittle<br />

materialor where high tear out loads are required. These<br />

surface bearing fastenersmay also be usedin situations<br />

with slotted holes on the blind side of the application.<br />

Installation of structural blind fasteners is both safe<br />

and simple. No fumes are emitted in the installation<br />

process, no heat is used, and surfaces do not have to<br />

be cleaned or pretreated. The availability of material and<br />

coating options for structural blind fasteners virtually<br />

eliminates concerns about surface oxidation. Some<br />

structural blind fasteners even include undercut filets on<br />

the sleeves, ensuring that they seat properly and require<br />

no grinding or de-burring of the hole surface.<br />

Installed structural blind fasteners remain tight up to<br />

their minimum mechanical values, creating tight, vibrationresistant<br />

joints that are less susceptible to cracking.<br />

These versatile fasteners can also be used in conjunction<br />

with adhesives to ensure that a joint remains tight until<br />

the adhesives cure while also contributing additional<br />

supportive strength to the joint.<br />

Finally, the installed cost of structural blind fasteners<br />

tends to be lower than that of other joining options,<br />

with savings on time, labor, and complicated inspection<br />

processes resulting in overall savings and higher output.<br />

Moving Forward<br />

The automotive industry is under continued pressure<br />

to do more with less: less weight, less cost, and less<br />

time. The growing usage of aluminum and other exotic<br />

materials presents unique challenges in joint design.<br />

Understanding how different joining technologies function<br />

from the perspective of weight, cost, productivity, and<br />

reliability is crucial. While adhesives and welding are often<br />

the joining technologies of choice when trying to address<br />

weight concerns, structural blind fasteners should also be<br />

given strong consideration.<br />

Structural blind fasteners may add minimal weight to<br />

the system when compared to adhesives or welds, but<br />

despite this, structural blind fasteners offer a viable, if<br />

not superior, alternative to other technologies. Structural<br />

blind fasteners create strong, tight joints between various<br />

materials, and the wide selection of fastener options<br />

offers unique characteristics and performance, allowing<br />

joint designers to zero in on the solution that works<br />

best for each application. Easy installation procedures<br />

make it easier to secure and train operators, while quick<br />

visual inspection guidelines help ensure that each joint is<br />

fastened properly, every time..<br />

HOWMET FASTENING SYSTEMS


164<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

LAURENCE CLAUS CAN SOMEONE SLOW THIS ROLLER COASTER DOWN? from page 118<br />

Additionally, we see continued cost pressure on<br />

items like food, gasoline, energy, and construction<br />

materials. It is impossible to predict at the moment, but<br />

once instituted, how many of these items will remain<br />

inflated? Additionally, how much additional energy and<br />

resources will be required by fastener companies to<br />

address and pass along their rising costs to their<br />

customers?<br />

COVID Vaccine Mandates<br />

A final and very ominous looming challenge will be<br />

how fastener companies will react to upcoming vaccine<br />

mandates. Recent presidential edicts, should they<br />

withstand legal challenges, will make it necessary for<br />

most private sector companies with over 100 employees<br />

and government contractors to have a fully vaccinated<br />

workforce. Although there may be some provisions for<br />

exclusions, these are expected to be fairly limited. How<br />

will companies address compliance to whatever the new<br />

rules effectively become when a significant segment<br />

of their workforce, in some cases, perhaps as high as<br />

40% remain unvaccinated? Companies, many already<br />

struggling under the weight of the pandemic, simply<br />

cannot remain solvent if confronted with having to<br />

furlough or terminate 20%-30% of their workforce or face<br />

costly enforcement actions or penalties.<br />

Summary<br />

If only one of these forces was in-play, companies<br />

would likely feel some mild stress but quickly figure out<br />

successful ways to work around them. However, the<br />

combination of all these forces simultaneously raises<br />

the question of whether we are facing a “Perfect Storm.”<br />

Regardless whether you are impacted by all of these<br />

things or not, the industry is inarguably experiencing<br />

one of its most challenging seasons in recent history.<br />

Business leaders and managers will have to stay<br />

on-top of all of these things, recognize how many are<br />

interrelated, and be prepared to decisively act to keep<br />

their businesses healthy and making progress.<br />

LAURENCE CLAUS<br />

Frontenac announced that it has acquired EFC<br />

International (“EFC” or the “Company”), a valueadded<br />

distributor of highly engineered fasteners.<br />

The financial terms of the transaction were not<br />

disclosed.<br />

EFC operates globally and provides solutions<br />

such as engineering support, sales and marketing,<br />

distribution, and high-touch service to customers in<br />

the automotive, industrial, and other technical end<br />

markets. The Company has served as a critical link<br />

between suppliers and customers for over 35 years.<br />

EFC has a history of growth driven by longstanding<br />

supplier relationships and a tenured customer base.<br />

CEO, Matt Dudenhoeffer, along with the current<br />

executive team, will continue in their roles leading<br />

the Company.<br />

“We have enjoyed strong growth over the past<br />

several years as we executed on a number of key<br />

initiatives that have expanded our global reach as<br />

well as our customer and supplier base,” said Matt<br />

Dudenhoeffer. “With Frontenac as our new partner,<br />

we are excited to leverage their industrial distribution<br />

expertise to continue our expansion plans, both<br />

organic and inorganic, and continue to increase<br />

market share both domestically and abroad.”<br />

Ron Kuehl, Managing Director at Frontenac,<br />

commented, “We identify and invest in industry<br />

leaders that are growing in excess of the market and<br />

provide first rate service to customers and suppliers<br />

alike. EFC has grown impressively and perfectly fits<br />

our target profile. We look forward to deploying our<br />

playbooks, working with the team to accelerate the<br />

pace of progress, and having another successful<br />

industrial distribution investment for Frontenac.”<br />

Neal Sahney, Principal at Frontenac, added, “EFC<br />

has performed exceptionally well over decades and<br />

generated record results this year. The team has<br />

proven to be adept at both investing in the business<br />

for the long-term and growing earnings. The future<br />

is bright for EFC, and we are looking forward to<br />

collaborating with the team in support of their<br />

strategic plan.”<br />

For more information contact EFC International by<br />

Tel: 314-434-2888 or online at www.efc-intl.com.


THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 165<br />

MID-WEST FASTENER ASSOCIATION<br />

PO Box 5, Lake Zurich, IL 60047 TOLL-FREE 1-800-753-8338 TEL 847-438-8338 EMAIL mwfa@ameritech.com WEB www.mwfa.net<br />

<strong>2022</strong> BOARD OF DIRECTORS & EVENTS SCHEDULE by Nancy Rich<br />

<strong>2022</strong> Board of Directors<br />

President<br />

Vice President Jake Davis<br />

BTM<br />

Treasurer<br />

Secretary<br />

George Hunt<br />

Brighton-Best International<br />

Bob Baer<br />

Abbott Interfast Inc.<br />

ASSOCIATION ARTICLE<br />

Bobby Wegner<br />

Beacon Fasteners and Components<br />

Directors<br />

Glen Brin - Innovative Components Inc.<br />

Pam Cicero - Elgin Fastener Group<br />

Matt Delawder - SWD Inc.<br />

David Gawlik - telfast<br />

Jill Lewis - Integrated Packaging<br />

Alternates<br />

Rich Cavoto - Metric & Multistandard Components<br />

Tabitha Herbst - Burlington Graphics<br />

Jen Kushnir - DLP Coatings<br />

Steve Urhausen - All American Systems<br />

Wayne Wishnew - XL Screw Corporation<br />

<strong>2022</strong> Event Schedule<br />

February 17 Economic Update<br />

August 22-26 MWFA FSTNR Week<br />

August 23 40th Annual MWFA Fastener Show<br />

August 24 69th Annual Golf Outing<br />

August 25 MWFA Mixer<br />

August 22-26 Fastener Training Week<br />

November 3 Scholarship Awards & Elections<br />

December 8 Holiday Party<br />

Check www.mwfa.net for more dates and details.<br />

MID-WEST FASTENER ASSOCIATION


166<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

NELSON VALDERRAMA 5 WAYS TO THRIVE IN A SHIFTING INDUSTRY WITH CONSOLIDATING DISTRIBUTORS from page 122<br />

So what do these mean? Core accounts (a segment that<br />

typically represent 30-50% of your total GM$) are those<br />

ones that if you lose any of them you will not be able to<br />

sleep , they tend to be the stickiest and you and your team<br />

will do almost anything to keep them really happy.<br />

VIP accounts are just shy of being Core accounts, so<br />

you want to really focus on nurturing them to find out what<br />

is the most important add value you are providing that will<br />

make them to stick with you ---a journey that might take<br />

months.<br />

Standard accounts are your come-and-go customers<br />

but provide a nice GM$ at lower cost to serve. And the<br />

Drain accounts are actually losing you GM$, meaning it’s<br />

time to review the cost to serve them.<br />

To understand better how to segment these 2 last<br />

buckets of customers you need to use some metrics<br />

associated with customer acquisition, repeat purchases,<br />

tickets size and the cost to serve them becomes critical.<br />

Distributors should target buyers who will not just make<br />

one-time purchases but order regularly.<br />

Tip #5 - Size Matters, Use It To Your Advantage<br />

Being a smaller distributor comes with certain<br />

advantages that are unique to this industry. For example,<br />

such businesses might have the flexibility of adding<br />

products into their repertoire when demand suddenly<br />

increases for something specific like face masks and<br />

hand sanitizer during pandemic periods of time.<br />

Smaller businesses are better positioned to solve<br />

the issue of availability because they have fewer costs<br />

and constraints. Large companies often sacrifice speed<br />

in order maintain stability, which might translate into<br />

an inability for them respond quickly enough when new<br />

opportunities arise or threats materialize without warning.<br />

A well-structured company needs time before it can<br />

plan its next move; whereas smaller operations generally<br />

do not need as much forethought since everything’s been<br />

thought through beforehand. There are many advantages<br />

to working with a local distributor. They can provide you<br />

the critical tool or item that your company needs in order<br />

for their location, which may be close by on site and have<br />

an experienced sales rep who knows how best to deliver<br />

said products same-day if need arises! Big distributors<br />

might have a hard time pulling that off.<br />

The most successful distributors I’ve seen are those<br />

that have built a culture that rewards agility and getting<br />

things done. They play smart by keeping their eye on the<br />

ball, or in this case; target audience!<br />

Forward Thinkers Play The Game Differently<br />

To Thrive In A Consolidating Industry<br />

Forward Thinkers attract, retain and invest in the<br />

best talent which will help them to find a favorable mix<br />

of profitable customers as well make the investments in<br />

digital capabilities to improve the customer experience .<br />

Forward Thinkers Compete smarter by building<br />

commercial excellence from customer segmentation,<br />

sales force training and dynamically tailored pricing to<br />

accelerating organic growth and expanding margins<br />

The future is not bleak for smaller and midsize<br />

wholesale distributors. Even in the face of rapid<br />

consolidation, there’s no doubt they still have a place on<br />

this market as long as their experimentation continues<br />

with adjustments along the way to find out what that<br />

perfect spot looks like .<br />

Businesses with seven-figure revenues can coexist<br />

and thrive alongside the powerhouses that bring in billions<br />

every year. In many cases, they may serve different<br />

customer bases or address entirely different needs!<br />

Despite the odds, many businesses continue resisting<br />

attractive offers that would change their legacy. They know<br />

it’s important for them to maintain a certain level of<br />

independence and resist any attempts at rebranding in<br />

order not only stay relevant but also better endure years<br />

down the line with an established identity as well.<br />

If you are looking into how these tips can help your<br />

company stand out from competitors, then please feel<br />

free to get in touch.<br />

NELSON VALDERRAMA


INTERNATIONAL FASTENER EXPO<br />

MANDALAY BAY, LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 22-23, 2021<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 171


168<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

BRUNO MARBACHER DRIVING SYSTEMS FOR FASTENERS – EXTERNAL DRIVES from page 150<br />

External Torx Plus<br />

Torx Plus drive furnished with elliptical lobes, it<br />

enables higher torque than regular Torx. This information<br />

is partially based on product literature.<br />

Other critical features do not apply or are not<br />

prominent.<br />

Torxstem ® Double-End Studs<br />

Since most double end studs lack a drive system, it<br />

is necessary to grip the threaded portion of the stud in<br />

order to drive it in, which can result in thread damage.<br />

A special external TORX extruded onto one end of the<br />

TORXSTEM® double end stud simplifies driving.<br />

TORXSTEM studs are installed using a TORX socket<br />

thus reduce thread damage.<br />

Features & Concerns: 0º drive angle, as a result,<br />

the torque is transferred more in a turn direction,<br />

eliminates radial stresses.<br />

¤ Elliptical lobe configuration improves drive bit<br />

engagement.<br />

¤ Large cross-sectional area of lobes, provides 10%<br />

more torsional strength, thus allows for a higher torque.<br />

¤ Torx Plus allows for a Lower head Profile still<br />

enables a high torque transfer.<br />

¤ It requires a Torx Plus socket to assemble thus the<br />

worldwide use is limited.<br />

¤ This drive has a poor off-angle capability.<br />

¤ E-Torx Plus is available with Autosert to facilitate<br />

driver engagement to speed up automated assembly.<br />

¤ This drive is very durable, hence can be reused<br />

serval times.<br />

¤ TORX PLUS® sockets are required for installation<br />

and removal, as TORX® sockets are not compatible with<br />

regular Torx.<br />

12-Spline Flange<br />

The 12-spline flange screw drive has twelve splines<br />

the fastener head and tool. It consists of 12 equally<br />

spaced protrusions, each with a 60° angle. The spline<br />

drive was specified by ASTM B18.2.7.1M, which was<br />

withdrawn in 2011, making the spline drive obsolete.<br />

Its primary use is in high-torque applications, such as<br />

tamper-proof lug nuts, cylinder head bolts, as well as<br />

other engine bolts.<br />

Conclusion<br />

Many of the specialty drives we addressed are very<br />

useful for certain applications but may not be that useful<br />

for others. Before any of these drives are chosen, the<br />

application, installation, should be evaluated. Application<br />

engineers should carry out application testing, try it out<br />

in the intended installation. Based on the results the<br />

most suitable drive ought to be selected.<br />

Some of these special drives are still patented, they<br />

may not be readily available. Many of today’s devices,<br />

appliances are hardly ever serviced so using those<br />

special drives is perfectly all right.<br />

However, for equipment that needs periodic service<br />

and maintenance in the field, one should opt for more<br />

common drives.<br />

BRUNO MARBACHER


FASTENER FAIR USA<br />

CLEVELAND, OH - NOVEMBER 8-10, 2021


170<br />

THE DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK<br />

ROBERT FOOTLIK OPTIMIZING VERY NARROW AISLES from page 158<br />

Implementation Isn’t Easy...<br />

Or It Might Be Simpler Than You Think<br />

It all starts with philosophy and planning. The<br />

philosophical basis is defining families in both your<br />

context and your customer’s. While digging into the<br />

data for frequency of demand (“hits”) and quantities<br />

might be sufficient for a most Fastener Distributors,<br />

OEM is usually radically different. Customer purchasing<br />

systems, delivery requirements (corporate, centralized<br />

Distribution center, or shop floor), part interchangeability<br />

(vs. government contract part numbering), engineering<br />

and testing mandates and a host of other factors will<br />

dictate family groups. This can be best facilitated by<br />

communication between the individuals who actually<br />

work with the information. Attempting this level of<br />

cooperation by working thru sales is likely to be an<br />

exercise in futile frustration.<br />

Unless procedures and training are updated, the<br />

overall order processing time will increase dramatically.<br />

Spending money on sophisticated systems that add cost<br />

is not good for the company, or your career.<br />

At this point, VNA may make economic sense, but<br />

the Aaggravation factor@ is starting to dominate the<br />

discussion. Putting in a Very Narrow Aisle system is<br />

not just a matter of shoving the racks together.<br />

Every<br />

aspect must be planned to maximize performance.<br />

Investing in a $100,000 fork lift is only the down<br />

payment. Each additional cost factor contributes to<br />

the savings, or expenses, of the system. One must<br />

also examine the throughput. Will only one vehicle and<br />

system be required, or will additional units need to be<br />

purchased for immediate use? There are computer<br />

simulation programs available for quantizing these<br />

numbers. Most vendors can arrange for a dynamic<br />

test of their equipment. This might be performed in an<br />

installed system in another industry by utilizing a deck<br />

of cards to simulate product picks. With 52 cards,<br />

arranged in four families (spades, hearts, diamonds<br />

and clubs) one can set up storage and pick patterns<br />

that optimize the equipment usage and provides a fair<br />

evaluation of the throughput. This poor man’s system<br />

planning cannot cover every contingency, but will provide<br />

an initial starting point.<br />

The last factor to take into consideration is downtime.<br />

The more complicated the equipment, the greater the<br />

opportunity for mechanical or system failure. When the<br />

complex equipment is out of commission, will everything<br />

come to a halt? A relatively inexpensive Order Picker<br />

type of forklift can do many of the functions of a “Swing<br />

Reach,” with some loss of productivity. This may be an<br />

acceptable way to cover these contingencies, and it must<br />

be factored into the system justification.<br />

Are There Any Other Choices?<br />

When all these elements are considered, VNA<br />

systems are often the best choice for improving space<br />

utilization and productivity. Pay back periods of three to<br />

five years are legitimate criteria, but this may not optimize<br />

your situation. An acceptable alternative is not to trying<br />

to solve all problems with the same solution. Given the<br />

different requirements of picking “hits,” it may be possible<br />

to use a variety of equipment and aisle spacing. Fast<br />

moving, high pick families can be handled at floor level<br />

with wider aisles and a reach type of forklift. The slower<br />

moving affinity items within this family can be located<br />

directly above the “quick picks,” and the slower moving<br />

families, or stand alone items stored in a VNA area.<br />

Mixing and matching the materials handling<br />

equipment to the needs of the operation allows one<br />

to develop optimization techniques and expand these<br />

improvements on a “pay as you go” basis. The savings<br />

generated by each productivity enhancement can be<br />

accrued to prepay the next level on efficiency.<br />

Every Distribution facility has a unique operation.<br />

Even two branches, of the same company, in the same<br />

city, may not have identical needs, and should not utilize<br />

duplicated layouts, equipment or systems. Very Narrow<br />

Aisles have their place in the layout specialist’s “bag of<br />

tricks.” Knowing that sophisticated equipment exists,<br />

and evaluating its potential in your operation requires a<br />

long range perspective.<br />

Devote as much time to planning and improving the<br />

warehouse as marketing does to increasing sales. The<br />

profitability may be greater, and at the very least, the<br />

warehouse can continue to support the promises that<br />

sales generates.<br />

ROBERT FOOTLIK


INTERNATIONAL FASTENER EXPO<br />

MANDALAY BAY, LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 22-23, 2021<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 172


INTERNATIONAL FASTENER EXPO<br />

MANDALAY BAY, LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 22-23, 2021<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 174


INTERNATIONAL FASTENER EXPO<br />

MANDALAY BAY, LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 22-23, 2021<br />

CONTINUED ON PAGE 175


INTERNATIONAL FASTENER EXPO<br />

MANDALAY BAY, LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 22-23, 2021


INTERNATIONAL FASTENER EXPO - WELCOME RECEPTION<br />

MANDALAY BAY, LAS VEGAS, NV - SEPTEMBER 21, 2021


PAC-WEST FASTENER ASSOCIATION - HOLIDAY PARTY &<br />

TOYS FOR TOTS COLLECTION - DECEMBER 2, 2021


advertisers index<br />

#<br />

3Q, INC. 117<br />

Washers, nuts, tapping screws, bolts, special<br />

fasteners, single parts, secondary processes,<br />

in-house kitting and packaging, direct import<br />

services, and remote managed inventory.<br />

Tel (630) 405-8492<br />

Email: sales@3Q-Inc.com<br />

A<br />

ACS MANUFACTURING, INC 121<br />

Formed spring steel fasteners<br />

Tel (888) NUTS-R-US<br />

Email: info@acsmanufacturing.com<br />

AIM TESTING LABORATORY 93<br />

AIM Testing Laboratory is an integrated business<br />

partner. AIM’s technical experts support your<br />

staff and understand your processes so they<br />

can provide the correct knowledge and guidance<br />

when and where you need it.<br />

Tel (619) 396-2046<br />

Email: info@aimtestlab.com<br />

AJAX WIRE SPECIALTY CO., INC. 119<br />

For over 80 years, Ajax has been specializing in<br />

the custom design and manufacturing of wire<br />

springs, custom springs and spring assortments.<br />

Tel (855) 966-AJAX (2529)<br />

Email: ajaxwire@aol.com<br />

ALBANY STEEL & BRASS 27<br />

Specialty Tapping Screws - Swageform<br />

Tel (312) 733-1900<br />

Email: sales@albanysteel.com<br />

ALL AMERICAN WASHER WERKS 84<br />

Quality producers of washers and stampings<br />

Tel (847) 566-9091<br />

Email: sales@washerwerks.com<br />

ALLOY & STAINLESS FASTENERS<br />

38, 39, 78, 97, 123<br />

Supplies special metal fasteners in over 150<br />

material grades and over 25 coatings and<br />

platings using over 300 machines with a<br />

10,000 ton inventory with Emergency 24-7<br />

on call service.<br />

Tel (713) 466-3031<br />

Email: info@GoASF.com<br />

ALPHA-GRAINGER MFG. CO. 25<br />

Electronic hardware, captive screws, shoulder<br />

screws, spacers & standoffs<br />

Tel (508) 520-4005<br />

ALUMINUM FASTENER SUPPLY 110, 111<br />

The only exclusive aluminum fastener<br />

supplier of made in the USA products. 6,500<br />

line items in stock with same day shipping.<br />

It’s all we do!<br />

Tel (800) 526-0341<br />

Email: info@alumfast.com<br />

AMERICAN BELLEVILLE 35<br />

Belleville Washers, Belleville Springs, Disc<br />

Springs, Flange Washers, precision-machined<br />

custom components. Stamping, CNC lathe<br />

and mill machining, grinding, heat treating.<br />

Tel (440) 721-8350<br />

Email: lriga@AmericanBelleville.com<br />

AMERICAN IMPERIAL SCREW CORP. 85<br />

Push on hats, push on bolt retainers,<br />

locknuts, self-treading locknuts and washers,<br />

regular washer locknuts, push-on retainer<br />

fasteners and wing nuts, adhesives and<br />

metal anchors.<br />

Tel (800) 431-2391<br />

AMPG<br />

INSIDE BACK COVER<br />

Domestic manufacturer of shoulder screws,<br />

button head sex bolts, flat head sex bolts, prairie<br />

bolts, non-standard flat washers, and machined<br />

specialties from stock. Print to part in 7 days.<br />

Tel (317) 472-9000<br />

Email: sales@ampg.com<br />

B<br />

BAR STOCK SPECIALTIES 51, 115, 123<br />

Metal bar processing; drawing, peeling,<br />

grinding and cutting. Long length stainless<br />

bar to 60ft.<br />

Tel (713) 849-0055<br />

Email: info@GoBarStock.com<br />

BAY SUPPLY FRONT COVER, 3, 16<br />

Fastener & Tooling Super Warehouse. Top<br />

brands at bottom prices. Ships to 200+<br />

countries.<br />

Tel (800) 718-8818<br />

Email: info@baysupply.com<br />

BIG RED FASTENERS 65<br />

Domestic Stud Bolts. USA made and melted.<br />

Your full-service stocking distributor of all<br />

bolts, nuts, studs, washers, machine screws,<br />

tapping and self-drilling screws.<br />

Tel (866) 621-6565<br />

Email: sales@bigredfasteners.com<br />

BRIGHTON-BEST INTERNATIONAL<br />

OUTSIDE BACK COVER<br />

Socket & square head set screws, hex keys,<br />

L-Nine products, Grade 8 hex head, shoulder<br />

bolts, pipe plugs, dowel springs, nuts &<br />

metrics, hand tools and full stainless line.<br />

Tel (800) 275-0050<br />

www.brightonbest.com<br />

BRIKKSEN STAINLESS 139<br />

Full line of stainless-steel inch and metric. Tel<br />

(800) 962-1614<br />

Email: sales@brikksen.com<br />

BRYCE SECURITY FASTENER 119<br />

Manufacturer of the world’s most secure<br />

fasteners. Learn more about KEY-REX® and<br />

their other Made in the USA security fasteners.<br />

Tel (480) 559-8287<br />

Email: info@brycefastener.com<br />

C<br />

CAVALIER INDUSTRIAL SPECIALTIES<br />

61, 79, 123<br />

Acorn, dome, flat and radius cap styles –<br />

small and large diameters. Custom fasteners.<br />

Forging, turning, milling, drilling, slotting,<br />

broaching, grinding, and roll threading.<br />

Emergency 24-7 service.<br />

Tel (713) 983-0055<br />

Email: sales@GoCAV.com<br />

THE CENTER FOR FINANCIAL,<br />

LEGAL & TAX PLANNING, INC. 131<br />

Thinking of buying, selling or transferring your<br />

business? The center is the one-stop shop for<br />

all of your business needs.<br />

Tel (618) 997-3436<br />

Email: rbasi@taxplanning.com<br />

CHICAGO HARDWARE & FIXTURE CO. 87<br />

Mfrs of Wire Rope and Chain Fittings,<br />

Industrial and Marine Hardware and Allied<br />

Products<br />

Tel (847) 455-6609<br />

Email: info@chicagohardware.com<br />

COMPUTER INSIGHTS 19<br />

The Business Edge – The simple solution with<br />

a proven step-by-step method for unlocking<br />

your fastener company’s potential.<br />

Tel (800) 539-1233<br />

Email: sales@ci-inc.com<br />

CRESCENT MANUFACTURING 35<br />

With over 50 years of manufacturing<br />

expertise in the field of miniature screws<br />

and miniature fasteners, Crescent offers<br />

distributors an established source to meet<br />

your Aerospace, Military, Commercial, and<br />

Special Engineered requirements.<br />

Tel (860) 673-2591<br />

Email: sales@crescentmanufacturing.com<br />

D<br />

DARLING BOLT 163<br />

Supplier of US, metric and stainless-steel<br />

fasteners including nuts, bolts, screws,<br />

washers, hardware assortments and<br />

specialty auto body fasteners.<br />

Tel (800) 882-0747<br />

Email: sales@darlingbolt.com<br />

DDI SYSTEM 77<br />

Daily operations, eCommerce, Warehouse<br />

Management, CRM. ERP software for<br />

wholesale distributors.<br />

Tel (877) 599-4334<br />

Email: sales@ddisys.com<br />

DELTA SECONDARY 83<br />

Cut off & chamfer, cut threading, cross drilling,<br />

tapping, turning, milling, slotting, grooving.<br />

Tel (630) 766-1180<br />

Email: delta911@msn.com<br />

DISTRIBUTION ONE 49<br />

ERP Software for Fastener Distributors<br />

capable of running the entire operation,<br />

efficiently & profitably.<br />

Tel (856) 380-0629<br />

Email: info@distone.com<br />

DISTRIBUTOR’S LINK 6, 183<br />

Tel (800) 356-1639<br />

Email: tracey@linkmagazine.com<br />

E<br />

ELGIN FASTENER GROUP 53<br />

Selection. Service. Success. Discover the<br />

Elgin Advantage<br />

www.elginfasteners.com


advertisers index<br />

E<br />

E & T FASTENERS, INC 149<br />

Molded, machined, and stamped plastic<br />

fasteners - uts, bolts, washers - Kynar, Teflon,<br />

PVC, Nylon, and Polypropylene. Low minimums.<br />

Tel (800) 650-4707<br />

Email: eric@fastenercomponents.com<br />

E-Z LOK 57<br />

Thread inserts for metal, wood and plastic<br />

Tel (800) 234-5613<br />

Email: sales@ezlok.com<br />

F<br />

FALL RIVER MFG CO., INC. 23<br />

Manufacturers of Stainless steel & nonferrous<br />

fasteners<br />

Tel (800) 275-6991<br />

Email: sales@fallrivermfg.com<br />

FASCOMP ELECTRONIC HARDWARE 33<br />

Male-female standoffs, female standoffs,<br />

male-male standoffs, spacers, shoulder<br />

screws, captive screws, thumbscrews, swage<br />

standoffs and spacers, handles and ferrules.<br />

Tel (407) 226-2112<br />

Email: sales@fascomp.com<br />

FASTAR, INC. 31<br />

Coiled and Slotted spring pins, dowel pins,<br />

cotter pins, taper pins, grooved & special pins<br />

Tel (845) 369-7990<br />

Email: fastar@optonline.net<br />

FASTENER WEBSITE LINKS 134<br />

FCH SOURCING NETWORK 141<br />

(Tel) 877-332-7836<br />

FORD FASTENERS, INC. 15<br />

410 stainless screws, sheet metal, self-drillers,<br />

thread cutters, self-piercing, EPDM washers.<br />

Tel (800) 272-FORD (3673)<br />

Email: info@fordfasteners.com<br />

G<br />

GF&D SYSTEMS 113<br />

‘One-stop’ for grease fittings and accessories.<br />

Couplers and hose whips, grease fitting<br />

caps, grease guns, custom designed fittings,<br />

assortments, private labeling, custom kitting.<br />

Tel (800) 360-1318<br />

Email: sales@gfdsystems.com<br />

GLOBALFASTENERNEWS.COM 147<br />

GOEBEL FASTENERS, INC. 7<br />

Innovative fastener solutions: blind rivets, selftapping/drilling<br />

screws, toggles, strapping, wing<br />

seals, tools & safety and insulation accessories.<br />

Tel (713) 393-7007<br />

Email: sales@goebelfasteners.com<br />

GRAPHIKA CREATIVE 177<br />

Marketing solutions tailored for the Fastener<br />

Industry. Web, digital, email marketing,<br />

exhibitions, point of sale and corporate<br />

branding. Graphika - your off-site, in-house<br />

comprehensive marketing department.<br />

Tel (224) 489-9533<br />

Email: lee@graphikacreative.com<br />

GREENSLADE & COMPANY, INC. 101<br />

Fastener inspection equipment, innovative<br />

gage design, and dimensional calibration.<br />

Tel (817) 870-8888<br />

Email: sales@greensladeandcompany.com<br />

H<br />

HANGER BOLT & STUD CO 133<br />

USA Hanger bolts, studs, dowel screws, pins.<br />

Tel (800) 537-7925<br />

Email: sales@hangerbolt.com<br />

HANSON RIVET & SUPPLY CO. 117<br />

Rivets, threaded inserts, riveting tools,<br />

riveting machines, washers<br />

Tel (800) 777-4838<br />

I<br />

ICS FLANGE 41<br />

Stocks flange bolts and nuts in Grade 5, 8,<br />

8.8 and 10.9 in steel and stainless in any<br />

finish.<br />

Tel (800) 231-0360<br />

INDUSTRIAL FASTENERS INSTITUTE 71<br />

2021 Edition IFI Book of Fastener Standards<br />

is now available in hard cover and online<br />

format. www.indfast.org/shop<br />

Tel (216) 241-1482<br />

Email: techinfo@indfast.org<br />

INDUSTRIAL RIVET & FASTENER CO. 105<br />

One name, one number, one source for rivets<br />

and RivetKing FreeSet Series.<br />

Tel (800) BUY-RIVET<br />

Email: info@rivet.com<br />

INTEGRATED PACKAGING 107<br />

Parts are electronically counted, heatsealed<br />

in our poly-bags, and labeled with<br />

identification information on every bag, with<br />

accurate optical counting mechanisms and<br />

printers for SKUs.<br />

Tel (847) 439-5730<br />

Email: sales@integratedpack.com<br />

INTERCORP 1<br />

Premium self-drilling, drywall, needle-point,<br />

pole gripper, stainless steel, outdoor,<br />

concrete, cement board, woodworking and<br />

special application.<br />

Tel (800) 762-2004<br />

ISC – INTERCONTINENTAL SALES 77<br />

Fastener and Building Related Products.<br />

Same day shipping, free private labeling, no<br />

minimums<br />

Tel (800) 741-4278<br />

Email: info@isc-sales.com<br />

INTERFAST GROUP 69<br />

Distributor/importer of drywall, deck, selfdrilling<br />

and self-piercing screws.<br />

Tel (800) 605-1233<br />

Email: ifg@interfastgroup.com<br />

INTERNATIONAL FASTENERS, INC. 75<br />

Daggerz quality construction fasteners.<br />

Self-drill, drywall, deck, wood, concrete, clip,<br />

needle point screws, post frame screws,<br />

aluminum industry screws, EDPM bonded<br />

washers, bits & threaded rod.<br />

Tel (888) 241-0203<br />

Email: sales@daggerz.com<br />

INxSQL 91<br />

Full-featured, ERP distribution software designed<br />

and optimized for the Fastener Industry.<br />

Tel (877) 446-9775<br />

Email: sales@inxsql.com<br />

J<br />

JOHAN SMIT FASTENERS 123<br />

Manufacturer and supplier of steel nuts in<br />

the petro-chemical, steel construction and<br />

energy market.<br />

Tel +31(0)786230088<br />

Email: info@johsmit.com<br />

K<br />

KEN FORGING 21<br />

Domestic manufacturer of eyebolts, nut<br />

eyebolts, rod ends, turnbuckles & fittings, eye<br />

nuts, pad eyes, D-rings, c-clamps & screws,<br />

swivel hoist ring. Custom forgings up to 250 lbs.<br />

Tel (888) 536-3674<br />

Email: sales@kenforging.com<br />

KINTER ® 173<br />

X-mas tree clips, binder posts and screws,<br />

binder rings, steel barrel bolts and screws,<br />

wall anchors.<br />

Tel (800) 323-2389<br />

Email: sales@kinter.com<br />

L<br />

LELAND INDUSTRIES INC 145<br />

Manufacturer of bolts, nuts, screws in carbon<br />

or stainless. Custom threading and specials.<br />

U-Bolts and Anchors.<br />

Tel (800) 263-3393<br />

LOK-MOR, INC. 155<br />

American-made locknuts at competitive prices.<br />

Tel (800) 843-7230<br />

Email: sales@lok-mor.com<br />

M<br />

BRUNO MARBACHER 151<br />

With over 40 years of experience in the<br />

fastener industry, and a recently retired<br />

Director of Application Engineering, Bruno<br />

is available to assist and resolve critical and<br />

lingering fastening/assembly/quality issues.<br />

Email: brunomarbacher4@gmail.com<br />

MAR-BRO MANUFACTURING 153<br />

Domestic manufacturer of standards, specials,<br />

MS and NAS fasteners. Specializing in A286,<br />

12 pt flange and hex flange fasteners.<br />

Tel (602) 278-8197<br />

Email: sales@mar-bro.com


advertisers index<br />

M<br />

MEHTA TRADING INTERNATIONAL 141<br />

The complete MILL stainless fastener source.<br />

Tel (972) 642-1012<br />

Fax (972) 642-1244<br />

METRIC & MULTISTANDARD 13<br />

Providing quality metric industrial products<br />

and exceptional customer service since 1963<br />

Tel (800) 431-2792<br />

MW INDUSTRIES, INC – TEXAS 129<br />

Washers, special fasteners, and metal<br />

stamping for over 45 years. ISO 9001:2015<br />

certified.<br />

Tel (800) 875-3510<br />

Email: sales@mwindustries.com<br />

N<br />

ND INDUSTRIES<br />

INSIDE FRONT COVER, 42, 43<br />

Self-locking and self-sealing fastener<br />

processing, fastener inspection & sorting,<br />

chemical blending, bottling, and A2LA Lab<br />

testing.<br />

Tel (248) 655-2503<br />

Email: info@ndindustries.com<br />

NORTH EAST FASTENERS (NEF) 11<br />

AS9100 certified, supplying IFI, ANSI, MS,<br />

NAS, NASM, AN, DIN, JIS, JCIS high quality<br />

fasteners for commercial, military and<br />

aerospace.<br />

Tel (860) 589-3242<br />

Email: nef@nef1.com<br />

P<br />

PIVOT POINT 37<br />

Pins - clevis, cotter pins, quick release,<br />

locking - wire rope lanyards, stock and<br />

specials and award-winning inventions<br />

Tel (800) 222-2231<br />

Email: mail@pivotpins.com<br />

PRODUCT COMPONENTS CORP. 125<br />

Machined and molded fasteners in many<br />

types of plastics. Woman-owned and<br />

operated; specializing in excellent customer<br />

service, competitive pricing, quick delivery<br />

and small minimums.<br />

Tel (925) 228-8930<br />

Email: sales@product-components.com<br />

R<br />

RAF ELECTRONIC HARDWARE 59<br />

Domestic standoffs, spacers, male-females,<br />

swage, male-male and modified parts. NAS<br />

fasteners.<br />

Tel (203) 888-2133<br />

Email: info@rafhdwe.com<br />

W.J. ROBERTS CO. 101<br />

Spacers and standoffs. Hex and rounds<br />

3/16 to 5/8 diameter. Standoffs in brass,<br />

aluminum, steel and stainless steel.<br />

Tel (781) 233-8176<br />

Email: sales@wjroberts.com<br />

R&R ENGINEERING CO. 95<br />

Bent bolts, wire forms. Quality craftsmanship.<br />

Tel (800) 979-1921<br />

Email: sales@randrengineering.com<br />

S<br />

SETKO FASTENERS 93<br />

Domestic manufactured and imported<br />

socket products. Standards or specials. Mill<br />

shipments and blanket orders. Zinc plated<br />

sockets, nylon patches, drilling, etc. Ready...<br />

Setko!<br />

Tel (630) 800-6377<br />

Email: sales@setkofasteners.com<br />

SHEAR-LOC PRODUCTS 84<br />

The original instant thumbscrews. The<br />

ultimate socket head cap screw accessory.<br />

Over 5000 combinations. Inch and Metric.<br />

Tel (800) 775-5668<br />

Email: sales@shear-loc.com<br />

SOLUTION INDUSTRIES 29<br />

Call Solution Man to help you with nonstandard,<br />

OEM specific fasteners, including<br />

per print specials. Solution-ized service to<br />

meet your customer needs!<br />

Tel (866) 297-8656<br />

Email: sales@solutionind.com<br />

SPIROL 73<br />

Coiled and Slotted Spring Pins, Solid<br />

Pins, Disc Springs, Alignment Dowels and<br />

Bushings, Spacers, Compression Limiters,<br />

Threaded Inserts and Shims.<br />

Tel (800) 321-4679<br />

Email: info@spirol.com<br />

SRC SPECIAL RIVETS CORP. 165<br />

Blind Rivets. Company Rep: Tony DiMaio.<br />

Tel & Fax (978) 521-0277<br />

STAR STAINLESS SCREW CO. 47<br />

Stainless fasteners - Inch, metric, standards,<br />

non-standards, import, domestic.<br />

Tel (630) 595-3440<br />

SUBSCRIPTION FORM 121<br />

SUPERIOR WASHER & GASKET CORP. 2<br />

The single source supplier for all you washer<br />

and gasket needs. Made in the USA.<br />

Tel (631) 273-8282<br />

Email: swg@superiorwasher.com<br />

T<br />

TAMPER-PRUF SCREW, INC. 103<br />

Leader in Security Screws since 1974.<br />

Tel (562) 531-9340<br />

Email: tamperpruf90723@sbcglobal.net<br />

TORTOISE FASTENER CO. 59<br />

Specialty source for slow moving hex heads.<br />

Stainless, brass, silicon bronze, aluminum,<br />

nickel-copper and alloy 20 hex heads.<br />

Tel (800) 691-8894<br />

TUTTLE MANUFACTURING 181<br />

Anchors, bent bolt specials, spade bolts,<br />

acme threaded bars.<br />

Tel (847) 381-7713<br />

Email: tuttlemfg@gmail.com<br />

U<br />

UC COMPONENTS 107<br />

Clean-Critical Fastener and Seal Solutions.<br />

HV, UHV, Cleanroom Ready Fasteners<br />

and seals in just about any size, material<br />

and finish. RediVac® clean-packaged<br />

screws and O-rings. Custom products and<br />

prototypes.<br />

Tel (408) 782-1929<br />

Email: sales@uccomponents.com<br />

UNICORP 69<br />

Manufacturer of electronic hardware,<br />

fasteners and handles since 1971.<br />

Tel (973) 674-1700<br />

Email: sales@unicorpinc.com<br />

V<br />

VIRGINIA FASTENERS 161<br />

Specializing in HDG timber, hex, carriage,<br />

lag bolts, tie rods, nuts and washers.<br />

Tel (800) 368-3430<br />

Email: sales@vafasteners.com<br />

VOLT INDUSTRIAL PLASTICS, INC. 9<br />

US made plastic fasteners, all types &<br />

quantities, custom molding since 1992.<br />

Over 100 million parts in stock with<br />

worldwide shipping.<br />

Tel (800) 844-8024<br />

Email: sales@voltplastics.com<br />

W<br />

WESTERN WIRE PRODUCTS 179<br />

Cotter pins, custom wire forms, spring pins,<br />

d-rings, s-hooks, hitch pin clips, hog rings,<br />

key rings, and lock washers. Made in the<br />

USA.<br />

Tel (800) 325-3770<br />

Email: sales@westernwireprod.com<br />

WILLIE WASHER MFG. 157<br />

Domestic manufacturer of fender, spring,<br />

tab and flat washers,<br />

Tel (847) 956-1344<br />

Email: sales@williewasher.com<br />

X<br />

XL SCREW CORPORATION 45<br />

Importer of standard fasteners - hex<br />

cap screws, bolts, nuts, locknuts, thread<br />

forming screws, sheet metal screws, selfdrilling<br />

screws, machine screws, washers<br />

and anchors, metrics and mill shipments.<br />

Over 14,000 imported products in stock.<br />

America’s finest quality imported threaded<br />

fasteners since 1968.<br />

Tel (800) 323-7367<br />

Email: xlw@xlscrew.com

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