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National Hardwood Magazine - May 2022

The May 2022 issue of the National Hardwood Magazine features stories on Rehmeyer Wood Floors, Oaks Unlimited Inc, the HMA NatCon and much more.

The May 2022 issue of the National Hardwood Magazine features stories on Rehmeyer Wood Floors, Oaks Unlimited Inc, the HMA NatCon and much more.

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TO IMPROVE THE VALUE OF YOUR LUMBER

MAY 2022

FIND US AT THE

BOOTH #316

GREATEST HITS

CONTACT US TODAY

1-888-END-COAT sales@uccoatings.com


UCC_36802_National Hardwood Magazine Cover Version #2_v3.indd 1

TO IMPROVE THE VALUE OF YOUR LUMBER

MAY 2022

3/21/22 7:40 AM

Contents

National Hardwood Magazine MAY 2022 Volume 96 No. 4

GREATEST HITS

CONTACT US TODAY

FIND US AT THE

BOOTH #316

1-888-END-COAT sales@uccoatings.com

About The Cover

U-C COATINGS

“U-C Coatings is a leading manufacturer and

supplier of premium wood protection products.

For over 50 years, our products have been used

in a variety of industries, including hardwood and

softwood logging and lumber production, wood

products manufacturing, woodworking and wood

decking markets. Our products are used worldwide

to protect, conserve and enhance forest resources.

Our goal is to help our customers achieve more

with less waste and provide the highest level of

protection for their products.

The company offers Anchorseal® end sealers and edge sealers for lumber

and other wood products, as well as Gempaint® for lumber branding. We

continue to expand the Contechem® product line with Britewood for mold and

sapstain control in softwood and hardwood applications. The Contechem®

Sol-Brite product line provides excellent iron stain removal and brightening.

Seal-Once® is a line of eco-friendly, waterbased sealers for wood and concrete

that provides excellent water repellant performance and protection from the

elements. The Eco Chemical® line of water-based wood stains and other

coatings products is used by the pressure treating and fencing industries,

as well as other prefinished wood manufacturing firms. The Bates line of

glue releases help prevent glue buildup and make cleanup easier wherever

adhesives are used while DPS protects finished parts from checking and

delaminating while in storage.

The company has operations in Buffalo, Portland, and Seattle. Contact us

for any of your wood protection and finishing needs.”

www.uccoatings.com

Features & Industry Events

22

24

26

30

32

Rehmeyer Wood Floors:

Thinking Locally On A Global Scale

Forty Years Of Hardwoods At Oaks

Unlimited Inc.

HMA NatCon Aims To Prepare

Attendees For Successful Future

SCMA Gathers For Annual Meeting

AHMI Annual Meeting Sheds Light

On Key Industry Challenges

Departments 22

38

Speaker Shares Insights About

Supply Chain Issues With ALC

KFIA Welcomes “A Whole New World”

40 During 57th Annual Meeting

44

Twelve Students Graduate From

The 197th Class of NHLA Inspector

Training School

Founded in 1927 by: O.L. Miller – 1894-1963

Publisher: Paul J. Miller – 1963-2010

• Forest Products Export Directory • Imported Wood Purchasing Guide

• Import/Export Wood Purchasing News • Hardwood Purchasing Handbook

• Green Books’s Hardwood Marketing Directory

• Green Books’s Softwood Marketing Directory

• The Softwood Forest Products Buyer

Paul J. Miller Jr. – President

Terry Miller – Vice President

Zach Miller – Sales

Sue Putnam – Editor

Matthew Fite – Staff Writer

Tonya Rickman – Who’s Who Coordinator

Rachael Stokes – Graphic Artist

Tina Dial – Graphic Artist

Tammy Daugherty – Production Manager

Jennifer Trentman – Green Book Market Sales

Lisa Carpenter – Circulation Manager

Lexi Hardin – Subscription & List Services

ADVERTISING OFFICES:

5175 Elmore Rd., Suite 23, Memphis, TN 38134

901-372-8280 FAX: 901-373-6180

Reach us via the Internet at: www.nationalhardwoodmag.com

E-mail addresses:

ADVERTISING: tammy@millerwoodtradepub.com

EDITORIAL: editor@millerwoodtradepub.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS: circ@millerwoodtradepub.com

EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENTS:

Chicago, Los Angeles, High Point, Grand Rapids, Portland, Toronto

Controlled circulation postage paid at Memphis, TN

(USPS #917-760)

8 Hardwood Calendar

10 U.S.A. Trends

12 Canadian Trends

14 News Developments

16 HMA Update

18 AHEC Report

20 WCMA Insights

70 Who’s Who

72 Trade Talk

80 Classified Profit

Opportunities

84 Advertisers Index

The NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE (ISSN 0194-0910) is published

monthly, except for two issues in December, for $55.00 per year and

$65.00 (U.S. dollars) per year for Canada by National Hardwood Magazine, Inc.,

5175 Elmore Rd., Suite 23, Memphis, TN 38134. Periodicals Postage paid at

Memphis, TN, and at additional mailing offices.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to National Hardwood Magazine,

P.O. Box 34908, Memphis, TN 38184.

Publications mail agreement No. 40739074.

Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to:

P.O. Box 503, RPO W. Beaver Cre., Rich-Hill, ON L4B 4R6.

The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject editorial

content and Ads at the staff’s discretion.

2 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 3


Surrounded by America’s best hardwood sawmills,

the stage is set for EXPO 2023 in Nashville.

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4 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

August 23-25, 2023

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Targeting Buyers Around the Globe!

Forest Products Export Directory

“...the Most Comprehensive Buyer’s Guide for

the International Buyer...”

Published in Fall 2022

90% Renewal Rate in the 46th

Forest Products Export Directory

Abenaki Timber Corporation

Allegheny Veneer LLC

Allegheny Wood Products, Inc.

Ally Global Logistics LLC

American Lumber Co.

Anderson-Tully Lumber Co.

Atlanta Hardwood Corporation

Baillie Lumber Co.

Broadleaf Lumber Co.

Cardin Forest Products, LLC

Clark Lumber Co., Inc.

Cole Hardwood, Inc.

Crown Hardwood Co., Inc.

Cummings Lumber Co., Inc.

Deer Park Lumber International

Devereaux Sawmill, Inc.

East Ohio Lumber Co.

HHP, Inc.

Harold White Lumber Co.

Hanafee Bros. Sawmill Co., Inc.

Hermitage Hardwood Lumber

Sales, Inc.

J.D. Irving Limited

Kamps Hardwoods, Inc.

King City / Northway

Forwarding Ltd.

Lawrence Lumber Company, Inc.

Legacy Wood Products LLC

Matson Lumber Company

McClain Forest Products LLC

Midwest Hardwood Company

MO PAC Lumber Company

NELMA (Northeastern Lumber

Manufacturers Assoc.)

Northern Appalachian Logging

& Forestry LLC

Northwest Hardwoods, Inc.

Nyle Dry Kilns

Parton Lumber Co., Inc.

Penn-Sylvan International, Inc.

Prime Lumber Company

Primewood

Ralph Taylor Lumber Co., Inc.

Ram Forest Products, Inc.

Ron Jones Hardwood Sales, Inc.

Rossi Group

Salamanca Lumber Company, Inc.

SFPA (Southern Forest Products Assoc.)

SPF Precut Lumber

Sisler Lumber Co., Inc.

Snowbelt Hardwoods, Inc.

Softwood Export Council

Somerset Wood Products, Inc.

TMX Shipping Company, Inc.

Taner Timber Co., Inc.

Two Rivers Timber

Company, Inc.

Vexco, Inc.

Wagner Lumber Company

Wheeland Lumber Co., Inc.

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6 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

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HARDWOOD CALENDAR

INDUSTRIES

CONTROLS

Great Lakes Kiln Drying Association, Spring

Meeting with Ohio Valley Lumber Drying

Association, Ramada by Wyndham, Lansing, MI.

For information, email office@glkda.org.

May 4-5.

Canadian Hardwood Bureau, Meeting,

DoubleTree by Hilton, Montreal, QC.

www.canadianhardwoodbureau.com.

May 11-12.

2022 Hardwood Sawmilling Certificate

Program, Northcentral Technical College, Antigo,

WI. For more information call 715-803-1965.

June 6-July 1.

May

Expo Richmond 2022, Richmond Raceway,

Richmond, VA. www.exporichmond.com.

May 20-21.

Penn-York Lumbermen’s Club, Meeting, hosted

by Meridian Hardwoods of PA, Jackson Valley

Country Club, Warren, PA. www.pennyork.org.

May 23.

Montreal Wood Convention, Fairmont The

Queen Elizabeth, Montreal, QC.

www.montrealwoodconvention.com. May 24-25.

June

Penn-York Lumbermen’s Club, Meeting,

hosted by Tioga Hardwoods, Tioga Downs Casino

& Resort, Nichols, NY. www.pennyork.org.

June 20. n

CLEEREMAN LUMBER COMPANY 1930’s CLEEREMAN INDUSTRIES 1955 CLEEREMAN CONTROLS 2019

CLEEREMAN

TODAY

For optimal efficiency. . .

knows what a sawmill needs:

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Consistency.

Yield.

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Specializing in Premium Pennsylvania

Hardwood Lumber and Logs:

• Red Oak

• White Oak

• Hard Maple

• Soft Maple

• Cherry

• Poplar

• Ash

• Hickory

®

Your trusted source for

exceptional quality and consistency

for more than 200 years.

Matson Lumber Company

132 Main St.

Brookville, PA 15825

Phone: (814) 849-5334

Fax: (814) 849-3811

www.MatsonLumber.com

info@MatsonLumber.com

CLEEREMAN The most trusted name in carriages

n Over 1200 Carriages sold

n Lowest cost of ownership

n All parts in stock and reasonably priced

n In-house engineering department

n Everything from single piece equipment to

turn-key mills

Controls

Industries & Controls & Controls Engineer

8 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 9

STEFAN DRACOBLY

President Of

PAUL CLEEREMAN

VP Cleereman

Sales

DAN TOOKE

Senior Optimization

CLEEREMAN the newest name in sawmill controls and optimization

n Simple easy to use touch

screen with additional

tactile buttons

n Remote access for

troubleshooting

n No custom electrical

hardware, all parts are

off-the-shelf components

n Industry Standard

JoeScan X6 heads

n 3D data used for

opening the log and

estimating the back of

log profile

n Realistic views of the log

n Sure Grip Joystick

handles

n Operational statistics and

reports

n Over 65 systems sold

Cleereman Industries

and Cleereman Controls

715-674-2700

www.cleereman.com

info@cleereman.com


U.S.A. TRENDS

Supplier news about

sales, labor, prices, trends,

expansions and inventories

LAKE STATES

NORTHEAST

SOUTHEAST

WEST COAST

In the Lake States region, lumbermen who were

contacted reported that their markets were strong. In

Michigan, a lumber source said that, “based on general

inquiries, backed-up orders and sales, our market is

still pretty strong.” It’s “a little better” than it was several

months ago, he added.

His best-selling species include Hard and Soft Maple,

White Oak and Hickory. Hard and Soft Maple are both

“hot,” he noted. He also offers Red Oak, Walnut and

Cherry.

Hardwood markets continue to be robust throughout

the Northeast region, with one source stating it is “almost

too good.”

“The problem is not selling,” he explained, “it’s being

able to deliver. Whether it’s dealing with containers or

trucks, the problem is logistics.” As a senior sales manager

for a Connecticut-based sawmill, he expressed the

frustration involved with having the lumber ready but not

being able to move it. “We have our own trucks, which

helps, but we still need to work with third-party trucking

As Hardwood sales remain strong in the Southeast, industry

sources in the region continue to look for ways to

adapt to the current economic climate.

“The market is very much mixed,” noted one sales

manager for a sawmill located in Alabama. “A lot of mills

have logs, and some are scared to hold inventory or not

hold inventory. Everybody’s doing something different.”

He explained that there are noticeable fluctuations

related to species, as some prices are holding from six

months ago while others are falling, depending on the

Lumber providers on the West Coast who were contacted

gave positive assessments of their markets. One

distributor put it this way: Inflation, especially fuel costs,

is a problem. “It’s a stable market,” he continued. “But

my concern is, if we have many more of these runups in

costs, is it going to go the other way? The cost of materials

to build homes is up, the 30-year mortgage rate is up,

and we’d love to grow our business, but getting employees

has been very difficult. There’s a lot going on. And in

spite of all that, we’re still successful.”

Please turn to page 56 Please turn to page 57

Please turn to page 58 Please turn to page 60

New River Hardwoods, Inc.

QUALITY from start to finish!

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● Three Appalachian Hardwood Sawmills producing 35MMBF of lumber annually

● 400,000 board feet of kiln capacity drying 12MMBF of lumber annually

● Ripped and moulded products customized to meet each customer’s needs

● Straight line ripped and sanded products also available

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Species: Poplar, Red Oak, White Oak, Soft Maple,

Hard Maple, Cherry, Basswood and Hickory

Mark Pierce

Sales and Purchasing

Office: 336-889-0870

Cell: 336-858-2707

Email: mpierce@newriverhardwoods.com

4343 Highway 91

Mountain City, TN 37683

Phone: (423) 727-4019

Fax: (423) 727-4438

www.newriverhardwoods.com

10 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 11


CANADIAN TRENDS

News from suppliers about prices, trends, sales and inventories

ONTARIO

With milder weather conditions and snow melting

quickly across the province at the time of this writing,

sawmills reported having better log decks even though

they were still contending with a limited amount of loggers.

With the pandemic restrictions being lifted in various

degrees over the past month, businesses have been

able to increase operations, but still need to respect social

distancing. Mill production has improved somewhat

QUEBEC

Contacts commented sawmill production was up in late

winter, which were noted by wholesalers and secondary

manufacturing facilities. However, supplies are still a bit

shy of meeting demand for some species, grades and

thicknesses, while for other supplies are even with demand.

With oil demand being down, board road items

are also seeing a downturn in production. With the Russia-Ukraine

war, contacts expect disruptions to export

markets in the foreseeable future.

Please turn to page 61 Please turn to page 64

OUR TEAM

Our ability to find the right products quickly is made possible by our team of experienced and dedicated people

working to deliver exactly what you need.

SPECIES:

Aspen • Yellow Birch • White Birch • Red Birch

Birds Eye Maple • Hard Maple • Soft Maple

Red Oak • White Oak • White Ash • Walnut

Beech • Cherry • Hickory

LUMBER

RESOURCES

ALL YOUR ESSENTIALS

THICKNESSES:

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PRODUCTS:

Hardwood Lumber • Industrial • Pallet Components • Flooring

866-815-0404

1627 Bastien Blvd.

Quebec, Quebec G2K 1H1

www.rlumber.ca

12 LUMBER MAY 2022 RESOURCES n NATIONAL NHM HARDWOOD HALF HOR REV MAGAZINE 7-22-2019.indd 1

7/22/19 2:13 PM


NEWS DEVELOPMENTS

NEWS ABOUT NORTH AMERICAN INDUSTRIAL

HARDWOOD CONSUMERS INCLUDING MERGERS,

PLANT EXPANSIONS & ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES

COPELAND FURNITURE RECENTLY DEBUTED

THE LISSE COLLECTION

The family-owned and sustainable enterprise, Copeland

Furniture, located in Bradford, VT, planned to debut

14 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

the Lisse Dining Collection during the recent Spring High

Point Market. Every design in the new collection features

the company’s signature style of minimalism and integrated

functionality which results in a clean visual presentation.

The new additions include an extension

table, a buffet, and a crafted

chair, the company stated.

Copeland Furniture manufactures

its products exclusively from U.S.

grown Hardwoods from the American

Northern Forest. Their manufacturing

is all done in the U.S. Copeland offers

furniture in Cherry, Walnut, Maple

and Oak.

Since 1970, Copeland Furniture

has endeavored to produce furniture

for discerning consumers who appreciate

exceptional design and quality,

according to a company press release.

With sustainability as a guiding

force, the Lisse Collection showcases

Copeland’s attention to detail in the

curves and lines of each piece.

With its molded and sculptural lines,

Lisse is a study in subtle complexity.

The Lisse Buffet offers generous

storage space.

For more information, go to

www.copelandfurniture.com.

CENTURY COMPONENT

ACQUIRES DUTCH VALLEY

WOODWORKING

Century Components of Sugarcreek,

OH announced recently that

it has acquired Dutch Valley Woodworking,

also of Sugarcreek. Century

plans to expand production and incorporate

more local craftsmen from the

community, according to a company

press release. This acquisition, along

with the construction of their new

55,000 square foot facility, will provide

Century Components with more

than 100,000 square feet of production

and warehousing by the end of

2022.

Century Components uses solid U.S. Hardwoods (specifically

Hard and Soft Maple) in its manufacturing, which

is carried out only in the U.S.

Century Components began producing wood kitchen

accessories in 2007. Located

in Holmes County, OH, the world’s

largest Amish community, Century

Components crafts its bench made

products to quality standards instilled

by generations of woodworkers, a

company press release stated. With

over 40 craftsmen and support personnel,

its products are installed by

thousands of small and large cabinet

manufacturers across the United

States and in Canada. To learn more,

go to www.centurymade.com.

ROLL & HILL ESTABLISHES

LIGHTING PRODUCTION

FACILITY IN MICHIGAN

Roll & Hill, a manufacturer of highend

lighting and furniture, is establishing

a new lighting production facility in

Wyoming, MI with support from the

Michigan Strategic Fund. In its manufacturing

of lighting and furniture,

Roll & Hill uses solid U.S. Hardwoods

and produces only in the U.S. Lumber

species purchased include Black

Walnut, White Oak and Maple.

The project is expected to generate

a total capital investment of $1.5 million

and create up to 50 manufacturing

and corporate services jobs with

the support of a $300,000 Michigan

Business Development Program performance-based

grant from the Michigan

Strategic Fund. Michigan was

chosen for the project over the company’s

existing location in Brooklyn,

NY. West Michigan was chosen for

the project because of its proximity to

the supplier base and its history as a

furniture making center, according to

a state press release.

Roll & Hill began as a lighting manufacturer

in Brooklyn, NY and expanded into furniture in

2017. Roll & Hill is design-minded and collaborates with

independent designers to create a collection of high-end

Please turn to page 66

MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 15


HMA UPDATE


ONE INDUSTRY COMPRISED OF LEADERS UNITED

HMA’s 2022 National Conference

and Expo is now just a fond memory.

But what a memory! After two years of

confinement, our HMA members were

out in full force: In-person! Face-to-face!

Plus, members of the Southern Cypress

Manufacturers Association added to the

excitement of being together again. And

the sold-out industry Expo – a mix of

familiar and new faces – was the icing on the cake!

To make the event even sweeter, in attendance

were several industry associates contemplating HMA

membership. (As you know, our National Conference

and Expo is open to all industry stakeholders.) I’m

pleased to report that for them, experiencing the

welcoming atmosphere, the camaraderie, the networking

opportunities, and the on-point business sessions proved

to be the perfect introduction to our storied Association.

So I ask: is HMA membership right for you? And

might the following member benefits assist you in your

strategic planning? Take a look.

Regional Meetings: By touring sawmills,

concentration yards and secondary manufacturing

facilities, HMA members get to see the latest technology

at work; witness working solutions to common problems;

exchange information with seasoned counterparts; then

participate in discussions on industry issues, forest

resource topics, or Hardwood market updates.

These educational events are conducted in the spring

and fall of each year, and are designed to

deliver maximum value in minimal time.

(The ‘members only’ Spring Regional

Meeting is slated for May 25-26, in North

Carolina.)

National Conference & Expo: HMA’s

annual, two-day event features speakers,

workshops and roundtables on domestic

and global economics, manufacturing

and market trends, innovation, and issues of strategic

significance to the Hardwood industry. Industry suppliers

present and display the newest technology throughout

the Conference & Expo. Receptions and meal

venues provide opportunities for member-to-member

socializing, networking, information and idea exchanges,

and plenty of the best kind of fellowship. (Our 2023

National Conference and Expo is planned for Nashville,

Tennessee, March 22-24, at the JW Marriott.)

Industry Support: With the mindset of “one industry,

comprised of leaders united,” HMA members recognize

the importance of working together to shape the industry

for future generations. To that end, financial support

is given to the Hardwood Federation, our industry’s

advocacy voice on Capitol Hill; the American Hardwood

Export Council, the international association promoting

American Hardwood, globally; and the Real American

Hardwood Coalition, the Association-led, voluntary

promotion initiative working to raise consumer awareness

and interest in using American Hardwood products.

Please turn to page 67

45 Years Leading Dry Kiln Efficiency!

BY LINDA JOVANOVICH,

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT,

HARDWOOD MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION,

PITTSBURGH, PA

412-244-0440

WWW.HMAMEMBERS.ORG

16 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

kilnsales@nyle.com (800) 777-6953

www.nyle.com


AHEC REPORT

The Granite Valley Difference

The The Granite Valley Difference

The Granite Valley Difference

SEASON TWO OF AHEC’S “WORDS ON WOOD” PODCAST EXPLORES

NEW TECHNOLOGIES REVOLUTIONIZING WORKING FORESTS

Developed by the American Hardwood

alongside academics and forestry practitioners

such as Dr. Galina Churkina of the

Export Council (AHEC) in collaboration with

Disegno, the quarterly design magazine,

Potsdam Institute for Change Impact Research

Climate, Dr. Constance McDermott,

Words on Wood is a podcast taking an indepth

look at some of the big issues surrounding

forests and our relationship with

iver, technical consultant to the EU’s FLEGT

from the University of Oxford, and Rupert Ol-

them, exploring how management decisions

scheme to tackle illegal logging.

and the use of Hardwood products affect our

In Season Two, engineer Andrew Lawrence

and architect Lina Ghotmeh discuss

society. Season Two, available now on Spotify,

Apple podcasts, americanhardwood.

the complexities of timber in construction and

org, and other podcast services, explores

the future of tall timber buildings; designers

topics like advances in timber construction,

Sam Hecht, Yves Béhar and Elissa Brunato

explore new processes, forms, and tech-

new

Our

woodworking

Sawmills

technologies, rediscovering

traditional woodworking methods,

niques making wood a cutting-edge material;

Our sawmills in

and georeferencing Wisconsin prepare a Hardwood sample to trace its origin

with raw World timber Forest for delivery ID. There are also bitesize “Tree niture brand Zanat talk about their approaches towards

designer Stephen Burks and Orhan Niksic of Bosnian fur-

Ready

Shorts” to focusing our finishing on mills. unique properties and uses for a variety

of U.S. Hardwood species. Quality Saunders and Victor Deklerk from Kew Gardens, Our average one on-hand

traditional woodworking methods; and Phil Guillery, Jade

Custom Inventory

Each 30-minute Words on Wood episode focuses indepth

on a unique aspect of the forest and serves as dive into the To new help you technology streamline making your it possible 10 million to deter-

board feet.

of the leading Work botanical research centers on kiln-dried the planet, supply is

Processing

a platform for interdisciplinary We “rough discussion. grade” our Drawing kiln-dried

production process, we

Get the wood you need,

on mine the harvest location of a sample of wood.

woods to ensure the best appearance. can supply custom-cut

with quick turnaround.

the work of scientists, conservationists, Quality assurance forestry on every professionals,

academics, designers and architects, Words on Disegno, Kristina to your specs. Rapacki (Season One) and India Block

load. Weaved pre-production together by blanks podcast hosts Oli Stratford of

Wood is a space for candid reflection on the challenges (Season Two), these interviews offer multiple perspectives

single-source on how supplier we can to relate to and understand forests

and opportunities Granite Valley of working Forest with Products forests. keeps growing as a

Each episode is built around in-depth interviews with and the products we make from them. Offering expert

better serve you. We sell rough, S2S, straight-line ripping, and offer

experts in their field. In Season One, Designers and architects

like

science and analysis, along with industry insights and

NHLA

Formafantasma,

grades and customer-proprietary

Waugh Thistleton,

grading

dRMM

based

concrete

on NHLA

design

guidelines.

proposals, Words on Wood provides an

and Asif Khan Custom reflect products on their are work available with forests to your and exact wood specs accessible for width, length path to and understanding color. the global forces shap-

Visit our website to learn more or email us at sales@granitevalley.com.

Offices in Wisconsin, Indiana

& Colorado

sales@granitevalley.com

granitevalley.com

Alder | Aromatic Cedar | Black & White Ash | Aspen | Basswood

Beech | White & Yellow Birch | Bitternut | Butternut | Cherry

Grey & Red Elm | Hard Maple | Hickory | Red Oak | White Oak

Norway Pine | White Pine | Poplar | Red & Silver Soft Maple | Walnut

White Cedar | Rift & Quartered Red & White Oak

18 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

BY MICHAEL SNOW,

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,

AMERICAN HARDWOOD EXPORT COUNCIL,

STERLING, VA

703-435-2900

WWW.AHEC.ORG

Please turn to page 68

Our Sawmills

Our sawmills in

Wisconsin prepare

raw timber for delivery

to our finishing mills.

Granite Valley Forest Products keeps growing as a single-source supplier to

better serve you. We sell rough, S2S, straight-line ripping, and offer

NHLA grades and customer-proprietary grading based on NHLA guidelines.

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woods to ensure the best appearance.

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granitevalley.com

Beech | White & Yellow Birch | Bitternut | Butternut | Cherry

Alder Grey Alder | Aromatic & | Aromatic Red Elm Cedar | Cedar Hard | Black Maple | Black & | Hickory & White

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WCMA INSIGHTS

WCMA EMBRACES BUSY AGENDA

It has been a busy spring, and I have

enjoyed being back on the road attending

a number of industry events and

seeing members in person. I can always

tell when business is good by the

attendance rate at these events, and it

has been a great spring!

With a more active presence on social

media platforms, as well as our monthly

newsletter and blog, the WCMA

continues to be more accessible to its

members, wood industry partners, and the public. Many

members find great value in the newsletters which contain

a mixture of industry news, hot topics, employer resources

and news about our members. I know you are

all busy with the day-to-day, but I encourage you to take

the time to go through the newsletter, and please, submit

information that you feel other WCMA members would

enjoy. If you are not receiving the newsletter, please contact

wcma@wcma.com.

Collaborating with fellow trade associations is a priority

for 2022. I am pleased to continue to serve on the Executive

Committee for the Real American Hardwood Coalition

and participate in weekly calls on how to move this

industry-wide promotional campaign forward. Our goals

are to increase American Hardwood sales, improve industry

stability, and raise awareness of the health and

environmental benefits of Real American Hardwood.

Our members know that reaching consumers in a meaningful

way will have a positive impact on their bottom

line! If you are not yet aware of this initiative, please visit

the website at www.RealAmericanHardwood.org.

2022 Fall Conference and Plant

Tour Event

We will also be collaborating on our

2022 Fall Conference & Plant Tour Event

with Wood Machinery Manufacturers of

America (WMMA) for the second year

in a row. The event will be in Minnesota

this fall and offers numerous networking

opportunities and gives attendees an excellent

opportunity to learn how industry

professionals stay updated in areas such

as woodworking machinery, equipment, tooling, supplies,

software, and overall business solutions.

The event will be open to WCMA & WMMA member

companies. Non-members are encouraged to attend to

see what the WCMA is all about. We are sure that after

participating in these excellent networking opportunities,

you will be excited to join.

Conference details and registration will be announced

soon, visit the WCMA website for more information.

www.wcma.com.

WCMA Membership – If you are NOT a member,

you are missing out!

One of the topics discussed at a recent WCMA board

meeting focused on membership growth. The board acknowledged

that while it is important to retain our current

members, it’s equally important to grow our membership.

By welcoming new members and tech partners, we can

expand current programs, develop new benefits, and

add more variety to our networking, wood industry promotions,

and educational opportunities. I believe every

Please turn to page 69

BY AMY K. SNELL, CAE,

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,

WOOD COMPONENT MANUFACTURERS ASSOC.,

LINDSTROM, MN

651-332-6332

WWW.WCMA.COM

20 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE


“The one thing about being a custom manufacturer

is to keep pricing down and create a good working

environment for the employees.

These machines are here to help us craft the wood and create

the product we desire; they are a tool, but we still need

craftmanship and a streamlined manufacturing process.”

– Brad Rehmeyer, Owner, Rehmeyer Wood Floors

Rehmeyer Wood Floors, located in Shrewsbury, PA, offers wood flooring in a variety of domestic

Hardwoods and some imports. Rehmeyer’s custom wide plank flooring is showcased here by an

award-winning builder.

Rehmeyer Wood Floors:

Thinking Locally On A Global Scale

Shrewsbury, PA—To hear Brad Rehmeyer tell it, the

history of Rehmeyer Wood Floors, which is located

here, actually begins with cabinets.

“I’m the founder, but I started some 30 years ago building

cabinets and furniture and it eventually evolved into

making custom floors for people,” he said, noting that the

transition was not as strange as it might seem. “You see

a lot of people making custom kitchens, so why not custom

flooring?”

So, in 1985, Rehmeyer bought a moulder and began to

explore an idea: what if there were a company that could

become the go-to place for customized flooring; a business

that could help customers with the design element

and help them find other companies to supplement their

building projects? By the early 2000s, that concept had

become a reality.

By Scott Dalton

“I put in the latest automated equipment so we could

be more productive,” he commented. “At the beginning

we were primarily contract milling floors for other companies.

They would use us as a service. We would mill the

flooring to their specs, providing a value-added product.”

As the Rehmeyer Wood Floor line grew in popularity,

the company built on its original services, offering contract

milling as well as finishing services. They also began

to offer a customized range of options so that companies

can use Rehmeyer products as a private label brand.

Rehmeyer stated that they prefer to source wood domestically,

with lumber purchases totaling 200,000 board

feet annually. They buy White Oak, Hickory, some unsteamed

Walnut, and some American Cherry, as well

as other Hardwoods, such as Red Oak and Birch. Additionally,

Rehmeyer Wood Floors features some imported

Rough lumber is optimized for maximum width on a Raimann KM ripsaw at Rehmeyer Wood Floors.

lumber, such as Mahogany, from various regions such as

Central America.

“When I first started, we were initially doing a lot of contract

flooring,” Rehmeyer recalled. “The big thing then

was low-grade, pallet-grade material. The better material

was culled out for flooring, due to economics. There was

a lot of that being made. We are constantly evolving with

our suppliers to figure out what is being made today and

how to create lumber on the front end to create the best

products.”

Although trends in flooring have changed over the

years, some things have remained consistent. For example,

Reymeyer pointed out that consumers have always

wanted the natural look of wood. At the same time,

customers have become far more sophisticated in terms

of their tastes, due in no small part to the internet.

“We all used to look at TV to see what was out there,”

he stated. “Now, such a wide variety of people are looking

on the internet. The consumer is far more educated

than in the past.”

Consumers are also more acutely aware of where their

products come from, and many are looking for sustainable

approaches and eco-friendly products. Rehmeyer

said he sees such awareness as an opportunity.

“If our manufacturers capitalize on that, I think we can

all survive and consumers will get a better product, a

natural wood product,” he commented, noting that Rehmeyer

Wood Floors prides itself on sourcing natural

products whenever possible. “Even our finishes are all

natural. We use hardwax oils from Vesting of Holland; it

is harder than lacquer, dries with LED technology, and

is safe during manufacturing as well as in the home. We

as manufacturers want to do a good thing, which aligns

with consumer desires, many of whom are willing to pay

a premium for natural products.”

He added that another key to success lies in paying

less attention to trends and more attention to customers.

“Styles change all the time. One year it’s gray, the next

it’s black or white; it’s all over the place. But not everyone

wants gray,” he said. “Some customers are traditionalists

and want brown, but some want light tones in a beach

area. There are all sorts of styles out there, and it can

Please turn to page 45

22 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 23


Delcy Pryor, grandfather of Joe Pryor, president of Oaks Unlimited, inspecting White Oak staves air-drying in 1957.

Forty Years Of Hardwoods At

Oaks Unlimited Inc.

Waynesville, NC—Oaks Unlimited Inc.,

headquartered here, distributes green

and kiln-dried Appalachian Hardwood

lumber. The operation offers primarily Red and

White Oak and Poplar in 4/4 through 8/4 thicknesses,

all grades, surfaced, straight-line ripped

or rough.

Situated on a 20-acre facility, Oaks Unlimited

Inc. purchases and sells approximately 20 million

board feet annually.

Family-owned and -operated, the company

was incorporated in 1979. However, the family

history in the lumber industry is rich and rooted

going back with three generations of stave mill

and sawmill ownership. Joe Pryor Sr. and his father

Delcy Pryor ran stave mills in Tennessee and

By Michelle Keller

Green lumber at Oaks Unlimited is graded and stacked prior to kilndrying.

A Japanese cinematic crew filmed a Suntory whiskey commercial

in 1963, featuring staves from what became Oaks Unlimited.

Joe Pryor, president of Oaks Unlimited, said, “Our goal is to be

a customer-focused company that does business with integrity

each and every day.”

North Carolina. The current business, settled high in the

Appalachian Mountains, is an area known for superior

Hardwoods.

As for location, Oaks Unlimited is in a premium spot

for quality lumber. President Joe Pryor said, “We are located

35 miles west of Asheville, NC. In the heart of the

Appalachian region, we couldn’t ask for better quality in

our product.” At an altitude of approximately 3,000 feet

above sea level, the company is in a climate ideal for

producing excellent lumber.

Pryor explained, “Our lumber is made from top quality,

true Appalachian Hardwoods. Green lumber is graded

and carefully stacked on sticks with precise vertical

alignment for flatness during air-drying. We use sheds

for the air-drying process before kiln-drying to ensure the

lumber is bright and check-free. After kiln-drying, each

board is carefully graded by National Hardwood Lumber

Association (NHLA) certified inspectors.”

Pryor said the computerized scanning and measurement

equipment the company utilizes provides the most

accurate tally available. “Each board is precision endtrimmed

after kiln-drying so you receive neat, even packages

with minimum end split and wane,” he explained.

A Weinig gang rip optimizing system with movable

blades and 17-point board scanning produces strips.

Surfacing two sides and straight-line ripping one edge

is also available. The lumber is dried in Oaks Unlimited’s

state-of-the-art, computer controlled dry kilns with over

350,000 board feet of kiln space. “We take special care

during this process to make sure our lumber remains flat

and stress-free,” Pryor explained. “After kiln-drying, we

grade the lumber once again to make sure our customers

receive a high-quality product. The use of a computer-controlled

KD grading chain makes it possible to do

custom sorts of widths and lengths based on our customers’

needs.” All lumber packs are double-end-trimmed

before shipping. Packs are then export-banded and logos

are available on customer request.

The company operates six SII dry kilns and one

BolDesign kiln; an Automated Lumber Handling stacker,

trimmer, and grading station; a Newman S-282 planer;

a Weinig gang rip system; two Weima wood grinders; a

Biomass Engineering sawdust storage and boiler feed; a

VisionTally measurement system; and wood fired boiler

for the six kilns (SII) that dry Oak Hardwood lumber

and one gas fired kiln with powered vents for Poplar

(BolDesign).

When asked about the factors that contribute to the

company’s continued success, Pryor said, “Oaks Unlimited

is a steady company that produces consistent lumber

every year. Our goal is to be a customer focused company

that does business with integrity each and every day.

We are NHLA Grade Certified. The average tenure of

our employees is over 14 years with the company. Oaks

Unlimited feels like family and enjoys frequent cookouts,

pig-pickings, and a large Christmas party where all employees,

spouses, and children receive a gift from the

company.”

Please turn to page 48

Oaks Unlimited uses sheds for the air-drying process before

kiln-drying to ensure the lumber is bright and check-free.

24 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 25


HMA NatCon Aims To

Prepare Attendees For

Successful Future

Photos by Paul Miller Jr. and Terry Miller

Miramar Beach, FL–”Investing in the Future” was

the theme of the Hardwood Manufacturers Association’s

(HMA) 2022 National Conference and Expo, recently

held here at the Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort.

According to HMA Executive Vice President, Linda Jovanovich,

“The thought-provoking theme was developed

to engage and motivate our attendees to expand their

frame of reference; be flexible to change; look to others

as resources for growth; and invest in alternative processes

in order to progress and achieve success.”

To that end, the multi-day event included the following

eight learning sessions:

•Automation and Robotics – The future of Wood

Processing Technology: Simon Potvin, president,

wood processing division of the BID Group;

•Driving forces behind the decision to Automate:

Liz Russell, director of operations, Stella-Jones

Corporation;

•Promoting American Hardwoods in a changed

world: Michael Snow, executive director, American

Hardwood Export Council;

•Backstage Pass: Joshua Davis, vice president,

and Todd Moore, senior credit manager, Food &

Agribusiness Farm Credit Mid-America;

Hardwood Market Update and Outlook: Dan Meyer,

editor, Hardwood Publishing Company Inc.;

•Real American Hardwood Coalition Update +

Consumer Promotion Strategy: Michael Martin,

member RAHC Board of Directors, Mark Lainas,

chief innovation officer/president, and Taua Baccarin,

creative director, CANVAS United;

•Advocacy and Representation: Dana Lee Cole,

executive director, Hardwood Federation;

•Plan and Prosper: Conor Lokar, senior forecaster,

ITR Economics TM .

In addition to the informative presentations, the

event hosted an HMA board of directors meeting,

the annual meeting of the Southern Cypress Manufacturers

Association, a sold-out Vendor Expo and

numerous networking venues open to all 225 Conference

participants.

The Hardwood Manufacturers Association (HMA)

is the only national trade organization with membership

limited to Hardwood sawmills and lumber concentration

yards located in the U.S. n

Bill Buchanan, Buchanan Lumber Company, Aliceville, AL; Brian

Turlington, SII Dry Kilns, Lexington, NC; and Wayne Law, New

River Hardwoods Inc., Mountain City, TN

Bennett Thompson, ISK Biocides Inc., Memphis, TN; Tripp Josey,

Josey Lumber Co. Inc., Scotland Neck, NC; Andy Nuffer, DMSi

Software/eLIMBS/TallyExpress, Winston-Salem, NC; and Tom

Gerow, Wagner Millwork LLC, Owego, NY

Nordeck and Mary Claire Thompson, Thompson Appalachian

Hardwoods Inc., Huntland, TN; and Dawn Campbell and Paul Cabrol,

Battle Lumber Co. Inc., Wadley, GA

Eric Porter, Abenaki Timber Corporation, Kingston, NH; Tony

Pescaglia, MO PAC Lumber Co., Fayette, MO; Lindsey DiGangi,

Pennsylvania Lumbermens Mutual Insurance Co. (PLMI), Philadelphia,

PA; and Bucky Pescaglia, MO PAC Lumber Co.

Geoff Gannon, TS Manufacturing Co., Plymouth, NH; Troy Brown,

Kretz Lumber Company Inc., Antigo, WI; Ted Smith, TS Manufacturing

Co., Lindsay, ON

Bucky Pescaglia, MO PAC Lumber Co., Fayette, MO; Tommy Petzoldt,

East Perry Lumber Company, Frohna, MO; Chuck Boaz and

Jim Burris, Corley Manufacturing Co., Chattanooga, TN; Marv

and Karen Bernhagen, Lewis Controls/Corley Manufacturing Co.,

Cornelius, OR; and Tony Pescaglia, MO PAC Lumber Co.

Incoming HMA President Tommy Petzoldt, East Perry Lumber

Company, Frohna, MO and outgoing president, Troy Brown,

Kretz Lumber Co., Antigo, WI

Learn more at

www.hmamembers.org.

Tim and Hannah Reid, Buckman Laboratories Inc., Moundville,

AL; Geoff Henderson, Anderson-Tully Lumber Company, Vicksburg,

MS; and Mike Sumrow, Buckman Laboratories Inc., Memphis,

TN

Lloyd Lovett, King City Forwarding USA Inc., Pittsfield, MA; Paul

Miller Jr., National Hardwood Magazine, Memphis, TN; and Bruce

Dahn, HHP Inc., Henniker, NH

Additional photos on next page

26 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 27


HMA PHOTOS Continued

Nick Sokoll, Taylor Machine Works Inc., Louisville, MS; Tony

Hood, Turn Bull Lumber Company, Elizabethtown, NC; and Stuart

Tucker and Barry Black, Taylor Machine Works Inc.

Mark Williams, Jerry G. Williams & Sons Inc., Smithfield, NC;

Peter McCarty, TS Manufacturing Co., Dover-Foxcroft, ME; Riley

Smith, TS Manufacturing Co., Lindsay, ON; and Joey Nelson, JoeScan

Inc., Vancouver, WA

Alan Robbins, USNR, Jacksonville, FL; Scott Greene, High Country

Lumber & Mulch, North Wilkesboro, NC; and Martin Vaillancourt,

USNR, Plessisville, QC

Ken and Christine Trainor, Arxada LLC, Alpharetta, GA; and Donna

and Kenneth Keith, Talladega Machinery and Supply Company

Inc., Talladega, AL

Bruce Dahn, HHP Inc., Henniker, NH; Judd Johnson, Hardwood

Market Report, Memphis, TN; Brian Schilling, Pike Lumber Company

Inc., Akron, IN; David Steen, Pike Lumber Company Inc.,

Milan, IN; and Jon Johnson, Timber Products Company, Munising,

MI

Sylvain Dionne, Michael Baker and Patrick Lepage, BID Group,

Mirabel, QC; and Scott Ferland, Maine Woods Company LLC,

Portage Lake, ME

Niki St. Denis, TS Manufacturing Co., Lindsay, ON; Peter McCarty,

TS Manufacturing Co., Dover-Foxcroft, ME; Scott and Robyn

Cummings, and Marisa Chamberlain, Cummings Lumber Company

Inc., Troy, PA; and Troy Brown, Kretz Lumber Co. Inc., Antigo,

WI

Nathan Thompson, T & S Hardwoods Inc., Milledgeville, GA;

Lance Johnson and Bennett Thompson, ISK Biocides Inc., Memphis,

TN; and Michael Snow, AHEC, Sterling, VA

Nathan Thompson and Trisha Thompson, T & S Hardwoods Inc.,

Milledgeville, GA; and Andreas Mueller, Brunner-Hildebrand

Lumber Dry Kiln Co., Nashville, TN

Tripp Josey, Josey Lumber Company Inc., Scotland Neck, NC;

and Lance Johnson and Bennett Thompson, ISK Biocides Inc.,

Memphis, TN

Elijah McCarty and Jeremy Pitts, Nyle Dry Kilns, Brewer, ME; Jeremy

Mortl, Messersmith Manufacturing Inc., Bark River, MI; and

Adam Duplisea, Nyle Dry Kilns

Jon Krepol, Industrial Vision Systems Inc., Broomall, PA; Burt

Craig, Matson Lumber Company, Brookville, PA; and Mike Ballard,

Sawmill MD, Crestview, FL

Dave Sondel, Chris Fehr and Eric Degenfelder, U-C Coatings

LLC, Buffalo, NY

28 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

Henry German, DMSi Software/eLIMBS/TallyExpress, Omaha,

NE; Peter McCarty, TS Manufacturing Co., Dover-Foxcroft, ME;

Kirby Kendrick, Kendrick Forest Products Inc., Edgewood, IA;

and Jeremy Pitts, Nyle Dry Kilns, Brewer, ME

Dan Mathews and Ken Matthews, SII Dry Kilns, Lexington, NC;

Bob Pope, SII Dry Kilns, Montpelier, VT; Deb Johnson, Biolube

Inc., Fort Wayne, IN; Scott Ferland, Maine Woods Company LLC,

Portage Lake, ME; and Brian Turlington, SII Dry Kilns, Lexington,

NC

Kelly and Deb Johnson, Biolube Inc., Fort Wayne, IN; and Craig

Miller, Battle Lumber Co. Inc., Wadley, GA

Additional photos on page 52

MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 29


Zack Rickman, Atlanta Hardwood Corporation, Mableton, GA; Mark Tuck, Gates Milling Inc., Gatesville, NC; Hal Mitchell, Atlanta Hardwood

Corporation; and Lance Johnson, ISK Biocides Inc., Memphis, TN

Ian Faight, SCMA/HMA, Pittsburgh, PA; Kelsey Kennedy, Gates Milling Inc., Gatesville, NC; Jerry Fortner, Cypress Rose Sawmill,

Homerville, GA; Linda Jovanovich, HMA, Pittsburgh, PA; and Brian Meier, Cypress Rose Sawmill

Terry Miller, National Hardwood Magazine, Memphis, TN; Kaitlyn

Wood, Gates Milling Inc., Gatesville, NC; Rusty Logue, Battle

Lumber Co. Inc., Wadley, GA; and Hunter Manning, Gates Milling

Inc.

Tony Hood, Lee White and Brooks Jeffords, Turn Bull Lumber

Company, Elizabethtown, NC

SCMA Gathers For Annual Meeting

Miramar Beach, FL– The Southern Cypress Manufacturers

Association (SCMA) held its 2022 Annual

Meeting recently at the Sandestin Golf and Beach

Resort, located here, in conjunction with the Hardwood

Manufacturers Association’s National Conference and

Expo.

Thirty members, prospective members, promotion

sponsors, industry stakeholders, and staff gathered for

a networking reception and dinner to open the two-day

event. The next morning, the attendees met to review

the past year’s activities, preview 2022 promotion initiatives,

discuss association business, and elect officers.

Cassie Lewis, Turn Bull Lumber Company, Elizabethtown,

NC, was elected SCMA president. Lewis joined

Turn Bull Lumber Company in 2011, working her way

through the accounting and logistics departments, before

joining the sales team in 2015. She now serves as

the company’s account manager, and is responsible for

all sales, as well as managing the green and kiln-dried

inventories.

30 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

Photos by Terry Miller

Truss Beasley, Beasley Forest Products (BFP), Hazlehurst,

GA, was elected SCMA vice president. He joined

BFP in 2014 and is currently serving as vice president

of business development for the Beasley Group sawmills

and flooring plants. Beasley earned a Bachelor of

Finance and a Master of Business Administration from

Georgia Southern University.

The SCMA is a non-profit organization dedicated to

the promotion of Cypress building products to design

professionals and consumers. For more information,

visit www.CypressInfo.org. Follow the SCMA on Instagram

and Twitter at @cypress_info, and on Facebook

at @southerncypress.

If your company is engaged in the manufacture, processing,

or distribution of Cypress building products,

and is interested in joining, email member-services@

cypressinfo.org to learn about membership. n

Doug Brock, Semi-Retired, Panacea, FL; and Ryan Collins and

John Stevenson, Beasley Forest Products Inc., Hazlehurst, GA

Truss Beasley, Beasley Forest Products Inc., Hazlehurst, GA;

Cassie Lewis, Turn Bull Lumber Company, Elizabethtown, NC;

Zack Rickman, Atlanta Hardwood Corporation, Mableton, GA;

and Ian Faight, SCMA/HMA, Pittsburgh, PA

Michael Shook, Norcross Supply Company, Norcross, GA; Taylor Stringer, Stringer Industries Inc., Tylertown, MS; Tripp Josey, Josey

Lumber Company Inc., Scotland Neck, NC; and Warren Reeves, Wholesale Wood Products, Dothan, AL

MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 31


At the recent Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers Inc. (AHMI)

meeting, Jay Reese (left), of Penn-Sylvan International Inc., Spartansburg,

PA, passed the gavel as chairman to Tom Sheets, Blue

Ridge Lumber Co. LLC, Fishersville, VA.

AHMI Annual Meeting Sheds Light

On Key Industry Challenges

Story by Tom Inman and Sue Putnam

Hollywood, FL–Business sessions at the annual

meeting of the Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers

Inc. (AHMI) recently provided valuable information

on key industry topics in 2022.

Attendees were pleased with each of the presentations

and many requested copies of the reports. The

following is a recap of the business presentations and

the slides are available on the AHMI website www.

appalachianhardwood.org.

Forest Carbon Credits In Appalachia

NCX Carbon is America’s top provider of forest carbon

credits and Landowner Success Manager Kathryn

Morse explained the program in the AHMI region. The

NCX model pays forest landowners on an annual basis

to defer timber harvesting activities.

She said there are no costs to landowners to participate

and no minimum acreage required, but there is

an annual deferral commitment. The NCX model is the

only system that has been designed to eliminate these

barriers, Morse said.

“We’re able to achieve this through leveraging the

technology we’ve developed and meticulously designing

our methodology to support this framework,” she

said.

Alan Robbins, USNR, Jacksonville, FL; Connie Miller, National

Hardwood Magazine, Memphis, TN; and Robert Wagner, USNR,

Graham, NC

Photos by Paul Miller Jr.

Using artifical intelligence and remote sensing data,

the NCX assessment calculates a landowner’s model

and the volume of carbon eligible for earning credits by

deferring harvests for one year. The primary factors are

standing inventory (size, species of trees) and harvest

risk (proximity to markets, mill demand).

Landowners then bid on the price at which they would

be willing to sell some or all of those credits to the market,

Morse said. NCX gives landowners a report on what

corporations are willing to pay to help determine the

market clearing price. Landowners are notified of the results

of the auction and if bids are accepted, they enter

into a binding agreement to reduce their harvest by the

agreed amount for one year. Morse said that after the

year, a second evaluation is completed that issues the

credits to buyers and payment to landowners for the actual

amount of additional carbon delivered.

The Appalachian region has averaged $12-$14 per

acre in the past. For more information, visit www.ncx.

com.

Industry’s Growth And Challenges Addressed

Hardwood Market Report Editor Judd Johnson provided

AHMI attendees an overview of the lumber industry’s

strength during the past year and the news is positive.

The Hardwood industry in large part has been buoyed

by a robust housing market with consumers driving

demand not only in new home sales but remodeling,

renovation and DIY projects. Supported by an economy

that emerged strong after the first year of the pandemic,

homeowners have generously spent disposable

income. Noted Johnson, additionally, as the Millennial

Generation “comes of age” and enters the market as

first-time home buyers – soon to be followed by Generation

Z – this contributes to a positive mood in the housing

market. That positively impacts the lumber industry.

Johnson noted that a temporary economic/housing

cool down is afoot. He added, though, that is not due to

a decline in product demand. Instead, product demand

is actually building up, he said.

Some takeaways from Johnson’s detailed presentation

include the following:

•The Institute of Supply Management puts the PMI

(Purchasing Manager’s Index) at the highest level in 16

years. Johnson said that if the index is above 50 percent,

it indicates expansion in the manufacturing sector.

His presentation cited the most recent data for January

of this year when the PMI was about 58 percent. It peaked

at nearly 64 percent between February and March

2021 and has settled at a positive percentage.

•The housing industry has thrived, and like other industries,

has been challenged by supply/demand issues.

Johnson’s presentation compared the stages of

homes under construction, those that have not yet started

construction and those that completed construction

between December 2019 to December 2021. Nearly

749,000 single family units were under construction, including

those in inventory available for sale, those that

had been sold, and those that were started but not included

in inventory.

•These challenges in the housing market, too, are

pushing home prices literally ‘through the roof.’ According

to Johnson’s data, in two short years homes priced

at $400,000 or more have increased from representing

about 32 percent of homes sales in January 2020 to

nearly 55 percent in January 2022.

The $200,000-$300,000 priced homes have decreased

from 35 percent of the market in January 2020

to less than 10 percent. This has forced more homebuyers

into the $300,000-$400,000 price range. This segment

of the market has grown from about 24 percent in

January 2020 to nearly 35 percent in January this year.

As of the first of this year, fewer than 5 percent of U.S.

single family homes sold for under $200,000. That’s a

decline from approximately 7 percent in January 2020.

•Lumber consumption between 2018 and 2021 decreased,

creating the supply deficits that impact consumers,

home builders and end use manufacturers,

Please turn the page

Tom and Rosemary Inman, and Wendy and John Bowman, AHMI,

High Point, NC

Barry and Brenda Johnsa, Suwanee Lumber Co., Suwanee, GA;

and Pat and Chip Underwood, Thompson Appalachian Hardwoods,

Huntland, TN

Tony and Taylor Stringer, Stringer Industries Inc., Tylertown, MS;

John Crites II, Allegheny Wood Products Inc., Petersburg, WV;

and Frances Cooper, Cooper Machine Company Inc., Wadley, GA

Deb and Kelly Johnson, Biolube Inc., Fort Wayne, IN; and Tom

and Peggy Sheets, Blue Ridge Lumber Co. LLC, Fishersville, VA

32 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 33


AHMI MEETING Continued

according to Johnson’s data. In 2018, domestic grade

lumber consumption was 2.222 billion board feet (BBF).

Johnson reported that during 2021, lumber consumption

was 1.954 BBF. While that was a drop from 2018, it

was an improvement over 2020 when consumption fell

to about 1.8 BBF.

Johnson added that lumber consumption by the U.S.

furniture industry, alone, peaked in 1997 at 3 billion

board feet. However, in 2021, the consumption estimate

was .373 billion board feet, which, he noted, is a loss of

2.627 billion board feet of domestic grade lumber usage.

•Regarding specific Hardwood species, Johnson illustrated

that from February 2018 to February of this year,

Hard and Soft Maple prices were up more than 100 percent

from the respective low points. These prices were

for kiln-dried 4/4 FAS Nos. 1 and 2 White Hard Maple

and Sap & Btr Soft Maple.

4/4 Poplar prices hit a record high in August 2021 at

$2235/M (price per thousand board feet) and 4/4 Hickory

and Basswood prices at the time of Johnson’s presentation

were at record highs.

Meanwhile, wooden kitchen cabinet and countertop

imports to the U.S. increased 21.9 percent to a record

high from 2020-2021. His presentation showed that

back in the early 2000s, the emphasis was on Oak cabinets.

Then in the mid-2000s, design shifted to natural

finished light woods. Design trends didn’t significantly

Real American Hardwood Seeks Support

The Real American Hardwood Coalition is in the final

development of a consumer website to educate and encourage

people to buy Hardwoods.

RAHC members Amy Snell of the Wood Components

Manufacturers Association and Ray Moistner of the Indiana

Hardwood Lumbermen’s Association presented the

update at the 2022 AHMI Annual Meeting. The group

has completed its research, branding, industry website,

and funding strategy.

The emphasis now is the consumer website which

should be launched this spring and funding for it and

other work. Snell recapped the progress to date highshift

again until years after the Great Recession when

painted cabinets became a trend around 2013. This was

followed in 2019 and 2020 with a sizeable dip in imports

due to tariffs on Chinese imports, Johnson stated.

•Solid Hardwood flooring shipments from U.S. manufacturers

in 2021 were 20.6 percent higher than they

were in 2020, said Johnson. This is the highest level for

this product since 2007. His presentation illustrated that

in 2021 U.S. market consumption of solid Hardwood

flooring far outpaced imports, which had cornered considerable

market share in the mid-2000s.

Millwork saw an uptick in 2021 (0.453 BBF) over 2020

(0.431 BBF). So lumber consumption for millwork is

getting close to being as high as it was in 2019, when

it reached its highest level in nearly 10 years at 0.495

BBF. Johnson explained that from 2013 to 2021 lumber

consumption for millwork rose 17.1 percent and in

2020-2021 it still gained ground at 5.1 percent despite

the pandemic.

•Regarding U.S. exports of Hardwood lumber, Johnson

said 2021 total exports were just over 1.4 BBF. That

is 8.4 percent higher than 2020 and 2.5 percent higher

than 2019, but below 2016-2018 averages.

Hardwood Federation Advocacy In 2022

Hardwood Federation Executive Director Dana Lee

Cole said the group will deliver four key messages to

Congress this year:

•Forest products are part of the climate solution and

must be counted in federal carbon accounting programs.

•Tax and regulatory reforms must be favorable to

growing and sustaining the Hardwood industry and facilitate

passing family-owned businesses to the next

generation.

•Infrastructure and transportation legislation must address

barriers to shipping over land and water.

•Healthy export markets are key to industry success.

HF advocates for a broad swath of issues, and we

need to continually build relationships with lawmakers

from diverse political and geographical backgrounds,

Cole said. Policy impacting the Hardwood sector is

rarely passed on a partisan level.

Insurance Forum Covers Crucial

Business Issues

During the AHMI annual meeting, four AHMI member

insurance professionals presented key details about issues

the Hardwood industry is currently facing in 2022.

Two takeaways were: the cost of insurance for the

Hardwood sector is rising as carriers move away from

offering coverage and company leaders must review

policies to make certain they have adequate coverage.

The four presentations were titled:

(1) General Liability, Commercial Automobile, Workers’

Compensation: Joe Hughes of ECM Solutions

(2) Umbrella / Excess Liability Coverage: Ryan Harman,

Mountcastle Insurance

(3) Cyber Security & Best Practices: Toye Oshoniyi

and Duke Baldridge, Dominion Risk

(4) Contractual Risk Transfer Agreements Specific to

Logging / Hauling: Dawn Daum, McGriff Insurance.

These presentations are available to view at www.

appalachianhardwood.org and offer more details than

can be reported here. The contact information for each

presenter is included in their slides and readers of this

publication are encouraged to contact them directly with

questions or for more information.

Please turn the page

Barry Corcoran and Christy Siebert, ECM Solutions, Charlotte,

NC; and Jeff Dougherty, Ally Global Logistics, Jacksonville, FL

Nancy and Paul Stringer, Stringer Industries Inc., Tylertown, MS;

and Kimm and Steve Merrick, and Connie and Troy Jamieson,

Somerset Wood Products, Somerset, KY

John Crites II, Allegheny Wood Products Inc., Petersburg, WV;

Roy and Lynn Zangari, Meadow River Hardwood Lumber Co.

LLC, Roanoke, VA; Bo Hammond, Collins Hardwood, Kane, PA;

and Dean Alanko, Allegheny Wood Products Inc.

Mark Haddix, Farm Credit of the Virginias, Elkins, WV; Jim Burris,

Corley Mfg. Co., Chattanooga, TN; and Steve Hamer, Jim C.

Hamer Co., Kenova, WV

Ryan and Joy Harman, Mountcastle Insurance, Lexington, NC;

and Andy Nuffer, DMSi Software/eLIMBS/TallyExpress, Winston-Salem,

NC

Roy and Kim Cummings, Cummings Lumber Company Inc., Troy,

PA; and Paul Miller Jr., National Hardwood Magazine, Memphis,

TN

Stephen Zambo, Ally Global Logistics LLC, Jacksonville, FL; Bo

Hammond, Collins Hardwood, Kane, PA; and Peter McCarty, TS

Manufacturing Co., Dover-Foxcroft, ME

Angela Hammond, Collins Hardwood, Kane, PA; Tom Sheets,

Blue Ridge Lumber Co. LLC, Fishersville, VA; Jay and Reza Reese,

Penn-Sylvan International Inc., Spartansburg, PA; and Tom

Inman, Executive Director, AHMI, High Point, NC

34 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 35


AHMI MEETING Continued

John Smith and Lindsey DiGangi, Pennsylvania Lumbermens

Mutual Insurance Company, Philadelphia, PA

Joe Pryor, Oaks Unlimited Inc., Waynesville, NC; and Karen and

Karl Schmertzler, Yoder Lumber Co. Inc., Millersburg, OH

Sandy and Rick Jordan, Associated Hardwoods Inc., Granite

Falls, NC; and Kim and Mark Vollinger, W.M. Cramer Lumber

Company, Hickory, NC

lighting social media posts promoting American Hardwood.

Moistner explained how 28 industry associations

are working together to develop the effort.

Companies and individuals are encouraged to use the

branding materials and to donate annually to the campaign.

More information is available at www.realameri

canhardwood.org or from the AHMI office.

AHMI Officers and Trustees

This year was the election of AHMI Officers and Trustees

and the members present elected the following for

2022-23:

Chairman: Tom Sheets of Blue Ridge Lumber,

Fishersville, VA

Vice Chairman-elect: Roy Zangari of Meadow River

Lumber, Rainelle, WV

Treasurer: Tony Honeycutt of Mullican Flooring,

Johnson City, TN

Past Chairman: Jay Reese of Penn-Sylvan

International, Spartansburg, PA

Trustees:

Dean Alanko of Allegheny Wood Products,

Petersburg, WV

Sebastian Church of Church & Church Lumber,

Wilkesboro, NC

Jamie Coleman of Robert S. Coleman Lumber,

Culpeper, VA

Brian Conklin of Gutchess Lumber Co., Cortland, NY

Scott Cummings of Cummings Lumber, Troy, PA

Tim Parton of Gilkey Lumber Co., Rutherfordton, NC

David Pierson of Pierson Lumber, Clay, WV

John Pysh of Pennsylvania Hardwoods,

Pleasantville, PA

Jason Twigg of Tuscarora Hardwoods, Elliottsburg,

PA

Ray White Jr. of Harold White Lumber, Morehead, KY

Distributor: Mark Vollinger of W.M. Cramer Lumber

Co., Hickory, NC

Forestry: Steve Harp of Pardee Resources,

Summersville, WV

Consumer: Gat Caperton of Gat Creek Furniture,

Berkeley Springs, WV

The next meeting of Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers,

Inc. is the 2022 Summer Conference set for July

23-26 at The Homestead in Hot Springs, VA. n

Jeremy Pitts and Jeremy Howard, Nyle Dry Kilns, Brewer, ME;

and Robert Wagner, USNR, Graham, NC

John and Wendy Bowman, AHMI, High Point, NC; and Steve

Houseknecht, Wagner Lumber Co., Owego, NY

Dan Mathews, SII Dry Kilns, Lexington, NC; Kay Anderson, Roy Anderson Lumber Co. Inc., Tompkinsville, KY; Sandy Jordan, Associated

Hardwoods Inc., Granite Falls, NC; and Tonya Anderson, David Anderson and Lowery Anderson, Roy Anderson Lumber Co. Inc.

Amy Snell, Executive Director, Wood Component Manufacturers

Association, Lindstrom, MN; and Ray Moistner, Indiana Hardwood

Lumbermens Association, Indianapolis, IN

Michelle Zheng, Limin Zheng, Paul Zheng and Jia Zheng, ATI International

LLC, Roanoke, VA

Paul and Nancy Stringer, Stringer Industries Inc., Tylertown, MS;

and Kimm Merrick and Connie Jamieson, Somerset Wood Products,

Somerset, KY

36 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

Ray White II, Harold White Lumber Inc., Morehead, KY; John Pysh, Sandra Jacobson, John Toncich III and Max Kutz, PA Hardwoods

LLC, Kreamer, PA

MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 37


Speaker Shares Insights About Supply

Chain Issues With ALC

Roanoke, VA–Members of the Appalachian Lumbermen’s

Club (ALC) know that supply chain issues are

causing hardships and a researcher offered ways to

lessen the impact.

Purdue University Assistant Director of Extension and

Agricultural and Natural Resources Program Leader Dr.

Henry Quesada spoke at the recent ALC meeting at The

Hotel Roanoke. He recently resigned from Virginia Tech

for the new position at Purdue and spoke about the research

completed in Blacksburg, VA.

Freight delays and complications in 2021 and 2022

are causing many companies to look for better ways to

streamline their operations. Quesada said Supply Chain

Management (SCM) is defined as the integration and

management of all activities in the supply chain related

to the flow of information and transformation of raw materials

into value-added products.

Specific issues for the Hardwood industry include:

•Access to timber

•Waiting for parts for repairs

•Inconsistent supply of raw materials

•Fuel, truck availability

•Labor

•Market pressures

By Tom Inman

Successful companies look for ways to identify and

understand their supply chain and identify or eliminate

sources of waste. Quesada said managers must assess

the impact of actions and determine if they worked or is

there room for improvement.

Companies should also understand their costs of doing

business. These include:

•Carrying costs

•Capital investment

•Damage

•Obsolescence

•Inbound and transportation

•Receiving, shipping and warehouse operation

•Procurement

•Supplier and customer relationships

More information about ALC meetings and events is

available at www.lumberclub.org. n

Seth Deacon, WR Deacon & Son Timber, Lexington, VA; Shannon

Garland, Peakwood Forest Products, Roanoke, VA; Brandon

Reavis, La Casona Hardwoods LLC, New Bern, NC; and Jay Reese,

Penn-Sylvan International, Spartansburg, PA

Eric Carroll, S&S Sprinkler, Charlotte, NC; Lance Johnson, ISK

Biocides, Memphis, TN; Shannon Forrest, Robinson Lumber

Company, Anderson, SC; and Bennett Thompson, ISK Biocides,

Roanoke, VA

Eddy Phillips, Phillips Lumber & Farm Products, Mountain City,

TN; and Steve Leonard and Ismael Torres, Lawrence Lumber

Company Inc., Maiden, NC

Mark Williams, Jerry G. Williams & Son, Smithfield, NC; Andy

Nuffer, DMSi Software/eLIMBS/TallyExpress, Kernersville, NC;

and Roy Zangari, Meadow River Lumber, Rainelle, WV

David Bailey, New River Hardwoods Inc., Mountain City, TN; Ken

Matthews, SII Dry Kilns, Lexington, NC; Wayne Law, New River

Hardwoods Inc.; and Jamie Straka, Northwest Hardwoods Inc.,

Marion, NC

Peter McCarty, TS Manufacturing, Dover-Foxcroft, ME; Tyler King

and Mark Pierce, New River Hardwoods Inc., Mountain City, TN;

and Whit Donithan, Prime Lumber Company, Lexington, NC

BJ Snider, Poplar Ridge Lumber Co., Trade, TN; Mike Hood,

Woodgrain Millwork, Elkin, NC; and Clay McCreary and Rick Mc-

Creary, Granite Hardwoods Inc., Granite Falls, NC

Paul Zheng, ATI International, Roanoke, VA; Bill Graban, Prime

Lumber Company, Lexington, NC; and Mark Haddix, Farm Credit

of the Virginias, Elkins, WV

38 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

Jeff Dougherty, Ally Global Logistics, Jacksonville, FL; Bill Graban,

Prime Lumber Company, Lexington, NC; and Erin Cox, GTL

Lumber Inc., Ironton, OH

Gale Keener, Mullican Flooring, Ronceverte, WV; Stan Jones,

Koppers Inc., Pittsburgh, PA; Larry Cockram, Griffith Lumber

Co., Woolwine, VA; and Lance Johnson, ISK Biocides, Memphis,

TN

Stacey Dillon, Griffith Lumber Company Inc., Woolwine, VA;

Ross Frazier, Turman Lumber, Salem, VA; Marty Cornett, Pierce

Construction, Petal, MS; and Damon Additional Bevins, photos Farrow on next Lumber page

Company, Cairo, IL

MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 39


KFIA Welcomes “A Whole New World”

During 57th Annual Meeting

(Editor’s Note: In conjunction with the KFIA meeting, a hospitality suite was hosted by Robinson

Lumber Company, New Orleans, LA and Houchens Insurance Group, Lexington, KY.)

Lexington, KY–The Embassy Suites here served as

the host site for the Kentucky Forest Industries Association’s

(KFIA) annual meeting, attended by approximately

365 guests.

The multi-day event was packed with informational

sessions with topics ranging from infrastructure and carbon

markets to issues pertaining directly to the Kentucky

lumber region. For example, Tom Inman, president of the

Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers Inc., addressed

Hardwood training initiatives, followed by Darren Morris

of the University of Kentucky Forestry Extension, who

updated attendees about the White Oak initiative. Dana

Lee Cole, executive director of the Hardwood Federation

(HF), led two sessions. One was an HF update

and the other was an informative presentation about the

Real American Hardwood Coalition promotion.

Another issue addressed at KFIA was Trucking Availability

and What to Expect in the Future, by David Guess,

executive vice president of Safety and Insurance with

Usher Transport Inc.

His address was four-pronged and included comments

about:

•Driver shortage

Guess shared these comments with National Hardwood

Magazine: “The driver shortage isn’t necessarily

anything new to the industry. Many companies, such as

the one I represent, have faced a driver shortage for at

least 20 years as far as I can recall. In fact, I don’t recall

our operations manager telling me, ‘Dave, stop hiring

all those drivers’ during the time I worked as a recruiter.

Conversely, I think today there’s a greater focus on

the driver shortage due to the focus on labor shortages

throughout every industry. Now, however, ‘truck drivers’

have gained quite the notoriety in their level of importance

to, not just the trucking industry, but to every industry

that relies upon truck transport, especially within

that final mile of production. Is there a driver shortage?

Yes, no question about it, and will it ever improve? That

question leads into the avenues of attracting new drivers.”

•Avenues to attract new drivers into the industry

Guess noted: “Yes, we have several initiatives within

our industry to try and attract, and more importantly, retain

new drivers. One such initiative is through the Next-

Gen Trucking campaign. www.nextgentrucking.org/

40 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

Photos by Paul Miller Jr.

Learn more at www.kfia.org.

“A long-time industry colleague and friend, Linsey

Trent serves as the founder and CEO of this organization.

Their aim, in short, is to get as many young people

– high schools – interested in careers in logistics as

possible through a host of platforms. More information

about their mission can be seen on their website.”

•Electric trucks, specific to the industry

Guess commented: “Jokingly, as someone who represents

the petroleum transport industry, we’re not likely

to see electric trucks donning our parking lots anytime

soon. On a more serious note, our industry has

embraced electric vehicles as part of the overall infrastructure

of how goods and services are moved and

delivered. The problem with electric trucks, in, say, the

logging industry, is the availability of infrastructure for

recharging. From brief research of my own, I found that

many logging companies welcomed electric vehicles as

long there was ample capacity for recharging those units

without having to completely rebuild things.”

•Driverless trucks, in general

Guess stated: “And lastly, I mentioned driverless trucks

at KFIA. Again, as a petroleum carrier, the thoughts

of unaccompanied fuel transporters raises quite a few

eyebrows in any audience. Fear seems to be the overarching

theme when it comes to driverless trucks. The

issue is not so much the technology as it relates to the

truck as much as it is the infrastructure in place for highly

advanced trucks to function. IE: are the lines and mapping

of highways and roads so great that we could solely

depend on those in feeding the guidance systems? Is

our current satellite imagery for GPS accurate enough

to subside fears that driverless trucks may malfunction?

Those are just a few of the very basic common fears I

hear throughout the industry when the subject comes

up.

“My brief speech/presentation is not an endorsement

or criticism of any one particular industry, business, or

motor carrier, but solely the collective opinion of my 30

years’ industry experience.”

Regarding the KFIA, it was organized in 1965 with a

discussion among industry leaders concerning the lack

of communication between the industry, government

and educators. Over 50 years later, KFIA continues to

be a strong voice for the forest products industry. n

KFIA Past Presidents: Mervin Strader, Strader Bros. LLC, Elkton, KY – 2018-2020; Tony Goodman, C.B. Goodman & Sons Lumber,

Hickory, KY – 1998-2000; Steve Merrick, Somerset Wood Products, Somerset, KY – 1997-1998; Tony Leanhart, Retired, LaGrange,

KY – 2016-2018; Henry Christ, Dunaway Timber Co., Fordsville, KY – 2012-2014; Rick Goodin, YesterYear Floors, Campbellsville, KY –

2006-2008; David Feldman, Retired, Feldman Lumber, Lancaster, KY – 2004-2006; and Dan Allard, Domtar Paper Co. Inc., Hawesville,

KY – 2020-2022

Toto Robinson, Robinson Lumber Company, New Orleans, LA;

Dan Allard, Domtar Paper Co. Inc., Hawesville, KY; and Robert

McCarthy, Northwest Hardwoods Inc., Apple Creek, OH

(Sitting) Dick Rauh, Robinson Lumber Company, New Albany, IN;

Kelly Hostetter, Robinson Lumber Company, New Orleans, LA;

(Standing) Craig Albright, Messersmith Manufacturing Inc., Bark

River, MI; and Paul Miller Jr., National Hardwood Magazine, Memphis,

TN

Mike Krol, American Wood Fibers Inc., Circleville, OH; Jenna

Reese, Executive Director, The Ohio Forestry Association Inc.,

Zanesville, OH; John Hester, National Hardwood Lumber Association,

Memphis, TN; and Jeremy Pitts, Nyle Dry Kilns, Brewer, ME

Mark Pierce, New River Hardwoods Inc., Mountain City, TN; Andy

Nuffer, DMSi Software/eLIMBS/TallyExpress, Winston-Salem, NC;

and Travis Bach, East Ohio Lumber Co. Inc., Salineville, OH

Dan Shiels, Whitewater Forest Products LLC, Batavia, OH; Ray

White II, Harold White Lumber Inc., Morehead, KY; and Chase

Shiels, Whitewater Forest Products LLC

Additional photos on next page

MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 41


KFIA PHOTOS Continued

Anthony Hammond, Roy Anderson Lumber Co. Inc., Tompkinsville,

KY; Dana Lee Cole, Hardwood Federation, Washington, DC;

Brian Ballard, Tioga Hardwoods Inc., Terrell, NC; and Tom Inman,

Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers Inc., High Point, NC

Jeff Eisfelder, Taylor Machine Works Inc., Indianapolis, IN; Buddy

Downey, Downey Consulting LLC, Reedy, WV; and David Turner,

Taylor Machine Works Inc., Georgetown, KY

Keith Henry, GreenTree Forest Products Inc., Wallingford, KY;

Andy Nuffer, DMSi Software/eLIMBS/TallyExpress, Winston-Salem,

NC; and James Wells, GreenTree Forest Products Inc.

Josh Peachey and Jay Scatland, Eagle Lumber Co. LLC, Greensburg,

KY; Howell White, Walter M. Fields Lumber Company Inc.,

Memphis, TN; and Lewis Reed, Atlanta Hardwood Corporation,

Clarksville, TN

Darrin and Tonya Gay, Gay Brothers Logging & Lumber, Oneida,

KY; and Mike Ballard, Sawmill MD, Crestview, FL

Jerry Koetter, Koetter Woodworking Inc., Borden, IN; Eric Renneker,

Robinson Lumber Company, New Albany, IN; and Jerry

Renneker, Koetter Woodworking Inc.

Jim Higgins, SII Dry Kilns, Chambersburg, PA; and Don Goodin,

Lebanon Oak Flooring Co. LLC, Lebanon, KY

Adam Harris and Jordan Dale, Houchens Insurance Group, Lexington,

KY; Allan Robinson, PLMI, Philadelphia, PA; and Tony

Goodman, C.B. Goodman & Sons Lumber Inc., Hickory, KY

Chip Underwood and Juan Quintanilla, Thompson Appalachian

Hardwoods Inc., Huntland, TN; and Keith Byrge, La-Z-Boy Corporation,

Dayton, TN

Rusty Hawkins, Chad McPherson, David Anderson and Anthony

Hammond, Roy Anderson Lumber Co. Inc., Tompkinsville, KY

Tony Trobaugh, GF Hardwoods Inc., Moss, TN; Tom DeFilippo,

H & S Lumber Inc., Clay City, KY; Kris Vance, Goodfellow Inc.,

Shelbyville, KY; Quentin Moss, GF Hardwoods Inc.; Bobby Atkinson,

Somerset Wood Products, Somerset, KY; and Steven

Thomas, Graf & Thomas Lumber Co./GTL Forest Group, Vanceburg,

KY

Larry Norfleet and Steve Merrick, Somerset Wood Products,

Somerset, KY; and Peter McCarty, TS Manufacturing Co., Dover-Foxcroft,

ME

Scott Ray, Forest Supervisor, USDA Forest Service, Winchester,

KY; David Fields, Deputy Commissioner, Kentucky Energy and

Environment Cabinet, Frankfort, KY; Dan Allard, Domtar Paper

Company Inc., Hawesville, KY; Brandon Howard, Director &

State Forester, Kentucky Division of Forestry, Frankfort, KY; and

George Crawford, Somerset Wood Products, Somerset, KY

Ed Grambusch, Paw Taw John Services Inc., Rathdrum, ID; Robert

Ousley, James Ritter Lumber Co. Inc., Summer Shade, KY;

and James Morton, Paw Taw John Services Inc.

Lee White and Sawyer White, Harold White Lumber Inc., Morehead,

KY

Troy Jamieson, Somerset Wood Products, Somerset, KY; and

Paul Miller Jr., National Hardwood Magazine, Memphis, TN

Additional photos on page 50

42 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 43


Twelve Students Graduate From The 197th

Class of NHLA Inspector Training School

(Front row, from left): Jacob Whyatt, Oscar Ortigosa, Roman Matyushchenko (Instructor),

Colby Hinze, and Devin McInerney.

(Back row, from left): James Souder, Mario Castillo, Garrett Austin, James Schroeter, Will

Rushing, Nathaniel Flynn, Corey Workman, and John Olabode.

Memphis, TN–The National Hardwood Lumber Association

(NHLA) recently celebrated the graduation of

the 197th class of the Inspector Training School (ITS),

located here. Twelve students received the certificate of

completion.

Dana Spessert, NHLA Chief Inspector and ITS Dean of

Education, welcomed and thanked the families, friends,

and employers who supported the students during their

time away from home.

Instructor Roman Matyushchenko congratulated the

students, advising them to, “Give more than what is ex-

Graduates of the 197th class were:

•Garrett Austin, Austin Timber Co.

•Mario Castillo, Somerset Wood Products

•Nathaniel Flynn, Pine Knot Lumber Inc.

•Colby Hinze, Cole Hardwood Inc.

•Devin McInerney, Billsby Lumber Co.

•John Olabode, J. Gibson McIlvain Co.

•Oscar Ortigosa, Soriel SL

•Will Rushing, J.M. Jones Lumber Co.

•James Schroeter, Bryant & Young Lumber

•James Souder, Bryant & Young Lumber

•Jacob Whyatt, Bryant & Young Lumber

•Corey Workman, Somerset Wood Products

pected from you, and be more than

what you’re expected to be.”

Bobby Atkinson with Somerset

Wood Products, a graduate

of Class #119 in 1995, gave the

keynote address. He commended

the graduates and spoke about the

joy of working in an industry that is

sustainable, saying, “We are fortunate

to work in a business centered

around one of the few completely

renewable resources in the world.

As we carefully remove Hardwood

trees from the forest, we make way

for sunlight to reach the younger trees, so they can grow

tall.”

Jacob Whyatt with Bryant & Young Lumber was elected

class president. He spoke to his fellow students

during the ceremony reminding them, “As we return

home, let us remember to be an example of what a leader

looks like. We are the future of this industry, and the

generation behind us will look to us to learn how to make

a difference and succeed. So, let’s take on the responsibility

of being a leader with honor, with integrity, and with

compassion.”

Roman Matyushchenko presented the individual

achievement awards. Outstanding individual awards recipients

were as follows:

•Jacob Whyatt, ITS Educational Foundation Award for

Highest Overall Average

•John Olabode, Howard Hanlon Award for Second

Highest Overall Average

•Jacob Whyatt, Westside Hardwood Club Award for

Highest Board Run Average

•James Souder, The Milt Cole and NHLA Award for

Best Attitude/Citizenship

REHMEYER WOOD FLOORS

Continued from page 23

Surface texturing at Rehmeyer Wood Floors is accomplished by

a Trivec Sawmark and Brushing machine.

change geographically and with the feel of the home.

We listen to the end user and learn what they want to

try to achieve and give them that floor for the space we

are working on.”

Providing this customized approach requires a

streamlined operation, and Rehmeyer Wood Floors

is constantly fine-tuning its production. With a staff of

eight spread over a 30,000 square-foot facility, workers

employ a range of optimizing rip saws, Weinig moulders

and optimizing chop saws, Timesavers sanders,

Trivec sanding, structuring equipment and roll coaters.

According to Rehmeyer, embracing automation does

not mean sacrificing quality or customizability. Quite

the contrary, in fact.

“The one thing about being a custom manufacturer

is to keep pricing down and create a good working

environment for the employees,” he explained. “These

machines are here to help us craft the wood and create

the product we desire; they are a tool, but we still

need craftmanship and a streamlined manufacturing

process.”

As a result, the layout at Rehmeyer Wood Floors is

designed around the concept of efficiency. The facility

features a series of conveyers, linking a number of

C-shaped work shells.

Please turn the page

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Enrollment is now open for the 199th class, at the

Clearfield County Career & Technology Center in Clearfield,

PA. Class 199 begins on June 6, 2022. Enrollment

is also open for class 200 at NHLA headquarters in

Memphis, TN, beginning on September 26, 2022. To

enroll or learn more about the Program, please visit

www.nhla.com.

The NHLA Inspector Training School has a proud and

rich 70-year history, graduating more than 7,500 students

since its conception. The Program teaches the

rules and applications of the NHLA grading system and

prepares students for a career in the Hardwood industry.

This unique Program has earned worldwide respect,

attracting students from throughout the United States,

Canada, Europe, Africa, South America, and Asia.

The world’s largest and oldest Hardwood industry association,

NHLA represents companies and individuals

that produce, use, and sell North American Hardwood

lumber or provide equipment, supplies, or services to

the Hardwood industry. It was founded in 1898 to establish

a uniform system of grading rules for the measurement

and inspection of Hardwood lumber. Since 1979,

its headquarters have been in Memphis. n

To learn more about NHLA, please visit www.nhla.com.

570-836-1133 | Fax: 570-836-8982

3042 SR 6E Tunkhannock, PA 18657

www.deerparklumberinc.com

44 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 45


REHMEYER WOOD FLOORS Continued

“It’s not just about automation; it’s also about workflow,”

Rehmeyer said. “Because of our various customized

products, we need to also take into consideration

our employees, making it easier for them to complete all

of the necessary tasks while improving quality control to

ensure we exceed our customers’ expectations.”

As far as what comes next for the company, Rehmeyer

noted he does not see bigger as necessarily better,

but would instead like to reproduce the model that has

made the company so successful.

“I’ve envisioned for 20 years that we would be able to

replicate a company – small, about this size – that we

would build another custom plant like this one, where we

have our showroom and manufacturing all in one place,”

he observed. “We could take something like this to Atlanta

or Chicago. Instead of having a large plant in one

location, have smaller plants in strategic locations.”

Much of this stems from Rehmeyer’s belief in localism

– that success comes by paying attention to customers

through satellite companies that cater to a particular

geographic area rather than through a single large factory

that builds standardized products and ships them

all over.

“I think we need to rethink the way we do things in

Custom factory finishing is done with Vesting’s hardwax oil on a

Trivec finishing system.

this country,” he said. “You can offer more of a personal

touch with a company that has 10 to 40 employees. I

don’t want to lose the feel that my store/factory has here;

it has a real personal touch with our customers and our

builders. They like the feel when they bring their clients

in. I think that’s a feel we could re-create and I’d like to

expand on it.”

Rehmeyer stressed that the concept of localism can

be extended on a global scale. “I like to think that this

reflects the ethics of our company; we’re not just buying

wood in another country to save money. We want

to make sure if we buy lumber from abroad that we are

buying and supporting local suppliers there. The same

is true with finishes. Our finishes come from a company

in Holland that is the same size as mine. Like us, they

support the local people and economy,” he said. “We are

trying to deal with companies under the same ethics and

same business model. We look for them to be sustainable.

For example, we look at certain mills for the way

they grade their wood. Can they produce a product that

maximizes the use of as much of the tree as possible?

There are eco-friendly, educated consumers with the

At Rehmeyer Wood Floors, which purchases approximately

200,000 board feet of lumber annually, lumber planks are precision-milled

into tongue and groove flooring with a Weinig Unimat

500 moulder.

money to spend, who want to do it the right way. They

want to do the right thing for the environment, their country,

and their world.” n

For more information visit www.rehmeyerfloors.com.

Beasley Forest Products produces 170 million bd. ft.

of Southern Hardwood and Cypress lumber annually.

Linwood Truitt and John Stevenson are in charge of kiln-dried lumber sales; and Ray Turner handles industrial sales at Beasley Forest Products.

Beasley Forest Products offers:

• sorted and random widths in Red Oak (4/4), White Oak (4/4), Poplar (4/4 & 8/4), Ash (4/4 & 8/4)

and Cypress (4/4 & 8/4) for export or domestic shipment.

• 1.7 million bd. ft. kiln capacity.

• Cypress framing timbers and manufacture various tongue-and-groove patterns.

• pallet components (cut stock) and pallet cants.

• cross ties and industrial timbers.

• crane mats for the pipeline industry.

• prompt delivery with company trucks and local trucking companies.

KILN DRIED LUMBER SALES

Linwood Truitt, Ext. 4303

Cell: (912) 253-9000

Email: linwood.truitt@beasleygroup.com

John Stevenson, Ext. 4384

Cell: (912) 375-8226

Email: john.stevenson@beasleygroup.com

Beasley Forest Products, Inc.

P.O. Box 788 • Hazlehurst, Georgia 31539

Phone: (912) 375-5174 • Fax: (912) 375-9191

Web Address: www.beasleyforestproducts.com

INDUSTRIAL SALES

Ray Turner

Phone: (912) 253-9001

Email: ray.turner@beasleygroup.com

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46 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 47


OAKS UNLIMITED Continued from page 25

Oaks Unlimited has a warehouse for kiln-dried inventory. Oaks

Unlimited’s state-of-the-art, computer controlled dry kilns have

over 350,000 board feet of kiln space.

He continued, “Experience plays a vital role in what

we do here also. We have over 40 years of experience

producing quality Hardwood lumber for domestic and

export markets.”

Oaks Unlimited’s wholesale division enables them to

serve a larger market segment. Pryor said the company’s

sales staff has connections throughout the lumber

industry and can fill orders for high-quality products to

satisfy almost any requirement. “We have consistently

worked well with many companies outside the U.S. who

require high quality lumber,” he explained. “Approximately

75 percent of our production is exported. We also have

six salesmen in the wholesale division that buy and sell

all Hardwood lumber products throughout the U.S.”

Oaks Unlimited maintains inventories of over two million

board feet of 4/4 through 8/4 Appalachian Hardwood

lumber, specializing in 4/4 through 8/4 White Oak and

Red Oak in No. 1 Common and Better grades for the

export and distribution markets. While the primary focus

is Red and White Oak, Pryor said smaller quantities of

Poplar, Cherry and other Hardwoods are available.

Key personnel including Joe Pryor, President, are:

Trent Thomas, Vice President; Karen Pryor, Secretary;

Rick Parton, Plant Manager; Tina Parker, Office Manager;

Mark Taylor, Export Sales Manager; Ray Shepard,

Purchasing and Sales; Wendell Sugg, Sales; John

Oakes, Sales; Brad Froning, Sales; Doyle Hyde, Sales;

Kim Chester, Wholesale Documents; and Bruce Brown,

Wholesale Accounting.

Awarded North Carolina Exporter of the Year by the

After kiln-drying, each board is carefully graded by National

Hardwood Lumber Association certified inspectors.

North Carolina Department of Agriculture in 2016 and

the North Carolina Governor’s Award for export e-commerce

in 2021, Oaks Unlimited Inc. is a 35-year member

of NHLA, and is also a member of Appalachian Hardwood

Manufacturers Inc., Hardwood Manufacturers Association,

North Carolina Forestry Association, American

Hardwood Export Council and Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen’s

Association. Joe Pryor currently serves on the

board of directors for NHLA, HMA, and the Hardwood

Federation.

Lumber is loaded for shipping at Oaks Unlimited.

A family-oriented company, Joe and his wife Karen’s

daughter obtained a Master’s degree from Johns Hopkins

in neuroscience and works for a company that is

contributing to the Covid vaccine. Their son has a Master’s

degree in International Business and spent two

years of college in Hong Kong. He speaks Chinese

and currently works for the American Hardwood Export

Council (AHEC) in Washington, DC promoting sustainable

American Hardwoods worldwide. n

For more information visit www.oaksunlimited.com.

W11143 Cty Hwy G • P.O. Box 160 • Antigo, WI 54409 • EMAIL kretz@kretzlumber.com

TOLL-FREE (800) 352-1438 • FAX (715) 627-4399 • www.kretzlumber.com

INTERNATIONAL PHONE 00 + 1 + 715 + 6235410 • INTERNATIONAL FAX 00 + 1 + 715 + 6274399

48 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

BINGAMANLUMBER.COM

PO Box 247, Kreamer, PA 17833

☎ 570.374.1108 | 570.374.5341

MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 49


KFIA PHOTOS Continued from page 43

Andy Johnson, Hardwood Market Report, Memphis, TN; Marty

Cornett, Pierce Construction and Maintenance Co. Inc., Petal,

MS; and Jimmy Thornberry and William Perry, Powell Valley Millwork

LLC, Clay City, KY

Glen Thompson and Tommy Stiles, A.W. Stiles Contractors Inc.,

McMinnville, TN

Ray White, Harold White Lumber Inc., Morehead, KY; Joey Gray,

Prime Lumber Sawmill, Eastview, KY; Ray White II and Lee White,

Harold White Lumber Inc.; and Tom Inman, Appalachian Hardwood

Manufacturers Inc., High Point, NC

Matt Taylor, U-C Coatings LLC, Buffalo, NY; Damon Graf, DR Graf

Lumber Co., Lexington, KY; and Tom Johel, U-C Coatings LLC

Dewayne Feltner, MacBeath Hardwood Co., Edinburgh, IN; and

Marc Shiels, Charles F. Shiels & Co., Cincinnati, OH

Bob Bauer, Executive Director, Kentucky Forest Industries Association,

Frankfort, KY; and Toto Robinson, Robinson Lumber

Company, New Orleans, LA

whose topic was Growing the Global Pie.

At this year’s IHLA Convention, multiple networking opportunities

were offered, and the association’s board of directors

held a business session. The 2017 board president

for IHLA is Shaun Cook, of C.C. Cook & Son Lumber Co., of

Reelsville, IN. Tom Oilar of Cole Hardwood, located in Logansport,

row, IN, from is the left) 2017 Cole 1st Christ, vice president BreAnna and Brown, Brett Jackson Frank-

(Front

Brown and Charlotte Brown, Dunaway Timber Company Inc.,

Fordsville, lin, of Tri-State KY; and Timber (back LLC row, of from Bloomington, left) Gavin IN Christ, is the Megan IHLA

Brown, Kay Christ, Henry Christ, Ryan Christ and Aaron Brown,

Dunaway Timber Company Inc., Fordsville, KY

2nd vice president.

Additionally, in conjunction with the IHLA meeting, the

Fellowship of Christian Lumbermen held a brief meeting.

IHLA is a non-profit trade organization comprised of sawmills,

wholesale brokers, equipment vendors, secondary

manufacturers, loggers and landowners, among others in

the industry.

Learn more at www.ihla.org. n

Steve Biggs, PJ Clark Lumber, Cadiz, KY; and Deron Harris, Premium

Hardwoods Inc., Bremen, KY

Additional photos on next page

Donna and Jim Burris, Corley Mfg. Co., Chattanooga, TN; and

Tom Kain, Forest Stewardship Council US, Kingsport, TN

Andreas Mueller, Brunner-Hildebrand Lumber Dry Kiln Co.,

Nashville, TN; and Charles Goodin Jr., Lebanon Oak Flooring Co.

LLC, Lebanon, KY

NORTHERN & APPALACHIAN HARDWOODS

[ WWW.SIMONLUSSIER.COM ]

NORTHERN & APPALACHIAN HARDWOODS

[ WWW.SIMONLUSSIER.COM ]

NORTHERN & APPALACHIAN HARDWOODS

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MATHIEU LUSSIER - Export Sales Manager m2lussier@simonlussier.com

450.435.6591 - 16 BOUL. DE LA SEIGNEURIE EST, BLAINVILLE, QC CANADA J7C 3V5

50 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 51

APRIL 2017 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 51


HMA PHOTOS Continued from page 29

Brian Schilling and Stacy Floor, Pike Lumber Company Inc., Akron,

IN; and Nordeck Thompson, Thompson Appalachian Hardwoods

Inc., Huntland, TN

Gus Welter, Welter Forest Products Inc., New London, WI; Wayne

Law, New River Hardwoods Inc., Mountain City, TN; and Judd

Johnson, Hardwood Market Report, Memphis, TN

Tom Gerow, Wagner Millwork LLC, Owego, NY; Jean Benoit Piche

and Andre-Anne Doyon Boisvert, Piche Inc., Daveluyville, QC;

Tim Mosher, Raptor Integration Inc., Canoe, BC; and Carolle and

Marc Theriault, Josianne Goulet, and Louis Trottier, Piche Inc.,

Canoe, BC

Rodney Williams, Nicholson Manufacturing Ltd., Birmingham,

AL; Jim Burris, Corley Manufacturing Co. Chattanooga, TN; and

Tripp Josey, Josey Lumber Co. Inc., Scotland Neck, NC

Hunter Manning, Kaitlyn Wood and Kelsey Kennedy, Gates Milling

Inc., Gatesville, NC; John Stevenson, Thompson Hardwoods

Inc., Hazlehurst, GA; Truss Beasley, Beasley Forest Products

Inc., Hazlehurst, GA; and Mark Tuck, Gates Milling Inc.

Terry Miller, National Hardwood Magazine, Memphis, TN; Matt Tietz,

McDonough Manufacturing Company, Eau Claire, WI; Mike

Schulke, Tigerton Lumber Company, Tigerton, WI; Mike McAvoy,

McDonough Manufacturing Company; and Kirby Kendrick, Kendrick

Forest Products Inc., Edgewood, IA

Blu Lowery, Ward Timber Ltd., Linden, TX; Mike Penner, Breeze

Dried Inc., Tillsonburg, ON; and James Morton and Ed Grambusch,

Paw Taw John Services Inc., Rathdrum, ID

Joey Nelson, JoeScan Inc., Vancouver, WA; Bret Lowery and

Adam Ward, Ward Timber Ltd., Linden, TX; Leslie Rutland, Rutland

Lumber Company, Collins, MS; and Jerry Hendrix, Ward

Timber Ltd.

Additional photos on next page

52 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 53


HMA PHOTOS Continued

David Bailey, New River Hardwoods Inc., Mountain City, TN; Andy

Nuffer, DMSi Software/eLimbs/TallyExpress, Winston-Salem, NC;

and Ryan Collins, Beasley Forest Products Inc., Hazlehurst, GA

Michael Snow, AHEC, Sterling, VA; Dana Lee Cole, Hardwood

Federation, Washington, DC; and Michael Martin, National Wood

Flooring Association, Chesterfield, MO

Henry German, DMSi Software/eLimbs/TallyExpress, Omaha, NE;

Royce Durgin, Community Products LLC, Walden, NY; and Bruce

Dahn, HHP Inc., Henniker, NH

Teresa Battle Miller, Battle Lumber Co. Inc., Wadley, GA; and

Frances Cooper, Cooper Machine Company Inc., Wadley, GA

Jessica Fly and Dotty Fly, Fly Tie & Lumber LLC, Grenada, MS;

and Stacy and Hayes Mellott, Mellott Manufacturing Co. Inc., Mercersburg,

PA

Eric Porter, Abenaki Timber Corporation, Kingston, NH; and Jim

Howard, Atlanta Hardwood Corporation, Atlanta, GA

Julie and John Smith, PLMI, Philadelphia, PA; Robyn Cummings

and Marisa Chamberlain, Cummings Lumber Company Inc., Troy,

PA

Terry Miller, National Hardwood Magazine, Memphis, TN; Linwood

Truitt, Beasley Forest Products Inc., Hazlehurst, GA; Dan

Mathews, SII Dry Kilns, Lexington, NC; and Scott Ferland, Maine

Woods Company LLC, Portage Lake, ME

Additional photo on next page

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54 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 55


HMA PHOTO Continued

Ian Faight, Hardwood Manufacturers Association, Warrendale,

PA; and Anita Howard and Michael Martin, National Wood Flooring

Association, Chesterfield, MO

Keep Up With The

Latest Industry News

nationalhardwoodmag.com

LAKE STATES Continued from page 10

His sales are split 50-50 between distribution yards

and end users. He said his customers are “not struggling”

in their businesses. “Their sales are pretty good.

Supply and labor are their two biggest issues.”

Escalating prices for transportation are a problem, he

observed. However, availability is OK, he said. His company

can get its product delivered in a timely manner, he

stated. A problem, he said, is “producing enough lumber,

fast enough.”

A Wisconsin lumber provider said his market is “very

good. That assessment is based on the fact that everything

is moving, and most prices are good.” The market

is about the same as it was six months earlier, he stated.

“It’s been very good all along.”

He handles Red and White Oak, Hard and Soft Maple,

Basswood, Aspen, Ash, Cherry and Hickory. “The

Maples, Basswood and Aspen are the best sellers,” he

noted. He offers No. 3 and Better, mainly 4/4 and 5/4.

This lumberman sells his product to distribution yards

and end users, more to end users. “I think their sales are

going fantastic,” he said. The exception to that, he has

seen, is that they could use more employees.

“For the most part,” he stated, “domestic transportation

is good. In exporting, it’s been hard to get containers.”

In Indiana, a lumber contact said his market is “pretty

solid. Prices are good. Things are going well. The market

is not crazy-hot,” he said, “but product is moving steadily.”

Compared to a few months earlier, “It’s pretty similar,”

he observed. However, “I think shipping was better a few

months ago.”

He offers White Oak, Hickory, Basswood, Cherry, Hard

and Soft Maple, Walnut and some Ash. “The hot ones

are rift and quartered White Oak, Walnut, rustic White

Oak, Cherry and Hickory,” he stated.

His biggest customer category is distribution yards.

“But we also sell to end users,” he remarked. The majority

of his sales are domestic, but they do export.

As for his customers’ well-being business-wise, “I haven’t

heard anything negative about their sales,” he said.

Transportation “could definitely be better,” he said.

“Getting enough trucks to haul it all is what we’re fighting.”

n

NORTHEAST Continued from page 10

companies and it’s a nightmare. But also, of course we

can’t invoice unless we ship it, so there’s a cash flow

thing, as well.”

As a result, storage space is becoming an issue. “We

have 40-50 loads ready to go, but we can’t get the trucks,

which means we’re running out of space at the mill,” he

said. Other sources had similar stories, with numbers

ranging from 30 to 50 loads sitting around, waiting to be

transported.

A sales and marketing manager for a Maine-based

sawmill reiterated that the frustration is being felt by end

users, as well. “Our end users are primarily flooring and

cabinet manufacturers,” he explained, “and they consistently

talk about having backlogs. Between gas prices

and inflation, no one really knows how this will all play

out.”

Many are embracing a wait-and-see outlook while they

find ways to adapt. One sales manager for a New York

lumber yard noted, “We’re having to rethink our delivery

options on an almost daily basis. The demand for truck

drivers is high and they’re just a dying breed. The economic

climate, in general, with regard to fuel and transportation

issues – that’s a make-or-break factor with

many people in the lumber business right now. We’re just

waiting to see what will happen.”

She added that the rising costs are not just affecting

logistics. They’re also affecting every element of the

lumber business, from the logger incurring extra fuel ex-

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NORTHEAST Continued

penses to the increased cost of electricity to run a mill.

Still, her company is seeing strong sales in Hard and

Soft Maples, in FAS and Better. Similarly, other sources

noted that most species are selling almost as soon as

they are available.

For example, one source who deals extensively with

exports said that what little White Oak is available sells

quickly into Europe. “Red Oak at the moment, seems to

have a lot of demand,” he added. “I think it’s probably

people shifting over from White Oak to Red Oak, especially

on the uppers.”

He continued to state that all grades and species are

moving, but not necessarily to the same markets. “In

White Oak, you might have the uppers going mostly to

Europe,” he said, “but you’d also have some 1 and 2

Common moving domestically. It may vary in where it

ends up, but it’s moving.”

A source from Maine has seen high demand for other

species, as well. “The market for lumber is the best I’ve

seen in several years, particularly in terms of what species

are selling. We’re seeing high demand for Yellow

Birch in 4/4 and 8/4, and 4/4 Soft Maple is very much in

demand, as is Hard Maple in all grades.” He also noted

that since Ash trees are still alive in their area, that is also

a factor in sales.

“They’ll take all we can saw,” agreed a New York

source, whose sawmill stocks major lumber yards

throughout the Northeast. “They’re super eager to get

anything we can send their way, particularly Red Oak,

White Oak and Hard Maple in FAS and Better.” n

SOUTHEAST Continued from page 11

type of Hardwood being sold. “For us, Red Oak, White

Oak, Ash and Poplar are selling best, with Red Oak and

Poplar holding the top positions,” he said. “We’re holding

White Oak, as we think it will become much more scarce

and valuable in the next 60 to 120 days.” Among the species

that are selling well, he notes that the lower grades

and Commons seem to be doing better than FAS.

Another sales manager for an Arkansas-based sawmill

stated that White Oak in No. 2 Common and Select is

selling the best from their inventory of Red and White

Oak, Sap Gum, and Hickory. He noted that FAS Red Oak

seems to be softer than anything else.

A sales manager for a lumber and flooring manufacturer

in Tennessee reiterated, “Demand is good, it’s as high

as it’s been in a while. Supply is the issue. Of course,

that creates the demand on the outside, because they

can’t get it from anywhere, people are calling around to

new places.”

All sources interviewed mention the current economic

climate as a primary concern. “Everyone is complaining

about either the freight rates or the fuel,” noted one interviewee.

“Transportation cost is an issue, whether we’re

paying the additional cost or sharing it. Uncertainty about

interest rates and the political situation are becoming

very critical related to the number of houses being built,

cabinetry and flooring. They’re all affected by the interest

rates going up.”

Another source stated, “Our end users are mostly brokers

and they’re really struggling for supply and labor,

like everybody else. Those are the two hard issues, but

they seem to be waiting for the other shoe to drop. Everything’s

been so good and we look at what’s going on

outside…everybody feels like there’s no way that this

can keep up.”

Rising fuel cost remains a looming uncertainty for

most. “Freight cost is extremely high and gas has gone

up,” said one source. “Fuel is over $5 a gallon where we

are and will get worse. A lot of the low-end products will

be mostly affected. The price will be more noticeable on

the lower end.”

The owner of a Cypress sawmill located in Southern

Louisiana is seeing record sales with retail and contractor

orders for 8/4 timbers, as well as 4/4 thickness for

craftsmen. “The sales are up but South Louisiana is usually

different than the rest of this country because of the

oil and gas fields down here. When there’s a recession in

the rest of the country, we don’t experience it because of

our location. Even factoring that in, since pricing is going

up, I’m afraid it will get so expensive that people may just

stop buying Cypress. It priced itself out in the 80s and

seems to be heading the same direction now.”

The sawmills located in other areas feel an even greater

pinch, despite focusing on local markets. “The market

seems to be good but the Diesel fuel issue is having a

big impact on us. We’re getting a fuel surcharge out of

some people, but for some, we can’t. We were able to

get trucks because we don’t haul very far, so transportation

issues weren’t negatively affecting us until very recently,

when the price of Diesel went up substantially.” n

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58 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 59


WEST COAST Continued from page 11

He compared early 2022 to early 2021 and found them

to be “comparable.” He offers “all species imported and

domestic,” he stated. “Poplar, Red and White Oak and

Maple are the big sellers.” He sells to industrial accounts,

especially cabinet manufacturers, retailers, companies

that do remodeling and display companies. “Their sales

are fine,” he observed, “but a big challenge is that they

have quoted jobs prior to big price increases.” Also, he

said, “Everyone is upset about inflation, and people have

concerns about Russia asking China for support in the

Ukraine. It’s a distraction. We’re just going to have to see

it through.

“Getting transportation from our suppliers in the eastern

part of the United States is problematic,” he added.

“The freight rates vary. It’s crazy.”

A broker in Washington said his market is “busy. But

all our customers are looking for the same lumber: Hard

and Soft Maple and Birch are still tough to come by.” His

market is “the same” as it was a few months ago.

He handles Hard and Soft Maple, Basswood, Birch,

Poplar, Red and White Oak, Hickory, Alder – “pretty

much all the domestic Hardwoods and some imports like

Radiata pine and Banak.” His best seller, he observed, is

Soft Maple in grades Nos. 1 and 2 Common and Select

and Better. He offers “pretty much all thicknesses, but it’s

pretty heavy to 4/4,” he stated.

Among his customers are distribution yards and end

users. His customers’ sales are “still going pretty well,”

he noted. “There’s a lot of concern out there, given the

state of the world, inflation and the fuel prices. There’s a

lot of uncertainty. We’ve seen some customers talking

about holding off on purchasing, but they don’t hold off

for long. But they’re very concerned about the future, as

to whether we’re going to have a hard slowdown.”

The availability of trucks is a real issue, he said. “It’s

not just price; it’s availability at any price.”

In Southern California, “The market is still steady,” a

lumberman commented. “It’s not as busy as it was six

months ago. It’s steady.” He summed it up, saying, “The

market is good.”

He sells Walnut, Hickory, White Oak and Poplar in 4/4,

FAS and No. 1 Common and No. 2 Common to distribution

yards and end users. “Their sales are solid,” he said.

“There are no complaints.”

He did note that “containers are taking longer for us

to get the lumber from the sawmills.” There are plenty

of trucks, he observed. “Drivers add a surcharge for fuel

and that’s what the people pay – people being me and

everybody else. Especially in California, the rates are really

high for fuel.” n

ONTARIO Continued from page 12

although not equally for all producers, nor for the species,

grades and thicknesses. Contacts reported that

sales of green and kiln-dried materials are strong, especially

to the cabinet, flooring, furniture, and moulding and

millwork sectors. Hard and Soft Maple, Birch, Basswood

and Aspen are reported as strong sales items. The industrial

markets were also reported as doing very well.

Pallet manufacturers are struggling to get supplies for

their inventories. With the CP Rail strike, there is concern

supply chains will continue to see disruptions and

negatively impact small businesses. As well, concerns

over escalating fuel costs have been cutting into profits,

as has inflation.

Ash log availability has improved somewhat noted contacts,

and green Ash lumber output was being absorbed

quickly by end users and wholesalers. Demand is exceeding

kiln-dried availability and pushing prices higher.

Aspen producers and suppliers are having no difficulty

selling this species as demand remains strong, resulting

in prices climbing. Kiln-dried inventories are thin, noted

contacts.

With the housing sector strong on both sides of the

border, Basswood demand for new builds and remodelling

activity are making this species very popular for

painted finishes, thus increasing its demand. There is

still strong demand for Maple over Basswood, thus limiting

supplies for the species and pushing prices higher

as well. As for most Hardwoods, with the strong home

construction and remodelling spending by consumers,

it has had a positive impact on Hardwood business

overall. The whitewoods are seeing a great benefit, as

is Birch. Its versatility and lower cost compared to Hard

and Soft Maple make it an attractive alternative to secondary

manufacturers and wholesalers. With the strong

demand, supplies are limited for kiln dried Birch. Green

stocks are also strong, and supplies are growing which

are easing the price pressures for this species.

Hard Maple continues to be a top seller due to the

strong housing markets. However, some have substituted

lower cost Hardwoods for cost savings considerations.

Demand for green stocks has not been as good

Please turn the page

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60 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 61


ONTARIO Continued

challenge on the labor front.

Construction investment rebounded in 2021 as Canada’s

economy recovered from the effects of the pandemic.

Total year-over-year construction investment increased

by approximately 11 percent in 2021, as both

the residential and non-residential sectors saw gains.

Investment is projected to remain at or near current high

levels through 2023 before declining gradually over the

remainder of the forecast period.

Last year’s rise in construction activity lifted employment

to approximately 1.1 million workers, a seven percent

increase over 2020, and a gain of one percent beyond

pre-pandemic figures recorded in 2019. The surge

in activity is expected to boost employment further, with a

peak happening this year, continues the report.

Construction has rebounded well from the effects of the

pandemic, thanks to a strong housing market and public-sector

infrastructure investments. The challenge for

the industry, however, is how to manage its labor force.

Retirements are expected to reach their highest levels

over the next two years. More than 150,000 workers are

expected to leave the industry, with many of those being

baby boomers. It represents a loss of skills and experias

this time last year, commented contacts. Soft Maple

markets are strong they added. Some companies have

shifted part or all of their raw material purchases to Soft

Maple from Hard Maple. Kiln-dried supplies aren’t keeping

pace with buyers’ needs, and prices are rising. Demand

for green stocks is as good as for kiln-dried Soft

Maple.

International market interest in Red Oak has picked

up, led by demand from China. At the time of this writing,

it was not known if tariffs would be extended or rolled

back as the April 16th deadline approached.

White Oak sales are keeping green development production

shipped for this species. Markets for kiln-dried

White Oak are steady in Europe and the U.S., noted contacts.

BuildForce Canada said in its national forecast, 2022-

2027 Construction and Maintenance Looking Forward,

Canada’s construction and maintenance industry rebounded

strongly in 2021 and is expected to continue

growing through 2027. It notes that strong near-term

demand and sustained activity in several key sectors

present considerable opportunity, but may also present a

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ence and these are not easily replaced by new workers

entering the labor force.

Residential construction activity recorded significant

increases in 2021, with housing starts increasing by 21

percent year-over-year. BuildForce Canada expects demand

in most provinces to recede from this peak in 2022

or 2023.

There appears to be some evidence that Canada is

not keeping up with demand for new homes, though in

the face of rising interest rates, declines are expected in

the rate of new-home construction throughout the forecast

period. This in turn should produce corresponding

declines in overall employment. By the end of the forecast

period, residential-sector employment is expected

to have declined by 24,900 workers in comparison to its

2021 starting point.

Non-residential demands are expected to remain

strong over the forecast period, however, driven by increases

in spending across the public and private sectors.

The largest gains are expected over the near term,

peaking in 2024. Employment by 2027 is expected to

be five percent higher than 2021, an increase of 26,300

workers.

Ontario’s construction market is expected to see labor

market challenges throughout the forecast period as sectoral

unemployment returns to historically low levels. The

pace of residential activity is expected to moderate, but a

growing inventory of major infrastructure projects and a

projected recovery in commercial building construction is

expected to create growth across the forecast period and

throughout the province’s discrete regions.

Interprovincial mobility would be one solution industry

can deploy to compensate for peak periods of demand,

but peak demands will be seen across the country at the

same time, that option appears less viable in the short

term. Employee-incurred costs when searching outside

their home market creates a strong disincentive.

Developing a skilled workforce in the construction industry

takes years, and often requires participation in

a provincial apprenticeship program. By 2027, overall

hiring requirements in the industry are expected to near

172,000 due to the retirement of approximately 13 percent

of the current labor force and growth in worker demand.

Based on historical trends, Canada’s construction industry

is expected to draw an estimated 143,000 firsttime

entrants aged 30 and younger from the local population,

leaving the industry with a possible recruitment

gap. When coupled with demand growth, the industry

Please turn the page

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MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 63

4/4


ONTARIO Continued

may be short as many as 29,000 workers by 2027.

The pandemic has complicated the training and certification

of new workers. The latest Registered Apprentice

Information Systems data shows declines in new registrations

of at least 20 percent in nearly every province.

Such impacts are likely to reduce the near-term numbers

of new certified workers.

The report outlines how the construction industry remains

focused on building a more diverse and inclusive

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labor force. To that end, efforts are ongoing to enhance

the recruitment of individuals from groups traditionally

underrepresented in the province’s construction labor

force, such as women, Indigenous people, and newcomers

to Canada.

In 2021, there were approximately 190,000 women

employed in Canada’s construction industry, of which 27

percent worked directly in on-site construction. However,

of the 1 million tradespeople employed in the industry,

women made up only five percent of the on-site construction

workforce.

Also underrepresented on construction

sites is the Indigenous

population. In 2021, approximately

63,700 Indigenous people were

employed in Canada’s construction

sector, or nine percent of all Indigenous

people in the workforce. As the

Indigenous population is the fastest

growing in Canada and Indigenous

workers seem predisposed to the

pursuit of careers within the sector,

the report suggests there may be

scope to further increase the recruitment

of Indigenous people into the

construction workforce.

The construction industry may also

leverage new Canadians over the

coming decade to meet anticipated

labor market requirements. Canada

is expected to welcome an average

of more than 237,000 new international

migrants each year between

2022 and 2027. This will make new

Canadians a growing segment of the

overall labor force. The national construction

labor force is comprised of

approximately 20 percent new Canadians,

which is lower than the 26

percent overall share of new Canadians

in the total labor force. n

QUEBEC Continued from page 12

Ash demand continues to be

strong on international and domestic

markets. Supplies are hard to come

by due to low inventories, and to the

Emerald Ash Borer that decimated

many tree stands of this species.

Prices responded by rising slightly.

Basswood production has remained rather low over

the winter as the focus was on higher valued species,

such as the regionally important Hard and Soft Maple.

The Basswood supply is not where it should be as a result

for most grades and thicknesses, commented contacts.

Cherry markets are reported to be doing better than

at the beginning of the year, due to improved Chinese

markets. Some orders are taking up all of the on-hand

supplies available for certain businesses. The cabinet,

flooring and components manufacturers are also seeking

more Cherry as their respective

sectors are performing well.

Hickory sales are also on the rise

to a variety of markets. The U.S.

residential flooring sector is seeking

more of this species, as are cabinet

and moulding and millwork operations.

This has resulted in prices

being firm for most grades and thicknesses

of this species.

Business for the regionally important

Hard Maple is noted as brisk.

Demand for Hard Maple continues

to lead as the top selling species.

Even though lower cost substitutes

were used instead of Hard Maple

earlier in the year, businesses reverted

back to Hard Maple as other

species weren’t sufficient to meet

market demand. Prices are firm as

a result.

Soft Maple is also seeing strong

activity and suppliers are struggling

to keep up. Sawmills, kiln drying operations

and wholesalers can’t get

enough supplies to meet demand.

The cabinet sector is the largest

buyer for this species. Prices are responding

in an upward trend.

With strong housing markets on

both sides of the border, some home

projects have stalled due to the

shortages of labor and building materials.

Delays in supply chains are

being felt in the building sector with

finish dates being pushed back due

to these delays.

Oak purchases appear to have

levelled off, especially to the flooring

manufacturers. Truck trailer flooring

companies appear to be quite

busy and buying No. 2A and 3A

Oak, while others are reining in their

purchases of this species. Sawmills are not having any

difficulty finding outlets for their developing production.

The Chinese market for Red Oak is gaining momentum,

especially for No. 1 Common and Better grade. Business

is reported as good for this species.

White Oak sales on exports markets are seeing competition

from European Oak. Some contacts say competition

should ease since the Ukraine is a major source of

European Oak, but there is no evidence of this happening

at the time of this writing. Demand for kiln-dried White

Please turn the page

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64 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 65

Est 1915

Follow us on Instagram

@Patricklumber


QUEBEC Continued

Oak is steady on domestic markets and improving in the

Far East, noted contacts.

Poplar sales have declined since last year, and many

scaled back purchases even though demand for this

species and for finished goods is still strong. Prices for

this species are coming down. Kiln-dried prices are coming

down, but are still high from a historic perspective.

The Bank of Canada (BoC) raised its key lending rate

on March 2nd to 0.50 percent, the first rate hike since

2018. This rate affects rates Canadian consumers get on

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a mortgage, lines of credit and savings accounts at their

own banks.

The increase is the first of a series of anticipated hikes

that some analysts believe could see the overnight rate

rise by 175 basis points by the end of 2022 as the BoC

attempts to control a rise in inflation, which increased to

5.1 percent in January 2022.

The Bank cautioned that “inflation is now expected to

be higher in the near term than projected in January. The

Bank will use its monetary policy tools to return inflation

to the 2 percent target.

“Economic growth in Canada was

very strong in the fourth quarter

of last year at 6.7 percent. This is

stronger than the Bank’s projection

and confirms its view that economic

slack has been absorbed,” according

to the statement.

Mortgage lenders note that lending

rates remain near history lows

and the most BoC increase may

not have much effect on buyer demand.

Many variable-rate mortages,

which are affected by overnight rate

increases, have an interest rate of

below 2 percent. Even a rise of 175

basis points over the course of the

next eight months, a variable-rate

mortage of 2 percent would only rise

to 3.75 percent, well below the rate

that consumers qualified at.

Despite the rate hike, this can

be seen as positive for those in the

Hardwood industry as consumers

are still planning on home-buying,

and purchasing Hardwood finished

goods or tackling renovation projects

once they move into their new

homes. n

NEWS DEVELOPMENTS

Continued from page 15

furnishings, with a focus on on-demand

production. The company manufactures

its furniture at a separate

facility in Wyoming, where it currently

employs 22 people.

For more information, go to www.

rollandhill.com.

MSU Researchers Use AI To

Better Evaluate Lumber

A $500,000 federal grant will help

Mississippi State University (MSU)

researchers, based in Starkville, MS, use artificial intelligence

to increase the accuracy of lumber evaluation.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture award funds an innovative

research project in MSU’s Department of Sustainable

Bioproducts that aims to improve lumber grading

systems with a machine-learning model. The research will

identify characteristics that human graders and current auto-grading

technologies might otherwise miss—especially

characteristics which, relative to their nature and extent,

impact the value of each piece of lumber.

Assistant Research Professor Dercilio Junior Lopes explained

the goal is to create another

tool to complement current grading

practices and technologies.

“Visual graders have high accuracy,

around 95 percent, but worker fatigue

decreases that accuracy. Additionally,

auto-grading equipment can

struggle with certain wood species,

especially Hardwoods like Black Walnut,

in which the wood’s dark hue can

make it hard to discern knots. This

work offers checks and balances for

the weary worker and these problematic

wood species,” Lopes explained.

“We won’t replace lumber grading

experts or auto-grading equipment.

We’ll simply provide another tool for

rapid decision making in the fastpaced

production environment.”

The MSU Forest and Wildlife Research

Center team will create an

image dataset of common wood

strength reducing characteristics, curate

and annotate these images, and

then process them into deep learning-based

image segmentation models.

From there, they will integrate

the machine-learned algorithm into

user-friendly software in partnership

with MSU’s National Strategic Planning

and Analysis Research Center,

or NSPARC. To learn more, go to

www.msstate.edu. n

HMA UPDATE

Continued from page 16

More about the HMA

There is strength in numbers. Our

Association provides members a

significant connection to a unique

forest products industry brain trust.

I call it a collective wisdom that our

members share openly, and with great enthusiasm.

And for many of them, this extraordinary producer-toproducer

networking and information exchange is the

greatest member service.

If HMA sounds like your kind of trade Association, visit

HMAmembers.org for a closer look. Then contact me,

ljovanovich@hardwood.org, to discuss joining up with

a group of people that will positively affect the rest of your

life, both professionally and personally. n

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66 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 67

ISK BIOCIDES ISLAND.indd 7

5/18/17 3:14 PM


AHEC REPORT Continued from page 18

ing our environment.

In all, there are now eight Words on Wood episodes:

S1 E1: Welcome to the Forest – the fundamental issues

surrounding forests, and how these impact upon

the timber that eventually ends up in buildings, products

and furniture, with guests Sebastian Cox and Jameson

French.

S1 E2: The Carbon Sink – the significance of forests

to climate change, their role in reducing carbon in the

Quality Appalachian Hardwood Lumber

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Quentin Moss, KD-Lumber Sales/

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atmosphere, and the importance of carbon sequestration

for architecture and product design, with guests Andrew

Waugh, Galina Churkina and Sean Sutcliffe.

S1 E3: Illegal Logging – the challenges facing the design

and timber industries to cut out illegal logging, and

how architects and designers can respond, with guests

Formafantasma, Constance McDermott and Rupert

Oliver.

S1 E4: Wood and Wellbeing – the opportunities to

use timber within design and architecture to improve

our mental wellbeing and physical

health, with guests Asif Khan and

Alex de Rijke.

S2 E1: Building with Timber

– how timber construction, experimental

uses of wood and cellulose,

a worldwide timber tracing network,

and sustainability of buildings with

engineer Andrew Lawrence and architect

Lina Ghotmeh.

S2 E2: New Wood Technologies

– an ancient material provides designers

with new processes, forms

and techniques, with designers Sam

Hecht, Yves Béhar and Elissa

Brunato.

S2 E3: Old Crafts, New Ways –

the traditional craft processes fueling

contemporary modes of expression

in woodworking design, with guests

Stephen Burks and Orhan Niksic.

S2 E4: The World Forest ID – the

scientific solution to combat illegal

logging and trace harvest origin from

an end product, with guests Phil

Guillery, Jade Saunders and Victor

Deklerk.

I encourage you to listen to an episode

during your next walk, drive, or

lunch break, and share with friends

both in and outside of the Hardwood

industry to spread the word

about the global benefits of working

forests. You can listen to Words on

Wood, and subscribe to the podcast,

on Apple podcasts, Spotify, and

americanhardwood.org. n

WCMA INSIGHTS Continued from page 20

WCMA member and tech partner has something to contribute

to the WCMA mission. Why not invite more wood

component manufacturers and suppliers to our conversation?

Below are several of the key benefits of being a

member with the WCMA:

•Networking/Information Exchange – One of the main

reasons that members join and stay with the WCMA is

because of the access that it provides to a wide range

of industry experts. Your colleagues are often your best

source for in-depth insight and ideas. WCMA gives you

the opportunity to connect with industry

professionals across the

United States and into Canada.

•Virtual and Live Events – The

WCMA hosts events designed

with our members in mind. These

events offer members a great

chance to improve your knowledge

of the industry and to connect

with peers.

File Name: COLP 16180 - 2022_Hardwood_NHM_4.5625x7.5 Title: Preserving Treasures

Client: Collins Wood Pub: National Hardware Magazine

Job #: COLP 16180 Trim Size: 4.5625 x 7.5

App: InDesign CC Bleed Size: no bleed

Colors: 4CP Close Date: 03.25.22

•Exclusive use of Real American

Hardwood Coalition branding and

marketing resources.

If you are a current WCMA member,

participate in our “Member-Geta-Member”

campaign. We make it

easy for you to share our information

with colleagues, just visit our

website and go to the “2022 Member-Get-a-Member

Campaign” page

under “membership.”

If you are not a member, I would

love an opportunity to discuss membership

with you in more detail.

Please email me directly at amy@

wcma.com or call 651-332-6332.

You can see more about membership

and activities that the WCMA

is working on at our website, www.

wcma.com.

Preserving treasures.

Collins Hardwood

A family-owned business since

1855, ours is a heritage of

responsibility to the land and to

the people. Today, our 311,000

acres of FSC-Certified forests

produce some of the finest

lumber in the world—because

like you, we care what we

leave for future generations.

Visit us at IWF, booth #BC817.

Working with WCMA Members

The benefits of working with

WCMA member companies are

clear. Manufacturers that outsource

components are more profitable

than those that do not, period. All

independent studies since 1970

prove it. It’s just good business to

outsource.

Finding a supplier that can consistently

produce quality components and be responsive to

your needs is easier than ever before. Just give us a

call at 651-332-6332 or visit our source guide at www.

wcma.com/source_guide.html. You will be provided

with a list of WCMA Member Companies that will meet

your exact requirements for dimension and component

products made from Hardwoods, softwoods, and engineered

wood materials. It’s that easy!

We look forward to hearing from you! n

nationalhardwoodmag.com

Collins Pennsylvania Forest

Forest Stewardship Council ®

Look for our certified wood products

Building heirlooms.

The Joinery, Portland Oregon

featuring Collins Cherry

The finest in responsibly sourced Hardwood,

Softwood and Particleboard.

CollinsWood.com | 800.329.1219

@collinswood_1855

facebook.com/CollinsCompanies

68 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 69

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3/10/22 12:21 PM


WHO’S WHO

IN HARDWOOD PURCHASING

A BRIEF SKETCH OF THE LEADING

PURCHASING EXECUTIVES IN

THE HARDWOOD INDUSTRY

JOHN GRBIC is vice president

of operations at Adriatic Wood

Products Inc., located in Brooklyn,

NY.

Adriatic Wood Products manufactures

custom Hardwood

mouldings, carvings, ornaments,

woodturning and lumber. The

firm purchases more than one

million board feet annually of

John Grbic

domestic species, that include:

Alder, Basswood, Beech, Birch,

Butternut, Poplar, Walnut, Ash, Red and White Oak,

Hickory and Sycamore. In imports, they buy Sapele,

Teak, Wenge, Anigre, Avodire, Banak, Ebony, Iroka, Jatoba,

Khaya, Lacewood, Honduras Mahogany, Santos

Mahogany, Eucalyptus, Butternut, Zebrawood and domestic

pine (all 4/4-16/4 kiln-dried, 6-8 percent, rough or

Value-added services offered by the firm include hand

selecting Hardwood to customer specifications; custom

knives can be made to duplicate any moulding; and custom

replications of carved ornaments such as corbels

and appliqués.

Grbic has been with Adriatic Wood Products for 32

years and in his current position for the past 20. A graduate

of St. John’s University, Queens, NY, he and his wife

of 26 years, Jenny, have one son and two daughters. In

his spare time, Grbic enjoys playing guitar, soccer and is

a baseball fan.

Adriatic Wood Products is a member of the Architectural

Woodworking Institute. For more information visit

www.adriaticwood.com.

ment for the company.

Witmer Furniture benchbuilds

residential solid wood

furniture and was named a Top

100 Wood Manufacturer in the

United States by Woodworking

Network. They also received a

Manufacturing Excellence Award

from the State of Wisconsin.

The company purchases one

Kevin Schlinkmann

million board feet of Hardwoods

annually, including Oak, Birch,

Quarter-Sawn Oak, Cherry and Poplar, in grades No. 1

Common and Select and Better (4/4, 5/4, 6/4, and 8/4

thicknesses). All their products are available in several

colors and handling options.

Schlinkmann has worked at Witmer Furniture for 30

years and has been president since 2001. Building furniture

for Witmer was his first job in the industry. He gradu-

ated in 1990 from the University of Wisconsin – Madison

with a degree in business. His interests include spending

time outdoors, downhill skiing and hiking. He and his

wife, Susan, have been married for 28 years, and have

two adult children.

For more information, visit www.witmerfurniture.

com.

LEIGH ANN BATEMAN is the purchasing agent for

Woodfold Manufacturing Inc., located in Forest Grove,

OR.

Woodfold Manufacturing is a manufacturer of cutting

boards, as well as accordion folding and roll-up doors.

The company’s annual lumber purchases total approximately

1/2 million board feet of primarily Alder, as well as

KEVIN SCHLINKMANN is the president of Witmer

other Hardwoods in Select and Better and No. 1 Com-

Furniture, LLC, located in Abbotsford, WI. He is also

surfaced) annually. involved in lumber purchasing and operations manage-

Please turn to page 78

Over 40 Years of Setting the

Gold Standard in American Black Walnut

4/4 thru 16/4 Walnut

Proudly NHLA Grade Certified

Phone: 660-248-3000

MOPACLumber.com

inquiry@mopaclumber.com

70 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 71


TRADE TALK

AN UPDATE COVERING

THE LATEST NEWS ABOUT

HARDWOOD SUPPLIERS/VENDORS

EXPERIENCE QUALITY DEPENDABILITY

975 Conrad Hill Mine Rd. ~ Lexington, NC 27292

Phone 336-746-5419 ~ Fax 336-746-6177

www.kepleyfrank.us

Facilities:

3 Sawmills Processing 50 Million' • 750,000' Dry Kiln

Capacity • 600,000' Fan Shed Capacity

2 382 Newman Planer Mills • 50 Bay Bin Sorter

Products Available:

4/4-8/4 Appalachian Lumber • 6/4-8/4 Ship Dry Capacity

Crossties (100,000 BF per week) • Timbers up to 18'

1,000,000+ Average KD Inventory • 12,000,000+

Average AD Inventory

Species:

White Oak • Red Oak • Poplar • Ash • Hickory

Elm • Beech • Gum • Hackberry • Pecan

Jimmy Kepley, owner, and Bart

Jenkins, lumber sales

The firm manufactures 4/4 through 8/4 thicknesses.

Sales:

Bart Jenkins

bjenkins@kepleyfrank.us

Jimmy Kepley

jkepley@kepleyfrank.us

MEMPHIS, TN—The Board

of Managers of the National

Hardwood Lumber Association

(NHLA), headquartered here,

recently announced the appointment

of Dallin Brooks as the organization’s

executive director.

Since June of last year, the

search committee has been on

a quest to find the right executive

director to help NHLA reach

Dallin Brooks

its full potential. “With the help

of the recruiting firm Vetted Solutions, we have found

an individual with a great deal of energy, ability and an

intense desire to be part of helping to create a vibrant

industry,” said Jeff Wirkkala, president of NHLA.

For the last 10 years, Brooks has been the executive

director of the Western Wood Preservers Institute, working

to promote and protect the preserved wood market

for lumber, utility poles, and railway ties.

WWPI has steadily grown under his leadership and

transitioned from a defensive reactionary industry to a

positive offensive story, focusing on content creation

and dissemination. Together with his staff, he developed

smartphone apps for Treated Wood Guide, Wood Pole

Guide, and Tie Grading Guide in collaboration with other

industry associations. Brooks maintained the preserved

lumber “Checkmark” inspection program and worked

with universities to research and improve quality control

metrics and standards, reducing variability, and improving

treating production. He also successfully lobbied

legislation for the continued use and disposal of treated

wood waste in California.

Brooks graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree

in Wood Products Processing as well as a Master of Science

degree in Forest and Society from the University

of British Columbia. He has dual citizenship in Canada

and the United States. Brooks has innovative experience

in the Hardwood industry; while working for Jartek

Oy, he strived to bring thermal modification from Finland

to North America for wide plank flooring, cabinets, gun

stocks, and other niche Hardwood markets.

Brooks grew up in the forests on his family hunting

and fishing resort in BC, Canada. Brooks has seven kids

and is relocating his family to the Memphis, TN area. His

official start date will be June 13, 2022.

To learn more, go to www.nhla.com.

NEWALD, WI–Cleereman Industries/Cleereman

Controls,

headquartered here, recently

performed a number of equipment

installations, according to

Vice President Paul Cleereman.

At Shamco Lumber Inc. sawmill

in Iron River, MI, Cleereman

Industries’ engineering department

handled everything from

Paul Cleereman

the foundation/steel embedment

prints and electrical prints to all the engineered drawings

needed for the entire project. The primary breakdown of

this mill is a double cut band mill. Cleereman supplied

a new Mellott Model 642-6-foot slanted band mill for

this project along with an optimized Cleereman LP-42

linear carriage and Cleereman 654-2G optimized edger

line that feeds a Cleereman trimmer. The mill is supplied

with logs coming from the new Cleereman 848 debarker.

Cleereman supplied a Precision chipper and waste

system for Shamco. Cleereman Controls did all of the

optimization on carriage and edger lines in this mill along

with debarker and trimmer controls.

Also, Beiler’s Sawmill in Quarryville, PA recently installed

a Cleereman LP-42-inch linear carriage with

Cleereman Controls. Beiler’s Sawmill also has a Cleereman

edger on order for spring delivery 2022.

Rich in logging and sawmill history, Cleereman Industries

has developed and manufactured sawmill machinery

for over 60 years using three guiding principles:

•Manufacture high quality products built for high production,

increased yield and years of trouble-free operations.

•Use simple yet highly functional designs to minimize

the number of moving parts while maximizing the performance

and functionality.

•Provide unequaled service and support to its customers.

To learn more, go to www.cleereman.com.

MEMPHIS, TN—Nathan Hascher of ETT Fine Woods

in Donalds, SC, a longtime resident of Memphis, TN,

and his father, Rich Hascher, retired, longtime director of

the National Hardwood Lumber Association’s Inspector

Training School, based here, both were recently honored

Please turn the page

72 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 73


TRADE TALK

Continued

Nathan Hascher, left, and Rich Hascher, his father, were

recently honored as Lumberman of the Year separately for

2020 and 2021 at a meeting of the Lumbermen’s Club of

Memphis.

Church 14_Layout 1 4/17/18 3:43 PM Page 1

at the same meeting of the Lumbermen’s Club of Memphis

as the Lumberman of the Year, separately for 2020

and 2021.

Due to COVID, the presentations during those years

of Lumberman of the Year were postponed. At a recent

meeting, both father and son were recognized.

Rich Hascher was honored as Lumberman of the Year

for 2020 and Nathan Hascher for 2021. The club invited

Rich Hascher to be at the meeting to see his son

honored as Lumberman of the Year. The club also told

Nathan Hascher to be there to see his father honored.

But the club did not let each man know that he, himself,

would receive the award.

Nathan Hascher said, “The Lumbermen’s Club of

Memphis Lumberman of the Year award is an esteemed

honor. The list of former recipients includes known, successful

and respected lumbermen not just in Memphis

but throughout the industry. I was shocked to be thought

of in the same light. I am forever grateful for the Lumbermen’s

Club of Memphis and the many relationships

I have made.”

Rich Hascher said, “The Hascher’s really had a pretty

good day there. I thought it was really special for both of

us to win the Lumberman of the Year award. It’s a pretty

prestigious award.”

Andy Johnson, the club president, said that in Rich

Hascher’s 27 years as director of the NHLA Inspector

Training School, he was “an exceptional teacher who

took a deep interest in the success of his students.”

Johnson said that in Nathan Hascher’s career in Memphis,

Collierville, TN and South Carolina, he has demonstrated

“work ethic, integrity, leadership skills, and enthusiasm

for learning.” Nathan Hascher was president of the

Memphis Lumbermen’s Club in 2017-18.

BUFFALO, NY—U-C Coatings recently announced

the hiring of Chris Funk as an inside sales representative

at their headquarters here. Funk comes to U-C Coatings

with over 25 years’ experience in the transportation industry,

including running a small auto hauling company

for 10 years. His vast business experience will be a

valuable asset to the U-C Coatings team and their cus-

tomers, according to a company

spokesperson. Funk has an

Associate’s degree in advertising.

In his spare time, he enjoys

sports, music and spending time

with his family and friends.

U-C Coatings is a leading

manufacturer and supplier of

premium wood protection products.

For more than 50 years

Chris Funk

their products have been used in

a variety of industries, including Hardwood and softwood

logging and lumber production, wood products manufacturing,

woodworking and wood decking markets.

U-C Coatings’ products are used worldwide to protect,

conserve and enhance forest resources. Their goal is to

help their customers achieve more with less waste and

provide the highest level of protection for their products.

To learn more, go to www.uccoatings.com.

Please turn the page

We at Bryant Church Hardwoods, Inc., located in Wilkesboro, NC, are proud of our modern Hardwood

concentration yard facility that we constantly update to better serve our customers with the finest

Appalachian Hardwood and Eastern White Pine lumber available. Call us at (336) 973-3691 when we can

be of service.

WHA Annual Convention

August 17-19, 2022

This is an aerial view of our modern

Hardwood concentration yard where we

process quality Appalachian Hardwood

and Eastern White Pine lumber.

All Hardwoods Go West

Some facts about our company are, we:

•Have a 30 acre Hardwood and Eastern White Pine lumber concentration yard

that exclusively represents one sawmill.

•Specialize in all thicknesses of kiln dried Eastern White Pine lumber.

•Deal in Appalachian Hardwood species such as Red and White Oak, Poplar,

Ash, Hard and Soft Maple, Steamed Walnut, Cherry, Basswood, Beech and

mixed Hardwoods.

•Market our Appalachian Hardwood lumber in 4/4 through 8/4 thicknesses that

is green, air dried and/or kiln dried.

•Specialize in mixed truck loads.

•Have 9 steam dry kilns that have a combined dry kiln capacity of 630,000 bd.

ft. per charge.

•Own a Newman 382 planer.

•Usually carry about 4,000,000 bd. ft. on our air drying yard.

•Usually carry about 1,500,000 bd. ft. of kiln dried lumber in inventory.

•Offer export preparation, container loading and package tally.

•Offer the service of sorting lumber at special lengths, widths and grades

according to customer specifications.

•Use our own trucks and contract trucks for prompt delivery of your orders.

•Have over 75 years of combined experience in the lumber business.

Tim Church

Mason Church

Bus.: (336) 973-3691

FAX: (336) 973-7993

(800) 973-3380

Web site: http://BCHI.com

P.O. Box 995 • Wilkesboro, NC 28697

Distribution Yard: 683 Buck Road • Wilkesboro, NC 28697

Because we’ve been in business since 1953, we have many years of experience that helps us to ship your orders right the first time.

Chinook Winds Casino Resort

Lincoln City, OR

Sign up online: www.westernhardwood.org/2022

Networking!

Speakers!

Golf!

Fishing!

Fun!

74 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 75


A 60+ Year Tradition of Excellence

Serving architectural woodworkers, cabinet and fixture

manufacturers with vast inventories of premium quality

domestic and imported hardwoods, from Alder to

Zebrawood, 4/4 through 16/4 in many species. When you

need Hardwood, think MacBeath. . . a name synonymous

with fine quality and prompt, reliable service.

Corporate Office &

Concentration Yard:

Edinburgh, Indiana

800-322-9743

Arizona:

Phoenix: 602-504-1931

Tempe: 480-355-5090

Tucson: 520-745-8301

Reload:

Northern California:

Golden State Reload Berkeley: 800-479-9907

Perris, California

Stockton: 844-490-5051

800-322-9743

Utah: Salt Lake City: 800-255-3743

macbeath.com

JOSEY (JOCO) 2018 Christmas REV .qxp_Layout 1 11/19/18 2:42 PM Page 1

MacbeathREV 12-2018.indd 1

JoCo Lumber, Inc. is a division of

Josey Lumber Company, Inc.

Tripp, Logan, and Joey Josey

Our company offers:

• 10,000,000 BF of annual production from

our 6’ band headrig and 6’ band resaw.

• Red and White Oak, Soft Maple, Ash,

Poplar and Cypress in 4/4 through 8/4

thickness.

• rough, surfaced, air-dried and kiln-dried

lumber in random widths and lengths.

• export prepping, container loading of logs and lumber,

anti-stain dipping and end coating lumber.

• 500,000 BF of dry kiln capacity.

• 65,000 SF of enclosed warehouse for storage and loading of

kiln-dried lumber.

For Quality Appalachian Lumber Contact:

JOsey Lumber COmpany, InC.

JoCo Lumber, InC.

476 Lees meadow rd. • p.O. Drawer 447

scotland neck, nC 27874

TeL: (252) 826-5614 • FaX: (252) 826-3461

COnTaCT:

emaIL: joseylbr3@gmail.com

saLes: Logan Josey

6/21/19 10:13 AM

TRADE TALK

Continued

SURREY, BC—Brunette Machinery

Company Inc, with its

head office here, a premium

supplier to the North American

forest industry for more than

75 years, recently announced

the acquisition of D & L Timber

Technologies Ltd.

“We are thrilled to welcome

Kirk Forbes

this global leader in the portable

sawmill industry into our family,”

said Kirk Forbes, President and CEO of Brunette Machinery.

“The acquisition of D & L Timber Technologies

is well-aligned with Brunette’s strategy to grow and diversify

our international operations. D & L’s established

history and dedication to serving strategic markets will

allow us to broaden our customer base and advance

our existing North American platform.

“Through this transaction, D & L will maintain its

own identity and retain its manufacturing operations

in Lac La Hache, BC,” Forbes continued. “The team at

D & L Timber Technologies has built a solid reputation,

in their local community and globally, for innovation,

manufacturing expertise and excellence in customer

service. We believe by combining our two organizations’

shared values, first-class products, brands and

global capabilities, Brunette and D & L will elevate

their existing operations and will better meet the growing

demand for state-of-the-art equipment in the forestry

industry.

“We are pleased to officially welcome D & L Timber

Technologies’ dedicated and skilled employees to the

Brunette family,” said Forbes. “This transaction will allow

our team to write its next chapter as one of North

America’s foremost suppliers of quality wood processing

equipment. Our companies’ combined talents,

strengths and operational excellence will deliver significant

opportunities for growth to our employees and

our customers. We look forward to the exciting journey

ahead as we continue to provide high-quality products

and excellent service to our customers worldwide.”

To learn more, go to www.brunettemc.com.

PITTSBURGH, PA—The Board of Directors of the

Hardwood Manufacturers Association (HMA) elect-

(From left) Tom Gerow, Wagner Millwork LLC, Owego, NY; Troy

Brown, Kretz Lumber Company Inc., Antigo, WI; and Tommy

Petzoldt, East Perry Lumber Company, Frohna, MO

ed Tommy Petzoldt, East Perry Lumber Company of

Frohna, MO president of the HMA at their National

Conference and Expo in Miramar Beach, FL, recently.

Other HMA officers for 2022 are Vice President:

Tom Gerow, Wagner Millwork LLC of Owego, NY, and

executive vice president: Linda Jovanovich, HMA of

Pittsburgh, PA.

The HMA board of directors also elected members

to the executive committee. In addition to the officers,

they are: Geoff Henderson, Anderson-Tully Company

of Vicksburg, MS; Hal Mitchell, Atlanta Hardwood

Corporation of Mableton, GA; Craig Miller, Battle Lumber

Company, Inc. of Wadley, GA; Richard Buchanan,

Granite Hardwoods, Inc. of Granite Falls, NC; Wayne

Law, New River Hardwoods of Mountain City, TN; and

Tom Gerow, Wagner Millwork, LLC, of Owego, NY.

Troy Brown, Kretz Lumber Company, Inc. of Antigo,

WI, will serve on the executive committee as the immediate

past president.

During the conference’s Thursday business meeting,

HMA members elected Directors: Scott Cummings,

Cummings Lumber Company, Inc. of Troy, PA;

Matthew Netterville, Fred Netterville Lumber Company

of Woodville, MS; Tripp Josey, Josey Lumber Company,

Inc. of Scotland Neck, NC; David Lewis, Lewis

Brothers Lumber Company, Inc. of Aliceville, AL; and

Wayne Law, New River Hardwoods of Mountain City,

TN.

Please turn the page

Wood: The Natural Choice

Stay on track: www.rta.org or

“Looking for Premium Appalachian Hardwood?

Harold White Lumber, Inc. is the supplier

you can trust!”

HWL

HAROLD WHITE LUMBER

Founded in 1968 by Harold White, we offer:

• Bandsawn lumber

• Excellent color and texture

• 500,000 b.f. kiln capacity

• Planing mill facility

• On-site container loading

• Dimension plant specializing in paneling, flooring,

casing, doors and finger-joints

For lumber and prompt worldwide shipping,

contact Ray White: rwhite@haroldwhitelumber.com

For dimension and/or millwork requests,

contact Lee White: lwhite@haroldwhitelumber.com.

Harold White Lumber, Inc.

2920 Flemingsburg Road

Morehead, KY 40351

(606) 784-7573 phone

(606) 784-2624 fax

www.haroldwhitelumber.com

76 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 77

HAROLD WHITE 2016-2.indd 5

6/6/16 2:40 PM


Your support changes

hearts and minds

about wood, for good.

TRADE TALK Continued

The Hardwood Manufacturers Association is a national

trade organization with membership limited

to U.S. Hardwood lumber producers and processors.

HMA is a member-driven association providing

member companies peer-networking opportunities,

valuable information exchange and strategic management

tools. The association also conducts a focused,

far-reaching promotion campaign, directed to

both consumers and build professionals, extolling the

beauty, environmental preference and lasting value of

American Hardwood flooring, furniture, cabinetry and

millwork.

To learn more, go to www.hmamembers.org. n

BE PART OF

BUILDING

SOMETHING

BIG

Harvesting the Future through Education

DONATE TODAY @ NorthAmericanForestFoundation.org

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

WHO’S WHO Continued from page 71

mon (4/4, 5/4, 6/4, 8/4 and 10/4, kiln-dried).

Woodfold Manufacturing Inc. has been in operation

since 1957. The company has grown into one of the

nation’s leading suppliers of custom-crafted accordion

doors and roll-up doors serving both residential and

commercial markets.

Bateman is a graduate of Forest Grove High School,

located in Forest Grove. She has worked at Woodfold

Manufacturing for almost 31 years, with 20 years

spent in her current position.

Bateman has been married to Mike for 31 years and

the couple has two daughters and two grandchildren.

For more information, visit www.woodfold.com. n

China Extends Tariff Exclusions

On U.S. Hardwoods Until

November 30, 2022

Where We’ve Been

It’s no secret, the hardwood industry has been losing market share to

products that look like wood, but have none of the natural benefits or

authentic attributes of Real American Hardwood. In order to recapture

market share and improve industry stability, hardwood organizations

united to form the Real American Hardwood Coalition.

Where We Are

The goal is to develop a national consumer promotion campaign on a

scale that’s never been seen before. And a lot has been accomplished

in a short period of time—including the completion of an extensive

consumer research initiative, establishing brand guidelines, registering

trademarks, and launching social media profiles.

Where We’re Going, Together

The next steps will have the largest impact on the industry and require

buy-in from all industry stakeholders. The Coalition is preparing to

launch a comprehensive promotion campaign—including a consumeroriented

website, in-store promotion at top big box stores, a broad

media relations campaign, social media influencer partnerships, print

and web advertising, and much more.

Washington, DC—Hardwood industry exporters

received some good news recently when the

Chinese Ministry of Finance announced that it

would continue to exclude U.S. Hardwoods from

tariffs for an additional six-month period, through

November 30, 2022. The American Hardwood

Export Council received initial confirmation of the

extensions late Friday, April 15. This latest action

effectively means that business will carry on as

usual with no Chinese tariffs on U.S. Hardwood

lumber and log exports for the next six months.

The Hardwood Federation, with headquarters in

Washington, DC, will provide any further developments.

To learn more, go to www.hardwoodfed

eration.com. n

How You Can Get Involved

Moving the campaign forward and expanding its reach will take the

support of the entire industry—for the benefit of the entire industry.

■ Make a voluntary contribution to help fund the consumer

promotion campaign.

■ Use the Real American Hardwood logo on your sales and

marketing communications, facilities and vehicles, products,

and website.

■ Follow @RealAmericanHardwood on Instagram and Facebook,

and tag #RealAmericanHardwood in your social media posts.

78 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE

Visit RealAmericanHardwood.org to learn more and get on board.


CLASSIFIED

PROFIT OPPORTUNITIES

Kingsford Lumber Company is looking to hire a log yard manager for

the Kingsford Mill yard in Kingsford, MI.

Primary duties will include log scaling/grading, boltwood scaling and

inventory management, veneer sales and trucking coordinator between

remote yards, woods landings and mills. The yard manager will work

closely with the mill manager and equipment operator on yard inventory

and mill cut schedules. Other duties may include open market log

buying.

Job requirements – Must be able to identify species and understand

the official grading rules for hardwood log and tie cuts, cordwood scaling

(pile and truck scaling), forestry degree or equivalent experience,

valid WI or MI driver’s license,

HELP WANTED

TIGERTON LUMBER COMPANY

Yard Manager/Buyer – Tigerton Lumber Company – Iron River Landing

Tigerton Lumber Company is looking to hire a log yard manager for our

log yard in Iron River, MI.

Primary duties will include log scaling/grading and inventory management,

veneer sales and trucking coordinator between remote yards,

woods landings and mills. Other duties may include open market log

buying and satellite log yard management at our yards in Bruce Crossing,

MI and Conover, WI.

Job requirements – Must be able to identify species and understand

the official grading rules for hardwood log and tie cuts, forestry degree

or equivalent experience, valid WI or MI driver’s license,

Procurement Forester

Tigerton Lumber Company is looking to expand its procurement group

and will be hiring a forester for Northeast/East Central WI as well as

Southwest WI.

Primary duties will include buying stumpage through private landowner

negotiations and/or through timber bids (consultants as well as state,

federal and county forests). Administration of timber sales which includes

cruising timber, timber sale contracts, property/harvest line establishment,

marking timber, filing appropriate cutting notices (MFL/FCL

and County), sub-contracting logging and trucking, harvest inspections,

sale summary (scale ticket summary and working with accounting on

payments for loggers and landowners), MFL/FCL cutting reports and

sale close-outs. Other duties may include: MFL plan preparation, open

market log buying, log scaling and grading, road building/maintenance,

educational/outreach programs, participation in WI DNR committees.

KINGSFORD LUMBER COMPANY

FISTA/SFI Training – Training/certification will be done yearly

(if you do not have it currently it will be provided)

Salary – Based on 40 hour work week - $55,000/year - $XX,XXX

(negotiable based on experience)

To Apply – Please send a resume and cover letter to

Tigerton Lumber Company.

Tigerton Lumber Company,

Attn: Ben Knaack, PO Box 70, Tigerton, WI 54486, or

Email to: ben@tigertonlumber.com

Job requirements – Forestry degree or equivalent experience,

valid WI driver’s license

FISTA/SFI Training – Training/certification will be done yearly

(if you do not have it currently it will be provided)

Salary – Based on 40 hour work week - $45,000/year - $XX,XXX

(negotiable based on experience)

To Apply – Please send a resume and cover letter to

Tigerton Lumber Company.

Tigerton Lumber Company,

Attn: Ben Knaack, PO Box 70, Tigerton, WI 54486, or

Email to: ben@tigertonlumber.com

Yard Manager/Buyer – Kingsford Lumber Company – Kingsford Mill Yard

FISTA/SFI Training – Training/certification will be done yearly

(if you do not have it currently it will be provided)

Salary – Based on 40 hour work week - $45,000/year - $XX,XXX

(negotiable based on experience)

To Apply – Please send a resume and cover letter to

Kingsford Lumber Company.

Tigerton Lumber Company,

Attn: Ben Knaack, PO Box 70, Tigerton, WI 54486, or

Email to: ben@tigertonlumber.com

Any questions on any of these job postings please call Ben Knaack at 715-535-2181.

Benefits

Flexible work schedule

Mileage reimbursement program

Cell phone plan

Health insurance

Life insurance

Disability and dental

401k with company match (25% up to 6% of wages)

Vacation and sick leave

Flex spending account for health care costs

Seven paid holidays

Bereavement pay

Boot allowance

Certified Lumber Grader – Job Description

Cardin Forest Products is a family owned sawmill and kiln drying operation located

in South Pittsburg, Tennessee. We are currently seeking a candidate to fill a

hardwood lumber grading position in our kiln drying operation.

The ideal candidate will have:

•Been NHLA certified

•2 to 3 years of experience grading kiln dried hardwoods

Duties will include, but not be limited to the following:

•Grade and mark all lumber to be sorted according to NHLA rules/guidelines

and industry standards

•Communicate effectively with your team and other departments

•Adhere to all safety policies and perform tasks in a safe and responsible

manner

Required Qualifications:

•Minimum of one (1) year experience grading green and/or kiln dried domestic

lumber

•Must be NHLA trained or have equivalent knowledge.

•Must be physically capable of performing all duties of the job and any other

duties assigned by Crew Leader

Position

•Full time position

•Company offers medical, dental, 401(k), and other benefit offerings

We are an equal opportunity employer. Employment selection and related decisions

are made without regard to sexual orientation, race, color, age, disability,

religion, national origin, citizenship status and creed.

Salary Negotiable

Reply to: Jeremy Ball

Cell: (423) 619-8056

Email: jball@cardinfp.com

HELP WANTED

To: Anyone involved in the sawmill controls industry

To: Anyone involved in the sawmill controls industry

There are many stories and people that have been

involved in the sawmill controls industry.

This fascinating history should be preserved. I want to write

a book about this industry and would appreciate any stories

or comments you might want to add. I am willing to meet in

person if needed.

Please contact me, Jeff Hurdle, at:

hurd2575@gmail.com

SERVICES

901.767.9126

or visit us at

www.hmr.com

Benchmark pricing and market

commentary on the North American

hardwood lumber industry.

Go online at hmr.com for a sample copy.

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

2000 Optimil 6ft Twin Bandmill

Never used. Bandsaw with covers. $150,000.

Please call Jenness for more information at

207-745-2223 or Jeff at 207-342-5221.

USNR 4TA30 Top Arbor Three Shifting Saw Edger

200 hp drive motor, includes unscrambler, control

cab, infeed and outfeed. $95,000. Please call Jenness

for more information at 207-745-2223 or Jeff

at 207-342-5221.

Phone: (207) 342-5221

Fax: (207) 342-5201

PO Box 9, Ghent Road

Searsmont, ME 04973

Contact: Jenness Robbins

FOR SALE

Walnut Beams For Sale

#1 Common & Better (furniture grade), S2S,

2,000 board ft., kiln dried

Quantity – 15 beams, 6” sq. x 10’+

Market price

Contact – Jane Kuhns,

owner of Kuhns Contracting, Inc.

614-402-1681

Miller Wood Trade Publications

Connecting North American Forest Products Globally

LIKE AND FOLLOW US ON:

www.millerwoodtradepub.com

@millerwoodtradepub

80 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 81


TO IMPROVE THE VALUE OF YOUR LUMBER

To: Anyone involved in the sawmill controls industry

SEEKING AN eLIMBS SPECIALIST

DMSi is currently seeking a candidate to implement and support the eLIMBS inventory

system. This person will use their industry and product knowledge to help customers

improve their business processes with the software.

Duties include

-Manage implementation projects, including system set up and configuration

-Train customers and other DMSi personnel on use of the system

-Help resolve client cases by gathering information and researching issues

-Create documentation to improve eLIMBS training resources

Qualifications

-Knowledge of the hardwood lumber industry and supply chain processes

-Experience with training end-users (virtual and in-person) on new software procedures

-Strong logical and problem-solving skills

-The ability to positively represent DMSi/eLIMBS

Position Details

-Full-time position

-Ability to work from home or Omaha office

-Travel to customer locations required

-Medical, dental, vision, 401(K) with match, PTO, and other benefits provided

Reply to Kevin Peterson (kpeterson@dmsi.com)

Our Classified

Advertising

Works!

FOR INFORMATION CALL:

800-844-1280

Get it

fasterrrrrr.

We can’t control mail delays so we are speeding up the way you can get your next

issue. Scan and sign-up to get all 13 digital issues FREE and delivered directly to

your inbox.

National Hardwood Magazine keeps YOU informed about Hardwood sawmill production, lumber

distribution and consumption of apprearance grade Hardwoods throughout North America.

To: Anyone involved in the sawmill controls industry

FOR SALE

Dry Kiln Concentration Yard with 470,000 bdft Kiln Capacity

and 400,00 bdft Predryer Capacity

LOT – Western Pennsylvania

26.47 – acre industrial site

26.31 – acre wooded lot

70,000 sqft asphalt lot

100 x 80 vehicle lot

Enough sq footage to openly store 2,000,000 bdft lumber.

BUILDINGS:

80 x 212 Steel storage building concrete floor (blue lumber storage)

65 x 140 Wood frame equipment building concrete floor (green chain)

60 x 130 Wood frame equipment building (stacker)

60 x 80 Steel building high storage (sawdust)

60 x 60 Wood frame equipment building (grading shed)

130 x 80 Coe steel building (predryer)

5 – 50,000 ft SII Kiln Building

2 – 40,000 ft Irvington Moore Kilns

2 – 80,000 ft Nardi Kilns

25 x 160 Garage w/small office and wash area. Parts storage rooms.

Block and wood structure.

25 x 160 Open face wood storage shed, gravel floor.

25 x 160 Open face steel storage shed with a 50 x 60 high overhang roof,

gravel floor.

104,000 sqft Asphalt lot

OFFICE – Roughly 2,000 sqft working space.

11 Individual offices

2 large clerical offices

1 large conference room

Small kitchen

2 Restrooms

Reply to: nhm@millerwoodtradepub.com, put CMP #3578 in subject line.

USED MACHINERY FOR SALE

●USNR 4TA30 Top Arbor Three Shifting

Saw Edger

●Infeed Landing Deck

●USNR – Lunden Cam Unscrambler

S/N 41419

●Even Ending Rolls

●Queuing Hooks (2) ahead of Scanner

●Queuing Hooks (2) after Scanner

●Edger Infeed Model 600 Maximizer

S/N 2951-A

●USNR 4TA30 Edger with 200 HP Arbor

Drive Motor

●Outfeed Belt with Shifting Edging Shears

●Specs – Hardwood 1” to 4” Thick x 4” to 24”

Wide x 6’ to 16’ Long

●Saw Kerf .160” x Saw Plate .120”

●Two Hydraulic Units

●Water Mizer Oil Mist Guide System

●Set of Babbitt Guide Tools

Contact: Jenness Robbins

Cell: (207) 745-2223

Email: jenness57@gmail.com

ALL CLASSIFIED ADS MUST

BE PAID IN ADVANCE

$45.00 PER INCH

BLIND BOX NUMBER FEE: $10.00

DEADLINE: 30 DAYS

PRECEDING PUBLICATION MONTH

Classified advertising will not be accepted for Hardwood products such as lumber,

dimension, turnings, veneer, carvings, new dry kilns or dry kiln equipment, etc.

GREATEST HITS

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82 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 83

CONTACT US TODAY

MAY 2022

FIND US AT THE

BOOTH #316

1-888-END-COAT sales@uccoatings.com

3/21/22 7:40 AM

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ADVERTISERS

INDEX

Abenaki Timber Corporation..................10

Air Systems Mfg. of Lenoir, Inc..................

Ally Global Logistics...................................

Atlanta Hardwood Corporation..............67

Autolog Sawmill Automation......................

Automation & Electronics USA..............15

Baillie Lumber Co.......................................

Beard Hardwoods.......................................

Beasley Forest Products, Inc.................46

BID Group..................................................5

Bingaman & Son Lumber, Inc.................49

BioLube, Inc................................................

Breeze Dried Inc.....................................56

Carbotech International.............................

Cardin Forest Products LLC.......................

Church, Bryant, Hardwoods, Inc............74

Clark Lumber Co.........................................

Cleereman Controls..................................9

Cleereman Industries...............................9

Cole Hardwood, Inc....................................

Collins.....................................................69

Continental Underwriters, Inc...............47

Cooper Machine Co., Inc............................

Corley Manufacturing Co......................IBC

Cramer, W.M., Lumber Co.......................58

Cummings Lumber Co., Inc......................3

Deer Park Lumber, Inc............................45

Devereaux Sawmill, Inc..........................63

Distribution Management Systems, inc.

(DMSi)........................................................7

EXPO Richmond..........................................

Fitzpatrick & Weller Inc..............................

Forestry Systems........................................

Frank Miller Lumber Co., Inc......................

GF Hardwoods, Inc.................................68

Graf Bros. Flooring & Lumber....................

Granite Hardwoods, Inc.............................

Granite Valley Forest Products..............19

GTL Lumber Inc..........................................

Hardwood Forestry Fund............................

Hardwood Manufacturers Assoc ..............

Hartzell Hardwoods, Inc.........................51

Hermitage Hardwood Lumber

Sales, Inc................................................14

HHP, Inc.......................................................

Hurdle Machine Works Inc.....................21

Irving, J.D., Limited....................................

ISK Biocides, Inc....................................66

JoCo Lumber, Inc....................................76

JoeScan..................................................54

Jones, Ron, Hardwood Sales, Inc..............

Josey Lumber Co., Inc............................76

Kendrick Forest Products......................71

Kentucky Forest Industries Assoc.............

Kepley-Frank Hardwood Co., Inc...........72

King City Forwarding USA, Inc...............13

King City/Northway Forwarding Ltd.......13

Kretz Lumber Co., Inc.............................48

Lawrence Lumber Company Inc................

Lewis Controls, Inc...............................IBC

Lewis, Dwight, Lumber Co., Inc.................

Limbo......................................................58

Lucidyne Technologies Inc........................

Lumber Resources Inc...........................12

Lussier, Simon, Ltd.................................50

MacBeath Hardwood Company..............76

Maine Woods Company..........................73

Mars Hill, Inc...............................................

Matson Lumber Company.........................8

Maxwell Hardwood Flooring..................61

McDonough Manufacturing Company....64

Mellott Manufacturing Co., Inc...................

Meridien Hardwoods of PA., Inc.................

Messersmith Manufacturing, Inc...............

Midwest Hardwood Company....................

MO PAC Lumber Company......................70

Mueller Bros. Timber, Inc...........................

Neff Lumber Mills, Inc................................

New River Hardwoods, Inc.....................11

North American Forest Foundation........78

Northern Hardwoods..................................

Northwest Hardwoods, Inc........................

Nyle Dry Kilns.........................................17

Oakcrest Lumber, Inc.................................

OHC | Overseas Hardwoods Company.......

O’Shea Lumber Co......................................

Patrick Lumber Company.......................65

Paw Taw John Services, Inc......................

Pennsylvania Lumbermens Mutual

Insurance Company....................................

Peterson, Keith D., & Co., Inc................78

Pike Lumber Co., Inc..................................

PJ Clark Lumber.....................................53

Prime Lumber Company.............................

Primewood..................................................

Quality Hardwoods Ltd...............................

Railway Tie Association.........................77

Ram Forest Products, Inc.......................62

Real American Hardwood Coalition.......79

Rosenberry, Carl, & Sons, Lumber, Inc..60

Sawmill MD.................................................

SII Dry Kilns................................................

Sirianni Hardwoods, Inc.........................55

Smithco Manufacturing, Inc.......................

Snowbelt Hardwoods, Inc......................59

Southern Forest Products Assoc.............4

Stiles, A.W., Contractors, Inc.....................

Stoltzfus Forest Products, LLC..................

Taylor Machine Works, Inc.....................52

Tigerton Lumber Co....................................

TMX Shipping Co., Inc............................57

Tropical Forest Products............... IFC & 1

TS Manufacturing.................................. BC

Tuscarora Hardwoods, Inc.........................

U-C Coatings, LLC.................................. FC

USNR...........................................................

VisionTally..................................................

Western Hardwood Association.............75

Wheeland Lumber Co., Inc.........................

White, Harold, Lumber, Inc.....................77

Williams, R.J., Inc.......................................

York Legacy Mill Inc...................................

Note: Advertisers with no page number carry an alternating Ad schedule.

84 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 85


86 MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE MAY 2022 n NATIONAL HARDWOOD MAGAZINE 87

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