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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2021

ANNUAL

REPORT

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Table of Contents

2021 Board and Committee Roster. ..................................... 3

2021 Strategic Plan. ............................................... 6

2022 Strategic Plan. ............................................... 7

Meeting Rules and Parliamentary Procedure ............................... 8

2022 Membership Assembly Meeting Agenda ...............................11

2021 Annual Meeting Minutes. ........................................13

President's Report. ................................................16

2021 Year End Financial Statements. ....................................18

2022 Budget ....................................................22

Executive Director's Report ..........................................24

Committee Report: Nursing and Health Policy. .............................30

Committee Report: Nursing Practice. ...................................31

Committee Report: Education. .......................................32

2021 ANA-Michigan Award Winners. .....................................34

2021 ANA Membership Assembly Report ..................................35

2022 Leadership Candidate Bios .......................................39

Champions for Nursing Partnership Program . ..............................64

ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation. ......................................68

Appendix

ANA-Michigan Position Statements

Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact. ..................................75

Mitigating Implicit Bias to Reduce Disparities in Patient Outcomes. ..............77

Moral Distress. .................................................80

Nurse Title Protection ............................................83

Preventing Workplace Violence in Healthcare Settings. ......................84

Safe Nurse Staffing to Improve Quality of Care. ...........................87

Telehealth and Connected Health. ....................................91

ANA-Michigan Policy on Position Statements. .............................94

Current ANA-Michigan Bylaws. ........................................95

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Published for ANA-Michigan by:

Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency

P.O. Box 216 | Cedar Falls, Iowa 50613

(319) 277-2414


2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2021 Board and Committee Roster

Board of Directors

President Julia Stocker Schneider, PhD, RN, CNL

President-Elect Bridget Leonard, DNP, MBA-HCM, RN, CRRN, NEA-BC

Secretary Nikeyia Davis, MBA-HCM, BSN, RN, CNN

Treasurer Julie Bulson, DNP, MPA, RN, NE-BC

Director Katherine Dontje, PhD, FNP-BC, FAANP

Director Anne Kreft, BSN, RN

Director Joshua (Josh) Meringa, MPA, MHA, MBA, BSN, RN, NPD-BC

Director Julie Powell, DNP, MSN, RN, AGCNS-BC, CNEcl

Newly Licensed Director Gerardo (Gerry) Infante, BSN, RN

Tobi Lyon, MBA, CAE, Executive Director

Julia Stocker

Schneider

Bridget Leonard

Nikeyia Davis

Julie Bulson

Katherine Dontje

Anne Kreft

Joshua Meringa

Julie Powell

Gerardo Infante

Tobi Lyon

MNSA Faculty Advisor: Nadine Wodwaski, DNP, MSN-ed, ACNS, RN

Bylaws Committee

Chair - Joshua Meringa, MPA, MHA, MBA, BSN, RN, NPD-BC

Member - Nadia Farhat, MSN, RN-BC, AGCNS-BC

Member - Kechi Iheduru-Anderson, DNP, RN, CNE, CWCN

Member - Kimberly Hickey, MSN, RN, GCNS-BC

Member - Julie Bulson, DNP, MPA, RN, NE-BC

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Education Committee

Chair - Bridget Leonard, DNP, MBA, RN, CRRN, NEA-BC

Member - Gerardo Infante, BSN, RN

Member - Jennifer Mecomber, MSN, RN

Member - Patrick Joswick, DNP, AGNP-C, RN

Member - Ruth Duffy, BSN

Member - Mary Zugcic, RN, ACNS-BC, CRNI

Finance Committee

Chair - Julie Bulson, DNP, MPA, RN, NE-BC

Member - Jason Baker, MSN, AGACNP-BC, CCRN, RN

Member - Jaime Sinutko, RN, MSN, PhD

Member - Susan Owens, PhD, RN, FNP-BC

Member - VACANT

Legislative Committee

Chair - Linda Buck, DNP, MSN/ED, RN

Member - Remy Bruder, DNP, RN

Member - Donna Cassidy, DHSc, MSN, RN

Member - Nancy George, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, FAANP

Member - Lori Glenn, DNP, CNM, RN

Member - April Liberty, BSN, RN

Member - Noor Khalil, Med, BSN, RN

Member - Anna Scott, RN

Member - Susan Wiers, DNP, RN

MHSA Representative - Evelyn Zois Sweeney

Nominations Committee

Chair - Carole Stacy, MSN, MA, RN

Member - MaryLee Pakieser, MSN, RN, BC-FNP

Member - Joyce Reder, MSN

Member - Suzanne Keep, PhD, RN

Member - Beth VanDam, MSN, RN-BC, CNL

Nursing & Health Policy Committee

Chair - Nadine Wodwaski, DNP, MSN-ed, CNS, RN

Member - Alexa Andersen, MA, BSN, RN

Member - Beth Ammerman, DNP, FNP-BC

Member - Holly Thalman, BSN, RN

Member - Nikeyia Davis, MBA-HCM, BSN, RN, CNN

Member - Ramona Berry, MSA, BSN, RN

Member - Barbara Medvec, DNP, RN, NEA-BC

Member - Wanda Chukwu, DNP, MA, CNEcl, RN

Member - Linda Sarantis, MSN, RN, S.A.N.E.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Nursing Practice Committee

Chair - Julie Powell, DNP, MSN, RN, AGCNS-BC

Member - Bethann Perkins-Simmons, BSN, RN

Member - Erin Sudheimer, MSN, RN

Member - Linda Dunmore, MSN, RN, NE-BC, CPHQ, CPHS

Member - Nadia Farhat, RN, MSN, AGCNS-BC

Member - Nichole Budnick, BSN, RN

Member - Molly Stapish, MSN, CMSRN

Member - Marnie VanDam, MSN, RN

Member - Ruth Kechnie, RN, BSN, MSA, OCN, NE-BE

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

AMERICAN NURSES ASSOCIATION

MICHIGAN

2021

STRATEGIC PLAN

Mission: Advancing the nursing profession in Michigan.

Vision: ANA-Michigan is a vital community of professional nurses in Michigan. Together, we

are the experts in nursing practice. Our strength is our solution-focused thought leadership,

our long-term view of the nursing profession in a dynamic healthcare environment, and our

impact on quality care and patient safety.

ADVANCING

NURSES

LEADERSHIP

ENGAGING

MEMBERSHIP

EXPERIENCE

BOLSTER

ADVOCACY

Goal: Elevate the level of

professionalism in nursing.

Goal: Transform our culture for

optimal member engagement.

Goal: Leverage nurse’s

engagement in advocacy.

• Identify hot topics that are

most relevant to the current

nursing environment

• Identify a platform for

sharing/discussing current hot

topics/issues, best practices

and innovation

• Elevate the professional

image of nursing to the public

• Enhance the support of

nursing students

• Foster the advancement

of professional development

(education and certifications)

• Advance workforce priorities

and improve the work

environment across diverse

practice settings

• Increase the participation of

members in leadership roles

• Create a new process that

will promote an increase in the

Nurse Recognition Award

• Identify opportunities to

provide social engagement/

networking events to

encourage member

engagement and

member appreciation

• Enhance our presence via

Social Media platforms to

make them stand out in

the marketplace

• Identify a social or

communications platform for

“Nurse to Nurse” forums, chats,

problem and solution sharing,

or a listening ear

• Create new approaches that

increase direct relationships

with all registered nurses

• Identify opportunities to

educate members on the

critical role of the nurse

in advocacy

• Empower nurses to advocate

for the profession

• Provide resources to build

advocacy skills where they

can leverage and tell their

personal stories

• Increase nurse participation

in advocacy efforts

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

AMERICAN NURSES ASSOCIATION

2022

MICHIGAN STRATEGIC PLAN

ADVANCING

NURSE

LEADERSHIP

ENGAGING

MEMBER

EXPERIENCE

BOLSTER

ADVOCACY

MOBILIZE

STUDENTS AND

NEW NURSES

PROMOTE

NURSING

WELLNESS

Goal: Elevate the level

of professionalism in

nursing

• Identify hot topics that

are most relevant to

the current nursing

environment

• Identify a platform

for sharing/discussing

current hot topics/

issues, best practices,

and innovation

• Elevate the professional

image of nursing to the

public

• Foster the

advancement

of professional

development and

identify current topics

critical to nurses

today (education and

certification)

• Advance workforce

priorities and improve

the work environment

across diverse practice

settings

• Better reflect and

support the voice of the

“point of care” nurse in

the organization and in

products and services

• Increase diversity in

membership; racially,

ethnically, by nursing

practice area and

geographically in the

state

• Clarify and amplify the

organization’s identity

and brand to nurses

and other healthcare

professionals

• Create a gold-standard

leadership program

to enhance the skills

of early to mid-level

careerists

• Mentor nurses in

leadership skills

that translate into

effective mentorship

and guidance in the

workplace.

Goal: Transform our

culture for optimal

member engagement

• Increase the

participation of

members in leadership

roles

• Create a new process

that will promote

and increase nurse

recognition

• Identify opportunities

to provide social

engagement/

networking events to

encourage member

engagement and

appreciation

• Enhance our presence

via social media

platforms to make

them stand out in the

marketplace

• Identify a social or

communications

platform for “nurse to

nurse” forums, chats,

problem and solution

sharing or a listening

ear

• Create new approaches

that increase direct

relationships with all

registered nurses

• Create customized

learning and

communication

pathways for nurses at

all levels

Goal: Leverage

nurse’s engagement

in advocacy

• Identify opportunities

to educate members

on the critical role of

the nurse in advocacy

efforts

• Empower nurses

to advocate for

themselves and the

profession

• Provide resources

to build advocacy

skills where they can

leverage and tell their

personal stories

• Increase nurse

participation in all

forms of advocacy,

including professional

and legislative

• Train nurses to serve

as advocates on issues

urgent and important

to the profession

• Unite all nurses under

the ANA-Michigan

umbrella to create

a strong voice that

allows for collaborative

advocacy

Goal: Create a

pipeline of new to

nursing members

to assure nursing

leadership going

forward

• Create an “Early

Careerist” Task Force

that will lead the

charge on new nurse

initiatives

• Create a strong

relationship between

ANA-Michigan and

MNSA to assure a

seamless transition

to the workforce and

full ANA-Michigan

membership

• Create programming

and engagement

opportunities

specifically for new

nurses

• Enhance the support of

nursing students

Goal: To be the

organization that

advocates for

wellness in the

nursing profession

• Address and educate

around nursing burnout

and bullying

• Educate and engage

nurses in ways

to advocate for

themselves and others

• Foster a culture of

wellness and selfcare

in the nursing

profession

• Help instill change that

will promote healthier

work environments for

nurses in employment

settings across the

state of Michigan

Mission: Advancing the nursing profession in Michigan.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Membership Meeting Rules and Parliamentary Procedure

Rule 1:

Rule 2:

Rule 3:

Rule 4:

Rule 5:

Rule 6:

Rule 7:

Rule 8:

Rule 9:

Rule 10:

Rule 11:

Rule 12:

Meeting Rules

Registered members must wear their name

badges during the business session. All

membership in good standing may vote.

In making a motion or speaking to a

question, a delegate shall move to the floor

microphone, address the Chair, await

recognition of the Chair, and give the

delegate’s name and region.

The correct form to use in making a motion

is “I move that...”

All motions and amendments should be

written and signed by the maker of the

motion or amendment and then given to

the Chair.

A member may not speak against her/his

own motion, but may vote against it.

No member shall speak more than once, or

longer than three minutes, on the same

question until all have spoken who wish to

express and opinion.

All reports and supplements to reports shall

be written and shall not be read.

Only currently paid members of the

Association are entitled to vote at the polls

upon verification of their current dues

being in good standing according to the

most current membership rosters provided

to the tellers.

The Association staff shall report the

number of members registered after the

opening ceremonies. Supplementary

reports may be given later as the Chair may

direct.

A member should raise her/his hand to

indicate she/he cannot hear.

The member will act only on the resolves of

a resolution. Questions of clarification will

be handled according to parliamentary

procedure.

All sessions of the Annual Business Meeting

shall be open to the public unless the Chair

declares an executive question.

Parliamentary Information

Robert’s Rules of Order, Newly Revised is the

parliamentary authority that shall govern the ANA-MI

Business Meeting. The chair, as the presiding officer,

rules on all matters relative to parliamentary law and

procedures. The Parliamentarian serves only in an

advisory capacity to the presiding officer and members.

Member participation in the business session is

governed by the standing rules.

The motions that follow are defined in terms of action a

delegate may desire to propose. Rules governing these

motions are listed in Table 1.

A main motion introduces a subject to the Business

Meeting for consideration and is stated: “I move

that....”

FILLING OUT A MOTION FORM

Motion forms are at the registration table and will be

available on tables during the Business Meeting. Please

fill them out completely before bringing forward a

motion for consideration at the Business Meeting for

discussion.

You must sign your name and Region and get the

signature of a person to second the motion before

bringing it up.

An amendment (primary) is a motion to modify the

working of a motion. The motion to amend may be

made in one of the following forms, determined by the

action desired: “I move to amend by....”

• striking (word(s), phrase, paragraph).”

• inserting (word(s), phrase, paragraph).”

• adding (word(s), phrase, or paragraph at the

end of the motion).”

• substituting (paragraph or entire text of a

resolution or main motion and inserting

another that is germane).

An amendment to an amendment is a motion to

modify the wording of the proposed amendment and

is made as follows: “I move to amend the amendment

by....” The same forms for making an amendment are

applicable for making a secondary amendment.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

The motion to commit or refer is generally used to send

a pending motion (also called “the question”) to a small

group of selected persons - a committee, board, or

cabinet, for example - so that the question may be

studied and put in better condition for the assembly to

consider. The motion is stated: “I move to commit the

question to..........for further study.”

The motion to close a debate (previous question), if

seconded and approved by a two-thirds vote, stops

discussion on the pending question and is stated: “I

move the previous question.”

A division of the assembly may be called by any

member if the chair’s decision on a voice vote is in

question. The member proceeds to the microphone

and states: “I call for a division of the house.” The

chair then takes a standing or roll call vote.

A division of the question may be called when a

pending motion relates to a single subject but contains

several parts, each capable of standing as a complete

proposition. The parts can be separated, and each

considered and voted on as a distinct question. The

motion is stated: “I move to divide the

question........as follows....”

The motion to reconsider enables a majority of the

assembly to bring back for further consideration a

motion that has already been voted. The purpose of

reconsidering a vote is to permit correction of hasty,

ill-advised, or erroneous action, or to consider added

information or a situation that has changed since the

vote was taken. (Note exception on the Table -Rules

Governing Motions)

Parliamentary inquiry is a question directed to the

presiding officer to obtain information on parliamentary

law or the rules of the organization as relevant to the

business at hand. A member addresses the chair and

states: “I rise to a (point) of parliamentary inquiry.”

Point of information is a request, directed to the chair

or through the chair to another officer or member for

information relevant to the business and hand. The

request is not related to parliamentary procedure. The

member addresses the chair and states: “I rise to a

point of information.”

The motion to appeal the decision of the chair is

made at the time the chair makes a ruling. If it is made

by a member and seconded by another member, the

question is taken from the chair and vested in the

voting body for a ANA-Michigan decision. The motion

is stated: “I move to appeal the decision of the chair.”

Before a member can make a motion or address the

assembly on any question, it is necessary that he or

she obtain the floor through recognition by the

presiding officer. The member must:

• rise and proceed to the microphone.

• address the chair by saying, “Madam

Chairperson”

• await recognition

• give name and region

• state immediately the reason for rising

Rules Governing Motions

Interrupt Speaker Recognized by Chair Requires a Second Debated Vote

Main motion NO YES YES YES Majority

Amendment NO YES YES YES Majority

Amendment to amendment NO YES YES YES Majority

Limit Debate NO YES YES NO Two-thirds

Close debate (previous quest.) NO YES YES NO Two-thirds

Divide the Question NO YES YES NO Majority

Reconsider NO YES YES YES Majority*

Point of parliamentary inquiry YES NO NO NO Chair Decides

Point of Information YES NO NO NO Chair Decides

*Majority vote except when the motion being reconsidered required a two-thirds vote for its passage; then the

motion to reconsider requires a two-thirds vote.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

ANA-Michigan Membership Assembly Agenda

April 1, 2022

11:45—12:30 p.m.

11:45 Call to Order—Julia Stocker Schneider, President

• Roll Call of the Board of Director

• Roll Call of Membership

• Declaration of Quorum

• Review and Approval of the Agenda

• March 24, 2021, Meeting Minutes

11:50 Address from the President— Julia Stocker Schneider, President

11:55 Treasurer’s Report—Julie Bulson, Treasurer

12:00 ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation—Katherine Dontje, Director

12:05 Preliminary Results of Statewide Study of Nurses’ Experiences Using Their Electronic

Health Record (EHR) — Julia Stocker Schneider, President

12:15 Memberships Comment and Open Forum

12:20 Recognition of Outgoing Board Members—Julia Stocker Schneider, President

12:25 Tellers Report—Carole Stacy, Nominations Chair

12:28 Passing of the Gavel— Julia Stocker Schneider, President

12:30 Announcements and Adjournment—Bridget Leonard, President

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

4

April 15, 2024

October 15, 2023

12


Membership Assembly

March 24, 2021

12:30 pm – 1:30 pm

Virtual meeting held by Zoom

2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2021 ANNUAL

MEMBERSHIP MEETING

MINUTES

12:30 Call the Meeting to Order

President Stocker Schneider called the meeting to order at 12:30 pm.

Roll Call

Stocker Schneider: Present; Leonard, Present; Davis, Present; Martin, Present; Calarco,

Present; Dontje, Present; Keep, Present; Kreft, Present; Infante, Present

President Stocker Schneider declared a quorum (41 members in attendance).

Corrections or Additions to the Agenda

None Stated.

Motion #1: Approval of Agenda

Made by Nancy Martin; Second by Suzanne Keep; Motion Passed.

March 1, 2019, Annual Assembly Meeting Minutes

No additional corrections to March annual meeting minutes noted.

Motion #2: Approve March 1, 2019, Annual Meeting Minutes.

Made by Nancy Martin; Second by Suzanne Keep; Motion Passed.

12:35 President’s Message

• COVID-19 activities were reviewed.

• Year of the Nurse activities were presented.

• Diversity & Inclusion initiatives were discussed.

• The Nursing Informatics Survey was examined.

12:45 ANA- Michigan Financials

• Treasurer Nancy Martin presented the financial statements.

• Membership dues budget was $18,600.00; ended the year with $19,769.41.

• The association had a net loss of $5,484.88 due to having to cancel the March 2020

Annual Conference.

• A handful of operating expenses were over-budget: board insurance, marketing and

promotion, postage, and technology hosting.

• The association never had to move money from savings or investment account

throughout the year and always maintained a cash flow of $15,000 to $25,000 in

the checking account.

• In November 2020, ANA-Michigan was able to place an additional $15,000 from

savings to the investment account.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Motion #3: Accept ANA-MI 2020 Financial Report as presented.

Made by Bridget Leonard; Second by Marge Calarco; Motion Passed.

12:50 Address from Executive Director

• Tobi Lyon discussed the following:

• The office was closed on March 16, 2020, due to COVID-19; the Annual Conference

was cancelled a week later.

• Testimony was provided regarding the PPE shortage; 25 events were provided –

more than ever before in ANA-Michigan’s history.

• Staff was recognized and roles were summarized.

• MHSA was recognized.

• An update was provided on advocacy events.

• Member highlights were shared.

• The Champions for Nursing Partnership Program was announced.

• Things to watch for in 2021 included: whistleblowing that aligns with the code of

ethics, preventing workplace violence against nurses, creating an official foundation

as a 501(c)3.

• The outgoing board members were recognized and thanked.

12:55 Proposed Bylaw Amendments

• President Stocker Schneider invited Vineta Mitchell, Bylaws Committee Chair, to

the microphone to present the bylaws amendments.

• Chair Mitchell stated that the bylaws amendments were published to the membership

on January 22nd. There was a bylaws hearing held on February 17th, and based on

the hearing the Bylaws Committee is proposing no changes to the four amendments.

• Amendment #1 – Change in categories of membership and dues structure. No

discussion. MOTION CARRIES 89%.

• Amendment #2 – Revision of unexcused absence policy regarding the Board of

Directors. No discussion. MOTION CARRIES 98%.

• Amendment #3 – Revision of unexcused absence policy regarding the committees.

No discussion. MOTION CARRIES 95%.

• Amendment #4 – Revision of responsibilities of the Nursing and Health Policy

Committee and the Legislative Committee. No discussion. MOTION CARRIES

95%.

01:05 Address from Michigan Nursing Students Association

• President Nicholas Cooper shared the following:

• MNSA passed an enhanced honorary membership to open the door to undiscovered/

potential nurses.

• MNSA is focused on inspiring nurses and caring for each other; caring takes places

on both sides of the bedside.

01:10 Membership Comment and Open Forum

• Member Anna Scott recognized staff and expressed appreciated for the virtual app.

• Member Deborah Bach-Stante encouraged nurses to respond to nurse licensure

survey by March 31st.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

• Member Linda Buck recognized Evelyn Sweeney and MHSA for the value of the

partnership.

01:15 Recognition of Outgoing Board Members

• Nikeyia Davis, Secretary

• Nancy Martin, Treasurer

• Margaret Calarco, Director

• Suzanne Keep, Director

01:20 Teller’s Report

• Carole Stacy, Chair of the Nominations Committee presented the Teller’s Report.

• Electronic ballots were sent out via email on February 18 and voting remained open

until 5pm on March 4

• 3057 ballots were submitted; 221 members voted for a voter turnout rate of 7.2%

2021 Election Results

o Secretary – Nikeyia Davis

o Treasurer – Julie Bulson

o Director (2) – Josh Meringa and Julie Powell

o Nominations Committee (2) – Beth Van Dam and Suzanne Keep

o ANA Membership Assembly Representative – Anne Kreft

01:25 Adjournment

• Motion #5: Motion to Adjourn.

Made by Carole Stacy; Second by Julie Bulson; Motion Passed.

• The meeting was adjourned at 1:25 pm.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

President’s Report

Julia Stocker

Schneider

As I reflect on 2021, my second and final year as ANA-Michigan President, I am

proud of the work we have done as an Association. Though still operating remotely,

we kicked off our year with a successful Annual Conference and Meeting that

brought our members together virtually. The program was designed to support

our self-care, healing, and emergence from the conditions that have challenged

us as nurses during the pandemic. This set our pathway forward for the year to

shape the way for a brighter future for nurses in Michigan.

Our 2021 journey forward began with a strategic analysis of our association’s

education offerings and approach that included an environmental scan and

stakeholder survey. We were able to learn more about who our nurse learners

are and what their needs and preferences are, including content and delivery. Armed with this data,

we were able to develop a forward-looking plan that will help us to stay relevant and desired by

Michigan nurses for our professional development programs and educational offerings.

Given how much our world has changed since the onset of the COVID pandemic, we also invested

significant time and effort in 2021 to evaluate our progress towards our current priorities and to

identify new priorities in the current environment that are in need of our attention. Through this

work, our Board of Directors added two new areas of priority focus. Given the challenges to our nursing

workforce that were exacerbated by the latest COVID surges, we identified the need for a strong

pipeline into the nursing profession in Michigan. Therefore, we have identified the mobilization of

students and new nurses as a strategic priority. The board has also recognized the toll the pandemic

has taken on nurses in our state and has added the promotion of nurse wellness as a top priority.

ANA-Michigan has begun to utilize our 2022 strategic plan to drive our actions to advance the nursing

profession in Michigan. In an effort to advance nursing leadership, we are offering an Empowered

Leader Series to support leadership development. To address current issues that are most relevant

to Michigan nurses, we are also hosting a virtual town hall. As nurses, we face many challenges

out there. Through coming together on these issues, we can provide leadership on them as an

Association.

We continued working to engage member experience, including implementing the type and kinds

of educational offerings that better suits the needs of Michigan nurses, improving communication

and engagement mechanisms, as well as nurse recognition in our state. We are active in bolstering

advocacy through our lobbying efforts, meeting with the Governor’s Office, and our coalition

building with others through our participation in the Healthcare Workforce Sustainability Alliance.

In addition to our involvement in the alliance, we are planning other activities designed to mobilize

students and new nurses. We launched a foundation in 2021 that will give us additional avenues to

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

support nursing, including providing scholarships to nursing students. We are also engaging in efforts

to promote nurse wellness, including our partnership with the Michigan State Medical Society to

provide SafeHaven, our adoption of a position on mitigating implicit bias, and our sharing of resources

to support nurse wellness.

It has been my honor to serve as your ANA-Michigan President during these past two years. While it

has been a challenging time for nurses, I am grateful to the membership that we can come together

through ANA-Michigan to support one another and our nursing profession in the state. I am hopeful

about our direction and am excited to continue to serve along with you in ANA-Michigan as we lead

with creative solutions that support the achievement of our vision for nursing in our state.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Financial Statements

2021 Year-End Written Financial Summary

Operating Revenues:

Membership Dues: This fiscal year, we budgeted to receive a monthly average of $20,833.33

per membership dues. We ended $10,889.46 ahead of budget and averaged a monthly income of

$21,740.79 from dues.

Conference Income: 2021 was the Association’s first virtual conference, and we had a net profit of

$7,697.00. The 2020 conference was entirely canceled due to COVID, making 2019 the last in-person

conference we held, which resulted in a profit of $7,112.74.

Partnership Program: The newly launched partnership program has brought in additional new

revenue totaling $5,500.00.

RN Connect: $5,000 grant money for ANF was received to be a part of the RN Connect program.

NSO: Revenue is ahead by $1,500 as they contributed an additional $1,500 in sponsorship. The

Association budgeted $3,000 per their contract. Due to the facilitation of ANA selecting NSO over

Mercer, NSO gave the states who had NSO prior a one-time extra sponsorship for $1,500 in 2021.

Personal Benefit Program: ANA’s royalties for the personal benefit program have increased

significantly, resulting in $1,512.07 unplanned revenue. In 2019 and 2020, ANA-Michigan received

less than $500 each year. Thus, we removed the line item from the budget.

Operating Expenses:

Outside Contract Services: This line item is over budget. The $17,500 contract for education

assessment, $3,500 for strategic planning, and $7,750 for the first installment for the contract

regarding Ignite Sessions and Empowered Leader Series. The fee for our strategic planning facilitator

was the only line item planned for when we did the 2021 budget.

Net Profit

We had anticipated a net profit of $1,900; instead, we made a net profit of $12,878.16.

18


2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

12:31 PM ANA-Michigan

01/12/22 Balance Sheet

Accrual Basis As of December 31, 2021

Dec 31, 21

ASSETS

Current Assets

Checking/Savings

Bank of America Merrill Lynch 147,347.93

Dorothea Milbrandt Fund--Reserv 16,165.73

MSU Business Savings Accot 17,261.93

MSU Checking 12,576.43

Total Checking/Savings 193,352.02

Accounts Receivable

Accounts Receivable 625.00

Total Accounts Receivable 625.00

Total Current Assets 193,977.02

TOTAL ASSETS 193,977.02

LIABILITIES & EQUITY

Equity

Opening Balance Equity 96,071.78

Unrestricted Net Assets 70,408.76

Net Income 27,496.48

Total Equity 193,977.02

TOTAL LIABILITIES & EQUITY 193,977.02

19

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

12:32 PM ANA-Michigan

01/12/22 Profit & Loss Budget vs. Actual

Accrual Basis January through December 2021

Jan - Dec 21 Budget $ Over Budget % of Budget

Ordinary Income/Expense

Income

08-000 Nurse Appreciation Event 5,550.00 6,000.00 -450.00 92.5%

10-000 Conference

10-100 Exhibitor 2,500.00 3,000.00 -500.00 83.3%

10-200 Registration 8,922.00 14,000.00 -5,078.00 63.7%

10-300 Sponsorships 0.00 5,000.00 -5,000.00 0.0%

Total 10-000 Conference 11,422.00 22,000.00 -10,578.00 51.9%

11-000 Membership Engagement 0.00 15,000.00 -15,000.00 0.0%

12-000 Interest Income 23.82 150.00 -126.18 15.9%

13-000 Leadership Institute 0.00 34,000.00 -34,000.00 0.0%

14-00 Membership Dues 260,889.46 250,000.00 10,889.46 104.4%

15-000 Non-Dues Revenue

15-100 Career Center 0.00 1,000.00 -1,000.00 0.0%

15-300nDonations 6,602.48

15-600 Miscellaneous Revenue 90.00

15-700 Publications 6,000.00 5,000.00 1,000.00 120.0%

15-750 RN Connect 5,000.00

15-800 NSO 4,500.00 1,500.00 3,000.00 300.0%

15-950 Personal Benefit Program 1,512.07

15-955 Webinars 1,301.00 16,000.00 -14,699.00 8.1%

15-975 Partnership Program-CNPP 5,500.00

Total 15-000 Non-Dues Revenue 30,505.55 23,500.00 7,005.55 129.8%

Total Income 308,390.83 350,650.00 -42,259.17 87.9%

Expense

21-000 ANA Logo Merchandise 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.0%

22-000 Annual Conference

22-100 Audio/Visual 0.00 4,000.00 -4,000.00 0.0%

22-200 Awards 1,316.74

22-500 Marketing--Conference 0.00 500.00 -500.00 0.0%

22-800 Speakers 2,650.00 5,000.00 -2,350.00 53.0%

22-900 Supplies/Materials 0.00 4,700.00 -4,700.00 0.0%

22-950 Mobile App 1,000.00 1,000.00 0.00 100.0%

Total 22-000 Annual Conference 4,966.74 15,200.00 -10,233.26 32.7%

23-000 Business Expenses

23-100 Business Reg Fees 40.00 50.00 -10.00 80.0%

23-200 Business/Board Insurance 1,000.00 1,000.00 0.00 100.0%

Total 23-000 Business Expenses 1,040.00 1,050.00 -10.00 99.0%

24-000 Committees 5,073.08 10,000.00 -4,926.92 50.7%

25-000 Contract Services

25-100 Accounting Fees 1,138.50 1,500.00 -361.50 75.9%

25-200 Assoc. Mgmt. Services 163,250.00 150,000.00 13,250.00 108.8%

25-300 CEU 3,033.24 3,750.00 -716.76 80.9%

25-500 Legal Fees 2,000.00 2,000.00 0.00 100.0%

25-600 Lobbyist Contract 54,000.00 54,000.00 0.00 100.0%

25-700 Outside Contract Serv 28,749.00 3,000.00 25,749.00 958.3%

Total 25-000 Contract Services 252,170.74 214,250.00 37,920.74 117.7%

26-000 Membership Engagemen E... 0.00 15,000.00 -15,000.00 0.0%

27-000 Leadership Institute Exp 0.00 20,000.00 -20,000.00 0.0%

20

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

12:32 PM ANA-Michigan

01/12/22 Profit & Loss Budget vs. Actual

Accrual Basis January through December 2021

Jan - Dec 21 Budget $ Over Budget % of Budget

28-000 Operations

28-100 Cred. Card Proc/Security 644.00 1,500.00 -856.00 42.9%

28-200 Dues and Subscriptions 5,615.30 3,000.00 2,615.30 187.2%

28-300 Marketing/Promotion 10,301.58 12,000.00 -1,698.42 85.8%

28-400 Postage, Mailing Service 1,101.94 2,500.00 -1,398.06 44.1%

28-500 Printing and Copying 1,417.65 1,500.00 -82.35 94.5%

28-600 Supplies 0.00 1,500.00 -1,500.00 0.0%

28-700 Technology Hosting 11,722.92 11,000.00 722.92 106.6%

28-800 Telephone 1,506.39 2,000.00 -493.61 75.3%

Total 28-000 Operations 32,309.78 35,000.00 -2,690.22 92.3%

29-000 Other Expenses

29-100 COMON 250.00 250.00 0.00 100.0%

29-300 Miscellaneous 365.53

29-500 MSNA 615.56 2,500.00 -1,884.44 24.6%

29-700 Foundation 2,500.00 3,000.00 -500.00 83.3%

Total 29-000 Other Expenses 3,731.09 5,750.00 -2,018.91 64.9%

30-000 Travel and Meetings

30-100 ANAI 0.00 2,000.00 -2,000.00 0.0%

30-200 Board of Dir. Meetings 0.00 2,500.00 -2,500.00 0.0%

30-300 Board/Member Expenses 1,606.83 5,000.00 -3,393.17 32.1%

30-400 Lobbyist Expense 0.00 2,500.00 -2,500.00 0.0%

30-500 Membership Assembly 0.00 6,000.00 -6,000.00 0.0%

30-600 Staff Travel/Other 1,108.17 5,000.00 -3,891.83 22.2%

Total 30-000 Travel and Meetings 2,715.00 23,000.00 -20,285.00 11.8%

31-000 Nurse App. Event Exp 4,750.74 6,000.00 -1,249.26 79.2%

32-000 Quarterly Webinars 2,035.50 3,500.00 -1,464.50 58.2%

Total Expense 308,792.67 348,750.00 -39,957.33 88.5%

Net Ordinary Income -401.84 1,900.00 -2,301.84 -21.1%

Other Income/Expense

Other Income

33-000 Unrealized Gain/Loss Inv

33-100 Unrealized Gain 27,898.32

Total 33-000 Unrealized Gain/Loss... 27,898.32

Total Other Income 27,898.32

Net Other Income 27,898.32

Net Income 27,496.48 1,900.00 25,596.48 1,447.2%

21

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

3:40 PM

11/08/21

Accrual Basis

ANA-Michigan

2022 Approved Budget

Jan - Dec 22

Ordinary Income/Expense

Income

08-000 Nurse Appreciation Event 6,000.00

10-000 Conference

10-100 Exhibitor 3,000.00

10-200 Registration 14,000.00

10-300 Sponsorships 5,000.00

Total 10-000 Conference 22,000.00

11-000 Membership Engagement 10,000.00

12-000 Interest Income 150.00

13-000 Leadership Institute 25,000.00

14-00 Membership Dues 260,000.00

15-000 Non-Dues Revenue

15-100 Career Center 500.00

15-700 Publications 5,000.00

15-800 NSO 1,500.00

15-950 Personal Benefit Program 1,500.00

15-955 Webinars 5,000.00

15-975 Partnership Program-CN... 6,000.00

Total 15-000 Non-Dues Revenue 19,500.00

Total Income 342,650.00

Expense

22-000 Annual Conference

22-100 Audio/Visual 4,000.00

22-500 Marketing--Conference 500.00

22-800 Speakers 5,000.00

22-900 Supplies/Materials 4,700.00

22-950 Mobile App 1,000.00

Total 22-000 Annual Conference 15,200.00

23-000 Business Expenses

23-100 Business Reg Fees 20.00

23-200 Business/Board Insuran... 1,000.00

Total 23-000 Business Expenses 1,020.00

24-000 Committees 5,000.00

25-000 Contract Services

25-100 Accounting Fees 1,000.00

25-200 Assoc. Mgmt. Services 159,000.00

25-300 CEU 3,500.00

25-500 Legal Fees 1,500.00

25-600 Lobbyist Contract 54,000.00

25-700 Outside Contract Serv 15,000.00

Total 25-000 Contract Services 234,000.00

26-000 Membership Engagemen ... 5,000.00

27-000 Leadership Institute Exp 10,000.00

28-000 Operations

28-100 Cred. Card Proc/Security 1,000.00

28-200 Dues and Subscriptions 6,000.00

28-300 Marketing/Promotion 12,000.00

28-400 Postage, Mailing Service 1,000.00

28-500 Printing and Copying 1,000.00

28-600 Supplies 1,000.00

28-700 Technology Hosting 11,000.00

28-800 Telephone 2,000.00

Total 28-000 Operations 35,000.00

22

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

3:40 PM

11/08/21

Accrual Basis

ANA-Michigan

2022 Approved Budget

Jan - Dec 22

29-000 Other Expenses

29-100 COMON 250.00

29-500 MSNA 2,500.00

29-700 Foundation 1,500.00

Total 29-000 Other Expenses 4,250.00

30-000 Travel and Meetings

30-100 ANAI 2,000.00

30-200 Board of Dir. Meetings 1,500.00

30-300 Board/Member Expenses 5,000.00

30-400 Lobbyist Expense 2,500.00

30-500 Membership Assembly 6,000.00

30-600 Staff Travel/Other 5,000.00

Total 30-000 Travel and Meetings 22,000.00

31-000 Nurse App. Event Exp 2,500.00

32-000 Quarterly Webinars 3,500.00

Total Expense 337,470.00

Net Ordinary Income 5,180.00

Net Income 5,180.00

23

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Executive Director Report

“To do what nobody else will do, in a way that nobody else can do, in spite

of all we go through…that is what it is to be a nurse.” – Rawsi Williams, RN

While it is indisputable that nurses faced an ongoing crisis in 2021 that was fraught

with personal challenges and trying circumstance, ANA-Michigan continued to

expand its outreach, grow its membership, and advance the goals of its strategic

plan. And though the pandemic continues to present nursing professionals with

challenges related to COVID-19 (in terms of their health and the health of those

in which they serve), ANA-Michigan members and leadership have continued to

Tobi Lyon, MBA, CAE

demonstrate resiliency and care. We have doubled down on our commitment

to ourselves and each other and continue to drive our initiatives through advocacy efforts, media

visibility, and self-care resources and support. As I reflect on the year, I am truly inspired by the

strides ANA-Michigan has made as we readjust and redefine our terms. How this was possible in the

face of a global health crisis can only be attributed to the proactivity, dedication, and sacrifice of

our nurses and leadership.

While I am so proud of the advances we continue to make and the plans we have for the future,

it remains a critical matter that we prioritize the need to take proper care of our nurses and

support their wellness and well-being. Though there are many successes to celebrate, it would

be remiss not to acknowledge and act on behalf of those who are struggling. Nurses, physicians,

and healthcare providers are taking care of people every day. But who is taking care of them? The

American Nurses Foundation conducted several surveys this year (all available on ANA’s website,

nursingworld.org), and the statistics from these surveys reflect the toll that the pandemic continues

to take on this committed profession. The study reported that of the nurses surveyed, 51% reported

being exhausted, 43% reported being overwhelmed, 23% were depressed, 22% were angry, and a

mere 21% were optimistic about the future.

While these results are hard-hitting and difficult to know, even more impactful are the statistics

on how nurses are handling the stress and strain of the pandemic. Only 24% reported having sought

professional mental health support, 36% believe they should be able to manage it themselves, and

30% cite a lack of time. Some are concerned that if they did seek professional mental health support,

they could potentially face license issues, retribution by the employer, and stigma from co-workers.

These roadblocks to mental healthcare for nurses must be removed, and a shift to prioritization

of nurse well-being must occur before a severe problem becomes worse. Additionally, one of my

biggest takeaways from these results was that some nurses reported not knowing where to access

support or indicating that they felt Employee Assistance Programs were not readily available to them.

Because nursing support programs do exist, ANA-Michigan is working on new ways to communicate

this information immediately and effectively.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Given these ongoing hardships and stressors on healthcare providers, ANA-Michigan has partnered

with the Michigan State Medical Society (MSMS) to promote a new comprehensive and confidential

well-being program, SafeHaven, that comes not a moment too soon. Many are suffering from

stress and burnout, and it's affecting some providers at crisis levels. I feel that with ANA and ANA-

MI programming, faith in each other, prioritization of self-care, and our advocacy efforts rooted

in communication and clarity we will be able to realign the healthcare industry with nurses needs

and insight at the forefront. This program offers nurses and physicians a host of resources designed

to aid in addressing career fatigue and behavioral health concerns. The types of care provided by

SafeHaven include:

• In-the-moment telephonic support, available 24/7

• Face-to-face counseling sessions

• Peer Coaching

• WorkLife Concierge

• VITAL WorkLife App—connect with your resources, take assessments to evaluate well-being,

access Insights, videos and more

• Telephonic legal and financial consultations and resources

• Member website with extensive work and life resources

Nurses, physicians, and health care providers are a precious resource — and that's why SafeHaven

is committed to helping them stay well, avoid burnout, connect to their purpose, and manage the

demands of their personal and professional lives. ANA-Michigan is proud to stand alongside MSMS to

offer this leading resource as a value-added member benefit. For more information on SafeHaven

as it pertains to members of ANA-Michigan visit us online.

On the legislative front, the long-awaited passage of HB 4359, a bill to expand the scope of practice

for certified registered nurse anesthetists, was signed into law by Governor Gretchen Whitmer,

officially making the legislation Public Act 53 of 2021. The bill will allow CRNAs greater autonomy

in their practice while ensuring that only CRNAs with appropriate experience and credentials can

operate without physician oversight. HB 4359 passed the House and Senate with broad bipartisan

support and took effect on October 11, 2021, and we are excited about what this will mean for our

nurses’ career autonomy going forward.

Lastly, while not a new program, but certainly new from ANA, is the compelling report recently

completed by the National Commission to Address Racism in Nursing. The Commission officially

released the results from the survey of over 5,600 nurses with findings showing racism is a substantial

problem within the profession. Among other statistics, the survey reported that 63% of nurses surveyed

say that they have personally experienced an act of racism in the workplace with the transgressors

being either a peer (66%), patients (63%), or a manager or supervisor (60%). Additionally, 57% of

nurses said they have challenged racism in the workplace, but more than half said their efforts

resulted in no change.

These findings validate the Commission’s new definition of racism : “assaults on the human spirit in

the form of actions, biases, prejudices, and an ideology of superiority based on race that persistently

cause moral suffering and physical harm of individuals and perpetuate systemic injustices and

inequities.” It is imperative that we not only continue to address this problem but bring about

intentional change and spread meaningful awareness.

25


2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

While I intend to emulate and encourage the hope that nurses everywhere have exhibited, I am

unsure exactly what the future and coming years will hold in terms of the aftereffects of this

pandemic. What I can assure you is that in addition to keeping our association relevant and providing

resources and information: we are here to help. As outlined, we are taking significant action to not

only bring awareness to the issues nurses are facing but to provide tangible, accessible solutions.

Whether through advocacy, mental health tools, or information, you will always have this community

to lean on and utilize as an advocate. As we close another calendar year and set new goals around

engagement, transformation, and communication efforts, I am proud to continue to fulfill ANA-

Michigan’s mission but more notably to continue to stand beside and serve each of you. Thank you.

26


2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

A New Administration

ANA-Michigan Lobbyist, Muchmore Harrington Smalley & Associations (MHSA)

On Wednesday, January 20, our country observed the inauguration of the 46th

President of the United States. The moment was historic and unprecedented (a word

we have used often the last 12 months!) for so many reasons, including the swearing

in of the country’s first woman of African American and South Asian descent as

Vice President. Although this year’s inauguration certainly looked and felt different

in light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and a deep political polarization, it

remains a day of profound consequence and hope.

Evelyn Sweeney

President Biden, like his predecessors, has crafted a challenging and ambitious 100-day agenda,

dominated by a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief plan he needs Congress to approve. Although the

President can look to allies in Congress, as both chambers are now controlled by democrats, the

margins are very slim. Couple tight numbers with a campaign theme of unity and “restoring the

soul of America,” the President will need to make a habit of reaching across the aisle and securing

bi-partisan support if he hopes to cultivate a spirit of inclusivity and productivity during his tenure.

We saw quick action from President Biden (his first day in office) on issuing executive actions not

requiring congressional approval including, rejoining The Paris Climate Accord, extending restrictions

on evictions and foreclosures and requiring masks to be worn on all federal property and during

interstate travel on airlines or trains.

Arguably President Biden’s most immediate and pressing priority is overseeing a more intentional and

hands-on federal response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including vaccine deployment and economic

stimulus/business relief efforts. President Biden has proposed a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief plan

which would include $1400 per person direct payments to most households, expanded paid leave

and increases in the child tax credit. The proposal also includes $416 billion to create a national

vaccination program with the goal of inoculating 50 million Americans and opening schools for faceto-face

learning within his first 100 days in office.

Governor Whitmer who was seriously vetted as a Vice Presidential contender was invited to attend

the Biden-Harris inauguration by the President-elect. Governor Whitmer was also tapped by the

President to serve as one of the co-chairs of the inaugural committee, as well as one of four National

Democratic Committee Vice Chairs.

Governor Whitmer has repeatedly articulated her hope and confidence in what the Biden

administration will mean for Michigan, anticipating a strong relationship with the President and

the federal government. On the day of the inauguration Governor Whitmer issued the following

statement, “On his first day in office, President Biden has made it clear that he is committed to

ending the COVID-19 pandemic once and for all and building a stronger, more sustainable nation for

future generations. President Biden’s action to urge Americans everywhere to do their part and mask

up and launch a coordinated national response to the pandemic will undoubtedly save lives and put

us on track to defeat our common enemy: COVID-19.”

27


2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

President Biden has stated he sees himself as a, “transitional” President. The reality is his administration

will face some of the nation’s most complicated and significant challenges in a lifetime. I believe

former President George W. Bush stated it best when he directly expressed a message of support to

President Biden by stating, “Your success is our country’s success”.

Certified Nurse Anesthetists See Legislative Win with Passage of HB 4359

By Evie Zois Sweeney

Muchmore Harrington Smalley Associates

After decades of legislative debate and negotiating, legislation was recently enacted in Michigan that

expands the scope of practice for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs). House Bill 4359,

now Public Act 53 of 2021, was sponsored and championed by Representative Mary Whiteford (R-Casco

Twp.), a registered nurse by trade. The bill passed both the House and Senate with overwhelming

bipartisan support, despite expressed concerns from the Michigan State Medical Society.

The bill amends the Michigan Public Health Code and allows a registered professional nurse who

holds a specialty certificate as a nurse anesthetist to perform the following duties:

• Develop a plan of care

• Perform all patient assessments, procedures, and monitoring to implement a plan of care or

to address patient emergencies that arise during implementation of the plan of care

• Selection, ordering, or prescribing and the administration of anesthesia or analgesic agents,

including pharmacological agents that are prescription drugs (as defined) or controlled

substances

The bill would also allow a CRNA to practice without supervision if the individual met one of the

following criteria:

• He or she has practiced in the specialty health field of nurse anesthetist for three years or

more, and has practiced in that heath profession specialty field in a healthcare facility for

a minimum of 4,000 hours, OR

• He or she has a doctor of nurse anesthesia practice degree or doctor of nursing practice

degree

House Bill 4359 emphasizes collaboratively participating in a patient-centered care team and

includes language that does not require new or third party reimbursement or mandated worker’s

compensation benefits.

Representative Whiteford has been a passionate force, advocating for “scope reform” over multiple

legislative sessions. She believes the bill will enable Michigan hospitals and health care facilities to

choose the anesthesia model that works best for their community, while increasing patient access to

anesthesia services in underserved parts of the state and helping to control health care costs.

House Bill 4359 was signed by Governor Whitmer on July 13, 2021 and is now Public Act 53 of 2021.

The Public Act can be viewed here. It will take effect on October 11, 2021.

28


2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

In highly anticipated news, State Senator Rick Outman (R-Six Lakes) introduced Senate Bill 680 on

October 5, 2021, legislation that would allow full practice authority for nurse practitioners in the

State of Michigan. The bill was introduced with bi-partisan cosponsors, representing broad regional

support from Detroit to Traverse City.

The legislation amends the public health code and outlines the requirements an individual needs to

successfully complete to achieve nurse practitioner status in the State of Michigan. In addition, the

bill outlines an expanded scope of practice for nurse practitioners that includes, but is not limited

to the following allowable functions:

➢ Performing comprehensive assessments, providing physical examinations and other health

assessments, and providing screening activities

➢ Diagnosing, treating, and managing patients with acute and chronic illnesses and diseases

➢ Ordering, performing, supervising, and interpreting laboratory and imaging studies

➢ Prescribing pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions and treatment that are

within the registered professional nurse’s specialty role

➢ Engaging in health promotion and disease prevention

➢ Providing health education

The bill also includes language that would allow a nurse practitioner to consult with and refer

patients to other health professionals, as well as supervise registered professional nurses, licensed

practical nurses, and other health professionals, as appropriate. Finally, the bill includes important

language that would allow an advanced practice registered nurse who holds a specialty certification

in the specialty field of nurse practitioner to prescribe a controlled substance included in schedules

2 to 5 of part 72 of the public health code without delegation from a physician.

Senate Bill 680 would allow a nurse practitioner to practice at the top of his or her scope of practice

and reflects the highly skilled education and training necessary to earn the specialty certification.

Senator Outman has characterized the legislation as an opportunity to improve healthcare quality,

expand access to care, and invest in public health. Senate Bill 680 has been referred to the Senate

Health Policy and Human Services Committee. A committee hearing is expected in 2022.

29


2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

ANA-Michigan Committee Reports

ANA-Michigan Nursing and Health Policy Committee

Chair: Nadine Wodwaski, DNP, MSN-ed, CNS, RN

Alexa Andersen, MA, BSN, RN

Beth Ammerman, DNP, FNP-BC

Holly Thalman, BSN, RN

Nikeyia Davis, MBA-HCM, BSN, RN, CNN

Ramona Berry, MSA, BSN, RN

Barbara Medvec, DNP, RN, NEA-BC

Wanda Chukwu, DNP, MA, CNEcl, RN

Linda Sarantis, MSN, RN, S.A.N.E.

Committee Duties & Assignments

• Develop nursing and health policy initiatives related to ANA-Michigan’s Policy Platform.

• Monitor and analyze nursing and health policy issues; collaborate with other health and

nursing organizations in relevant nursing and health policy.

• Educate and collaborate with public policy makers, relevant private and organizational

policy makers.

• Monitor and address nursing and healthcare regulatory policy issues.

• Recommend and refer policy issues requiring legislative action or initiative to the Legislative

Committee.

• Assume other responsibilities for health policy as provided for in these bylaws and in policies

and procedures as established by the Board of Directors.

2021 Report

• Completed Telehealth and Mobile Health Position Statement for board approval and

dissemination to the membership.

• Completed Mitigating Implicit Bias to Reduce Disparities in Patient Outcomes for board

approval and dissemination to the membership.

• Spearheaded the initial development of implicit bias training opportunities to be considered

for the ANA-Michigan membership.

• Completed Implicit Bias Training Article for the quarterly newsletter publication.

• Completed A Guide To Surviving A Crisis: Empowering Your Voice Article for the quarterly

newsletter publication.

Acknowledgements

On behalf of ANA-Michigan, we would like to recognize and thank the following out-going committee

members for their dedication and service to the membership:

• Beth Ammerman, DNP, FNP-BC

• Nikeyia Davis, MBA-HCM, BSN, RN, CNN

• Barbara Medvec, DNP, RN, NEA-BC

• Linda Sarantis, MSN, RN, S.A.N.E.

• Nadine Wodwaski, DNP, MSN-ed, CNS, RN

30


2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

ANA-Michigan would also like to recognize and welcome new, in-coming committee members who

were appointed to serve the membership for a two-year term:

• Beth Ammerman, DNP, FNP-BC

• Marina Andriyakhova, BSN, RN, CWCN

• Deborah Bach-Stante, BSN, MPH, MSW

• Sarah Jennings, DNP, MPA, RN, NEA-BC

• Nadine Wodwaski, DNP, MSN-ed, CNS, RN

Chair: Julie Powell, DNP, MSN, RN, AGCNS-BC

Nichole Budnick, BSN, RN

Linda Dunmore, MSN, RN, NE-BC, CPHQ, CPHS

Nadia Farhat, RN, MSN, AGCNS-BC

Ruth Kechnie, RN, BSN, MSA, OCN, NE-BC

Molly Stapish, MSN, CMSRN

Erin Sudheimer, MSN, RN

Bethann Perkins-Simmons, BSN, RN

Marnie VanDam, MSN, RN

ANA-Michigan Nursing Practice Committee

Committee Duties & Assignments

• Identify and address nursing practice issues in Michigan. Collaborate with related nursing

organizations with specific clinical expertise in developing initiatives.

• Bring focus to the health and safety of nurses in all practice settings.

• Develop programs that broadly address the personal health and well-being of nurses.

• Collaborate with the Nursing and Health Policy Committee in addressing regulatory issues

affecting nursing practice.

• Address ethical issues in practice.

• Assume other responsibilities for nursing practice as provided for in these bylaws and in

policies and procedures as established by the Board of Directors.

2021 Report

• Drafted an information sheet on the history of vaccines to share with the membership and

the community.

• Drafted a position statement on COVID-19 vaccines.

• Developed an article for the quarterly newsletter publication on the role of the professional

nurse in community health care and other alternate roles in nursing.

• Drafted an article on travel nurses, staffing challenges and retention for the quarterly

newsletter publication.

• Reviewed The Virtual Nurses’ Lounge, The Emotional PPE Project, and SafeHaven as potential

platforms for ANA-Michigan to consider for mental health resources.

• Brainstormed ideas for a potential statement regarding COVID-19 vaccine boosters.

• Pushed a social media campaign to raise awareness for flu shots and COVID-19 vaccines.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Acknowledgements

On behalf of ANA-Michigan, we would like to recognize and thank the following out-going committee

members for their dedication and service to the membership:

• Linda Dunmore, MSN, RN, NE-BC, CPHQ, CPHS

• Nadia Farhat, RN, MSN, AGCNS-BC

• Julie Powell, DNP, MSN, RN, AGCNS-BC

• Molly Stapish, MSN, CMSRN

• Marnie VanDam, MSN, RN

ANA-Michigan would also like to recognize and welcome new, in-coming committee members who

were appointed to serve the membership for a two-year term:

• Linda Dunmore, MSN, RN, NE-BC, CPHQ, CPHS

• Denise Ervin, BSN, NC-BC

• Ruth Kitzmiller, MSA, BSN, RN, NE-BC

• Gina Schrader, MSN, RN, CEN

• Wendy Szafranski, MSN, RN, CNE

ANA-Michigan Education Committee

Chair: Bridget Leonard, DNP, MBA, RN, CRRN, NEA-BC

Ruth Duffy, BSN

Gerardo Infante, BSN, RN

Patrick Joswick, DNP, AGNP-C, RN

Jennifer Mecomber

Mary Zugcic, RN, ACNS-BC, CRNI

Committee Duties & Assignments

• Seek input from Members on educational topics and speakers to plan educational offerings.

• Plan the annual educational conference.

• Develop an annual Membership Assembly and conference budget to be submitted to the Board

of Directors for prior approval for the following year’s Assembly program and conference.

• Assume other responsibilities for conference as provided for in these bylaws and in policies

and procedures as established by the Board of Directors.

2021 Report

• Oversaw the final planning stages for the 2021 ANA-Michigan Annual Conference and

Membership Assembly.

• Finalized the planning of nurse contact hours in conjunction with the 2021 Virtual Annual

Conference and Membership Assembly.

• Developed quarterly educational virtual programming.

• Worked on developing a potential 2021 Leadership Academy.

• Finalized and released for use the Reality of Becoming a Nurse webinar series for members.

• Partnered with Oakland University to host a Virtual Abstracts and Poster Webinar for members

ahead of the 2022 Annual Conference and Membership Assembly.

• Initiated and developed all details related to the 2022 Annual Conference and Membership

Assembly.

• Worked to host Ignite Sessions at the Annual Conference for the first time as a new opportunity.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Acknowledgements

On behalf of ANA-Michigan, we would like to recognize and thank the following out-going committee

members for their dedication and service to the membership:

• Dr. Bridget Leonard, DNP, MBA, RN, CRRN, NEA-BC

• Jennifer Mecomber, MSN, RN

• Mary Zugcic, RN, ACNS-BC, CRNI

ANA-Michigan would also like to recognize and welcome new, in-coming committee members who

were appointed to serve the membership for a two-year term:

• Maria Bobo, DNP, RN, WHNP-BC, CENP

• Kristen Dessouki, DNP, RN, FNP (c)

• Linda Keilman, DNP, MSN, GNP-BC, FAANP

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2021 ANA-Michigan Award Winners

ANA-Michigan hosted the Awards and Recognition Fundraiser on Tuesday, November 16, 2021, to

launch the newly formed ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation and to formally recognize excellence in

nursing this year. To make the event extra meaningful, ANA President Dr. Ernest Grant flew in from

the east coast to join ANA-Michigan for the evening as a VIP guest and keynote speaker.

Seven awards were presented, and five recipients were in attendance to accept in person, a sight we

would not have been able to witness just one year ago. Adding to the night’s joy was the attendance

of four 2020 award recipients, who had never had the chance to celebrate their awards in person

with their peers.

Congratulations to the 2021 Award Recipients:

• Exceptional Promise Award – Zoe Retell

• Future Nurse Leader Award – Meklit Shonga, RN

• Public Policy Advocate Award – Sue Anne Bell, PhD, FNP-BC, FAAN

• Innovation Award – The Dr. Gary Burnstein Community Health Clinic

• Collaborative Practice Award – Kent County Health Department

• Lifetime Achievement Award – Phyllis S. Brenner, PhD, RN

• Dorothea Milbrandt Nurse Leader Award – Linda Taft, RN

Photo

Unavailable

Zoe Retell Meklit Shonga Sue Anne Bell Phyllis S. Brenner Linda Taft

Kent County Health Department

34

The Dr. Gary Burnstein Community Health Clinic


2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Summary of the 2021 Virtual Annual Meeting

of the ANA Membership Assembly

The American Nurses Association (ANA) Membership Assembly held its annual meeting virtually

on Friday, June 18, 2021. ANA President, Ernest Grant, PhD, RN, FAAN, presided.

CALL TO ORDER

ANA President Grant called the Virtual Annual Meeting of the ANA Membership Assembly to

order at 4:35pm ET on Friday, June 18, 2021.

ORDER OF BUSINESS

A quorum 1 for the transaction of business was established.

The proposed Standing Rules for the Conduct of the Business of the Virtual Annual Meeting of the

ANA Membership Assembly (Standing Rules) were disseminated for review on May 18, 2021.

Per Section 5.b of the proposed Standing Rules: No motions shall be permitted except for a

motion to adopt the agenda, a motion to adopt the rules for the meeting, and a motion to

approve the recommendations of the ANA Professional Policy Committee. Therefore, no motions

to amend the Standing Rules were permitted.

ANA President Grant presented the proposed Standing Rules. Without objection, the Standing

Rules were approved.

The Agenda for Virtual Annual Meeting of the ANA Membership Assembly meeting was

disseminated on May 18, 2021. Per Section 5.b of the Standing Rules: No motions shall be

permitted except for a motion to adopt the agenda, a motion to adopt the rules for the meeting,

and a motion to approve the recommendations of the ANA Professional Policy Committee.

Therefore, no motions to amend the agenda were permitted.

ANA President Grant presented the agenda for the Virtual Annual Meeting of the ANA

Membership Assembly. Without objection, the agenda was approved.

REPORT OF THE NOMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS COMMITTEE

Gayle Peterson, RN-BC, Chair of the Nominations and Elections Committee (NEC) reported that a

Call for Nominations was issued in December 2020 for ANA elective offices for the following

positions on the ANA Board of Directors (board) Vice-President, Treasurer, Director-at-Large, and

1

A quorum for transaction of business by the Membership Assembly shall consist of 50 percent of the total C/SNA and IMD

representatives and three members of ANA's Board of Directors, one of whom is the ANA President or Vice President (ANA

Bylaws Article III, Section 8.b).

35

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Director-at-Large Recent Graduate as well as four positions on the Nominations and Elections

Committee. A second Call for Nominations was disseminated in February 2021 due to insufficient

nominations for the following ANA Elective Offices: Vice-President, Director-at-Large, Directorat-Large

Recent Graduate and four positions on the ANA Nominations and Elections Committee.

On March 19, 2021, the final slate of candidates was announced. Membership Assembly voting

representatives were reminded that officer positions on the board are elected by majority vote

and all other positions are elected by plurality.

ANA PRESIDENT’S ADDRESS

ANA President Grant presented his Address.

VIDEO GREETINGS FROM THE NATIONAL STUDENT NURSES ASSOCIATION

Participants viewed a pre-recorded address from Kyle Loose, President of the National Student

Nurses Association.

REPORT OF THE ANA CHIEF NURSING OFFICER

ANA Chief Nursing Officer, Debbie Hatmaker, PhD, RN, FAAN, presented her report.

REPORT OF THE ANA CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

ANA Chief Executive Officer, Loressa Cole, DNP, MBA, RN, NEA-BC, FACHE, FAAN, presented her

report.

VIDEO GREETINGS FROM THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NURSING

Participants viewed a pre-recorded address from Eileen Sullivan-Marx, PhD, RN, FAAN, President

of the American Academy of Nursing.

NIGHTINGALE TRIBUTE

ANA President Grant read the poem, She Was There, written by ANA member Duane Jaeger,

MSN, RN, APRN, to pay tribute to the nurses who passed away since the 2020 ANA Membership

Assembly.

VIDEO GREETINGS FROM THE AMERICAN NURSES CREDENTIALING CENTER

Participants viewed a pre-recorded address from Rhonda Anderson, DNSc(h), MPA, BS, RN,

LFACHE, FAAN, President of the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

REPORT OF THE ANA TREASURER

ANA Treasurer Jennifer Mensik Kennedy, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, presented the Report of the

ANA Treasurer.

VIDEO GREETINGS FROM THE AMERICAN NURSES FOUNDATION

Participants viewed a pre-recorded address from Wilhelmina M. Manzano, MA, RN, NEA-BC,

President of the American Nurses Foundation.

REPORT OF THE ANA PROFESSIONAL POLICY COMMITTEE

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Susan King, MS, RN, CEN, FAAN, member of the ANA Professional Policy Committee (Committee)

reported that the Call for Proposals for the 2021 Membership Assembly opened on November

19, 2020, and closed on February 1, 2021, with 21 new proposals submitted by the deadline.

One proposal, Recognizing Mary Eliza Mahoney during National Nurses Week/Month, was

received for consideration as an emergent proposal. The Committee determined that the

proposal did not meet the criteria, per Section 4 of the Membership Assembly Policy

Development Guide, to be considered by the 2021 Membership Assembly and elected to forward

the proposal to the board for consideration prior to the board’s May 2022 meeting.

Four Dialogue Forums were held virtually. Dialogue Forums #1, Health Care Delivery Systems that

Fully Incorporate Nursing Services, and #2, Precision Health and Genomics were held on Tuesday,

June 1, 2021, and Dialogue Forums #3, APRN Full Practice in Nursing Homes, and #4, Lessons

Learned: COVID-19 Pandemic Crisis Standards of Care, on Thursday, June 3, 2021.

New this year participants had an opportunity to provide input on the preliminary

recommendations for each Dialogue Forums via an online comment period which was open

from Wednesday, June 9, 2021, to Monday, June 14, 2021. A total of nine individuals submitted

comments during the online comment period.

Along with the final recommendations for each Dialogue Forum, the Committee’s report

included a summary of comments from the Dialogue Forum and submissions received during

the comment period.

ANA President Grant reminded participants that per Section 5.b of the Standing Rules no motions

to amend the final recommendations of the Committee would be permitted and that voting will

occur remotely immediately following the Membership Assembly through 11:59pm ET Thursday,

June 24, 2021.

ANA RECOGNITIONS

ANA President Grant recognized the following:

Constituent/State Nurses Associations

ANA-Hawaii (new member as of 2020)

• Nevada Nurses Association (centennial in 2020)

• New Mexico Nurses Association (centennial in 2021)

• New Jersey State Nurses Association (member for 120 years)

Outgoing C/SNA Executive Directors

• Tina Gerardi, Executive Director of the Tennessee Nurses Association

• Colleen Casper, Executive Director of the Colorado Nurses Association

• Sally Watkins of the Washington State Nurses Association

ANA Board of Directors with terms ending December 31, 2021

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

ANA Board of Directors with terms ending December 31, 2021

• Vice-President, Susan Y. Swart

• Treasurer, Jennifer Mensik-Kennedy

• Director-at-Large, Jeff Watson

• Director-at-Large (Recent Graduate), Marcus Henderson

ANA President Grant introduced Katheren Koehn, MA, RN, FAAN, Executive Director of the

Minnesota Organization of Registered Nurses, who presented the final recognition to retiring

ANA staff member, Janet Haebler, Associate Director II, Policy and Government Affairs.

VOTING INSTRUCTIONS

NEC Chair Peterson shared that the Proviso adopted by the Membership Assembly on March 23,

2021, held that “voting operations must be administered by an independent vendor, under the

supervision of the Nominations and Elections Committee and the ANA Office of General Counsel,

using an appropriate Internet-based voting application capable of ensuring full protection of the

integrity and secrecy of the vote.” Based on the mandate, the ANA Office of General Counsel

reviewed and selected Elections America, the independent vendor that has administered ANA’s

national elections since 2014.

An overview of the remote voting process was shared by NEC Chair Peterson for the election of

ANA Board Members, ANA NEC members, as well as the motions to approve the

recommendations of the ANA Professional Policy Committee was presented.

CLOSING REMARKS FROM THE ANA PRESIDENT

ANA President Grant thanked ANA staff for their work in successfully incorporating meetings and

related events associated with Membership Assembly virtually this year. In closing, ANA

President Grant acknowledged that ANA has had the privilege of working to advance, advocate

for and elevate the profession, improve nurses’ work environments, and strive for the public

good all while in the face of a global pandemic. Highlighted efforts included the work of the

National Commission to Address Racism in Nursing, celebration of the Year of the Nurse, ANA’s

125 th anniversary, and other milestones across the ANA Enterprise.

In closing, ANA President Grant presented a video clip of the American Nurse Heroes

documentary, developed as part of the Year of the Nurse celebrations, in collaboration between

ANA, HealthCom Media, and Al Roker Entertainment.

ADJOURN

ANA President Grant adjourned the Virtual Annual Meeting of the ANA Membership Assembly at

7:11pm ET on Friday, June 18, 2021.

###

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

PRESIDENT-ELECT

Barbara Medvec, DNP, MSN, MSA, NEA-BC

University of Michigan - School of Nursing | Clinical Assistant Professor

Saline, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have been

in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

- ANA-Michigan Leadership Academy Taskforce (2019-2021)

- ANA-Michigan Nursing and Health Policy Committee

(2018-2021)

- ANA Advocacy Institute Fellow - ANA-Michigan

Representative (2019-2020)

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

Michigan Organization of Nurse Leaders (MONL)

American Organization of Nursing Leaders (AONL)

Coalition of Michigan Organizations of Nursing (COMON)

Sigma Theta Tau - International Rho Chapter

American Hospital Association

American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nurses (AAACN)

International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INASCL)

Online Learning Consortium (OLC)

Doctors of Nursing Practice, INC

Council on Graduate Education for Administration in Nursing (CGEAN now ASLN)

National Arab American Nurses Association (NAANA)

American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) & Michigan (MACHE)

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

Past President of Ann Arbor Chapter of the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS)

Past Secretary of the national Oncology Nursing Society (ONS)

National Chapter Chairperson Oncology Nursing Society (ONS)

Chair - Standards of Practice Committee (AAACN)

Chair - Bylaws Committee (CGEAN/ASLN)

ANA-Michigan Leadership Academy Taskforce

ANA-Michigan Nursing and Health Policy Committee

ANA Advocacy Institute Fellow - ANA-Michigan Representative

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

The reality of the continued pandemic offers both opportunity and challenges for ANA

Michigan and our Michigan nurses. Facing the reality of nursing fatigue, burnout, loss of

leaders and nursing expertise is a challenge as we now face workforce shortages and

continued demand changes in care delivery. Three key areas for our continued consideration

in nursing include:

1. Cultivating all means to build professional resilience and support for nursing mental/

physical health to retain our nursing workforce.

2. Engaging everyone in our nursing community to build their voice, share experiences

and stories to gain access to environments and individuals to shape and contribute to the

priorities facing healthcare and nursing.

3. Building the understanding of the value of nursing to the residents in the State of Michigan

recognizing that nurses are the safety surveillance in healthcare.

I want to serve in this role and leverage my skills and experience to promote the greatness of

nursing and Michigan nursing. Using our ANA Michigan Strategic plan to build our path along

with using the The Future of Nursing 2020-2030 Charting a Path to Achieve Health Equity

will be essential on this journey as we begin to rebuild amidst the pandemic.

I am best qualified to carry out these duties based on an extensive career in nursing

from bedside to executive leadership and professional organization leadership. Beyond

my professional experiences I am passionate for nurses and nursing. I want to assure

that Michigan nurses will continue have provide their expertise, empathy, patience and

compassion in addition to their expert voices as we move forward into the post pandemic era

of nursing practice and health care.

(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; National Academy of Medicine;

Committee on the Future of Nursing 2020-2030. The Future of Nursing 2020-2030: Charting

a Path to Action.)

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

Thank you for this opportunity to serve.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

PRESIDENT-ELECT

Joshua Meringa, MPA, MHA, MBA, BSN, RN, NPD-BC

Spectrum Health | Nurse Educator & Academic Liaison

Grandville, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have been

in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

ANA – Mentorship program: currently working as a mentor

with 1 mentee, previously worked with 2 mentees last year

• Serve as the Student Nurse Online Community Manager

since 2021

ANA-MI – Served on the Board of Directors as a Director at Large

since 2021

Served on the Nursing & Health Policy Committee for 2 years

• Served on workgroup that developed the ANA-MI COVID-19 Training Program for K-12

Schools

• Served on the Steering Committee for the ANA-MI Nursing Leadership Academy

• Selected to serve on the ANA-MI Bylaws Committee for 2021-2023

WNA (ANA affiliate): I serve as a CEAP Committee Member/Peer Reviewer for the Wisconsin

Nurses Association Continuing Education Approval Program

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

I have been an active member of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing during my

time serving on the Michigan Board of Nursing.

I serve on the program advisory boards for several nursing programs including Michigan

State University, Ferris State University, Grand Rapids Community College, Baker College,

Cornerstone University and Hope College.

I am an adjunct nursing faculty member for Calvin University, Hope College, and Davenport

University.

I am a practice agency representative for Spectrum Health on the West Michigan Clinical

Placement Consortium.

I have worked with DHHS Office of Nursing Programs for the past several years, providing

input into the annual licensing survey of MI nurses.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

I was appointed by Gov Snyder in 2012 and 2016 to represent nurses in practice or

administration with a BSN on the Michigan Board of Nursing (2012-2020)

Elected as Chair of the Michigan Board of Nursing 2013-2020.

Served as a Board of Nursing member on the Administrative Rules Committee and Chaired

the Allegations Committee.

I serve as an elected City Council Member in my home community of Grandville, MI.

I have been involved with the Michigan Municipal League, serving on several legislative

committees and the Elected Officials Academy Board.

I was elected to serve on the Michigan Municipal League Board of Trustees in 2021.

I serve on the Grandville Business Relations Committee and Grandville Parks & Recreation

Board.

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

The strategic focus of the 2022 ANA-MI Strategic Plan aligns closely with my vision for

ANA-MI to be the premier nursing professional organization in Michigan. I am proud to be

a member of this organization, and I am seeking opportunities to become involved in a

leadership capacity, to serve the members, and to further advance the mission and vision of

the organization. I believe my background, knowledge, experience, and previous and current

service to the nursing professional make me an ideal candidate to serve ANA-MI Board in a

leadership role.

This past couple of years, having gone through several waves of the COVID-19 pandemic,

during the proclaimed “Year of the Nurse” no less, has not only highlighted the importance

and value of nursing to our communities, but has also made evident the need for nurses to be

engaged in activities that advance and support the profession and patient care in a variety of

ways. Long the ‘most trusted profession’, nursing has been at the forefront in confronting the

COVID-19 pandemic and raising public awareness and appreciation for the contributions of

the profession.

There are several key issues facing ANA-MI in the coming years:

Advancing nursing leadership and professional development remains a great need within

the profession. In a dynamic field like nursing, we must continue to support and encourage

professional development, advance educational and certification achievement, and continue

to promote both formal and informal continuing professional development opportunities for

all nurses to learn and grow. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for nurses to

be innovative, resilient, and adaptable to ever-changing conditions related to patient care

needs and the healthcare environment. We must continue to seek ways to both encourage

interest and entry into the profession, while seeking to promote greater diversity with the

goal of the profession more closely resembling the makeup of the communities we serve. Our

newest nurses, both in school, and entering the workforce are entering the profession at one

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

of the most challenging times any of us can remember. We need to lift them up and support

them as they develop their practice and build healthy professional behaviors. I believe my

professional experience in nursing education and professional development, both supporting

and providing professional development opportunities for experienced as well as new nurses

and students entering the profession, would serve the organization well to advance these

efforts. Mobilizing new nurses and student nurses about to enter the profession provides an

opportunity to engage the next generation of nurses to advance the organization, as well as

move the profession forward in new ways.

Going virtual for many meetings and other social activities has allowed us to think outside

the box and reimagine what communication, networking, and engagement look like. Virtual

has forced us to develop a level of comfort engaging in new platforms and provides a new

level of convenience to reach members across distances, as well as eliminate travel time and

expense to participate in meetings and other professional development activities. This new

way of conducting business, networking, and connecting people provides opportunities

for improving member engagement, accessibility, and communication. ANA-MI has an

opportunity to capitalize on these technologies to bolster membership engagement, improve

member experience, and deliver value to members in new ways not previously available.

The COVID-19 pandemic has also highlighted the need for nurses to take care of themselves

both physically and mentally so that they can have the capacity to care for others. Nurses

can set an example for health and wellness for the community. The mental health needs of

nurses, perhaps some of the hardest hit from the COVID-19 experience, are likely to be at an

all-time high in the months and years to come. We have an opportunity, and obligation to

support the wellness and well-being of nurses, especially their mental health. During my time

on the Board of Nursing, I reviewed and consulted on many cases of nurses involving mental

health or substance abuse. We need to take care of our own, and support those that are

struggling with these issues, for the safety of patients, as well as to promote the resilience of

the profession.

Bolstering advocacy efforts at the state and national levels remains an important priority for

nurses and ANA. ANA-MI has excellent opportunities to advocate on behalf of the profession

and nurses practicing in all areas and practice settings across the State. We are stronger with

one voice, which can be challenging at times in nursing with so many different specialties

and practice environments represented within the profession. We need to focus on the

issues and concerns that impact all of us, instead of getting caught up on those issues that

we differ on. ANA-MI is poised to be a leader in Michigan representing the voice of nursing

to our legislators and state government officials through sharing our positions on important

healthcare and professional issues of concern. We have opportunities to engage and inform

members like never on important policy matters, as well as educate nurses on the important

role of advocacy within the profession. My background in local government, as well as my 8

years on the Michigan Board of Nursing have providing me insight, and unique experiences

with public policy, nursing regulation, advocacy, and government.

In summary, there are many issues facing nurses in the coming years, and I believe ANA-MI

is well positioned to be at the forefront leading the way to advance the nursing profession.

As an experienced clinician, nurse educator, public servant, and community leader, I believe

my skill set and experience would serve the organization well. I am driven, collaborative,

detail-oriented, conscientious, enthusiastic, engaged, and professional. I am proud to be a

nurse, and I look forward to and am excited for the opportunity to serve the profession and

be a part of these efforts to advance the nursing profession through ANA! Thank you for the

opportunity to be considered for President-Elect of ANA-MI.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

DIRECTOR

Gerardo Infante, BSN, RN

Davita Dialysis | Clinical Coordinator

Ypsilanti, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have

been in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

I have been participating actively in the board as the current

Newly Licensed Director, which I filled for a partial term.

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

NAHN (president) & ANNA (Co-secretary)

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

MHC (Michigan Health Council - Diversity Workgroup)

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

As a recent licensed RN and part of a “double” minority (Hispanic & a male nurse), I can bring

a different perspective to the board to help our nursing colleagues in Michigan.

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

I would love to continue serving in any capacity on the ANA-MI board.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

DIRECTOR

Bethany Skillen, BSN, RN

Mercy Health Physician Partners | Manager for Ambulatory

Geriatrics Programs

Grand Rapids, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have

been in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

I am a member and keep up with ANA-Michigan news and

related information.

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

- HCCI: Home Centered Care Institute

- AAHCM: American Academy of Home Care Medicine

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

- National Home Care Collaborative: a program through Johns Hopkins University and the

John A. Hartford Foundation

- Calvin University School of Health Steering Committee

- Currently being considered for GR City Affordable Housing Fund Board

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

We are in unprecedented times as a state, as a nation and as a planet. We need a strong

and collaborative group of leaders to continue listening, supporting and directing Michigan

Nurses. There is a reason each one of us became a part of the most trusted profession, but

we’re tired, and we need kindness, advocacy and action in order to continue our work. I’d be

honored to represent you as a Director for the ANA-Michigan.

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

I am scheduled to complete my MPA, Master’s in Public Administration, from Kent State University

in May 2022. This degree has challenged me to think across silos and to collaborate

with other disciplines within our communities. True health can only be achieved when we

think of education, access to healthy food, housing, and a fair justice system as components

of health care.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

NEWLY LICENSED DIRECTOR

Alexa Andersen, MA, BSN, RN

Cherry Health | RN Care Manager

Belmont, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have

been in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

I’m a current member of ANA-MI’s Nursing & Health Policy

Committee.

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

Michigan Nurses Association (general member), Michigan Nursing

Students Association (Graduate Consultant & Presidential

Advisor), National Student Nurses’ Association (general member)

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

ANA-MI’s Nursing & Health Policy Committee (member), New Directions for Nurses (Board of

Directors President)

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

When I think about the issues facing ANA-MI at this time, there are two things that come to

my mind: continuing to build & increase participation & engagement, and also the current

health & well-being of our members considering the challenging times we’ve been facing due

to COVID-19. Although building connections with our members is always a consideration, I

believe that the COVID-19 pandemic has made it even more imperative that we engage with

our members & truly understand their needs. I believe that ANA-MI stands at a unique place

to be that resource for nurses too, and that our organization can make a positive impact in

the lives of our members.

I am extremely interested in serving in the Newly Licensed Director role as well & believe

I would be best qualified to carry out the duties of this office for a variety of reasons too.

While in my one-year accelerated second-degree BSN program, I became involved in the

Michigan Nursing Students Association (MNSA) & served as President during 2020 (and

currently as a Graduate Consultant & Presidential Advisor). It was through this involvement

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

that I came to further understand the needs of nursing students & then new nurses. I learned

about ANA & ANA-MI through my involvement with MNSA & in addition to becoming a

general member of ANA following graduation, I became a committee member with ANA-

MI’s Nursing & Health Policy Committee. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my experience so far on this

committee & genuinely seek to become more involved with ANA-MI - and especially help

bring to light & move forward the unique concerns of new nurses in the field. I am a very

relational, positive, & communicative individual, and I believe that it is these qualities & my

past experiences that will greatly aid me in this role as the Newly Licensed Director.

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

I genuinely look forward to getting further involved in ANA-MI through serving as the Newly

Licensed Director. I believe that this would be a tremendous opportunity to connect with new

nurses & help connect them to our wonderful, professional organization - especially during

this extremely challenging time in nursing & healthcare. Thank you for your consideration!

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

NEWLY LICENSED DIRECTOR

Cheri Wollack, RN

Michigan Medicine | Acute Medicine/Telemetry RN Level C

Saline, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have been

in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

As a student at Washtenaw Community College I was a

member of the National Student Nurses’ Association and

collaborated to recruit a speaker for our Human Trafficking

Awareness Event that served the students at WCC as well as

healthcare professionals in the community and provided CEU

credit.

Additionally, I worked with Dr. Joanne Yastik, Director of Nursing at WCC,

to write a proposal for the League for Innovation in the Community College Public Health

2019 grant application. We felt our project entitled “Accessing Oral Health Care and Oral

Health Education Across the Lifespan,” a collaborative effort between our nursing and dental

assisting students, would respond to a need inour community.

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

In addition to ANA and ANA-MI, I am an active member of MNA-UMPNC at Michigan

Medicine. I have also been approved to attend the American Holistic Nurses Association

Conference in June of 2022.

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

Michigan Medicine

I serve on our unit’s UBC committee in the role of Secretary and Vaccine Lead.

- Minute Keeping

- Seeking to improve our quality and safety metrics

- Promoting timely, safe delivery of influenza, pneumonia, and Covid vaccinations to our

patients

I serve on our unit’s Celebrations and Wellness Committee helping to improve the morale and

health of our staff members and reduce burnout.

- Implemented regular Diversity, Equity and Inclusion events

- Promoted opportunities to serve in the community through

- Sleep in Heavenly Peace - building beds for children in need

- HOPE Clinic’s Christmas Program - providing gifts, medical, dental, and mental health care

along with nutritious food, hygiene items, and baby supplies for the underprivileged in our

community

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

I also serve as our M-Healthy Champion and lead our Healthy U program promoting an active

lifestyle among our staff.

In the Community

I volunteered with Hope Clinic’s Healthy You Program (2 sessions)

- Implemented and facilitated a weekly walking group to promote activity among identified

at-risk clients

- Performed regular health checks including vital signs, HgB A-1c monitoring, weight loss

accountability, and spiritual care

- Promoted healthy dietary choices by providing nutrition information and cost-effective

recipes for our clients

- Mobilized nurse volunteers on 8B to provide health education and supplies for the

community New Life Church | City Staff and Volunteer

- Mentored high school students, single professionals and hosted youth events

- Coached adult volunteers

- Donor recruitment and communication

- Lead and engaged youth on various personal growth, leadership retreats and service trips-

- Counseled youth and adults in a variety of areas including personal growth, mental health,

spiritual well-being, marriage relationships, etc.

Certifications

Youth Mental Health First Aid USA Certified (Exp. Nov. 2022)

RN to BSN Degree from EMU (Projected Graduation Summer 2022)

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

As a new nurse beginning my career during the Coronavirus pandemic I have experienced

firsthand the challenges our colleagues are facing on a daily basis with no definite end

in sight: emotional and physical burnout fueled by inadequate staffing and unsafe nursetopatient

ratios, mental-health concerns and childcare issues related to educational

fluctuations and isolation, fear and anxiety related to what the future will hold, not to mention

the financial pressures many of us face.

We wear many hats. We are spouses, parents, family members, caregivers, students, mentors,

coaches, and volunteers. We are nursing professionals who give our very best to our patients,

yet we struggle with exhaustion and moral conflict as we feel like it is never enough to meet

the magnitude of needs surrounding us. Our resources are stretched thin. With patient

safety and adequate staffing absorbing much time and energy, mentoring and professional

development have suffered, leaving new nurses feeling disenfranchised and inadequately

prepared. And then there is the allure of travel nursing’s inflated salaries enticing nurses

away from their “home-base” leaving a shortage of RNs to “hold down the fort”. We cannot

minimize the emotional impact of witnessing coworkers leave the profession or move on to

greener pastures on those who stay behind.

Meanwhile, violence and verbal aggression towards nurses continues to be an issue, further

depleting our emotional bank-accounts. We are so busy working and caring and giving

out, but feeling isolated from relationships with no time to process our grief. As individual

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

nurses we can feel powerless to effect change. This is why I feel so passionate about serving

on ANA-Michigan’s Board as a Newly Licensed Director. I want to provide a voice for my

amazing colleagues in the trenches who work with such patience, skill and determination

to provide excellent patient care, but are burning out and feeling unsupported in their

profession. As an individual I can care for a handful of patients in a day, but in a leadership

position I can advocate for and promote change that will benefit Michigan’s nurses and all of

our patients collectively.

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

I would like to express my strong interest in the Newly Licensed Director position with

ANA-Michigan. As you are aware, I am a practicing Acute Medicine & Telemetry nurse at

the University of Michigan Hospital pursuing an RN to BSN completion program at EMU

with projected graduation of summer 2022. I believe my educational training and work

experiences have prepared me well for serving on the board.

As a student at WCC I had the privilege of advocating for and setting up an educational

Human Trafficking event for our Student Nurses Association, representing my class by

demonstrating nursing skills at our National League for Nursing Center of Excellence

celebration attended by former Governor Snyder, writing a public health grant proposal for

the League for Innovation in the Community with my Director of Nursing, and giving the

Pinning Speech at my nursing cohort’s convocation. These varied experiences challenged me

to grow intellectually and as a leader.

During my time as a Fundraiser/Donor Liaison with RUN Global I was responsible for

recruiting and mobilizing a richly diverse team of individuals to invest their time and

resources in a worthwhile cause. This - in addition to my work mentoring youth and young

adults at New Life Church, first as a volunteer for 6 years, then as an employee, greatly

reinforced my interpersonal communication skills that will undoubtedly contribute to my

success in this role.

Finally, my varied experiences serving clients in their homes and working as a patient care

tech and now as a registered nurse at the University of Michigan have solidified my passion

to serve individuals at their most vulnerable, and my commitment to provide excellent and

compassionate care. Over the past three years I have had the unique advantage of building

mutual trust and rapport with the outstanding staff at Michigan Medicine, serving on our UBC

committee and implementing evidence based interventions to improve our quality and safety

metrics, developing a comfort level with the specific patient population we serve daily, and to

see first hand the important role we play in quality of life outcomes for the patient and family.

My desire is to make a significant impact right away if I am selected for the Newly Licensed

Director Position. My colleagues and supervisors can attest to my work ethic, professionalism,

and resourcefulness in accomplishing goals. Recognizing that this is a challenging time for

everyone in the nursing profession and in our community, I want to sincerely thank you for

your time and consideration.

Warm Regards,

Cheri Wollack, RN

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE

Joyce Reder, MSN, RN

Education and Training Connection | Instructor

Bay City, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have been

in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

I have served on the Nominations Committee for the last two

years and would like to serve again. This is the only position I

have served on in the past.

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

I am not a member of any other professional nursing organization

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

I have not served on any other committee.

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

I received my ADN in 1993 from Delta College, University Center, Michigan. I received my

BSN and then an MSN in nursing education from Regis University in Denver, Colorado. I am

currently in the DNP program at Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, Michigan.

I have 27 years of nursing experience in direct patient care including working in the acutecare

setting and in the intensive care unit. I also have experience as a contracted provider in

private-duty nursing. For the past six years I have been focusing on teaching and have taught

clinical and classroom courses for several universities and colleges in my area. I particularly

enjoy clinical instruction because I get to know my students very well.

An issue that I strongly believe in in minimum education requirements for new nurses. There

is so much more new graduates need to know to practice safely than when I graduated in

1993. This is not to say that the profession doesn’t appreciate all that the ADN nurses have

contributed, but new technologies, medications, treatment protocols, and evidence-based

methods require a working knowledge of nursing research and theory. These subjects may

not even be introduced in Associate degree programs. I practiced with an Associate degree

for 15 years before going back to school. To those on the fence about returning for a higher

degree, it is difficult, but we need to support each other and encourage nurses to pursue

higher degrees for the benefit of the profession and our patients.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

I have enjoyed serving on the nominations committee for the last two years. I have made

some connections with other nurse leaders and I better understand the responsibilities of

serving for a professional organization. I hope you will consider me for another two-year term

on the nominations committee.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE

Sherry Thompson, MSN, RN

Hope Network | Nursing Coordinator

Grand Blanc, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have been

in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

While I have not been able to participate previously due to

my pursuit of higher education. I am now looking forward to

participating actively in the American Nurses Association.

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

Black Nurses Rock; Actively involved in my church

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

Suicide prevention programs.

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

Nursing shortages and the recruitment of more minority nurses and future minority nursing

students. As a nurse I have experienced exhaustion, mandates, and a lack of general

appreciation that hospital administrators have for the nursing profession. As a minority

nurse and nursing educator, I have experienced first, hand a lack of diversity, lack of support,

lack of promotional opportunities and support of minority nurses. On the educational level

minority nurses are unfortunately questioned disproportionately in their knowledge and

competency unfairly. Because of the experience I know that I can be a positive voice for

change and innovation in reversing these trends.

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

I look forward to having the opportunity to work with the American Nurses Association in

sharing ideas and promoting the nursing profession to its highest level.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

ANA-MICHIGAN NURSES FOUNDATION DIRECTOR

2 YEAR TERM

Linda Bond, MSN, PhD

Retired, Kirkhof College of Nursing, Grand Valley State

University | Professor Emerita, Nursing

Kentwood, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have

been in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

Current: ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation Advisory Board

Past: Past President Region 3; Past Region 3 Representative

to the Board; Nominations Committee

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

Currently, none. Past: NLN; Sigma Theta Tau, Kappa Epsilon Chapter;

AWHONN

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

I represented the Dean’s Office, Kirkhof College of Nursing Alumni Board - major project,

establish GVSU Nursing Alumni Scholarship. Board of Directors, (Founding Member); The

Bonnie Wesorick Center for Health Care Transformation, endowed center located within

the Kirkhof College of Nursing, Grand Valley State University.

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

Of the many issues, these two are central: supporting nurses in practice; and increasing the

number of nurses entering the profession. As a retired nurse, these are areas where I can

help. The newly established ANA-MI Nurses Foundation’s mission speaks to these two issues.

Having had the opportunity to be a part of the team that is working to actualize the work of

the Foundation, I would like continue that work.

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

I have had the priviledge this past year to work with a tremendous group of nurse leaders

and ANA-MI staff to create the structure for the recently established ANA-MI Nurses

Foundation. I would like to continue to be a part of Board of Directors as that work continues

and fund raising continues to be able to actualize the goals identified for our first year of

operation.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

ANA-MICHIGAN NURSES FOUNDATION DIRECTOR

2 YEAR TERM

Jonnie Hamilton

DNP, MSHSA, PNP-BC, NE-BC, RN

Ascension MI Community Health School-Based Health

Centers | Manager

Detroit, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have

been in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

I have been a member of ANA since 1973 currently life

Member of Michigan Nurses Association Member of ANA-

Michigan since its founding Served on many committees in

both Michigan Nurses Association and ANA Michigan Currently a

member of the founding ANA-Michigan Foundation.

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

National Black Nurses Association

Detroit Black Nurses Association

National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners and Michigan Chapter

Chi Eta Phi Sorority, Incorporated Professional Nurses Association

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Incorporated

Sigma Theta Tau Nurses Honor Society

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

Currently Vice President of Detroit Black Nurses Assoc.

National First Vice President Chi Eta Phi Sorority, Inc.

Board Member of Delta Manor

Chair Advocacy Social Health Policy Committee and Protocol Committees for Lambda Chi

Chapter. Chi Eta Phi Sorority, Inc.

Serve on Membership, Community Outreach and Social Action Committees for Detroit

Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

As a long time member of ANA and ANA-Michigan I keep current on issues that affect

the practice of nursing and the well-being of nurses. Currently issues that are facing

the organization are the Nursing Shortage, and practice issues as well as organizational

membership. As I have been a part of the implementation of the Foundation I think I would

make a excellent director due the work that I have already put in over the past ten months

to bring this organization to fruition. I am qualified due to my long and continued work with

non-profits and community organizations. I helped write the duties and can carry them out.

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

As a long time member of the organization having served in numerous capacities on the

national level as a delegate for 15 years on the State level and committee chairs and members

and on the chapter level (prior to the reorganization) as treasurer and committee member.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

ANA-MICHIGAN NURSES FOUNDATION DIRECTOR

2 YEAR TERM

Myrna Holland, MSN, BSN, RN

Retired (Providence - Ascension)

Elk Rapids, MI

None

What activities are you currently involved with or have

been in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

Advisory Board for the ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation;

Past President, Board Member of Region 2 (Northern) of

ANA-MI; Founding member of RN-AIM

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

Volunteer, Munson Medical Center (MMC), Traverse City

Volunteer, Elk Rapids Community Cupboard, 501(c)(3)

Past Board of Directors, Northern Health Plan, 501(c)(3)

Past President & Board member of MMC Volunteers

Past Volunteer Representative on Munson Healthcare

Advocacy Committee

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

The nursing shortage is a critical issue facing the profession and ANA-MI. For its initial year

the ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation (Foundation) has set goals to address the shortage

through providing scholarships to pre-licensure nursing students and to provide non-tuition

personal need grants to allow students to focus completing their nursing education. The

mission and values of the Foundation were established by the Foundation’s advisory board

to be in sync with the ANA-MI’s current strategic plan and is organized to operate through

philanthropic work to support the ANA-MI mission of advancing the nursing profession.

A prime goal of the Foundation is to raise funds to support their work. I strongly believe

that as nurses we need to contribute to the growth and well-being of our nurse colleagues.

By serving as a volunteer and by being both a legacy and annual donor to several charities,

I have an appreciation of what prompts one to give and I have no problem in asking others

to donate. I want to see the Foundation grow to meet the 4-Star criteria of groups such as

Charity Navigator and to be seen as a source help, hope and pride by Michigan nurses. As a

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

ANA-MICHIGAN NURSES FOUNDATION DIRECTOR

2 YEAR TERM

Linda Taft, RN

Retired/Community Vaccinator

Clinton Township, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have been

in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

Currently serving as an Advisory Board Member for the ANA-

Michigan Nurses Foundation for it’s development and launch.

Past President, President Elect and Secretary for ANA-MI and

service on multiple committees and workgroups (Nominations,

Bylaws, Governance).

Member, ANA Nominations and Elections Committee (NEC) (2022-

2023). Past Member, ANA Leadership Council Executive Committee

(LCEC). Membership Assembly representative, multiple years.

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

None at present.

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

Served on Michigan Board of Nursing, Health Professionals Recovery Committee, COMON

in leadership positions. Also represented Michigan at NCSBN during tenure on the Board of

Nursing.

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

ANA-Michigan is taking a multi-faceted approach to address the many challenges facing the

nursing profession through education, support, advocacy and policy making. We are not only

facing (and working through) the largest pandemic ever seen, but must also be positioned to

improve conditions and compensation for nurses.

I am seeking this position as I believe our newly formed Foundation will be well positioned to

inform, educate and support nurses as they navigate through their personal and professional

paths as nurses. I support our Foundation’s Mission and Values, and am excited for the

opportunity to serve in this capacity if elected.

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

No further comments.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

ANA-MICHIGAN NURSES FOUNDATION DIRECTOR

Katherine Dontje, PhD, RN

Michigan State University | Associate Professor

Bath, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have been

in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

My experience with ANA-Michigan includes serving as

treasurer and then president of reginal Six. Over the last six

years I have been on the Board of Directors. In addition, I have

served on the Practice Committee as a member than as chair

of that group for 4 years. I am completing my tenure on the

ANA-MI Board of Directors this Spring. I am presently serving as

an Advisory Board Member of the ANA-MI Foundation and

would like to continue that role as a director

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

I am a member of several professional organizations these include Michigan Council of Nurse

Practitioners, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, National Organization of Nurse

Practitioner Faculty and Sigma Theta Tau. In addition, I serve as an evaluator for Commission

on Collegiate Nursing Education. I also serve as a grant reviewer for the Health Resources

and Services Administration.

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

I have served as President of Sigma Theta Tau Alpha Psi Chapter, Present of the local chapter

of Michigan Council of Nurse Practitioners. I was a member of the Primary Care Consortium

which focused on bring multidisciplinary groups together on Primary care issues and

concerns. I also feel that my role as project lead on two large HRSA grants is relevant to this

position. As Project Director I am responsible for organizing the activities and monitoring

finances.

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

During the last few years nurses have faced a number of challenges, the most significant of

these is the COVID-19 Pandemic. Due to this healthcare crisis, nurse especially those in front-

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

line positions in hospitals and extended care facility have been under an extreme amount

of stress. These nurses are facing many diverse challenges that have not been experience

in the past. This has resulted in nurses leaving the profession due to stressful working

conditions. The biggest issue facing ANA-MI and all major professional nursing organizations

is how to best support nurses that are feeling overwhelmed emotionally and financially due

to the changing health care environment. One way ANA- MI is addressing this issue is the

establishment of the ANA-MI Nurses Foundation which has been established to provide

financial support to nursing students and nurses across the state through scholarships and

grants to those in need. I feel my position as an ANA-MI Board member and my participation

in establishing the framework for the Foundation makes me highly qualified to continue to

participate in the leadership of this group

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

I feel the ANA-MI Nurses Foundation is an important addition to ANA-MI and will provide

opportunity to support nurses across the state and would like to be part of the process of

getting this organization established.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

ANA-MICHIGAN NURSES FOUNDATION DIRECTOR

3 YEAR TERM

MaryLee Pakieser, MSN, RN, FNP-BC

Advanced Correctional Healthcare, Inc. | NP

Traverse City, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have been

in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

ANA-MICHIGAN - Current

- Advisory board member for the ANA-Michigan Nurses

Foundation

- Nominations Committee (2021 -2022)

ANA - Current

- ANA-PAC Leadership Society 2020 to present , Chair 1/2021

- Nominations Committee 2020 -2022

- APRN Task Force 2021 to present

- RNAction Influncers Task Force 9/2021 to present

ANA-MICHIGAN - Past

- Nomination Committee Chair 2016-2018

- President 2014-2016

- President -Elect 2012-2014

- Public Policy Council 2012-2014 ,2016-2018

- Michigan Delegate to ANA Member Assembly 2012,2014-2016

ANA - Past

- Board of Director Member at Large 1/2018-12/2019

- Committee on Appointments 2018 -2019

- Committee on Honorary Awards 2019

- ANA-PAC 1/2018 -12/2019 , Vice - chair 2019

- Task Force on Value Pricing 2015-2019

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

- Michigan Council of Nurse Practitioners (MICNP) 2002 to present

- MICNP PAC 2013 to present

- Membership committee 2020 to present

- President 2011-2012

- President-elect 2010-2011

- Past President 2012-2013

- Board member 2006-2010

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

- Traverse Area District Library Board of Trustees appointed 2019 and reappointed for a four

year term 2020 , elected as Secretary 2020

- Northwest Michigan College / Dennos Art Museum Docent 2015 to present

- 2011-2013 Michigan Department of Community Health Task Force on Nursing Practice, chair

of the subgroup on advanced practice issues

- Safe Harbor Homeless Shelter volunteer 2012 to present

- Michigan Center Rural Health Board 2004 -2010

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

I would like to address three issues facing ANA-MI. The first is the sustainability of the

nursing workforce. This is an issue with national and global perspectives, but it is of particular

concern for me here close to home. Prior to 2020 we were already working to alleviate

a shortage of RNs. Now, two-years into the Covid-19 pandemic we are experiencing an

acceleration of the staffing shortage. The pandemic has been unrelenting and has hit nurses

particularly hard with physical and emotional stressors. Without licensed nurses, patients

will suffer. We need the type of nursing leadership that ANA-MI cultivates to recruit the

next generation of clinical leaders, while supporting current frontline staff in these difficult

environments.

The second issue is the visibility of nursing. This has been a long-standing priority for me

and one I will continue to highlight. ANA-MI is in the position to continue advocating that

nursing leadership is at the table as healthcare continues to evolve and change. We have

a unique voice that champions our patient populations, and we need to make sure that we

represent them in being part of the solution. By collaborating with other nursing and clinical

organizations, we can drive innovative solutions to this complex challenge.

The final issue I would like to discuss is continuation of a culture at ANA-MI that is vibrant,

energetic and creative – that welcomes all RNs to participate and makes sure they feel like

they belong. Advocating for diversity in our membership base, committee structures and

Board of Directors so that we reflect the communities we serve. However, the true gift of

diversity is inclusion – encouraging diverse perspectives and listening to different ideas;

inviting everyone to be involved at their level of comfort – and asking for a little more.

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

Serving on the Advisory Board of the ANA-MI Nurses Foundation has given me a perspective

of hope for the future, that I would like to continue as a Director on the Foundation Board.

The work of the foundation is to foster nurses helping nurses which resonates with me at

a deep level. What I bring to the foundation is a long history of involvement in nonprofit

organizations, curiosity, creativity, and the ability to work in a group. Having served on the

Advisory Board has provided me insight into the legal and financial structure needed for a

foundation to succeed. It will take focused efforts to raise the capital needed to advance

the philanthropic mission. By creating an organization that builds nurses up and encourages

them to engage at the workplace, in the community, at a government level we all win. At this

point in my career, I believe we can overcome the challenges the nursing community faces by

developing effective leaders. I want to be involved in this effort and I can provide guidance,

passion and energy that will move the mission forward.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2022 ANA-MI LEADERSHIP CANDIDATE

ANA-MICHIGAN NURSES FOUNDATION DIRECTOR

3 YEAR TERM

Carole Stacy, MSN, MA, RN

McLaren | Carenow Clinic Nurse

Dimondale, MI

What activities are you currently involved with or have been

in the past related to ANA-Michigan or ANA?

ANA Executive Leadership Council, ANA-Michigan

Nominations Committee, ANA-Michigan Past President.

What other professional organizations are you involved with?

ANA, National Holistic Nurse Association, Michigan

Organization of Nurse Leaders

What other elected, appointed offices or community activities relevant to this position

have you been involved with?

Volunteer with Ingham County Health Department for Covid clinics

Please write a statement that indicates your view on issues facing ANA-Michigan? Indicate

why you want to serve in this role and why you are best qualified to carry out the duties of

this office? This statement will be shared publicly with the membership.

I want to serve on the ANA Foundation for a variety of reasons. As an ANA-Michigan

member since it’s inception it has been a primary goal of mine to see ANA-Michigan have a

foundation. As a Foundation board member you are entrusted to care for the foundation’s

philanthropic resources and to take a long-term view of how things may be different 5 or 10

years ahead and not just our nursing world as it is today today. A Foundation Board member

has three overarching duties: Duty of Care, Duty of Loyalty and Duty of Obedience. I would

commit to following all of these to the best of my ability.

If elected to the Foundation I bring knowledge of how a board needs to work, boundless

energy, and expertise on the culture of nursing. Having been involved in nursing at the state

and national levels I bring connections and relationships from a wide range of contacts and

experiences and the ability to forge strong partnerships.

Please include any other additional comments you would like to add.

I have no other comments other than I knew Doretha Milbrandt and saw her as a nursing icon.

I think a foundation would be exactly what she would want to see for ANA-Michigan.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

CHAMPIONS FOR NURSING

PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

The 2021 ANA-Michigan Champions for Nursing Partnership Program is an

enhancement of the current Organizational Affiliate Program.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

ANA-Michigan invites individuals and organizations to

CHAMPIONS FOR NURSING

take part in the Champions for Nursing Partnership Program

PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

(CNPP), an enhancement to the pre-existing Organizational

Affiliate Program. The CNPP benefits are designed to provide a

mutually valuable and long-term partnership between ANA-MI and the

supporter. CNPP offers multiple levels to allow for different tiers

of engagement.

BENEFITS OF CNPP

• Complimentary subscription to ANA-Michigan’s weekly e-newsletter

• Complimentary subscription to ANA-Michigan’s quarterly publication, The Future of Nursing

• Discounted ANA-Michigan member rates

• Priority consideration for other ANA-Michigan sponsorship opportunities

By becoming a part of the CNPP, members of the ANA-Michigan will receive

enhanced,diverse and more inclusive resources that support our mission, vision and

strategic plan.

Mission: Advancing the nursing profession in Michigan.

Vision: ANA-Michigan is a vital community of professional nurses in Michigan. Together,

we are the experts in nursing practice. Our strength is our solution-focused thought

leadership, our long-term view of the nursing profession in a dynamic healthcare

environment, and our impact on quality care and patient safety.

2020-21 Goals: Advancing Nurses Leadership, Engaging Membership Experience and

Bolster Advocacy.

CNPP LEVELS

Marketing and promotion of partners with CNPP would begin immediately in

2021. The payment and agreement are based on a calendar year.

• Individual Ally - $250 Minimum annual contribution

• Bronze - $500

• Silver - $1,000

• Gold - $2,000

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

BENEFITS BY LEVEL

CHAMPIONS FOR NURSING

PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

INDIVIDUAL ALLY BRONZE SILVER GOLD

$250+ $500 $1,000 $2,000

ADVERTISING

Recognition on ANA-Michigan’s

champions webpage including

company logo (or name if individual

ally) and a link to website or webpage

of choice

Introduction of new champion

notification email blast to

ANA-Michigan membership

Submit an article or banner ad for

weekly e-newsletter

Recognition as a champion in

ANA-Michigan publication

1 PER YEAR

1 PER YEAR 2 PER YEAR 4 PER YEAR

Opportunity to submit an educational

article for ANA-Michigan publication 1 ISSUE 2 ISSUES 4 ISSUES

List events on ANA-Michigan’s online

calendar of events & in weekly

e-newsletter

Email blast to members with

information/links from champion to all

ANA-Michigan members

Sliding banner ad on ANA-Michigan

website home page

1 PER YEAR 2 PER YEAR 4 PER YEAR

6 MONTHS 12 MONTHS

Post on all ANA-Michigan social media

channels

Provide informational webinar/meeting

of choice to ANA-Michigan membership

2 PER YEAR 6 PER YEAR 12 PER YEAR

1 PER YEAR 1 PER YEAR

ANA-Michigan list of active members

EXCLUSIVE FACE TIME WITH ANA-MICHIGAN EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP

Opportunity to present for up to 10

minutes on the topic of your choice &

provide materials to the Board of

Directors and/or ANA-Michigan

leadership

ANNUAL CONFERENCE

ANNUALLY

1 PER YEAR

Exhibitor’s Video (virtual exhibit)

1 PER YEAR 1 PER YEAR

Champion recognition -verbal, signage,

website, and break slides

Champion recognition on companion

app NAME ONLY LOGO LOGO

Advertisement in attendee program

materials with live links LOGO ONLY 1/2 PAGE FULL PAGE

Recognition as a general event sponsor

Priority selection of Annual Virtual

Conference sponsorship opportunities

Complimentary registration to virtual

social event at Annual Conference

Complimentary full package registration

to virtual Annual Conference

1 FULL

PACKAGE

2 FULL

PACKAGES

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

2021 CNPP Partner List

First Last Company Sponsorship Level

Robert Upton Indiana Wesleyan University Bronze

Gerardo Infante National Association of Hispanic Nurses Michigan Silver

Chapter (NAHN-MI)

Brenna Youngs NSO Silver

Amy Johnson Oakland University School of Nursing Silver

Mike Lazusky Olivet College RN+BSN Program Gold

Natasha Bischoff The Morel Company Bronze

Lauren Paton University of Detroit Mercy Bronze

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

ANA-MICHIGAN NURSES FOUNDATION

Since the beginning of ANA-Michigan’s establishment as an organization, a long-term goal was to

eventually establish a 501(c)3 foundation. This was needed for the association to have additional

avenues to impact the well-being of nurses. There was a strong need to enlarge and use the donation

that was received by the estate of Dorothea Milbrandt into something that would attract tax-exempt

charitable donations and grants to fund educational and research activities, as well as provide a

dedicated foundation for members of the public to contribute their support of nursing.

At the end of 2020, the realization of this goal started to become a reality. The ANA-Michigan Board

of Directors appointed seven long-term association members to serve as an advisory board. They

were tasked with the following:

• Set the mission and vision

• Establish strategic goals

• Determine the official name of the foundation

• Establish bylaws

• Establish size and composition of the board

• Establish an MOU between the foundation and the ANA-Michigan Board of Directors

The advisory board first met on March 26, 2021. Along with ANA-Michigan staff, those initial tasks and

goals were completed in under a year. The ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation was officially approved

as a 501(c)3 by the State of Michigan, and the following additional milestones have been reached:

• The foundation website was set up: www.ana-michigan.foundation

• The advisory board participated in a webinar on fundraising best practices

• A system to receive online donations, both one-time and recurring, was put in place

• A $10,000 fundraising goal was set for 2021 and it was met and surpassed.

• The foundation was officially launched in the fall of 2021.

The American Nurses Association – Michigan Nurses Foundation, was officially launched at an evening

Awards and Recognition Fundraiser that was held at the Ann Arbor Marriott Ypsilanti at Eagle Crest on

Tuesday, November 16, 2021. Honored guest speaker for the event was Dr. Ernest Grant, the current

President of the American Nurses Association.

“We were thrilled to launch the foundation, after many months of hard work and dedication on

behalf of the Foundation Advisory Board,” said Tobi Lyon, Executive Director of ANA-Michigan. “The

Foundation is poised to do great work as they focus on raising funds for the many needs of nursing

across the state of Michigan.”

Through the power of philanthropy, the ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation promotes and advances

Michigan nurses and the profession through the support of professional development, education,

scholarly work, research opportunities, and personal needs. They envision being the premier nursing

foundation that shapes the profession by energizing and mobilizing their resources.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

“The creation of this foundation is the culmination of great ideas and the dedication needed to turn

them into actions,” said Myrna Holland, RN, MSN, a member of the Foundation Advisory Board. “With

the foundation officially up and running, we can shift our focus to raising funds and allocating them

to the areas of nursing that need it the most. Our work is just beginning.”

A campaign to raise $10,000.00 by soliciting donations of “$1.00 Per Year for Each Year You’ve Been

a Nurse” was successful in reaching its fundraising goal. This allowed for development of plans for

two (2) $2,500.00 scholarships to be awarded in 2022; Scholarship for Academic Excellence and

the Dorothea Milbrandt Leadership Scholarship. In support of personal needs, a $500.00 Personal

Assistance Grant is in development, as well.

Donations can be made through our foundation website: www.ana-michigan.foundation via credit

card, PayPal or by downloading a form and mailing a check to the address on the form. Donations

are tax-deductible, as ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation is a 501(c)3 organization.

The ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation Advisory Board

Linda Bond, MSN, PhD

Susan Meeker, MSN, RN

Kathy Dontje, PhD, FNP-BC, FAANP

MaryLee Pakieser, MSN, RN, FNP-BC

Jonnie Hamilton, DNP, PNP-BC, NE-BC

Linda Taft, RN

Myrna Holland, MSN, RN

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation Mission, Vision and Values

Introduction:

Established in 2021, the ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation is a tax-exempt, charitable 501(c)(3)

organization. ANA-Michigan Nurses Foundation seeks to provide access to education and research

opportunities to advance the future of the nursing profession. The Foundation relies on the generosity

of its donors to fund scholarships and grants year after year.

Mission:

Through the power of philanthropy, we promote and advance Michigan nurses and the profession

through the support of professional development, education, scholarly work, research opportunities,

and personal needs.

Vision:

The premier nursing foundation that shapes the profession by energizing and mobilizing our resources.

Values:

• Education – foster professional and personal development

• Equity – embrace fairness and justice

• Excellence –promote the highest level of nursing practice

• Compassion – serve and support Michigan nurses and the community

• Integrity – act with ethical intent and transparency

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

American Nurses Association-Michigan Nurses Foundation

BYLAWS

ARTICLE I—NAME, OFFICES, PURPOSE

Section 1. Name

The name of the organization, a Michigan not-for-profit corporation, is American Nurses Association-

Michigan Nurses Foundation (the “Foundation”).

Section 2. Offices

The Foundation shall maintain a registered office in the State of Michigan and a registered agent at

such office. The Foundation may have other offices within or without the state.

Section 3. Purposes

The purpose of the Foundation as set forth in its Articles of Incorporation is to establish and support

programs initiated by the Foundation to do the following:

a. Improve the professional and educational advancement of nurses.

b. Facilitate leadership development.

c. Encourage nursing research.

d. Support professional health and wellness.

e. Promote the professional image of nursing.

Section 4. Charitable Organization

A related purpose of the Foundation, as also set forth in it Articles of Incorporation, is to be and

remain a tax-exempt charitable organization under Section 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code

of 1986, as amended (or any corresponding provision of any future United States Internal Revenue

law). Therefore, the Foundation and all persons acting for or on behalf of it in pursuing its purposes

shall:

a. Adhere and abide by all provisions of Section 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code

of 1986, as amended (or any corresponding provision of any future United States Internal

Revenue law) such that the Foundation remains a non-profit entity.

ARTICLE II— MEMBERS

Section 1. Classes of Members

The Foundation shall have no members.

ARTICLE III —BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Section 1. General Powers

The affairs of the Foundation shall be managed by its Board of Directors.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Section 2. Number

The Foundation Board of Directors shall be a minimum of nine (9) and a maximum of fifteen (15)

members. Nine members from the ANA-Michigan membership will be elected by the ANA-Michigan

membership in conjunction with the annual election. An additional one to six community members

can be appointed by the Foundation Board of Directors.

Section 3. Elections

Directors shall be elected each year by the membership of ANA-Michigan at the appointed time

either prior to or during its annual meeting. The elections shall be separate and by secret ballot and

by the same tellers as are provided for the ANA-Michigan elections.

Section 4. Term of Office

Each director shall hold office for a term of two (2) years. No director shall serve more than three

(3) consecutive terms. The terms of the directors shall be staggered.

Section 5. Elections

The officers of the Foundation shall be elected annually by the Board of Directors at the first regular

meeting of the Foundation following the ANA-Michigan Annual Assembly. Vacancies may be filled, or

new offices created and filled at any meeting of the Board of Directors.

Section 6. Vacancies

Any vacancy or vacancies on the Board of Directors will be filled for the balance of the unexpired

term by a majority vote of the Foundation Board of Directors.

Section 7. Qualifications

Directors shall hold an active membership in ANA-Michigan. Appointed community members must be

a Michigan resident to serve on the Foundation, but not hold an Officer position. No more than two

(2) members of the ANA-Michigan Board of Directors may serve as members of the Foundation Board

of Directors.

Section 8. Annual Meeting and Reporting

The Foundation President, or their designee, shall report to the membership of ANA-Michigan on

financials, activities, programs, and other pertinent activities of the Foundation at the ANA-Michigan

Annual Assembly.

Section 9. Regular Meetings

Directors shall meet a minimum of at least twice (2) annually. Notice of all regular meetings shall be

given at least one (1) month in advance.

Section 10. Special Meetings

Special meetings of the Board of Directors may be called by the President or any three (3) directors,

and the person(s) calling a special meeting of the Board shall set the time and manner (in person,

electronically or by conference call) of meeting.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

Section 11. Notice

The notice or waiver of notice of meeting of the Board need not specify the business to be transacted

at, nor the purpose of, such meeting unless specifically required by law or these Bylaws. Notice

of any special meeting of the Board of Directors shall be given at least five (5) days in advance by

written notice to each director.

Section 12. Quorum

At all meetings of the Board of Directors a majority of the total number of directors then in office

and at least one officer shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. If less than a

majority of the directors is present at any meeting, a majority of the directors’ present may adjourn

the meeting to another time without further notice. Withdrawal of directors from any meeting shall

not cause failure of a duly constituted quorum at that meeting.

Section 13. Removal

Any officer elected by the Board of Directors may be removed by the Board whenever in its judgment

the best interests of the Foundation would be served thereby.

ARTICLE IV—OFFICERS

Section 1. Composition

The officers of the Foundation shall be President, Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer.

Section 2. Responsibilities

a. The President shall:

i. Serve as the principal elective officer of the Foundation.

ii. Preside over the meetings of the Board of Directors and Executive Committee.

iii. Supervise all administrative matters, business, and affairs of the Foundation as

directed by the Board of Directors and in conjunction with the Executive Director of the

Foundation.

iv. Serve as an ex-officio member of any committees, task forces or ad-hoc committees of

the Foundation.

v. Serve as an ex-officio member, without vote, on the ANA-Michigan Board of Directors.

b. The Vice President shall:

i. Assume the duties of the Foundation President in his/her absence.

ii. Serve as a member of the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee.

iii. Assist the President in the performance of the duties of the office whenever requested

to do so.

c. The Secretary shall be accountable for the record keeping and reporting of meetings of the

Foundation.

d. The Treasurer shall be accountable for the fiscal affairs of the Foundation and shall provide

reports and interpretation on the financial conditions of the Foundation, as may be requested,

to the Board of Directors.

e. The Executive Director of ANA-Michigan shall also be the Executive Director of the Foundation

and shall:

i. Function as the chief operating officer of the Foundation and have the responsibility to

manage the day-to-day business of the Foundation according to policies established by

the Board of Directors.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

ii. Be accountable to the Board of Directors and report to the President on a regular basis.

iii. Be an ex-officio member of the Board of Directors, without voting rights.

iv. May act as Secretary of the Foundation, as directed by either the President or the

Secretary.

ARTICLE V—COMMITTEES

Section 1. Creation of Committees

The Board of Directors can designate standing or special committees, as it deems appropriate. Each

committee shall consist of such persons as the Board shall appoint.

ARTICLE VI—AMENDMENTS

Section 1. Amendments with Notice

These Bylaws may be amended at any regular meeting of the Foundation by a majority vote, provided

that the amendment(s) has been submitted in writing to all directors at least 30 days prior to such

meeting.

Section 2. Amendments without Notice

These Bylaws may be amended without notice at any regular meeting by a two-thirds vote of those

present and voting.

ARTICLE V—DISSOLUTION

Section 1. Dissolution

Upon the termination, dissolution or winding up of the Foundation, the Board of Directors shall,

after paying or making provisions for the payment of all liabilities, distribute all assets of the

Foundation to an organization or organizations as are organized and operated exclusively for one or

more exempt purposes within the meaning of Section 501(c) (3) or 501(c)(6) of the Internal Revenue

Code. Any such assets not so disposed of shall be disposed of as designated by the Board of Directors

or as directed by the Ingham County Circuit Court, exclusively for such purposes.

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

POSITION STATEMENT

ENHANCED NURSE LICENSURE COMPACT

On April 13, 2018, the ANA-MI Board of Directors voted

to support the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact, that

would permit Michigan to join the current 30 states who

are part of the “enhanced nurse licensure compact”. The

Public Policy Council studied and discussed in-depth

strengths and weaknesses. The Council and Board

members held a “learning session” on the eNLC with

a presentation by a representative from the National

Council of State Boards of Nursing. The Council

recommended SUPPORT with the provision that the MI

Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (MI-

DLARA) does not pass on the costs of implementation of

the eNLC through another increase in the nurse licensure

fees. The legislature doubled Michigan nurse licensure

renewal fees in 2017.

WHAT IS THE NURSE LICENSURE COMPACT?

The NLC allows a registered nurse (RN) or licensed

practical nurse (LPN) to possess a multistate license,

which permits practice in both their home state and

other compact states, while maintaining the primary state

of residence. Unless the nurse is under discipline or

restriction, a multistate license permits practice (physically

or telephonically/electronically) across state lines in all

NLC states.

WHAT IS THE RATIONALE FOR ANA-MI’s SUPPORT

OF eNLC?

The Council first considered:

Is this bill consistent with the tenets of ANA-MI’s Policy

Platform?

FACTORS INFLUENCING SUPPORT FOR THE BILL

• There is an increase in nursing practice and patient

care access across state lines (care coordination,

occupational health, etc.)

• Regional or national health crises require rapid

deployment of nurses to areas of need.

• There is need to move nurses with highly specialized

skills to states with medical crises for patient

populations. A recent example is the number of

Michigan residents who required specialized care

available only through nurses employed in multiple

states across a national healthcare system who were

experienced in this specialized care. This care was

related to contaminated injections prepared at a

compounding pharmacy in Massachusetts

• There are increasing national and international

infectious disease outbreaks that require movement

of nurses to meet patient and community needs

(Ebola, flu, etc.).

• New nurse graduates will have more flexibility with a

Michigan “home state” license if there are not

sufficient available nursing positions in Michigan.

• Nursing faculty and students are sometimes engaged

in clinical placements across state lines.

• Nurses move across states to support family care

needs. These nurses may desire to continue nursing

employment. They may be delayed in their ability to

obtain a new state license.

FACTORS INFLUENCING CHALLENGES OF THE BILL

• Nurses are responsible to know multiple state

requirements for ongoing licensure. For example,

Florida requires continuing education for infection

control.

• Nurses must be knowledgeable about and abide by

varying state laws and regulations.

• In cases of nurses providing care through technology

(telephonic, web site, etc.), it is not clear in which

state the nursing practice is located (the state of the

nurse or the state of the patient receiving care). There

MICHIGAN

AMERICAN NURSES ASSOCIATION

Position Statement - Page 1 of 1

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

POSITION STATEMENT

ENHANCED NURSE LICENSURE COMPACT

does not appear to be ongoing monitoring, data

collection, or an evaluation plan to inform policies

related to eNLC.

• eNLC membership does not provide assurance that

nurses will in fact be knowledgeable of laws that

pertain to nursing practice within those jurisdictions

prior to engaging in practice in member states.

OTHER INFORMATION

• The Michigan Organization of Nurse Leaders (MONL)

who are predominately hospital chief nursing officers

are in support of HB4938.

• Rep. Whiteford is awaiting ANA-MI’s position and a

discussion prior to scheduling a House Health Policy

Committee hearing.

• If the bill is passed, Michigan nursing education

programs will need to include information about

nurse licensure compacts and, as importantly, prepare

faculty with this information for teaching.

• Legislators and organizations such as the AARP are

interested in knowing ANA-MI’s position on this bill.

NEED MORE INFORMATION?

• For more information on the enhanced NLC, visit

nursecompact@ncsbn.org

• For a current map of eNLC states,

visit www.nursecompact.com

MICHIGAN

AMERICAN NURSES ASSOCIATION

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

POSITION STATEMENT

MITIGATING IMPLICIT BIAS TO REDUCE DISPARITIES IN PATIENT OUTCOME

The purpose of this statement is to explore implicit

bias and the role it plays in healthcare disparities and

to identify what nurses can do to encourage equality

of care for all patients.

BACKGROUND

Our United States Declaration of Independence

assures equality, life, liberty and the pursuit of

happiness as fundamental rights for all (Jefferson,

1776), yet there is nothing in the document that

promises healthcare as a right for all citizens. For

this and other reasons, healthcare imbalances and

disadvantages are present in our country. Citizens

with steady incomes, better health insurance, healthy

food, clean water and greater access to care often

experience better healthcare opportunities than

citizens with less money, lesser or no health insurance

coverage, inadequate food and water resources and

less access to care (Probst, et. al, 2020; Oppel, et al,

2020) . Healthcare disparities have been defined by

Healthy People 2020 as “a particular type of health

difference that is closely linked with social, economic,

and/or environmental disadvantage” (ODPHP). With

the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare

disparities have become more obvious.

Citizens of color are even at a greater risk for

healthcare disparities. While African American

citizens made up 14% of Michigan’s population, they

accounted for 35% of the COVID-19 cases by July

2020 and were noted to be four times more likely to

die a COVID-19 related death than their Caucasian

counterparts (Michigan.gov). Several studies have

shown that implicit bias by healthcare providers is

associated with lower quality of care (FitzGerald &

Hurst, 2020).

Healthcare disparities such as these sparked

Michigan’s governor, Gretchen Whitmer, to form a

task force to advise her on strategies to eliminate

these racial disparities. One recommendation is

to mandate healthcare providers to participate in

implicit bias training as a condition of relicensure

in an effort to eliminate discrimination against

all citizens, especially those from disadvantaged

backgrounds (executive order 2020). ANA-MI

strongly supports Governor Whitmer’s stance on

eradication of racism and healthcare disparities.

The mission statement which drives the American

Nurses Association is to “Lead the profession

to shape the future of nursing and health care.”

As nurses, it is up to us to facilitate increased

opportunities for those experiencing disparities in

healthcare due to bias. It is up to us to help even the

playing field and to progress toward full equality in

healthcare.

IMPLICIT BIAS

Implicit bias, also known as unconscious bias, has

been defined as “the tendency to process information

based on unconscious associations and feelings,

even when these are contrary to one’s conscious

or declared beliefs,” (Dictionary.com (2020).

Furthermore, implicit bias includes any preconceived

thoughts that can result in disparities and it is the

duty of the healthcare provider to become aware of

our own biases to help embrace the changes needed

to eliminate healthcare disparities (ANA, 2018;

Fitzgerald & Hurst, 2016). It has been noted when

people experience discrimination based on personal

characteristics, it can impact their physical and

psychological health (Sutin, Stephan & Terracciano,

2016). Racism has been described as a public health

crisis which affects the mental as well as physical

health of all people (ANA, 2018). In the past, the

ANA has also taken the position there should be

no discrimination in nursing practice nor in health

care and that all patients should be viewed as equal

Position Statement - Page 1

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

POSITION STATEMENT

MITIGATING IMPLICIT BIAS TO REDUCE DISPARITIES IN PATIENT OUTCOME

and nurses should be treat them with impartiality,

respect, and civility (2018).

RECOMMENDATIONS:

Strategies to mitigate implicit bias include building

upon previous work of the ANA- Michigan (2018)

based on opposing all racism and discrimination and

being an advocate for all patients, regardless of their

gender, race, ethnicity, etc.

• Acknowledge that implicit biases do exist and

becoming aware these biases can result in

disparities in health outcomes associated with

many demographic factors. (As nurses it is

imperative to be aware of demographic factors

which can undermine our patient’s success for

health. Some of these factors might include

questioning if there are safe living situations,

availability for safe places to walk, feasibility of

obtaining fresh produce and other healthy food

choices, and obtaining fresh clean water for

drinking.)

• Follow the Nursing Code of Ethics, which advises

nurses to band together as patient advocates

against racism, discrimination and injustice.

• Participate in the required implicit bias training.

While this will be a part of the next license

renewal, it will also expand knowledge on this

subject.

• Assume the responsibility for recognizing your

own implicit biases.

• Commit to treat all patients equally regardless

of their race, ethnicity, economic status, sexual

identity, or gender.

• Become an advocate for all patients, for issues of

diversity, equity and inclusion.

As nurses it is our duty to uphold the values and

mission of the ANA-Michigan by treating all patients

equally and fairly.

REFERENCES:

Sutin, A., Stephan, Y. & Terracciano, A. (2016).

Perceived discrimination and personality

development in adulthood. Developmental

Psychology, 52(1), 155-163. doi: 10.1037/dev000069

American Nurses Association (ANA) (2018). Position

statement on The Nurse’s Role in Addressing

Discrimination: Protecting and Promoting Inclusive

Strategies in Practice Settings, Policy, and Advocacy.

Found at:

https://www.nursingworld.org/~4ab207/globalassets/

practiceandpolicy/nursing-excellence/ana-positionstatements/social-causes-and-health-care/thenurses-role-in-addressing-discrimination.pdf

Dictionary.com (2020). Implicit Bias. https://www.

dictionary.com/browse/implicit-bias

Michigan.gov. Michigan Data, Cases by Demographic

Characteristics, Mich. Coronavirus,

https://www.michigan.gov/

coronavirus/0,9753,7-406-98163_98173---,00.html,

(last visited July 5, 2020).

Center for Disease Control & Prevention. COVIDView,

A Weekly Surveillance Summary of U.S. COVID-19

Activity, (July 5, 2020). https://www.cdc.gov/

coronavirus/2019-ncov/covid-data/covidview/index.

html, (last visited July 5, 2020).

Oppel, R.A., et al., The Fullest Look Yet at the Racial

Inequity of the Coronavirus, N.Y. TIMES (Jul. 5,

2020), https://www.nytimes.com/

interactive/2020/07/05/us/coronavirus-latinosafrican-americans-cdc-data.html..

Id. (observing that “Non-Hispanic American Indian

or Alaska Native persons have an age-adjusted

hospitalization rate approximately 5.7 times that of

non-Hispanic White persons.”)

Position Statement - Page 2

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2021 ANNUAL BOOK OF REPORTS

POSITION STATEMENT

MITIGATING IMPLICIT BIAS TO REDUCE DISPARITIES IN PATIENT OUTCOME

CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report –

United States, 2013, 62 MNWR (Supp. 3) 1, 1-187

(2013), https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/other/

su6203.pdf. Id. at 157-160.

The Heart Attack Gender Gap, U. EDINBURGH:

EDINBURGH FRIENDS (Oct. 29, 2019),

https://www.ed.ac.uk/edinburgh-friends/

supplements/the-heart-attack-gender-gap.

Deadly Delivery: The Maternal Health Crisis in the

USA, AMNESTY INT’L. (May 7,

2011),https://www.amnestyusa.org/reports/deadlydelivery-the-maternal-health-care-crisis-in-the-usa/.

Agency For Healthcare Res. And Quality, U.S. Dep’t

Of Health And Human Serv., Pub No. 14-0006,

National Healthcare Disparities Rep. (2013).

Healthy People 2020. U.S. Department of Health

and Human Services: Washington, DC. https://www.

healthypeople.gov/2020/about/foundation-healthmeasures/Disparities#6

FitzGerald C, Hurst S. (2017). Implicit bias in

healthcare professionals: a systematic review. BMC

Med Ethics. 2017 Mar 1;18(1):19. doi: 10.1186/s12910-

017-0179-8. PMID: 28249596; PMCID: PMC5333436.

Jefferson, T. (1776). The Declaration of Independence,

preamble. Retrieved from https://etc.usf.edu/

lit2go/133/historic-american-documents/4957/thedeclaration-of-independence/

American Nurses Association. Mission Statement.

https://www.nursingworld.org/ana/about-ana/

Probst, J. C., Zahnd, W. E., Hung, P., Eberth, J.

M., Crouch, E. L., & Merrell, M. A. (2020). Rural-

Urban Mortality Disparities: Variations Across

Causes of Death and Race/Ethnicity, 2013–2017.

American Journal of Public Health, 110(9), 1325–

1327. https://doi-org.proxy.lib.umich.edu/10.2105/

AJPH.2020.305703

Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

(ODPHP). (internet accessed 11/02/2020). Disparities.

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POSITION STATEMENT

MORAL DISTRESS IN TIMES OF CRISIS

Background

Moral distress is “knowing the right thing to do

but being in a situation in which it is nearly impossible

to do it.” 1

Critical care teams wrestle daily with moral challenges

in the context of their normal professional

activities. 2 During a crisis, such as the COVID-19

pandemic, everyday challenges are compounded.

For example, patient surge results in shortages of

lifesaving equipment needed to keep patients

alive 3 and a lack of personal protective equipment

necessary to protect nurses, their patients, their

families, and their communities. 4,5 Team members

struggle to maintain their professional, emotional,

and moral equilibrium when caught in tragic situations

beyond their control.

Nurses, and all members of the healthcare team,

must protect their personal integrity and sense

of justice to be effective in their work. Too often,

nurses are pressured to compartmentalize emotions,

and to rapidly and stoically “do your duty.”

Sustaining a strong sense of duty maintains order,

serves patients, and preserves the respect of

coworkers and loved ones. However, discerning

one’s duty may not take the linear path of simply

following orders and regulations. Those who apply

a care-based morality prioritize relationships with

others in making moral decisions. 1,6 Embracing

a care-based perspective recognizes that nurses

live in a web of moral duties that includes their

duty to protect themselves, their patients, their

families, and their communities.

Recommended Actions for

Healthcare Institutions

Every organization must:

• Provide the vital supplies and equipment that

nurses need to protect themselves and others.

• Establish evidence-based, consistent, procedures

for equitably allocating scarce resources

and use them in a way that maximizes value without

endangering safety. 8,9

• Consider creating an interdisciplinary triage

committee composed of respected volunteers to

provide unbiased opinions in difficult situations.

This preserves each direct caregiver’s ethical duty

for beneficence. 3

• Ensure that administrators are accessible to

those performing direct patient care, and that

they maintain clear communication and transparency

regarding institutional challenges.

• Guarantee that nurses are included as decision

makers on all institutional ethics committees.

• Monitor the clinical and organizational climate to

identify situations that could create moral distress.

• Provide tools to help clinicians recognize the

experience of moral distress.

• Create interdisciplinary forums to discuss patient

goals of care and divergent opinions regarding

those goals of care in an open, respectful environment.

• Ensure institutional support systems include

easy access to:

• Ethics committees

• Critical stress debriefings

• Protocols for end-of-life care

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• Readily available crisis counseling

• Employee assistance programs

• Grief counseling

Recommended Actions for Nurses

Nurses must:

• Pay attention to your inner voice and recognize

when it conflicts with what you are being asked to

do or what circumstances demand that you do.

• Create a moral compass for yourself by expanding

your ethical knowledge. Seek out professional

and institutional resources that can provide ethical

guidance, such as:

• American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for

Nurses 10

• International Council of Nurses Code of Ethics

for Nurses 11

• Your hospital’s ethics committee or moral distress

consulting team.

• Learn the signs and symptoms of moral distress.

They include:

• Feelings of frustration, anger, and guilt 12

• Physical manifestations such as heart palpitations,

insomnia, and fatigue

• Psychological consequences such as withdrawal,

emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization of

patients. 13

• Seek out a trusted mentor.

• Use employee assistance resources and see a

qualified professional counselor or therapist when

needed.

• Lean on coworkers, friends, and loved ones. They

are all in the mix as you balance your personal and

professional duties, and they need to know when

you are experiencing moral distress.

• Practice self- care, and keep a reflection journal.

References

1. Jameton A. What moral distress in nursing history could

suggest about the future of health care. AMA J Ethics.

2017;19(6):617-628.

2. Savel RH, Munro CL. Moral distress, moral courage. Am J

Crit Care. 2015;24(4):276-278. doi: 10.4037/ajcc2015738

3. Truog RD, M.D., Christine Mitchell C, Daley GQ. The

toughest triage — Allocating ventilators in a pandemic.

NEJM. Published online March 23, 2020. doi: 10.1056/

NEJMp2005689 https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/

NEJMp2005689

4. Interim Infection Prevention and Control Recommendations

for Patients with Suspected or Confirmed Coronavirus

Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Healthcare Settings. Centers

for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/

coronavirus/2019-ncov/infection-control/control-recommendations.html

5. Interim Guidance: Rational use of personal protective

equipment for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). World

Health Organization. Accessed March 25, 2020. https://

apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/331215/WHO-

2019-nCov-IPCPPE_use-2020.1-eng.pdf

6. van Nistelrooij I, Leget C. Against dichotomies: On

mature care and self-sacrifice in care ethics. Nurs Ethics.

2017;24(6):694-703. doi: 10.1177/0969733015624475

7. Barden C, Cassidy L, Cardin S, eds. AACN Standards for

Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments:

A Journey to Excellence. 2nd ed. Aliso Viejo, CA: American

Association of Critical-Care Nurses; 2016. https://

www.aacn.org/nursing-excellence/standards/aacn-standards-for-establishing-and-sustaining-healthy-work-environments.

Accessed March 25, 2020.

8. Emanuel EJ, Persad G, Upshur R, et al. Fair allocation of

scarce medical resources in the time of covid-19. N Engl

J Med. Published online March 23, 2020. doi: 10.1056/

NEJMsb2005114

9. Daugherty Biddison EL, Faden R, Gwon HS, et al. Too

many patients…a framework to guide statewide allocation

of scarce mechanical ventilation during disasters. Chest.

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MORAL DISTRESS IN TIMES OF CRISIS

2019;155(4):848-854. doi: 10.1016/j.chest.2018.09.025

10. American Nurses Association. Code of Ethics for Nurses

With Interpretive Statements. Silver Spring, MD: Nursesbooks.org

Retrieved from https://www.nursingworld.org/

practice-policy/nursing-excellence/ethics/code-of-ethicsfor-nurses/coe-view-only/

11. The ICN Code of Ethics. Revised. Geneva Switzerland:

International Council of Nurses; 2012.

12. Epstein EG, Delgado S. “Understanding and Addressing

Moral Distress.” Online J Issues Nurs. Published online

September 30, 2010. doi: 10.3912/OJIN.Vol15No03Man01.

13. Rushton CH, Caldwell M, Kurtz M. Moral Distress:

A catalyst in building moral resilience. Am

J Nurs. 2016;116(7):40-49. doi: 10.1097/01.

NAJ.0000484933.40476.5b

Contact

www.ana-michigan.org

nurse@ana-michigan.org

(517) 325-5306

This position statement was adopted by ANA MI from the

work by AACN.

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POSITION STATEMENT

“NURSE” TITLE PROTECTION

Written by Susan Wiers, DNP and Public Policy Council

The 173,000 plus Registered Nurses in Michigan are

essential to the health and safety of the state’s residents. 1

The title “Nurse” is not included in the list of protected

titles in the Michigan Public Health Code (MPHC). Thus,

the residents of Michigan cannot be assured that individuals

calling themselves nurses possess the education and

competencies required for licensure and safe practice. 2

At least 39 states have adopted language in their nurse

practice acts restricting use of the title “Nurse” or language

implying an individual is a nurse who is educated

and licensed as authorized by the state.3 Despite Recommendation

2a of the Michigan Department of Community

Health Task Force on Nursing Practice that “Nurse”

be included as a protected title in the MPHC and the

Administrative Rules of the Michigan Board of Nursing,

Michigan remains in the minority of states without title

protection for ‘Nurse.” 2,3

Nursing has been ranked as the most respected, ethical

profession in Gallup polls for 16 consecutive years since

2002. 4 This trust in nursing must be safeguarded from

individuals and groups who misrepresent themselves as

nurses thus threatening safety and health of the public. 5

Tolerating overt use of the title “Nurse” or misleading

titles implying individuals other than those who have met

the requirements for licensure from state boards of nursing

lends itself to exploitation of vulnerable individuals

and erosion of nursing’s well-earned public reputation

and confidence.

Nursing licensure and title protection are regulated with

the primary purpose of protecting the public. 6 Nursing

licensure requires specialized knowledge and independent

decision-making and mandates a minimum level of

demonstrated and documented competency for a specific

scope of practice. 2,6 Title protection assures that individuals

without the minimum education and competency

for licensure cannot misrepresent themselves to the public

as nurses.

The title “Nurse” should be protected in the MPHC consistent

with the titles “Physician”, “Dentist”, “Chiropractor”,

and “Social Worker”. 2 Individuals not licensed and registered

by the state can and do use the title “Nurse.” 2 Legally

tolerated arbitrary use of the title “Nurse” by those who

do not possess the minimum education and competencies

for licensure in the State of Michigan confuses public

and places it at risk. 2 Just as has been done in the majority

of other states, the title “Nurse” must be defined and

protected in the MPHC so that patients and families can

be assured that their nurse possesses legitimate education

and competencies to safely care for them. 2

References

1. Michigan Public Health Institute. Michigan Annual

Nurse Survey Project. Okemos, MichiganJune 2018.

2. Michigan Department of Community Health

Task Force on Nursing Pratice. Final Report and

Recommendations. 2012.

3. American Nurses Association. Title

“Nurse” Protection. December 10, 2013;

https://www.nursingworld.org/practice-policy/

advocacy/state/title-nurse-protection/.

4. Brenan M. Nurses keep healthy lead as most honest,

ethical profession. 2017; https://news.gallup.

com/poll/224639/nurses-keep-healthy-lead-honestethical-profession.aspx.

5. McElroy S. Nurse Title Protection Bill passed in the

2008 West Virginia Legislative Session. Maryland

Nurse. 2008;10(1):14-14.

6. Flook DM. The professional nurse and regulation. Journal

of perianesthesia nursing. 2003;18(3):160-167.

7. Missouri State Board of Nursing. Nursing Practice Act

and Rules. In. Jefferson City, MO2017.

8. Services NDoHaH. Statues Relating to Nurse Practice

Act. In: Unit DoPHL, ed. Lincoln, NE2017.

9. New York State Education Law. Article 139, Nursing.

2010; http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/nurse/

article139.htm.

Approved: December 14, 2018 by the

ANA-Michigan Board of Directors

Contact

www.ana-michigan.org

nurse@ana-michigan.org

(517) 325-5306

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PREVENTING WORKPLACE VIOLENCE IN HEALTHCARE SETTINGS

Background

The ANA Nurses Bill of Rights maintains that nurses

have the right to a work environment that is safe

for themselves and for their patients regardless of

the setting of care.

According to reports from National Institute for

Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), individuals

who are injured and who miss work as a result

of violence in healthcare settings is increasing

(U.S. Department of Labor [DOL], Bureau of Labor

Statistics, 2014).

Violence in healthcare facilities is complex and

multiple factors may contribute to the problem.

Nurses and other caregivers have a personal and

professional duty to “do no harm” to patients.

Many will put their own safety at risk to help a

patient and some consider violence “part of the

job.” Many excuse attacks as being unintentional

and due to an individual’s illness or impairment.

In addition to physical harm, individuals who

experience or witness violence in the healthcare

workplace are at risk for emotional consequences

that can lead to time away from work, burnout,

job dissatisfaction, and decreased productivity.

These and other consequences compromise both

worker and patient safety.

As of June, 2019, 36 states have established or

increased legal penalties for the assault of nurses

and other healthcare providers and nine states

require healthcare organizations to run workplace

violence programs (ANA, 2019). As of this writing,

Michigan has NEITHER specific legal penalties

nor workplace violence program requirements for

healthcare organizations.

Definition of Workplace Violence

NIOSH defines workplace violence as physically

and psychologically damaging actions that occur

in the workplace or while on duty. (NIOSH, 2002).

This can include verbal violence – threats, verbal

abuse, hostility, harassment which can cause psychological

trauma and stress even though there is

no physical injury (OSHA, 2015)

NIOSH describes four basic types of workplace

violence:

Type 1 – Involves “criminal intent” In this type of

violent encounter, individuals with criminal intent

have no relationship to the business or employees.

Type II: Involves a customer, client, or patient. In

this type “individual has a relationship with the

business and becomes violent when receiving

services.”

Type III: Involves a “worker on worker” relationship

and includes employees who attack or threaten

another employee.

Type IV: Violence involves personal relationships

and includes “individuals who have interpersonal

relationships with the intended target but no relationship

to the business”

Types II and III are the most common types in

health care settings.

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PREVENTING WORKPLACE VIOLENCE IN HEALTHCARE SETTINGS

Evidence

According to The Occupational Safety and Health

Administration (OSHA), healthcare workers,

including nurses, are at 4x higher risk of experiencing

workplace violence than those who work

in other industries. Registered nurses experienced

14 violent injuries resulting in days away from

work per 10,000 full time employees compared

with a rate of 4.2 per 10,000 in private industry as

a whole. Psychiatric aides are at highest risk (590

per 10,000) followed by nursing assistants (55 per

10,000). (U.S. Department of Labor [DOL], Bureau

of Labor Statistics, 2014). The statistics underpinning

this statement are drawn solely from reported

incidents and OSHA notes that many incidents that

could be included are NOT reported for a variety

of reasons. Part of the problem is that because violent

incidents are so common, they have become

normative and among victims, only 30% of nurses

and 26% of physicians actually reported the incidences

(OSHA, 2015).

Core Components

ANA-MI concurs with ANA regarding interventions

and supports the following:

Primary prevention strategies that include development

of workplace violence prevention programs,

development of relevant policies, and

education programs specifically designed for

nurses and frontline caregivers. Students should

also learn about the issue in nursing education

programs. Employers and educational institutions

must support work environments that are safe

and align with OSHA’s “Guidelines for Preventing

Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service

Workers” (OSHA, 2015; Lipscomb & London,

2015.)

Secondary prevention strategies that include

interventions designed to reduce and/or minimize

the negative impact of workplace violence.

Reporting incidences of violence is paramount so

that accurate data can be gathered and analyzed.

Tertiary prevention strategies that are designed to

reduce the consequences of workplace violence

and may include incident debriefing, counseling

programs, root cause analysis and confidentiality

assurances. Legislative and legal strategies that

protect all healthcare providers should be considered

and supported.

References

American Nurses Association. (2019) Workplace violence.

Retrieved from https://www.nursingworld.org/practice-policy/advocacy/state/workplace-violence2/

American Nurses Association. (2016). American Nurses Association

calls for a culture of safety in all health care settings

[Press release]. Retrieved from https://www.nursingworld.

org/news/news-releases/2016/americannurses-associationcalls-for-a-culture-of-safety-in-all-health-care-settings/

xxii

American Nurses Association. Position Statement on Incivility,

Bullying, and Workplace Violence. 2015. Web: https://

www.nursingworld.org/practice-policy/work-environment/

violence-incivility-bullying/

The Joint Commission. (2010). Preventing violence in the

health care setting. Sentinel Event Alert, Issue 45. Web:

https://www.jointcommission.org/assets/1/18/SEA_45.PDF

The Joint Commission. Sentinal Event Alert: Physical and

verbal violence against healthcare workers. Retrieved from:

https://www.jointcommission.org/assets/1/18/SEA_59_

Workplace_violence_4_13_18_FINAL.pdf

National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

Division of Safety Research. (2002) Violence: occupational

hazards in hospitals. Cincinnati, Ohio: U.S. Department of

Health and Human Services, Public Health Services, Center

for Disease Control and Prevention, NIOSH Division of Safety

Research.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. (2013).

Workplace violence prevention for nurses. CDC Course No.

WB1865—NIOSH Pub. No. 2013-155. Retrieved from https://

www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/ violence/training_nurses.html.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration. (2015).

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PREVENTING WORKPLACE VIOLENCE IN HEALTHCARE SETTINGS

“Guidelines for preventing workplace violence for healthcare

and social service workers” (Publication No. OSHA

3148-04R 2015). Retrieved from https://www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3148.pdf.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration. (2015).

“Workplace violence in healthcare: understanding the challenge.”

https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3826.pdf

U.S. Government Accountability Office. (2016). Additional

Efforts Needed to Help Protect Health Care Workers from

Workplace Violence. Retrieved from tps://www.gao.gov/

products/GAO-16-11 xxviii Occupational Safety and Health

Administration (OSHA). 2015. Retrieved from https://www.

osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3827.pdf xxix

U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2014).

Nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses requiring days

away from work, 2013. (No. USDL-14-2246). Retrieved from

http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/osh2.pdf.

Approved: November 8, 2019

by the ANA-Michigan Board of Directors

To be reviewed: November 8, 2021

Contact

www.ana-michigan.org

nurse@ana-michigan.org

(517) 325-5306

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POSITION STATEMENT

SAFE NURSE STAFFING TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF CARE

It is the position of the ANA-Michigan that:

1. Optimal nurse staffing is essential for quality and safe patient care in all health care settings.

2. Determination of optimal nurse staffing requires a framework and policies that inform

organizational decision making through analysis of the many factors that impact the delivery of

safe patient care.

3. Optimal nurse staffing is a complex determination and cannot be achieved through application

of simple patient to nurse ratios.

4. Safe nurse staffing models should be selected that most closely match the characteristics

of the institution and include active and substantive input from the nurses who are closest to

patient care.

Background

Medical errors are now the third leading cause

of death in the United States (US). The persistent

nature of medical errors is documented

in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, To Err Is

Human, which pointed to nearly 100,000 preventable

deaths in US hospitals annually (IOM, 1999).

This work shaped decades of research with focus

on patient safety. Nurses are the largest clinical

group of providers in hospitals and other health

care settings; thus, nurses’ impact on patient safety

is significant. A large body of evidence exists documenting

the relationship between nursing care,

nurse staffing, and patient safety. Risks associated

with suboptimal professional nurse staffing in the

patient care setting include medication errors,

compromised ability to “rescue” patients at risk

for death, increased incidence of patient falls, hospital-acquired

pressure ulcers, physical restraint

use, and missed care.

Optimal nurse staffing is a complex process

not being amenable to simple division or nurse

patient ratios; straightforward ratios do not

result in safe care. Moving toward a professional

model that empowers registered nurse (RN)

decision-making regarding their practice requires

a framework focused on the analysis of multiple

factors affecting patient care delivery. To create

a work environment that allows professional RNs

to meet the demands and complexity of patient

care, sufficient professional nursing staffing care

models are crucial to the delivery of high quality

safe patient care. Shifting the nursing culture

towards a professional model that empowers RNs

with decision-making involvement and includes

a framework for organizations’ decision making

about staffing based on the analysis of multiple

factors affecting patient care versus a one-dimensional

standardized nurse-patient ratios approach

is vital to “ensuring the right staff are in the right

place at the right time” (Bolvin, 2017, p. 31). Harmonious

with the American Nurses Association

(ANA) position, ANA-MI is committed to creating

dynamic solutions that support context dependent,

optimal nurse staffing necessary to meet the

needs of healthcare recipients.

This paper presents the outcomes evidence about

recent approaches to nurse staffing and identifies

the principles, concepts, and framework for

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determining optimal nurse staffing for safe patient

care. While the referenced studies on safe nurse

staffing are hospital-based, the principles and

methods may also be applied to nurse staffing in

other health care settings.

Evidence

The impasse between nurses and administrators

about the solution to the complex issue of ensuring

the delivery of safe care within the context of

increasing patient acuity and fiscal constraints of

hospitals has moved the issue of adequate staffing

to the political arena (Hertel, 2012). In 2004,

nurse staffing took center stage when California

became the first state to mandate nurse-to-patient

ratios in acute care settings. By 2009, 14

states had enacted nurse staffing legislation and,

as of September 2010, 24 states have enacted or

proposed legislation to mandate staffing ratios,

staffing acuity systems, or staffing plans and committees

(Douglas, 2010). Subsequent studies

examining the relationship between mandatory

staffing ratios and nurse satisfaction and patient

safety and outcomes have demonstrated mixed

results (Aiken et al., 2010; Bolton, et al., 2007; Hertel,

2012)

Research on nurse staffing ratios’ impact on

patient safety has demonstrated higher nurse

to patient ratios are associated with decreased

mortality rates, fewer failure to rescue events,

and lower hospital–acquired pneumonia rates

(Douglas, 2010). Mandated ratios in California

were associated with lower mortality and better

nurse retention; 74% of nurses reported they felt

the quality of care had improved since mandated

ratios (Aiken et al., 2010).

Conversely, individual studies and systematic

reviews have reported difficulty in consistently

detecting statistically significant associated

improvements in a variety of nurse-sensitive

patient outcomes with increased nurse staffing

(Hickam et al., 2003; Kane, Shamliyan, Mueller,

Duval, & Wilt, 2007; Lake & Chung, 2006; Lang

et al., 2004; Seago,2001: all as cited in Bolton et

al., 2007). In a large-scale study, Bolton and colleagues

(2007) examined patient outcomes from

2004 to 2006 in 185 hospitals in California compared

to 2002 (pre-mandated staffing ratios) and

found no statistical significance in the association

between increased nurse staffing and key indicators

of falls, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, and

restraint use rates (Bolton et al., 2007). The inconsistency

in outcomes associated with increased

nurse staffing underscores the complexity of

determining optimal staffing.

A survey of administrators about strategies to

accommodate mandated ratios lends to potential

insight about why mandated ratios do not consistently

result in improved patient safety and outcome

measures. Respondents reported ancillary

support staff layoffs (thus shifting non-RN work

to the professional nurse) and use of contingent

nurses to provide break coverage; both strategies

could have a negative impact on patient safety

and continuity of care (Douglas, 2010). Similarly,

Bolton and colleagues (2007) found that with

mandated staffing ratios came a change in staff

mix with a reduction in care provided by LPN and

other non-licensed staff, suggesting that administration

leaders used RN hours to meet the regulatory

staffing requirements. These approaches

raise concerns about the unintended consequence

of negating the potential positive impact

of mandated higher RN to patient ratios by 1)

effectively reducing RN time to attend to RN activities

and 2) increasing the risk for mistakes related

to the potential for communication errors during

handoffs to contingent nurses along with variability

of the skills and competencies of contingent

nurses in unfamiliar settings.

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Definition of Safe Staffing,

Core Components and Staffing Models

Definitions

The ANA defines staffing as … “a match of registered

nurse expertise with the needs of the recipient

of nursing care services in the context of the

practice setting and situation“(ANA, 2012, p. 6).

Staffing is done in the present – day to day and

sometimes shift to shift. Staffing work can be centralized

(one department is responsible for staffing

all the units) or decentralized (units manage their

own staffing needs) or a combination of both.

Core Components

ANA Core Components of Nurse Staffing:

1. All settings should have well-developed staffing

guidelines with measurable nurse-sensitive

outcomes specific to that setting and healthcare

consumer population, which are used as

evidence to guide daily staffing.

2. RNs are full partners working with other healthcare

professionals in collaborative, interdisciplinary

partnerships.

3. RNs, including direct care nurses, must have

a substantive and active role in staffing

decisions to ensure the necessary time

with patients to meet care needs and overall

nursing responsibilities.

4. Staffing needs must be determined based on

an analysis of healthcare consumer status (e.g.,

degree of stability, intensity, and acuity) and

the environment in which the care is provided.

Additional considerations include professional

characteristics, skill set, and mix of the staff

and previous staffing patterns that have been

shown to improve outcomes.

5. Appropriate nurse staffing should be based on

allocating the appropriate number of competent

practitioners to a care situation, pursuing

quality of care indices, meeting consumer-centered

and organizational outcomes, meeting

federal and state laws and regulations, and

attending to a safe, quality work environment.

6. Cost-effectiveness is an important consideration

in delivery of safe, quality care.

7. Reimbursement structure should not influence

nurse staffing patterns or the level of care

provided.

Staffing Models

Shortcomings in current RN staffing models present

opportunities for improvements that benefit

patients, nurses, and healthcare organizations. No

single staffing model is ideal in all care settings or

situations. Staffing must be adjusted according to

patient care needs within a specific unit or department.

Fixed or rigid models do not provide flexibility

essential to adapt to rapid and fluid changes

in acute care environments.

There is a difference between staffing and scheduling.

Schedules are planning documents that

are future focused. Factors that affect a schedule

include: historical census for a time period, the

surgical schedule, and seasonal or predictable

issues such as the flu season. Schedules must also

accommodate vacations, maternity leaves, staff illness

and institutional policies.

Various staffing models are used in healthcare

settings. Three models follow; each has advantages

and disadvantages.

1. Budget Based Staffing: the number of nurses

is determined according to nursing hours per

patient days. Total patient days are the average

number of patients on a particular unit for a

24-hour period. Nursing hours refers to the

total number of hours nurses work on that unit

for a specific amount of time. This model does

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not take into consideration the actual number

of patients, the “churn” in patients – admissions,

discharges, transfers in 24 hours, or

patient acuity.

2. Staffing by Nurse to Patient Ratios: This model

dictates the number of patients one nurse can

care for during a designated period of time. It

does not take into consideration other unit staff

such as CNA’s, housekeeping, unit clerks, etc.

Also, it doesn’t take into account patient acuity

or nurse driven care decisions. This model may

also affect patient throughput from areas such

as the Emergency Department, Labor and

Delivery, and the ICUs.

3. Staffing by Patient Acuity: This model considers

the acuity or complexity of each patient, which

is often determined by the number of tasks

and amount of time to complete them. Rather,

this model should consider the full scope of

nursing practice and time needed to maintain

standards of care. This complex model also

needs to consider individual patient characteristics

such as age, diagnosis, comorbidities,

socioeconomic status, cultural and family

issues, and severity of illness.

References

Aiken, L. H., Sloane, D. M., Cimiotti, J. P., Clarke, S. P., Flynn,

L., Seago, J. A., . . . & Smith, H. L. (2010). Implications of the

California nurse staffing mandate for other states. Health

services research, 45(4), 904-921.

American Nurses Association. (2012). Principles for nurse

staffing (2nd ed.). Silver Spring, MD: Nursesbooks.org.

Retrieved from http://www.nursesbooks.org/ebooks/download/ANA_Principles_Staffing.pdf

American Nurses Association. (2015). Optimal nurse staffing

to improve quality of care and patient outcomes. Retrieved

from http://www.nursingworld.org/DocumentVault/NursingPractice/Executive-Summary.pdf

Bolvin, J. 2017) CNOs and CFOs partner to reap benefits

of acuity-based staffing. American Nurse Today 12(9), 30-32.

Buerhaus, P. I. (2009). Avoiding mandatory hospital nurse

staffing ratios: An economic commentary. Nursing Outlook,

57(2), 107-112.

Bolton, L. B., Aydin, C. E., Donaldson, N., Storer Brown, D.,

Sandhu, M., Fridman, M., & Udin Aronow, H. (2007). Mandated

nurse staffing ratios in California: A comparison of

staffing and nursing-sensitive outcomes pre-and post-regulation.

Policy, Politics, & Nursing Practice, 8(4), 238-250.

Douglas, K. (2010). Ratios-If it were only that easy. Nursing

Economics, 28(2), 119-125.

Hertel, R. (2012). Regulating patient staffing: A complex

issue. Academy of Medical-Surgical Nursing, 21(1), 3-7.

Institute of Medicine (IOM). (1999). To err is human. Washington,

DC: National Academies Press.

Mensik, J. (2014). What every nurse should know about staffing.

American Nurse Today, 9(2), 1-11.

Approved: December 15, 2017

by the ANA-Michigan Board of Directors

To be reviewed: December 14, 2018

Contact

www.ana-michigan.org

nurse@ana-michigan.org

(517) 325-5306

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AMERICAN NURSES ASSOCIATION

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TELEHEALTH AND CONNECTED HEALTH

BACKGROUND

The United States is in the midst of a global

pandemic from Covid-19, a highly contagious disease

that has caused severe social, economic and cultural

disruptions to everyday life in America. Telehealth,

also referred to as Connected Health, has grown

exponentially during this time as more services are

being delivered and are eligible for reimbursement

from public and private insurers. The Center for

Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released

new guidelines for telehealth in April, 2020 that

encourage expansion of services to populations they

cover. Examples from major Michigan healthcare

systems include Michigan Medicine which conducted

444 virtual visits in February, 2020 and increased

those to more than 20,000 visits by the end of

April, 2020. Henry Ford Health System went from

conducting 150 virtual visits per week to 10,000

virtual visits and report high patient satisfaction with

this option.

Nearly 20% of Americans live in rural areas where

there is a shortage of both providers and healthcare

facilities. “The health consequences for communities

that lack resources can be dire” states Joelle Fathi

DNP RN ARNP CTTS, an expert on biobehavioral

nursing and health informatics and a member of the

2018 ANA Steering Committee to revise its Core

Principles of Telehealth. Fathi further states that

connected health has value for patients in urban

and major metropolitan areas. The expansion of

healthcare services through connected health creates

the opportunity to serve populations with care

that is “necessary, timely, efficient, convenient and

effective.” (Moore & Trainum, 2019, p. 32).

The Affordable Care Act and the 2017 Health

Care Act both support the use of telehealth and

technology to expand access to care delivery. Tamara

Broadnaux DNP RN NEA-BC, Clinical Operations,

Department of Veterans Affairs states that “As

providers move toward more value-based, shared

saving, and accountable care models as required in

healthcare reform, connected health provides better

care coordination, management and communication

with patients.” (Moore & Trainum, 2019, p. 32).

In 2019, ANA released Core Principles on Connected

Health (Principles) as a guide for healthcare

professionals who use telehealth technologies to

provide quality care. This document is an update

to the 1998 ANA Core Principles on Telehealth and

reflect the evolution of healthcare using a more

interdisciplinary approach. There are 13 Principles

within the guide that identify unique issues related

to practice, regulatory, privacy, reimbursement,

documentation and competencies. (ANA, 2019).

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

(CDC) has issued Guidelines on using Telehealth

to expand access to essential healthcare services

during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. ANA

recognizes that connected health provides a

method of healthcare delivery that can improve

access to quality health care when implementation

is conducted using accepted standards and best

available evidence. Nurses play an essential role in

the adoption and use of connected health across care

settings and roles and are well-positioned to lead in

the adoption and use of care via these technologies.

DEFINITIONS

The American Nurses Association defines telehealth

and Connect Health as “the use of electronic

information and telecommunications technologies

to support and promote long distance clinical

health care, patient and professional health-related

education, public health and health administration.

Technologies include: videoconferencing, the

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internet, store-and-forward imaging, streaming

media, and terrestrial and wireless communication”

ANA, n.d. While telehealth has been in existence for

many years, it has grown exponentially recently due

in part to need to deliver care virtually during the

coronavirus pandemic.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)

(2020) define telehealth as “a two-way, real- time

interactive communication between a patient and

a physician or practitioner at a distant site through

telecommunications equipment that includes, at a

minimum, audio and visual equipment.”

Several telehealth modalities allow providers and

patients to connect using technology to deliver

health care:

• Synchronous: This includes real-time telephone

or live audio-video interaction typically with a

patient using a smartphone, tablet, or computer.

• In some cases, peripheral medical equipment

(e.g., digital stethoscopes, otoscopes,

ultrasounds) can be used by another HCP (e.g.,

nurse, medical assistant) physically with the

patient, while the consulting medical provider

conducts a remote evaluation.

• Asynchronous: This includes “store and forward”

technology where messages, images, or data are

collected at one point in time and interpreted or

responded to later. Patient portals can facilitate

this type of communication between provider and

patient through secure messaging.

• Remote patient monitoring: This allows direct

transmission of a patient’s clinical measurements

from a distance (may or may not be in real time)

to their healthcare provider.

• Mobile Health (mHealth): This includes the use

of mobile devices to support health care and

public health information exchange. Information

exchange using mHealth may include general

educational information, targeted texts, and

disease outbreak notifications.

Nurses have the background, skills and creative

ingenuity to help patients effectively navigate and

engage in telehealth modalities across the continuum

of care.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

1. Endorse the term telehealth and Connected

Health, as this is the most widely used and

accepted term used in national guidelines,

by third party payors and most professional

organizations

2. Adopt the 2019 ANA Core Principles on

Connected Health.

3. Advocate to make permanent recent policy

changes that reduce barriers to telehealth

services and reimbursement at the state and

national level.

4. Advocate for registered nurses (RN) and advance

practice registered nurses (APRN) to be included

in any legislation and to have access to telehealth

platforms used by organizations

5. Advocate for the inclusion of telehealth content

and experiences at all levels of registered nursing

education.

REFERENCES:

American Nurses Association (2019, June 6). ANA

core principles on connected health. Retrieved

from https://www.nursingworld.org/~4a9307/

globalassets/docs/ana/practice/ana-core-principleson-connected-health.pdf

American Nurses Association. (n.d.). Telehealth.

https://www.nursingworld.org/practice-policy/

advocacy/telehealth/

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Moore, E., & Trainum, B. (2019). Connected health:

ANA’s updated principles put nursing at the forefront.

American Nurse Today, 14(12), 32-33.

U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (2020,

April 24). Telehealth. Retrieved from https://www.

cms.gov/Medicare/Medicare-General-Information/

Telehealth

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ANA-MICHIGAN POLICY ON PUBLIC POSITION STATEMENTS

POLICY

ANA-Michigan shall take public positions on legislation and health policy proposals, and

recommend actions based on the following Platform and process.

PURPOSE

ANA-Michigan’s position statements articulate the Association’s stand on health care policy

proposals of importance to its membership and the public it serves. Positions are generated in

response to trends and best practices in health care and health policy related to current and

emerging issues that impact the health of the citizens of Michigan, their access to care, standards

and excellence in nursing practice; and the profession of nursing.

All proposed policy positions are first benchmarked to the ANA-Michigan Mission, Vision and

Strategic Values. The Criteria below are also applied to the analysis and recommendation of policy

positions to the Board of Directors.

Platform Issues

Access to Quality Care

1. Promote accessibility to healthcare for all residents of Michigan

2. Support services for vulnerable populations

3. Ensure nursing care by appropriate licensed providers

4. Assure basic human needs services that impact individual health status

5. Support programs that enhance health literacy

Human Rights/Social Justice

1. Provide for informed healthcare choices through evidence-based education of Michigan residents

2. Support legislative proposals that positively impact the health and welfare of Michigan residents

3. Educate legislators when proposals would negatively impact the health and well-being of Michigan residents

4. Oppose discrimination in health policies/regulations and delivery of care

5. Support competent care for diverse Michigan populations

6. Protect the privacy of Michigan residents in issues of healthcare

Quality and Safety of Health Care

1. Maintain state policies and regulations consistent with national nursing standards

2. Support for programs that address health promotion and maintenance and prevention of disease/disability

3. Actively collaborate with healthcare organizations within the state for purposes of quality care, patient safety and

nursing input

Advances in the Practice and/or Profession of Nursing

1. Promote the viability of professional nursing organizations

2. Promote statewide communication within the profession

3. Encourage occupational health and safety of nurses

4. Support public funding for nursing research and education

Process for Position Statement Review

1. Requests for development of an Association position statement on a policy, issue or legislation may be made by the

Board of Directors, an individual member, or based on member survey results.

2. The request is sent to the Public Policy Council for consideration.

3. The Public Policy Council reviews the issue, evaluates the issue in relation to the ANA-Michigan Mission, Values and

Impact Statement and the Platform criteria.

4. The Public Policy Council makes a recommendation to the Board using an evidence-based review of the issue and its

relevance to the above Platform Criteria. Topic experts may be used to develop the position statement.

5. The Board determines whether the proposed position statement is adopted by the Association and made public.

6. The Association positions are reviewed by the Public Policy Council annually.

7. Recommendations for policy changes are made to the Board.

8. Joint positions (e.g. with other healthcare groups) may be developed.

Approved by the ANA-Michigan Board of Directors on September 19, 2015

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