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Hawai'i Nurse - May 2022

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The Hawaiʻi Nurse

May 2022 | Vol. 2 No. 4

hawaii-ana.nursingnetwork.com

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE HAWAIʻI - AMERICAN NURSES ASSOCIATION (HAWAIʻI-ANA).

Quarterly publications are direct or electronically mailed to approximately 9400 nurses in Hawaiʻi. Receiving this newsletter does NOT mean you are a member of Hawaiʻi-ANA. Check your membership

status on page 7 of this publication. Brought to you by the Hawaiʻi-ANA whose dues paying members make it possible to advocate for nurses and nursing at the state and federal level.

Join Hawaiʻi-ANA

& ANA Today!

Only $15 per month.

Visit hawaii-ana.nursingnetwork.com

to find out more or to join!

BECOME A

MEMBER TODAY!

President’s Message

NURSES MAKE A DIFFERENCE

CELEBRATING NURSES MONTH

Nurses Make A Difference

and Hawaiʻi-ANA is looking

to amplify that message. As

we enter into another year

celebrating Nurses Month,

Hawaiʻi-ANA is looking

forward to showing nurses

the value we see in the work

they do each and every day.

The intention this year is to

provide programming that

Katie Kemp

results in new knowledge,

practice-transformation strategies, and recognition.

Hawaiʻi-ANA is committed to offering professional

development opportunities, advancing the profession

through legislation engagement, and educating

our community of the value of a Registered Nurse.

We want to ensure our membership is valuable,

relevant, and impactful. Nurses are tired of hearing

the hero-rhetoric and instead want to see progressive

action taken to improve their working conditions,

professional value, and patient outcomes.

This year Hawai’i-ANA asked our members to

nominate their nursing colleagues who make a

substantial difference in the nursing practice. As I

collected these nominations it was enlightening to see

the overwhelming amount of nominations, and the

variety of specialties and job roles our nurses take on.

More importantly, these nominations demonstrated

the beauty of the nursing profession and our ability to

recognize each other for the commitment and value

we provide for our community’s wellbeing.

Thank you Hawaiʻi Nurses! You truly Make A

Difference.

See page 10 to read about

our featured nurses!

Links to Other Nursing

Organizations

Hawai’i Board of Nursing

Hawai’i Association of Professional Nurses

Hawaiʻi Nursesʻ Association-OPEIU Local 50

Hawai’i State Center for Nursing

Hawai’i Nurses Association

Philippine Nurses Association of America

American Association of Nurse Leaders Hawaii

current resident or

Non-Profit Org.

U.S. Postage Paid

Princeton, MN

Permit No. 14

Hawaiʻi-ANA is hosting a hybrid nurses month celebration to honor our nurses accomplishments

and dedication. We will feature a guest speaker, networking time, in-person vendors, and poster

presentations. For more information about our Nurses Month Celebration visit our website at

https://hawaii-ana.nursingnetwork.com

Legislation/Health Policy Page . .... 2-4

Student Nurses Page ............ 4-6

Hawaiʻi-ANA Membership ...........7

I joined Hawaiʻi-ANA Because... ......7

ANA-Only Members ...............8

Districts Page ...................9

Board of Directors News ...........9

INDEX

Nurses Month Nurse Features ......10

HI-ANA Nurse Educator Sponsorship

Recipients: New Knowledge Gained . . 11

2021 Hawaiʻi Nursing Workforce

Supply Report from HSCN .....12-13

Oral Health Toolkit

for Hawaiʻi Providers .........14-15


Page 2 • Hawaiʻi Nurse May, June, July 2022

Legislation/Health

Policy Page - 1

Our Advocacy Committee Addresses

Issues of Importance to Nurses in Hawaiʻi

In keeping with our mission and purpose,

members of the Advocacy Committee, Co-chair

Linda Beechinor, Co-chair Taryn Amberson, Andrea

Montgomery-Kylie, Tiffany Hooks, Marion Poirier,

Bob Gahol and Nancy Atmospera-Walch have been

engaging in the State of Hawaiʻi’s 31st Legislative

Session by submitting both individual testimony and

testimony on behalf of HI-ANA for bills of interest to

Hawaiʻi-ANA and nurses.

• See the Events page for information about

upcoming committee meetings to join in the

policy and legislative work we do with coalitions

among Hawaiʻi nurses.

• See the 2022 Legislature State of Hawaiʻi

pages on the Hawaiʻi-ANA website for more

information and testimony on these bills.

• Watch Hawaii Legislature’s Website: Using the

Interactive Features and Finding Bills - YouTube

Hawaiʻi-ANA Advocacy Committee meets

regularly during the legislative session. All are

welcome! Join us in empowering nurses to advocate

for the improvement of the healthcare system in the

communities we live and work.

Join us through the events page on our website at

https://hawaii-ana.nursingnetwork.com/nursing-events

We are actively posting announcements and updates

on our website at https://hawaii-ana.nursingnetwork.com

in the pages titled 2022 LEGISLATURE - State of Hawaiʻi

and PAST Legislation.

Spread the word and participate in the process of

supporting bills by submitting individual testimony!

Respectfully submitted 4/10/22 by Linda Beechinor

and Taryn Amberson, Co-Chairs Hawaiʻi-ANA

Advocacy Committee.

Contact Info: for questions or assistance

call (808) 779-3001, or email executivedirector@

hawaii-ana.org or director@ana.org

Our Mission:

Hawaiʻi-ANA empowers nurses to

advocate for the improvement of the

healthcare system in the communities

where we live and work.

Our purpose is to:

1. advocate for nurses in the

workplace, legislature, and the

community

2. provide opportunities for

mentorship, leadership,

continued education, community

engagement, and promotion of

the nursing profession.

3. build a network of empowered

nurses to inspire change and

improve our healthcare system

and community.

Update to

Congressional Activity,

dated April 10, 2022:

Current RNAction Alerts - Subscribe Now and

Share your Story, or simply click on any of the

below links.

1. Thank your Representative for passing

workplace violence legislation in the House!

Send a quick note now to thank your legislator

for their support – and remind them to

continue standing with nurses in the future!

2. The Senate Must Introduce Workplace

Violence Legislation Now - The Workplace

Violence Prevention for Health Care and

Social Service Workers Act (H.R. 1195) was

passed in the House and now it’s time for

the Senate to follow suit! If passed, this bill

would require OSHA to develop and enforce

specific standards for health care and social

service employers to hold them accountable

for protecting their employees.

3. Tell Congress Your Story: Nurses Need Better,

Safer Work Environments - Please share

with your members of Congress the struggle

you have faced or witnessed regarding

your nursing work environment. What may

have worked well and what hasn’t? Many

nurses have been unable to take time off

during the pandemic or working mandatory

overtime, facing severe staffing shortages

and not being properly valued. Please take a

moment to shed some light on your personal

experience.

4. Address Nursing Shortage - We need Congress

to act to address the ongoing, debilitating

nursing shortage impacting every state in

the country. This letter to Congress calls for

them to: (1) Pass the Future Advancement of

Academic Nursing Act (S.246/H.R. 851) that

in part provides much needed funding for

increasing faculty to improve the education of

nurses; and (2) Work with key stakeholders

to change current payment structures to

finally recognize nurses as a value instead of

‘overhead’.

5. Use of telehealth services must be expanded -

Congress has the ability to make the COVID-19

telehealth flexibilities permanent by passing

the Creating Opportunities Now for Necessary

and Effective Care Technologies (CONNECT)

for Health Act (S.1512/H.R.2903).

6. Honor Nurses Who Served Their Country

(p2a.co) - The U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps served

in World War II and are the only uniformed

corps members from that war who haven’t

been recognized as veterans. The United

States Cadet Nurse Corps Service Recognition

Act (H.R. 2568 / S. 1220) would correct

this and ensure that these nurses’ service

to their country isn’t forgotten. The Senate

Veterans Affairs Committee recently passed

this legislation! Please ask your Senators

to tell Leadership to bring this to the floor

immediately.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Executive Director: Linda Beechinor, DNP, APRN,

FNP-BC

President: Katie Kemp, BAN, RN, GERO-BC

President-Elect: Nancy Atmospera-Walch, DNP,

MPH, MCHES, LNHA, CCHN, CMC, BSN, RN

Vice President: Linda Beechinor, DNP,

APRN, FNP-BC

Secretary: Marion Poirier, M.A., RN

Treasurer: VACANT

Neighbor Island Director: Denise Cohen, PhD,

APRN, FNP-BC

Director-at-large: Bob Gahol, RN, BSN,

MBA, MPA, MMAS, MSS

Director-at-large: Taryn Amberson, MPH,

BSN, RN, CEN, NHDP-BC

Director-at-large: Robin Zachary, DNP, Ed.S, RN

Director-at-large: Tiffany Hooks, DNP,

FNP-C, RNC-OB

NOMINATING COMMITTEE

Nominating Committee Chair: Pokiʻi Balaz, DNP,

EMBA, MSN, BSN, APRN-Rx, FNP-BC, NP-C

Member: Brian Fikes, MS, APRN, ACHPN-BC

Member: Soroya Acosta, BSN, RN-BC

Member: Doreen Nakamura, DNP, MBA, RN,

NEA-BC, CCM

Member: Michael Kaneshiro Chou, RN, PCCN, CMGT-BC

PRODUCTION

Publisher

Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency, Inc.

Editor and Publisher are not responsible nor liable for editorial or

news content.

Hawai’i Nurse is published four times a year, February, May,

August, and November, for the Hawai’i - American Nurses

Association, a constituent member of the American Nurses

Association. Hawai’i Nurse provides a forum for members to

express their opinions. Views expressed are the responsibility of

the authors and are not necessarily those of the members of the

Hawai’i-ANA.

Articles and letters for publication are welcomed by the editorial

committee. Hawai’i-ANA Editorial Committee reserves the right to

accept or reject articles, advertisements, editorials, and letters for

the Hawai’i Nurse. The editorial committee reserves the right to

edit articles, editorials, and letters.

Address editorial comments and inquiries to the following

address:

500 Lunalila Home Road, #27-E

Honolulu, HI 96825

executivedirector@hawaii-ana.org

No parts of this publication may be reproduced without

permission.

Subscription to the print version of the Hawai’i Nurse is included

with membership to the Hawai’i - American Nurses Association/

American Nurses Association. Complimentary electronic

copies are sent to all Hawai’i nurses and posted on the

Hawai’i - American Nurses Association website at hawaii-ana.

nursingnetwork.com. Address such requests to the Hawai’i-ANA

Office at the address above or email executivedirector@hawaiiana.org.

Circulation 9,400.

For advertising rates and information, please contact Arthur L.

Davis Publishing Agency, Inc., PO Box 216, Cedar Falls, Iowa

50613, (800) 626-4081, sales@aldpub.com. Hawai’i-ANA and

the Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency, Inc. reserve the right to

reject any advertisement. Responsibility for errors in advertising

is limited to corrections in the next issue or refund of price of

advertisement.

Acceptance of advertising does not imply endorsement or

approval by the Hawai’i - American Nurses Association of

products advertised, the advertisers, or the claims made.

Rejection of an advertisement does not imply a product offered

for advertising is without merit, or that the manufacturer lacks

integrity, or that this association disapproves of the product or

its use. Hawai’i-ANA and the Arthur L. Davis Publishing Agency,

Inc. shall not be held liable for any consequences resulting from

purchase or use of an advertiser’s product. Articles appearing in

this publication express the opinions of the authors; they do not

necessarily reflect views of the staff, board, or membership of

Hawai’i-ANA or those of the national or local associations.


May, June, July 2022 Hawaiʻi Nurse • Page 3

Legislation/Health Policy Page - 2

Summary of bills followed by Hawaiʻi-ANA in the Hawaii

State Legislature: 31st Legislature 2022

Bill Name

[Bill Number]

Hawai’i State Center for

Nursing Funding

[HB1594/SB2274]

Our Care, Our Choice Act

Amendment

[HB1823/SB2689]

Summary

Seeks to increase nursing license fees by $20 biennium AND for mandatory engagement in the

nursing workforce supply survey. This will ensure policy makers and nursing leaders have the critical

information needed to plan for public health and safety matters.

Advocates to remove unnecessary roadblocks in the existing legislation so all eligible patients can

access the compassionate option of medical aid in dying.

Disposition

(as of 4/4/22)

Ongoing (in House)

Ongoing (in Senate)

Limiting Mandatory Overtime

for Nurses [HB1985/SB2602]

Proposes to limit the practice by which nurses are forced to work overtime hours regardless of the

impact on the nurses’ well-being or patient safety.

Died in Committee

International Nurse

Licensure

[HB1758/SB2460]

Abortion Care [HB2210/

SB2282]

Sick Leave

[HB1504/SB2492]

Nurse Faculty Funding

[HB2221/SB3353]

Teen Vaping Bills

[HB1570 & HB2151/SB3118]

Preceptor Bills

[HB1975/SB3208]

Advocates to allow RNs and LPNs, regardless of their country of origin or place of nursing education,

to seek a temporary permit to practice nursing in Hawaiʻi while meeting the same standards and

requirements such as success with NCLEX examination, verification of equivalency of nursing

education that are in place in HAR 457-7.

Seeks to improve access to all pregnant persons by using gender-neutral language; repealing the

imprisonment consequences for violation; and, clarifying that APRNs are authorized to provide

abortion care.

Requires employers with five or more employees to provide meal and rest breaks to employees under

certain conditions and to provide a minimum amount of paid sick leave to employees to care for

themselves or family members who are ill/require medical care.

Supports 39 nurse faculty positions to allow schools of nursing in the UH system to increase

enrollment from qualified students who already live and work in Hawai’i.

Seeks to identify the responsibilities of the DOH and the DOE towards our youth that are part of

the vaping epidemic. Subsequent amendments resulted in a loss of support for enforcement due

to their onerous nature. [HI-ANA asked this to be re-amended to allow for the original intent of

enforceability and responsibility by our government departments]

Seeks to clarify the definition of preceptor to allow a broader array of specialty providers who engage

in teaching future primary care providers; to clarify the definition of “volunteer-based supervised

clinical training rotation;” and, to amend the Preceptor Credit Assurance Committee to improve

administration and roles.

Ongoing (in Senate)

Ongoing (in House)

Died in Committee

Died in Committee

Ongoing (in Senate)

Died in Committee

Physician’s Assistants

[HB1575]

Liability for COVID

Prescriptions

[SB2199]

Expands the scope of practice for physician assistants. Requires a sampling of medical records, rather

than all medical records, to be reviewed when physician assistants prescribe controlled substances.

Protects physicians, APRNs, and pharmacists from civil and criminal liability for prescribing or

administering early treatment for COVID-19 in good faith to prevent hospitalization and death.

Ongoing (in Senate)

Died in Committee

Lab-Pharmacy

[HB1667/SB2592]

Defines “clinical laboratory director” to include certain physicians, licensed clinical laboratory

scientists, and pharmacists-in-charge of pharmacies. Amends the definition of “practice of

pharmacy” to include the ordering and performing of certain Clinical Laboratory Improvement

Amendments waived tests.

Unknown

Income Tax Credit for Nurses

[HB2437/SBXXXX]

Establishes a $10,000 income tax credit for physicians, osteopathic physicians, and nurses who are

licensed and actively practicing in the State.

Died in Committee

GET Exemptions

[HB1919]

APRN Schools

[SB2187]

RNs for Rural Areas – DOH

Taskforce

[HB1635/SB3180]

Student Loan Repayment

[HB1795/SB2597]

Exempts certain foods, medical services, and feminine hygiene products from the general excise tax.

Includes advanced practice registered nurses with prescriptive authority in the list of health care

professionals authorized to administer medication to public school students. Requires administration

of the medication to be approved by the Department of Health or other on-campus, school-based,

health care provider pursuant to a written agreement with the Department of Education. (SD1)

Establishes the rural health task force within the department of health to make recommendations

on registered nurse recruitment and retention in rural areas of east Maui, Molokai, and Lanai.

Appropriates funds for the Hawaii state loan repayment program administered through the John A.

Burns School of Medicine, subject to a matching funds requirement. Effective 1/1/2050. (SD1)

Died in Committee

Died in House vs Ongoing

(in House)

Ongoing (in Senate)

Died in Committee

Red Hill Water

[HB2274]

President Joe Biden signed a bill into law February 18, 2022 (authored by Senator Brian Schatz) that

included $100 million to empty the Navy’s Red Hill fuel tanks.

Passed at the Federal Level


Page 4 • Hawaiʻi Nurse May, June, July 2022

Legislation/Health Policy Page - 3

ANA Policy and Government Affairs, Nursing Practice and Work Environment,

Center for Ethics and Human Rights, and Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation

Every two months the Constituent and State

Nurses Associations (C/SNAs) of the American Nurses

Association (ANA) have a conference call where we

share the national and state policy and government

affairs information, to keep us all informed of what

is going on around the country, and to share our

experiences, strategies and information on these

current issues of interest to nurses. At Hawaiʻi-ANA, the

members of the Advocacy Committee ensure that we

represent Hawaiʻi nurses at these calls. This is a report

to the nurses of Hawaiʻi, from our February 9, 2022 call.

National Legislative Priorities -

Bills in Congress

Workplace Violence

The Subcommittee on Employment and Workplace

Safety on the Senate HELP Committee held a hearing

titled “Recruiting, Revitalizing and Diversifying: Examining

the Health Care Workforce Shortage.” Link: http://send.

ana.org/link.cfm?r=9c8tnWmv4ntG4csIB2Z7gQ~~&pe=

mV-ih_40080FHHQbCUit9inE0NwHpN8hwsExwtMsrQr3E

vCiA8baFQIwx6JU_aoh&t=s-bzSZy-8_aiEp4SmN3ffg~~

Nursing Shortage

ANA issued a statement to Congress and the

Administration to address the root causes of the nursing

shortage. Link: http://send.ana.org/link.cfm?r=9c8tnWm

v4ntG4csIB2Z7gQ~~&pe=8pNr-IbHnjSbnlwvVzXkQzua

my_4Y5RHcEX0nZTIHGO3lZApn_LItPQWYi_Dk4Li&t=sbzSZy-8_aiEp4SmN3ffg~~

No updates since 12/8/21 meeting on the following:

HNHN and Immunizations, Safe Patient Handling and

Mobility, National Commission to Address Racism in

Nursing, Staffing

ANAʻs National Initiatives & Programs

Recently published Capitol Beat Blog: http://

send.ana.org/link.cfm?r=9c8tnWmv4ntG4csIB2Z7gQ~~&

pe=1WrmikK6o_fmBtj4ceth9TTGmfemnGV8GTraCTmkzP-

ZIUYhKnbM9LBfrisH8B_B&t=s-bzSZy-8_aiEp4SmN3ffg~~

post

This blog outlines the Policy and Government Affairs

Team’s 2022 priorities and places a strong emphasis on

the nursing shortage crisis.

Recent Call to Action: Nurses Don’t Need

Platitudes. Congress must help end the nursing

shortage crisis

Link: http://send.ana.org/link.cfm?r=9c8tnWmv

4ntG4csIB2Z7gQ~~&pe=QZyxklH89ZNqmQB7o8p_

Cin_0yR6O9VDJhK5AePfXM_PhGp67Bfi4jR3Scx1rf38&t=sbzSZy-8_aiEp4SmN3ffg~~

on the nursing shortage

This Call to Action asks Congress to address the

nursing shortage with three practical steps:

1. Pass the FAAN Act

2. Pass the Dr. Lorna Breen Health Care Provider

Protection Act

3. Work with key stakeholders to change current

payment structures to finally recognize nurses as a

value instead of “overhead”

Please share this campaign with friends, colleagues and

family!

U.S. State Legislative Priorities/

Trends Agenda

Compacts

NLC legislation has been filed in California, Illinois,

Rhode Island and Washington.

APRN compact legislation has been filed in Utah (and is

under discussion in the USVI).

Covid/Staffing Agencies/Vaccinations

Multiple states have filed legislation that would prohibit

immunization as a condition of employment.

There was a discussion surrounding price gouging by

staffing agencies and bills either under consideration or

introduced in Maryland, Missouri or Ohio that would cap

health staffing agency overhead costs in the range of

10%-15%.

Nurse Staffing

Hawaii has introduced legislation relating to both

mandatory overtime as well as introducing a bill that

would require all nursing license applicants to respond

to the center for nursing workforce supply survey in

conjunction with license renewal.

Minnesota discussed the current bedside related

staffing legislation which would call for 60% direct

care nurses, have the committee on a quarterly basis

and institute an arbitration/dispute process.

Nursing Education/Workforce

Indiana’s legislature has introduced several bills

involving both nursing education and workforce,

including a bill that would increase the number of

nurses entering the workforce by creating more

flexibility in how they are trained via simulation.

New Hampshire is trying to create a Paramedic-RN

bridge program and seeking examples from states that

have been successful.

South Carolina mentioned loan forgiveness efforts

that may be awarded as part of a broader pool of $20

million in ARA funds set aside for faculty in schools.

Workplace Violence

Legislation currently in eight states (adding Kansas,

New York and Oregon to the pre-meeting list in

addition to a committee being formed to study in

Maryland).

Other

Kansas asked if other C/SNA’s were seeing legislation

regarding the usage of temporary nurse aides.

Kentucky provided an update relating to current

efforts, including continued discussions in the state

regarding potential ARPA funding as well as the

introduction of ARPN full practice authority legislation.

Utah provided an update on efforts related to

surgical smoke, establishing the Utah Healthcare

Workforce Unit and RN apprentice licensure.

Legislation has been filed in both Kansas and

Oklahoma that would expand a pharmacist’s scope of

practice to include non-chronic/minor conditions.

Preceptorship related tax credit legislation has been

introduced in Colorado, Illinois and New Mexico.

Respectfully submitted by Taryn Amberson

04/10/2022

Student Nurses Page - 1

HISNA held their 8th Annual HISNA Conference on

March 5, 2022 at Chaminade University of Honolulu

The theme “Resilience”

was well received by

attendees who welcomed

Keynote Speaker Jill

Hoggard Green, PhD,

RN, President and Chief

Executive Officer of The

Queen’s Health System (QHS). Dr. Green spoke on “How

nurses were and are still being resilient throughout the

pandemic and ever changing legislation.”

Breakout session presenters included:

• Cathy Parkes, BSN, RN, CWCN, PHN spoke about

her roles as a chief educator and wound nurse.

• Kelly Johnson, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, Senior Vice

President and System Chief Nursing Officer of QHS.

• Volunteers from the Hawaiian Islands Chapter for

the Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN).

• Panel of Alumni members of HISNA working in

various RN roles in the community.

Hawaiʻi-ANA participated as a vendor and sponsor

to the event where we welcomed students to inquire

about the professional organization and student

nurse membership to Hawaiʻi-ANA, and promoted

our upcoming mentorship program. Tiffany Hooks,

HI-ANA Director-at-large (left) and Katie Kemp, HI-

ANA President (right) also participated in the fun and

caught a photo with one of the guest speakers, Cathy

Parkes, BSN, RN, CWCN, PHN (center) and developer

of “Level up RN.”


May, June, July 2022 Hawaiʻi Nurse • Page 5

Student Nurses Page - 2

My Review of the 8th Annual HISNA Conference

Matthew Abe

Kapiolani Community College ADN Student

On March 5, 2022, I had the opportunity to attend the

8th Annual HISNA Conference at Chaminade University

of Hawaii. As this was my first HISNA Conference,

I did not know what to expect. Upon arrival, I was

admittedly impressed by the level of professionalism and

organization. HISNA members dressed in business suits

greeted each attendee with a smile, a personalized name

tag, and a raffle ticket. Did someone say raffle ticket? As

I made my way into the auditorium, I thought to myself

that with a prepaid bento and an hourly raffle, this event

was already trending in the right direction!

Once inside the auditorium, we were greeted by more

friendly HISNA representatives that ushered us to the

seats while vendor booths and health care organization

booths lined the surrounding walls. As the attendees

filed in, the auditorium quickly reached maximum

capacity. I recall looking around the auditorium as the

keynote speaker (Dr. Jill Green, CEO of Queens Medical

Center) took the stage and noted that it was standingroom-only!

Dr. Green spoke about the status of healthcare in

Hawaii and more specifically, the role of the nurse in

Hawaii’s healthcare system. She thanked each attendee

for considering a career in nursing while stating the

devotion and commitment of nurses have afforded

Hawaii one of the lowest Covid-19 mortality rates in the

nation. Dr. Green’s speech drew a raucous applause from

the audience. The atmosphere in the auditorium was

electric. I cannot explain what it was like to be sitting in a

room with other nurses and nurses-to-be. It just felt right

to know that each person in the room was as excited as

I was to help and provide care to the Hawaii community.

Shortly after Dr. Green’s introduction, the HISNA

members broke us up into groups where we had the

opportunity to listen to presentations from Dr. Kelly

Johnson, Cathy Parkes RN (of the YouTube channel Level

Up RN), and HISNA RN speakers Rey Sagayaga RN and

Oscar Thomas RN.

Dr. Johnson outlined the history of Queens Hospital

and briefly touched on the direction that Queens Hospital

intends to take. It was especially encouraging to hear

that nurses are anticipated to have an important role in

shaping the future of healthcare in Hawaii. Dr. Johnson

cited examples of nurses participating in interdisciplinary

teams with doctors and healthcare executives to

reevaluate processes to better meet the needs of their

patients. Upon the completion of Dr. Johnson’s speech,

the HISNA conference organizers pulled raffle numbers

and gave away a Littmann stethoscope!

In the next breakout room, Cathy Parkes RN of the

YouTube channel Level Up RN shared her inspiring

personal account of changing careers and earning her

BSN later in life. Ms. Parkes also shared study tips and

advice that she said had helped her along her nursing

school journey. And when her presentation came to an

end, the HISNA raffled a Level Up RN flashcards package

valued at $400!

In the last breakout room, Rey Sagayaga RN and

Oscar Thomas RN shared their heartwarming stories of

volunteering their medical services to underprivileged

residents in 3rd world countries. Both gentlemen

shared that they had resided in Hawaii but wanted the

opportunity to expand their horizons while impacting the

lives of residents abroad. It was humbling to hear that

these gentlemen had spent their hard-earned money

and vacation hours, to fly to underdeveloped countries

and provide basic healthcare needs (such as screenings,

etc) to residents less fortunate.

Prior to attending the 8th Annual HISNA Conference,

I did not know what to expect. I recall my professor

suggesting that our class attend the event and stressing

that we would not regret it. Having attended the 8th

Annual HISNA Conference, I have to say that she was

right. I would strongly recommend that any nursing

student or prospective nursing student attend the next

HISNA conference!

Kapiolani Community College ADN Students with

Dr. Robin Zachary, their instructor, while they

attended the HISNA Conference.


Page 6 • Hawaiʻi Nurse May, June, July 2022

Student Nurses Page - 3

Are you a member of your Hawaii

Student Nurses’ Association?

Join HISNA Today!

All student nurses in Hawai’i can

become Student Subscribers to

American Nurses Association for FREE

Join Hawai’i-ANA as a

Student Subscriber

These Hawaiʻi Nursing

Students did!

Janina Abdelahad

Jethra Chryseis Agbayani

Amanda Lauren Barlan

Melinda Belmodis

Jannet Brown

Jessica Burke

Sheila Mae Cabasag

Joan Cayaban

Christa Clerico

Ka’Imionalani Cobb-Adams

Jessica Cocson

Alexis Cortes

Sequoia Dahlberg

Joda P. Derrickson

Lyka Faye Dumbrigue

John Eharis III

Jessica Ely

John Jacob Ferrer

Jennifer Freeman

Harlee Fujimoto

Samuel Fullmer

Alana Galloway

Brianna Ganal

Daniel Gardner

Jennifer Glade

Ashley Gusman

Aliyana Haag

Yun Han

Menierva Lynn Lagundi

Louis Langi

Evan Manning

Angelique Mara

John Mendonca

Kiana Meyers

Whitney Mitchell

Kathryn Moreno

Adam Murakami

Christian Okawa

Celeste Pasion

Janeen Payne

Patricia Poston

Jennifer Proctor

Jillian Raiger

Fatima Reed

Kacie Shimizu

Stephanie Shirota

Deva Siblerud

Juaquina Soland

Laurie Soon

Shyanne Steele

Raisa Strom-Okimoto

Andy Tran

Hailey Tuesday

Christy Ujimori

Laila Valdez

Bree Watanabe

Matthew Whisenant

Uiyeol Yoon

Lili Younce

Honolulu

Waipahu

Mililani

Kapaa

Mililani

Kapaa

Pearl City

Waipahu

Makawao

Kailua

Lahaina

Aiea

Lihue

Honolulu

Waipahu

Mililani

Honolulu

Honolulu

Honolulu

Lihue

Honolulu

Honolulu

Honolulu

Honolulu

Mililani

Kahului

Honolulu

Honolulu

Honolulu

Kaneohe

Honolulu

Honolulu

Honolulu

Ewa Beach

Kalaheo

Wailuku

Kaneohe

Honolulu

Honolulu

Wahiawa

Honolulu

Honolulu

Honolulu

Waipahu

Aiea

Hilo

Lihue

Ewa Beach

Ewa Beach

Kapaa

Aiea

Honolulu

Honolulu

Waianae

Ewa Beach

Honolulu

Honolulu

Ewa Beach

Honolulu

Hawaiʻi-ANA respects the insights and contributions of students as the nurse leaders of tomorrow.

We’re here to support you in your journey, every step of the way. There’s no need to wait for

licensure to start benefiting from Hawaiʻi-ANA and ANA – as a Student Subscriber, you’re ahead of

the game with access to:

Welcome to the Profession Kit

The Welcome to The Profession Kit is a comprehensive collection of digital resources created

specifically for you by fellow health professionals who have been in your position.

Developed especially for new nursing graduates and early career nurses, this digital kit is an

online resource hub designed to help you find your first job, enhance your employability, and

grow your nursing career.

Exclusive Online Student Community

Join a vibrant online community where thousands of nursing students just like you are navigating

nursing school and facing similar challenges. As a Student Subscriber, you have exclusive access to

the student community which offers a unique experience built on networking, sharing, and trust.

Member-Only Content

As a Student Subscriber, you’ll enjoy access to member-only digital content on nursingworld.

org. Additionally, you’ll have access to the full suite of ANA digital publications such as American

Nurse Today and ANA SmartBrief. As well as full ANA Position and Policy papers on important

nursing issues, such as safe patient handling and the opioid epidemic.

Advocacy Alerts and ANA’s Legislative Blog

When nurses speak, Washington listens! As the premier organization for all RNs, ANA brings

nurses together to advance their careers and the profession through legislation and advocacy.

Get involved to learn the key issues facing nurses right now. Also get access to ANA’s advocacy

blog, anacapitolbeat.org.

Access to Resources

For example, the vital Code of Ethics for Nurses, the ANA Career Center, and The Healthy Nurse, and

Healthy Nation Grand Challenge.

In addition, Hawaiʻi-ANA offers

o this monthly newsletter “The Hawaiʻi Nurse” that goes out to over 9000 nurses in Hawaiʻi, and you

can receive it as a student subscriber!

o to connect nurses and nursing students in Hawaiʻi, to address state and national issues of interest

to our profession

o this Student Nurse Page: dedicated to student issues

o opportunity to publish student papers: we solicit scholarly papers quarterly for publication and

distribution throughout Hawaiʻi

o attendance and participation in Hawaiʻi-ANA Board meetings, annual events during Nurses’ Week,

annual Membership Assembly, and other volunteer community activities that include networking and

continuing education programs throughout Hawaiʻi.


May, June, July 2022 Hawaiʻi Nurse • Page 7

Hawaiʻi-ANA Membership

BE PROUD OF YOUR MEMBERSHIP IN YOUR STATE PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION.

If your name is here, you enjoy the benefits of joint membership with ANA and Hawaiʻi-ANA, with 326 other RNs in Hawaiʻi.

Ma. Lourdes Brexy Abara

Shannon Abarra

Alaina Abbott

Kevin Abee

Theresa Abraham

Margielyn Acierto

Kathleen Acierto

Soraya Acosta

Janine Jessica Aguinaldo

John Aiwohi III

Maria Lourdes Akagi

Carrie Alexander

Taryn Amberson

Susan Anderson

Kamomilani Anduha Wong

Louisse Gayle Aque

Paula Nichaelle Aquino

Nancy Atmospera-Walch

Jason Austria

Katie Azama

Kealohakuualohakuupokii

Balaz

Nicasio Baldonado

Wainani Ballard

Toni Ballard

Alyssa Krizza Mae Balmaceda

Betty Bartleson

Charlotte Baylon-Jones

Anita Becker

Linda Beechinor

Ali Bernhardt

Francia Birulin

Jeny Bissell

Laura Blue

Mary G. Boland

Pola Isabelle Bonete

Jennifer Booker

Gayle Bovee

Michele Brailo

Lydia Brandes

Patricia Brooks

Kathleen Burger

Stephanie Butler

Danette Butterfield

Petronila Cabana

Rachel Cabel

Maureeb Camacho

Melveen Camba

Nancy Capuano

Dawn Carlock

Jessics Caudill

Tiare Caycayon

Darlena Chadwick

Michelle Chapman

Kimberly Chow-Rule

Cassie Ann Claveria

Ruthie Clearwater

Denise Cohen

Mazie-Rose Coloma

Sorayda Comiso

Francisco Conde

Katherine Converse

Rachel Coolidge

Gerilyn Corpuz-Takemoto

Lynn Dagan

Abigail Daigle

Perie Danao

Katherine Davis

Haley Deforest

Patti Dellaport

Liza Dernehl

Alison Diehl

MAE Diloretto

Didar Dodhi

Kris Marie Domingo

Karen Dureg

Mark Ernst

Cortez Fabia

Lynne Faulkner

Jonathan Felarca

Janice Ferguson

Brian Fikes

Kirsten Fisher (Bennett

-maiden name)

Teri Fonoti

Holly Fontenot

Deborah Michiko Fried

Brendon Friedman

Michael Froebel

Linda Fukuhara

Christian Joseph Gaerlan

Pablito Gahol

Jennifer O. Galicinao

Julie Ann Caridad Gamboa

Peter Gampon

Kathleen Garo

Lena Gebelein

Juanita Geronimo-Babas

Alexandra Gesin

Dulce Gonzalez Melgar

Kara Gormont

Kimm Goshi

Valerie Gourley

Jill Green

Amelia Greenidge

Jenny Greenlee

Jaclyn Griffin

Courtney Gunter

Kathleen Hagan

Rhoberta Haley

Karla Hall

Carissa Hamelin

Marie Hammond

Paul Hannigan

Melissa Harauchi

Rose Hata

Fina Havelock

Kimberly Hayashi

Crystal Haynes

Yuka Hazam

Patricia Hensley

Jennifer Herrington

Stephanie Higa

Michelle Higgins

Philip Higgins Weimer

Ruth Honda

Tiffany Hooks

Helen Hudson

Ferna Idica

Kathryn Inamine

Tracy Ingram

Barbara Insisiengmay

Jennifer Iseri

Jaryn Iwamoto

Brenda Jackson

Marianela Jacob

Laura Jambura

Valerie Janikowski

Leeah Javier

Shelly Lynne Jaynes

Heideman

Katherine Jeffrey

Zachary Johnson

Kelly Johnson

Monica Joiner

Kathryn Jones

Merlene Jose

Cheryl Kaaialii

Karen Kalanta

Robin Kalohelani

Reid Kaneko

Lori Kaneshige

Alison Kaneshiro

Teah Karamath

Barbara Karodia

Misako Kawakami

Laila Kemmerly

Katherine Kemp

Leanne Kihara

Julie Kim

Daniel Kim

Natalie Kitamura

Ethel Koga

Christine Kramer

Shannon Kunimura

Wendy Lai

Carol Lee

Emily Levitt-Gopie

Deborah Virginia Lichota

Trevor Lidge

Quanae Lill

Jane Lim

Yushiu Lin

Roberta Losik

Macey Luo-Souza

Marlo Lyman-Kekaualua

Vanessa Lyons

Sidney Macaw

Andrea Manaea

Nancy Manali-Leonardo

Janel Manos

Catherine Marin

Natalie Mark

Julienne Mateo

Deborah Mattheus

Kirsten McCullum

George McElravy

Maria Fe McGehee

Jason McGregor

Leslie Menchetti

Chrissy Miller

Susan Minnich

Veronica Mitchell

Kayoko Miura

Chelsie Miyao

Jaymilette Moken

Christy Monaghan

Andrea Montgomery-Kylie

Molly Moore

Mariam Moran

Maria Moreno Chow

Ray Morikawa

Doreen Nakamura

Christina Nases

Jailu Navarrete

Abbie Neves

Patricia W. Nishimoto

Alexis Noh

Shellie Norman

John Cary Nuez

Liza Oasay

Maureen O’Brien

Jayson O’Donnell

Faith Olivera

Amy Olsen

Mary Frances Oneha

Krystel Anne Ordonez

Melito Orosco

Catherine Overstreet

Kawailehua Paikai

Valerie Parayno

Joan Parker-Dias

Celestia Parsons

Elizabeth Pavlik

Jaimelee Peleiholani

Kiana Perez-Santos

Sarah Perkins, RN BSN

Carol Petith-Zbiciak

Nora Phillips

Witsudar Phothini

Margaret Plyler

Jason Poe

Marion F. Poirier

Joselyn Ponce

Kathrine Pope

Christine Prentice

Jill Price

Linda Price

Sapi Purcell

Nhi Quach

Elvie Marie Quemado

Kristine Qureshi

Rica Lorraine Rabanal

Chamaigne Ralston

Dana Ramos

Christina Ranan

Meryl Kate Rebamonte

Shelley Ann Repercio

Sheri Richards

Nikki Richardson

Karol Richardson

Christy Rios

Katie Risley

Jason Robinson

Konstantina Rose

Roxann Rowe

Veronica Russell

Feliciana Sales

Tina Salvador

Paula Sanders

Karen Sawyer

Anne Scharnhorst

Young Schoen

Anna Schulte

Elizabeth Seymour

Abigail Sharpe

Laine Shikuma

Patrick Shine

Renee Shove

Aileen Siliado

Katherine Silvestri-Elmore

Kimberly Simmons

Larisa Skripchenko

Jill Slade

Sean Slentz

Edna Smith

Amy Snyder

Dolores Soler Bergau

Kristen Stone

Dawn Styner

Kathleen Sullivan

Emily Sutton

Corinne Suzuka

Justin Ager Tabbay

Joan Takamori

Elsa Talavera

Katie Talbot

Justine Tallon-Satink

Len Tanaka

Martina TaylorCampbell

Juval Tomas

Claudine Tomasa

Kathleen Tomasa

America Toralba

Donna Torres

Hulali Trask

Alice Tse

Carmen Tsiopanas

Melanie Tsukamoto

Lani Tsuneishi

Lani Untalan

Carrie Urban

Lisa Ushiroda-Garma

Donna Vanstralen

Sherrane Vargas

Noelia Velez

Blessie Vergara

Christina Villanueva

Reina Faye Villanueva

Cristina Vocalan

Mary Volenec

Erin Von Der Ahe

Elizabeth Elaine Wakayama

Laureen Watanabe

Anna Weigand

Thyra Wilbur

Chelsey Williams

Tara Wilson

Jennifer Wold

Suzette Wright-Maximo

Denise Yamada

Leslie Ann Yanagihara

Kristine Yearwood

Gary Yoshimoto

Naomi Yoshimoto

John Yoza

Robin Zachary

Jennifer Zafrani

I joined Hawaiʻi-ANA

Because...

I joined Hawaii-ANA because

the professional guidelines that

guide nurses actions are a

direct result of the work done

by our State and National

chapters. The Hawaii Board of

Nurses has put into Hawaii state

law the ANA Code of Ethics that

all nurses must abide by. It is

imperative that we have a voice

in crafting those guidelines.


Page 8 • Hawaiʻi Nurse May, June, July 2022

ANA-Only Members

If your name is on this list of 103 RNs in Hawaiʻi, you are a member of ANA-Only, and you are not a member of your state

association at Hawaiʻi-ANA. Want to join Hawaiʻi-ANA jointly with ANA? Just email Linda at executivedirector@hawaii-ana.org

and say you “want to be a joint member of ANA and Hawaiʻi-ANA.” We will help you (bonus: it is less $$!).

Jennifer Abe

Paula Hulme

Sandra Quipotla

Joint membership with ANA and Hawaiʻi-ANA

costs $15 a month or $180 annually

and provides these benefits:

Kris Aceret

Cindy Arce

Kristin Arrindell

Tori Ikehara

Christine Inamine

Kristen Ishikawa

Richard Ramirez

Madonna Reisert

Brian Rose

ANA’s COVID-19 Self-Recovery Package for Nurses

Elizabeth L. Asahara

Dyanarra Alexa Ballesteros

Mary Jang

Avril Jenkins

Mary Rovelstad

Lindsay Sanchez

Free Navigate Nursing webinars with FREE CE

Rosemary Baugh

Allan Johnson

Merita Sao Auelua

Save $100 on ANCC certification (initial or renewal)

ANA Community of members-only online discussion groups

Advocacy to strengthen nursing’s voice

Nancy Bellatti

Manuel Calupe Jr

Natalyn Cayetano

Clementina D. Ceria

Martin Katz

Leanne Kauwe

Josette Kawana

Ethel Koga

Karoline Searing

Raelene Shinchi

Sharon Skouge

Sharlene Skripko

Opportunities to network with over 240,000 ANA members

American Nurse journal

OJIN - The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing & ANA SmartBrief

Kristen Collat

Mae Kimberly Corpuz

Bobbie-Jean Crivello

Trisha Devereaux

Lydia Ligon

Madelyn Locquiao

Alison Lovell

Rachael Lund

Dorota Strugala

Cari Suhr

Elsa Talavera

Kanoe Tani

ANA Mentorship Program

Corey Dillman

Anella Mark

Linda Thorp

Discounts on ANA books, professional development resources, and CE

Professional tools such as CINAHL, PubMed Citations,

and the Global Disease Alert map

Personal Benefits - Professional Liability Insurance (NSO)

Personal Benefits - Term Life and AD&D (Prudential)

Helena Doherty-Gehrke

Glenda Dumayas

Belinda A. Dungca

Eileen Factora

Janet Francisco

Marcelina Gallardo

Catherine Marquette

Stephanie Marshall

Tammy McKee

Cherry Elaine Medina

Mi Mende

Mark Mendoza

Janina Tod

Kim Tomasa

Joyce Trompeta

Jolly Anne Uclaray

Patti Urso

Janet Uyehara

Personal Benefits - Student Loan Solutions (Laurel Road)

Arthur Garza

Semico Miller

Coraleen Valdez

Personal Benefits - Financial Wellness (Prudential)

Personal Benefits - Travel Discounts (BookingCommunity)

Personal Benefits - Long Term Care Insurance (Mutual of Omaha)

Joseph Giovannoni

Caroline Glover

Eden S. Goto

Michelle Grandalen

Haunani Miller

Shirley Morca

Ramona Nakagawa

Priscilla Navares

Kristina Valenzuela

Aimee Villarmia

Susan Von Essen

Jasmine Wagner

ANA Career Center access

RNPerks (RNPerks.org)

Frankie Hale

Linda M. Hamada

Cindy Hanscam

Susan Ohlson

Grace Pakele

Jennie Pasalo-Dominno

Kimberly Webster

Aya Windham

Shelley A. Womack

Madeline Harris

Ralf Ian Pasion

Elena Woo

Eunice Hipolito

Melanie C. Pekala

Monina Yamashita

Katie Hokama

Julie A. Potter-Dunlop

Valerie Yim

Beverly M. Hookano

Linda Price

Leigh Ziegler


May, June, July 2022 Hawaiʻi Nurse • Page 9

Districts Page

District and Membership Engagement Committee News

Membership is truly the heart of the organization. Our

members put in the time, energy, and funding necessary

for our organization to exist. Through the work of

our members, Hawai’i-ANA has become a successful

professional organization.

Membership growth is inarguably one of the top

priorities of an organization, and Hawai’i-ANA is fully

committed to growing its members. We currently have

over 300 members. With over 15,000 registered nurses

in the state, we can potentially increase our membership

two to three times our current numbers. But we have a

lot of work to do to attain this goal, and we need the

help of our members.

The District and Membership Engagement

Committee is working diligently to address recruitment

and retention issues. We meet every other month and

discuss ways to improve our membership numbers.

We plan to develop a policy for Hawai’i-ANA regarding

district formation. We formed separate districts to

help address the specific needs of each district. The

districts are as follows:

• Honolulu – Reps Kelly Johnson and Mike Kaneshiro

SAVE THE DATE

• Windward (Waimanalo, Kailua, Kaneohe, Kahaluu,

Punaluu, Hauula and Kaa’awa) – Rep Bob Gahol

• Leeward (Ewa Beach, Waianae Central Oahu

District includes Waianae Coast and North Shore)

– Rep Marion Poirier, Jailu Navarette, and Tiffany

Hooks

• Kauai County – Aileen Siliado

• Maui County, including Molokai and Lanai – Denise

Cohen

• Big Island (Hawai’i County) – Aulani Hammond

We are looking for interested members to serve as

representatives for each district, particularly in the Big

Island. We plan to split Hawai’i County into two districts,

Hilo and Kona Districts, due to the size of the area.

We recently invited the 100 ANA-only members

residing in Hawaii to become joint members. As joint

members with Hawaiʻi-ANA, they will pay less dues and

become full voting members in our state association.

ANA-Only members with premier membership can

become joint members of ANA and Hawai’i-ANA for

$21.34 monthly or $256.08 annually. If they choose

The Hawai’i- ANA Mentorship Program will launch the second

cohort on June 15th. Applications open on May 10th with

submission deadline of May 31st.

The Mentorship Program is four-months with monthly discussion topics, speakers,

networking opportunities, and continued education credits. This program is perfect

for the student nurse seeking advice on choosing their first job, the early-career nurse

wanting to gain networking connections and additional skills, or the veteran nurse

wanting to give back through sharing their knowledge and experience.

We are seeking Mentees and Mentors to participate in this program.

Applications are open May 10-31. Apply today: https://form.jotform.com/210376377263155

the standard joint membership option, the fee is $15

monthly; or $174 annually.

Additionally, they are eligible for local discounts

and fees for continuing education programs and be

connected to other local professional nurses and

organizations.

Other benefits include:

• State association newsletter

• Representation in the state house on critical issues

• Local networking opportunities

• Education and career development

• Career center and job networking

Several ANA-only members took advantage and are

now joint members. We will continue to extend this

invitation to those who remain ANA-only members.

Our committee is also working on many other

initiatives to improve membership growth. We will

share them with you once they are finalized. If you

are interested in participating in our committee or

our initiatives, don’t hesitate to contact Bob Gahol

at director@hawaii-ana.org or Denise Cohen at

neighborislanddirector@hawaii-ana.org.

Board of Directors News

Hawaiʻi-ANA says good-bye and mahalo for all your

service to Hawaiʻi-ANA and Hawaiʻi nurses

Taryn Amberson and Andrea Montgomery-Kylie

Hawaiʻi-ANA Board of Directors members Andrea

Montgomery-Kylie, Treasurer, and Taryn Amberson,

Director-at-Large, are both moving to Washington state.

These are the 2nd and 3rd Board members we have lost

to Washington state in the past year, including Dr. Mary

Volenec who departed in 2021. This is probably indicative

of the exodus of other Hawaiʻi nurses due to the cost

of living in Hawaiʻi and the opportunities for career

advancement in less expensive venues. If you have

more stories like this of colleagues, please send them to

executivedirector@hawaii-ana.org

On April 9, 2022 the Hawaiʻi-ANA Board of Directors

hosted an “Aloha and Mahalo” luncheon at Elks Club to

honor our departing board members. From left to right

Hawaiʻi-ANA Board members: Katie Kemp, President;

Robin Zachary, Director-at-Large; Linda Beechinor, Vice

President; Andrea Montgomery-Kylie, Treasurer; Taryn

Amberson, Director-at-Large.


Page 10 • Hawaiʻi Nurse May, June, July 2022

CELEBRATING NURSES MONTH NURSE FEATURES

Nominated by Hawaiʻi-ANA Director-at-large,

Taryn Amberson

Jenny Hanish

Pali Momi Medical Center,

Emergency Department

Emergency Nurse for 12 years

I became a nurse because I

liked science. Med school was

too long and my dad told me I’d

be poor forever if I did graphic

design, but also because I liked science and people and

my mom was a nurse. She’s a warm bowl of sunshine,

always sweet and good and always helping and putting

others before herself. I think this made me equate being

a nurse to being a good person when I was younger.

Nominated by Hawaiʻi-ANA Director-at-large,

Bob Gahol

Erlinda T. Ferrer

Kapiolani Medical Center for

Women and Children

Registered Nurse for 40 years

Erlinda became a nurse because

she was asked by her aunt, who

paid for her schooling to take

up nursing to be able to come

to the U.S. Upon graduation from nursing school, she

moved to New York on a working visa and worked at

Mount Sinai Hospital. After two years, she relocated to

Hawaii and has lived here ever since. Through Erlinda’s

assistance, many of her nephews and nieces obtained

their college degrees and became successful in their

chosen professions.

Nominated by Hawaiʻi-ANA Director-at-large,

Taryn Amberson

Joray Witt

Pali Momi Medical Center,

Emergency Department

Registered Nurse for 11 years

When I was a kid my dad fell off

a ladder and sustained an arm

laceration...I was automatically

hooked to the emergent and

fast paced flow of the ER. From that moment, I knew I

always wanted to be an ER RN.

Nominated by Hawaiʻi-ANA Neighbor-Island Director,

Denise Cohen

Katie Talbot

Maui Memorial Medical Center

LPN for 2 years and RN for 7

years

I became a nurse because

it was my innate behavior to

help others. My mother is a

Nurse and my father is a physician. Medical talk was

referred to as “dinner conversation” in my house.

I have worked in the Emergency Department for

my entire career, and my passion for healthcare

and improving healthcare has only intensified with

the effects of this Pandemic. Whether it’s helping

patients or helping other nurses, my passion is fueled

by improving the day of others.

Nominated by Hawaiʻi-ANA Member and Mentorship

Committee Member, Kara Gromont

Holly Ann Kataoka

Hawaii Department of Health,

Public Health Nursing, Central

Oahu

22 years

Before becoming a Public

Health Nurse, my journey

took me through pediatric

clinic nursing and adult acute care. During that

time I briefly worked in the community at the

Stop Flu At School (SFAS) clinics in its early

stage. It was in the community that I found

my place. I enjoyed the interactions with the

different agencies, nurses, families, and children.

It has been almost 14 years since I’ve joined

Public Health Nursing and the rewards have

been greater than I could have imagined. I love

empowering and supporting individuals and

families where they live, work, and go to school.

As a Public Health Nurse, I am part of a team that

supports a culture of health by promoting healthy

people in healthy communities. It is fulfilling

to continue advocating for health equity for all

people in Hawai’i.

Nominated by Hawaiʻi-ANA Member and Mentorship

Committee Member, Kara Gromont

Lindsey Guth

Complex Area Lead: Hana,

Lāhainā, Lānaʻi, Molokaʻi

Complex Area. Clinic Site:

Princess Nāhiʻenaʻena

Elementary School- Lāhainā,

Maui.

Pediatric Nurse for 10 years.

I have always known I’ve wanted to help others

and work with children. There is so much growth

and development that occurs in the pediatric life

span. It is rewarding to be a part of a family’s

first few weeks with their newborn and be able

to nurture and guide them through infancy,

toddlerhood, all the way into young adulthood.

Nursing affords me the opportunity to build

strong relationships with patients and their

families and potentially have lasting impacts on

children’s futures through the health education

and promotion I can provide. Being born and

raised in Hawaiʻi, I always knew I wanted to

give back to my community, especially those

in rural settings where healthcare is so scarce.

I feel fortunate to currently be working with

and supporting our rural communities in Maui

County.

Nominated by Hawaiʻi-ANA Member and Mentorship

Committee Member, Kara Gromont

Kenna Gardes

Complex Area Lead: Kaimukī-

McKinley-Roosevelt Complex

Area. Clinic Site: Kaimukī High

School

Registered Nurse for 4 years

To do something meaningful with

my life and help my community.

Nominated by Hawaiʻi-ANA Member Mel Orosco

Carolyn Hanakahi

The Family Treatment Center at

the Queen’s Medical Center

Registered Nurse for 27 years

I became a nurse because I

wanted to make a difference

in people’s lives. Nursing is a

challenging profession but at

the same time very rewarding when you know you

are part of the healing process. I am proud to be

part of this process and be able to give the children

hope to live. I love connecting with the families,

educating them, and giving them encouragement

to support their children and never give up. It’s

the greatest feeling when the patients are being

discharged home and the parents show their

appreciation.

Nominated by Hawaiʻi-ANA President, Katie Kemp

Mel M. Orosco

The Queen’s Medical Center

Registered Nurse for 12 years

It is the concept of compassion

that has inspired me since I

was young. Taking care of my

ailing mother at 11 years old

until she passed away made

me realize that nursing is innate in me. Since then,

I always felt the strong passion to care for the sick,

and advocate for the most vulnerable population of

the society. I find fulfillment in assisting, in helping

them that they may feel better and somehow may

alleviate suffering and in turn promote their overall

well-being.

Nominated by Hawaiʻi-ANA Member Mel Orosco

Cheryl Lynn Miller

The Family Treatment Center at

Queen’s Medical Center

Registered Nurse for 17 years

My favorite aspect of being a

psychiatric nurse is working with

children and adolescents and

making a difference in a young

life and giving hope where, at times, there is none. I

love putting a smile on a face where there is sadness

and knowing I helped to brighten someone’s day.


May, June, July 2022 Hawaiʻi Nurse • Page 11

HI-ANA Nurse Educator Sponsorship Recipients:

New Knowledge Gained

In fulfillment of our mission, to empower nurses to advocate for the

improvement of the healthcare systems where we live and work, Hawaiʻi-ANA

offered sponsorship to cover the fee of attendance to the Hawai’i State Center

for Nursing Nurse Educator’s Evidence-Based Practice Workshop.

Hawaiʻi-ANA received an overwhelming number of excellent applications

which shows how dedicated our members are to furthering their knowledge

and improving the nursing profession of Hawaiʻi. Congratulations to our two

sponsorship recipients: Juval Thomas, RN, BA, BS, MS, MPH; and Kathleen

Acietro, RN-BC, MSN.

Read about Juval and Kathleen’s experience attending the conference and

why they find their membership with Hawaiʻi-ANA valuable.

Juval Thomas

What did you learn at the conference?

I learned how to identify and conduct the processes

involved in evidenced-based practice from the nation’s

leading experts at the Helene Fuld Health Trust National

Institute for Evidenced-based Practice in Nursing and

Healthcare at the Ohio State University.

What will you change about your nursing practice?

I will strengthen my clinical practice, education, and

mentoring by using scientific evidence to support current best practice or to

make change in how we can better care for our patients.

What will you change about your nursing practice accordingly?

I have started sharing what I learned with several people in my home

department and am hoping we can strengthen the collaborative relationship we

have with other departments such as Risk Management to provide a unified,

supportive stance on EBP. External evidence coupled with internal evidence

collected from departments such as risk management and even nursing quality

improvement can contribute to well informed implementations which lead to

safe, quality care for our patients, staff and community we serve.

Why do you find your membership within Hawaiʻi-ANA valuable?

My membership with Hawai’i-ANA is invaluable, but to be honest I never

realized it till now. If you are like me, a good number of my days are left to

keeping my head above water, putting out fires or just trying to hang in there.

The day ends and the next day is sometimes a repeat. Taking this moment

to reflect made me realize Hawai’i-ANA keeps me connected. In my busy

world where my attention is being pulled left and right, this way and that,

I feel Hawai’i-ANA keeps me on track and on the ball of what is happening in

the nursing world and especially in my home state. The organization’s regular

emails and communication, as well as personalized messages from the leaders/

members are sincerely appreciated and honestly touch my heart. Hawai’i-

ANA allows me to network with other nurses and healthcare providers who

share common aspirations and goals which is also invaluable. Thank you for

everything! Your organization is doing a fantastic job.

Why do you find your membership within Hawaiʻi-ANA valuable?

The Hawaii ANA provides me career advancement and networking: offers

discounts on ANCC certifications and CNEs; allows access to CINAHL; stays

current with nursing practice through journals; and facilitates networking with

nursing colleagues and mentors through local conferences.

Kathleen Acierto

What did you learn at the conference?

I learned so many things during the two day

conference. I learned that making decisions, implementing

changes, opening people’s mindset to the importance

of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) prevents harm,

saves money, deters litigation, is vetted and credible.

It validated that many decisions made are by those who

are the loudest and most vocal rather than decisions

backed by data and EBP. The conference stressed that

any stakeholder, especially those who hold leadership positions, need to “Stop

the madness and lead with EBP!!” This is the best way to make well informed,

rational decisions which will also assist with transparency and standardization

within your organization.

President-elect, Nancy Atmospera-Walch also attended the HCSN

Nurse Educator Workshop and was able to meet up with our two

scholarship recipients!

NursingALD.com can point you

right to that perfect NURSING JOB!

NursingALD.com

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E-mailed Job Leads


in lifelong learning and ongoing professional development ensures that Hawaii's nurses have

Engaging

most up-to-date information to provide safe, quality care to the people of Hawaii.

the

Hawaii nurses are prepared at

of

baccalaureate level or higher.

the

national rate is 59% (Campaign

The

Action, 2021).

for

completed a nurse

years

program.

residency

ADN

BSN

MSN

DNP

47%

before 2009

Graduated

67%

2009+

Graduated

data contained in this infographic are excerpts from the 2021 Hawai'i

The

Workforce Supply survey and report. For additional inforgraphics and

Nursing

visit https://www.hawaiicenterfornursing.org/data-reports/. If you

reports,

this information in an alternate format, please email

require

Page 12 • Hawaiʻi Nurse May, June, July 2022

2021 Hawaiʻi Nursing Workforce Supply Report

from the Hawaiʻi State Center for Nursing

Importance of the Hawaiʻi State Center

for Nursing (HSCN) to all nurses in Hawaiʻi

Dr. Linda Beechinor, APRN

The Hawai`i State Center for Nursing was established by the Hawai`i

State Legislature in 2003 “to address nursing workforce issues” (Act 198).

Mission of HSCN: Through collaborative partnerships, the Center

provides accurate nursing workforce data for planning, disseminates nursing

knowledge to support excellence in practice and leadership development;

promotes a diverse workforce and advocates for sound health policy to serve

the changing health care needs of the people of Hawaii.

HSCN is a strong on-going resource and advocate for the nurses of

Hawaiʻi. Hawaiʻi-ANA intends to continue working with HSCN to perform

the critical work necessary for the advancement of the nursing profession

in Hawaiʻi. In so doing we operationalize our own mission to “empower

nurses to advocate for the improvement of the healthcare system in the

communities where we live and work.”

Learn more about how the Hawaiʻi State Center for Nursing makes a

difference to the nursing profession by reading the 2021 Hawaiʻi Nursing

Workforce Supply Report

Dr. Beechinor is the

current Executive Director

and Vice President of

Hawaiʻi-ANA. On April 8,

2022 Dr. Linda Beechinor

was appointed to the

Hawaiʻi State Center for

Nursing Advisory Board by

Governor Ige. Her term will

expire on June 30, 2026.

2021 LIFELONG LEARNING

HAWAII NURSING WORKFORCE SUPPLY

1 in 3

78% registered nurses hold a national

BSN+ PREPAREDNESS

CERTIFICATION

TOP CERTIFICATIONS

certification.

Visit nursingALD.com today!

BSN + BY COUNTY

83%

19%

15%

12%

12%

Care

Critical

Medical-Surgical

Emergency/Trauma

L&D/Neonatal

Search job listings

in all 50 states, and filter by

location and credentials.

Browse our online database

of articles and content.

Find events

for nursing professionals in your area.

Your always-on resource for

nursing jobs, research, and events.

63% 63% 61%

Honolulu Hawaii Maui Kauai

CONTINUING COMPETENCY

asked nurses to tell us about all continuing

We

activities they completed.

competency

85%

30

completed

education contact

continuing

7%

hours.

120+ hours

spent

nursing students.

precepting

23%

all nurses who

of

within the last 10

graduated

8%

8%

PROGRESSION

ACADEMIC

PROGRAM TYPES

PhD

(1%)

57%

Oncology

20%

41%

9%

28%

EBP EDUCATION

7%

nurses of

enrolled in

are

degreeleading

nursing

programs.

nurses have received formal

of

on evidence-based practice.

education

graduates are more likely to have

Recent

EBP education.

received

VS

Case Management

hscndata@hawaii.edu.


infographic highlights key statistics related to the impact of the COVID-19

This

on Hawaii's nurses and their overall wellbeing.

pandemic

nurses felt valued

of

appreciated at work.

or

felt their

nurses

supervisor/manager

genuine concern

expressed

their well-being.

for

Honolulu

58%

nurses experienced

of

type of workplace

some

nurses experienced verbal or

of

violence from a patient or visitor.

physical

nurses experienced

of

verbal abuse, or

bullying,

forms of incivility at

other

work.

are a vital part of the healthcare team. They work under the direction of registered

LPNs

(RNs) and other healthcare professionals to provide basic healthcare which includes

nurses

Hawaii

17%

of LPNs were educated

59%

the state of Hawaii.

in

Maui

18%

of LPNs are enrolled in a

11%

degree-leading program.

nursing

Certificate - 69%

LPN

- 4%

Diploma

Kauai

7%

Degree - 9%

Associate

Degree - 18%

Baccalaureate

felt so stressed

nurses

at work, they considered

out

the pandemic, nurses experienced

During

range of emotions.

a

data contained in this infographic are excerpts from the 2021 Hawai'i

The

Workforce Supply survey and report. For additional inforgraphics and

Nursing

visit https://www.hawaiicenterfornursing.org/data-reports/. If you

reports,

this information in an alternate format, please email

require

of licensed practical

9%

are male.

nurses

(25 - 40)

Millenial

X (41 - 56)

Generation

of LPNs plan to retire in

10%

next five years.

the

report having Native

15%

ancestry.

Hawaiian

- 35%

Ambulatory

- 32%

Post-Acute

7% 15%

- 17%

Other

Health/Hospice - 11%

Home

data contained in this infographic are excerpts from the 2021 Hawai'i Nursing Workforce

The

survey and report. For additional inforgraphics and reports,

Supply

https://www.hawaiicenterfornursing.org/data-reports/. If you require this information in an

visit

format, please email hscndata@hawaii.edu.

alternate

Nurse

Family

Practitioner

are a critical part of the healthcare team that works to develop and implement a

RNs

plan of care for optimal health. They conduct comprehensive assessments,

patients'

- 4%

Diploma

Degree - 20%

Associate

Degree - 64%

Baccalaureate

Degree - 11%

Graduate

Care

Critical

19%

of RNs were educated in

54%

state of Hawaii.

the

of RNs are enrolled in a

7%

degree-leading program.

nursing

Med-Surg

15%

OB/Mother-Baby

12%

are RNs who have advanced education, training, and certification. They care for

APRNs

by assessing health conditions, diagnosing illnesses, and providing treatments

patients

Practitioner - 76%

Nurse

Nurse Specialist - 6%

Clinical

Nurse Midwife - 5%

Certified

RN Anesthetist - 2%

Certified

in 10 APRNs have prescriptive authority.

9

of nurse practitioners have

92%

Primary

Pediatric,

Care

ED/Trauma

12%

Gerontology,

Adult

Care

Primary

(25 - 40)

Millenial

X (41 - 56)

Generation

11%

11%

7%

6%

(25 - 40)

Millenial

X (41 - 56)

Generation

48%

39%

4%

report having Native

12%

ancestry.

Hawaiian

Critical Care

OB/Mother-Baby

- 42%

Hospital

- 20%

Other

- 17%

Ambulatory

- 13%

Post-Acute

data contained in this infographic are excerpts from the 2021 Hawai'i Nursing Workforce

The

survey and report. For additional inforgraphics and reports,

Supply

https://www.hawaiicenterfornursing.org/data-reports/. If you require this information in an

visit

format, please email hscndata@hawaii.edu.

alternate

of advanced practice

10%

nurses are male.

registered

report having Native

11%

ancestry.

Hawaiian

in 4 APRNs are doctorally

1

Of these, majority

prepared.

Care - 50%

Ambulatory

- 26%

Other

20%

Hospital-

Health/Hospice - 4%

Home

data contained in this infographic are excerpts from the 2021 Hawai'i Nursing Workforce

The

survey and report. For additional inforgraphics and reports,

Supply

https://www.hawaiicenterfornursing.org/data-reports/. If you require this information in an

visit

format, please email hscndata@hawaii.edu.

alternate

May, June, July 2022 Hawaiʻi Nurse • Page 13

Infographics taken for “The Hawaiʻi Nurse” newsletter from: https://www.hawaiicenterfornursing.org/supply/

2021 HAWAII NURSE WELLBEING

IN THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

REGISTERED NURSES (RNs)

2021 HAWAII NURSING WORKFORCE SUPPLY

establish nursing diagnoses, and provide education to patients and caregivers.

*"In the past 12 months" is relative to the data collection period which occurred between April 2021 - June 2021.

53%

COVID-19 PATIENTS

# OF RNs IN HAWAII

LICENSURE

all nurses have taken care of

of

patients.

COVID-19

3 in 4

employed

nurses

hospitals have cared for COVID-

in

19 patients.

STRESS & BURNOUT

70%

In the past 12 months*...

nurses reported

of

stressed at work.

feeling

are 15,072 licensed RNs living and

There

in Hawaii.

working

# OF YEARS LICENSED

< 6 years

19%

AGE

1 in 4

of registered nurses

12%

male. are

25%

37%

DEMOGRAPHICS

38%

Baby Boomer (57 - 75)

6 - 10 years

17%

LEADERSHIP SUPPORT

leaving the nursing profession.

66%

In the past 12 months*...

17%

nurses looked into

of

mental health services

seeking

21+ years

34%

11-15 years

16-20 years

10%

RACE

of RNs plan to retire in

16%

next five years.

the

19%

due to stress at work.

1 in 2

21% 22%

15%

26% 24%

EDUCATION

Multiracial White Asian Other

EMOTIONS

RNs

Population

HIGHEST DEGREE EARNED

WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

37%

In the past 12 months*...

Med-Surg

TOP SPECIALTIES

Adult Gero.

31%

violence.

6%

Admin./Mgt.

23%

WORK SETTINGS

TOP RN CERTIFICATIONS

Home Health - 8%

hscndata@hawaii.edu.

LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSES (LPNs)

2021 HAWAII NURSING WORKFORCE SUPPLY

ADVANCED PRACTICE REGISTERED NURSES (APRNs)

2021 HAWAII NURSING WORKFORCE SUPPLY

which may include the prescription of medication.

patient monitoring, medication administration, bathing, and feeding.

DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGRAPHICS

# OF LPNs IN HAWAII

# OF APRNS IN HAWAII

LICENSURE

LICENSURE

are 1,287 licensed LPNs living and

There

in Hawaii.

working

% BY COUNTY

AGE

24% 29%

are 1,234 licensed APRNs living and

There

in Hawaii.

working

APRN ROLES

AGE

32% 30%

47%

38%

Baby Boomer (57 - 75)

Baby Boomer (57 - 75)

Multi-Certified - 2%

# OF YEARS LICENSED

RACE

55%

PRESCRIPTIVE AUTHORITY

RACE

of APRNs plan to

16%

in the next five years.

retire

39%

39%

26%

< 6 years

22% 22% 16%

24%

24% 22%

46%

24%

26%

6 - 10 years

16%

15%

Multiracial White Asian Other

prescriptive authortiy.

4%

LPNs

Population

# OF YEARS LICENSED

Multiracial White Asian Other

11-15 years

14%

16-20 years

13%

APRNs

Population

30%

< 6 years

21+ years

33%

6 - 10 years

25%

PRACTICE SPECIALTIES

13%

11-15 years

EDUCATION

26%

EDUCATION

16-20 years 12%

Adult Gero.

Family Health

21+ years

20%

13%

Pediatrics

9%

Rehab

have received their DNP.

4%

HIGHEST DEGREE EARNED

TOP NP CERTIFICATIONS

WORK SETTINGS

WORK SETTINGS

Hospital - 4%

12%

59%

12%

Link to full report: 2021 Hawaiʻi Nursing Workforce Supply Report


Page 14 • Hawaiʻi Nurse May, June, July 2022

Oral Health Toolkit for Hawaiʻi Providers

Providing Oral Health Service in Primary Care Practice

An 8-minute video providing instruction on the 5 essential oral health services provided during a well child visit.

Essential Oral Health Services Provided During a Well Child Visit

1. Caries risk assessment

2. Knee-to-knee clinical exam

3. Fluoride varnish application

4. Education/anticipatory guidance

5. Establishing a dental home

Watch the video: https://vimeo.com/uhmanoanursing/oralhealthinpractice

Steps to Applying Fluoride Varnish

Supplemental Companion Video Handout for Providers

Aloha Healthcare Providers,

Oral health is integral to overall health.

Unfortunately, far too many individuals in the State

of Hawaiʻi are not able to access the oral health

care they need and deserve. The consequences

of poor oral health are far- reaching including the

negative oral and overall health effects as well as

the unnecessary costs of emergency room visits for

preventable oral health conditions.

The integration of oral health into primary care

practice is one substantial and economical way to

reduce the poor oral health outcomes and improve

overall health and quality of life for our island

residents. Young children are seen by primary care

providers more often than oral health professionals,

with an average of 12 recommended pediatric

well-child visits conducted in the first 36 months

and yearly between 3 until 21 years of age. Each

primary care visit is an opportunity to assess oral

health status, provide oral health education, connect

families to a dental home and when appropriate,

apply fluoride varnish.

The following oral health toolkit was developed

through a collaboration between the Hawaiʻi State

Department of Health, Family Health Services

Division, and the UH Mānoa Nancy Atmospera-Walch

School of Nursing. Included in this toolkit, you will

find the following items to help you to effectively

integrate oral health into your practice.

Items For Primary Care Providers:

• Steps to Applying Fluoride Varnish (Video and

Handout)

o Visualexamplesofearlychildhoodcaries

o Template:FluorideVarnishProgressNotes

Items For Families:

• Fluoride Varnish Factsheet

For more information and resources on improving

oral health outcomes, please contact me at

mattheus@hawaii.edu.

Mahalo,

Deborah Mattheus, PhD, APRN-Rx, CPNP

Nancy Atmospera-Walch Professor in School Health

and Associate Professor

Hawaiʻi Keiki: Healthy & Ready to Learn, Senior Practice

Director and Dental Sealant Program Director

Materials Needed

• Gloves

• Fluoride varnish and applicator (Figure 1)

• 2x2 gauze squares

Use this template and create a smart phrase in EMR to ease in charting

• Disposable tongue blade or mouth mirror (optional)

Name of Patient: __________________

DOB: _____________

Application Oral Examination Steps

Caries 6. Obtain or enamel the defects materials not present

Plaque

7. Inform

does not

caregiver

present

of

on

the

teeth

procedure and obtain consent Figure 1: Single dose fluoride varnish product

Caries 8. Reassure Risk Assessment caregiver that any discoloration from varnish

No Caries is temporary Risk

Moderate to High Risk for Caries *(See section below)

9. Position child in “knee-to-knee” position (Figure 2)

Consent obtained

10. Prepare the fluoride varnish

Procedure • Be Documentation

sure to mix to assure consistent fluoride levels

Child was positioned for varnish application. Teeth were dried. Varnish was applied. Child tolerated procedure

well with no during complications. application

Procedure 11. Dry the could teeth not before completed fluoride due varnish to child is non-cooperation.

applied with

2x2 gauze

Figure 2: “Knee to knee” position

Post-Procedure Documentation

Fluoride 12. Apply varnish a thin handout layer of provided? varnish to Yes surfaces / No of teeth

Caries (Figure prevention 3) handout provided? Yes / No

Child has dentist? Yes / No If no dentist, dental referral made? Yes / No

• Yellowish tint may appear

____________________________________

13. No eating or drinking for 30 minutes after fluoride ____________

Name, Title, Signature of Varnish Provider Date / Time

varnish procedure

* Risk Factors: Children with at least one of the below risk factors

Post-Varnish Application Instructions

Figure 2: should Knee-to-knee be considered position at moderate

caries risk. The presence of multiple factors places the child at high caries risk.

• Do not brush or floss for at least 4-6 hours after

Social and Medical History Factors

application

• Avoid Born prematurely hot beverages

• Avoid Limited hard access or to crunchy dental care foods

Importance Preventive of a Dental Behaviors Home

Template: Fluoride Varnish Progress Note

Lower socioeconomic status (on Medicaid)

Special Health Care Needs Caries present

Family members with cavities

Brushing < 2 x daily

• Children No fluoride are in water recommended or supplements to go to the dentist

within Dental Findings 6 months of getting their first tooth and no

later

Congenital

than

tooth

their

defect

first birthday.

Plaque on teeth

• HDS Caries Medicaid/CCMC present can help find a QUEST dentist.

Parent Diet Issues should be advised to call 808-792-1070 for

assistance.

Drinks juice or sugary drinks between meals

Eats sugary snacks between meals

Sleeps with both or at breast

Figure 3: Varnish application

March 2022

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Nancy Atmospera-Walch School of Nursing

March 2022

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Nancy Atmospera-Walch School of Nursing


May, June, July 2022 Hawaiʻi Nurse • Page 15

Early Childhood Caries

Normal and Abnormal Findings During Your Oral Examination

Fluoride Varnish

Factsheet For Parents

Normal Baby Teeth

Chalky White Spots Around the Gum Line

Signs of Early Decay

What is fluoride varnish?

• Fluoride varnish is a protective coating that

is applied to teeth to help prevent cavities.

Why is fluoride varnish

recommended?

Brown Spots

Signs of Moderate Decay

Blackened and Missing Teeth

Signs of Severe Caries

Template: Fluoride Varnish Progress Note

Use this template and create a smart phrase in EMR to ease in charting

Template: Fluoride Varnish Progress Note

Name of Patient: __________________

Use this template and create a smart DOB: _____________

phrase in EMR to ease in charting

Name Oral Examination

of Patient: __________________

DOB: _____________

Caries or enamel defects not present

Plaque Oral Examination does not present on teeth

Caries or enamel defects not present

Plaque Caries Risk does Assessment not present on teeth

No Caries Risk

Caries Moderate Risk to Assessment High Risk for Caries *(See section below)

Consent No Caries obtained Risk

Moderate to High Risk for Caries *(See section below)

Consent Procedure obtained Documentation

March 2022

Child was positioned for varnish application. Teeth were dried. Varnish was applied. Child tolerated procedure

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Nancy Atmospera-Walch School of Nursing

Procedure well with no Documentation

complications.

Child Procedure was positioned could not be for completed varnish application. due to child Teeth non-cooperation.

were dried. Varnish was applied. Child tolerated procedure

well with no complications.

Post-Procedure Procedure could Documentation

not be completed due to child non-cooperation.

Fluoride varnish handout provided? Yes / No

Post-Procedure Caries prevention Documentation

handout provided? Yes / No

Child Fluoride has varnish dentist? handout Yes / No provided? Yes If no / dentist, No dental referral made? Yes / No

Caries prevention handout provided? Yes / No

Child ____________________________________

has dentist? Yes / No If no dentist, dental ____________ referral made? Yes / No

Name, Title, Signature of Varnish Provider Date / Time

____________________________________ ____________

Name, Title, * Risk Signature Factors: Children of Varnish with Provider at least one of the Date below / Time risk factors should be considered at moderate

caries risk. The presence of multiple factors places the child at high caries risk.

* Risk Factors: Children with at least one of the below risk factors should be considered at moderate

caries Social and risk. Medical The presence History Factors of multiple factors places the child at high caries risk.

Lower socioeconomic status (on Medicaid)

Born prematurely

Special

Social and

Health

Medical

Care

History

Needs Caries

Factors

present

Limited

Lower socioeconomic

access to dental

status

care

(on Medicaid)

Family

Born prematurely

members with cavities

Special Health Care Needs Caries present

Limited

Preventive

access

Behaviors

to dental care

Family

Brushing

members

< 2 x daily

with cavities

No fluoride in water or supplements

Preventive Behaviors

Dental

Brushing

Findings

< 2 x daily

No

Congenital

fluoride

tooth

in water

defect

or supplements

Plaque on teeth

Dental

Caries present

Findings

Congenital tooth defect

Plaque

Diet Issues

on teeth

Caries

Drinks

present

juice or sugary drinks between meals

Eats sugary snacks between meals

Diet

Sleeps

Issues

with both or at breast

Drinks juice or sugary drinks between meals

Eats sugary snacks between meals

Sleeps with both or at breast March 2022

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Nancy Atmospera-Walch School of Nursing

• Fluoride varnish makes teeth stronger,

stops cavities from getting worse and

helps to prevent new cavities from

forming. Cavities can cause pain that may

lead to trouble eating, speaking, playing

and learning. It can also cause serious

infections.

Is fluoride varnish safe?

• Yes. Fluoride varnish is safe for any age. It can

even be used on babies when their first teeth

come in. If you have questions or concerns

about using fluoride varnish, talk to your

doctor or dentist. Children should see a dentist

starting by age 1.

How is fluoride varnish applied?

• Fluoride varnish is painted on the teeth with

a brush by a trained dentist, dental hygienist,

doctor or nurse. It is quick and easy and

there is no pain or bad taste. The varnish

sticks to the teeth and may make the teeth

look yellowish, but this will go away when the

teeth are brushed the next day.

How long does fluoride varnish last?

• Fluoride varnish keeps protecting teeth

for several months. It works best if it is

reapplied every three to six months.

Can I eat, drink or brush my teeth

after fluoride varnish is applied?

• Do not brush or floss for at least 4-6 hours

after application.

• Avoid hot beverages until the following day.

• Avoid hard or crunchy foods until the

following day.

Is fluoride covered by my insurance?

• Most dental and medical insurance

providers, including Medicaid, cover fluoride

varnish.

• Ask your provider to check your coverage.

March 2022

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Nancy Atmospera-Walch School of Nursing


Page 16 • Hawaiʻi Nurse May, June, July 2022

Rest, Relax, Laugh: Spending Time with Yourself

Dr. Phyllis Lawrence, DNP, RN, NEA-BC

Reprinted with permission from Tennessee Nurse, February 2022 issue

Rest and Relax

How many times have you been told that you need to get plenty of sleep

for good physical health? Sleep is also instrumental in maintaining sound

mental and emotional health. Rest is not only the act of sleeping, but you

can rest your body, mind, and tap into your spirit simply by feeling renewed.

Waking up and feeling that you have run a marathon is a sign of significant

activity during your rest period. Either the mind continues to cycle, or you

may be suffering from a sleep disorder. In either case, you are not at rest.

To rest the mind, you must relax. Relaxation is defined as the state

of being free from tension and anxiety (Google dictionary, 2022). The

Cambridge Dictionary defines relaxation as a pleasant activity that makes

you become calm and less worried. This definition supports the concept of

complementary and alternative interventions and modalities. Relaxation can

really be a state of mind. One of the most effective holistic modalities that

promotes relaxation is meditation. Meditation is reflected in many forms,

including guided imaginary, mindfulness, Zen meditation, Mantra meditation,

Transcendental meditation, and Yoga meditation, just to name a few.

Mindfulness has become popular over the last few years. Being mindful is

the basic human ability to be fully present in the moment, aware of your

surroundings, feelings, and emotions. Try it, sit still in a quiet place. Place

your hands in your lap. Now close your eyes. What do you hear? What do you

smell? Breathe slow and steady while maintaining the rhythm. Continue this

practice for approximately 10-15 minutes. Notice the change in your stress

level or anxiety. This simple exercise can alleviate stress and anxiety, and if

engaged in regularly, lead to an optimistic outlook.

Laugh for a Healthier You

Have you noticed that when you laugh, you feel better? It is harder to cry

while you are laughing. Research has found that laughing triggers the release

of endorphins (nature’s feel-good chemicals). It has also been reported that

laughter decreases stress hormones and increases immune cells. We have a

natural response to infection, which helps produce antibodies, improving our

resistance to disease and promoting our overall well-being. What makes you

laugh? Is it a funny commercial, your loved one(s), maybe your co-workers?

Laughter is the best medicine. In an article by Robinson, Smith, & Segal (July

2021), learn to create opportunities to laugh, watch a funny movie, TV show,

or YouTube video, check out a comedy club, read the funny pages, check out

the humor section in your bookstore, play with a pet, better yet host a game

night with friends.

I would like to share with you some of the things that make me laugh.

Watching my favorite comedy movies, even though I know the punch line,

dancing to my favorite 80’s jam on YouTube, and serving with a grateful

heart. When I see someone smile, I smile! During hard times, laughter has

been a saving grace for many. Whitman (2017) A new study reveals how

laughter affects the brain, which may be an explanation why giggles play an

important role in social bonding.

When you take time for yourself, you validate your worthiness and value.

Make it a point to celebrate your life. Buy that neat sweater, go to the movies

with your spouse, family, or friends. Do something that you enjoy, and that

makes you feel good. How about butter pecan ice cream? Take care of

yourself so that you can take care of others. The first step to self-care is

accepting that you are worthy of that care. The care you require may need

to come from a professional source, and that’s okay. There are services

available through most healthcare facilities and organizations. Sometimes you

just might need to talk. It may be a good time to phone a friend.

Take a moment and plan to rest, relax, and laugh. Try to include at least

one activity to cover each one of the components. Start with resting and

relaxing, then let the laughter begin. Remember, you are worthy, valuable,

and appreciated. Self-worth can only be measured by you. So make every

moment count, and be mindful of your value. I can sum it up in one word,

priceless!!

References

L. Robinson, M. Smith & J. Segal (2021). Laughter is the Best Medicine. https://www.

helpguide.org/articles/mental-health/laughter-is-the-best-medicine.htm

Mindful: healthy mind, healthy life (2022). https://www.mindful.org/meditation/

mindfulness-getting-started/

Whiteman, H. (2017). Laughter releases ‘feel good hormones’ to promote social

bonding. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317756

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