11.02.2022 Views

The Greenville Pioneer - 2022-02-11

The Greenville Pioneer - 2022-02-11

The Greenville Pioneer - 2022-02-11

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS
  • No tags were found...

You also want an ePaper? Increase the reach of your titles

YUMPU automatically turns print PDFs into web optimized ePapers that Google loves.

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, April 10, 2020 1

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022 1

Thinking Insurance? Think Nationwide Greenville • Windham

Thinking Nationwide? Think Victor DeVito!

Text Now: 518-424-7865 or Call: 518-785-5054

www.GNHlumber.com

Visit Our Full Service Website Including

Find

Instant

the perfect

Chat: www.victordevito.com

color for any room in your

Victor F. DeVito, YOUR UPSTATE Elite Agency home with Ben Moore’s tools! Get started at:

www.GNHlumber.com/PickColor

Get Your

Servicing All Nationwide Accounts - Auto-Home-Life-Business

Rate Now!

Not all Nationwide affiliated companies are mutual companies and not all Nationwide members are insured by a mutual company. Nationwide is on your wide, and the Nationwide N and Eagler are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. 2015 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. NPR-0784A0(12/15)

Friday, April 10, 2020 • $1.50

Friday, February 11, 2022 • $1.50

LARGEST PAID CIRCULATED NEWSPAPER IN GREENE COUNTY

COVID-19 death Spartans toll fall

could reach 240,000 to RCS after

See page 9

late-game slide

Trash can pose

COVID-19 risk

Schools

remain

closed

By Andrea Macko

Greenville Pioneer

GREENVILLE—Schools

will remain closed statewide

through mid-April and the state’s

first temporary hospital was

By Melanie Lekocevic

Educational Services, provides shared educational

programs and services to school

completed in New York City on

Capital Region Independent Media

Friday as New York remains the

districts in New York state.

GREENVILLE — The 2022-23 budget

season is getting off the ground for the

coronavirus, or COVID-19.

nation’s epicenter for the novel

The preliminary rollover budget for

Schools

the district

will

— which

now

will

remain

change over the

school district and will continue through

closed

coming

statewide

months

through

— includes

April

an increase of

May, when voters will have their say.

15.

1.56%.

The board of education for the Greenville

Central School District opened the

Schools across New York

were ordered

The 2021-22

closed March

budget

18

came in at

through

$32,886,167,

April 1 to

an

be

increase

reassessed

of $633,152, or

budget process at its Jan. 10 meeting with

every 1.96%, two over weeks. the previous The state’s year.

a preliminary look at the “rollover budget,”

waiver The was rollover extended budget for school for the coming

which gives the district its start.

districts school to year, receive which, state again, aid without

holding point, physical is $33,398,872, classes which for represents

serves as a start-

The next meeting will be held Feb. 28,

when the board will begin fine tuning the

180 an days. increase of $512,705, or 1.56%. That includes

keeping this time, staffing schools and are programming

numbers.

During

The rollover budget is used as a starting

point for the new budget,” Business

still at required the same to levels provide as continuity

of year. instruction, meals for stu-

they are this school

Official Janet Maassmann said. “The draft

dents and Some information components on of availablget

childcare predicted resources to rise, such as insurance

the rollover bud-

is put together based on the assumption

FILE PHOTO

all programming and staffing levels will

The Greenville Central School District Board of Education is beginning the budget process for the “We costs, understand which are the estimated challenges

the 5%, school Maassmann closure said. creates Those for costs will be

to increase by

stay exactly as they currently are. We then

2022-23 school year.

look at the previous budget and increase

families. revised Hopefully, to actual costs this extended

closure will help keep our stu-

when they are finalexpenditures

that we know will increase lated to employment contracts, increases to and retirement rates.”

every year, for example salaries, costs re-

BOCES contractual costs, health insurance BOCES, or the Boards of Cooperative dents and community See healthier,” BUDGET, page 15

said Greenville Central School

District Superintendent Tammy

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED Sutherland. “When the District

rash is a possible danger when it comes to spreading COVID-19.

receives additional guidance

concerning the Governor’s Executive

Order, we will be able

Greenville Recycling Center reduces C-D hours capital project

to share more details and answer

additional questions, including

y Melanie Lekocevic nications for Carmen Barbato, you have been cleared by your mize the amount

enters

of ‘touch’ our those

phase

surrounding spring break,

2A

ourtesy Columbia-Greene Media Inc., a waste disposal company doctor,” she said.

drivers have on garbage.” grading, and other regulatory

serving Greene, Columbia and But everyone is asked to When putting your trash together

for disposal, you should difficulties faced by our students

requirements. We recognize the

GREENE COUNTY― Berkshire counties, said there take steps to prevent possible

veryone is aware by now are things everyone should be transmission, infected or not. double bag it and make sure it and families and ask for patience

f mandates to practice soial

distancing, hand hygiene the coronavirus through the the community safe, we ask There should be no loose gar-

times.”

doing to prevent the spread of “To keep our drivers and fits securely in your trash can. during these unprecedented

nd other ways of preventing trash.

that households please make bage, no loose tissues or paper “Our teachers, staff, students

and families have done an

ransmission of the coronavius,

but here’s a possible dan-

towels included with recyclables,

and trash cans should not amazing job working together to

er you may not have thought

be overflowing. Drivers will keep our students engaged while

f — spreading the virus “To keep our drivers and the community safe, we ask

only collect trash that is stored schools are closed. Our caring

hrough your trash.

that households please make sure they are bagging all in the tote, Carmen Barbato community inspires me with

Trash disposal was deemed

garbage so it makes it to its destination, and refrain from said.

their dedication to our students

n “essential” service by Gov.

All recyclables should also and families,” Sutherland added.

ndrew Cuomo when he put overflowing your totes. As we know, the virus remains on

be rinsed clean, and all liquids

should be emptied before es the school closure creates for

“We understand the challeng-

trict regulations in place in household garbage for days, depending on the carrier

he battle against COVID-19. material. For that reason, together we need to minimize being placed in the garbage. families. Hopefully, this extended

ut waste-disposal experts say

the amount of ‘touch’ our drivers have on garbage.” Customers are asked to wear

here are risks if garbage is not

gloves when handling their closure will help keep our students

and community healthier as

andled and packaged propery

— and that is

— CARMEN BARBATO JR., OWNER OF CARMEN BARBATO, INC.

trash cans, and sanitize them

By

a concern

Melanie

for

Lekocevic

phase 2A.

Cairo-Durham regularly. Middle/High schools saw we ing look aid reimbursement, forward to getting according past to the

hem.

Capital Region Independent Media

“People are not bagging this pandemic and getting back

In Greenville, the town People who are infected,

Construction

or sure

on

they

phase

are

1 was

bagging

ongoing

all

work completed in the first phase of the capital project plan.

their garbage — there are loose to our normal routines,” said

ecycling center is CAIRO-DURHAM open, but may be, — are The asked $28.9 to take for several extra

precautions in the to Cai-

protect tion both of the destination, work done over and the refrain summer from Voters approved the $28,935,000 cap-

garbage months, including so it makes a large it por-

to its project.

The project includes both interior

things like tissues and paper

Cairo-Durham and exterior work Superintendent on both campuses of and

ith limited hours. million Town capital resdents

needing ro-Durham to dispose school of sanitation district has workers complet-

and of 2021. the overflowing your totes,” said ital

project towels in with recyclables,”

Schools aims to Michael make the Wetherbee. schools’ facilities and

Mary

project

Barbato

in December

said.

2018,

“That

with

is

about “I am incredibly proud of

rash or recyclables ed its can first stop phase of community work and has at begun large, Barbato Both Cairo-Durham company owner Elementary Carmen and Bar-64.2bato Jr. “As we know, the virus

parents who have done such an

not of sanitary, the cost and eligible it doesn’t for state belong

with recyclables. People

build-

our teachers, staff, See PROJECT, students and page 15

y the center from 8 a.m. to said.

oon on Wednesday and Satrday

only.

virus or suspect you do, we for days, depending on the

keep educating our community’s

“If you have the corona-

remains on household garbage

amazing job working together to

are overstuffing their totes —

please refrain from doing that,

Mary Barbato, vice presient

of marketing The redesigned and commu-

entrance to Cairo-Durham garbage out Middle/High until a week School. after son, together we need to mini-

See TRASH, page

ask that you don’t put your carrier material. For that rea-

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

10

children while school is closed,”

Wetherbee added. “The innovative

ways teachers and staff have

used to teach, the commitment

our students have demonstrated

Dog groomer opens town’s

See SCHOOLS, page 10

Act would abolish local voice

in solar review process newest business

To our readers,

By Nora Mishanec

By Melanie Lekocevic

Cuomo.

and should it pass,

That,

the

in fact,

state

is how Tambasco space where the dog salon is now

Capital Region Independent Media

Courtesy of Columbia-Greene Media “It is impossible to say

first heard the space in the rear of

will have complete authority

override town zoning

located sold satellite dishes, Direct

We hope you and your family

are staying healthy and well.

if anything outside the

the building had opened up. TV and performed repairs, VanZutphen

said. When

GREENVILLE — The town’s

GREENE COUNTY―A

“I was actually getting my hair

normal will get done, but laws,” he said. “If you take News about COVID-19 is changing

every day.

the building space

newest business opened its doors in

proposed budget amendment

that would cut local

talking about it, so I talked to Jacob

done in the salon and the girls were

renewable energy siting is away a town’s right to have

became

We do our

available,

best to

VanZutphen

January.

still on the table,” he said.

ensure that what knew you it was read where the couple

Dogs of Greenville, located charge at of zoning,

voices out of the solar permitting

process is moving

she

about it and

you

he

have

jumped right on it,”

Since the budget amendment

was announced on

current information “We came available. across an opportuni-

in our print wanted edition to is open the their most own business.

11448 Route 32, across from taken Dollar

General, opened for of business the town’s

away a

said.

good portion

forward despite pushback

She

reason

first

to

got

exist.”

into dog

Feb. 21, local officials have

Please

grooming

understand ty to have that a place some right here in town

Jan. 3.

from Greene and Columbia

when she was training her

warned that changing solar

siting laws to abolish cials have been lobbying of

Hanse said local offi-

news,

puppy

particularly and heard the the number place was available

The owners, groomer Autumn

county officials.

years ago and decided she

people

loved

affected, for lease,” has he undoubtably

to work changed remodeling since we and sent built this it out to be a

said. “We did some

Tambasco and her husband Jacob

Negotiations are continuing

on the proposed

with them full-time.

dogs so much she wanted

the existing review process lawmakers to debate the

VanZutphen, live in Greenville and

would violate home rule proposed amendment separate

from budget negotia-

paper to the printing nice dog salon.” presses. We

wanted to open their business close

changes to siting solar and

“I had a puppy that I was

and diminish local authority

over land use.

visit with our and Facebook with the page dogs, at allergies www. and all.

encourage going you, VanZutphen if possible, actually to works

to home.

wind energy, known as the

to puppy training classes

“I have been grooming tions, for a move supported by

Accelerated Renewable

I decided to train to become

“We would be powerless

facebook.com/greenvillepioneer

a dog

“I am only allergic to some

about 17 years,” Tambasco state said. Sen. Daphne Jordan,

Energy Growth and Community

Benefit Act, said

groomer,” Tambasco said.

against the state if it passes,”

said Coxsackie Town

news, with ani-

closings he and said. cancelations. “Autumn is the groomer,

where “I like we are dogs. sharing It depends breaking on the hair type,”

“We live in Greenville and R-43. I have dogs — I like working

been grooming out of Glenmont, Changes so to the solar siting

Green-

process dogs or not we belong would probably have a Thank you,

Jordan Levine, deputy communications

director for the “We are at the mercy

drying dogs, comforting them or

mals. Jacob is actually allergic to

Supervisor Rick Hanse.

but I have been helping out with

we decided to open a spot CONTRIBUTED PHOTO ville so I am not so far from in home.” the state farm budget, of dogs. Jordan I get my dog

energy and environment in of the state whether they

The

fix

Greenville

at

holding them Pioneer when Autumn is cut-

Groomer Autumn Tambasco and her husband Jacob VanZutphen have opened The salon is located in the same work.”

the office of Gov. Andrew take it out of the budget,

the town’s newest business, Dogs of Greenville.

building as Eclips Hair Studio.

See SOLAR, page 10

The business formerly in the See GROOMER, page 15

Officials are

concerned that the

proposed changes

could accelerate the

development of solar

farms across Greene

and Columbia

counties, including

Hecate Energy’s

proposed 700-acre

facility in Copake and

the Flint Mine solar

project in Coxsackie.

See page 8

$33.4M budget is school district’s starting point


2 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022

news@greenvillepioneer.com • www.greenvillepioneer.com

413-212-0130

ADVERTISING - All advertising requests must be made one week in advance.

NEWS DESK - News items must be received twelve days prior to publication.

OBITUARIES - Obituaries must be confirmed with a funeral home.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - Letters to the editor must include the author’s name,

address and daytime telephone number. Authors are limited to one letter every 30 days.

Letters are published at the discretion of the editor and must be original content.

POSTMASTER - The Greenville Pioneer is published every other Friday by Capital

Region Independent Media, 164 Main Street, Ravena, NY 12143. Periodicals postage paid

at Greenville, NY 12083. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Greenville Pioneer, 149

Main Street, Ravena, NY 12143. The cost for a subscription is $40 annually.

For Customer Service issues call 413-212-0130 or email Wdewsjr@gmail.com

Mark Vinciguerra

PRESIDENT

“Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.”

#SupportRealNews

- Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Warren Dews, Jr.

PUBLISHER

wdewsjr@gmail.com

Melanie Lekocevic

EDITOR

melaniel123@icloud.com

GREENVILLE — In an effort

to capture and preserve for posterity

what it was like to attend classes

in a one-room schoolhouse, the

Greenville Education Foundation

recently brought together five individuals

who attended classes in

School 19 in Potter Hollow before

it closed in 1955.

Robert Cook, Virginia Reed

Cook, Gerald Goodfellow, Linda

Reed Mormile and Diane Reed

Sala, shared their memories of attending

School 19 with guidance

from Don Teator, the Greenville

town historian, who served as a

moderator for the discussion.

The group spoke about what

attending a one-room schoolhouse

was like, and what impact it had on

their lives. Many of their remembrances

were quite humorous, while

others were somewhat sobering.

The entire get-together was

digitally recorded by Tim Albright,

a GCS social studies teacher and

Greenville Media Club advisor, and

two of the club’s members, Alexis

Langolis and Laila Overbaugh.

Nadia Boyea, a GCS graduate (and

recent SUNY Oneonta graduate)

traveled from Oneonta to assist in

the filming, and to provide tips with

regard to camera set-up and lighting.

Boyea will be working in the

coming weeks with Laila and Alexis

editing the footage. When completed,

the edited version will be

available for viewing by members

of the Scott M. Ellis Elementary

School faculty and student body.

This project was organized by

Linda Mormile and Ed Volmar.

Linda and John Mormile hosted the

filming at their home.

Learning in a one-room

schoolhouse

FEBRUARY 2022

12 - Lex Grey Trio performs at The Windham

Local, 2-4 p.m. , 5410 Route 23, Windham.

Farm-to-table entrees, craft brews, wine,

desserts and more. No cover.

14 - Greenville Central School District Board

of Education meeting, mid-year update

on comprehensive plan, 6 p.m. at Greenville

Middle/High School library, Route 81,

Greenville.

14 - Greene County Legislature County

Services and Public Works, Economic

Development and Tourism, Finance, and

Government Operations meetings, 6 p.m.,

Greene County Municipal Building, 411

Main Street, Suite 403, Catskill.

15 - Durham Town Board meeting, 7:30

p.m., at Town Hall, 7309 State Route 81, East

Durham.

16 - Freehold Volunteer Fire Company

meeting, 2 p.m., at Freehold Volunteer Fire

Company firehouse, Route 32, Freehold.

16 - Greene County Planning Board meeting,

6:30 p.m., Greene County Municipal

Building, 411 Main Street, Room 419,

Catskill.

16 - Greene County Legislature regular

meeting, Frank P. Stabile Jr. Legislative

Chambers, 411 Main St., Suite 403, Catskill.

16 - Cairo Town Board meeting, 7 p.m., Cairo

Town Hall, 512 Main Street, Cairo.

16 - Friends of Five Rivers annual meeting

and guest speaker event (online), 7 p.m.

Register at https://friendsoffiverivers.org/

our-members/

17-20 - Hudson Jazz Festival, Hudson Hall

at Hudson Opera House, 327 Warren Street,

Hudson.

17 - Webinar: Parents as Partner, Greenville

Central School District.

17 - Greene County Fire Advisory Board

meeting, 7 p.m., at Greene County Emergency

Control and Training Center, 25 Volunteer

Drive, Cairo.

19 - Community Science Program: Great

Backyard Bird Count, 9:30-11 a.m., at Five

Rivers Environmental Education Center, 56

Game Farm Road, Delmar. Free admission.

Call 518-475-0291 to register by Wednesday,

Feb. 16.

19 - Making a Great Backyard Bird Habitat

Program, 2 p.m., at Five Rivers Environmental

Education Center, 56 Game Farm Road,

Delmar. Free admission.

20 - Jimmy Greene Quartet performs at

Hudson Hall at Hudson Opera House, 327

Warren Street, Hudson.

21 - President’s Day, Cairo Town Hall closed.

21 - Greenville schools closed for President’s

Day.

22-25 - Greenville schools winter recess. No

school.

23 - Freehold Volunteer Fire Company Ladies

Auxiliary meeting, 2 p.m., at Freehold

Volunteer Fire Company, Route 32, Freehold.

25-27 - Fasching and Karneval Weekend,

begins Friday, Feb. 25 at 2 p.m. and run

through Sunday, Feb. 27 at 10:30 a.m.,

at Riedlbauer’s Resort, 57 Raveine Drive,

Round Top. Prices vary.

We strive to inspire our diverse, well-rounded work force and management team to always perform at the highest levels of safety

and professionalism. We deliver service by maintaining a reputation where our unquestionable Values of honesty and integrity drive our

actions on and off the job.

494 Western Turnpike, Altamont, NY • Phone: 518.355.6034 • www.carvercompanies.com

Keith W. Valentine, CIC, LUTCF and his team are ready to serve all

of your insurance needs with more companies, more choices, and

more experience which all lead to BIG Savings for you!

Take advantage of Valentine Insurance Agency’s affiliation with

SAN group and SIAA, the largest alliance of independent Insurance

Agencies in the Northeast and Continental U.S., with over 3500

Members across 48 states writing more than $9 Billion in total

member premiums.

Contact Keith Valentine for a quote!

Office 518-943-3489 • Mobile 518-821-8244

KEITH@MYVALENTINEINSURANCE.COM

More Than Great Rates

Trusted Advisors

HOME AUTO BUSINESS LIFE HEALTH

www.myvalentineinsurance.com

Jon T., customer since 2004

I’ve bought property insurance and auto insurance from Valentine Insurance

Agency for nearly 20 years, and they are simply the BEST. I owned many rental

properties in Greene County, and renovated several buildings. Valentine not

only found the appropriate insurance, but gave years of invaluable advice. Their

knowledge of property and business in the local area helped me tremendously, and

I have recommended them to everyone. Don’t waste your time using anyone else.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Former students at School 19 in Potter Hollow recently shared their experiences learning in a one-room schoolhouse

in a video with Town Historian Don Teator, third from right, to preserve these memories for posterity.

2 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, October 22, 2021

news@greenvillepioneer.com • www.greenvillepioneer.com

Mark Vinciguerra

PRESIDENT

Warren Dews, Jr.,

PUBLISHER

wdewsjr@gmail.com

2 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, April 24, 2020

news@thegreenvillepioneer.com • www.greenvillepioneer.com

Mark Vinciguerra

Publisher

Warren Dews, Jr.,

General ManaGer

wdewsjr@gmail.com

CONTACT US

Warren Dews, Jr., General Manager

wdewsjr@gmail.com

news@thegreenvillepioneer.com

www.greenvillepioneer.com

ADVERTISING - All advertising requests

must be made one week in advance.

NEWS DESK - News items must be received

five days prior to publication.

OBITUARIES - Obituaries must be confirmed

with a funeral home.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - Letters to the

editor must include the author’s name,

address and daytime telephone number.

Authors are limited to one letter every 30

days. Letters are published at the discretion

of the editor and must be original content.

POSTMASTER - The Greenville Pioneer is

published every other Friday by Capital

Region Independent Media, 149 Main Street,

Ravena, NY 12143. Periodicals postage paid

at Greenville, NY 12083. Postmaster: Send

address changes to The Greenville Pioneer,

149 Main Street, Ravena, NY 12143. The

cost for a subscription is $30 annually.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic there are no upcoming

events or public meetings. Please stay safe and stay home.

CONTACT US

Warren Dews, Jr., General Manager

wdewsjr@gmail.com

news@thegreenvillepioneer.com

www.greenvillepioneer.com

ADVERTISING - All advertising requests

must be made one week in advance.

NEWS DESK - News items must be received

five days prior to publication.

OBITUARIES - Obituaries must be confirmed

with a funeral home.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - Letters to the

editor must include the author’s name,

address and daytime telephone number.

Authors are limited to one letter every 30

days. Letters are published at the discretion

of the editor and must be original content.

POSTMASTER - The Greenville Pioneer is

published every other Friday by Capital

Region Independent Media, 149 Main Street,

Ravena, NY 12143. Periodicals postage paid

at Greenville, NY 12083. Postmaster: Send

address changes to The Greenville Pioneer,

149 Main Street, Ravena, NY 12143. The

cost for a subscription is $30 annually.

For over 30 years, the Carver Company’s Core Competencies

consist of General & Marine Construction, Sand and Gravel

Mining, Property Management, Port, Stevedoring, Terminal &

Warehouse Management, Maritime and Logistics, and Tug and

Barge Marine Towing.

We strive to inspire our diverse, well-rounded work force and

management team to always perform at the highest levels of

safety and professionalism. We deliver service by maintaining

a reputation where our unquestionable Values of honesty and

integrity drive our actions on and off the job.

494 Western Turnpike

Altamont, NY

Phone: 518.355.6034

www.carvercompanies.com

CONTACT US

Warren Dews, Jr., General Manager

wdewsjr@gmail.com

news@thegreenvillepioneer.com

www.greenvillepioneer.com

ADVERTISING - All advertising requests

must be made one week in advance.

NEWS DESK - News items must be received

five days prior to publication.

OBITUARIES - Obituaries must be confirmed

with a funeral home.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - Letters to the

editor must include the author’s name,

address and daytime telephone number.

Authors are limited to one letter every 30

days. Letters are published at the discretion

of the editor and must be original content.

POSTMASTER - The Greenville Pioneer is

published every other Friday by Capital

Region Independent Media, 149 Main Street,

Ravena, NY 12143. Periodicals postage paid

at Greenville, NY 12083. Postmaster: Send

address changes to The Greenville Pioneer,

149 Main Street, Ravena, NY 12143. The

cost for a subscription is $30 annually.

By Sarah Trafton

Courtesy of Columbia-Greene Media

PRATTSVILLE—Amid

the

public health crisis wrought by

COVID-19, the county’s fifth flycar

joined the system Monday.

Adding the paramedic vehicle,

which preps patients for transport

prior to the arrival of an ambulance,

was a hotly debated topic in

the Greene County Legislature in

2019.

Catskill lawmakers Michael

Bulich and Matthew Luvera opposed

the budget amendment because

they did not agree with the

county footing the bill instead of

the towns. Catskill has its own Advanced

Life Support ambulance

system.

Mountaintop officials, including

Hunter Town Supervisor Daryl

Legg and Legislator Larry Gardner,

D-Hunter, argued that the mountaintop

community was underserved

and that lives on the mountain

should be just as important as

those in the valley towns.

The flycar was added to the

budget prior to its approval in November.

The most important asset

is not the truck, but our highly

trained and skilled paramedics led

by Chief Steve Brucato,” Greene

County EMS Paramedics President

Mark Evans said in a statement.

“Our medics are among the highest

trained in the region; only the flight

medics have more training.”

Evans also commended the

paramedics for continuing to work

and provide life-saving care to residents

during the pandemic.

“Being a paramedic is stressful

enough without the added potential

exposure and precautions now

mandated,” he said.

“Medic 8” is based at the Prattsville

Firehouse through an agreement

with the fire district.

“It’s a great add to the town, a

service to the town, mountaintop

and the county,” Prattsville Deputy

Town Supervisor Greg Cross said.

“It was a little bit of an uphill battle

to get it. There were many people

involved in making it happen.

“Daryl Legg was instrumental

in not taking no for an answer. And

of course we had to have help from

the county administrator and county

legislature to make it happen.”

Cross said he believes the new

flycar will make medical care more

accessible for the community.

“It’s a win for the mountaintop,”

he said. “There’s not a lot of

EMS assets up here. This bridges

the gap from crisis to hospital care.

We’re happy to have it.”

The flycar is a 2020 Chevrolet

Tahoe, which cost $45,000

equipped with lights, siren and

striping and another $50,000 in

life-saving equipment. The truck

carries a cardiac monitor/defibrillator,

airway/intubation kit, IV kit,

CPR machine and drug bag with

nearly all the emergency drugs of

an emergency room, according to

Evans.

Cost estimates requested by the

Legislature showed that the price

of a new flycar would be around

$403,000.

The flycar will be paid for in

2020 by a $60,000 contribution

from Greene County Emergency

Medical Services and a $50,000

State and Municipal Facilities Program

Grant from the state Assembly.

The remaining $303,203 will

come from the county, according to

the resolution passed in November.

“We are very pleased that the

mountaintop towns worked together

to request this truck and the

Greene County Legislature agreed

to the additional funding to place

another medic truck in service,”

Evans said. “Having this truck

based in Prattsville helps to provide

a vital medical asset in an underserved

area.”

The truck will be staffed 24/7,

365 days per year and has a primary

response area of Prattsville, Lexington

and Ashland.

“Greene County EMS uses

System Status Management, so as

medic trucks are sent on calls, the

other available trucks move position

to be best located for additional

calls,” Evans said. “This truck,

as with any of the medic trucks,

despite their home base position,

could end up at any location in the

county depending on the need.”

Legg and other mountaintop

officials including Hunter Town

Councilman Dolph Semenza,

Lexington Town Supervisor John

Berger and former Windham Town

Supervisor Robert Pelham approached

the Legislature in February

2019 about the issue, requesting

that the current flycar on the mountain

be relocated from Windham to

Hunter and that a second vehicle be

added.

The officials cited response

times as the reason for their request.

The response time for the three

vehicles stationed in the valley

is nine minutes, Evans said at a

March 2019 meeting, while the

mountaintop vehicle’s response

time is 14 minutes.

In August, Evans confirmed

that a new location for Medic 9, the

existing vehicle, had been found in

the village of Hunter.

The building, at the corner of

Bridge Street and Route 23A, required

some renovating and Evans

expects the flycar will be relocated

by June 1, he said.

Mountaintop gets a second fly car

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Pictured from left, Steve Brucato, chief of Greene County Paramedics; Mark Evans, president of Greene County Paramedics; Greg

Cross, Prattsville town supervisor; and Greene County Paramedics Board members Prattsville Fire Chief Jim Dymond and Prattsville

Hose Company President Dave Rikard.

Better TV

Our Promise to You

Offer expires 7/15/20. Restrictions apply. Call for details.

Smart HD DVR included.

AMERICA’S TOP 120

Great entertainment

with a local touch.

190 $59 99 /mo.

Channels

HI-TECH ADVISERS

(888) 729-4907

Document Ref: IQM9L-BLADW-UE84B-PAVJK Page 5 of 5

To have your organization’s events added to our calendar, please enter them online at www.greenvillepioneer.com

OCTOBER 2021

22-Nov. 1 - Greenville Rotary Coat Drive, drop-off boxes

at Greenville Central School, GNH Lumber and the

National Bank of Coxsackie. Coats will be distributed to

the local area and to the homeless.

22-31 - Fine Free October at Heermance Memorial Library.

The library is collecting for Hope’s Mission’s backpack

program. for every item brought in, the library will

waive $5 from your library fi nes (excludes billed items or

items from other libraries).

25 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81,

East Durham.

26 - Pints for Polio fundraiser by Greenville Rotary Club,

6 p.m., Tasing Lab, 4856 Route 81, Greenville. More

information: greenvillenyrotaryclub@gmail.com.

27 - Cairo Town Budget meeting, 7 p.m., 512 Main

Street, Cairo.

27 - Greene County Legislature public hearing, tentative

2022 county budget, 6 p.m., Catskill High School

auditorium, 341 West Main Street, Catskill.

31 - Trunk or Treat, 3-5:30 p.m., GNH parking lot, Route

81, Greenville. Sponsored by Greenville Rotary Club.

31 - Trick or Treating at the Firehouse, 4 p.m., Cairo

fi rehouse, 30 Railroad Avenue, Cairo.

NOVEMBER 2021

1 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81, East

Durham.

1 - Greene County Board of Electrical Examiners, 1

p.m., Greene County Office Building, 411 Main Street,

4th Floor, Room 469, Catskill.

1 - Cairo Town Board meeting, 7 p.m., 512 Main Street,

Cairo.

2 - Election Day - Cairo Town Hall closed.

2 - Durham Town Board workshop meeting, 7:30 p.m.,

7309 Route 81, East Durham.

2 - Election Day Used Book Sale by Friends of the Cairo

Public Library, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Stock up on used

books, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs for all ages before

winter. All proceeds go to the Cairo Public Library.

3 - Greenville Town Planning Board meeting, 7 p.m.,

Pioneer Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

3 - Green eCounty Economic Development Corp. meeting,

4 p.m., County Office Building, Room 427, 411 Main

Street, Catskill, or wath on YouTube.

4 - Cairo Town Planning Board meeting, 7 p.m., 512

Main Street, Cairo.

8 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81, East

Durham.

9 - Greenville Town Zoning Board meeting, 7 p.m., Pioneer

Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

11 - Veterans Day - Town offices closed.

15 - Greenville Town Board meeting, 7 p.m., Pioneer

Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

15 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81,

East Durham.

16 - Durham Town Board meeting, 7:30 p.m., 7309

Route 81, East Durham.

25 - Thanksgiving - Town offices closed.

29 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81,

East Durham.

DECEMBER 2021

4 - CANCELED: The Bates Church Christmas program

has been canceled after much discussion and due to

an abundance of caution over concerns of COVID-19.

For over 30 years, the Carver Company’s Core Competencies consist of General & Marine Construction, Sand and Gravel Mining, Property Management, Port, Stevedoring, Terminal

& Warehouse Management, Maritime and Logistics, and Tug and Barge Marine Towing.

We strive to inspire our diverse, well-rounded work force and management team to always perform at the highest levels of safety and professionalism. We deliver service by maintaining

a reputation where our unquestionable Values of honesty and integrity drive our actions on and off the job.

494 Western Turnpike, Altamont, NY • Phone: 518.355.6034 • www.carvercompanies.com

GO BIG

Sean Van Etten ‘20

Automotive Technology

Lake Katrine, N.Y.

THE NUMBER OF QUALIFIED

AUTO TECHNICIANS NEEDED NATIONWIDE

IS PROJECTED TO RISE ABOVE

750,000

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

BY THE YEAR 2024

The Greenville Pioneer wants to hear from you.

Send information about upcoming events and

news to news@greenvillepioneer.com.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

Qualified customers can now

apply for Home Energy Assistance

Program (HEAP) grants,

a federally funded program that

provides regular and emergency

assistance to help pay heating

and utility bills, and new this

year, gas and electric utility arrears

assistance grants of up to

$10,000 per household.

Both HEAP grants and Regular

Arrears Supplement (RAS)

program grants are available

through local Department of

Social Services (DSS) offices.

Applications for HEAP are also

available at Offices for the Aging

and online at mybenefits.

ny.gov.

“We are pleased that additional

assistance is available for

families in our community who

may be struggling, especially

as we continue to navigate the

COVID-19 pandemic,” said

Anthony Campagiorni, vice

president of customer services

and gas operations. “We encourage

all customers who are

eligible to apply.”

Families who qualify for

HEAP grants and use electricity

or natural gas as their primary

heating source could receive a

HEAP grant of $350 or more

toward their utility bill, depending

on family income and

size guidelines. For example, a

family of four with natural gas

heating and an annual income

of $62,988 would qualify for a

$350 grant.

Central Hudson customers

who receive HEAP grants or

qualify for other assistance programs

will receive additional

bill credits for up to 12 months

on their Central Hudson bill.

As an example: A Central

Hudson customer who qualifies

for a Tier 1 HEAP grant

and uses natural gas for heating

is eligible for bill credits of up

to $30 per month; while a Tier

1 customer who has electric

heating can receive a credit of

almost $40 each month. Customers

with lower incomes who

qualify for higher tiers could be

eligible for larger bill credits.

Campagiorni

added,

“Households receiving a HEAP

benefit for non-utility heating

fuels such as oil, propane,

wood/wood pellets, kerosene,

coal or corn are also eligible for

a monthly credit on their electric

or non-heating gas bill.”

Customers who heat with

non-utility heating fuels should

email their current Notice of

Decision letter to Central Hudson

at careunit@cenhud.com to

be enrolled and receive the bill

credit.

Regular HEAP grants for

the fall and upcoming winter

are available from now through

March 15, or until funding is

exhausted. Emergency HEAP

grants will be available between

Jan. 3 and Mar. 15. These

benefits are designed to meet an

eligible household’s immediate

energy needs.

The Heating Equipment Repair

or Replacement (HERR)

program is also available to

assist customers who have primary

heating equipment that

is either inoperable or unsafe.

HERR grants are currently

available and will remain so

through Sept. 30, 2022.

NEW THIS YEAR

The Regular Arrears Supplement

program is a new program

providing up to $10,000 in utility

arrears assistance to eligible

households that are unable to

pay their unpaid electric and/

or gas utility arrears. This program

is open to homeowners

and renters and can apply to all

arrears, including those accrued

prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.

This program only applies to

electricity and natural gas, and

not deliverable fuels such as

home heating oil or propane. It

is currently available and will

remain open to qualified customers

until Sept. 30, 2022 or

until funding is exhausted.

In addition to Central Hudson’s

bill discounts for customers

receiving HEAP grants,

these bill discounts are now

also provided to customers who

receive Lifeline; Supplemental

Nutrition Assistance Program

(SNAP); Medicaid; Supplemental

Security Income (SSI); Federal

Public Housing Assistance;

Veterans Pension or Survivors

Pension; and certain programs

for Native Americans. This program

provides a monthly bill

credit for up to 12 consecutive

months.

During the COVID-19 pandemic,

Central Hudson has

suspended service terminations

and is actively reaching out to

customers who are experiencing

financial challenges to determine

if they are eligible for

further assistance. In order to

provide necessary documentation

for certain assistance programs,

some Central Hudson

customers are being proactively

provided with statements

showing a past due balance or

a termination notice. These

statements may be necessary

for a customer to qualify for

an emergency HEAP benefit or

other charitable resources like

Central Hudson’s Good Neighbor

Fund that provides “last

resort” grants to help pay the

energy bills of local residents

in need who have exhausted all

other forms of public and private

utility assistance.

For more information on

HEAP eligibility requirements

and benefits, visit www.CentralHudson.com/HEAP

or

http://otda.ny.gov/programs/

heap/program.asp; and for more

on all of Central Hudson’s assistance

and billing programs,

visit www.CentralHudson.com,

and click on “My Account.”

Utility assistance grants of up to $10,000 available

ville Firehouse through an agreement

with the fire district.

“It’s a great add to the town, a

op gets a sec

Greene County Paramedics; Mark Evans, preside

ene County Paramedics Board members Prattsvi

online at www.greenvillepioneer.com

aminers, 1

ain Street,

ain Street,

ro Public Library, 10 a.m.

books, audiobooks, CDs a

winter. All proceeds go to t

3 - Greenville Town Plan

Pioneer Building, 11159 R

3 - Green eCounty Econom

ing, 4 p.m., County Office B

Street, Catskill, or wath on

4 - Cairo Town Planning

Main Street, Cairo.

8 - Durham Town Court, 3:

Durham.

9 - Greenville Town Zoning

neer Building, 11159 Route

11 - Veterans Day - Town o

15 - Greenville Town Boa

Building, 11159 Route 32,

15 - Durham Town Court

East Durham.

16 - Durham Town Boar

Route 81, East Durham.

25 - Thanksgiving - Town o

29 - Durham Town Court

East Durham.

DECEM

To have your organization’s

events added to our

calendar, please enter them

online at www.greenvillepioneer.com

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, October 22, 2021

rra

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, April 24, 2020

re are no upcoming

safe and stay home.

’s Core Competencies

ion, Sand and Gravel

evedoring, Terminal &

Logistics, and Tug and

g.

nded work force and

at the highest levels of

ervice by maintaining

Values of honesty and

nd off the job.

ke

4

s.com

By Sarah Trafton

Courtesy of Columbia-Greene Media

PRATTSVILLE—Amid

the

public health crisis wrought by

COVID-19, the county’s fifth flycar

joined the system Monday.

Adding the paramedic vehicle,

which preps patients for transport

prior to the arrival of an ambulance,

was a hotly debated topic in

the Greene County Legislature in

2019.

Catskill lawmakers Michael

Bulich and Matthew Luvera opposed

the budget amendment because

they did not agree with the

county footing the bill instead of

the towns. Catskill has its own Advanced

Life Support ambulance

system.

Mountaintop officials, including

Hunter Town Supervisor Daryl

Legg and Legislator Larry Gardner,

D-Hunter, argued that the mountaintop

community was underserved

and that lives on the mountain

should be just as important as

those in the valley towns.

The flycar was added to the

budget prior to its approval in November.

The most important asset

is not the truck, but our highly

trained and skilled paramedics led

by Chief Steve Brucato,” Greene

County EMS Paramedics President

Mark Evans said in a statement.

“Our medics are among the highest

trained in the region; only the flight

medics have more training.”

Evans also commended the

paramedics for continuing to work

and provide life-saving care to residents

during the pandemic.

“Being a paramedic is stressful

enough without the added potential

exposure and precautions now

mandated,” he said.

“Medic 8” is based at the Prattsville

Firehouse through an agreement

with the fire district.

“It’s a great add to the town, a

service to the town, mountaintop

and the county,” Prattsville Deputy

Town Supervisor Greg Cross said.

“It was a little bit of an uphill battle

to get it. There were many people

involved in making it happen.

“Daryl Legg was instrumental

in not taking no for an answer. And

of course we had to have help from

the county administrator and county

legislature to make it happen.”

Cross said he believes the new

flycar will make medical care more

accessible for the community.

“It’s a win for the mountaintop,”

he said. “There’s not a lot of

EMS assets up here. This bridges

the gap from crisis to hospital care.

We’re happy to have it.”

The flycar is a 2020 Chevrolet

Tahoe, which cost $45,000

equipped with lights, siren and

striping and another $50,000 in

life-saving equipment. The truck

carries a cardiac monitor/defibrillator,

airway/intubation kit, IV kit,

CPR machine and drug bag with

nearly all the emergency drugs of

an emergency room, according to

Evans.

Cost estimates requested by the

Legislature showed that the price

of a new flycar would be around

$403,000.

The flycar will be paid for in

2020 by a $60,000 contribution

from Greene County Emergency

Medical Services and a $50,000

State and Municipal Facilities Program

Grant from the state Assembly.

The remaining $303,203 will

come from the county, according to

the resolution passed in November.

“We are very pleased that the

mountaintop towns worked together

to request this truck and the

Greene County Legislature agreed

to the additional funding to place

another medic truck in service,”

Evans said. “Having this truck

based in Prattsville helps to provide

a vital medical asset in an underserved

area.”

The truck will be staffed 24/7,

365 days per year and has a primary

response area of Prattsville, Lexington

and Ashland.

“Greene County EMS uses

System Status Management, so as

medic trucks are sent on calls, the

other available trucks move position

to be best located for additional

calls,” Evans said. “This truck,

as with any of the medic trucks,

despite their home base position,

could end up at any location in the

county depending on the need.”

Legg and other mountaintop

officials including Hunter Town

Councilman Dolph Semenza,

Lexington Town Supervisor John

Berger and former Windham Town

Supervisor Robert Pelham approached

the Legislature in February

2019 about the issue, requesting

that the current flycar on the mountain

be relocated from Windham to

Hunter and that a second vehicle be

added.

The officials cited response

times as the reason for their request.

The response time for the three

vehicles stationed in the valley

is nine minutes, Evans said at a

March 2019 meeting, while the

mountaintop vehicle’s response

time is 14 minutes.

In August, Evans confirmed

that a new location for Medic 9, the

existing vehicle, had been found in

the village of Hunter.

The building, at the corner of

Bridge Street and Route 23A, required

some renovating and Evans

expects the flycar will be relocated

by June 1, he said.

Mountaintop gets a second fly car

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Pictured from left, Steve Brucato, chief of Greene County Paramedics; Mark Evans, president of Greene County Paramedics; Greg

Cross, Prattsville town supervisor; and Greene County Paramedics Board members Prattsville Fire Chief Jim Dymond and Prattsville

Hose Company President Dave Rikard.

V

You

ply. Call for details.

cluded.

P 120

ment

uch.

99 /mo.

nnels

ERS

907

Page 5 of 5

your organization’s events added to our calendar, please enter them online at www.greenvillepioneer.com

ve, drop-off box-

Lumber and the

be distributed to

ce Memorial Li-

Mission’s backn,

the library will

es billed items or

7309 Route 81,

ille Rotary Club,

reenville. More

ail.com.

p.m., 512 Main

hearing, tentakill

High School

skill.

arking lot, Route

e Rotary Club.

e, 4 p.m., Cairo

9 Route 81, East

1 - Greene County Board of Electrical Examiners, 1

p.m., Greene County Office Building, 411 Main Street,

4th Floor, Room 469, Catskill.

1 - Cairo Town Board meeting, 7 p.m., 512 Main Street,

Cairo.

2 - Election Day - Cairo Town Hall closed.

2 - Durham Town Board workshop meeting, 7:30 p.m.,

7309 Route 81, East Durham.

2 - Election Day Used Book Sale by Friends of the Cairo

Public Library, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Stock up on used

books, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs for all ages before

winter. All proceeds go to the Cairo Public Library.

3 - Greenville Town Planning Board meeting, 7 p.m.,

Pioneer Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

3 - Green eCounty Economic Development Corp. meeting,

4 p.m., County Office Building, Room 427, 411 Main

Street, Catskill, or wath on YouTube.

4 - Cairo Town Planning Board meeting, 7 p.m., 512

Main Street, Cairo.

8 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81, East

Durham.

9 - Greenville Town Zoning Board meeting, 7 p.m., Pioneer

Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

11 - Veterans Day - Town offices closed.

15 - Greenville Town Board meeting, 7 p.m., Pioneer

Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

15 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81,

East Durham.

16 - Durham Town Board meeting, 7:30 p.m., 7309

Route 81, East Durham.

25 - Thanksgiving - Town offices closed.

29 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81,

East Durham.

DECEMBER 2021

4 - CANCELED: The Bates Church Christmas program

has been canceled after much discussion and due to

an abundance of caution over concerns of COVID-19.

Core Competencies consist of General & Marine Construction, Sand and Gravel Mining, Property Management, Port, Stevedoring, Terminal

& Warehouse Management, Maritime and Logistics, and Tug and Barge Marine Towing.

ded work force and management team to always perform at the highest levels of safety and professionalism. We deliver service by mainreputation

where our unquestionable Values of honesty and integrity drive our actions on and off the job.

494 Western Turnpike, Altamont, NY • Phone: 518.355.6034 • www.carvercompanies.com

GO BIG

Sean Van Etten ‘20

Automotive Technology

Lake Katrine, N.Y.

THE NUMBER OF QUALIFIED

AUTO TECHNICIANS NEEDED NATIONWIDE

IS PROJECTED TO RISE ABOVE

to hear from you.

ming events and

pioneer.com.

FROM YOU!

ir Central Hudson bill.

an example: A Central

n customer who qualir

a Tier 1 HEAP grant

es natural gas for heating

ible for bill credits of up

per month; while a Tier

tomer who has electric

g can receive a credit of

t $40 each month. Cuswith

lower incomes who

y for higher tiers could be

e for larger bill credits.

mpagiorni

added,

eholds receiving a HEAP

t for non-utility heatels

such as oil, propane,

wood pellets, kerosene,

r corn are also eligible for

thly credit on their elecnon-heating

gas bill.”

stomers who heat with

ility heating fuels should

their current Notice of

on letter to Central Hudcareunit@cenhud.com

to

olled and receive the bill

gular HEAP grants for

ll and upcoming winter

ailable from now through

15, or until funding is

sted. Emergency HEAP

will be available be-

Jan. 3 and Mar. 15. These

ts are designed to meet an

e household’s immediate

needs.

e Heating Equipment Rer

Replacement (HERR)

m is also available to

customers who have priheating

equipment that

er inoperable or unsafe.

grants are currently

ble and will remain so

h Sept. 30, 2022.

NEW THIS YEAR

The Regular Arrears Supplement

program is a new program

providing up to $10,000 in utility

arrears assistance to eligible

households that are unable to

pay their unpaid electric and/

or gas utility arrears. This program

is open to homeowners

and renters and can apply to all

arrears, including those accrued

prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.

This program only applies to

electricity and natural gas, and

not deliverable fuels such as

home heating oil or propane. It

is currently available and will

remain open to qualified customers

until Sept. 30, 2022 or

until funding is exhausted.

In addition to Central Hudson’s

bill discounts for customers

receiving HEAP grants,

these bill discounts are now

also provided to customers who

receive Lifeline; Supplemental

Nutrition Assistance Program

(SNAP); Medicaid; Supplemental

Security Income (SSI); Federal

Public Housing Assistance;

Veterans Pension or Survivors

Pension; and certain programs

for Native Americans. This program

provides a monthly bill

credit for up to 12 consecutive

months.

During the COVID-19 pandemic,

Central Hudson has

suspended service terminations

and is actively reaching out to

customers who are experiencing

financial challenges to determine

if they are eligible for

further assistance. In order to

provide necessary documentation

for certain assistance programs,

some Central Hudson

customers are being proactively

provided with statements

showing a past due balance or

a termination notice. These

statements may be necessary

for a customer to qualify for

an emergency HEAP benefit or

other charitable resources like

Central Hudson’s Good Neighbor

Fund that provides “last

resort” grants to help pay the

energy bills of local residents

in need who have exhausted all

other forms of public and private

utility assistance.

For more information on

HEAP eligibility requirements

and benefits, visit www.CentralHudson.com/HEAP

or

http://otda.ny.gov/programs/

heap/program.asp; and for more

on all of Central Hudson’s assistance

and billing programs,

visit www.CentralHudson.com,

and click on “My Account.”

stance grants of up to $10,000 available

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, October 22, 2021

neer.com

ance.

tion.

or’s name,

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, April 24, 2020

oneer.com

ance.

.

or’s name,

pcoming

ay home.

etencies

Gravel

rminal &

d Tug and

orce and

t levels of

intaining

nesty and

.

By Sarah Trafton

Courtesy of Columbia-Greene Media

PRATTSVILLE—Amid

the

public health crisis wrought by

COVID-19, the county’s fifth flycar

joined the system Monday.

Adding the paramedic vehicle,

which preps patients for transport

prior to the arrival of an ambulance,

was a hotly debated topic in

the Greene County Legislature in

2019.

Catskill lawmakers Michael

Bulich and Matthew Luvera opposed

the budget amendment because

they did not agree with the

county footing the bill instead of

the towns. Catskill has its own Advanced

Life Support ambulance

system.

Mountaintop officials, including

Hunter Town Supervisor Daryl

Legg and Legislator Larry Gardner,

D-Hunter, argued that the mountaintop

community was underserved

and that lives on the mountain

should be just as important as

those in the valley towns.

The flycar was added to the

budget prior to its approval in November.

The most important asset

is not the truck, but our highly

trained and skilled paramedics led

by Chief Steve Brucato,” Greene

County EMS Paramedics President

Mark Evans said in a statement.

“Our medics are among the highest

trained in the region; only the flight

medics have more training.”

Evans also commended the

paramedics for continuing to work

and provide life-saving care to residents

during the pandemic.

“Being a paramedic is stressful

enough without the added potential

exposure and precautions now

mandated,” he said.

“Medic 8” is based at the Prattsville

Firehouse through an agreement

with the fire district.

“It’s a great add to the town, a

service to the town, mountaintop

and the county,” Prattsville Deputy

Town Supervisor Greg Cross said.

“It was a little bit of an uphill battle

to get it. There were many people

involved in making it happen.

“Daryl Legg was instrumental

in not taking no for an answer. And

of course we had to have help from

the county administrator and county

legislature to make it happen.”

Cross said he believes the new

flycar will make medical care more

accessible for the community.

“It’s a win for the mountaintop,”

he said. “There’s not a lot of

EMS assets up here. This bridges

the gap from crisis to hospital care.

We’re happy to have it.”

The flycar is a 2020 Chevrolet

Tahoe, which cost $45,000

equipped with lights, siren and

striping and another $50,000 in

life-saving equipment. The truck

carries a cardiac monitor/defibrillator,

airway/intubation kit, IV kit,

CPR machine and drug bag with

nearly all the emergency drugs of

an emergency room, according to

Evans.

Cost estimates requested by the

Legislature showed that the price

of a new flycar would be around

$403,000.

The flycar will be paid for in

2020 by a $60,000 contribution

from Greene County Emergency

Medical Services and a $50,000

State and Municipal Facilities Program

Grant from the state Assembly.

The remaining $303,203 will

come from the county, according to

the resolution passed in November.

“We are very pleased that the

mountaintop towns worked together

to request this truck and the

Greene County Legislature agreed

to the additional funding to place

another medic truck in service,”

Evans said. “Having this truck

based in Prattsville helps to provide

a vital medical asset in an underserved

area.”

The truck will be staffed 24/7,

365 days per year and has a primary

response area of Prattsville, Lexington

and Ashland.

“Greene County EMS uses

System Status Management, so as

medic trucks are sent on calls, the

other available trucks move position

to be best located for additional

calls,” Evans said. “This truck,

as with any of the medic trucks,

despite their home base position,

could end up at any location in the

county depending on the need.”

Legg and other mountaintop

officials including Hunter Town

Councilman Dolph Semenza,

Lexington Town Supervisor John

Berger and former Windham Town

Supervisor Robert Pelham approached

the Legislature in February

2019 about the issue, requesting

that the current flycar on the mountain

be relocated from Windham to

Hunter and that a second vehicle be

added.

The officials cited response

times as the reason for their request.

The response time for the three

vehicles stationed in the valley

is nine minutes, Evans said at a

March 2019 meeting, while the

mountaintop vehicle’s response

time is 14 minutes.

In August, Evans confirmed

that a new location for Medic 9, the

existing vehicle, had been found in

the village of Hunter.

The building, at the corner of

Bridge Street and Route 23A, required

some renovating and Evans

expects the flycar will be relocated

by June 1, he said.

Mountaintop gets a second fly car

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Pictured from left, Steve Brucato, chief of Greene County Paramedics; Mark Evans, president of Greene County Paramedics; Greg

Cross, Prattsville town supervisor; and Greene County Paramedics Board members Prattsville Fire Chief Jim Dymond and Prattsville

Hose Company President Dave Rikard.

tails.

Page 5 of 5

ation’s events added to our calendar, please enter them online at www.greenvillepioneer.com

oxthe

d to

l Lickwill

s or

81,

lub,

ore

ain

ntaool

ute

b.

airo

ast

1 - Greene County Board of Electrical Examiners, 1

p.m., Greene County Office Building, 411 Main Street,

4th Floor, Room 469, Catskill.

1 - Cairo Town Board meeting, 7 p.m., 512 Main Street,

Cairo.

2 - Election Day - Cairo Town Hall closed.

2 - Durham Town Board workshop meeting, 7:30 p.m.,

7309 Route 81, East Durham.

2 - Election Day Used Book Sale by Friends of the Cairo

Public Library, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Stock up on used

books, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs for all ages before

winter. All proceeds go to the Cairo Public Library.

3 - Greenville Town Planning Board meeting, 7 p.m.,

Pioneer Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

3 - Green eCounty Economic Development Corp. meeting,

4 p.m., County Office Building, Room 427, 411 Main

Street, Catskill, or wath on YouTube.

4 - Cairo Town Planning Board meeting, 7 p.m., 512

Main Street, Cairo.

8 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81, East

Durham.

9 - Greenville Town Zoning Board meeting, 7 p.m., Pioneer

Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

11 - Veterans Day - Town offices closed.

15 - Greenville Town Board meeting, 7 p.m., Pioneer

Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

15 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81,

East Durham.

16 - Durham Town Board meeting, 7:30 p.m., 7309

Route 81, East Durham.

25 - Thanksgiving - Town offices closed.

29 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81,

East Durham.

DECEMBER 2021

4 - CANCELED: The Bates Church Christmas program

has been canceled after much discussion and due to

an abundance of caution over concerns of COVID-19.

tencies consist of General & Marine Construction, Sand and Gravel Mining, Property Management, Port, Stevedoring, Termihouse

Management, Maritime and Logistics, and Tug and Barge Marine Towing.

ce and management team to always perform at the highest levels of safety and professionalism. We deliver service by mainhere

our unquestionable Values of honesty and integrity drive our actions on and off the job.

rn Turnpike, Altamont, NY • Phone: 518.355.6034 • www.carvercompanies.com

GO BIG

Sean Van Etten ‘20

Automotive Technology

Lake Katrine, N.Y.

THE NUMBER OF QUALIFIED

AUTO TECHNICIANS NEEDED NATIONWIDE

IS PROJECTED TO RISE ABOVE

750,000

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

BY THE YEAR 2024

m you.

ts and

m.

OU!

udson bill.

e: A Central

who quali-

HEAP grant

as for heating

credits of up

; while a Tier

has electric

e a credit of

month. Cusincomes

who

tiers could be

bill credits.

added,

iving a HEAP

-utility heatoil,

propane,

ts, kerosene,

so eligible for

on their elecgas

bill.”

o heat with

fuels should

nt Notice of

Central Hudenhud.com

to

ceive the bill

P grants for

oming winter

now through

til funding is

gency HEAP

available bear.

15. These

ed to meet an

’s immediate

quipment Reent

(HERR)

available to

ho have priuipment

that

le or unsafe.

re currently

ll remain so

2022.

NEW THIS YEAR

The Regular Arrears Supplement

program is a new program

providing up to $10,000 in utility

arrears assistance to eligible

households that are unable to

pay their unpaid electric and/

or gas utility arrears. This program

is open to homeowners

and renters and can apply to all

arrears, including those accrued

prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.

This program only applies to

electricity and natural gas, and

not deliverable fuels such as

home heating oil or propane. It

is currently available and will

remain open to qualified customers

until Sept. 30, 2022 or

until funding is exhausted.

In addition to Central Hudson’s

bill discounts for customers

receiving HEAP grants,

these bill discounts are now

also provided to customers who

receive Lifeline; Supplemental

Nutrition Assistance Program

(SNAP); Medicaid; Supplemental

Security Income (SSI); Federal

Public Housing Assistance;

Veterans Pension or Survivors

Pension; and certain programs

for Native Americans. This program

provides a monthly bill

credit for up to 12 consecutive

months.

During the COVID-19 pandemic,

Central Hudson has

suspended service terminations

and is actively reaching out to

customers who are experiencing

financial challenges to determine

if they are eligible for

further assistance. In order to

provide necessary documentation

for certain assistance programs,

some Central Hudson

customers are being proactively

provided with statements

showing a past due balance or

a termination notice. These

statements may be necessary

for a customer to qualify for

an emergency HEAP benefit or

other charitable resources like

Central Hudson’s Good Neighbor

Fund that provides “last

resort” grants to help pay the

energy bills of local residents

in need who have exhausted all

other forms of public and private

utility assistance.

For more information on

HEAP eligibility requirements

and benefits, visit www.CentralHudson.com/HEAP

or

http://otda.ny.gov/programs/

heap/program.asp; and for more

on all of Central Hudson’s assistance

and billing programs,

visit www.CentralHudson.com,

and click on “My Account.”

ce grants of up to $10,000 available

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, October 22, 2021

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, April 24, 2020

oming

home.

encies

ravel

inal &

Tug and

ce and

evels of

taining

sty and

By Sarah Trafton

Courtesy of Columbia-Greene Media

PRATTSVILLE—Amid

the

public health crisis wrought by

COVID-19, the county’s fifth flycar

joined the system Monday.

Adding the paramedic vehicle,

which preps patients for transport

prior to the arrival of an ambulance,

was a hotly debated topic in

the Greene County Legislature in

2019.

Catskill lawmakers Michael

Bulich and Matthew Luvera opposed

the budget amendment because

they did not agree with the

county footing the bill instead of

the towns. Catskill has its own Advanced

Life Support ambulance

system.

Mountaintop officials, including

Hunter Town Supervisor Daryl

Legg and Legislator Larry Gardner,

D-Hunter, argued that the mountaintop

community was underserved

and that lives on the mountain

should be just as important as

those in the valley towns.

The flycar was added to the

budget prior to its approval in November.

The most important asset

is not the truck, but our highly

trained and skilled paramedics led

by Chief Steve Brucato,” Greene

County EMS Paramedics President

Mark Evans said in a statement.

“Our medics are among the highest

trained in the region; only the flight

medics have more training.”

Evans also commended the

paramedics for continuing to work

and provide life-saving care to residents

during the pandemic.

“Being a paramedic is stressful

enough without the added potential

exposure and precautions now

mandated,” he said.

“Medic 8” is based at the Prattsville

Firehouse through an agreement

with the fire district.

“It’s a great add to the town, a

service to the town, mountaintop

and the county,” Prattsville Deputy

Town Supervisor Greg Cross said.

“It was a little bit of an uphill battle

to get it. There were many people

involved in making it happen.

“Daryl Legg was instrumental

in not taking no for an answer. And

of course we had to have help from

the county administrator and county

legislature to make it happen.”

Cross said he believes the new

flycar will make medical care more

accessible for the community.

“It’s a win for the mountaintop,”

he said. “There’s not a lot of

EMS assets up here. This bridges

the gap from crisis to hospital care.

We’re happy to have it.”

The flycar is a 2020 Chevrolet

Tahoe, which cost $45,000

equipped with lights, siren and

striping and another $50,000 in

life-saving equipment. The truck

carries a cardiac monitor/defibrillator,

airway/intubation kit, IV kit,

CPR machine and drug bag with

nearly all the emergency drugs of

an emergency room, according to

Evans.

Cost estimates requested by the

Legislature showed that the price

of a new flycar would be around

$403,000.

The flycar will be paid for in

2020 by a $60,000 contribution

from Greene County Emergency

Medical Services and a $50,000

State and Municipal Facilities Program

Grant from the state Assembly.

The remaining $303,203 will

come from the county, according to

the resolution passed in November.

“We are very pleased that the

mountaintop towns worked together

to request this truck and the

Greene County Legislature agreed

to the additional funding to place

another medic truck in service,”

Evans said. “Having this truck

based in Prattsville helps to provide

a vital medical asset in an underserved

area.”

The truck will be staffed 24/7,

365 days per year and has a primary

response area of Prattsville, Lexington

and Ashland.

“Greene County EMS uses

System Status Management, so as

medic trucks are sent on calls, the

other available trucks move position

to be best located for additional

calls,” Evans said. “This truck,

as with any of the medic trucks,

despite their home base position,

could end up at any location in the

county depending on the need.”

Legg and other mountaintop

officials including Hunter Town

Councilman Dolph Semenza,

Lexington Town Supervisor John

Berger and former Windham Town

Supervisor Robert Pelham approached

the Legislature in February

2019 about the issue, requesting

that the current flycar on the mountain

be relocated from Windham to

Hunter and that a second vehicle be

added.

The officials cited response

times as the reason for their request.

The response time for the three

vehicles stationed in the valley

is nine minutes, Evans said at a

March 2019 meeting, while the

mountaintop vehicle’s response

time is 14 minutes.

In August, Evans confirmed

that a new location for Medic 9, the

existing vehicle, had been found in

the village of Hunter.

The building, at the corner of

Bridge Street and Route 23A, required

some renovating and Evans

expects the flycar will be relocated

by June 1, he said.

Mountaintop gets a second fly car

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Pictured from left, Steve Brucato, chief of Greene County Paramedics; Mark Evans, president of Greene County Paramedics; Greg

Cross, Prattsville town supervisor; and Greene County Paramedics Board members Prattsville Fire Chief Jim Dymond and Prattsville

Hose Company President Dave Rikard.

ls.

age 5 of 5

tion’s events added to our calendar, please enter them online at www.greenvillepioneer.com

x-

e

to

i-

k-

ill

or

1,

b,

re

in

a-

ol

te

ro

st

1 - Greene County Board of Electrical Examiners, 1

p.m., Greene County Office Building, 411 Main Street,

4th Floor, Room 469, Catskill.

1 - Cairo Town Board meeting, 7 p.m., 512 Main Street,

Cairo.

2 - Election Day - Cairo Town Hall closed.

2 - Durham Town Board workshop meeting, 7:30 p.m.,

7309 Route 81, East Durham.

2 - Election Day Used Book Sale by Friends of the Cairo

Public Library, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Stock up on used

books, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs for all ages before

winter. All proceeds go to the Cairo Public Library.

3 - Greenville Town Planning Board meeting, 7 p.m.,

Pioneer Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

3 - Green eCounty Economic Development Corp. meeting,

4 p.m., County Office Building, Room 427, 411 Main

Street, Catskill, or wath on YouTube.

4 - Cairo Town Planning Board meeting, 7 p.m., 512

Main Street, Cairo.

8 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81, East

Durham.

9 - Greenville Town Zoning Board meeting, 7 p.m., Pioneer

Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

11 - Veterans Day - Town offices closed.

15 - Greenville Town Board meeting, 7 p.m., Pioneer

Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

15 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81,

East Durham.

16 - Durham Town Board meeting, 7:30 p.m., 7309

Route 81, East Durham.

25 - Thanksgiving - Town offices closed.

29 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81,

East Durham.

DECEMBER 2021

4 - CANCELED: The Bates Church Christmas program

has been canceled after much discussion and due to

an abundance of caution over concerns of COVID-19.

ncies consist of General & Marine Construction, Sand and Gravel Mining, Property Management, Port, Stevedoring, Termiouse

Management, Maritime and Logistics, and Tug and Barge Marine Towing.

and management team to always perform at the highest levels of safety and professionalism. We deliver service by mainere

our unquestionable Values of honesty and integrity drive our actions on and off the job.

Turnpike, Altamont, NY • Phone: 518.355.6034 • www.carvercompanies.com

GO BIG

Sean Van Etten ‘20

Automotive Technology

Lake Katrine, N.Y.

THE NUMBER OF QUALIFIED

AUTO TECHNICIANS NEEDED NATIONWIDE

IS PROJECTED TO RISE ABOVE

750,000

you.

s and

.

OU!

son bill.

A Central

who quali-

EAP grant

for heating

redits of up

hile a Tier

as electric

a credit of

onth. Cuscomes

who

ers could be

ill credits.

added,

ing a HEAP

tility heatil,

propane,

, kerosene,

eligible for

their elecas

bill.”

heat with

fuels should

Notice of

entral Hudhud.com

to

eive the bill

grants for

ing winter

ow through

funding is

ncy HEAP

ailable ber.

15. These

d to meet an

immediate

ipment Rent

(HERR)

vailable to

o have pripment

that

or unsafe.

currently

remain so

22.

NEW THIS YEAR

The Regular Arrears Supplement

program is a new program

providing up to $10,000 in utility

arrears assistance to eligible

households that are unable to

pay their unpaid electric and/

or gas utility arrears. This program

is open to homeowners

and renters and can apply to all

arrears, including those accrued

prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.

This program only applies to

electricity and natural gas, and

not deliverable fuels such as

home heating oil or propane. It

is currently available and will

remain open to qualified customers

until Sept. 30, 2022 or

until funding is exhausted.

In addition to Central Hudson’s

bill discounts for customers

receiving HEAP grants,

these bill discounts are now

also provided to customers who

receive Lifeline; Supplemental

Nutrition Assistance Program

(SNAP); Medicaid; Supplemental

Security Income (SSI); Federal

Public Housing Assistance;

Veterans Pension or Survivors

Pension; and certain programs

for Native Americans. This program

provides a monthly bill

credit for up to 12 consecutive

months.

During the COVID-19 pandemic,

Central Hudson has

suspended service terminations

and is actively reaching out to

customers who are experiencing

financial challenges to determine

if they are eligible for

further assistance. In order to

provide necessary documentation

for certain assistance programs,

some Central Hudson

customers are being proactively

provided with statements

showing a past due balance or

a termination notice. These

statements may be necessary

for a customer to qualify for

an emergency HEAP benefit or

other charitable resources like

Central Hudson’s Good Neighbor

Fund that provides “last

resort” grants to help pay the

energy bills of local residents

in need who have exhausted all

other forms of public and private

utility assistance.

For more information on

HEAP eligibility requirements

and benefits, visit www.CentralHudson.com/HEAP

or

http://otda.ny.gov/programs/

heap/program.asp; and for more

on all of Central Hudson’s assistance

and billing programs,

visit www.CentralHudson.com,

and click on “My Account.”

e grants of up to $10,000 available

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, October 22, 2021

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, April 24, 2020

ing

me.

ies

el

al &

and

nd

s of

ing

and

By Sarah Trafton

Courtesy of Columbia-Greene Media

PRATTSVILLE—Amid

the

public health crisis wrought by

COVID-19, the county’s fifth flycar

joined the system Monday.

Adding the paramedic vehicle,

which preps patients for transport

prior to the arrival of an ambulance,

was a hotly debated topic in

the Greene County Legislature in

2019.

Catskill lawmakers Michael

Bulich and Matthew Luvera opposed

the budget amendment because

they did not agree with the

county footing the bill instead of

the towns. Catskill has its own Advanced

Life Support ambulance

system.

Mountaintop officials, including

Hunter Town Supervisor Daryl

Legg and Legislator Larry Gardner,

D-Hunter, argued that the mountaintop

community was underserved

and that lives on the mountain

should be just as important as

those in the valley towns.

The flycar was added to the

budget prior to its approval in November.

The most important asset

is not the truck, but our highly

trained and skilled paramedics led

by Chief Steve Brucato,” Greene

County EMS Paramedics President

Mark Evans said in a statement.

“Our medics are among the highest

trained in the region; only the flight

medics have more training.”

Evans also commended the

paramedics for continuing to work

and provide life-saving care to residents

during the pandemic.

“Being a paramedic is stressful

enough without the added potential

exposure and precautions now

mandated,” he said.

“Medic 8” is based at the Prattsville

Firehouse through an agreement

with the fire district.

“It’s a great add to the town, a

service to the town, mountaintop

and the county,” Prattsville Deputy

Town Supervisor Greg Cross said.

“It was a little bit of an uphill battle

to get it. There were many people

involved in making it happen.

“Daryl Legg was instrumental

in not taking no for an answer. And

of course we had to have help from

the county administrator and county

legislature to make it happen.”

Cross said he believes the new

flycar will make medical care more

accessible for the community.

“It’s a win for the mountaintop,”

he said. “There’s not a lot of

EMS assets up here. This bridges

the gap from crisis to hospital care.

We’re happy to have it.”

The flycar is a 2020 Chevrolet

Tahoe, which cost $45,000

equipped with lights, siren and

striping and another $50,000 in

life-saving equipment. The truck

carries a cardiac monitor/defibrillator,

airway/intubation kit, IV kit,

CPR machine and drug bag with

nearly all the emergency drugs of

an emergency room, according to

Evans.

Cost estimates requested by the

Legislature showed that the price

of a new flycar would be around

$403,000.

The flycar will be paid for in

2020 by a $60,000 contribution

from Greene County Emergency

Medical Services and a $50,000

State and Municipal Facilities Program

Grant from the state Assembly.

The remaining $303,203 will

come from the county, according to

the resolution passed in November.

“We are very pleased that the

mountaintop towns worked together

to request this truck and the

Greene County Legislature agreed

to the additional funding to place

another medic truck in service,”

Evans said. “Having this truck

based in Prattsville helps to provide

a vital medical asset in an underserved

area.”

The truck will be staffed 24/7,

365 days per year and has a primary

response area of Prattsville, Lexington

and Ashland.

“Greene County EMS uses

System Status Management, so as

medic trucks are sent on calls, the

other available trucks move position

to be best located for additional

calls,” Evans said. “This truck,

as with any of the medic trucks,

despite their home base position,

could end up at any location in the

county depending on the need.”

Legg and other mountaintop

officials including Hunter Town

Councilman Dolph Semenza,

Lexington Town Supervisor John

Berger and former Windham Town

Supervisor Robert Pelham approached

the Legislature in February

2019 about the issue, requesting

that the current flycar on the mountain

be relocated from Windham to

Hunter and that a second vehicle be

added.

The officials cited response

times as the reason for their request.

The response time for the three

vehicles stationed in the valley

is nine minutes, Evans said at a

March 2019 meeting, while the

mountaintop vehicle’s response

time is 14 minutes.

In August, Evans confirmed

that a new location for Medic 9, the

existing vehicle, had been found in

the village of Hunter.

The building, at the corner of

Bridge Street and Route 23A, required

some renovating and Evans

expects the flycar will be relocated

by June 1, he said.

Mountaintop gets a second fly car

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Pictured from left, Steve Brucato, chief of Greene County Paramedics; Mark Evans, president of Greene County Paramedics; Greg

Cross, Prattsville town supervisor; and Greene County Paramedics Board members Prattsville Fire Chief Jim Dymond and Prattsville

Hose Company President Dave Rikard.

5 of 5

’s events added to our calendar, please enter them online at www.greenvillepioneer.com

1 - Greene County Board of Electrical Examiners, 1

p.m., Greene County Office Building, 411 Main Street,

4th Floor, Room 469, Catskill.

1 - Cairo Town Board meeting, 7 p.m., 512 Main Street,

Cairo.

2 - Election Day - Cairo Town Hall closed.

2 - Durham Town Board workshop meeting, 7:30 p.m.,

7309 Route 81, East Durham.

2 - Election Day Used Book Sale by Friends of the Cairo

Public Library, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Stock up on used

books, audiobooks, CDs and DVDs for all ages before

winter. All proceeds go to the Cairo Public Library.

3 - Greenville Town Planning Board meeting, 7 p.m.,

Pioneer Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

3 - Green eCounty Economic Development Corp. meeting,

4 p.m., County Office Building, Room 427, 411 Main

Street, Catskill, or wath on YouTube.

4 - Cairo Town Planning Board meeting, 7 p.m., 512

Main Street, Cairo.

8 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81, East

Durham.

9 - Greenville Town Zoning Board meeting, 7 p.m., Pioneer

Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

11 - Veterans Day - Town offices closed.

15 - Greenville Town Board meeting, 7 p.m., Pioneer

Building, 11159 Route 32, Greenville.

15 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81,

East Durham.

16 - Durham Town Board meeting, 7:30 p.m., 7309

Route 81, East Durham.

25 - Thanksgiving - Town offices closed.

29 - Durham Town Court, 3:30 p.m., 7309 Route 81,

East Durham.

DECEMBER 2021

4 - CANCELED: The Bates Church Christmas program

has been canceled after much discussion and due to

an abundance of caution over concerns of COVID-19.

s consist of General & Marine Construction, Sand and Gravel Mining, Property Management, Port, Stevedoring, Termie

Management, Maritime and Logistics, and Tug and Barge Marine Towing.

d management team to always perform at the highest levels of safety and professionalism. We deliver service by mainour

unquestionable Values of honesty and integrity drive our actions on and off the job.

rnpike, Altamont, NY • Phone: 518.355.6034 • www.carvercompanies.com

GO BIG

Sean Van Etten ‘20

Automotive Technology

Lake Katrine, N.Y.

THE NUMBER OF QUALIFIED

AUTO TECHNICIANS NEEDED NATIONWIDE

IS PROJECTED TO RISE ABOVE

ou.

nd

!

n bill.

Central

o quali-

P grant

r heating

its of up

le a Tier

electric

credit of

th. Cusmes

who

could be

redits.

added,

a HEAP

ty heatpropane,

erosene,

gible for

eir elecbill.”

at with

s should

otice of

ral Hudd.com

to

the bill

ants for

g winter

through

nding is

HEAP

ble be-

5. These

meet an

mediate

ent Re-

(HERR)

lable to

ave prient

that

unsafe.

currently

main so

.

NEW THIS YEAR

The Regular Arrears Supplement

program is a new program

providing up to $10,000 in utility

arrears assistance to eligible

households that are unable to

pay their unpaid electric and/

or gas utility arrears. This program

is open to homeowners

and renters and can apply to all

arrears, including those accrued

prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.

This program only applies to

electricity and natural gas


2 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, May 8, 2020

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022 3

2 Editor’s Note: A charge is not a of Leeds, was arrested April The 16 Greenville an appearance Pioneer • Friday, ticket. May 8, 2020

conviction. All persons listed are

Police Blotter

in Cairo and charged with violating

environmental conserva-

of Freehold, was arrested April

• Michael Manchur, Jr., 54,

innocent until proven guilty in

Editor’s Note: A charge is not a conviction.

All persons listed are innocent

amended or dismissed.

■ Ripal Patel, 27, of Palenville, criminal Police a court of

possession

law. Charges Blotter

of a

can

controlled

be

was tion issued laws, an an appearance unclassified ticket. misdemeanor.

■ Rebekah She Briggs, was 40, issued of Purl-

an appearance third-degree ticket. criminal mischief,

misdemeanors. 22 in Freehold He and was charged issued with an

was arrested Jan. 21 at 5:59 p.m. in substance, both class A misdemeanors;

• James tampering Rancourt, with physical 37, of ing,

until proven Due to guilty the in COVID-19 a court of law. pandemic Catskill there and are charged no upcoming Editor’s Note: A charge is not a

with prohibited

stay sale safe of an and alcoholic stay home.

of

appearance

Leeds,

was arrested

was

ticket.

arrested

Jan. 26

April

at 5:08

16 an

a class

appearance

■ Ashley E felony;

ticket.

Drum, resisting 38, of arrest Johnstown,

and

Charges events can be or amended public meetings. or dismissed. Please

conviction. All persons listed are

beverage evidence, innocent

Acra was

until a arrested class proven E April

guilty felony; 30

in

and in Cairo

p.m. • in Danielle

and charged

Cairo and S. McKenna,

with violating

charged with 38,


second-degree

Michael Manchur,

was arrested obstruction

Jr., 54,

Jan. 29 at

STATE POLICE and first-degree unlawful dealing fifth-degree a charged court of law. with criminal Charges second-degree

possession can be of third-degree of Cairo,

environmental

was assault arrested

conservation

with April intent 22 of

to 12:13 of governmental

Freehold, was

a.m. in Durham administration,

arrested April

and charged

■ Beverly Cole, 45, of Catskill, with a child - alcohol, both class A a amended burglary, controlled or a dismissed. substance, felony, fifth a class degree D cause in Cairo

laws,

physical and

an

charged

unclassified

injury, second-de-

with

misdemeanorenth-degree

sev-

22

with both

in

class

Freehold

reckless A misdemeanors;

and charged with

endangerment and of

was arrested Due to Jan. the COVID-19 at 8:23 pandemic a.m. misdemeanors. there are no He upcoming was issued an felony. criminal He was possession held. of stolen

She

menacing with criminal

was issued

a weapon, possession

of a controlled

an third-degree

and property,

disorderly

a class

conduct,

criminal

B misdemeanor;

a violation.

mischief,

in Catskill and charged with seventh-degree

criminal possession ■ Iftakher Chowdhuly, 55, of sackie, fourth

appearance ticket.

property,

• James

■ Briana a Griffin, misdemeanor,

Rancourt, 37,

25, of Cox-

and

of appearance

fourth-degree

ticket.

criminal substance, a

possession He

class

was

E felony;

issued

resisting

an appearance

arrest

events or public meetings. Please stay safe and stay home. Acra seventh-degree criminal possession

of governmental of a controlled substance and

was

was degree

arrested

arrested criminal

April

Jan. 23 possession

in of Catskill a weapon,

30 and

at 2:40 of a class

• Danielle

a weapon, A misdemeanor.

S. McKenna,

all class A She misdemeanors;

issued

was

38, and

ticket.

second-degree obstruction

charged

of a controlled substance, a class A Hudson, was arrested Jan. 21 at 9 a.m.

with second-degree

and a charged misdemeanor.

He is a scheduled

of

with

Cairo,

an

was

and appearance

arrested

assault with ticket.

April 22

intent to • Rhett B.

administration,

Butler, 36, of

burglary,

misdemeanor. She was held. p.m. in Catskill and charged with operating

a felony, fifth

motor vehicle to appear

degree

with in in Cairo

a cause • physical Katie

and

S.

charged

injury Stein, with 28,

with

a of weapon,

Coxsackie, a class D was

West

seventh-degree

third-degree both

Albany,

class

was

A fleeing misdemeanors;

arrested officer

April

in and

22

a

criminal

■ Brad Hapeman, 48, of Hudson,

was arrested Jan. 20 at 1:20 beverage and first-degree unlawful and • driving Matthew

prohibited sale of an alcoholic blood-alcohol Cairo Town

possession

Court.

of stolen

content over 0.08%

criminal

felony. arrested

possession

Her arrestee April motor disorderly

in New vehicle, Baltimore

conduct, both class and

a violation. A charged misdemeanors;

He

property, a misdemeanor,

while D. intoxicated, Rinaldo,

and

both 25, status 22 in

of

was Athens

a controlled

unknown. and charged

substance,

with with

was

petty and issued

larceny, reckless an appearance driving, a class an A

fourth

a.m. in Catskill and charged with dealing with a child - alchol, both unclassified of Freehold,

degree

misdemeanors. was

criminal

arrested

possession

April a

driving

class A

■ Emiliano while

misdemeanor.

ability Rosales, impaired

She was

29, of

unclassified ticket.

misdemeanor misdemeanor. and third-degree She was

manufacture of drug-related paraphernalia,

a class A misdemeanor, sued an appearance ticket. Spa,

class A misdemeanors. He was is-

19 ■ in

of

Chloe Catskill

a weapon,

Kailas, and

a

32, charged

misdemeanor.

of Ballston with issued

Catskill, by alcohol appearance

was and arrested driving

ticket.

Jan. while 27 at

issued criminal

• an Rhett appearance trespass,

B. Butler,

a ticket. class

36,

B misdemeanor.

■ William was

of

operating

He is scheduled

was arrested

a motor

Jan.

vehicle

to appear

22 at 12:45

with

in

10:03 intoxicated,

• Katie S.

p.m. in Catskill both

Stein,

unclassified

28, of West Albany,

and charged

He

arrested

was Clemens, issued

April 24, an appearance

22 of

Cairo

and fifth-degree criminal possession

of a controlled substance, a was arrested Jan. 21 at 8:55 p.m. in with

■ Gail Van Etten, 65, of Athens, p.m.

a blood-alcohol

Town Court.

in Coxsackie

content

and charged

greater Coxsackie,

with

misdemeanors.

was

driving while

She

arrested

intoxicated

was issued

April

and Springfield,

in New Baltimore

ticket. Pennsylvania,

and charged

was

than


first-degree

0.08%

Matthew

and

D.

introducing

driving

Rinaldo,

while

25, 22

dangerous

aggravated

an appearance

in Athens and

driving

ticket.

charged with

while intoxicated,

arrested

with


petty

Laurent Jan.

larceny,

30 at Danthine, 12:28

a class

a.m. 47, in

A

of

class D felony. He was held. Catskill and charged with prohibited

sale of an alcoholic beverage a

intoxicated,

Freehold, was

contraband

both

arrested

into

unclassified

April driving

a prison,


both

Melissa

while

unclassified

A.

ability

Moon,

impaired

misdemeanors.

42, of misdemeanor

Hunter of Sloansville,

and

and charged was

third-degree

with arrested

19

driving

■ Crawford Boice, 28, of Ancram,

was arrested Jan. 20 at 1:14

misdemeanors.

in Catskill and

class D felony,

He

charged

and

was

third-degree

issued

with by

Cairo,

alcohol

He

was

was

arrested

and driving

issued an

April

while

appearance

17 in criminal

while April intoxicated 22

trespass, New

a class

and aggravated Baltimore

B misdemeanor.

operating

an appearance

a motor

ticket.

vehicle with intoxicated,

Cairo and charged

both unclassified

with aggravated

unlicensed

and first-degree unlawful dealing criminal possession of a controlled ticket.

driving and charged

He

while intoxicated, with

was issued

petty

an

both larceny,

a class

appearance

a blood-alcohol unclassified

• Robert E. Lambert,

content greater

31, of misdemeanors. She

operation

was issued

of a

a.m. in Catskill and charged with with a child - alcohol, both class A substance/narcotics with intent to ■ Anna Beinhart, 33, of Woodstock,

was arrested Jan. 28 at 4:04 issued third-degree

ticket.

misdemeanors. A misdemeanor, He was and

than

Cairo,

0.08%

was arrested

and driving

April

while

21 in an

motor

appearance

vehicle,

ticket.

an unclassified

fifth-degree criminal possession of misdemeanors. She was issued an sell, a class B felony. Her arrestee

• Laurent appearance criminal

Danthine,

ticket. trespass,

47,

intoxicated,

Cairo and charged

both

with

unclassified

first-degree

criminal contempt

misdemeanor;

• Melissa A.

failure

Moon,

to obey

42, of

a of

a controlled substance, a class D appearance ticket.

status was unknown.

p.m. in Catskill and charged with

a class

Sloansville,

■ Chino

B misdemeanor.

was arrested

Rosado-Muniz,

He

22,

was

misdemeanors. He was

and

issued

aggravated

Cairo,

traffic device,

was arrested

an equipment

April 17

violation,

in April of

felony, and first-degree operation ■ Lisa Hutton, 61, of Jewett, ■ Gloria Herpel, 57, of Acra, manufacture of drug-related paraphernalia

and seventh-degree crim-

issued an

22

appearance

in New

ticket.

Baltimore

an appearance

family

ticket.

offense, both Cairo and

and

charged

using her

with

turn

aggravated

signal Watervliet, and was arrested Jan. 29 at

of a motor vehicle impaired by was arrested Jan. 21 at 7:28 p.m. in was arrested Jan. 24 at 9:42 p.m.


charged

Robert E.

with

Lambert,

petty

31,

larceny,

a.m. in Coxsackie and charged

of

class


E

Robert

felonies.

E. Lambert,

He was held.

31, of

less than

unlicensed

100 feet

operation

from a turn,

of a 9:40

drugs, an unclassified misdemeanor.

He was released on his own reited

sale of an alcoholic beverage driving Cairo and while charged intoxicated, with first-de-

an unstance,

both class A misdemeanors.

Windham and charged with prohib-

in Cairo, Greenville was arrested and charged April 21 with in inal possession of a controlled sub-

Cairo,

a class

was

A

arrested

misdemeanor,

April 25

and

in

• Connie M. Akersloot, 61, motor

all infractions.

vehicle,

She

an unclassified

was issued with third-degree introducing contraband into a

Cairo and charged

criminal

with

trespass,

first-degree

misdemeanor; failure to obey a prison, a a class A misdemeanor. He

cognizance.

and first-degree unlawful dealing classified gree criminal misdemeanor. contempt She and was aggravated

class

criminal

B misdemeanor.

contempt

He

and

was

aggravated

family offense, both

For over 30 years, the Carver Company’s Core Competencies

She traffic was device, issued an appearance equipment ticketlation,

and using her turn signal

vio-

was issued issued an appearance an ticket.

■ Douglas consist of Parslow, General & Marine 29, of Construction, with a child Sand - alcohol, and Gravel both class A released

UNITED

on family her own offense, recognizance. both

■ Michelle Cherimond, 38,

Hunter, was arrested Jan. 13 at misdemeanors. She was issued an class ■ Gary E felonies. Leonard, He 42, was of held. Greenville,

• was Connie arrested M. Akersloot, Jan. 25 at 5:36 61, was all infractions. arrested Jan. She 28 at was 6:05 issued

less ■ than Kyle 100 Andrews, feet from 31, of a Cairo, turn,

class

• Robert

E felonies.

E. Lambert,

He was issued

31, of

Mining, Property Management, Port, Stevedoring, Terminal &

of Cairo, Albany, was arrested Jan. 30 at

10:11 p.m. in Hunter and charged appearance ticket.

an appearance

was arrested

ticket.

April 25 in

Warehouse Management, Maritime and Logistics, and Tug and

p.m.

1:03 Cairo

• p.m. Anthony

and in charged Coxsackie J. Beaudoin,

with and first-degree

charged 45,

with driving while intoxicated Barge and Marine Towing. ■ John Koument, 64, of Hensonville,

p.m. in Greenville and charged in Cairo and charged with seventh-degree

criminal possession

with second-degree introduction of

aggravated

For over

driving

30 years,

while

the

intoxicated,

both unclassified misdemean-

6:58 p.m. in Windham and charged rious physical injury, a class D felo-

of a controlled substance and sec-

Carver Company’s Core

was

Competencies

of Coxsackie,

criminal

was

contempt

arrested

and

April

aggravated

We

arrested Jan. 21 at with assault with intent to cause se-

consist strive of to General inspire & our Marine diverse, Construction, well-rounded Sand work and force Gravel and WITH YOU

UNITED

contraband 25 in Coxsackie

family offense,

into a prison, and a charged

both

class A

Mining, management Property team Management, to always perform Port, Stevedoring, at the highest Terminal levels of

class

&

ors. He was issued an appearance with prohibited sale of an alcoholic ny, and endangering the welfare of ond-degree criminal use of drug

misdemeanor. with operating

E felonies. He was issued

She a motor was issued vehicle an

an appearance ticket.

Warehouse safety and Management, professionalism. Maritime We deliver and service Logistics, by maintaining

and Tug and

Together we help one another.

ticket.

beverage and first-degree unlawful a child, a class A misdemeanor. His paraphernalia, both class A misdemeanors.

He was issued an appear-

of Coxsackie, ■ Gary than Leonard, 0.08%

appearance with a blood-alcohol

• Anthony

ticket. content

a reputation where our J. Beaudoin, 45,

Barge unquestionable Marine Towing. Values of honesty and

During these challenging greater

■ Azzon Tarik, 19, of Cairo, dealing with a child - alcohol, both arrestee status was unknown.

was arrested 42, with of a Greenville,

conviction,

prior

integrity drive our actions on and off the job.

April

was arrested We strive Jan. to 21 inspire at 5:28 our p.m. diverse, in well-rounded class A misdemeanors. work force He and was issued

Turnpike

WITH ■ Kyle Sweet, 34, of Greenville, YOU

times, you can rely on your

ance ticket.

25 in was Coxsackie arrested a class Jan. E felony,

and 25 charged at 5:36 and

Catskill management and charged team with 494 to prohibited

sale safety of and alcoholic professionalism. beverage Altamont, We deliver NY ■ service Jesse Hildenbrand, by maintaining 41, of a.m. in Greenville Together and charged we help with one was another. arrested Jan. 28 at 9:55 p.m. in

unclassified

always Western perform

newspaper to provide

an at appearance the highest ticket. levels of was arrested on Jan. 26 at 12:03 ■ John Amen, 33, of Maspeth, p.m.

driving

with operating Greenville

while intoxicated,

a motor and charged

an

details about any resources

vehicle

with assault a blood-alcohol with

misdemeanor.

intent to cause content serious

greater physical than 0.08% injury, a with class a D prior felo-

He

that may be available

was issued an appearance ticket.

and first-degree a reputation unlawful where our Phone: dealing unquestionable 518.355.6034 Coxsackie, Values was of arrested honesty Jan. and 21 at operating a motor vehicle with a Hunter and charged with operating

During to assist these those challenging

who are

CONTACT US

• Austin T. Hollister, 21, of

with Warren a child Dews, Jr., General - alcohol, integrity Manager www.carvercompanies.com

both drive class our actions A 10 on a.m. and in off Coxsackie the job. and charged blood-alcohol content of 0.08% a motor times, vulnerable vehicle you can and with rely in-need. on a your blood-alcohol

content newspaper over to 0.08% provide and driving a driving child, a class while A misdemeanor. intoxicated, His an

news@thegreenvillepioneer.com

ny, conviction, and endangering a class E the felony, welfare and of

wdewsjr@gmail.com

Purling, was arrested at 3:30

misdemeanors. He was issued 494 Western an with Turnpike manufacture of drug-related and driving while intoxicated, both

www.greenvillepioneer.com

a.m. April 27 in Saugerties and

appearance

ADVERTISING -

ticket.

All advertising requests

Altamont, paraphernalia NY and seventh-degree unclassified misdemeanors. He while details intoxicated, about any both resources unclassified arrestee unclassified status was misdemeanor. unknown. He

must be made one week in advance.

charged with operation of a motor

vehicle while impaired by

NEWS DESK - News items must be received

that may be available

was issued an appearance ticket.

five days prior to publication.

Phone: 518.355.6034

to assist those who are

OBITUARIES - Obituaries must be confirmed

CONTACT US

• Austin T. Hollister, 21, of

with a funeral home.

Warren Dews, Jr., General Manager www.carvercompanies.com

vulnerable and in-need.

drugs, an unclassified misdemeanor.

He was issued an ap-

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - Letters to the

wdewsjr@gmail.com

Purling, was arrested at 3:30

editor must include the author’s name,

news@thegreenvillepioneer.com

address and daytime telephone number.

www.greenvillepioneer.com

Authors are limited to one letter every 30

a.m. April 27 in Saugerties and

ADVERTISING days. District: Letters are - published All advertising at the discretion requests Join the

pearance ticket.

must of the be editor made and one must week be in original advance. content.

charged with operation of a motor

vehicle while impaired by

NEWS POSTMASTER DESK - News - The items Greenville must be Pioneer received is

five published days prior every to publication. other Friday by Capital

OBITUARIES Region Independent - Obituaries Media, must 149 be Main confirmed Street,

Mac & Cheese and

with Ravena, a funeral NY 12143. home. Periodicals postage paid

drugs, an unclassified misdemeanor.

He was issued an ap-

LETTERS at Greenville, TO NY THE 12083. EDITOR Postmaster: - Letters to Send the

Cairo-Durham

editor address must changes include to The the Greenville author’s Pioneer, name,

address 149 Main and Street, daytime Ravena, telephone NY 12143. number. The

Authors cost for a are subscription limited to is one $30 annually. letter every 30

RECOGNIZED INDUSTRY LEADER

Sloppy Joes! pearance ticket.

days. Letters are published at the discretion

of the editor and must be original content.

POSTMASTER - The Greenville Pioneer is

Board Not all financial

published every other Friday by Capital of companies Education

are the same.

Region Ameriprise Independent Media, financial 149 Main Street, advisors have access to a wide selection of products

Saturday, February 19

Ravena, NY 12143. Periodicals postage paid

and at Greenville, NY 12083. Postmaster: Send

address CAIRO services

changes to The – including

Greenville The Pioneer, Cairo-Durham

investment products, and be insurance, a registered brokerage voter. services All

149 Main Street, Ravena, NY 12143. The

Central

and other

cost RECOGNIZED for a subscription School

solutions

is $30 annually. District

to help

Board

you

INDUSTRY of

meet

three

your needs

seats

for

are

education

LEADER

three-year,

savings,

nonpaid

terms ending in June 2025.

4 pm to 6 pm

CONTACT US protection, estate planning, retirement and more.

Education Warren Dews, Jr., General will Manager have three seats

wdewsjr@gmail.com

CONTACT US

www.Ameripriseadvisors.com/team/sm-miller-associates/resources

Not all financial companies are the same.

TAKE OUT ONLY

news@thegreenvillepioneer.com

up for

Warren Dews, Jr., General Manager

Ameriprise

election

www.greenvillepioneer.com

wdewsjr@gmail.comfinancial this spring.

advisors have access

Learn

to a wide

more

selection

about

of

what

products

school

ADVERTISING news@thegreenvillepioneer.com

- All advertising requests

and If

must be www.greenvillepioneer.com

you’re services made week

interested including advance. investment joining products, board insurance, members brokerage do at www.cairodurham.org

your needs for (under education the “Board savings, of FREE WILL DONATION – NO TICKETS OR

services

NEWS ADVERTISING DESK - News items - All must advertising be received requests

the five Cairo-Durham and days must prior other be made to publication. one solutions week in advance. Board

AMERIPRISE

to help of you Education,

CONTACT with a five funeral days contact US home. prior to publication. protection, the board estate 5 Palisades clerk planning, to Dr. Education” Ste.320 retirement | Albany, menu). and more. NY 12205

FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.

meet

OBITUARIES NEWS DESK - Obituaries - News must items be must confirmed be received

Warren LETTERS OBITUARIES Dews, TO Jr., THE General - EDITOR Obituaries Manager - Letters must be to confirmed the

get wdewsjr@gmail.com O: editor CONTACT with must a funeral include US home. the author’s name,

www.Ameripriseadvisors.com/team/sm-miller-associates/resources

a nominating 518.458.7200 petition x 109 by | calling

F: 518.458.7201 Completed | M: nominating 518.337.0898 petitions

are due back to the board

news@thegreenvillepioneer.com

address Warren LETTERS and Dews, daytime TO Jr., THE General telephone EDITOR Manager

RESERVATIONS NEEDED!

- Letters number. to the

www.greenvillepioneer.com

518-622-8534,

wdewsjr@gmail.com

editor must include the author’s ext. name, 25010.

ADVERTISING Authors news@thegreenvillepioneer.com

address are limited and - All daytime to advertising one letter telephone every requests number.

30

days. Letters are published at discretion

must of the be www.greenvillepioneer.com

Authors editor made and are must week limited be in original to advance. one content. letter every 30

Prospective

NEWS ADVERTISING days. DESK Letters - News are items - published All must advertising

candidates

be at received the AMERIPRISE discretion requests

must FINANCIAL clerk in the SERVICES, District Office INC. by

POSTMASTER - The Greenville Pioneer five published days must of the prior be every editor made publication.

and other one must week Friday be in original advance. by content.

have

Capital

OBITUARIES Region

NEWS POSTMASTER a primary

Independent

DESK - Obituaries - News

Media, - The must items

149 Greenville be residence must

Main confirmed be

Street, Pioneer received is 5 Palisades in the Dr. Monday, Ste.320 | April Albany, 18, NY by 12205 5 p.m. The

with Ravena, a five published funeral days

NY 12143. home. prior every to

Periodicals

publication. other Friday postage by paid Capital

Cairo-Durham LETTERS at Greenville,

OBITUARIES Region TO Independent NY THE 12083.

- EDITOR Obituaries Media, Postmaster: - Letters must 149 be Main to confirmed

Send the Street,

O: editor with Ravena, 518.458.7200

Central

must a funeral include NY 12143. home. the Periodicals author’s postage name, x paid 109

School

| F: 518.458.7201

district office

| M:

is

518.337.0898

located at 424

address changes to The Greenville Pioneer,

District, address LETTERS at Greenville, and be daytime TO NY THE at 12083. telephone EDITOR least Postmaster: - Letters number. 18 to Send the years old Main St., Cairo.

149 Main Street, Ravena, NY 12143. The

Authors editor must include the author’s name,

cost for address a are subscription limited changes to is to one $30 The annually. letter Greenville every Pioneer, 30

days. address 149 Letters Main are and Street, published daytime Ravena, at telephone the NY discretion 12143. number. The

of the Authors cost editor for and a are subscription must limited be original to is one $30 content. annually. letter every 30

POSTMASTER days. Letters - The are published Greenville at Pioneer the discretion

published of the every editor and other must Friday be original by content. Capital

Region POSTMASTER Independent Media, - The 149 Greenville Main Street, Pioneer is

Ravena, published NY 12143. every Periodicals other Friday postage by paid Capital

at Greenville, Region Independent NY 12083. Media, Postmaster: 149 Main Send Street,

address Ravena, changes NY 12143. to The Periodicals Greenville Pioneer, postage paid

149 Main at Greenville, Street, Ravena, NY 12083. NY Postmaster: 12143. The Send

cost for address a subscription changes is to $30 The annually. Greenville Pioneer,

149 Main Street, Ravena, NY 12143. The

cost for a subscription is $30 annually.

Better TV

Our Promise to You

College Corner

Better TV

AMERICA’S TOP 120

190

Our Promise Channels to You

$59

AMERICA’S TOP 99 /mo.

120

190

Smart HD DVR included.

Channels

$59 99 /mo.

Great Smart HD entertainment

DVR included.

with a local touch.

• Madison Marcello, of Greenville, was named to the Lincoln Memorial

University dean’s list for the fall semester of 2021.

• Earlton resident Mason Osborn graduated from Castleton University

with a bachelor of science degree in Practice in Physical Education

in December.

• Three local students were named to the President’s List for the fall

semester at Siena College. They are Aidan O’Connor, of Greenville;

Pyton Russell, of East Durham; and Timothy Ryan, of Westerlo.

• Faichal Offer Iravena expires Ayeva, 7/15/20. of Restrictions New Baltimore, apply. Call a for junior details. majoring in

engineering and management, was named to the dean’s list for the fall

semester at Clarkson University.

• Austin C. Field, of Freehold, a sophomore majoring in engineering

and management, was named to the dean’s list for the fall 2021

Offer expires 7/15/20. Restrictions apply. Call for details.

semester at Clarkson University.

• Several area students earned inclusion on the Siena College

dean’s list for the Great fall HI-TECH semester, entertainment

including ADVISERS Steven Cody, of Round Top;

Jennifer Cuti, of Cairo, Sarah Dauphin, of Cairo, Shelby Doren, of

Greenville; and (888) Claire with Tolan, a 729-4907

of local Greenville. touch.

• Mason Osborn, of Earlton, was named to the President’s List at

Castleton University for the fall semester.

• East Durham student HI-TECH Mikaela ADVISERS

Phillips made the dean’s list for the

fall semester at Castleton University.

Greenville (888) resident Hailey 729-4907

Cummings qualified for the fall 2021

dean’s list at Belmont University.

• Carrie Morgan, of New Baltimore, was named to the Southern

New Hampshire University fall President’s List.

• Nylah Interrante, of Round Top, was recognized for earning Part-

Document Ref: IQM9L-BLADW-UE84B-PAVJK Page 5 of 5

Time Honors at SUNY Canton this fall as a Finance major.

• Earlton resident Eli Larson, a Mechatronics Technology major,

made the President’s List at SUNY Canton for the fall semester.

• Lydia Ackerman, a Lasell University student from Hannacroix,

was Document named Ref: to IQM9L-BLADW-UE84B-PAVJK the dean’s list this fall.

Page 5 of 5

The following students earned a spot on the dean’s list at The

College of Saint Rose: Alexis Cummings, of Cairo, a Music Education

major; Zachary Hilton, of Rensselaerville, a Business Administration

major; Erin Barrett, of Greenville, an Early Childhood and Childhood

Mark Vinciguerra

Education major; Myia Hulbert, of Cornwallville, a Communication

Warren Dews, Jr.,

Sciences and Disorders major; Publisher Emily Connolly, of Greenville, a Biology-Cytotechnology

major; and Zander Schipano, of Westerlo, a Psychology

major.

General ManaGer

Mark wdewsjr@gmail.com Vinciguerra

news@thegreenvillepioneer.com

Publisher

• www.greenvillepioneer.com

Warren 413-212-0130 Dews, Jr.,

ADVERTISING - All advertising requests must be made one week in advance.

General ManaGer

NEWS DESK - News items must wdewsjr@gmail.com

be received ten days prior to publication.

OBITUARIES news@thegreenvillepioneer.com - Obituaries must be confirmed with • www.greenvillepioneer.com

a funeral home.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - Letters 413-212-0130

to the editor must include the author’s name,

ADVERTISING THE address and PUBLIC

daytime telephone number. Authors are limited to one letter every 30 days.

Letters are published

- All

at

advertising

the discretion

requests

of the

must

editor

be

and

made

must

one

be

week

original

in advance.

content.

NEWS NEEDS POSTMASTER DESK - THE News - The items Greenville must Pioneer be received is published ten days every prior other to publication. Friday by Capital

OBITUARIES TRUTH; Region Independent - Obituaries NOT Media, must 164 Main be confirmed Street, Ravena, with a NY funeral 12143. home. Periodicals postage paid

LETTERS SOCIAL

at Greenville, TO NY THE 12083.

MEDIA EDITOR Postmaster: - Letters Send to address the editor changes must include to The Greenville the author’s Pioneer, name, 149

address Main Street, and daytime Ravena, NY telephone 12143. The number. cost for Authors a subscription are limited is $30 to one annually. letter every 30 days.

Letters HEADLINES are published at the & discretion of the editor and must be original content.

FAKE NEWS.

POSTMASTER - The Greenville Pioneer is published every other Friday by Capital

Region Independent Media, 164 Main Street, Ravena, NY 12143. Periodicals postage paid

at Greenville, #SupportRealNews

NY 12083. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Greenville Pioneer, 149

Main Street, Ravena, NY 12143. The cost for a subscription is $30 annually.

Police Blotter

Asbury United Methodist Church

Sunday Worship & Sunday School - 9:00 am

5830 State Rte. 81, Greenville NY 12083

518-966-4181

All services will be in-person and live-streamed

to YouTube at asburyumcgreenvilleny

Send us your church listing!

news@greenville

pioneer.com


s

ook

4 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022

Obituaries

Invest in Energy Efficient Double

Hung Windows This Fall and SAVE!

Michael R. (Pop) Klima died on January

20, 2022, in Ghent, New York.

Born in Hudson, New York on April

07, 1935, he was predeceased by his

parents Joseph and Helen Klima. He

was also predeceased by his brothers,

Joseph Klima and Billy Klima, and sisters,

Myrtle Gaylord and Carol Nimmons.

He is survived by his sisters Winnie

(Clarence) Speed, and Mary Graziano.

He was predeceased by the “love of his

life,” Robin Hamm Klima. He raised his

family with her in Philmont, New York.

He had four children, Michael, Scott

(Patricia), Jeffrey, Jennifer (Keith) MacTavish.

He had eight grandchildren, Jeffrey,

Kristopher, Michael, Alexsis (Elson), Ashley

(Alex), Keegan, and Brian (Bridget).

Michael R. (Pop) Klima

He was predeceased

never a branch on the

by his granddaughter,

Christmas tree that did

Savannah. He also had

not have an ornament.

great-grandchildren. He

After an illness 13

met his newest great

years ago, he moved to

grandson, Max, prior to

live with his daughter in

his recent illness.

Greenville, New York.

He worked for

He spent his time there

Mabey’s Moving &

with his constant companion,

his dog Hope.

Storage and enjoyed

working for the Mabey

He enjoyed taking her

family. He was a Navy

for walks to the park

veteran and a member

and sitting outside on

of the Greenville American

Legion Post 291.

at neighbors as they

sunny, days waving

Michael R. (Pop) Klima

He always enjoyed his

passed by.

vacations to Disney World with his wife If you would like to make a charitable

and decorating for Christmas. There was contribution in Mike’s memory, please

Invest in your

home's energy

efficiency this fall

and save at GNH!

For a limited time

only, 2200 Series

Smarter Windows

Double Hung

Replacements are

ONLY $169.OO!

*Must place window order

by October 30th, 2019! learn more.

Doris Canty passed away Loving older sister of George,

peacefully in her sleep on Greenville Jr and · Windham Richard. She · Latham was very

Friday, January 21, at Home close with her mother and two

Sweet Home in Catskill, NY.

www.GNHlumber.com

brothers and they all contribut-

Born in Jersey City, NJ, 0% she financing ed to the to household credit qualified before they

was the daughter of Rosina got married.

(Friel) and George Kirchner. Doris was married to the late

Visit GNH to

Doris (nee Kirchner) Kelly Canty

February 7, 1924 - January 21, 2022, in Catskill, NY

William V. Kelly on 9/23/50

in Jersey City, NJ. They raised

five wonderful children living

in Livingston, NJ; Needham,

MA; Ridgewood, NJ; and finally

Manlius, NY. She is survived

by her sons Mark (Vikki) Kelly,

Hurst, TX; W. Brian (April Curtis)

Kelly, LaGrande, OR; Kevin (Loretta)

Kelly, Portland, OR; Paul

(Margaret) Kelly, Greenville, NY;

and her daughter Ann Kelly, N.

Reading, MA; her grandchildren

Travis (Katelyn) Kelly, West

Linn, OR; Petra Kelly, Denton,

TX; Vaughn (Bekka) Kelly, Palmer,

AK; Elizabeth Kelly, Denton,

TX; Marta (Ben Levitan) Kelly,

Rensselaer, NY; Anna Kelly,

Greenville, NY; her great-grandchildren

Makena and Leo Kelly,

West Lima, OR; Otis and Quinn

Kelly, Palmer, AK; and Clementine

Kelly, Denton, TX.

In addition to her parents,

she was predeceased by her

SHOUT

OUTS!

ADVERTISE ON

OUR NEW PAGE

Shout it out to a

family member, friend,

business or group of people.

Message could be an

I love you, congratulations,

happy birthday,

cheer on a team or person.

for more information

CALL 413.212.0130

make a check payable to the Karma

Fund (fund for unexpected expenses for

pet owners). Please mail checks to the

Delmar Animal Hospital, 910 Delaware

Avenue, Delmar, NY 12054.

The family would like to thank the

Albany County EMS, nurses and support

staff at Albany Medical Center and

Whittier Nursing Facility for their compassionate

care.

There are no calling hours. Services

will be announced later this spring, to be

held at the Mellenville Union Cemetery.

To leave online condolences visit :www.

saccofuneralhome.com.

brothers, her husbands William

V. Kelly and James Canty, and

her daughter-in-law Diane Kelly.

Doris was a very crafty

talented artistic woman who

loved home decorating, flower

arranging, sewing and gardening.

She painted landscapes

from New York and Florida in a

range of media. She decorated

furniture and other items with

tole painting sharing her artwork

while enhancing items. These

art pieces grace the homes of

her children.

She had a career as an office

worker and attended college

nights at St. Peter’s College,

Jersey City, NY. After raising her

family, she had a career as a

real estate agent in Fayetteville,

NY. She served on the Town of

Manlius Zoning Board when few

women were in such positions.

She was active in Garden Club,

Gourmet Group and Welcome

Wagon.

During the war she volunteered

in the USO clubs to raise

the morale of soldiers about to

ship out. She did mock fortune

telling with cards, then backed

off when people ascribed supernatural

power to her. She had a

distaste for cards after that.

She loved family and children

and was loved in return. She

was a devoted Roman Catholic,

her whole life having worshiped

with St. Patrick’s Church,

Catskill, NY; San Antonio Catholic

Church, Port Charlotte, FL;

and St. Ann’s Church, Manlius,

NY.

After retirement she lived in

Lake Suzy, FL; Port Charlotte,

FL; Grapevine, TX, and Catskill,

NY.

Jan’s

Country Cuts

The Pioneer of Integrative

Solutions on Land and Sea

CONSTRUCTION MARITIME MATERIALS

Walk-Ins Welcome

Call for an appointment

(518) 966-8349

BOOTH RENTERS CAN APPLY!

4841 NY-81 Greenville, NY

WED - SAT: OPEN 9:30AM-5PM • SUN - TUE: CLOSED

unvaccinated individuals must wear a mask

Carver Companies fundamental belief has been to provide

unparalleled service all while maintaining our values of honesty

and integrity both on land and sea. We pride ourselves on our

unmatched logistics services and superior products to our

customers, partners and tenants. We work hard to inspire our

diverse, well-rounded workforce and management team to always

perform at the highest levels of safety and professionalism.

30+ Years

IN THE INDUSTRY

5 Ports

on the East Coast and Canada

2,000+ Pcs

OF EQUIPMENT

HEADQUARTERS: 494 WESTERN TURNPIKE | ALTAMONT, NY | 518.355.6034

WWW.CARVERCOMPANIES.COM


The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022 5

NFPA: Use caution when

using home heating equipment

The National Fire Protection

Association (NFPA) is urging the

public to use added caution when

heating their homes during the winter

months, when nearly half (48%)

of all U.S. home-heating equipment

fires occur.

Home heating equipment is the

second-leading cause of U.S. home

fires and home fire injuries, and the

third-leading cause of home fire

deaths and direct property damage.

According to the latest U.S.

Home Structure Fires report from

NFPA, an average of 45,800 home

heating fires occurred each year between

2015 and 2019, resulting in

an estimated 480 civilian deaths,

1,350 civilian injuries, and $1 billion

in direct property damage.

“During the coldest months of

the year, home-heating equipment

kicks into high gear,” said Lorraine

Carli, vice president of Outreach

and Advocacy at NFPA. “Understanding

when and where home

heating fires happen is critical, so

that they people can take the steps

to minimize associated risks and

safely heat their homes.”

Space heaters are most often responsible

for home-heating equipment

fires, accounting for more

than two in five fires, as well as the

vast majority of associated deaths

(81%) and injuries (80%).

AG: Increased protections

from surprise medical bills

NEW YORK – New York Attorney General Letitia

James reminds New Yorkers about safeguards that are

in place to protect consumers from unexpected and often

devastating medical bills.

The federal No Surprises Act, which went into effect

Jan. 1, 2022, builds on existing New York law to

shield New Yorkers from many unexpected medical

bills.

The new law prohibits hospitals and health care

providers from billing patients for more than their

in-network co-payment or deductible on many unexpected

out-of-network bills.

“Unexpected medical bills can be a devastating

blow for individuals and families and take years to recover

from,” James said. “New Yorkers should be able

to seek necessary medical treatment without worrying

about unanticipated financial hardship, but they first

must know about the protections available to them.

This additional support from the federal government

will allow New Yorkers to focus on what’s really important:

getting the care they need.”

Under both the No Surprises Act and New York

law, hospitals and health care providers are prohibited

from billing a patient for more than the in-network

co-payment, co-insurance, or deductible costs for certain

“surprise” out-of-network bills. These surprise

bills include bills for:

• Emergency services provided at emergency

rooms or freestanding emergency departments. Emergency

care includes screening and stabilizing treatment

sought by patients who believe they are experiencing

a medical emergency or are in active childbirth labor.

• Non-emergency services provided at in-network

facilities. Treatment by an out-of-network health care

provider at an in-network hospital, hospital outpatient

department, or ambulatory surgery center is covered

under the law.

• Air ambulance services

Real, Reputable,

Trusted. Your News

Media.

THIS PUBLICATION

SUPPORTS REAL

NEWS.

“Space heaters can be effective

tools for heating smaller areas, but

they need to be used with caution

and care,” said Carli, pointing to

the tragic fire that occurred in January

in the Bronx, which reportedly

began with a malfunctioning space

heater and resulted in 17 fatalities.

A failure to clean equipment was

the leading cause of home-heating

equipment fires. Fires in which a

heat source was too close to combustible

materials caused the largest

shares of civilian deaths, injuries

and direct property damage. Half

of home heating fire deaths were

caused by placing equipment too

close to things that can burn.

NFPA offers these tips and

guidelines for safely heating your

home during the winter months:

• Heating equipment and chimneys

should be cleaned and inspected

every year by a qualified professional.

• Keep anything that can burn

at least 3 feet away from all heating

equipment, including furnaces,

fireplaces, wood stoves and space

heaters.

• Always use the right kind of

fuel, as specified by the manufacturer,

for fuel-burning space heaters.

• Create a 3-foot “kid-free zone”

around open fires and space heaters.

• Make sure space heaters are

in good working order and used in

accordance with the manufacturer’s

instructions. Turn portable heaters

off when leaving the room or going

to bed.

• Fireplaces should have a sturdy

screen to stop sparks from flying

into the room. Ashes should be cool

before putting them in a metal container,

which should be placed outside

at least 10 feet away from your

home.

• All fuel-burning equipment

should be vented to the outside to

avoid carbon monoxide poisoning.

• If you smell gas in your gas

heater, do not light the appliance.

Leave the home immediately and

call your local fire department or

gas company.

• Make sure smoke and carbon-monoxide

alarms are located

throughout the home; test them

monthly to ensure they’re working

properly.

NFPA offers a wealth of home

heating safety tips, information,

and resources to help better educate

the public about ways to safely

heat their homes. In addition,

NFPA’s “Put a Freeze on Winter

Fires” campaign with the U.S. Fire

Administration works to promote a

host of winter safety issues, including

home heating.

Additionally, the No Surprises Act has provisions

that further protect consumers from getting entangled

in billing disputes, including the required disclosure of

all surprise billing protections directly to all patients

and on the health care provider’s websites.

Providers also now need to submit surprise out-ofnetwork

bills directly to patients’ health plans, so the

health plan can send a payment to the provider and

send the patient an Explanation of Benefits (EOB)

indicating the amount the patient owes the out-of-network

provider.

If a health plan applies out-of-network coverage to

a surprise bill, patients have the right to appeal. Consumers

may appeal the determination to the health plan

and then, if the plan upholds its decision, to an independent

external reviewer.

The new guidelines apply to uninsured New Yorkers

as well, for whom health care providers must provide

good faith estimates of expected charges. If the

amount charged is more than $400 over the estimate,

the uninsured may elect to submit their bill for review.

In 2014, New York passed groundbreaking legislation

to protect consumers from surprise medical bills.

The “Surprise Bill” was the first of its kind in the nation

and provides transparency to consumers to protect

them from excessive bills when a patient unknowingly

receives services from a physician who is not part of

their health care plan’s network of providers.

Additional information regarding surprise billing

can be found on the Office of the Attorney General

website. Please contact the Attorney General’s

Health Care Helpline at 1-800-428-9071, or visit the

online portal if you believe you have been improperly

charged for a surprise bill by a health care provider, or

that a health plan has improperly assessed cost-sharing

for a surprise bill.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Wallace is a 4-year-old domestic shorthaired cat pictured with

CGHS/SPCA Adoption Counselor Rebecca Warner. Wallace

came to us as a transfer from another shelter and is patiently

waiting for his forever home! He can be found roaming around

the cat rooms, begging our staff for pats and attention. Are

you looking for a furry companion to snuggle with and keep you

company? Wallace is your guy! If you’re interested in adopting,

please fill out an application online at www.cghs.org or give us

a call at 518-828-6044 ext. 100.

Beware of

puppy scams

By Ron Perez

For Capital Region Independent Media

When Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans

and other regions of the southeastern United States, it

was not only a tragedy for people and businesses — it

also affected tens of thousands of animals.

During this time, many shelters in the Northeast —

including CGHS/SPCA — stepped up to help absorb the

animals that were displaced from Katrina. This was the

first time that regions at least a thousand miles apart were

able to coordinate rescue efforts to assist with the adoptions

of animals. By doing this, thousands of animals

were saved and adopted to new homes in the Northeast;

however, this also opened the floodgates for some people

to exploit animals by “tugging” on the heartstrings

of animal lovers.

Shortly after Katrina, literally hundreds of dog-rescue

organizations popped up all over the Northeast. Initially,

they appeared to help place puppies that were born

in the south where they lacked sufficient people willing

to adopt them. However, for some of these “rescues,” it

became a very lucrative scam.

This is the way it works: puppies are intentionally

bred in the South and sold to “rescues” in the Northeast,

then, in turn, these disingenuous people sell the puppies

anywhere from $250 to $500. Unsuspecting people pay

for these puppies under the assumption they are donating

to the “rescue” and furthering their mission, when

in fact the “rescue” pockets the funds and continues to

exploit well-intentioned people.

At CGHS/SPCA, we’ve received numerous complaints

from unsuspecting people who bought these puppies,

only to find out the puppies were never examined

by a veterinarian in New York and were often carrying

diseases such as distemper and parvo — diseases which,

in most cases, are fatal to dogs. In addition, many of the

puppies had skin conditions such as ringworm, mange

and open sores (hot spots). Yet other complaints from

adopters included severe worms and fleas.

Often these puppies are housed in horrible conditions

and given minimal food and veterinary care; as puppies

are a commodity for these “rescues,” the less they spend,

the more they profit.

Also, interstate travel for these dogs is always stressful

and often inhumane.

Now, there are some outstanding rescues in our area

that work tirelessly to help dogs and meet the CGHS/

SPCA stamp of approval — and we are so appreciative

for all their time and commitment to helping our canine

friends.

The next column will be a continuation, with some

warning signs to look for to protect yourself from bad

“rescue” groups, as well as some items that can build

your confidence that you’re dealing with a reputable rescue.

Feel free to call us with any questions at 518-828-

6044 or visit our website at www.cghs.org. Our Food

Bank is open to any from the public in need of pet food

or for those wishing to donate food from 11:30 a.m. to

4 p.m. daily. All of our cats and kittens are “Furrever

Free,” with all expenses paid. Spay/neuter clinics for

cats are $86 male or female, including a rabies vaccination

and a 5-in-1 feline distemper combination vaccination.

Nail clipping services are available every Saturday

from 10-11 a.m. at the shelter for a donation of $10 for

cats and $15 for dogs (currently prepaid only).

Ron Perez is the President/CEO of the Columbia-Greene

Humane Society/SPCA Board of Directors.

He may be contacted at ronperez@cghs.org.

THE PUBLIC NEEDS THE TRUTH;

NOT SOCIAL MEDIA HEADLINES & FAKE NEWS.

#SupportRealNews


6 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022

County seeks

Honor a Vet

nominations

CATSKILL — The

Greene County Veterans

Service Agency is looking

to honor veterans who have

gone above and beyond the

call of duty.

The Honor A Vet program

honors a veteran each year

who served honorably in

any branch of the U.S. military

on active duty or was

activated with the National

Guard or Reserves.

Nominations should be

sent to Michelle Romalin

Deyo, Director, Greene

County Veterans Service

Agency, 159 Jefferson

Heights, Suite D-303,

Catskill, NY 12414.

The nominee will be a

long-term resident of Greene

County who has continued

to maintain strong ties to the

county.

The nomination packet

includes a three-page profile

form and two additional

lined pages to write out a

brief biography of the candidate’s

military service. Fill

in the profile form completely

and use the blank lined

pages to elaborate on the details

of the candidate’s military

career and community

service, if applicable.

For example, include how

the veteran decided to join

the service or if they were

drafted; where they went

through training; what they

did in the military, including

their job title and description

of their duties; geographical

locations they went to; war

or war eras they served in;

experiences they had; and an

account of how they received

any medals or awards. Also

include if the veterans participated

in community organizations

such as the American

Legion or VFW, Elks,

Rotary Club, etc. Did they

work with youth? Volunteer

at church or other house of

worship? You may add any

other information you feel is

pertinent.

Ensure that all information

provided is true and

accurate. Verification must

be submitted of military service

and all awards, medals,

honors, etc. that you have

claimed to be true and accurate.

Any award that cannot

be verified by documentation

will be omitted form

the application before being

submitted to the committee

for selection. Any application

found or known to

contain notable inaccuracies

will not be submitted to the

committee for selection.

Send all nominations

directly to Greene County

Veterans Service Agency at

159 Jefferson Heights, Suite

D-303, Catskill, NY 12414,

in person or by mail. Submissions

may also be uploaded

and emailed to veterans@discovergreene.com.

For questions or clarifications

of instructions, call

the Greene County Veterans

Service Agency at 518-943-

3703. Dates are subject to

change.

The deadline to nominate

a candidate for the Greene

County Honor A Vet for this

year is March 15. A ceremony

is typically held on

Armed Forces Day, the Saturday

prior to Memorial Day

weekend.

COURTESY OF PEXELS

Exercise can have a significant impact on the body and brain health of seniors, according to the Association of

Mature American Citizens.

Impact of exercise on

America’s seniors

By John Grimaldi

For Capital Region Independent Media

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Every

year at this time there is a call

for seniors to establish an exercise

routine. The holidays are over

and so is the copious feasting that

goes with the season. It’s time to

lose a few pounds. The Association

of Mature American Citizens

[AMAC] strongly encourages

older Americans to stay in shape.

But we offer this advice with an

abundance of caution. Your health

care providers call the shots and

we recommend that seniors heed

their advice when it comes to what

you should or should not do for exercise,

according to AMAC’s CEO

Rebecca Weber.

Dr. Andrew E. Budson is chief

of cognitive and behavioral neurology

at the Veterans Affairs Boston

Healthcare System, lecturer

in neurology at Harvard Medical

School, and chair of the Science of

Learning Innovation Group at the

Harvard Medical School Academy.

“Changes in strength, swiftness,

and stamina with age are all

associated with decreasing muscle

mass,” Dr. Budson said. “Although

there is not much decline

in your muscles between ages 20

and 40, after age 40 there can be

a decline of 1% to 2% per year in

lean body mass and 1.5% to 5%

per year in strength.”

Dr. Budson notes that aging

can also raise coordination issues

as we grow older, issues that are

associated to the brain and nervous

system. Reduced strength and coordination,

too, is the result of a

lack of physical activity, he added.

Certified Cognitive Behavioral

Therapy specialist Brock Armstrong,

agrees.

“Exercise affects the brain in

many ways,” Armstrong said. “It

increases heart rate, which pumps

more oxygen to the brain. It aids

the release of hormones which

provide an excellent environment

for the growth of brain cells. Exercise

also promotes brain plasticity

by stimulating growth of

new connections between cells in

many important cortical areas of

the brain. Research from UCLA

even demonstrated that exercise

increased growth factors in the

brain which makes it easier for the

brain to grow new neuronal connections.”

The National Institutes of

Health [NIH] also says that as we

age cognitive issues may emerge.

For example, it can get harder to

make quick decisions.

“Age-related diseases accelerate

the rate of neuronal dysfunction,

neuronal loss and cognitive

decline, with many persons developing

cognitive impairments

severe enough to impair their

everyday functional abilities, the

definition of dementia,” according

to the NIH. “There is growing

evidence that healthy lifestyles

may decrease the rate of cognitive

decline seen with aging and help

delay the onset of cognitive symptoms

in the setting of age-associated

diseases.”

In other words, said AMAC’s

Weber, exercise can be good for

the brain and body as we age; talk

to your doctor about it. He or she

can help you design an exercise

regimen tailored to your needs.

The 2.4 million member Association

of Mature American Citizens

[AMAC] www.amac.us is a

vibrant, vital senior advocacy organization

that takes its marching

orders from its members. AMAC

Action is a non-profit, non-partisan

organization representing the

membership in our nation’s capital

and in local Congressional Districts

throughout the country.

HAPPINESS IS A WARM PUPPY

AND A WARM HEART

Fuel Oil with a 30 Mile Delivery Service & Competitive Pricing

OR Switch from Oil to LP/Natural Gas - same day in some cases!

OUR FORMULA FOR SUCCESS IS VERY SIMPLE:

Low Prices + Quality Products + Great Service = Happy Customers

13640 US RT 9W

HANNACROIX, NY

WWW.CA-ALBRIGHT.COM

518-756-3127


Qualified households may now “In addition to these grants, eligible

customers will also receive a Heating Equipment Repair or Re-

An additional benefit, the

HUDSON — Medical and community leaders joined in Hudson

pply for Home Energy Assistance

recently to unveil state-of-the-art 3D breast biopsy technology that

ro¬gram (HEAP) grants, a federlly

funded program that provides vide further assistance in lowering available to assist income quali-

credit on their utility bills that proplacement

(HERR) program, is

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022 officials at Columbia Memorial Health say will significantly improve 7

the diagnosis, treatment and outcomes for breast cancer patients

oth reg¬ular and emergency fiancial

assistance to help pay heatgiorni.

replacing their primary heating

their energy costs,” said Campafied

homeowners in repairing or

Greene Cemetery and Columbia counties. seeks 2020

Body Mind and Spirit... Connections

The stereotactic 3D biopsy system, known as Affirm, will provide

more precise targeting of tissue abnormalities identified through

g and utility bills.

The bill credit is based on the equipment when the systems are

The grants are available type of heating source and income

Start

inoper¬able

with

or unsafe.

self-love

Applications

for HERR are accepted

CMH’s mowing 3D mammography capabilities, donations

yielding earlier and more

rough local Department of Soial

Services (DSS) offices and He added that qualified house-

through Sept. 30, 2020, or until the

level.

accurate detection of breast cancer. The technology was acquired

through HANNACROIX the generosity — of The community Hannacroix members Rural Cemetery, who contributed which is to located

ffices for By the Pat Aging. LarsenCustomers

holds receiving a HEAP how the benefit mind for works funding this is ex¬hausted.

possess and that you allow to loving vibes to those you love as well. Those

For Capital Region Independent Media

BODY MIND AND SPIRIT the Columbia

on Route

Memorial

411 in Dormansville/Westerlo,

Health Foundation.

is seeking donations for

f Central Hudson Gas & Electric non-utility heating process. fuels (And such of as course To you apply for HEAP and HERR shine the through. 2020 mowing expense for in the your cemetery.

“This life-saving 3D biopsy technology, life that paired you with are attracted our 3D mammography

service, provides our patients with the most advanced diag-

to, those

orp. who receive a HEAP benet

toward their ac¬count will also kero¬sene, coal or restraint corn are regarding also el-

their first local DSS office, call (800) reminders give a donation, that you it would might be community, greatly appreciated, family members, organizers grocery said. They atten-

oil, propane, wood/wood do understand pellets, I was benefits, showing customers may contact Here Whether are some you have loving a loved who one are buried part of there your social or would network, just like in your to

Have I caught your attention with that

sweet, simple phrase?

nostic

e issued a monthly credit on their igible for a monthly topic credit and on refrained their from 342-3009, get-

or visit www.mybenefits.ny.gov.

In¬dividuals who are self-love. Organizers to home,” said

consider also thank

care available

when all focusing who have

in locations

on helped

that

dants, in the

are

even past.

comfortable, convenient and

the UPS guy.

During this month of hearts and roses,

close

ill for a max¬imum of 12 months electric or non-heating into gas “lusty” bill. details...!).

Don’t be need CMH

uncomfortablbutions

In addition

your help President to When keep and the CEO

you cemetery Jay P.

practice maintained. Cahalan.

self-love, Contri-

you are

ased on service

chocolates

type

and

and

loving

amount

sentiments to those

“We’re happy to Our provide mind bill works 60 to and pre-oldepare us for relationship by

always

and do not receive

with can this be to

concept. sent offering to: Hannacroix It

3D mammography

more likely Rural to Cemetery, eat

and

better,

3D

participate

biopsy C/O Linda services,

in Smith, healthy

around you in the form of cards and kind gestures,

in truth the amount of joy you are capa-

taking stock of the possibili-

it tise just got through sidetracked its affiliation by many with prove. Albany Who Medical doesn’t Center. want all The of the Albany

CMH

f HEAP benefit.

discounts to customers who heat Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Treasurer, was

has

yours

significantly 115 to State consider, Route augmented 143, activities Westerlo, its radiology

and New exercise,

and York pathology

your 12193. sleep

exper-

will im-

“We’re pleased to offer addional

assistance

with these fuels, as well,” said

ble of giving to another always begins with

Program (SNAP) benefits may

above to

ties that might be in store. The

lesser Med significant and CMH concepts radiology of and be pathology better? services are now fully integrated,

which about means others that before mammograms, Most of and all, all you’ll imaging be more and diagnos-

the amount

to families

love you show

who

yourself

Campagiorni.

first.

contact their local Office for the

hormones kick in and then

thinking

ay be struggling

So let’s

and

take

depend

this a step

on

forward Customers and begin should email their Aging to learn of the eligibil¬ity

genuine of

the mind begins to take ownership

of all these feel-good

mission “Each to re-think year in this the whole U.S. more more than authentically 268,000 women with your are diagnosed needs and the

yourself. tic studies, I’m are giving interpreted you per-

by the body, region’s mind leading and spirit, experts.

EAP benefits, this story and with encourage the body all chemistry HEAP we Notice emit of Decision Letter to

and you’ll connect

requirements by calling 800-342-

ligible households around those to apply,” we love said and care Central for or hope Hudson to at CareUnit@cenhud.com

to be enrolled and receive

9871 or by visiting

things floating around inside. Pat www.aging. Larsen concept. with breast cancer,” said Tariq needs Gill, M.D., of others chief around of Radiology you. Isn’t at CHM. that what

nthony Campagiorni, attract. Vice Present

of Customer Let’s start Services with the and male the chemistry, bill credit. just self-love here. Self-love is

But we’re focusing

ny.gov.

on

“This For technology, starters, self-love now available can it’s right all about? here in our community, is a tremendous

these ideas. step forward in our ability So, to this detect month and of diagnose celebration early of stage LOVE,

For

that state

more

of appreciation

grants for for oneself the that HEAP grows from eligibility within. We requirements By the way, breast these ideas cancer, are significantly universal at improving take the time the to likelihood honor yourself. of successful Begin exer-

information

mean any

on

or all of

egulatory because Affairs. it’s the first thing that came Regular up when HEAP I

Campagiorni began researching. explained There that is actually fall and a science upcoming develop winter are a high available

desire between for com-now and and happiness, Mar. 16, which Hudson.com/HEAP in short relates directly or http://otda. your life. You should Columbia be your biggest Memorial advo-

Health had Foundation before. Know Vice this Chair is the Anne message Scho-

you’ve

regard and for our benefits, own well-being visit www.Central- any age and can treatment.” be initiated at any time in cising self-love in a deeper way than you ever

ualified behind families attraction using that electricy

or natural panionship. gas as Attraction their primary begins 2020, within or the until brain funding to our is peace exhaust-

of mind. ny.gov/programs/heap/program.

(We question everycate.

Self-talk is maker key here. said: “This technology been is truly waiting a gift for and of the life permission made possible you were

leads to

eating source and has may its own receive set of a reglar

HEAP benefit In a male, $350 testosterone or more, is be the available dominant between Our Jan. mind 2 will and direct Hudson’s us to take assistance care of our and billing • Prioritize yourself. yond words That means to our YOU supporters get who Happy continue Valentine’s to rally Day around to you CMH all. Be to sure

specialized ed. hormones. Emergency HEAP thing at grants this point.) will asp; and for more on all of Central Go ahead try through it: the tremendous generosity seeking of to our get donors. your life We back are on grateful track again. be-

epending hormone on family that income drives lust. and Our Mar. olfactory 16, 2020. systems

pick applied up the subtleties toward that designed are given to meet off

and eligible help us house-

to understand son.com, not to and sacrifice click our on “My• Be Ac-

honest, nice and trusting of yourself. month and know that it’s OK to do so.

These own needs benefits when are we are programs, in a state visit of self-love www.CentralHud-

put on that to-do ensure list first. its Start essential today. mission can to continue indulge yourself and expand.” in all that you love this

ze guidelines,

eir Central by these Hudson male account. hormones and attracts hold’s a immediate female. nature energy to needs. please others. count.” Listening to these If you aren’t, no one else will be. You teach And a box of chocolates and a few roses

There’s a “feel-good” reaction these cues from our mind’s perspective requires people how to treat you.

given from this platform just might shift the

chemicals release.

focus and attention. How often do we ignore • Set healthy boundaries. Am I hearing a relationships in your life like never before.

Females have a similar effect take place those cues?

loud YES YES YES from those reading this? Don’t forget to buy yourself some flowers as

from the release of estrogen that causes the If you possess a healthy degree of selflove,

Isn’t it time that you began to say NO, I’m well.

attraction factor. There’s a period shortly after

then you will come from a better place sorry, that’s not OK! Go ahead be clear with Pat Larsen is a fitness instructor teaching

“attraction” takes place when a couple’s hormones

of knowing what they want out of the experi-

the person who’s been dumping on you or music and movement to baby boomers, se-

go haywire and there’s a real sense of ence. Allow your thoughts and your mind to disrespecting you. They’ll get the message. niors and elders at The Shamrock House in

elation and increased heart rates, along with help you identify these goals and don’t brush • Give yourself a break from self judgement.

East Durham. Live morning classes on Mon-

sweaty palms and a highly energetic and euphoric

off or ignore red flags that suggest behavior

Lose the language that is offensive. I’m days and Thursdays. She is also a certified

feeling.

patterns that leave you feeling hollow and not telling you to have no accountability. I’m hypnosis therapist. Programs to enhance life-

Understanding the body’s chemistry for mentally depleted.

telling you to be kind and gentle with yourself styles in guided meditations, acupressure for

both males and females helps create a pathway

Finally, one of the most sacred and dy-

and watch how you react.

relief of everyday aliments, readings and per-

for recognizing just how important what namic aspects of self-love has to be recog-

Self-love means accepting yourself as you sonal one-on-one sessions and support in per-

you’re “giving” off is. Taking care of that natural

nized as the very nature of your true spirit are. Accepting of your emotions, putting your son or via phone appointments. Schedule Pat

chemistry enhances your experience with coming through in all aspects of relationships. physical and mental well-being first. for a speaking engagement with your group

someone you’re attracted to.

When your spirit is fulfilled, you are a reflection

When you regain a better attitude toward or club. Contact Pat via email at Pelarsen5@

Next, let’s take a shot at understanding the

of the very essence of the self-love you yourself, guess what? You’ll give off better aol.com or by phone at

518-275-8686.

— Approaching 1 year in business July 9th, 2019 —

WE ACCEPT ALL N.Y.STATE DEPOSITS

HELP WANTED

6 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, January 17, 2020

CDL CLASS Specials B

FUNDRAISERS DRIVER

Tanning

Infrared

Will Assist Next to with Family Picking Dollar

FULL TIME WITH BENEFITS

Up

One Month Package

Bodywrap ®

Tanning made

PART for Fundraisers

TIME easy and FOR hassle-free. WINTER cellulite MONTHS

reduction, pain relief,

Real, Reputable, We have both a

relaxation, skin rejuvenation,

tanning bed and a booth.

and detoxification!

Trusted. Your Clean News We PAY Drivers the License Extra Penny • Tank

Media. Hazmat • Airbrake

TO APPLY:

If you feel that this job could be an excellent fit for you and are

GET 1

looking for Sweet a company Cider to and call Our home, Own please Cider direct Donuts! your resume

and references to Randy@CA-Albright.com.

13640 RT 9W • P.O. BOX 11 • HANNACROIX, NY 12087

PHONE: SUPPORTS 518-756-3127 REAL • FAX: 518-756-2900

Jams & Jellies.

• WWW.CA-ALBRIGHT.COM

NEWS.

255 Mansion Street

TO &

We Now 2381 Carry Rt. Local 9W, Grass Ravena Fed Beef! Coxsackie, NY

Open 7 days Next a week to Family from Dollar 10am-5pm

(518) 731-2559 HEATING

(518) 731- 6196 • Cty Rt 26, Climax, NY 12042

Follow us

(1/2 Mile on left off

GLASS PLASTIC THE Rte. 81 PUBLIC — Red Barns NEEDS on Hill)

CANS THE TRUTH;

&

on Facebook

COOLING

salon255ltd.com

SYSTEMS

TUESDAY-FRIDAY 10am-6pm

SATURDAY 9am-2pm

SUNDAY Closed

• Upgrading to energy-

MONDAY Closed

ERVICE

e Garage

, Brakes,

ansmision,

s

Drop Off Service

NO Waiting at Machines

We Count for You!

Want to Help with Raising Money —

FUNDRAISERS

Will Assist with Picking Up

for Fundraisers

SALON 255 LTD

— Approaching 1 year in business July 9th, 2019 —

You look fabulous!

WE ACCEPT We PAY ALL the N.Y.STATE Extra Penny DEPOSITS

on All NY State Deposit

Drop Off Service

NO Waiting at Machines

We Count for You!

Want to Help with Raising Money —

Salon 255 LTD is a state of the art salon offering a full menu of services

in a warm and luxurious atmosphere. Our professional, friendly staff

are trained in the latest trends and are always advancing their

education. Cans/Bottles

In industry that is forever changing, it is our priority to

always provide a superior experience!

With a variety of offerings and services to choose from, we’re sure you

will be happy working with us. We are looking forward to working with

you and helping you look fabulous!

2381 Rt. 9W, Ravena

GLASS PLASTIC CANS

ORDER YOUR

THANKSGIVING

PIES

BY NOV. 24th

on All NY State Deposit

Cans/Bottles

BUY 2

and

GET 1

FREE

Benefits can include weight loss,

BUY 2

and

FREE

16 Varieties of Apples Still on the Stand!

Pies on the Weekends!

Squash, Vegetables,

THIS PUBLICATION

On the

Local Maple Syrup & Honey,

stand:

, LLC

Hannacroix Rural

Invest in Energy Efficient Double

Hung Windows This Fall and SAVE!

*Must place window order

by October 30th, 2019!

NOT SOCIAL MEDIA HEADLINES & FAKE NEWS.

Invest in your

home's energy

efficiency this fall

and save at GNH!

For a limited time

only, 2200 Series

Smarter Windows

Double Hung

Replacements are

ONLY $169.OO!

Visit GNH to

learn more.

Greenville · Windham · Latham

www.GNHlumber.com

0% financing to credit qualified

“Journalism keeps you planted in the earth.” - Ray Bradbury

#SupportRealNews

AUTO &

TIRE

#SupportRealNews

SERVICE

• Full service Garage

• Alignment, Brakes,

Shocks, Transmision,

Diagnostics

• Firefighters “Thank You”


8 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022

18 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, January 17, 2020

Let Us Look Into Your Hearing

MELANIE LEKOCEVIC/CAPITAL REGION INDEPENDENT MEDIA

The coaching staff offers pointers to the Spartans during a timeout in the game against the RCS Indians.

• Free Hearing Screenings

• Free Demonstrations

• Free Clean & Checks

• Latest Hearing Technology

• Tinnitus Relief

• 0% Financing Available

Spartans fall to RCS

after late-game slide

By Melanie Lekocevic

Capital Region Independent Media

RAVENA-COEY-

MANS-SELKIRK — The game

was close the first half in the

Spartans’ matchup against the

Ravena-Coeymans-Selkirk Indians,

but that would change

late in the contest.

The RCS boys’ varsity bas-

11573 NY-32, Suite 4A • Greenville, NY 12083

ketball team hosted the Spartans

on Jan. 25 and would take a victory

with a final score of 54-45,

but the outcome was far from

clear the first three quarters.

With the Indians up 4-2 in www.hearinghealthusa.com

518-662-0707

the opening moments of the

game, RCS’s Eddie Reville

stole a pass by Spartans’ Jack

Motta and passed the ball downcourt

to Jack McFerran, who Spartan LIMITED Aden Weiss drives TIME the ball OFFER

down the court in the matchup with the

MELANIE LEKOCEVIC/CAPITAL REGION INDEPENDENT MEDIA

drove to the basket and scored a Indians.

two-pointer, giving the Indians ter on a Receive three-pointer up by Reville

with 4:50 to go in the half, ran scored a two-pointer with

to The Indians’ Jack McFer-

an early 6-2 lead.

By the end of the first period, bringing the Indians to within just under a minute to go in the

the two teams would be all tied three, with the Spartans up 18- quarter, giving the Indians their

up at 12.

15.

first lead in the second period,

The Spartans got off to a hot

Timeout was called with edging the Spartans 19-18.

start at the top of the second

4:00 to go in the half.

But with four seconds left in

quarter, with Motta breaking the

Coming out of the timeout, the half, Motta would drop in a

tie on a two-pointer with 6:30 to

the Indians took possession and two-pointer to give Greenville

go in the second and was fouled

on the play. Motta made the free

drove the ball downcourt, but the lead once again at Spartans

throw, giving the Spartans a 15-

the Spartans’ on a West new stole pair the ball of20, Indians 19. Reville made a

12 lead.

to take over. The Spartans failed shot at the halftime buzzer but

digital hearing aids!

Spartan Nicholas West hit a to take advantage and the Indians

reclaimed possession. into the locker room up by one.

missed, sending the Spartans

three-pointer moments later to

Expires 12/31/19.

bring the score to 18-12, with Ryan Southworth on the Greenville’s Motta made the

the Indians failing to score since Indians would break the stalemate,

scoring from under the two-pointer with 7:20 left in the

first score of the second half, a

the first period. Timeout was

called. *This information is intended basket for the with sole purpose 2:10 to of go fitting in the or selecting third to a bring the score to Spartans

22, Indians 19.

The hometown hearing aid squad and is would not a medical half to examination bring the Indians or audiological to with-evaluationin

one point.

RCS’s Jayden make its first score of the quar-

McClellan

50%

OFF


THE

ORIGINAL

5828 ST RT 32 • WESTERLO, NY 12193

FEATURING...

MELANIE LEKOCEVIC/CAPITAL REGION INDEPENDENT MEDIA

Jack Motta, the Spartans’ top scorer on the day, looks to pass the ball.

• Homemade

Fresh Sausage

• Handmade

‘in house’ Mozzarella

• Boar’s Head Cold Cuts

• Cold Heros

• Hot Heros • Fish Fry

• Daily Specials • Imported Cheeses

HAND-TOSSED BRICK OVEN PIZZA

CATERING

FOR ALL

OCASIONS!

Check us out on FB

Follow us on Instagram

MELANIE LEKOCEVIC/CAPITAL REGION INDEPENDENT MEDIA

Jack Motta, No. 3, reaches around an opponent to get to the basket and

scores a two-pointer.

www.silvercreekdeli.com

MELANIE LEKOCEVIC/CAPITAL REGION INDEPENDENT MEDIA

Nicholas West shoots from downtown.

returned the favor seconds later,

scoring a two-pointer to

bring the Indians to within one.

The Indians took the lead on a

Southworth two-pointer under

the basket.

McFerran extended the Indians’

lead to 25-22, and then

Reville hit a three-pointer from

downtown to give the hometown

team a 28-22 lead.

The Indians began pulling

away on a pair of three-pointers

by Wyatt Algozzine and Reville.

By the top of the final stanza,

the Spartans were down 43-31

before McClellan stole the ball,

drove it down court to widen the

Indians’ edge to 45-31.

The Indians never looked

back, ending the game at Indians

54, Spartans 45.

Jack Motta was the top scorer

for the Spartans on the day

with 25 points, Coach Dane

Carpenter said.

The Spartans hit 50% of their

free throws in the game, and

took advantage of Indians’ turnovers,

scoring 20 points. The

team had 13 steals, 19 turnovers

and 13 personal fouls.


The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022 9

$1.4M fund aids low, moderate income homeowners

By Melanie Lekocevic

Capital Region Independent Media

More than $1.4 million in state grant

funding has been set aside to assist lowand

moderate-income homeowners in

Greene and nearby counties with repairs

and safety upgrades for their homes.

The program will also help first-time

home buyers who meet eligibility requirements

make a down payment on a new

home purchase.

State Sen. Michelle Hinchey, D-46, announced

the funding Jan. 21.

The funds will be administered by the

New York State Homes and Community

Renewal’s Office of Community Renewal

and is being disbursed to nonprofit organizations

and municipalities in Greene,

Schenectady and Ulster counties.

The groups will then, in in turn, distribute

the money to low- and moderate-income

individuals.

“This state funding will change lives

in our communities, allowing people

with disabilities to implement accessibility

modifications, helping first-time home

buyers make down payments, supporting

COURTESY OF PEXELS

seniors with emergency repairs and assisting

low- and moderate-income New York-

State Sen. Michelle Hinchey, D-46, announced a fund that will help low- and moderate-income

homeowners in Greene County make needed repairs or put a down payment on a new home

ers in implementing needed upgrades to

purchase.

their homes,” Hinchey said.

In Greene County, $98,000 was award- ed to the Catskill Mountain Housing De- velopment Corporation. The organization

Report: More funding,

flavored tobacco

legislation needed

ALBANY – The American

Lung Association’s 20th annual

“State of Tobacco Control” report

reveals significant progress in the

work to end tobacco use, but products

like e-cigarettes and other flavored

tobacco products, including

menthol cigarettes, create concern

for anti-tobacco advocates.

The report was released Jan. 26.

The annual report finds that

New York earned mixed grades on

passing policies to reduce and prevent

tobacco use but highlighted

two main areas of improvement:

tobacco funding and flavors.

The “State of Tobacco Control”

report evaluates state and federal

policymakers on actions taken to

eliminate tobacco use, the nation’s

leading cause of preventable death.

The report recommends proven-effective

tobacco control laws and

policies to save lives.

The 2022 “State of Tobacco

Control” reveals the country has

made substantial progress in advancing

tobacco control policies

over the past 20 years, including

comprehensive smoke-free laws

in more states, increased tobacco

taxes across the nation and more

Americans with access to treatments

to help them quit smoking

through state Medicaid programs.

In New York state over the last

20 years, lawmakers have made

significant strides to reduce tobacco

use, including a robust clean

indoor air act that protects people

from secondhand smoke, according

to the American Lung Association.

However, there is more work to be

done. The adult smoking rate is still

12%, and the high school tobacco

use rate is 25.6%.

Today, smoking costs the state

over $10 billion and the lives of

more than 10,000 New Yorkers annually.

“While we have seen considerable

progress in New York, tobacco

use remains our leading cause of

preventable death and disease, taking

an estimated 28,170 lives each

year,” said Trevor Summerfield,

director of advocacy for the American

Lung Association in New York.

“And our progress on tobacco control

policy has not been equal. We

continue to see the unequal burden

of tobacco use and exposure to secondhand

smoke in communities experiencing

health disparities.”

NEW YORK’S GRADES

“State of Tobacco Control”

2022 grades states and the District

of Columbia in five areas that have

been proven to prevent and reduce

tobacco use and save lives. New

York received the following grades:

• Funding for State Tobacco

Prevention Programs – Grade F

• Strength of Smokefree Workplace

Laws – Grade A

• Level of State Tobacco Taxes

– Grade B

• Coverage and Access to Services

to Quit Tobacco – Grade C

• Ending the Sale of All Flavored

Tobacco Products - Grade D

This year’s report noted the

need for New York policymakers to

focus on increasing funding for tobacco

prevention and quit-smoking

programs. The Lung Association is

advocating for an increase in state

tobacco control funding as an investment

in prevention that would

save lives, given the ongoing youth

vaping epidemic.

“Despite receiving over $1.8

billion from tobacco settlement

payments and tobacco taxes, New

York only funds tobacco control

efforts at 21% of the level recommended

by the Centers for Disease

Control and Prevention,” Summerfield

said. “The Lung Association

believes the funds should be used to

support the health of our communities,

and to prevent tobacco use and

help people quit, and not switch to

e-cigarettes. These programs are

also critical for helping to end tobacco-related

health disparities.”

The increased funding could

also be paired with an increased

tobacco tax – which has been proven

to be one of the most effective

ways to reduce tobacco use, not

only among low-income individuals

but also for youth, is to significantly

increase the tax on all tobacco

products, including e-cigarettes.

Multiple studies have shown that

every 10% increase in the price of

cigarettes reduces consumption by

about 4% among adults and about

7% among youth. New York has

not significantly increased its tobacco

tax in over a decade.

In addition to funding and taxes,

the report urges legislators to

end the sale of all flavored tobacco

products, including menthol cigarettes.

In addition, menthol cigarettes

continue to be the major cause of

tobacco-related death and disease

in Black communities, with nearly

81% of Black Americans who

smoke using them. Ending the sale

of flavored tobacco products, including

menthol, will not only help

end youth vaping, but will also help

address the disproportionate impact

of menthol cigarettes and flavored

cigars have on many communities,

including Black Americans,

LGBTQ+ Americans and youth.

“Kids follow the flavors, so

ending the sale of all flavored tobacco

products in New York is key

to ending youth tobacco use. We

call on legislators in Albany to prohibit

the sale of all flavored tobacco

products, including menthol, across

New York,” said Summerfield.

FEDERAL GRADES

OVERVIEW

“State of Tobacco Control”

2022 also grades the federal government

in five areas:

• Federal Government Regulation

of Tobacco Products (2022

grade – D)

• Federal Coverage of Quit

Smoking Treatments (2022 grade

– D)

• Level of Federal Tobacco Taxes

(2022 grade – F)

• Federal Mass Media Campaigns

to Prevent and Reduce Tobacco

Use (2022 grade – A)

• Federal Minimum Age of Sale

for Tobacco Products to 21 (2022

grade – I*)

* The Incomplete grade is

for the FDA being more than 18

months overdue in publishing the

final Tobacco 21 regulations as required

by statute.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Winter can be a great time to go birding. If you brave the cold, you may see birds not out and about during the

warmer months.

Be a ‘snow birder’ this winter

While the chilliest months of

the year may seem like the hardest

time to venture outdoors, it can be a

great time to go birding, according

to the New York State Department

of Environmental Conservation.

Layer up and head out to your

backyard, local park or other public

space and observe some of the

bird species that you may not normally

see during warmer months.

Winter raptors, including

snowy owls, short-eared owls,

barn owls and hawks, migrate

south from the Canadian tundra

ALTAMONT – State Sen. Michelle

Hinchey, D-46, announced

legislation Thursdsay that would

give all municipal institutions in

New York the option to shift their

food budgets to locally-based, fair,

ecologically sound and humane

food sources.

The legislation, S7534/A8580,

would make it easier for communities

to buy food from businesses

that meet their values, according to

Hinchey.

The bill is sponsored by

Hinchey, who represents Greene

County, in the Senate and Assembly

Majority Leader Crystal Peoples-Stokes

in the Assembly.

If adopted into law, the bill

would make New York the first

state to institute a values-based

procurement model that promotes

the purchase of more sustainably

produced food from local economies,

especially smaller-scale

farms and minority-owned businesses.

The legislation ensures that

suppliers’ workers are offered safe

and healthy working conditions

and fair compensation, that livestock

receive humane care and that

consumers have access to nutritious

meals, under the bill.

New York’s municipal institutions

— including schools, shelters,

childcare centers and hospitals

— are required by current state

food procurement law to choose

the lowest responsible bidder in

all food purchasing decisions, preventing

any further criteria from

being considered.

Hinchey said the bill would

bring New York’s food policies,

which haven’t been updated since

the 1970s, into the 21st century

by creating pathways for municipalities

to award food contracts to

businesses that are no more than

10% more expensive than the lowest

bidder if they possess one or

more of the following qualities:

• Environmental Sustainability:

Sourcing from producers that

employ sustainable practices to

improve soil health and carbon sequestration;

conserve on-farm energy

and water; reduce food waste

and greenhouse gas emissions;

reduce or eliminate synthetic pesticides

and fertilizers; protect and

enhance wildlife habitats and biodiversity,

and more.

• Racial Equity: Opening

pathways for Minority and Women-Owned

Businesses (MWBEs)

and farmers to access institutional

contracts.

• Fair Labor Practices: Ensuring

18 that food suppliers respect and

helps senior citizens with the cost of taking

care of emergencies and code violations in

their homes that could pose a threat to their

health or safety, or could impact the livability

of the home, Hinchey said.

The Better Community Neighborhoods,

Inc. in Schenectady County was awarded

$150,000 to provide financial assistance to

make homes accessible to low- and moderate-income

individuals with disabilities.

An additional $437,500 was also

awarded to the Schenectady County group

to help first-time home buyers make a

down payment or rehabilitate housing.

In Ulster County, $800,000 was awarded

in New York State Community Development

Block Grant funding to be used to

rehabilitate housing in the county.

The local organizations will oversee

disbursement of the funds.

“I congratulate the local nonprofits and

municipalities across Greene, Schenectady

and Ulster County that have been selected

to receive this important funding, and

I thank Gov. Hochul for her partnership

in closing the affordability gap on home

ownership throughout New York state,”

Hinchey said. “Owning a home is a hallmark

of the American Dream and I will

continue to fight for investments to help

more upstate New Yorkers secure safe, accessible

and affordable housing.”

and can be observed near open

bodies of water and large grasslands.

Some species of woodpeckers

may be easier to hear or see in

their winter homes. Black-capped

chickadees remain in northern climates

due to their ability to survive

the ultra-cold weather.

Winter is also the best time to

observe bald eagles, according to

DEC.

Use a website like eBird to see

what species have been detected

near you. The free Merlin Bird ID

app can help you identify unfamiliar

birds and add even more new

species to your lists.

If you do brave the cold and

snow, properly preparing for winter

conditions is essential for a

more enjoyable and safe experience.

Check out the DEC’s latest

YouTube video on layering for

winter, and read up on some winter

hiking safety tips that can be followed

for any outdoor trip.

Stay tuned for future announcements

on the New York State Birding

Trail to find locations across

the state to go birding.

Hinchey: Revolutionize the way

municipalities buy food

protect workers’ rights to organize

and bargain collectively for better

wages and conditions.

• Local Economic Benefit:

Sourcing products in which 51%

of the raw agricultural materials

have been grown, harvested, processed

and manufactured in New

York state.

• Nutrition: Prioritizing purchase

of healthful foods that promote

well-being, namely products

comprised of whole grains, fresh

and minimally processed fruits and

vegetables, whole plant-based and

lean proteins, and essential fats (including

nuts, seeds and fish).

• Animal Welfare: Promoting

humane treatment of farm animals

by sourcing from farmers who

prohibit intensive confinement

and provide animals with enough

space and enrichment to carry out

natural behaviors, as illustrated by

their participation in an independent

animal welfare certification.

Let Us Look Into Your Hearing

582



10 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022

12 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, May 8, 2020

A Plant letter diseases to Jason

By Bob Beyfuss

only about 12 years of growth. It is syrup as his Uncle Lester and I did. wet spot since that is what they like tree finally shot up and started

For Capital One of Region the things Independent I liked Media most about

straight

my

as

Lacking

an arrow

chlorophyll,

with perfectly

they need

Lester

to get their

loved larch

of seedlings

trees, and

once the

to grow

disease

in,

occurs,

in their native

so the

habitat,

A

up

third major infectious agent is viruses.

growing one to two feet a year. It

former job as a Cooperative Extension

symmetrical,

agent “food”

whorled

from other

branches.

sources than

so do

sunlight

I. They

by

are the

emphasis

only deciduous

conifer that commonly grows It languished for about five

is on prevention.

north.

In addition to preventive

chemical fungicides there are cultur-

different than

Viruses, like the COVID-19 virus, are very

in Greene County was the process of figuring breaking down and absorbing organic matter.

has

bacteria

now become

or fungi

the

in

biggest

the sense

tree I

There are a few “tips” included The other one, although only a few

out what was causing problems with garden Sometimes in the process of feeding on plant al practices than can also be utilized, much to that they are have not planted living on organisms, my property. per I need

in this blog that doubles as a gardening

plants, column. lawns, trees Jason or is shrubs. the nephew It is sort of like material, they kill or damage their host. This the satisfaction of gardeners who don’t want They can only to get survive a picture and of reproduce 6-foot-tall inside Will,

se.

years younger and 50 feet away, is in our region, featuring beautiful, years, remaining a 2-foot-tall shrub,

barely 7 feet tall. It leans towards pale, lime-green spring growth and as is often the case when you transplant

a “wild” tree. Transplanting

of detective my late work friend, without Larry, a aka cloak Lester, or dagger. distinguished pathogens from saprophytes. to use chemical fungicides.

living cells. standing They have next a to very “his” short tree life the expectancy,

unlike time they bacteria come or up fungi, to visit. and they

next

the sun and I have to keep it staked. orange fall color that signals the

whom I used I often what mentioned I learned in about these this topic Once a plant is infected with a fungal Another major cause of disease in plants

They both have beautiful, bright peak of woodcock migration in our mature, native trees and shrubs onto

columns in public in health previous as well, years. when we contracted

Jason with the and New his York wife State just Department wel-

of infection. The general strategy is to try to living organisms that can exhibit long-term of them as renegade hunks of DNA or RNA

disease, it is generally difficult to “cure” the and animals are bacteria. Bacteria are also don’t necessarily need water to infect. Think

yellow, fall color and the leaves town. Lester and I timed many of your property sounds like a cool

Unfortunately, a few years ago,

remain until a hard frost. I use the our woodcock hunts on the larch idea, but it is usually not a great a porcupine climbed the tree and ate

comed Health a to baby conduct boy into educational this world programs to prevent the infection in the first place or keep dormancy. Like fungi, they can damage their that get into the genes of plants or animals,

leaves to make a tincture that I believe

has cured my tinnitus. ones by Lester’s cabin are Euro-

several times prior to digging them ing it and resulting in three central

color change each October. The idea. Unless you root prune them the bark off the central leader, kill-

and combat I suggested Lyme disease. they plant This a week tree in I will share it from spreading. Fungi are living organisms hosts by “feeding” on the tissue of the host and direct the cells to make more viruses.

the some baby’s principles honor. I of wrote disease Jason and this infection I that can survive for a long time, either actively

causing infection, or in a dormant state that ply. Of course, not all bacteria are pathogenic and

and using the host’s cells to grow and multi-

They are also very tiny compared to fungi

Female ginkgo trees bear edible pean larch and you can also buy up, over a year or more, you

learned, which are pretty relevant in these

cut

bacteria.

off leaders. It is not quite as pleasingly

email today.

fruit that smells like cat urine when Japanese larch. Larch

days of the COVID-19 pandemic.

may last for 100 years or more. This longevity

allows them to re-occur when

and

are

neither

all quite

are all fungi.

90% of the existing roots and they symmetrical now, but big enough to

Hi Jason,

Viral infections in plants are far less common

ripe. Despite that fact, they are

In order to contract a disease, whether

similar,

conditions

except for the

Our

grafted

bodies

ones

contain

will take

millions

years

of

to adapt

foreign

to their new

than

fully

bacterial

display

or fungal

its beautiful

First, make sure you select a

infections

fall color

because

they and generally it serves cannot as a perennial get inside reminder a plant

sometimes

long-lived

it is a plant

tree

or

for

animal

your son!

disease,

No crabapple,

flowering cherry, peach, pa-

three factors are

used

right.

in

Some

Chinese

fungal

cooking.

diseases

that

are

“weep.”

ubiquitous

I would

bacteria

not

and

suggest

fungi that

home.

do us no harm whatsoever.

must occur simultaneously. If any of these

If you want

and

a gingko,

must be

be

dealt

sure

with

to

every

any grafted

season.

tree, really. Graft

In

unions

fact, many of

Lester

these

and

organisms

I spent

are

many,

without

many

help to me from of Lester. another That’s living the organism. real point

three factors are not present, there can

get

be

a

no

male clone!

Twenty years ago, almost

sometimes

all the garden

fail in a

responsible

few years.

for keeping

hours

us

over

healthy.

the years

Bacteria,

doing

Leafhopper

exactly of insects memorial and trees, aphids actually. are usually We all

per birch or any other fruit tree! No

disease. First, before I discuss these specific

My second,

seeds

or

that

maybe

were

even

sold

first,

were treated

The

with

first

a

“Grandkid

like fungi,

Tree”

usually

I

require

that to landscape

water to become

his log cabin.

involved

He

in have viral a infections “Lester” in in our plants. hearts These to recall.

evergreens either, as they all seem

factors, I need to talk about the things

choice,

that

would

pink-colored

be sugar

fungicide

maple. This

called

planted

“Captan.”

on

This

my property

infectious.

was an had a “native plant theme” way insects be-injecfore the virus into the plant physically

with their mouthparts and once inside

to have health issues these days.

cause disease.

species is

fungicide

not without

protected

many pests

tender

American

seedlings from

Larch (Tamarack)

One of the

that

most common

“native”

bacterial

landscaping

disease

of pears near and apples fashionable. is called We “fireblight.” dug up the oak the tree plant they can replicate.

became

Personally, I like ginkgoes because

Whatever species you decide,

In general, disease-causing organisms

of course,

getting

but it has

“damping

beautiful

off,”

fall

which

I dug

is a

up

general

in the Adirondacks,

are fungi,

they are

bacteria

tough,

or

grow

viruses.

fast

All

and

may

color

cause

and a

term

wonderful

for similar

growth

diseases

habit.

caused Lake by Placid. several I planted This it for disease my oldest

seedlings grandson, grow Will. hail Will hits is 15 flower years blossoms. the cabin, Splashing well as water the shadbush, grown, high quality, named cultivar

most often and the occurs sugar when maples rain he or planted Since by

I suggest that you buy a nursery

all three of these types of pathogens

cause disease in somewhat different

seem

diseases

immune

with

to

similar

most pests,

symptoms,

having

but

There

all are

are many genera interesting of fungi. The cultivars infected

outlived

different

them

in their

evolutionarily.

mode of action

I have

or how with they arrowhead spindly shapes and eventually to columnar, keel over old and now die and with almost spreads 6 feet the tall. disease. It the Most, pinkster, but not the horizontal all, fungicides

tree are to catch ineffective hobblebush in treating and bacterial a few things ent that cal, source.

junipers, tree from a reputable, preferably lo-

manners, dealing with them requires differ-

two

infect.

of them, different cultivars, that to round. When a conspicuous your son shriveling is a teen-oager, he could stem at probably soil level. tap It is “his” highly up contagious to him! That and “wild” disease. Larch Commercial tree did fruit not growers make it, often like winterberry. use remain essentially Reach the Bob same. Beyfuss This is at where rlb14@ I

narrowing took 10 years of the for the strategies, but the principles of infection

have It totally seems different to me that growth most habits.

are One caused is already by fungi. 25 Fungi feet tall, are after organisms tree that and use usually the sap fatal to once make contracted. maple was deliberately planted antibiotics, in a such very as streptomycin, Anyway, my to try transplanted to kill will Larch pick up cornell.edu. the story next week.

plant diseases

generally require water to become infectious. It is virtually impossible to cure a flat bacteria.

Reach Bob Beyfuss at rlb14@cornell.edu

Positively Speaking

By Toby Moore

For Capital Region Independent

Media

Last week I started to unravel

a formerly classified document

called “The Analysis and

Assessment of the Gateway

Process” written in 1983 by

Lieutenant Colonel Wayne M.

McDonnel, whom we will refer

to as Wayne. Wayne was tasked

by the U.S. Army to study “The

Gateway Process” and its relation

to national defense.

The Gateway Process”

is a technique developed by

the Monroe Institute from the

1960s through the 1980s. I will

do a quick recap, but it will be

helpful for you to go back and

read last week’s edition if you

haven’t already.

I find this document fascinating

for two reasons. First is

because I often talk about positive

thinking and the power of

the human mind, and this document

discusses concepts of our

reality and powers of the human

The Gateway Process, Part 2

mind that even if only 10% of

it was accurate, it’s enough to

change the way we think about

ourselves dramatically, our

capabilities, and the world in

which we live. The second reason

is that the U.S. Army considered

The Gateway Process”

important enough to study for

many years and keep classified

for over 20 years.

To learn The Gateway Process,

the practitioner must understand

a few things. First,

there is no such thing as matter

— everything is energy.

Second, the only thing in the

universe that is not energy is

consciousness. Third, the entire

universe is a hologram of unbelievable

complexity.

The Gateway Process teaches

participants how to meditate

with specific sound frequencies

and visualization techniques

to bring the practitioner into

a meditational state known as

Hemi-Sync. Hemi-Sync occurs

when both the left and right

hemispheres of the brain are

synchronized.

Synchronizing both hemispheres

of the brain is not something

that humans do naturally.

Somebody who has practiced

Zen meditation for 20 years

or more can quickly achieve

Hemi-Sync. The Gateway Process

can teach a dedicated

practitioner how to Hemi-Sync

within a week or two.

Some say that just one person

who knows how to achieve

a state of Hemi-Sync can do

more damage to an opposing

force than an entire army. Perhaps

this is why the military

was so interested in analyzing

this technique and has probably

developed a more advanced

method of their own.

Some claims in this document

are controversial and hard

to comprehend, but I’ll briefly

go over them before getting to

my main point of interest.

According to this document,

The Gateway Process teaches

the practitioner to access the infinite

information stored within

the universal hologram to solve

any problem, change reality,

heal life-threatening injuries,

separate from their physical

body to witness things happening

in another part of the world,

the universe, other dimensions,

interact with other forms of

consciousness within these dimensions,

and even time travel,

viewing the past and the future.

One of the things I often

write about is living above

your present circumstances.

I’ve learned through life experience,

reading many books on

positive thinking, in particular,

the works of Joe Dispenza,

that if you can see a vision of

the future you’d like to have,

combine the vision with intense

positive emotion and maintain

that vision and feeling for long

enough, you will accomplish

your goal.

The Gateway Process confirms

this through a technique

called “patterning”: “... The

patterning technique recognizes

that since consciousness

is the source of all reality, our

thoughts have the power to influence

the development of reality…

If those thoughts can be

projected with adequate intensity…however,

the more complicated

the objective sought, and

the more radically it departs

from our current reality, the

more time the universal hologram

will need to reorient our

reality….”

What’s the take-away? Believe

and have faith! If you’re

determined to accomplish your

dreams, then you must believe

that you’ve already completed

them in a future timeline.

As often as you can, visualize

yourself achieving the desired

outcome, allow yourself to feel

the feelings of success. If you

can do that for long enough, it

will be given to you.

Toby Moore is a columnist,

the star of Emmy-nominated “A

Separate Peace,” and the CEO

of Cubestream, Inc.

ap

P

al

bo

na

in

th

ci

O

of

C

fi

be

bi

ba

of

ti

m

H

el

A

id

R

qu

it

he

ul

de

si

th

WHITTLING AWAY

By Dick Brooks

For Capital Region Independent

Media

I was passing a full length

mirror the other day and made

the mistake of looking at it.

Lengthwise, I fit just fine, it

just wasn’t wide enough. Never

having known a mirror that

lied, I think it’s time to shed a

few pounds.

I’ve been considering it for

some time now, there are hints

and signs that have helped me

come to this conclusion. Since

the majority of mature Americans

are now judged to be overweight,

maybe sharing some of

Fitness Concepts

By Mary Schoepe

For Capital Region Independent

Media

When the weather turns cold

and snowy, it always reminds

me of the days when my mom

made a pot of mulled apple cider.

She would start making the

cider in the morning, throwing

in some cinnamon, cloves and

allspice, and then let it cook on

the stove all day. That combination

of spices made the cider

delish!

But there’s so much more to

these humble spices than just

taste. Many spices like cinnamon,

allspice, ginger, turmeric

and cardamom have incredible,

proven health benefits that we

can all take advantage of.

by Dick Brooks

my personal observations with

you will help some others to resolve

to become losers, too.

I’ve noticed that my legs are

getting longer — at least it has

become harder to reach my feet.

In fact, now that I think about

it, it’s been a while since I’ve

seen my feet.

The number of X’s on the

size tags in my shirts is starting

to rival the marque of an adult

movie theater. I found one of

my T-shirts folded and stored in

with the tablecloths.

I can now use my belt to

measure my height. I no longer

have a sideways. My double

chin has had children of its

For example, at the McCormick

Science Institute in Hunt

Valley, Maryland, a small 2012

study published in the Journal

of the Academy of Nutrition

and Dietetics reported that adding

6 grams of ground cinnamon

to 50 grams of hot cereal

lowered blood glucose in both

normal and obese participants.

Nora Saul, manager of nutrition

services at Joslin Diabetes

Center in Boston, said that “cinnamon

has a place in a diabetes

meal plan and can be used in

concert with their medication.”

And according to several

studies, cinnamon may also

provide heart-healthy benefits

that include reducing high cholesterol

and triglyceride levels.

A 2017 review of 13 studies

was conducted to determine if

Mirrors don’t lie

Spice it up!

cinnamon supplementation has

a beneficial impact on lipid levels.

Researchers concluded that

cinnamon significantly lowered

total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol

and triglyceride levels.

Another heart healthy spice

is allspice. Native to Central

America and the West Indies,

it’s a kind of berry that combines

flavors of pepper, nutmeg

and cinnamon for a power-packed

flavor dose. Allspice

is used for indigestion, intestinal

gas, abdominal pain, heavy

menstrual periods, vomiting,

diarrhea, fever and as a cure for

the common cold.

Even though allspice is beneficial

for many ailments, it

can cause allergic reactions in

people that have existing gastric

ulcers or ulcerative colitis.

own. Actually, it’s not quite that

bad, but it is headed in that direction,

so I figure I better start

now or it may become reality.

I’m really not in bad shape.

In fact, round is a very nice

shape but I’d like to try for oblong

at least. It means getting

up earlier and making time for

some planned exercise. The

only problem I foresee is that

my favorite early morning exercise

is making breakfast. That

could be a conflict of interest.

I think I’ll hit the library and

read up on some of the more

popular diets. I’ve been on the

Dr. Atkins Diet before and liked

it, even though the idea of losing

weight by eating a whole

cow at a sitting while passing

up a slice of bread and a helping

of beans never quite seemed

logical to me.

At the very least, I’ll keep

myself entertained for weeks.

Have you noticed how many

books on diets and proper nutrition

are in the library? The

only section that’s bigger is

the cookbook section. Did you

know there are more cookbooks

found in the average American

home that any other type of

book? Maybe I’ve discovered a

correlation here between obesity

and literacy. Nah!

Being a person of reasonable

Always make sure you talk to

your medical professional first.

Known for their use in Indian

food and gingerbread baked

goods, cloves are a sweet and

aromatic spice that has also

been used in traditional medicine.

Rich in the mineral manganese

(which is involved in the

formation of bone), cloves may

promote bone health. Low bone

mass is a condition the affects

43 million older Americans and

can result in osteoporosis. An

animal study found that taking

manganese supplement for 12

weeks increased bone density

and bone growth; however current

research is mostly limited

to animal and test tube studies.

More research is needed to determine

how it may affect bone

intelligence, I think I’ll gather

my support group around me,

start moving more and eating

less and in a few weeks, I’m

sure I’ll start getting positive

results.

If I don’t, I think I’ll just

hang that full-length mirror, the

one that started all this, sideways

and stand farther back.

That should also solve the problem.

Thought for the week —

“It’s sad to grow old, but nice

to ripen.” — Bridgitte Bardot

Until next week, may you

and yours be happy and well.

Dick Brooks can be reached

at whittle12124@yahoo.com.

formation in people.

Another ancient remedy

with many impressive medicinal

properties is cardamom.

Cardamom may fight inflammation,

prevent cavities and

bad breath, may lower blood

sugar and may help with weight

loss and lower anxiety. Unfortunately,

little or no human research

exists for a number of

health claims associated with

this spice. Nevertheless, adding

cardamom to your cooking may

be a safe and effective way to

improve your health.

While spices can’t replace

prescribed medications, they

have been shown to be one part

of a disciplined approach that

may ward off many health conditions.


The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022 11

Transcribed from her diary by

Kathy Saurer Osborne

Sunday, Feb. 11: Fair. No

church till evening. Had roast

pork dinner. Visited. Chuck &

Joyce came about 3. We went

there for dinner. Had a most delicious

meal. Home 12.30 A.M.

Chuck staid the nite.

Monday, Feb. 12: Cloudy

most of the day. Managed to

get the clothes dry. Chuck staid

here and went back about noon.

Came back and Joyce went

home with him. Janet staid with

the girls.

Tuesday, Feb. 13: Fair and

thawing. Gene sick with intestinal

grippe. Gertrude in bed with

a cold. Joyce came and helped

me out. Chuck went back home.

Got the ironing done. ‘Lite

came this P.M. and we had

a good visit. They are trying

to find a man to help. Chuck

phoned he had gotten in a ditch

in Dunbar Hollow. He can’t get

over tonite. Gene had a fainting

Grandma Mackey’s Diary

spell. We called Dr Bott. He

couldn’t come right away. She

feels better now. Adrienne and

Adele are at Youth Fellowship.

Rev. Starr called a minute.

Wednesday, Feb. 14: Cloudy

and warm. Went to see Gene.

She was feeling better. I did

her ironing. Chuck came about

11. Had dinner and we went to

Delite’s. Had a little visit and

came home. Jammie brought

Chuck. Joyce got ready and

went back with him and Carol.

They have a little party at Bryant’s

tonite. Joyce got a cute diamond

for Valentine’s Day. She

was very much delighted with

it. I got some valentines and a

box of candy. Joyce is going in

tomorrow A.M. with the family’s

and staying in until Friday

P.M. The boys leave 3:30 tomorrow

P.M.

Thursday, Feb. 15: A fine

day, but cold. Washed and

ironed hand washing. Made

a pie and a cake and cleaned

1951 life in Medusa

bedrooms and congoleum. Crocheted.

Gertrude in bed most of

the day. Joyce called 11 P.M.

last nite. They had forgotten

some things and came by for

them 12:30 with the Lincoln.

She called tonite. Chuck got

away from Albany 4:45 tonite.

Gene feels better tonite.

Friday, Feb. 16: Fair. A fine

day. Cleaned living rooms and

dusted. Crocheted etc. Joyce

came tonite with Don. Adele

went to the B.B. game at Hunter-Tannerville

tonite.

Saturday, Feb. 17: Cloudy.

Icy and rain. Gene at Effie’s.

Joyce has a touch of intestinal

grippe and I have a cold.

Couldn’t go to the Card Party

at Edith Giffords. Sorry! Joyce,

Don, Adrienne and Adele have

gone to Coxsackie on track of a

“television set.”

Sunday, Feb. 18: Cloudy

and warm. Didn’t go to Church.

Joyce and Adrienne did. Don’s

cold is horrid. Joyce and I went

to S. Westerlo for her hat bag.

Called at Eufemia’s. Went on to

Delite’s for supper. Home 8:40

P.M.

Monday, Feb. 19: Warm and

thawing. The clothes dried and

I ironed some of the slips and

blouses. Joyce got a card from

Chuck. I called and told her

tonite. The men brought the

TV set. It works fine, as well

as any I’ve seen. Crocheted etc.

Haven’t felt very well. Caught

a little more cold, I guess. Addie

brought me a box of nuts.

Good!

Tuesday, Feb. 20: Fog all

day. Have a touch of intestinal

grippe. Gertrude did the ironing.

I crocheted and did a few

odd jobs. Children watching

TV. Called Delite. Philip was

sick Sunday nite but is better

now.

Wednesday, Feb. 21: Rain.

Sat most of the day. Did a few

odd jobs. Joyce came with Don.

He was in the city. She has tomorrow

off. Children had to go

to school. They were mad!!

Thursday, Feb. 22: Cloudy. A

little sun in the P.M. Got meals

visited etc. Watched the TV in

the evening. Am taking Joyce to

Gedney’s in the A.M. Don had

the day off and put in the ceiling

light in the bathroom, he got

in Albany yesterday.

Friday, Feb. 23: A fine day.

Looks like spring. Took Joyce

to Greenville. Cleaned living

room and dusted. Gertrude

went with Louise to a meeting

at the hall. The man came and

finished putting in the TV set.

Joyce came back with Gene and

Stubby. They and Joyce have

gone out. The girls are at a B.B.

game.

Saturday, Feb. 24: Fair and

windy. Made two apple pies.

Got meals and did everyday

work. Everyone watching TV.

Gene at Effie’s. Girls washed

hair and clothes. Don worked in

the bathroom.

WE HAVE

WE HAVE

HIGH STANDARDS.

HIGH STANDARDS.

WE JUST DON’T CHARGE

WE JUST DON’T EXTRA CHARGE FOR THEM.

EXTRA FOR THEM.

$6,399

MSRP

$6,399

CFORCE ®

At CFMOTO, we’ve always held ourselves to high

standards. But the difference between us and our

CFORCE 600

®

competitors At CFMOTO, is that we’ve we always don’t charge held ourselves you extra to for high them.

(Plus freight & setup)

When standards. you compare But features the difference to features between with us the and big our guys,

MSRP

600

the only competitors place we’re is that not we equal don’t is the charge price. you Our extra CFORCE for them.

(Plus freight & setup)

600

has a powerful 580cc EFI engine. Standard features When include you compare durable features composite-over-steel to features with the racks, big guys,

Ridevision LED headlights and taillights, hand the guards, only place winch—the we’re not equal is the price. Our CFORCE 600

list has goes a powerful on. With 580cc CFMOTO, EFI engine. you get Standard more so features you can include get out durable and composite-over-steel racks,

experience Ridevision more LED headlights together. and taillights, hand guards, winch—the

EXPERIENCE MORE TOGETHER

list goes on. With CFMOTO, you get more so you can get out and

experience more together.

EXPERIENCE MORE TOGETHER

T STROPSROTO

6 TOWN LINE 23 MOTORSPORTS .tR 30

6003 Rt. 32, Westerlo, NY 12193

W (518) olretse

797-3540 , NY 1 | www.townlinemotorsports.com 3912

6

PARTS | SERVICE

23

|

.tR

SALES

30

w moc.stropsrotomenilnwot.ww

We service W all major olretse

, brand NY 1 motorcycles, dirt bikes, 3912 snowmobiles, and ATVs.

Call us at (518) 797-3540 to schedule your service.

w moc.stropsrotomenilnwot.ww

T STROPSROTO

WARNING: CFMOTO recreational vehicles are intended for off-road use only, and can be hazardous to operate. Read Owner’s Manual and all product labels before operating.

Never operate on paved roads. Operators and passengers must wear a helmet, eye protection and protective clothing. Operators must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s

license. Passengers, if permitted, must be at least 12 years old. Always use seat belts, cab netting and doors (if equipped). Never operate under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Avoid Real, excessive Reputable,

speed and sharp turns, and never engage in stunt driving. Check state and local laws before operating on trails. Take a safety training course before operating.

Contact WARNING: your CFMOTO recreational dealer for more vehicles information, are intended call the for ATV off-road Safety use Institute only, and at 1-800-887-2887, can be hazardous or to go operate. to www.atvsafety.org. Read Owner’s ©2021 Manual Zhejiang and all product CFMOTO labels Power before Co., Ltd.

Trusted. Your News

operating.

Never operate on paved roads. Operators and passengers must wear a helmet, eye protection and protective clothing. Operators must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s

license. Media. Passengers, if permitted, must be at least 12 years old. Always use seat belts, cab netting and doors (if equipped). Never operate under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

Avoid excessive speed and sharp turns, and never engage in stunt driving. Check state and local laws before operating on trails. Take a safety training course before operating.

Contact your CFMOTO dealer for more information, call the ATV Safety Institute at 1-800-887-2887, or go to www.atvsafety.org. ©2021 Zhejiang CFMOTO Power Co., Ltd.

TOWN LINE AUTO

Full Service Auto Repair | Body Shop & Collision Repair

THIS PUBLICATION

6501 Route 32, Greenville, NY 1208

SUPPORTS REAL

(518) 966-8003 | www.townlineauto.com

NEWS.

TOWN LINE SELF-STORAGE

Safe, Secure & Convenient | Storage Units | Boat & RV Parking

6501 Route 32, Greenville, NY 1208

(518) 966-8003 | www.townlineself-storage.com

REPORTERS, EDITORS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS

CREATE REAL NEWS. JOURNALISM YOU CAN TRUST.

#SupportRealNews


12 4 The The Greenville Greenville Pioneer Pioneer • Friday, • Friday, February January 11, 1, 2022 2021

al?

E!!

s

ools

Many people kept diaries in the past

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Local towns and fire companies have produced their own maps for years —

maps which show all the named roads in town. They can be useful for more

Many people, both men and

women, kept diaries in the past.

I have a small collection of local

diaries and would love to have

more because they illustrate the

daily lives people were leading

and what and who was important

to them. Most people started

diary keeping on January 1 of

a given year. While they may

not have continued recording

until the end of the year, the diaries

usually tell what their authors

were doing on New Year’s

Day. Since this edition of “The

Greenville Pioneer” is coming

out on January 1, I thought I

would share with you how some

people spent that day in the past.

I don’t even know the names of

all those who kept the diaries.

Often, they didn’t put their

names in the books. Perhaps you

can guess who the authors might

have been. If you do find a clue,

please let me know.

Helen Tripp was one of the

daughters of Alfred and Maria

Utter Tripp. She was born January

26,1853, and she lived until

January 27, 1917. She lived

in the brick house on the main

street of Oak Hill with her family.

On information. January 1, 1874, she

recent

By started Mary a Lou diary: Nahas

For Capital Thursday, Region Independent Weather Mediavery

pleasant. I worked around the

house Many until of us noon. use maps In the daily afternoon

cellphones sewed or on in my our dress. cars to find Did

on

our

addresses. not go anywhere We use Google nor was Earth there to

see any the one location in here and till surroundings evening. Mrs. of

properties Eliza Flower for sale. called. Maps Received are part of a

the letter resources from Libbie we take Russell. for granted.

But Friday, did you January consider 2: how Weather old

maps very can pleasant, help you thawed find out all about day.

the I sewed history on of my Oak dress Hill and nearly Vicinity?

day. I Aunt frequently Mary get Utter requests and from Jim-

all

folks mie came wanting down to know this evening about the to

history go the of their donation. property. [I While can imagine

do what a deed the search donation the was, county but

you

can

courthouse can anyone if you share are more in the information?]

time, Aunt you Mary will likely invited still us have to

area and

have

questions. go with her. The coal fire went

out For last example, night. I the had property to make that it

is up now this morning. referred to Aunt as Mary the Tripp had

Store a very and nice House time; in Oak they Hill, cleared in a

deed $104. recorded in the Greene County

Deeds, Saturday, Book January.3: G, p. 89, recorded Weather

very 30, 1823, pleasant; describes thawed the proper-

all day

July

ty again as part today. of Lot I 34 had of to the make Maitland the

Patent: coal fire again today. Father,

Mother, “The southeast Hattie and corner Carrie of the [her lot

is two on youngest the north sisters] side of the went Public over

Road to Uncle 46 links Briggs from today. the southwest [Uncle

corner Briggs of was a store a Tripp then and occupied lived by in

Col. Medusa James or Holcomb.” Westerlo]. I finished

my The dress, next all but deed, the recorded buttons and in

1815, pockets. refers to the public road as

the Sunday, “Loonenburg January & 4: Schoharry Weather

Turnpike.” very nice and pleasant. Went to

Durham Another to early church deed this references morning.

Did property not get “described back in as time fol-

nearby

lows, for Sunday to wit; beginning School. at Did the not southwest

to church corner of this the old afternoon. store formerly [The

go

occupied Tripps lived by James next Holcomb, to the Oak on Hill the

north Methodist side of Church the Schoharie and were turnpike always

from very thence involved north there.] sixty-four Or-

road;

degrees ville preached. west, forty-six I wrote links a to letter the

southeast to Libbie corner Russell of a this building evening. lot

leased Did not to Levi go to Austin church. Jr.; [It for sounds thence

north like there eighteen were degrees opportunities east on the to

east spend line the of said whole Austin, day continuing and evening

same at church.] course to the west shore

the

of the Chauncey creek on which B Day the from saw mill Alcove

then recorded along the on said January shore

stands;

down 1,1887: the said Thurs. creek Went about one to hundrecove—got

ten feet, 3 being gal. kerosene. the same more

Al-

or less, The to diary the northwest of another corner anonymous

leased person to Elisa recorded: Craw; then Jan on the 1,

of a

lot

west 1888 line Rained of said all Craw day. a Hugh southwesterly

in evening. course, hundred thirty-five feet

here

to a A. stake M. and Cowles stones; thence recorded a westerly

his diary: course January sixteen feet 1, 1898: to a stake The

in

and snow stones; that thence fell a yesterday southwesterly has

course been piled in a direct in heaps range last with night the

west and end the of wind said is store, still forth blowing. three

and I could a half not feet get to the home northwest last night corner

for of the the snow said store; was then drifted. along Mr. the

west Whitehead end of said and story myself to the played place 5

of games beginning, of dominoes further evidence this morning.

In being the evening made to played the original with

reference

lease Mr. given Mackey. by Lucas Mr. DeWitt, Cook to and Jacob

brother Roggen, drove March them 22, to 1809.” the house

to break Understand out the that? roads. There is much

information in deeds, but it is often

not Jan. at all 1, clear 1918: now. A If diary you have from a

map the Wade of Oak family Hill with recorded: some names Mary

attached, is with us. you We can stay perhaps in all start day. to

understand. Big Fire in Catskill 2:20 a.m.

Fortunately, Mrs. Mary D. surveyors Mattice were from

working Catskill in wrote: the area Wednesday, from early days. Jan

Maps 1,1919: were We desirable stayed enough home. Made to be

published head cheese and and a number hockeye of [a those pig

early product]. maps are available online

now. For The years New many York State Oak Archives Hill and

has Vicinity 80,000 families maps from have the 17th gone century

Florida to the in present. the winter; Of course, the Tripps, many

to

won’t the Fords, help and you, the but Wades some all likely had

will. houses in the Bradenton area.

For Today these I folks, thought the I would New write Year

about

was a

some

time to

of

go

the

south.

maps

A

I

series

have

found

of diaries

useful

written

in doing

by

local

the

historical

Wade

family

research.

give

These

an idea

are

of

not

what

the only

the

maps

New

that

York

are

folks

available

did in

and

Florida:

if you

have

Gainesville

found others

Fla

that

Jan

are especial-

1, 1925.

ly useful, I hope you will share that

information.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

The T. back Morris of the dustjacket Longstreet of Brooks in 1918 Atkinson’s book pictures him and tells about

wrote: his many “Maps achievements. are as invaluable as

meals to any person who intends

to enjoy the Catskill Country. The

legend of the largescale masterpieces

is a fascinating short story to the

man who walks.”

The government maps show every

trail, every road, every roadside

house, streamlet, ford, and spring.

In planning out the day’s progress

they will inform you as to whether

you will find secondary roads or the

superior roads of the state. With the

contour lines and a compass, crosswoods

travel becomes secure. Every

vagary of the slope, each knoll,

each rill of water, is there to identify

your location. Geological survey

Mary Wade of Oak Hill was one of the many area people who went to Florida each

maps are available online and in

winter. Some visited; others retired there. Most people drove from the Catskills to

hard copy.

Florida, and there are numerous accounts of their trips which took several days

There are three, really two, early

and possibly car repairs along the way.

maps I go to regularly looking for

answers to social history questions.

ma critic for the “New York

Times,” and Pulitzer CONTRIBUTED Prize-winning

an author idea of who how had these a properties

PHOTO

The earliest map I have a scan

This map, produced as a fundraiser by local students, is fun, attractive and provides

of in my files is the 1829 Map of

house in

were viewed.

Greene County NY by David M.

Durham on the Susquehanna

Burr. It outlines the towns, shows

stage routes, and mentions mills

line, but they can often be found at

antique shows and flea markets.

Turnpike for many years, published

a book in 1951 called

and manufacturers. I don’t find it Another kind of map which I am

“Once Around the Sun.” It is

especially helpful because the information

is too general. However, drawn map. It will not be based on

there is an essay for every day

always looking for is a local hand-

presented in diary form in that

it does provide early information. surveys but on the memories of the

of the year.

The map that is often referred person making the map. It is somewhat

akin to a diary that provides

residents, but today I want to

Some essays describe local

to as the Geil Map of 1856 is one

I go to regularly. That map was

local details not well known. The

share his philosophical comments

on January 1, 1951. He

published in Philadelphia and is described

as a general-content county

OVERBAUGH details may not be totally accurate,

but if you are looking for the house

map showing towns,

was in New York City that day.

DUMPSTERS

rural buildings

and householders’ names. It was

a family lived in at a certain time,

His musings seem relevant for

hand-colored to emphasize town

you can sometimes find the answer

today: “New Year’s Day. The

boundaries and areas. Available here. Coupled with information

new year comes in with a sting.

through the Library of Congress, from deeds, these are helpful in telling

Available the story of your property.

ing at a freezing temperature

New York is alarmed. Rain fall-

the Geil Map 15-Yard can be found Dumpsters by

searching The dress Helen Map Mark Tripp of Greene wrote Overbaugh about County, A map I recently came across

in her diary - Greenville

would likely have been similar to those worn by the Tripp ladies in this picture. has covered the sidewalks with

N.Y. They prided Geil 1856. themselves Very on helpful their a hard glaze. Speaking over the

518-947-9981

fashionable is the was the Historic Resources Map

attire, made mostly at home. At that period of time, the local stores sold yard

option good and to notions. zoom into Some sections ladies in to town get from the Durham Valley Scenic

had a dressmaker come to stay for a week or so to make their new gowns.

city radio the mayor personally

an enlarged view of the area you are Byway Corridor Management Plan.

warns motorists to keep off the

researching. Mr. and Mrs. Bates, Nelson and It Had shows dinner scenic at home. byways, Junior rivers with and Thurs. Jan 2. John went on

icy streets. The Weather Bureau

forecasts a heavy snow-

I ate The our next New map Year’s you will dinner certainlgether

want to outside look at is our the tents F.W. Beers placies,

[country conservation club?] Building easements, for state the another lovely day starting to

to-

streams, us. There Catskill was a dinner Park at boundar-

the CC the road I did chores, washed,

ing our tables together. (Menu: Tourists but we did not go. The rain at night. Reggie Fowler

storm tonight. At the moment,

Atlas of Greene County 1867. This forests, historic structures, historic

fricasseed chicken, sweet and holidays passed off very pleasantly.

Thunder showers later Friday, Jan 3. Johns home, it warm and we begin the new

broke his leg at Newells.

the year looks bright…. we are

is probably the best known of the buildings, historic districts, historic

white potatoes, cucumber pickles,

chili reprinted; sauce, many creamed people onions, have evening.

rained all day. John went with year triumphantly. The worst

early local maps. Copies have been roads, potential historic farms, potential

historic roads and archeolog-

widely

parts green framed peas, in sweet their corn, homes. celery, The Jan 1, 1939: callers this afternoon.

went to Helens.

does. Not many of us in Ameri-

Floyd Nickerson after hay. I can happen; occasionally it

ically sensitive areas. It includes insets

of Cornwallville, East Durham,

original cranberries maps sauce. were in Coffee color. Hope Lemon

pies.) Press The published men washed reprints the in Jan 2 this is our 56th wedding Saturday Jan 4: Lovely ca are prepared for it, for we do

Farm

Durham and Oak Hill from the 1867

1976 dishes in black for us. and Mrs. white. Bates and anniversary. Quite a change between

then and now

I went to Middleburg got our cheerfully assume that in some

day just like spring. Helen and not believe it in our bones. We

Beers map. It shows the locations of

I called The Beers on 1867 Mrs. map Harder has been from

digitized Hudson by on the this Vedder camp. Library in

the schools,

Jan 1, 1940:

the stone

Mr.

arch

and

bridges,

Mrs. money from Clarence, came mystic way love conquers all,

Coxsackie Jan 1, 1928: and is Spend available the online. day a

West

Palmer,

Durham,

Mrs.

South

Lasher,

Durham,

Nelson

Hervey

back by way of Potter Hollow. the good outweighs evil in the

Copies home. are Bates also are available away the for week purchase

end. Mr. at the and library. Mrs. I Lasher find this called map ham ist Club and the Rooms. cemeteries. A very nice about 4 oclock had a hay ride that at the eleventh hour some-

and

Street,

I had our

Centerville,

dinner at

East

the

Wind-

Tour-

Stopped at Ethel Bates got home just balances of the universe and

especially this afternoon. useful because We spend it has village

spare inserts time for writing Oak Hill, letters. Durham, Nel-

of for Durham the club Connect about is preparing 230 were an Hand-drawn Sunday maps Jan are 5: Just somewhat a perfect like a diary, will presenting prevent information the worst remem-

before

our turkey The dinner Historical gotten Working on purpose Group through the woods.

thing gloriously CONTRIBUTED triumphant PHOTO

Cornwallville son goes to church. and East Durham online there. map Price showing 80 cents. historical The locationness

within meeting Durham. at 7:00, The group then an is John walked to Elmers. Geil, of the world’s experience our

busibered

day Very by a local icy resident, rained last information night. that it may happens. not be available In the austere in a book. light

that Deland list names Fla: of Jan businesses 1, 1930 and A

business very lovely owners, day. information Need no useful

Wash in a this variety am; of take ways. a nap this afcal

and cartographer. card playing. While Mr. the and project Mrs. milk.

ternoon. And go with the and depressions strike us down,

fire. fortunate entertainment to include and Jeff refreshments Bliss, a lo-

K.O. and Cecile was down after optimism is naïve. When wars

I’ve also used the map to Lashers

early to see school the districts, Glorified their Ameri-

num-

the plan You is can to have see the an online New York map Mary Wade, wife of Leslie

find is Howards still in the came development this afternoon. stages,

the

we are shocked, incredulous,

bers and unprepared. But cautious

can Girl. and where the schoolhouses that folks anyone had can a access wide online. circle of Wade, lived in the Green Revival

house in Oak Hill. She

calculations bore us; they have

Mon-Fri were 7:30-6 1934: located. · Sat Deland, 8-5 Comparing · Sun Fla. 9-2 We the go 1856 out friends, There are lots also of tax activities, maps, driving and

Geil such a dismal appearance and

for dinner map and and the go 1867 to the Beers movies map tour warm maps, weather. a map published Some of by them Cairo-Durham

stayed a few High months School students and then – January 1, 1946 and record-

became the Durham Town Clerk

will sound. To Americans optimism

in afternoon. show changes Mr. in and property Mrs. owners

Kipp

from

as well

Orange

additions

City

to

call

the towns.

in the returned north. Others made ed in her diary: We have Town

is a more congenial attitude. It

I could go on and on, but you get

This

evening.

is also

Tooldie

the map

seems

usually

some

cited

Florida their permanent home. Clerk’s office and had the safe

may be even more than that: it

the idea; I have a sizable folder of

and

better

reproduced

today. 80

in

in

articles

the shade.

and studies.

Another diary which has etc. moved to our house. Wrote

may be creative. For all that I

local maps.

Jan 1, 1935: A lovely day. no name identifying its owner, a few licenses. Stayed home for know at the moment, ‘Happy

For later research I find maps

As an earlier writer commented,

We call on Mr. and Mrs. Vincent written in an O-K Seal Theme New Year’s Day.

New Year’ may be nothing less

published by local town and fire

“A map has a purpose and an audience.

Its purpose may be as broad as

and the Hacks. Have our dinner

at home. Spend our evening is titled “My Diary for 1936.” Town Papers, etc. Had to get gins one more journey around

Tablet is one of my favorites. It Jan. 2: got desk ready for than prophecy as the world be-

companies useful because they

show road names, some of which teaching the major physical and political

features of the entire world, or

with Mr. and Mrs. Luke

Wed. Jan 1 --1936: Geils, new battery for car. Pop [Leslie] the sun.”

have been changed today and many

Jan 2. Three callers. Nice John and I were to Flossies & got all the Town Clerk material Columnist Mary Lou Nahas

of which I am not familiar with as narrow as convincing a neighbor

day. Our anniversary. Hacks for Harris. A beautiful day. Came in order for me. Not much business

yet.

an. She lives in Oak Hill, thus

is the Town of Durham Histori-

when I find them referenced in an to move a fence. The audience may

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

the evening.

back and stopped at Golda’s,

article or deed. I am not aware of be as broad as the general public or The 1856 Geil map, available online, is easy to use and full of detail and

any

Jan.

of these

1,

which

1938:

are

A

available

lovely day.

on-

as

they

narrow

were

as

sawing

a single

ice.

person.” even

Brooks

drawings

Atkinson,

of buildings.

the dra-

the name of her column.

Greenville Auto & Truck Parts

4979 Route 81, Greenville · 518-966-5344

The 1829 map by Burr provides early information.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The role of maps in finding

historical answers

The front of the “Once Around the Sun” dust jacket is typical of illustration in 1951

when it was published. The book sold for $4.

The Tripps had a house in Bradenton, where the whole family visited. I U was in

fact living there when he died, but his body was returned to Oak Hill for burial in

the Oak Hill Cemetery. They were members of the Bradenton Country Club.


The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022 13

The Magic

Ball Trilogy

written by Steve Trout, former Yankee player

Buddy the baseball –

Magic, wisdom & friendship, part 3

Back in his room Billy looked at his baseball gear and put it in the

closet.

“Practice.”

Billy looked at Buddy, nodded his head, grabbed his baseball bag

and headed to the backyard. He set up the net to practice throwing,

then hitting. He also threw his ball against a brick wall to work on his

fielding. He saw his mom looking out the window and giving him a

thumbs up. He returned the thumbs up.

She came out onto the porch. “Billy,” she said, “you got a ‘B’ on

your math test, you caught a big fish. You went out and practiced

baseball. And you took out the garbage. Oh, and your room is clean.”

“Mom, you went in my room?”

“Yes, just to close the window because it was going to rain. Oh, and I

took the old dirty baseball and threw it away.”

“What? Oh, no!” Just then he heard the garbage truck. Billy yelled

out the window, “Hey, stop!” The garbage man didn’t hear Billy. Billy

sprinted down to stairs to the curb and just as Buddy was about to

be crushed, Billy pulled him out of the truck.

“Hey, kid! Are you crazy? You almost lost your arm for that old ball!”

the man yelled.

“If you love something, it’s worth it,” Billy told him.

Then he said, “Mom, never ever touch Buddy again.”

“You even have a name for the ball?” she asked. “Is he like a friend?”

“Yes, I never told you about this, but I found

Buddy in the woods when I was looking for

my home run ball. He’s very special to me.”

He looked at Buddy, “I don’t know what I’d

do if you got destroyed. You’re magic to

me.”

The real magic is in you.”

During recess at school the

next day Billy sat on a swing and

watched the other kids playing soccer.

He thought of what Buddy would say: “Go play. Make some

friends. Get into the action.” He jumped off the swing in mid-air and

went over to where the others were playing soccer.

“Hey, Billy, we were hoping you would come over and join us,” one of

the kids said.

“Really? I don’t know how to play soccer,” Billy replied.

“Heck, we just kick the ball and have some fun,” Sammy said.

Billy said to himself, “I thought they didn’t like me, but they do.”

“Come play tomorrow with us.” Liz smiled at him.

“Oh, my gosh, Liz just asked me to play with them tomorrow,” Billy

thought.

Billy took Buddy out of his pocket and held him in his hand. “Things

have really changed for me since I started listening to you. What if I

didn’t save you from the garbage truck? How would I continue with

all the great things I’m learning from you?”

“It’s inside of you. Our secret,” Buddy reminded him.

The next day Billy went to the sporting goods store to buy some new

shoes for soccer. On the way out, he bought a plastic ball holder for

Buddy. “Buddy, I’m going to live with all the great things you have

taught me, and I believe that magic comes in many different ways.”

“Magic is everywhere if you look for it and believe in it,” Buddy said.

Once he was back at home in his room, Billy put Buddy in his new

plastic case, gave him a smile and a kiss and promised to always

have him in his life.

Just then, the doorbell rang. He heard his mom yell “You’re home!”

Billy ran down the stairs and there was his dad. He jumped into his

arms.

Read the next installment in the next Greenville Pioneer!

SPONSORED BY:

Debra Danner, Catskill Regional Manager

CBPP Greenville Office 11573 State Route 32 Unit 8B Greenville NY 12083 • CBPrime.com • 518-966-4900

I wanted to thank everyone within the Ravena / Coeymans /

Selkirk communities for their continued support over the last

year. It has been difficult at times but we have managed to get

through it and provide a helpful community service. We are back

to regular business hours Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm / Sat 10am - 3pm

/ Closed on Sundays

Currently, with the volume of bottles and cans we are only

taking drop offs - bring in your empties, place them in a designated

area, we take your name and then give you the earliest time

frame to come back or any time thereafter to collect your money.

Since opening in July 2018, we have helped raise approximately

$52,500, which is almost 924,000 bottles/cans for 50 different

organizations which anyone can donate to.

We look forward to servicing the community in the future.

If you have any questions regarding operation, donations or

fundraisers please reach out....

Shane DeCrescenzo

Just Makes Cents

Bottle & Can Redemption Center

518-577-3084

Justmakescents6@gmail.com


14 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022

BUDGET, from page 1

ized in March.

One area that may also change is debt

service, or money the district pays on its

debts.

“Our existing debt service payments,

we know the actual amounts for the 2022-

23 school year, but in May we are going to

put a bus referendum that we propose on

the main ballot, so for the numbers that are

in the debt service line, I have estimates,”

she added.

There are also estimates for revenue the

district expects to collect, with a big chunk

of that the unknown amounts coming from

the state, which won’t be known until later

this year.

“On the revenue side, the large factor

will be our state aid projections for the

2022-23 school year and the tax cap calculation,”

Maassmann said. “April 1 is the

deadline to adopt the state budget. At that

point we will make any necessary adjustments

to our projections.”

Under the rollover budget, administrative

costs are expected to show the biggest

increase.

The administrative component had an

increase of 2.66%,” Maassmann said. “The

administrative component consists of administration

of the schools, clerical staff,

school board costs, central data processing,

BOCES administrative costs, research,

planning and evaluation.”

The second largest jump in expenses

comes from capital costs.

The capital component has a 2.24%

increase,” Maassmann said. “This is the

maintenance and custodial staff, debt service,

facilities, utilities costs, service contracts,

maintenance and repairs, and general

insurance.”

The program component of the rollover

budget shows a 1.27% increase, Maassmann

said, which includes salaries and

benefits for teachers and staff; delivering

services like health, guidance, the library

and athletics; textbooks; instructional materials;

equipment; extracurricular student

activities; BOCES program costs; and

transportation.

The board of education will next review

the specific components of the rollover

budget and fine tune them. The program

component will be discussed at the board’s

Feb. 28 budget workshop at 6 p.m. Capital

and administrative components of the budget

will be reviewed March 7 at 6 p.m.

The proposed budget will be voted on

by the board April 11 at 6 p.m.

Voters will have their say on the budget,

propositions on the ballot and board

of education elections on Tuesday, May 3.

Voting will take place 1-9 p.m. in the Ellis

Elementary School cafeteria.

The budget is expected to change between

now and the final budget voted on by

the board of education.

GROOMER, from page 1

local news

YOU NEED & TRUST

ALL IN ONE PLACE!

Visit Us Now:

TheUpstater.com

ting their nails or trimming around the face. I

can be around dogs, I just can’t be blow drying

certain breeds.”

Dogs of Greenville offers services for all

kinds of canines.

“This is a full-service grooming salon

so we do nails, baths, haircuts, ear cleaning,

brush-outs,” Tambasco said. “I am trained in

all breed cuts, so I can groom any breed.”

Tambasco and VanZutphen have lived

in Greenville for the past 10 years and when

they made the decision to open their own

business, they “wanted to be close to home,”

they said.

“Our sons go to Greenville schools, so it

is nice to be close to the schools,” VanZutphen

said.

Anyone interested in scheduling a

grooming session for more than a quick nail

trimming should call the salon for an appointment.

“Stop in and try us out,” Tambasco said.

“We have a varying schedule. I book to

people’s needs, but for the most part we are

open Monday to Thursday from 8:15 a.m. to

whenever. And then every other Sunday.”

In addition to some Sunday hours, Tambasco

can also be available evenings to accommodate

working individuals, she said.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Autumn Tambasco with one of her “customers.”

www.facebook.com/

GreenvillePioneer

TCI of New York Gives Back

Strong belief in an obligation to the larger community

By Mark Westcott

January 14, 2022

Coeymans, NY – During these trying times of the

pandemic, now more than ever it is important to

pull together to help those with need. TCI of NY is

working hard to do their part. “We have put down roots

here since moving to Coeymans in 2014,” said Brian

Hemlock, President. “We are a family-owned business

and strongly believe in our obligations to the larger

community in which we live.”

Charles Engelhardt, Pastor, Abounding Love Christian

Fellowship, runs the Kindness for Kids summer lunch

program to help meet the nutritional needs of children

in the RCS community during the summer. He said,

The meal plans provided during the school year are not

available during July and August. We provided nearly

4,000 healthy lunches over the past two years. It would

not have been possible without TCI’s support.”

John Barr, TCI’s Operations Manager said, “Too many

people face hunger every day. We decided to step up to

do something about it.”

Kindness for Kids is staffed 100% by volunteers and

100% of the contributions go to feeding the kids.

Contact Pastor Kate at 518-588-6681 if you’d like to

help.

The Ravena News Herald and The Greenville Pioneer

work with local organizations including TCI on the Feed

a Mind, Feed a Family program that delivered over 120

Turkey Dinners to local families at Thanksgiving. “It’s

about feeding people and taking a piece of our profits

and donating it back into the community,” said Warren

Dews, Publisher. Contact Warren at 413-212-0130 or

Wdewsjr@gmail.com to participate in next year’s

program.

Representatives of the organizations met at Stop

& Shop in Ravena to deliver Thanksgiving meals to

people. Each meal fed about six people. Pictured Left

to Right are Kyle Smith, Shop ‘n Save, Kathy Durivage,

RCS High School, Deputy Brian Patty, Kasey LaBarge,

RCS High School, John Barr and Brian Hemlock, TCI NY.

TCI helped the Hope Full Life Center on their Blessing

Bag Project to feed the hungry in RCS this past holiday

season. Hope Full Life Center is a charity-run food

assistance program for struggling families located in

Faith Plaza in Ravena.

“Providing extra help continues to be critical as 1 in 7

Americans are still uncertain how they will get enough

to eat for themselves and their families,” said Center

Director Rebecca Flach. “The Blessing Bags help

the Center get food into the hands of people in our

community who need it most.”

call (518) 756-9091.

— ADVERTORIAL —

Contributions from the

community and partnerships

with companies like TCI

make it possible. Go to www.

HopeFullLifeCenter.org, or

“One of the Missions of the Riverview Missionary

Baptist Church is to be a ‘Thanks-Living Church’

throughout the year,” said Antonio Booth, Co-Pastor.

“We are a group of Christians who thank God for His

blessings and share those blessings with others.”

The church mission comes to life in a variety of activities

including participating in the Town of Coeymans

Riverfest. The church set up a “blessing booth” at the

festival. TCI provided the free backpacks full of school

supplies to any student who stopped by the booth.

John Barr, Operations Manager holds up a backpack

given away free by the Riverview Missionary Baptist

Church at their Blessing Booth at the annual Riverfest

in Coeymans.

“When we first came to Coeymans the Reverends

Antonio Booth and Dr. Roxanne Jones Booth warmly

welcomed us to the community,” said Mr. Hemlock. “It

meant a lot to us. They have been a great neighbor

and we greatly appreciate the work they do in our

community.”

TCI also teams up annually to support the church block

party, annual crop walk, summer camp and pony rides.

For more information, please contact the church at

RiverviewMBC@gmail.com or call 518-756-2018.

Over the years, TCI has developed a strong partnership

with RCS High School awarding scholarships to RCS

High School Seniors and providing rewarding paid

internship opportunities. The company now employs

several former interns in good paying full-time jobs

with benefits.

Lisa Patierne, Principal at RCS, said, “Not every student

will go onto college. TCI provides students with paid

worked based learning opportunities that can lead to a

promising career.”

“This private-public partnership between TCI and

RCS is a perfect example of career exploration and

readiness that is paramount to developing a skilled

workforce” states Brian Williams, Executive Director

of the Capital Region Workforce Development Board.

Mr. Hemlock and Mr. Barr join RCS High School students

on their annual field trip to the “Trail of the Fallen” to

honor those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice for

our nation. Located near West Point the students

participate in a day-long team-building exercise with

military staff. TCI sponsored part of the trip.

RCS students at the

top of the hike. There

is an ever-expanding

mound of stones,

benches, and painted

rocks placed in memorial to the lives lost during military

conflicts. The students decorated four rocks of their

own and took turns carrying them up to the memorial.

“It is important that we as a country and a community,

remember and appreciate all of those who have served

in the United States Armed Forces,” said Mr. Hemlock.

“We have both active and retired military working at

TCI.”


The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022 15

PROJECT, from page 1

equipment align better with the

district’s educational, technological

and safety standards, according to a

newsletter released by the district in

January.

“Our school district is the center

of our community,” District

Superintendent Michael Wetherbee

said. “Not only does this project

create a great sense of pride within

our schools, but it is providing

much-needed upgrades that will

allow for increased community access

and enhanced educational facilities

for our students.”

The project includes classroom

renovations, centralized services,

community spaces, a new media

center, improved athletic facilities,

parking lot improvements, installation

of air conditioning at the elementary

school, and general repairs

and maintenance.

In phase 1 of the project, a new

state-of-the-art media center was

constructed at the middle/high

school, including seating areas, new

equipment and collaborative workspaces.

The facility includes amenities

like three “breakout” rooms

where students can work individually

or in groups, built-in charging

ports for laptop computers, and five

rows of Mac desktop computers

available for student use.

Classroom and office spaces

were constructed behind the

auditorium for use by the music,

visual arts and music technology

programs. Classroom spaces were

also built to accommodate the district’s

growing distance-learning

program, in which students can take

online classes in schools around the

region, such as computer science

and American Sign Language, according

to the district.

Two science classrooms saw

renovations to lab tables, cabinets

and seating that hadn’t been updated

since the 1970s. Wash stations,

hazard hoods and chemical storage

spaces were also added to the classrooms.

The middle/high school entrance

was reconfigured into a single

point of entry for both schools

and the main offices and transportation

office were relocated to a suite

near the new main entrance.

Other improvements completed

under phase 1 were resurfacing and

reconfiguration of the parking lots,

with a revised traffic flow pattern.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The district’s capital project is now in phase 2A of construction. Pictured is

seating in the completed media center.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The school’s media center was recreated in the multi-year capital project in

the Cairo-Durham Central School District.

A new Student Services Center

was also created where guidance

counselors and social workers are

located.

The elementary school front

parking lot was also expanded to

provide an additional 29 parking

spots and air conditioning was

installed inside the building. Improvements

were made to the health

office to meet accessibility needs,

including widened doorways to accommodate

wheelchairs, and two

girls’ bathrooms were renovated.

The next phase of the capital

project, phase 2A, is now underway.

During this phase, the middle/

high school health office will be relocated

to a central location — it is

currently in the middle school. The

change will make the health office

more accessible to both middle and

high schoolers, according to the district.

The old high school main office,

guidance office and faculty

workroom are being converted into

information technology and custodial

storage spaces, as well as new

learning spaces for a variety of educational

programs.

Outside, the track will be resurfaced

to repair cracks, a project

that is not expected to interfere with

the district’s spring sports season.

Some spaces will be reconfigured to

provide more space for use by the

soccer and football teams.

After phase 2A is completed,

phase 2B is expected to last through

summer of this year.

Under phase 2B, the space

where the old health office was

located will be renovated and will

house Pupil Personnel Services and

the Curriculum and Instruction offices.

A pair of boys’ bathrooms at

the elementary school will be renovated

over the summer, and asbestos

abatement will be conducted

over the summer as well.

The final phase will also include

renovations to more classrooms,

including two science classrooms

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The media center provides ample space and resources for students to learn

and explore.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The redesigned visitor parking lot loop outside the middle/high school.

that haven’t been renovated since

the building was first constructed in

1976, as well as updates to an art/

technology room at the high school.

A fitness center, which will be

open to the community and the

district’s physical education classes,

will be built where the middle

school cafeteria is now located. The

fitness center will include a separate

entrance where community

members will be able to enter when

school is not in session. With the

middle school cafeteria’s removal,

a second serving line will be added

to the high school cafeteria to accommodate

students in grades 6-12,

according to the district.

The project is under budget as a

result of contractor bids that came

in lower than expected, so the Cairo-Durham

Board of Education is

looking to reassess the scope of the

work to add items originally excluded

due to cost constraints.

The district has an opportunity

to augment the capital improvement

project with items that were

cut from the original scope due to

budgetary concerns,” Wetherbee

said. “The board decided to use the

remaining bond funds to address

other health and safety items as well

as enhancements to our facilities

without any additional tax impact.”

Additional work at the middle/

high school that will be added to the

project include refurbishing the auditorium’s

sound system; purchasing

wall mats for the gymnasium;

replacing the gym’s audio system;

adding lights to the athletic field;

and creating a classroom for Family

and Consumer Science courses.

At the elementary school, outdated

and unusable locker rooms will be

upgraded.

The additional bond funds will

also be used to replace water pipes

at the middle/high school that date

back to 1976, and replace the floor

in the high school cafeteria’s kitchen

and serving areas.

The capital project was originally

slated for completion in September

2022, however with the

additional work the district now

expects the project to continue into

the 2022-23 school year, according

to the district.

AUTO TECHNICIAN

FULL TIME - ESSENTIAL BUSINESS

We are looking for a responsible Auto Technician to perform all assigned vehicle repairs and

maintenance work in accordance with dealership and factory standards.

Peace

of Mind

General Auto Technician Qualifications

• Carrying out repairs and replacing damaged parts.

• Testing motor vehicles and equipment.

• Diagnosing the cause of any malfunctions.

• Carrying out inspections of completed repairs to ensure that the vehicle is safe to be driven.

• Returning a customer’s vehicle to them in clean condition.

• Road testing vehicles, inspecting, and testing mechanical units.

• Following a checklist to ensure that all key work has been done.

• Checking engine lights, air bag systems, transmission fluids and filters.

• Following safety policies and procedures

• Assisting in assembling cars and trucks.

• Maintaining an organized neat and safe bay.

• Must have a valid NYS License and clean record.

Key Skills and Competencies

• Capable of working on foreign and domestic vehicles.

• Experience operating all types of vehicles and transportation equipment.

• Able to use Snap-On diagnostic equipment.

• Performing work efficiently and effectively.

• Superb mechanical aptitude, manual dexterity, and attention to detail.

Job Overview

C.A. Albright & Sons, LLC has been in operation for over 110 years. We have an immediate

opening for a dynamic person to help us keep growing. 2020 was a big year for the company

with the launch of a Propane division which has propelled the company into a new market and

immediate new customer growth. If you are excited to be part of a winning team, C.A. Albright &

Sons, LLC is a perfect place to get ahead and call home. Room for advancement!

To Apply

After careful consideration of this position as described and required qualifications, if you feel

that this job could be an excellent fit for you and are looking for a company to call home, please

direct your resume and references to Randy@CA-Albright.com.

GENERAL LABORER

FULL TIME POSITION - ESSENTIAL BUSINESS

We are looking for a General Laborer to take up manual labor tasks along with a variety of other

tasks that are directed their way. One of the most important skills that the candidate should have

is the ability to multi-task in a fast-paced multi-industry environment.

General Labor Qualifications

• Cleaning: Ensure all waste containers are emptied, sweeping, mopping, dusting, bathrooms

• Loading and uploading materials and equipment, when needed

• Assist with Propane sets

• Assist HVAC

• Assist Automotive

• Must be able to lift and carry 20Ibs plus at times

• Performs various physical duties as assigned

• Moving tools, equipment, or other material as directed by management

• Ability to safely operate various vehicles and equipment, when needed

• Must have a valid driver’s license

Job Overview

C.A. Albright & Sons, LLC has been in operation for over 110 years. We have an immediate

opening for a dynamic person who will help us keep growing. 2020 was a big year for the

company with the launch of the Propane division which has propelled the company into a new

market and immediate new customer growth. If you are excited to be part of a winning team,

C.A. Albright & Sons, LLC is a perfect place to get ahead and call home. Room for advancement!

To Apply

After careful consideration of this position as described and required qualifications, if you feel

that this job could be an excellent fit for you and are looking for a company to call home, please

direct your resume and references to Randy@CA-Albright.com.

13640 RT 9W • P.O. BOX 11 • HANNACROIX, NY 12087

PHONE: 518-756-3127 • FAX: 518-756-2900 • WWW.CA-ALBRIGHT.COM

Family Owned with more than 500

Employees across our affiliated

companies. TCI of NY is proud to be in

Coeymans creating good paying jobs.

What We Do:

TCI of NY recycles transformers and other oil-filled electrical equipment in a

safe and environmentally responsible manner. Our customers include some of

the largest utilities in the world, as well as private businesses and homeowners.

More than 99 percent of the material we process is recycled, refurbished and

serviced for beneficial reuse.

Regulatory Oversight:

Our operations are monitored and overseen by the U.S. Environmental

Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Transportation, the New York

State Department of Environmental Conservation, and the New York State

Department of Health. We are subject to annual and unannounced, unscheduled

inspections. We take pride in our Occupational Health, Safety and Training

programs, and our record of strict compliance with all applicable state and

federal regulations, including the submission of annual inventory reports to

local emergency management authorities.

Emissions and Discharges:

Our self-contained processes produce no air emissions or wastewater

discharges into local water bodies.

Call us at 518-756-9997

99 Coeymans Industrial Park Lane • Coeymans, NY 12045 • (518) 756-9997


16 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022

Blood, platelet

donations critically

needed amid

blood crisis

ALBANY — While there

has been a significant and encouraging

response to the dire

need for blood across the nation,

the American Red Cross

needs more people to give in

the weeks ahead to recover

from its worst blood shortage

in more than a decade.

Those interested in helping

are urged to schedule the

earliest available blood or

platelet donation appointment

in their area to help ensure accident

victims rushed to the

emergency room, those being

treated for cancer and others

who count on blood product

transfusions can receive lifesaving

care without delay.

Since the Red Cross issued

its first-ever blood crisis

alert, severe winter weather

has further complicated efforts

to rebuild the blood supply.

Hundreds of blood drives

have been canceled across the

country due to winter storms

in January, forcing about

6,500 blood and platelet donations

to go uncollected.

As February begins and

the effects from the spread of

the omicron variant and winter

weather persist, people are

urged to make an appointment

now to give blood or platelets

in the weeks ahead by using

the Red Cross Blood Donor

App, visiting RedCrossBlood.

org or calling 1-800-RED-

CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

Those who come to give

blood or platelets Feb. 1-28,

will receive a $10 Amazon.

com Gift Card via email,

thanks to Amazon.

During this challenging

time, the Red Cross is also

actively recruiting blood-collection

employees and blooddrive

volunteers who play

vital roles in supporting the

nation’s blood supply.

To learn more about employee

opportunities in the

Eastern New York Region,

visit redcross.org/careers. For

volunteer opportunities, visit

redcross.org/volunteertoday.

Each Red Cross blood

drive and donation center follows

the highest standards of

safety and infection control,

and additional precautions –

including face masks for donors

and staff, regardless of

vaccination status – have been

implemented to help protect

the health of all those in attendance.

Donors are asked to

schedule an appointment prior

to arriving at the drive.

Donors can also save up to

15 minutes at the blood drive

by completing a RapidPass.

With RapidPass, donors complete

the pre-donation reading

and health history questionnaire

online, on the day of donation,

from a mobile device

or computer. To complete

a RapidPass, follow the instructions

at RedCrossBlood.

org/RapidPass or use the Red

Cross Blood Donor App.

To donate blood, individuals

need to bring a blood donor

card or driver’s license or

two other forms of identification

that are required at checkin.

Individuals who are 17

years of age in most states (16

with parental consent where

allowed by state law), weigh

at least 110 pounds and are

in generally good health may

be eligible to donate blood.

High school students and

other donors 18 years of age

and younger also must meet

certain height and weight requirements.

Dumpster Rentals Made Easy!

Commercial & Residential

• Construction • Demolition • Roofing • Clean-Out Work

Cartaway, LLC is located in Glenmont, NY

518-439-0533

REBECCA’S

SPECIAL OLYMPICS DREAM

to go to Orlando in

June 2022 has come true!

Valentine’s Day event:

Petals for Paws

HUDSON — Florist Elegant

Floral Creations by Amy will

be teaming up with the Columbia-Greene

Humane Society/

SPCA (CGHS) to help raise

funds for the shelter’s programs

and services that serve more

than 5,000 animals each year.

For every Valentine’s Day

flower arrangement that is ordered

on or before Feb. 11, 25%

of the sale will be donated to

CGHS (orders by phone must

specify PETALS FOR PAWS).

Valentine’s Day Arrangements

may be delivered within

the approved area (vicinity of

Copake, NY - please contact Elegant

Floral Creations by Amy

for details at 518-329-4031) or

you can pick up your arrangements

at CGHS, 111 Humane

Society Road, Hudson, NY, on

Saturday, Feb. 12, from noon to

3 p.m.

Valentine’s Day arrangements

available for the PET-

ALS FOR PAWS event are as

follows:

- Mini 2.5” Novelty Hoya

Heart Plant in a ceramic container

($25)

- 6” mix succulent garden

with pink flowering Kalanchoe

($35)

- Pink or peach monochromatic

Designer’s Choice Floral

Design in white birch container

($55)

- Wrapped dozen red roses

with filler ($65)

- Wrapped dozen pink (or

mix) roses with filler ($60)

- Dozen red roses in vase

New York high school seniors who are graduating

and interested in pursuing a career in agriculture

can apply for New York Farm Bureau’s

Agricultural Youth Scholarship.

Eligible students can use the financial award

for college or advanced training in the skilled

trades. Statewide winners can earn up to $3,000

towards their future education.

The applicant or their family must be a New

York Farm Bureau member, and the student must

live and/or work a farm or be involved with agriculture

in the state.

The student must also complete the application,

which includes writing an essay addressing

what they value and stand for in agriculture and

life and how these values have impacted their decision

to pursue an agricultural career.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Petals for Paws, a Valentine’s Day fundraiser, will benefit the shelter animals

at the Columbia-Greene Humane Society.

with filler ($85)

- Dozen pink (or mix) roses

in vase with filler ($80)

To view samples of the arrangements

above, you may

visit the CGHS Facebook page

or visit www.elegantfloralcreationsbyamy.com.

To order, please call 518-

329-4031 or visit the website

above. When calling, you must

specify you are participating in

the PETALS FOR PAWS event.

Each order will contain a Valentine’s

Day card and envelope

(florist size). All botanicals will

have a packet of floral food.

Vases will all be clear glass

(vase designs will be boxed

for travel) and plants will have

drainage saucers if needed.

New York Farm Bureau seeking

scholarship applicants

Scoring will determine both county and district

winners and may include a personal interview.

Each district winner will receive $250 and

then compete for one of two state scholarships

worth $3,000 and $2,000, based on their submitted

applications. Applications must be submitted

by March 1, and the judging will take place prior

to April 20.

For more information, including the online

application, go to New York Farm Bureau’s website

at www.nyfb.org. The scholarship information

and web-based application can be found under

“Promotion and Education” in the programs

section of the website.

You can also call the New York Farm Bureau

office at 1-800-342-4143 for more information.

Thank You

to everyone who purchased one of her

handmade bracelets or made donation through

any of the community fundraising events.

SPECIFICALLY, WE WOULD LIKE TO THANK:

• Village of Ravena and staff

• Coeymans Fire Co. Auxiliary

• VFW Auxiliary

The Senior Projects

• Coeymans Farmers Market

• Shop & Save

• J&A Masonry

We are truly overwhelmed by the

generosity this community has shown.


The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022 17

St-Cath_Kinship Care_6-21_Layout 1 6/30/2021 2:37 PM Page 1

Living on Purpose

At his voice, the storm became a whisper

By Dr. Billy Holland

For Capital Region Independent Media

I spend a lot of time writing,

and I try to present a balance of

optimism and reality.

This is becoming more difficult

as we are constantly bombarded

with so many things we do not

understand. Even more disturbing

is to consider how much negativity

is going on that we are not

aware of. I’m not implying that we

anticipate evil behind every bush

or under every rock, but my convictions

accept our need to pray

for spiritual discernment.

I’ve had conversations with

individuals who believe that more

information is depressing and

brings them into a higher level of

anxiety. I understand. The idea of

knowing less is an attitude that

many are choosing to embrace

for the sake of their health and

well-being.

As a minister, I certainly do not

want to add more burdens to the

worries and concerns we already

struggle with, but learning how to

process and manage our thoughts

is a key to walking in a stronger

faith. Whether we decide to face it

or not, we are in a deadly spiritual

war and God’s people are called to

be His front-line soldiers.

We’ve all had our share of disappointments

and it’s painful, to

say the least. Personal problems

with finances, health issues and

stressful relationships take a heavy

toll on us. Many try to escape from

the suffering with temporary distractions,

but they are just instruments

of denial.

We can hide behind our fantasies

and pleasures for a while but

eventually, we are forced to return

to the reality of our situation.

The good news is these cycles

can be broken when the desire to

be set free becomes greater than

the desire to stay on the emotional

merry-go-round. So, how can we

overcome and claim victory? The

first step to walking in the peace

that passes all understanding is to

make sure our relationship with

Christ is where it should be.

Each person lives on a unique

spiritual level when it comes to

being in love with Jesus and I pray

that all will come to know God

while there is an open window of

His grace. If we ask Him to save

us, He will, and if we are saved,

we can repent and be restored into

a glorious fellowship with Him.

“For he says, in the time of my

favor I heard you, and in the day

of salvation I helped you. I tell

you, now is the time of God’s favor,

now is the day of salvation” II

Corinthians 6:2.

I’m not trying to be a bearer

of gloom, but I believe many

things are coming that will be

very disturbing. Sadly, there has

been much deception and we have

only seen the tip of the iceberg.

The more truth that is revealed the

more we need to be careful about

who we trust.

We are told in II Timothy

chapter 4 there are seducing spirits

and doctrines of devils that are

attempting to sear our conscience

like a hot iron. Matthew chapter

24 warns us about false prophets

and how sin will increase and

love will decrease. Luke chapter

21 also mentions shocking events

that will come upon the earth and

how people’s hearts will fail them

from fear.

We look around today and ask

ourselves, what did we think the

end times would look like?

Listen, my brothers and sisters,

the perfect love that casts out fear

is centered in our passionate love

for God. How can we love God

with all of our hearts if we do not

know Him? When we truly know

Him, we can place our trust in

Him completely and will be able

in His strength to endure whatever

happens.

I encourage you today to invest

more time with God. We can

be as close to Him as we want.

Turn your attention away from the

voices of chaos and confusion and

allow Him to prepare your heart

and renew your mind with His

thoughts.

In our search for truth, remember

He is the way, the truth,

and the life. May we allow His

personal instructions to bring protection,

wisdom, purity, hope and

encouragement into our lives so

we can abide in the peace and joy

of knowing that all is well with our

soul.

Then they cried out to the

Lord in their trouble, and he

brought them out of their distress.

He stilled the storm to a whisper;

the waves of the sea were hushed.”

Psalm 107:28-29.

Read more about the Christian

life at billyhollandministries.com.

Because you care!

Sometimes, things don’t always work out at home for a child.

New York’s Office of Children and Family Services estimates that 130,000

children around the state live with a grandparent, an aunt or uncle, or other

family member. Some even live with close family friends. When a family member

or close family friend assumes the responsibility of caring for a child, that’s called

Kinship Care.

Perhaps you are a kinship care provider, or know someone who is. If you are,

you do it for all the right reasons. Because you care. But there’s good news.

St. Catherine’s Center for Children has launched a new program to support

kinship caregivers in Albany, Schenectady, Greene and Ulster Counties. The

program connects caregivers like you to a variety of community and public

support services, providing you with the tools you need to succeed. Want to learn

more? Call us at the number below, or email kinshipcare@st-cath.org

St. Catherine’s Center for Children

40 North Main Avenue, Albany, NY 12203

www.st-cath.org • 518-453-6700


18 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022

Be A Better Gardener

Selecting the best of the best

By Thomas Christopher

would perform best in average garden wilderness. Mount Cuba maintains outstanding

examples of this sort of design, flowers for sixty seconds, noting every

season; they daily observe each plant’s

For Capital Region Independent Media

conditions.

Despite his outstanding horticultural but it also includes formal gardens created pollinator that stops by during that interval.

In this way, they are testing not only

When Sam Hoadley interviewed at the expertise, Sam got the job and for almost with native plants.

Mount Cuba Center, he was told that if he three years now he has been supervising These demonstrate how natives can

was hired, he would be expected to be the

the various plants’ visual appeal and general

garden worthiness but also their value

Mount Cuba’s plant trials. He is quick to also integrate into a more controlled, domesticated

setting that would better suit

worst gardener at that renowned botanical note that most of the horticulture at this

garden of native plants in Hockessin, Delaware.

That, after all, was what the job — the highest level.

ba’s formal gardens, the native plants are

to wildlife.

500-acre, world-renowned institution is at some suburban gardeners. In Mount Cu-

All of this information is eventually

manager of Horticultural Research — was Particularly interesting are Mount Cuba’s

formal gardens. The reflex among such displays.

available, for free, in print at Mount Cuba

given all the care that one would expect in compiled into detailed reports, which are

all about.

If hired, Sam would be charged with native plants gardeners has been to design The situation is quite different in the Center, or in a digital form for download

growing native plants and their cultivars their landscapes in a naturalistic style, to trial gardens. Parallel beds accommodate

plants lined out in orderly fashion; center.org/research/trial-garden/.

at the center’s website: https://mtcuba-

side by side without coddling to see which make them look like a subtly embellished

they are mulched and weeded and staked Sam Hoadley says the data quoted in

if they threaten to sprawl into the paths. these documents represents, of course, the

Plants are also irrigated during their first experience in the Mid Atlantic Piedmont

season of growth to help them establish

region, but in comparing his results with

themselves. Thereafter, however, (a typical

trial lasts three years) they are largely

plant trials at institutions as far away as

left on their own, except for weekly inspections

to record their growth, health considerable overlap, and he would con-

the Chicago Botanic Garden, he has found

and bloom (if any). These observations sider it of relevance throughout the East

are input into tablets or smartphones right Coast.

in the garden.

Starting with a superior plant is half

The selection of plants is not random. the secret of success in the garden. For

In large part, the trial plots are a symptom

of Mount Cuba’s success. The for-

Center’s reports as essential as your fa-

this reason, I recommend the Mount Cuba

mer estate of the Copeland Family, which vorite trowel.

maintained a passionate interest in plants

For more information about this subject,

listen to my conversation with Sam

native to the region, this landscape was

formally converted to a botanical garden

in 1983.

Hoadley on the Berkshire Botanical Garden

Growing Greener podcast, at https://

At the time, Mount Cuba’s interest

in native plants was exceptional. Native

plants were rarely available in local podcasts/best-of-the-best-garden-tested-

www.thomaschristophergardens.com/

nurseries, and Mount Cuba played an instrumental

role in promoting them horti-

Be-a-Better-Gardener is a community

native-plants.

culturally, even collecting from the wild service of Berkshire Botanical Garden,

many fine strains that it introduced to the located in Stockbridge, MA. Its mission,

nursery industry.

to provide knowledge of gardening and

Since then, however, there has been a

the environment through a diverse range

modest boom. The difficulty for the average

gardener today is not so much in

of classes and programs, informs and inspires

thousands of students and visitors

finding sources of native plants, but rather

in distinguishing which of those available each year. Thomas Christopher is a volunteer

at Berkshire Botanical Garden and

will best fulfill their dreams for their landscape.

is the author or co-author of more than

SNAP, Credit and

Popular plants such as coneflowers – a dozen books, including Nature into Art

Debit Cards Now Accepted!

members of the genus Echinacea – for example,

may be represented in nursery cat-

Press, 2019). He is the 2021 Garden Club

and The Gardens of Wave Hill (Timber

alogs by dozens of distinct selections and of America’s National Medalist for Literature,

a distinction reserved to recognize

cultivars. Which ones are the best from a

he Greenville Pioneer • Friday, December OPEN: 20, 2019 MON, TUES,

gardener’s perspective?

13

those who have left a profound and lasting

impact on issues that are most import-

That’s the question Sam Hoadley has

Home

THURS,

heating

SAT 10-2 • WED,

assistance

FRI 2-6

been answering. Every year, he adopts

ant to the GCA. Tom’s companion broadcast

to this column, Growing Greener,

one genus of popular plants native to the

Delaware region, and then collects and

plants out all the variations he can find. In streams on WESUFM.org, Pacifi ca Radio

grants

2480 US Route

now

9W, Faith

available

Plaza, Ravena

CMH unveils

addition to observing the plants’ growth, and NPR and is available at his website,

518-756-9091 • www.HopeFullLifeCenter.org

The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, January 17, 2020 his team has also taken to recording pollinator

visitations during the flowering

https://www.thomaschristophergardens.

13

com/podcast.

Helping Harvest

Grocery store for

families in need!

Qualified households may now

pply for Home Energy Assistance

ro¬gram (HEAP) grants, a federlly

funded program that provides

oth reg¬ular and emergency fiancial

assistance to help pay heatng

and utility bills.

The grants are available

hrough local Department of Soial

Services (DSS) offices and

ffices for the Aging. Customers

f Central Hudson Gas & Electric

orp. who receive a HEAP benet

toward their ac¬count will also

e issued a monthly credit on their

ill for a max¬imum of 12 months

ased on service type and amount

f HEAP benefit.

“We’re pleased to offer addiional

assistance to families who

ay be struggling and depend on

EAP benefits, and encourage all

ligible households to apply,” said

nthony Campagiorni, Vice Presdent

of Customer Services and

egulatory Affairs.

Campagiorni explained that

ualified families using electricty

or natural gas as their primary

eating source may receive a reglar

HEAP benefit $350 or more,

epending on family income and

ize guidelines, applied toward

heir Central Hudson account.

“In addition to these grants, eligible

customers will also receive a

credit on their utility bills that provide

further assistance in lowering

their energy costs,” said Campagiorni.

The bill credit is based on the

type of heating source and income

level.

He added that qualified households

receiving a HEAP benefit for

non-utility heating fuels such as

oil, propane, wood/wood pellets,

kero¬sene, coal or corn are also eligible

for a monthly credit on their

electric or non-heating gas bill.

“We’re happy to provide bill

discounts to customers who heat

with these fuels, as well,” said

Campagiorni.

Customers should email their

HEAP Notice of Decision Letter to

Central Hudson at CareUnit@cenhud.com

to be enrolled and receive

the bill credit.

Regular HEAP grants for the

fall and upcoming winter are available

between now and Mar. 16,

2020, or until funding is exhausted.

Emergency HEAP grants will

be available between Jan. 2 and

Mar. 16, 2020. These benefits are

designed to meet an eligible household’s

immediate energy needs.

An additional benefit, the

Heating Equipment Repair or Replacement

(HERR) program, is

available to assist income qualified

homeowners in repairing or

replacing their primary heating

equipment when the systems are

inoper¬able or unsafe. Applications

for HERR are accepted

through Sept. 30, 2020, or until the

funding is ex¬hausted.

To apply for HEAP and HERR

benefits, customers may contact

their local DSS office, call (800)

342-3009, or visit www.mybenefits.ny.gov.

In¬dividuals who are

60 and older and do not receive

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance

Program (SNAP) benefits may

contact their local Office for the

Aging to learn of the eligibil¬ity

requirements by calling 800-342-

9871 or by visiting www.aging.

ny.gov.

For more information on

HEAP eligibility requirements

and benefits, visit www.Central-

Hudson.com/HEAP or http://otda.

ny.gov/programs/heap/program.

asp; and for more on all of Central

Hudson’s assistance and billing

programs, visit www.CentralHudson.com,

and click on “My Account.”

3D biopsy technology

Hannacroix Rural

HUDSON — Medical and community leaders joined in Hudson

recently to unveil state-of-the-art 3D breast biopsy technology that

officials at Columbia Memorial Health say will significantly improve

the diagnosis, treatment and outcomes for breast cancer patients

Greene Cemetery and Columbia counties. seeks 2020

The stereotactic 3D biopsy system, known as Affirm, will provide

more precise targeting of tissue abnormalities identified through

CMH’s mowing 3D mammography capabilities, donations

yielding earlier and more

accurate detection of breast cancer. The technology was acquired

through HANNACROIX the generosity — of The community Hannacroix members Rural Cemetery, who contributed which is to located

the Columbia

on Route

Memorial

411 in Dormansville/Westerlo,

Health Foundation.

is seeking donations for

the 2020 mowing expense for the cemetery.

“This life-saving 3D biopsy technology, paired with our 3D mammography

service, provides our patients with the most advanced diag-

Whether you have a loved one buried there or would just like to

give a donation, it would be greatly appreciated, organizers said. They

nostic

also thank

care available

all who have

in locations

helped

that

in the

are

past.

comfortable, convenient and

close Organizers to home,” said need CMH your help President to keep and the CEO cemetery Jay P. maintained. Cahalan. Contributions

In addition can be to sent offering to: Hannacroix 3D mammography Rural Cemetery, and 3D biopsy C/O Linda services, Smith,

CMH Treasurer, has significantly 115 State Route augmented 143, Westerlo, its radiology New and York pathology 12193. expertise

through its affiliation with Albany Medical Center. The Albany

Med and CMH radiology and pathology services are now fully integrated,

which means that mammograms, and all imaging and diagnostic

studies, are interpreted by the region’s leading experts.

“Each year in the U.S. more than 268,000 women are diagnosed

with breast cancer,” said Tariq Gill, M.D., chief of Radiology at CHM.

“This technology, now available right here in our community, is a tremendous

step forward in our ability to detect and diagnose early stage

breast cancer, significantly improving the likelihood of successful

treatment.”

Columbia Memorial Health Foundation Vice Chair Anne Schomaker

said: “This technology is truly a gift of life made possible

through the tremendous generosity of our donors. We are grateful beyond

words to our supporters who continue to rally around CMH to

ensure its essential mission can continue and expand.”

WE WANT TO HEAR

FROM YOU!

The Greenville Pioneer wants to hear

from you. Send information about upcoming

events and news to news@

greenvillepioneer.com.

(We need to have announcements

at least two weeks in advance.)

Invest in Energy Efficient Double

Hung Windows This Fall and SAVE!

— Approaching 1 year in business July 9th, 2019 —

Invest in your

home's energy

efficiency this fall


The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022 19

Social

Security

Matters

Should

I quit

work to

preserve

my Social

Security

benefit

By Russell Gloor

For Capital Region Independent Media

Dear Rusty: I recently took a

big pay cut in my job. Several older

friends have advised that I not continue

to work much longer in this

reduced paying job because it will

affect my Social Security when I

get ready to start drawing it.

I’m currently 62 and thought

about working until around 65.

Friends are advising that my SS

check will be smaller due to the

decrease in pay. I have tried calling

my local and national Social Security

office and can’t get anyone to

answer the phones to see if this is

true.

I don’t want to take this pay cut

only to work (maybe) three more

years and take a lower SS benefit

when I can retire now and draw a

bigger SS check. Advice please!

Signed: Anxious About

Social Security

Dear Anxious: I think your

well-meaning friends are causing

you unnecessary anxiety because

your Social Security benefit isn’t

computed from your last several

years of earnings. Rather it is your

lifetime earnings that determines

your base Social Security benefit,

known as your Primary Insurance

Amount” (PIA).

Your PIA is what you get if you

claim exactly at your full retirement

age (FRA,) which, for you, is 66

years and 10 months. If you claim

SS before your FRA, your benefit

will be permanently cut (by about

29% if you claim at 62 and about

12% if you claim at 65).

Your PIA is computed using the

highest earning 35 years of earnings

(adjusted for inflation) over

your lifetime, and your most recent

earnings would affect your SS

benefit only to the extent they are

among the lifetime 35 years used.

If you don’t yet have a full

35 years of earnings, then to quit

working now would actually hurt

your SS benefit, because SS always

uses 35 years to compute your benefit,

even if you don’t have a full

35 years of earnings. In that case,

they would use “zero” earnings for

enough years to make it 35, and

those zero-earning years would

mean a smaller benefit. So even if

your recent earnings are lower than

before, they are still more than the

$0 that SS will use if you don’t have

at least 35 years, so those lower

earnings will help your SS benefit

not hurt it.

The bottom line is this: Your

actual SS benefit won’t be cut just

because you now have lower earnings;

rather your benefit will be

based on your highest earning 35

years over your lifetime. But any

benefit estimate you now have assumed

you would continue to earn

at your most recently reported level

until you reach your FRA so,

whether you stop working now or

just take a lower salary, your actual

benefit when you claim will be less

than your recent estimate from Social

Security.

Note too that it is a common

misconception that SS benefits are

based on the last 10 years of earnings,

but that is incorrect. Your benefit

amount will be computed using

your average monthly earnings

over your lifetime (the 35 years in

which you earned the most, adjusted

for inflation).

This article is intended for information

purposes only and does

not represent legal or financial

guidance. It presents the opinions

and interpretations of the AMAC

Foundation’s staff, trained and

accredited by the National Social

Security Association (NSSA). NSSA

and the AMAC Foundation and its

staff are not affiliated with or endorsed

by the Social Security Administration

or any other governmental

entity. To submit a question,

visit our website (amacfoundation.

org/programs/social-security-advisory)

or email us at ssadvisor@

amacfoundation.org.


20 The Greenville Pioneer • Friday, February 11, 2022

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!