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The Knight Crier

NICE TO SEE YOU AGAIN

BY JULIA NARDONE AND MILAN VARIA

COVER STORY PAGE 2

INDEX June 2022

NEWS 2-5

SPORTS 5-9

FEATURES 10-15

OPINION 16-20

NORTH PENN HIGH SCHOOL - LANSDALE, PA

TRIBUTE TO DR. DIETRICH 20

RETIREES 21-24

SENIOR GOODBYES 25

CLASS OF 2022 26-33


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 2

NEWS

NICE TO SEE YOU AGAIN

BY JULIA NARDONE AND MILAN VARIA

A smile is one of the most important means of expression and for the past two years, they have been

hidden. But now, North Penn is unmasked and smiling.

March 13th, 2020 to March 1st, 2022 are two dates that are just under two years apart, yet represent

two entirly different realities. For seniors at North Penn, masks have been present during all three of

their high school years and while it was necessary to protect each other and ourselves, the removal of

mask mandates in schools makes human interaction more personal and unified.

From a student perspective, the transition from wearing masks to not wearing them within the span

of a couple days was as seamless as turning on a light after being in the dark for two years. It was

going from a time when all that people saw were eyes above a blue cloth to faces where hidden smiles

became visible and outshined all of the negative effects masks brought on. The small outward change

brought a time of personal and social turmoil to an end.

“Nothing is simple. Covid restrictions have benefits for saving lives, but they also affected

everyone’s mental health, changed how we live for the worse, and went too far sometimes. We have

to find balance, and I think we’re closer now to that than before,” North Penn High School Senior Eric

Wang said.

For seniors especially, to have a normal last semester of high school before graduating is a blessing.

We saw the previous two years of seniors have drive-by graduations, outdoor prom, and virtual events.

Unlike the seniors last year and the year before, this year’s seniors have never had a normal high

school year. However, to be the first graduating class since 2019 to see each other’s smiles and feel

each others excitement at graduation all together in one night makes up for the restrictions on some

other events earlier in the year.

NPSD BLACK HISTORY ORATORICAL COMPETITION

RETURNS AFTER ONE YEAR HIATUS

BY JULIA NARDONE, FEBRUARY 2022

TOWAMENCIN- Through public speaking and the celebration of Black History Month, twentythree

North Penn students honored the legacies of renowned black leaders in America in the annual

Black History Month Oratorical Competition. With exceptional talent and performances, two first

place winners were awarded in the oldest age group: junior David Lyons and senior Dominique Bethel.

The North Penn School District held its annual Black History Month Oratorical Competition on

February 24, 2022, in the North Penn High School auditorium where a wide variety of community

members attended to watch students ranging from grades 4-12 perform a published speech or poem

from a black leader from history or today.

“It’s nice for the community to come back together for such a special event and I think that to be able

to end Black History Month with an event like this is a great way to finish,” Assistant Superintendent

Dr. D’Ana Waters said, grateful this event was able to happen in person again.

Welcomed by Penndale assistant principal Dr. Marjorie Diègue and led by Master of Ceremony

Isaiah Dia, the night started out with the singing of the Black National Anthem “Lift Every Voice and

Sing” by James Weldon Johnson, performed by North Penn student Miaira Jefferson.

The judges were introduced for the competition by Diègue, the panel consisting of Tamara Della

Anderson, Nicholaus P. Bernardini, Dr. Jill Clark, J’Mel Johnson, and George Whitehair.

While the results were being decided, a clip from the Colors of Pride assembly earlier this month

was played for the audience. Click here to see the clip of students Miaira Jefferson and Isaiah Dia

singing Stand Up from the movie Harriet.

The time then came for the results to be announced. Assistant Superintendent Dr. D’Ana Waters

and Mr. Nicholas Taylor, along with Superintendent Dr. Curt Dietrich, Board President Tina Stoll, and

Board directors Dr. Wanda Lewis-Cambell and Juliane Ramic, were present to congratulate all of the

students who participated, as well as the winners.

In Group 1, Payton Jackson came in 3rd place after performing I too by Langston Hughes as well

as singing A Change is Gonna Come by Sam Cooke. Katherine Phillips came in 2nd place after

performing Amanda Gorman’s Presidential Inaugural Speech, and Saanvi Waghmare won 1st place

for Group 1 after performing You Survived It by Viola Davis.

In Group 2, Jeffery Jimmy came in 3rd after performing I am the Greatest! by Muhammad Ali,

Makayla Lewis came in 2nd after performing Yara Shahidi’s Black Girls Rock! speech, and Tatyana

Pometun won 1st place for Group 2 after performing Praise Song for the Day by Elizabeth Alexander.

“It feels like we’re actually back to normal and we’re moving on, which is nice. I think that at some

point we have to move on and go back to what life was like before,” Wang said.

On the other side of the classroom, and even, computer screens, however, were North Penn’s

teachers. Empty hallways with classrooms that were just as abandoned slowly became half full. Then,

this year started, but the masks stayed and brought teachers new troubles.

“It was difficult not knowing if people understood what was happening. Are people getting this?

Are they understanding it? Are they laughing at the right times? Are they concerned at the right times?

With the masks, I could tell if your eyes are on me. But could I always tell if students were listening

to what I'm saying you're reacting to it? Not really, it was hard. I couldn’t see if you were laughing or

having a good or bad day,” North Penn English Teacher T.J. Gillespie said.

Gillespie noted that not seeing faces made everyone seem more mysterious and brought

“I learned how tenuous it all is, and and how much we take things for granted, and how appreciative

I am to have students in my room who can connect with what we're doing in class and relating to each

other on an interpersonal level,” Gillespie said.

Eventually, teachers saw the full return and are now being greeted with classes where every desk

has a smile. A combination of small steps led to significant change, and for the first time in two years,

North Penn’s teachers received the opportunity to smile with their students. Learning became personal

again.

Covid-19 has put schools through a lot these past two years, and it was evident that many students

and teachers across the district were struggling. None of it was easy but the perseverance of teachers,

administrators, parents, and students made it possible for North Penn to make the most of what Covid

threw at us and the reward: creating personal bonds between students and teachers in-person and

smiling, making the second semester in 2022 at NPHS one to remember.

In Group 3, Kairee Glass came in 3rd place after performing Drowning Fish by Rudy Francisco,

and both David Lyons and Dominique Bethel came in first place for their outstanding performances,

Lyons performing Dr. Martin Luther King’s NBC interview from 1967 and Bethel performing Fannie

Lou Hamer’s powerful testimony at the DNC in 1964.

“I was really nervous, I’m nervous every time,” Bethel expressed

after the event. She had previously won her age group in both 9th and

10th grade so winning one more time in her senior year means a lot to

her. “I’m glad it’s over but I’m happy I won.”

“Their speeches were powerful, they connected with the audience,

and they made you feel everything they said, and they moved people,”

Waters finished. “Some of them were really activating and they all did

a great job.”

SCAN TO TO WATCH

COVERAGE FROM NPTV!


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 3

NORTH PENN UNMASKED: BOARD APPROVES MASK

OPTIONAL CDC GUIDELINES

BY EMILY DAHMS, FEBRUARY 2022

LANSDALE- After about a year and a half of mask-mandated classrooms, the North Penn School

Board has unanimously voted for masks to be optional in all North Penn schools and transportation

effective March 1, 2022. This decision was based on the new CDC guidelines put out last Friday.

The CDC’s guidelines were changed based on more factors like hospitalizations and new case

numbers decreasing.

“Adjustments the CDC made now are impacting our Health and Safety plan. Namely, the CDC

issued new guidance incorporating the number of hospital beds being used, the number of hospital

admissions, and the total number of new covid cases in a particular area. With that, Montgomery

County now has a designation of Medium, with that, a revised Health and Safety plan,” Superintendent

Dr. Curt Dietrich explained.

With Montgomery county being in the medium level, masks are optional. However, should the

county go back to high the masks will be mandated again per North Penn’s Health and Safety Plan.

Immunocompromised students or staff concerned with medical situations will not go unnoticed.

“If any individuals would like use to consider any medical advice they’re getting they can certainly

have that submitted to us and our team, well take a look at that, if its an IEP or 504 situation, we’ll

see what we can do to accommodate any kind of requests that would stem from that,” Dietrich said.

Dietrich will additionally be meeting with the Montgomery County Office of Public Health

tomorrow to discuss the mandate being lifted and to get another perspective on optional masks.

MARCHING TO STATE GLORY

BY EVA SCHUSTER, OCTOBER 2021

October 23rd proved to be a triumphant night for the North Penn Marching Knights as they earned

the title of Pennsylvania Group IV Open State Champions. Dedication, drive, and diligence carried the

Knights to this unforgettable win Saturday night.

With competition days lasting between 12 and 16 hours, the Marching Knights continually have

a packed schedule. Lastt Saturday, their day began with a 5-hour rehearsal, which was immediately

followed by their traditional State Championships Day celebration. This celebration entails a special

meal that members enjoy in the cafeteria, prior to the competition later that same day. They also

receive gifts and favors from their parents, based on the theme of the show.

“This year our show is called Skybound, and it’s about flight and a young

boy dreaming of becoming a pilot and then growing up and realizing his dream.

So, there’s all kinds of plane themes in the show, there’s toy plane props that

they use, their uniforms look like pilot uniforms, and so on. They get all these

gifts and food and things that are along that theme,” Joe Santanello, director of

the Marching Knights, explained.

After the celebration ends, the competition begins. The Marching Knights

next participated in the Open State Championship, where they scored a 90.6

out of 100 and won awards for both Best Percussion and Best Visual at West

Chester University.

“Third place got hit, alright, that was them. Second place, you know you

always have that pounding thing. I’m on the field, I can’t fidget cause I’m in

position. They call out the other band, and I’m like, ‘aw, we got first place,

that’s really cool; still gotta keep it professional, though.’ We were the last band

of the night, and we got the highest score of the night out of all the bands in all

the divisions,” said Abby Thornton, president of the Marching Knights.

The success of the Marching Knights begins with each individual member.

Remarkable hard work and commitment is present in every Marching Knight,

and the teamwork and drive they demonstrate leads them to victory.

“Even during regular day practices we have the drive to work and to make it

perfect, and you wanna be the best that you can be for this. It’s not really a, ‘oh,

I’ll get it next time.’ It’s one performance. It’s how you are in practice, and the

more consistent you are in practice and the more you work, when you actually

get your one chance to perform, you’ll feel a lot more confident and feel good

about what you’re doing,” Thornton stated.

This year provides special experiences for the newer members of the

Marching Knights, as their season last year was limited due to COVID-19.

“This year is great because this is the new members’ first real band season,

you know, going to football games, going to the competitions; not just

videotaping it on the turf field and then sending it out,” Thornton said.

It is also important that everyone remain respectful of each other’s decisions when regarding

wearing or not wearing masks.

“If you want to wear a mask, fine, if you don’t want to wear a mask, [you] shouldn’t be bullied for

[your] decision on which way [you] want to go,” Board president Tina Stoll said after the Audience

of Citizens concluded.

The Audience of Citizens presented many concerns and opinions to the board. Some concerns come

from parents and students from the district, a recurring concern being how masks impact students in

the classroom and their interactions with other students or staff. Students from the district spoke and

presented concerns, young and old, varying from requests that the board makes masks optional, to

asking that better guidelines be put in place to enforce the wearing of masks in schools.

“I don’t feel safe going to school and I don’t want to risk my health and my safety every single day

just to get an education,” one North Penn sophomore expressed during public comment, wanting to

keep the mask mandate, stating that her concerns were shared by multiple classmates and friends.

The meeting transitioned to the Superintendent Search Proposal. The board members voted to

approve the search proposal to “Approve Hazard, Young, Attea & Associates to assist the District with

conducting a search for the position of Superintendent of Schools in accordance with their proposal,

the terms of which include a consulting fee of $21,500 and related expenses.” The board voted with

five board members in agreement and two against. The five votes in agreement were by Tina Stoll,

Elisha Gee, Jonathan Kassa, Timothy MacBain, Cathy Wesley. The two votes against were by Juliane

Ramic and Al Roesch.

The scheduled work session meeting on March 8th has been canceled however the next meeting

will be an action meeting held on March 17th at North Penn High School at 7 p.m.

With next year being the fiftieth year of the Marching Knights, they are always looking for new

members and ways to expand. An ice cream social meet-and-greet is held toward the end of May

every year for students in both middle and high school. Free ice cream is offered as well as information

about the program for students interested in joining.

“Long term, we want the band to grow. As early as fifthteen or twenty years ago, there would be

more like 130 to 140 members, but here, now, it’s been around 80 to 90 members for a pretty long

time. So, I do want us to try to grow as an organization and get back over 100 members,” Santanello

stated.

The North Penn Marching Knights will next compete in Regional Championships on October 30th.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 4

C.H.I.P.-ING AWAY AT STUDENTS' FUTURES

BY JESSICA WENDOWSKI, JANUARY 2022

‘What do you want to do when you’re older?’ is the question all high schoolers have probably been

asked since middle school. For most people, that question can be overwhelming and stressful but all

they need is an opportunity to push them in the right direction which might lead them to their future

careers.

This year, North Penn High School is offering an internship program called The Community Hosted

Internship program (C.H.I.P.). This program is meant to give juniors and seniors experience in a work

setting, hopefully giving them an idea of what they might want to pursue after high school/college.

Mr. Christopher Frey, a Health/Phys Ed teacher currently on a special assignment, is the coordinator

for this program.

Although this program may help students find their dream job, it also may not, but there are many

important lessons and skills that can be developed from this experience. One thing this program helps

students develop is soft skills. Soft skills are things like problem-solving, working with people you

like, working with people you don’t like, and dressing and talking professionally.

“Not everyone has a direct path to exactly what they’re going to do. As a matter of fact, most people

change their careers three to four times in their life,” Frey emphasized.

This program is for everyone at North Penn and the best part about it is that it happens on a student’s

own time. They can do it in the summer going into their junior year or after their junior year, on half

days, winter break, and spring break.

“It’s all about your schedule and your convenience,” Frey said.

There are many benefits for students who participate in this program. If they don’t know what they

want to do, they can discover other jobs they might like by going out there and trying something. If a

student finds out what they don’t want to do, they just saved time, money, and maybe even a semester

of college.

“We just want you to go out and get a good experience. Every internship is different. Some might

be really hands-on, some might be more observation, some might be in an office and maybe others

are more out in a field experience. The only thing required of you is that you sign up for it,” Frey

explained.

For this program, there are two different internship options. The first option requires seventy hours

of non-paid work, and you receive 0.5 high school credits. The second option requires forty hours

of non-paid work, and you receive 0.3 high school credits. After the student’s hours are completed,

they must write a small paragraph to reflect on their experience, a resume, and three professional

references. Once all that is completed and turned in, they will have a pretend interview with Frey to

practice career readiness.

“These are all things that are important to take forward with you, a resume that will continue to

grow and your experiences grow,” Frey exclaimed. “You’re getting experience and you’re going to

come out of it with some things you are going to need moving forward in college and in your work

career.”

NERO AND TECKLIN CROWNED KING AND QUEEN IN

THE NEW CRAWFORD STADIUM

BY JULIA NARDONE, OCTOBER 2021

New stadium and new memories for the class of 2022, with the only other homecoming game they

attended being ‘The Last time in the Swamp’ in 2019. For the homecoming court, the experience was

even more.

North Penn seniors Bailey Brooks, Molly Caspar, and Eric Wang were the MC’s for the ceremony

and introduced each candidate as they walked down the 50 yard line with some interesting facts about

them.

Linsey Gilbert and Jaiman Kondisetty won third place, Sanaa Beaufort and Eric Lewis won second

place, and winning Homecoming Queen and King for Homecoming 2021, was Caitilin Tecklin and

Giovanni Nero.

Previous King and Queen Keenan Washington and Landry Holt were on the turf to crown the

new King and Queen and expressed much excitement to be back at North Penn for the first normal

homecoming since 2019.

With the combined cheers of the large crowd and the congratulations of their fellow court nominees,

those crowned were even more elated to have such a great opportunity to be on the turf for their last

year of high school at North Penn.

“I can’t even describe it, I feel over the moon,” Tecklin expressed after being crowned in front of

the biggest crowd Crawford stadium had seen since before Covid.

Being the last two nominees to be introduced and join the court during the ceremony might have

made both Tecklin and Nero nervous, but it all played out in the end.

“It was an incredible experience, I feel so honored to be here,” Tecklin said, her smile never leaving

her face.

For Nero, winning Homecoming King was an even bigger surprise, he never expected to even be

on the court in the first place.

“I feel great, I get free piggyback rides, and I beat all you tall people,” he exclaimed, receiving

congratulations from all the other court nominees, as well as the crowd.

“Even though [they] could have voted for somebody else, everybody’s a winner and we all deserved

it,” Tecklin said, hoping to carry out the night with fun and excitement with her fellow court and

friends.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 5

AQUATICS OFF COURSE AFTER PANDEMIC

BY JULIA SHEARER, SEPTEMBER 2021

Since November of 2020, minimal interaction with other students, half covered faces, and strongly

enforced separation has been the war cry for the revived in-person learning of North Penn High

School. It is well known that every class in the district has been impacted by the grueling pandemic,

but for Tory Young, an aquatics instructor, the entire face of swim class has changed.

Adaptation was the mantra for every teacher pushing through the pandemic. For the aquatics

teachers, it was all the more difficult to adjust to the lack of physical interaction, since that key aspect

was what aquatics class revolved around. They lost the most important part of their job.

“It was really hard for us as teachers. For me personally, [interacting with students] is the thing that

I enjoy the most and honestly do the best,” Young reflects, “we want to have that interaction, we want

to build those relationships, and we want to help people to feel better and do better, and just get that

sense of accomplishment, especially when it comes to something as unique as aquatics.”

Though there is a refreshing atmosphere of bringing every student of North Penn High back in

person, Young and the aquatics department are still not fully satisfied with this year’s circumstances.

Contrasting from previous years, partaking in swim class is now optional for sophomores.

“We are sad and disheartened with the decision,” Young said, “I am not only sad for me and my job,

but I know how important activity is, especially in a pandemic.”

The importance of activity, particularly after a year and a half of people being more inactive than

ever, is immense. It benefits not only teenagers’ physical health, but their mental, emotional and social

health as well.

“What we do is really important. It’s lifesaving, and it’s a life skill. We teach a lot of safety

components, leisure activities, and lifelong activities that we are very proud of,” Young explains. “It’s

so much more than just gym class or swim class.”

For the lucky students that opted to participate in aquatics, Young plans to demonstrate just how fun

this class can be, while still providing a covid safe environment.

“We have to carefully make these changes, but we want to show everyone how fun swimming can

be and what lifelong skills these are going to be for everyone,” Young informs.

Tory Young may dream of reviving the required credits of swim class, but for now, the aquatics

department is making the most of their challenging situation, and doing its best to ensure a solid future

for North Penn’s aquatics curriculum.

SPORTS

COMPETITORS ARE NO MATCH FOR OUR VERY OWN

KNIGHT ESHA VELAGA

BY MOLLY AGRISS, NOVEMBER 2021

After an undefeated season, junior Esha Velaga finished out strong and took home the 2021 PIAA

3A Girls’ Singles Tennis State Championship title.

Velaga won North Penn’s first tennis state title since 2018, when her sister won it. She and her sister

are the only tennis girls from North Penn with a state championship.

“I have had the pleasure this year of working with NP junior Esha Velaga. Esha earned the number

one singles position on the Girls Tennis team this season. [Being] Undefeated in all her league

matches earned her entry into the League Singles Tournament this fall. As the number one seed in the

tournament, she successfully took the League Singles Title. Esha’s personal goal of reaching the PA

State tournament had begun,” Coach Renee Didomizio explained.

The outstanding player started her journey at a young age. Velaga has been playing tennis for 11

years. She started playing at age five and has competed in matches ever since she was seven years old.

“I started to get more competitive with tennis at around age 7 or 8 because I started playing in

10-and-under tournaments, and then it picked up from there,” Velaga stated.

For the state tournament, Velaga had to play two matches on Friday and two matches on Saturday.

She played amazing in all of her matches and enjoyed the whole experience at states.

“It was fun to be in an environment where everyone’s team is supporting each other,” Velaga said.

Apart from the school team, Velaga also plays for the High Performance Tennis Academy. In the

states championship, Velaga competed against one of her close friends from her club team, Grace Li.

“A lot of the girls I played against were my friends so it was even more fun. It was definitely a little

more relaxed playing against my friend since we both knew each other,” Velaga exclaimed.

Velaga was thankful for the experience and was more excited to bring more light to the tennis team.

“I felt good winning states, North Penn isn’t really known for their tennis so it felt good,” Velaga

said.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 6

UNIFIED TRACK TEAM RACES WAY TO SUCCESSFUL

SEASON

BY MAUREEN GAMBOGI, APRIL 2022

No matter what you are capable of, anyone that has the determination and courage can cross the

finish line with pride. Starting as one of the first Unified Track teams in the country to compete against

hundreds of districts, the North Penn Unified Track team has been training on the track to work

towards defeating their competition.

Branching off of Special Olympics, this PIAA sport allows student-athletes with and without

disabilities to work together in order to succeed on and off the track. Both the partners and athletes

compete in one track and one field event. The running events include the 100 meter, 200 meter, and

the 400 meter. In addition, 100 and 400 meter relays are also available for competition. Shot put, long

jump, and mini javelin are all part of the program’s field events.

“A common misperception is that just the athletes participate in the events and this is not the case.

It’s fun because all participants get to contribute to the team’s success,” Byrnes, head coach of the

Unified Track team, stated.

Starting in 2016, this program has helped grow other Special Olympic sports to be added to North

Penn. As one of the first Unified Track teams in the country, it has encouraged other districts to take

part in this program. In 2017, Unified Bocce was added and North Penn was given the Champion title

a few years later. With Covid in 2020, the first day of practice was the day the district got shut down so

the season was canceled and the following year, the program hosted a Heptathlon to keep the program

up and running. This year, Unified Track is finally back to normal and the bonds with the partners and

athletes are stronger than ever.

“It’s an awesome environment. If you want to become more involved in school activities, joining

Unified Track is a great way to do that,” Lupinacci, a partner, and Penn Relays qualifier, explained.

Not only are the participants looking to finish their race with a good time, but they are also searching

for having a good time with one another. Being able to take a step out of a teenager’s comfort zone

and create long-lasting friendships with people they don’t normally interact with is all part of the

experience. It doesn’t just establish new connections but gives high schoolers the experience to work

with people that might not have similar experiences as them.

“One of my favorite parts is seeing students start as complete strangers at the beginning of the season

and develop great friendships by the end of the season. Unified Track gives students the opportunity to

get to know kids that may be different from the kids they see in their classes or in other activities. Just

the pure nature of competing together fosters great connections,” Byrnes noted.

To become more familiar with the events and with each other, the team practices twice a week.

Their practice time gives kids who are unfamiliar with the track to learn and enhance their comfort

level with competing.

“I would like to win a few meets. We always work hard at the practices we have and we also

encourage each other to get better. Everybody participating wants to win so it is important to me to do

my part,” Lupinacci confirmed.

It is important to sign up early because there are only 40 students that the program can have on the

roster. Yet, Byrnes is looking to add a junior varsity team in the upcoming seasons with more people

that continue to sign up.

Catch the North Penn Unified Track team come together in upcoming meets and in Penn Relays on

April 27 as this program dashes towards a great season and a bright future.

KNIGHTS SOFTBALL TEAM COULD BE ON OF NP'S

MOST DOMINANT IN HISTORY

BY JESSICA WENDOWSKI, APRIL 2022

They are here to run the table.

Returning back to the field this spring after a six-game shutout win streak that led to becoming state

champions last season, North Penn softball is back and on fire. So far they haven’t lost a game this

season and they aren’t planning on it.

After the best possible outcome of a high school sports season, the defending state champs are

picking up right where they left off. Last season the Knights ended with a record of 26-2 and this year

with a lot of key returners, they have won all nine of their games and have had seven shutouts scoring

a minimum of 5 runs in a game.

“It’s just a great group of girls with a lot of chemistry. I have had teams before that were just as

good, but they didn’t have the chemistry and something always came up in the season that hurt the

team,” Coach Rick Torressani said.

“We had a really strong team last year. I think our connection really helped us propel our play and

obviously, we had talent but just how close we were last year, that’s the main reason we were able to

go as far as we did and play as well as we did,” junior varsity pitcher Julia Shearer explained.

Coming off such a successful season, some would say the girls have a lot of weight on their

shoulders, but for this team, that is in the past, and they have their eye on this year’s prize.

“Everybody says are you going to defend your title and I keep telling the girls and telling everybody

that asks me, we aren’t defending anything because we already won. It’s a new year, a new season, we

just have to go out and do it again and that’s what our goal is,” Torressani emphasized.

“States happened. It’s over with. It’s a fresh season now and we are trying to keep that momentum

going, but we cant stay on the fact that we are the state champions because that gets in our heads and

makes us overconfident,” Shearer stated.

At this point, they are about halfway through their season and have so far been on a streak. Coming

up is some of their harder games and teams who are gunning for their title.

“We know everyone is out to get us this year. We’ve been told multiple times that teams are out to

get us so we have to take that and run with it and really just play our game,” Shearer said. “Starting

off with some easier games earlier on in the season builds our confidence and with that confidence, I

feel like it will enable us when we get to the harder games to really dig deep and show what we can

do because we know it’s there.”

While the amount of dominance they have shown in the beginning of the season is great, both

Shearer and Torressani know it’s only going to continue with the teamwork and hard work.

“We really play as a team. We all like each other, we get along well and I feel like that connection,

us being so close, makes it more lighthearted to play together,” Shearer exclaimed.

On game days the girls wear shirts repping their motto “Run the Table”, meaning they aren’t going

to lose again. As Torressani explained after the last game they lost last year, the team was joking

around and that’s where it came from.

“They wanted to go out and say hey, we can win every game, so let’s run the table,” Torressani

explained.

The Knights are unquestionably a team full of promise and heart. Winning states last year was just

the beginning of the long journey of success to come.

“Go with the game plan, know what we are facing and stay confident and humble through all of

it,” Shearer said.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 7

STATES SWEEP FOR BOYS AND GIRLS WATER POLO

BY JESSICA WENDOWSKI, NOVEMBER 2021

Last year, the boys’ and girls’ water polo teams got thrown in the deep end. Following a delayed start

to the season and practices being held at Whites Road Pool, each team faced a devastating defeat, as

they both fell just one goal short of becoming league champions, the state tournament being canceled

altogether due to Covid. Instead of drowning in their sorrows, each team resurfaced to the top of the

water, both claiming a state championship in 2021.

During the water polo states tournament this year, the girls’ team beat Wilson High School at

Wilson, winning by 3 goals with a final score of 7-4.

Exactly one week later, the boys beat La Salle College

High School at their home pool, winning the title game

7-6.

“No one likes getting second. Definitely going into

this season we had that goal in mind the entire year,”

junior Aidan Faikish said.

Senior goalie Luna Hutchinson went on to say, ¨I

know a lot of us were going into this season like we

want to win states and our coach was like that too. It’s a

really good feeling knowing that we actually achieved

our goal from the beginning of the year.¨

The North Penn Water Polo program has a

history of successful seasons, a lot resulting in state

championships. Before last year, the girls’ team was

on a six consecutive winning streak, totaling 13 state

championship titles, and the boys are not too far behind

with a total of 8 titles. Those numbers once again rise

due to this year’s teams.

¨The girls and the boys, we are a solid team. There

are players that can overtake a game, but compared to

other teams, I think we are really well balanced, and I

think that’s the strength of our program,¨ head coach

of both teams, Jason Grubb stated, ¨It was a good

motivating thing to have a state championship back,

knowing that we got to play all those teams last year.¨

FRANCIS STRIKES UP SUCCESS IN SENIOR YEAR

BY JESSICA WENDOWSKI, FEBRUARY 2022

Lucas Francis never has trouble staying in his lane. This North Penn senior has surely been on a

roll this season… but enough with the puns. When it comes to bowling, you can count on Francis to

follow through with a perfect game.

Francis has been an asset to the bowling team all four of his years at North Penn High School.

Although a lot of his success has been during his seasons with the high school team, his passion

stemmed from a deeper root.

“I’ve been bowling for about 10 years and I first got into it from my grandfather. He was a very

good bowler when he was growing up. Eventually, he taught

me once I was around 8 or 9 years old and just got me into a

league and then tournaments and it just took off from there,”

Francis explained.

High school Coach Don Stadnycki still had his eye on the

young prodigy for a while.

“I knew of him before he was able to bowl for me as a

freshman and actually visited him in action bowling in a

junior league. I was excited to see his early talent. The wait

for him to be eligible to bowl for North Penn was greatly

anticipated,” Stadnycki stated.

When it was time for Francis to make his presence known,

it only took him one season before breaking his first school

record. He broke the school’s highest average record in his

sophomore year, then went on to beat his own record in his

senior year.

After breaking multiple recordst, Francis was able to

accomplish his biggest achievement yet. Francis broke the

All-time State Record for Highest Average.

Every year all the water polo coaches in Pennsylvania get together to make All-State teams to

recognize the players who stand out in the pool. After the final states game, the teams were announced.

Between the boys and the girls, 11 Knights fought for and earned a spot on an All-State team.

Receiving the first award for the boys was junior Nathan Rawa, who received an Honorable

Mention. Junior Andrew Davis got a spot on the Third Team All-State. The Knights who made the

Second Team All-State were senior captain Tim Schwar and junior Aidan Faikish. Senior captain

Bobby Freece and junior goalie Danny Dunigan were named to First Team All-State.

“Definitely ending the season with an award like that just shows all the hard work we all put in, and

just being acknowledged by the whole state for being

one of the best players is just really a great feeling,”

Freece said.

Dunigan later added, “It was good to be recognized

as one of the top players in the state. It just really

boosted the morale of the team after winning states, so

it was just a great night for the North Penn Knights.”

Next up for the girls All-State teams, earning

Honorable Mention was senior captain Ava Zollars.

Making their way onto the Second Team All-State

was senior goalie Luna Hutchinson and junior Brenna

Mancini. Lastly, earning spots on the First Team All-

State team were senior captain Paige Mitchell and

junior Anna Evans.

¨I’ve played in my sophomore, junior, and now my

senior year, and this year was definitely the best feeling

because I played in all the games and actually made an

impact in the games,¨ Mitchell stated.

These two state title wins came at a time when boys

and girls water polo needed it the most. Giving the

Knights a familiar taste of victory already has them

eager for what’s to come next season.

¨It’s huge. We get asked this question all the time:

‘Do you ever get tired of winning?’ No, never,¨ Grubb

emphasized.

“I’ve broken I think every record in North Penn High School and now the state record is one that

I’ll be holding onto for a while. It’s pretty cool to get,” Francis said.

Before Francis broke the record it was 239.1 points averaged. With averaging 4.1 points more, over

42 games averaging at 243.2, Francis was able to beat the record by a good amount of points.

“As for the state record, he always knew what was needed to achieve it and the drive to get there

was relentless. The inter feeling he had once accomplished was seen and the pride was established,”

Stadnycki exclaimed.

“It was a great feeling to break it because I got close sophomore year and I knew with a little more

hard work and dedication, I would be able to get close my junior year or senior year. I was eventually

able to break it this year and it was just a relief and a really good feeling,” Francis went on to say.

Aside from his many records, Francis has also won two

national titles, one at age 13 and one at age 15. He has also

won countless state tournaments. Although his time at North

Penn is coming to and end, as a student-athlete with this

much talent, Francis has many opportunities for him outside

of North Penn’s doors.

“As for his future, he already has connections and

opportunities awaiting him down the road, and with his work

ethic for both education and bowling, I am sure it will lead to

a stellar career,” Stadnycki stated.

Francis has not yet decided where he plans to attend

college, but his two top picks are Purdue University and

Ohio State. Whichever school he ends up picking, he will be

continuing his bowling career there.

It is undeniable that the success Francis has gained over

the years is due to his endless work and passion for the sport,

but Francis has made it clear that he couldn’t have done it

without his people in his corner.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 8

12 KNIGHTS MAKE DREAMS COME TRUE

BY MARISSA LEIBOWITZ, NOVEMBER 2021

A moment that all student-athletes dream of is getting recruited to play their respective sport in

college. Twelve of North Penn High School’s very own athletes made that commitment last Tuesday

morning.

On Tuesday, November 16th, twelve of North Penn’s student-athletes gathered in the auditorium

to sign their National Letters of Intent to play Division l and Division ll sports at the collegiate level.

The athletes that signed represented many North Penn sports including Baseball, Softball, Field

Hockey, Acrobatics and Tumbling, Gymnastics, both Men’s and Women’s Lacrosse, and Water Polo.

The morning started with a welcome address from the first-year athletic director, Mr. Don Walsh.

“You’ve all taken the opportunity to do well with the opportunities that have been afforded to you”,

Walsh said. “ Congratulations to all of our student-athletes.”

Each athlete was then introduced by their coach and given the opportunity to talk about their

decision process and what led them to pick the school they will be playing at for the next 4 years.

“I chose Old Dominion which I am now really excited about. In terms of Old Dominion, I really

liked how the coaches seemed like they were welcoming and really cared about who I really was and

that they wanted me to succeed. It was really welcoming”, Old Dominion University Baseball commit

Dylan Brown said.

Bloomsburg University Women’s Lacrosse commit Danielle Preston also shared her thoughts about

her decision to play at Bloomsburg.

“When I went on my visit I just knew the team was like family and like my family here at North

Penn and I am very excited,” Preston said.

Coaches were also given time to reflect on their experiences coaching their student-athletes during

their time at North Penn. Not only did they read their stats and athletic achievements, but also reflected

on them as a person and as a student. Each coach expressed what great work ethic each athlete had as

well as what strong leadership skills they all possessed.

All of the student-athletes have worked very hard over their athletic and academic career to get to

this point. Congratulations go out to all of the student-athletes that signed Tuesday morning. North

Penn will be cheering them on during all their future academic and athletic endeavors.

Full list of the 12 signing day athletes below:

• Dylan Brown- Old Dominion University for Baseball

• Sophia Collins- Kutztown University for Softball

• Baylen Detweiler- East Stroudsburg University

• Kaitlyn Green- Frostburg State University for Acrobatics and Tumbling

• Aislyn Labadie- Ball State University for Gymnastics

• Paige Mitchell- Lasalle University for Water Polo

• Daniel Myers- Chestnut Hill College for Men’s Lacrosse

• Danielle Preston- Bloomsburg University for Women’s Lacrosse

• Micki Secoda- Mercy College for Softball

• Elizabeth Stark- Mercy College for Softball

• Emily Varilla- Lasalle University for Women’s Lacrosse

• Madison Waldspurger- Saint Francis University for Field Hockey

CIRCULAR JOURNEY FINDS MR. WALSH ATOP NPHS

ATHLETICS

BY PEYTON STAGLIANO, OCTOBER 2021

Towamencin – Every stroke slicing through the water. Each gasp of breath. Cheering muffled by

the rippling water. Every second is one stroke closer to the wall. Mr. Don Walsh (North Penn Class of

1994) wishes he could relive his days in the water all over again, and in a roundabout way, he sort of is.

His days as a student are long gone, and after a journey over the last 22 years that took him from

NPHS rookie teacher in 2000, to NPHS assistant principal, to Lower Merion Athletic Director, to

Special Education teacher at Penndale, followed by stints at Northbridge and Pennfield, and then back

to assistant principal at NPHS… he has finally found is way back into the athletic wing of NPHS as

the new athletic director. Walsh, once a swimmer and water polo player here at North Penn, has found

his way back to the bustling school that once served him as a place where he could get involved and

form bonds that would last a lifetime.

“It feels good to be back in the place where a lot of things started for me with school, sports, and

involvement,” Walsh said when discussing how it feels to be back at North Penn.

Sports have always played a significant role in Walsh’s life when it came to creating an outlet away

from all the chaos. Whenever he felt disconnected from school or covered in a blanket of stress, a

quick jump in the pool and a hardcore practice never failed to alleviate it all. His experience with

water polo and swimming also helped him to develop connections with peers and faculty members

who became people he could always turn to for support. During his time as a student-athlete, he not

only used sports as an escape but also as a learning opportunity.

“Participating in swimming and water polo taught me sportsmanship, camaraderie, discipline, work

ethic, and time management,” Walsh explained. “I believe all of that has actually helped me get to

where I am in life.”

Seeing as how much sports have shaped his life, it is obvious that as athletic director Walsh hopes to

create the same experience for all North Penn student-athletes. Getting involved is a moral of his and

he strongly encourages every kid to get involved, whether it’s in sports or some other extracurricular

activity. He supports the involvement of all kinds.

“I have always encouraged students to get involved. Some kids have connections with school

academically and others don’t. Having those extracurriculars gives students a release valve. For the

students who aren’t connected to school academically I hope that those

extracurriculars give them something to shoot for and hopefully they

can start to make a connection to their academics,” Walsh stated.

With an already stellar athletic program at North Penn, many people

wonder, what could be changed? In terms of what he hopes to bring

to the athletic program, Walsh explained that he wants to reimage the

programs. Along with that, going back to his strong urge for involvement,

he also hopes to push for more participation.

SCAN TO READ THE

FULL STORY ONLINE!


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 9

ENERGY ROLLS IN AROUND UNIFIED BOCCE AT NPHS

BY JULIA SHEARER, FEBRUARY 2022

TOWAMENCIN – Walking into the Navy gym Friday afternoon, one would have gotten a glimpse

of North Penn colors splattered in the bleachers, heard excited chattering over the blaring warm-up

music, and witnessed memories being made. That is what the Unified Bocce experience is all about.

Being so much more than just an after-school activity, the Unified Bocce team proves to make a

difference in the lives of every Knight involved. At North Penn High School, every student, regardless

of their differences, continues to inspire one another on a daily basis. The Unified Bocce team goes

above and beyond that precedent. Students from every grade at the high school have come together to

make the after-school experience unforgettable for the athletes and their partners.

Senior Kayla Pugliese and Juniors Nick Lupinacci and Julia Kile have seen first hand the impact

this activity has had on the students involved.

“Every practice the kids come and love playing bocce after school… everyone has fun with it,”

Lupinacci explained.

“It’s a friendly place, it’s open, anybody can come, and it’s a great experience. I really recommend

coming out,” Pugliese added.

As a one of a kind bocce team, the significance of this event goes much deeper than what is seen on

the surface. Not only is bocce giving students an opportunity to have fun after school, but it is allowing

athletes to open up and really get comfortable with their peers. People are constantly working hard to

give these athletes memories to last a lifetime.

“I’ve seen a lot of students come out of their shells. I’ve become friends with a lot of different

people. They really enjoy working hard every practice and becoming better athletes at this game,”

Kile elaborated.

The goal of this activity is not only to win, but to allow some students the opportunity to do

something they have never done before; be a part of a team. Bocce athletes Mark Heath and Erin Chi

always make the most of their time with their teammates, and everyone involved does a phenomenal

job of making it a welcoming experience for the athletes.

“It’s great to play with my friends…I feel glad that I made friends with my partner, Dylan [Brown],”

Heath said. ”

“Being with everyone is really fun and being part of the family…It’s just great. I feel like we’re

included and it’s a really great team,” Chi added.

For those who have decided to help out, it is nothing short of an impactful experience. Students are

making the most of spending time with their partners, all while volunteering for the greater good and

gaining the big idea behind it all.

“I got involved because I wanted to meet new people and I wanted to interact with people I don’t

see everyday. I wanted to be exposed to new experiences and new people,” Kile explained.

“At first I was a bit hesitant about joining because I didn’t know how to handle everybody or how to

play bocce, but now I’m here and I love it so much. I’ve made so many new friends and actually know

how to play bocce now,” Pugliese described. “It’s just been an awesome experience and I couldn’t ask

for anything better.”

Mrs. Susan Ahart is the coach for this charismatic team. She recognizes the goal of bringing kids

with disabilities and kids without together, to

ultimately engage in a mutual activity as one.

“I want to give all the students involved

opportunities to make new friendships,

and to give students with disabilities a safe,

structured way to interact with other kids,”

Ahart explained.

“Every ounce of this is very much “North

Penn,” where we come together as a group in

any obstacle we face. In bocce we’re coming

together as a team regardless of disability

status… It’s a fun activity for all of us to be

involved,” Ahart described.

In the long run, being a part of this bocce

team will lead to lasting friendships, and

loads of memories for both parties to take

with them through life.

“You make so many personal connections

here, and just seeing [the athletes] do as well

as they do, just brings a smile to my face,”

Pugliese concluded.

SWEET XC SEASON COMES TO A CLOSE IN HERSHEY

BY EMILY DAHMS, NOVEMBER 2021

For junior Colin Fisher and sophomore Ava Warner, their cross country ended sweetly while they

attended states in Hershey. Warner’s running at states concluded her first season as a cross country

athlete, and for Fisher, his junior year ended with his first trip to states as well.

Warner, Fisher, and freshman Achilles Schui were the three North Penn Cross Country runners to

qualify for states this fall. For Warner and Fisher, to be just two of 3,000 students at NPHS to earn this

distinction is not only a prestigious honor but also a difficult one. Qualifying for states takes a lot of

work and focus. Warner and Fisher both prepared for this moment all season

“The goal was to make it as a team. Obviously, that didn’t go exactly how we wanted it, but a

success compared to the season prior because this is the first time we have had people go in 3 years.

So definitely a success, and we are hoping to get the whole team there next year,” Fisher claimed.

“Since this is my first year doing cross country, I didn’t even expect to make states or expect it to go

how it did. I just tried my best and tried to work hard,” Warner stated.

Although both put in tremendous amounts of work, making it to states wasn’t a guarantee.

“I kinda had it in the back of my mind, but it was never really a given. So it was definitely something

I had to work for, but it was always something I was thinking about,” Fisher stated

“I did not expect it. I thought at districts I would have to run a time much faster than my usual time,

but I was lucky because they let a lot more people go to states,” Warner explained.

Qualifying for states in cross country is a lot different from other sports.

“It’s all about what you run in districts, and you need a solid five people. And that basically means

having that within a certain time range. If you have all your five in the top 50 at districts you have a

very good shot at going to states,” Fisher explained.

Both Fisher and Warner remember when they found out they had made it to states.

“Well for me I just finished, and Jaime Diedel was saying how there’s a chance I could have made it

to states. She was the one who told me, ‘Ava you made it,’ when it came out… I was the last individual

to qualify, which was pretty amazing, but it just happened that way,” Warner shared.

“Similar to what Ava said. They have to finalize the results and everything… I remember Jaime

telling us, myself and my teammate Achilles, that we were in. That was a great moment,” Fisher said.

The state meet was on November 6th in Hershey PA at the Park view course.

“We left Friday morning from school and we stayed overnight at in Hershey,” Fisher explained.

Both runners competed in a 5k for the meet.

“The race was a 5k and I placed 144th out of 239. The time was 17:55,” Fisher stated.

“I was 106th out of 240, and my time was 20:54,” Warner said.

A race like this can be very nerve-racking for young athletes.

“I was just so nervous. At the starting line, there are different blocks of people. In my block was

the girl that finished first and she was expected to be first out of the whole state,” Warner explained.

However, this can change just by your perspective of the race itself.

“There wasn’t really too much going on because this was the first race that nothing was really riding

on it. There was no consequence to running terribly, obviously, that wasn’t the goal, but there wasn’t a

lot of pressure to do great. Our coach just told us to compete and have fun,” Fisher stated.

This experience is one that won’t be taken for granted for these athletes.

“I plan on doing cross country next year. My goal is not be as nervous and not be as hard on myself.

So I don’t have to put pressure on myself as much as I did this year,” Warner said.

“I do plan on running cross country next year and honestly similar to what we did this year but

hopefully to get everyone to states,” Fisher concluded.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 10

FEATURES

BRETTS WITH MUCH TO BE THANKFUL FOR, AS THE

BEAT GOES ON

BY ALLYSON LEDDY, NOVEMBER 2021

For North Penn High School guidance counselor Mr. Patrick Brett, failure was never a drawback.

Until, it started happening within.

Nearly a year after some of the biggest challenges of his life, and after a heart and liver transplant

this summer, Brett is getting back to a normal, healthy life.

From December of 2020 until July of 2021, The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania was

Mr. Brett’s home. He was admitted after almost two full years of heart and liver failure, and weeks of

procedures. During the first few months he was separated from his family, his students, and everyday

life as he awaited his transplant. Mr. Brett was born with Tetralogy of Fallot. Tetralogy of Fallot is a

heart condition made up of four heart defects from birth. Common effects from Tetralogy of Fallot are

lack of oxygen, trouble gaining weight, heart murmurs, fainting, and blue-tinted skin. It can also be

passed down through generations.

“I was born with Tetralogy of Fallot. For me, it was a disease that impacted me to a certain extent. It

wasn’t the most affected thing in my everyday life. I was able to live a pretty normal life compared to

the other kids born with Tetralogy of Fallot that were impacted more than I was. I played sports, I went

to school everyday, and I was involved in many activities growing up,’’ Mr. Brett stated.

Although Mr. Brett had to stop playing competitive sports, his love and dedication carried on.

“I got into managing the teams in high school as a student manager. Eventually, I started coaching

at 18 years old. That would lead me to continue coaching halfway through my career at North Penn

with Coach Manero, as well as the basketball team,’’ Mr. Brett shared.

Even though Mr. Brett could not physically be with his friends, and coworkers, he still felt their

love and support.

“During that time I was able to work with North Penn; they allowed me to work from the hospital.

It wasn’t really different from working at home, it was just a matter of scheduling around my doctors

appointments. The district offices have been very accommodating for me. As well as my colleagues,

they have been giving out an immense amount of support, whether it was phone calls, text messages,

offering to do things for the kids, Mrs. Brett, or myself. Mrs. Brett

started a facebook page to give updates to everyone who wanted to

know more. The amount of people responding there, or just checking in

has been very overwhelming in a good way,’’ Mr. Brett shared.

Mr. Brett’s wife, Mrs. Lauren Brett, is a math teacher at North

Penn. When hearing the news that her husband would be receiving the

transplant, Mrs. Brett felt a sense of relief.

SCAN TO READ THE

FULL STORY ONLINE!

“For our family to be saved, a family lost a loved one. For families

like ours, please become an organ donor or give back to the community,”

Mrs. Brett lastly stated.

ALUMNI EMILY MILLIRON SCORES IN SPORTS MEDIA

BY EMILY COURTNEY, JANUARY 2022

Emily Milliron has turned her passions of sports and journalism into a full time career. Not only

does she get to be surrounded by it, getting an inside scoop on details, she works on it 24/7.

An alumni of the North Penn School High School, she originally wanted to become a sports

reporter. She figured, ‘how could she get paid to talk about sports?’. While in high school she pursued

an interest in the Knight Crier, NPTV, commentating play-by-play on sports games, even going into

career study with NPTV.

After graduating from North Penn in 2013, Milliron pursued journalism at Temple University.

There she could network and connect with people that had the same interests as her. While at Temple,

she became an anchor and reporter for the student-run newscast, OwlSports Update, keeping the

students and staff up to date on how the Owl’s finest athletes were doing.

“We covered all of Temple sports including football, which was doing very very well when I was

there. Matt Rhule, who is now head coach for the Carolina Panthers was the head coach for the team.

There I thought, this is so great, this is what I want to do for a career, ” Milliron explained.

Knowing she wanted to continue a career in journalism Milliron got a job in Maine as a reporter,

covering local news for NBC. Covering mostly hard news, she reported tough subjects such as murder,

covering everything that came her way.

“While I was there I shot all my own video and edited all of it. I was a reporter so I was on camera, I

set up all the interviews, and it was the most work I had ever done in my entire life, in a very rewarding

way,” Milliron said.

In an attempt to make her job more exciting and suited to her strengths, she started covering the

Patriots, the New England pro football team. From there a friend from Temple brought up the starting

of CBS HQ, a 24/7 media coverage of all sports. Being in frozen January Maine, she was eager to

move to the sunshine state, Florida where the company was being built.

Now, she could do all the things she loved in a new and exciting way, as well as in a beautiful

environment. This allowed her to be in her element, being in the heat of professional games, catering

highlight reels within the moment, catching athlete’s most spectacular moments.

The live aspect of it all she felt the most when COVID-19 hit. She recalls seeing first hand how live

sports and media took a complete turn, as it thoroughly shut down for the first time.

“All of a sudden I hear through my headset from one of my producers from the floor above me

say ‘Hey, Rudy Gobert has COVID.’ and I thought ‘what?’. It got weird because from there every

single sports league shut down, and we’re a 24/7 news network covering sports and all of a sudden all

we were doing was covering COVID,

there were no games,” Milliron said.

Although the world of professional

sports changes with COVID-19,

Milliron does not lose hope for a

bright future. Even though regular

testing and masks will not go away

soon, she is determined that the

absolute shutdown will not happen

again.

While she continues her journey

through sports media, she hopes

to see more women like her in the

field of sports. She elaborates how

she believes more women should

feel comfortable in their domain,

illuminating the ostracizing situation

of being the only women in the room

and feeling the effects of it.

“I am a big proponent of women in

sports and women in male dominated

fields especially, and I would love

to figure out a way to move that

conversation forward and make it a

career,” Milliron described.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 11

THE PRES TAKES A SEAT ON THE STOOL

BY MOLLY AGRISS, NOVEMBER 2021

All great ideas come from somewhere, for one North Penn Senior, it was a McDonald’s parking lot.

If you have ever been scrolling through Instagram you may have come across the account @

barstoolsports. As of this school year, North Penn now has their very own Pres. In August, Pat Breen

created the North Penn Barstool account (@northpennbarstool). He doesn’t have the 12 million

followers yet… but numbers are climbing!

One day, Breen was sitting in a Mcdonald’s parking lot with his friends when he came up with the

idea for the NP Barstool Instagram account.

“Me and my friends went to McDonald’s and we were just sitting in the parking lot when we came

up with the idea. We spam followed a bunch of people and after like three days we had three hundred

followers and it just kept growing and growing,” explained Breen.

With no expectations of the account blowing up, the page now has over 1,000 followers and

continues to grow every day. As the fall sports season comes to a close and almost all the teams

covered by @northpennbarstool, this page is where many loyal followers at North Penn now go for

their weekly sports updates.

“Once we started posting sports people started to really like that, people started reposting and liking

our posts,” Pres stated.

One of the purposes of the NP barstool account is to give recognition to sports players. To do this,

Breen selects a player of the game who he thinks stood out the most and played with heart. After each

game, the POTG takes a seat on the blue wooden stool known as “The Stool.” They then shake the

Pres’s hand for a picture that will be featured on the account.

“As an athlete myself, it is special to get recognition for playing a sport; it’s exciting,” Breen said.

With North Penn Barstool being so popular throughout the High School it was only a matter of time

before the idea spread throughout the district. Taking inspiration from Pres, Penndale Middle School

and Gwyn Nor Elementary School debuted their very own barstool accounts not too long after Breen’s

account blew up.

Although Breen loves to see it throughout the North Penn School District he has had some copycats

in neighboring districts.

“As you have probably seen Wissahickon Barstool made an account and there’s definitely some

beef going on with them because they’ve copied everything we do, I’m just waiting for a game where

we play Wiss so everyone can go, and it is just crazy,” Breen noted.

Pres is at almost all the sports games. He tries his best to be at every game and support all athletics.

Not only does Breen give recognition to sports teams but he also shows spirit for our Marching

Knights and shouts out their accomplishments as well.

“I try to make time for it, I feel like it is important to support other sports teams. We try to be very

inclusive and get to all sports,” Breen shared.

But this account isn’t a one-man show, with Breen’s busy schedule it is impossible for him to be at

every game. The account is co-run by Luke Patterson and Jack Gorham.

Breen is doing an exceptional job bringing the students together and getting them excited about

sports. While the concept of the Instagram account may have been born from a major account that

already exists, the school spirit and unity through the district that Breen has engendered is clear.

Make sure you go give “da Pres” a follow @northpennbarstool on Instagram.

A-POD TO AQUATICS, B-POD TO BIO AND MILES TO

GO BEFORE WE SLEEP

BY PEYTON STAGLIANO, JANUARY 2022

What if I told you that during this school year, you have already walked the distance from NPHS

to Virginia Beach? Well even if you don’t believe me, it is in fact true. And by the time you finish the

school year, you will have walked so far that Virginia Beach will be a destination in the distant past.

Everyone’s steps throughout the day are going to be different and will vary every day, depending

on how far each of your classes are and what classes you have. If you are running from Aquatics to A

pod one day, but the next you are only leisurely walking from B pod to A pod, your total step counts

are going to be different.

Most students aren’t aware of how far they are walking. I remember the day when I realized that my

phone was tracking my steps around the school. I was stunned when I learned that some days I was

walking as much as 5 miles a day! Granted, many of those steps came from the mile I walked in gym

for walking unit. But after tracking my steps and miles this week, I still walk about 3 miles per day!

On Monday when I hopped on the bus at the end of the school day and checked my step tracker, I

had only walked a total of 2.2 miles and 5,012 steps, which is particularly low for me. I realized my

steps were so low because I had a double lab, which means I stayed in my seat instead of making the

trek from my science class to the gymnasium and back.

For the rest of the week, I tracked all my steps; here were my step counts for the rest of the week.

Tuesday: 3.2 miles on 7,556 steps; Wednesday: 2.7 miles on 6,323 steps; Thursday:3.5 miles on

8,143 steps; Friday: 2.8 miles on 6,410 steps.

This means that the total amount of miles I walked in school this week was 14.4 miles on 33,444

steps, averaging almost 2.9 miles per day.

After talking to a few students, I learned that many students average anywhere between 3-5 miles

per day of walking when in school. Sophomore Kira Logiovine revealed that she walks a total of

7,000 to 8,000 steps per day. Logiovine unfortunately is on crutches, but after a full day of school, she

reported still having walked a total of 3 miles– even while taking the elevator.

I decided to incorporate some statistics to really put our total amount of miles and steps into

perspective. Let’s say we walk a total of 3 miles per day, 15 miles per week, and 33,500 steps each

week for all 180 days of the school year. That would mean we walk 540 miles or 1,206,000 steps by

the end of the school year. That means that by the end of the school year, we could walk all the way

from North Penn High School and almost reach Quebec, Canada. You could also reach other places,

for example, if you went South you would reach Charlotte, North Carolina. If you went West you

would almost reach Cincinnati Ohio, and if you went straight North you would almost reach Bar

Harbor, Maine.

Sophomore Sam Ridler said she likes to walk a little further in between bells instead of walking

straight to class. She explained that during the four minutes between the bells, although short, is a great

way to get up and get moving. She likes to take as much advantage of this time as she can. During

lunch, she also makes a point to get up and move as well because if she sits too long she has a difficult

time staying focused. Between all of her little walks, Ridler walks an average of 4 miles per day, and

she says that it has really helped her focus and keep her energy up during the day.

As Ridler demonstrated, walking during the school day actually has many benefits for students.

Many studies have shown that when students take breaks to walk in school, even just between classes,

children have shown to have higher academic performances. These higher academic performances

are likely due to better attentiveness in class from the walking. But walking doesn’t only have positive

effects on your academic performance, but also on your mood. Doctors say higher steps, lower stress,

higher levels of happiness. So you may be thanking school for your higher step count and better mood.

Next time you are racing to beat the bell to your next class, just think of all the incredible advantages

that will come from your steps. And when you reach the end of the school year, just think, you may

have just walked yourself all the way to North Carolina.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 12

DILLON SCOTT ON NPR'S PODCAST "FROM THE TOP"

BY JULIA NARDONE, JANUARY 2022

Not many North Penn students have had the opportunity to be recognized

on the national stage but violist Dillon Scott has… multiple times.

This week, Scott is being featured on NPR’s musical podcast From the

Top hosted by pianist Peter Dugan. Scott is performing Sonata in E-Flat,

Op. 120, No. 2, Mvmt 2 by Johannes Brahms on the viola. Listen to his

performance here and the whole podcast here.

“I heard about the show through the Philadelphia Youth Orchestra,”

Scott said. “They sent out a bunch of competitions, outreach things,

applications for certain things whether it be summer programs or things

like this too. It was one of the many things I got two summers ago and I

instantly thought it would be very cool. I applied in the fall of last year and

it took 6 months to hear back from the organization.”

Scott is currently the principal violist of the Philadelphia Youth

Orchestra(PYO) which is an organization for young musicians to further

their advanced training under renowned instructors. He has participated

in multiple events and performances from opportunities from the PYO,

including the SPHINX competition where he placed 3rd last year.

“It was a huge application process and there were a lot of pieces to

upload and a lot of essays to write and things like that but when I heard

back I was really excited,” Scott said but discovered the process would be

a lot longer than he expected. “But then it took another 8 months to get a

show because they have to piece together all of these kids from around the

country and put them together in shows that have contrasting repertoire, contrasting ages, contrasting

instruments, and preferably in a location near us. That process took months.”

Once he received his recording date, Scott participated in a virtual lab fellowship with people from

the industry giving lectures about what it’s like as well as people from the recording industry, having

workshops and giving inside details. At the end of the fellowship, all of the work the performers did

went towards creating a virtual performance for the Children’s Hospital of Colorado.

THE UNTOLD SIDE OF SCHOOL BOARD MEETINGS

BY MILAN VARIA, MARCH 2022

Christian Fusco, the Vice President of the North Penn School Board, had never experienced a panic

attack – that is, until last October. As he was vying for reelection, online discussions reached the point

where he faced personal attacks and damaging accusations that became too much. He was dealing

with something he never felt before. The next thing Fusco knew, he was rushed to an emergency room.

“To see people who don’t know me talking about me that way, caused me before the election to

have a panic attack,” Fusco said. “It actually happened at a doctor’s office. I had been transported from

the doctor’s office by ambulance to the hospital. It has absolutely taken a toll on me personally, I have

anxiety now, like I’ve never had before. I’m figuring out how to deal with that, and how to continue

to serve in this role, knowing that it’s unlikely that this situation is going to be changing anytime.”

The politicization of schools has become increasingly prevalent since the COVID-19 Pandemic

began. Parents have growingly become more and more vocal during school board meetings and

have voiced their concerns. Yet, sometimes these concerns become

accusations directed at the school board directors and the directors now

have a new set of problems to deal with: defending themselves and

figuring out how to deal with new anxieties.

Fusco understands that parents want only the best for their children,

but also expressed that sometimes these extremes can cause issues.

“When people are going to a hyperbolic place is when it becomes

an issue,” Fusco said. “When you’re accusing people of child abuse,

you give license for other people to start acting in an irrational way.

That can make us feel unsafe, to be perfectly honest. There are certain

messages that have come our way that have made members of the

board feel unsafe. It is taking a toll on our health.”

Certain comments, often vitriolic and personal, have become the

focus in the community discussion, and often relay false information.

These moments can escalate and attack directors on a personal level.

“I can remember personally, before the election, when the issue of

certain books being identified in libraries was being contextualized as

pornography. It was put into online groups, Facebook groups, social

media network, of sort of like-minded political people. That was

“All of us had to put our heads together, create a program of music, what we were going to learn,

how we were going to present it to the kids and then we gave a virtual

performance live through Seacrest studios,” Scott explained. “It was really

fun because we had to pick a piece that would have been accessible to

kids and how to present it to kids and make it interesting and that was

something that I’ve never had to do.”

After all of that, Scott finally got to record in Philadelphia on December

17 accompanied by Dugan on the piano.

“There were like seven to ten people in the studio whether it be sound

engineers or producers who were just listening to the music trying to figure

out what I could be doing better or what he could be doing better,” Scott

reflected. “I felt like they were swarming around me like sharks and so It

was actually really fun because I had to be focusing on him, or else I would

have been distracted by everyone else.”

Because he was playing in a studio and not as a performance, Scott was

able to face Dugan instead of facing away from him, which is what he

normally does in because of how the viola is designed to project sound.

“We’d look up sometimes and make eye contact and I’ve never had the

opportunity to do that,” Scott said.

Although opportunities like this are exciting for Scott and he enjoys

participating in them, he is trying to focus more on his future in these next

couple of months, working on his college repertoire and figuring out who

he plans to study with after graduating high school.

“I would love to live a lifestyle where I travel around the world and

collaborate with other artists. In this ideal career, I hope to do work as a chamber musician as well as

a soloist which will allow me to be immersed in the cultures of others and learn more about how art

connects us all,” Scott finished.

For more on Scott’s story, check out Knight Crier story “Dillon Scott refuses to let Covid draw

boundaries in musical pursuits.” featuring his background with the viola and his musical journey.

Make sure to follow Scott’s Instagram account to see more of his work at @dill_onviola and listen

to his segment on From the Top before the end of the week!

probably the first time I started seeing people in public that I didn’t know talk about me,” Fusco said.

Those comments online hurt Fusco deeply. As an educator who works with children every day,

Fusco could not ever imagine himself as who people say he might be. Particularly with topics involving

social issues, Fusco has faced major backlash, even though most of the time he is not in control of

those decisions. Oftentimes, these are books that are concerned with the LGBTQIA+ community.

“It wasn’t like this at all four years ago. The pandemic, while it did open up the meeting forum

for the community, which by and large is a good thing, it clearly has come with some unintended

consequences,” Fusco said. “One of which is, it’s a lot easier to find faults and to make those

accusations and make them into viral videos.”

As community members continue to get involved, situations like these continue to occur more

frequently and escalate more often. Fusco believes that part comes down to a misunderstanding.

“I think there’s this misunderstanding of the position of school board director — that we are experts

on everything that happens within every single building in the course of every day,” he said. “In fact,

nothing could be further from the truth.”

School board directors are volunteers and work for the people in

their community. They are not paid, and instead, dedicate time towards

the district on their own accord.

“There is a difference between what we do and what other politicians

do. We don’t have an office or a staff. When you see our own numbers

on our website, those are our actual phone numbers,” Fusco said. “We

are doing this because we want to serve the community. I have not

made a decision that everybody in the community is happy with– but

understand that I’m representing the will of the community and that the

decisions we make [we believe] are in the best interest of the district.”

These accusations that school board members have been facing

have become counterproductive for much of what parents stand for,

and ultimately, come at the expense of school board members’ mental

health. Taxpayers asking for changes in the ways schools operate and

offering vitriolic, pejorative remarks are two very different things. It

is time to diverge from these accusations and return back to respectful

discussions that focus on the good of the students and allow the mental

well-being of all stakeholders to remain strong.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 13

NPHS UNIFIED IN AUTISM AWARENESS

BY MILAN VARIA AND EMILY DAHMS, APRIL 2022

North Penn High School never comes up short when it comes to tackling a cause.

Within the last few weeks, students have begun wearing blue wristbands that read “SPREAD THE

WORD TO END THE WORD,” and adorning their Chromebooks with blue stickers that say the

same. At first, it may be hard to recognize what this exactly means, but these students want others

to ask. Once they do, they learn how North Penn is fighting the stigma against autism and becoming

more inclusive for their students with disabilities.

“I think it is an important way for North Penn to connect students who have disabilities and those

who do not. It’s beneficial on both ends. It’s helpful for students who have disabilities and maybe don’t

have as many opportunities to connect. It’s also helpful for students without disabilities to learn what

it’s like for others that have more struggles than they do,” Special Olympics Advisor Sue Ahart stated.

The goal of creating these opportunities is for everyone, not just one or two students.

“The goal is to build friendships on both ends, to build confidence both for the students with

disabilities but I’ve also seen that the students get involved, those that don’t have disabilities also it

builds their confidence in connecting with others,” Ahart said.

Students can still get involved in these activities. There will be a trip to the zoo on April 26th. There

is also a Special Olympics, track and field event for a day. This will be taking place at Souderton.

Students with disabilities go to compete with the help of another student from North Penn. Rather

than a staff member helping those who are competing students will help each other for a day of fun.

These activities will help students become more involved. Although difficult, it helps bring

awareness to school and spreads knowledge to those who lack it.

“I think it was a challenge to ask kids to sit at a table to talk to other kids about an issue, and to kind

of put themselves out there so I’m proud of the kids who came out and did it,” Ahart added.

From these events and conversations, Ahart hopes that North Penn, specifically the student body,

will come and learn from each other. Everything is a learning experience, and from these experiences,

Ahart believes that North Penn can become more inclusive.

“I hope that the conversations get kids to come to the table. I’m hopeful that some of the people that

we spoke with, that when they see somebody who’s sitting by themselves at lunch, they might go over

and approach and ask them if they want to join friends. Or if they see somebody who’s in a wheelchair

trying to move through these hallways, they might stop and actually let them go, rather than cut them

off and keep going their way because they’re so consumed in their own world. We often don’t realize

how even small actions can create chance,” Ahart said.

Despite this, there is still more to learn. Recently, a student came to Ahart and brought up a new

concern: the Autism Speaks puzzle piece. Ahart noted that even she did not know until the North Penn

student told her.

“I think the concerns about it are newer, and the word isn’t fully out yet, so it’s important we tell

people the meaning behind it,” Ahart said.

The puzzle piece used to be a very common symbol for autism. However, this symbol can be up

to someone’s interpretation. This symbol can be signifying to some that they have a “missing piece”

or their puzzle is incomplete. This is simply not true, no one’s “puzzle” is incomplete. Although this

symbol used to be seen more often, now people are realizing how it is hurting others. North Penn’s

goal is for everyone to be aware and included.

Autism Speaks has been criticized for discriminating against those with Autism because its goals

have been associated with trying to find ways to prevent autism rather than making life easier and

more accepting for those people. They also have been criticized for wrongly blaming children with

autism in regards to how they affect their parents’ lives. Essentially, many believe that the organization

does the opposite of what they claim.

The new symbol proposed to both combat Autism Speaks’ puzzle piece and to lead the Autism

rights movement is the rainbow-colored infinity symbol. The infinity sign is meant to represent those

who are both neurodivergent and neurotypical as one group of people and aims to show people that

autism is both on a spectrum and a variation that occurs naturally, and not a disease that needs to be

cured. With this new symbol, people across the world can better support those in their life and become

more accepting of differences no matter how big or small. As Autism Awareness month comes to an

end it is important to keep this in mind. With the collaboration of students, better efforts are possible.

MR. ALADDIN ABOU-OUF HAS SEEN THE WORLD BUT

FINDS HOME AS NORTH PENN SUBSTITUTE

BY JULIA SHEARER, MARCH 2022

Think about it- students typically don’t know much about their substitutes, let alone the adventures

they have been on in their lifetime. Let’s meet a substitute everyone has had, but never truly met.

The average high school substitute may appear one way on the outside, but could in reality be living

an extraordinary life full of unexpected twists and turns, and students could have no idea about any of

it. Mr. Aladdin Abou-Ouf is a substitute at North Penn high school, and accurately represents the idea

that not everyone is as they seem.

Abou-Ouf is a well-known figure at North Penn. Whether people know him for his approachable

aura, kind presence, or helpful advice, the 6th year North Penn substitute takes pride in his ways of

connecting with people, regardless of where he may be in the building on a given day.

“I like to help people and make their life easier. I give my experience to everyone who needs it, and

make their future brighter and more positive, as much as I can,” Abou-Ouf said.

Aside from being a part of the North Penn family, Abou-Ouf has a passion for traveling and

exploring what the world has to offer. He definitely did not follow a definite path when finding his

way to North Penn. Prior to moving to Pennsylvania, he experienced another lifestyle in Egypt, where

he worked as a tour guide, allowing him the opportunity to see the world.

“If I had the opportunity to travel I would take it no matter what… I’ve traveled to seventeen

countries worldwide, and thirty-four states in the United States. I like to travel; it’s my life to travel, to

see different people, different mentalities, different cultures,” Abou-Ouf explained.

Being a tour guide brought so many opportunities for Abou-Ouf to see the world and what different

places had to offer. There are so many unique places in the world, and Abou-Ouf recognizes this

everywhere he travels.

“Every nationality, they have their own cultures, they have their own traditions. I like to see how

they practice their lives, and I love it,” Abou-Ouf elaborated. “Everywhere I travel I like to test

everything- the people, the food, culture- its everything.”

“The life in North Penn High School is an interesting one because I meet people from all over; they

are all different. For most kids, it’s very nice and I like them. The majority is very good,” Abou-Ouf

said. “Some kids are hyper, some kids are very nice, some kids focus, some kids want to be something

in the future.”

Not only does Abou-Ouf have experience in many professions, but he has some hobbies that he

enjoys, as well as an intellectual talent that not many people possess.

“I read every night for thirty minutes in four or five languages. I speak

English, German, French, Italian, and Arabic,” Abou-Ouf said.

Abou-Ouf’s experiences, wherever he may be in the world or

whatever language he may be speaking, shaped him to become the

influential person he is today. Throughout his journeys around the world

and in his career teaching, Abou-Ouf has realized one big idea.

“If you want to have a bright future, you have to work. Nothing

comes easy…A man is a man everywhere in the world. A woman is a

woman everywhere in the world,” he finished.

SCAN TO READ THE

FULL STORY ONLINE!


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 14

STUDENTS TEACHING STUDENTS IN MONTGOMERY

ELEMENTARY CULTURAL CLUB

BY JULIA SHEARER, FEBRUARY 2022

Students typically begin their Spanish, French, or German language studies in seventh or eighth

grade. At Montgomery Elementary School, the fifth and sixth graders involved in the Cultural Club

are exposed to different languages and cultures earlier than most.

Mrs. Donna Chevoor, a fifth year teacher at Montgomery, became inspired to allow younger kids to

get the cultural experience that isn’t always available at their ages.

“I was talking to another ESL teacher in the district and she had started a club similar to this one. I

was really interested so I decided to make one at Montgomery,” Chevoor elaborated. “I tweaked it a

little bit to fit the way I wanted the program to work… and that’s how it started.”

Introducing younger students to the wonders of different languages can be beneficial to them in the

long run. Chevoor understands this, and does her best to expose her kids to what’s really out there for

them to learn.

“I do it for fifth and sixth grade because I know starting in the middle school there are so many

different clubs and they start to be

introduced to languages, so I kind of

wanted to get their feet wet,” Chevoor

said. “Also I wanted to kind of branch

out and get them to notice that there is

a larger world out there other than just

Lansdale, and a lot of things that they

perceive are not really the truth.”

Chevoor wanted to expand the

Cultural Club by getting assistance

from the high school language

teachers. In this particular instance, she

collaborated with Mrs. Brittany Atkiss,

a Spanish teacher at North Penn, to

help teach the kids to learn more about

Spanish cultures.

“[Mrs. Chevoor] had reached out

to me, asking if the Spanish students

could come down to her cultural club

at some point. We signed up for two

dates; the first in January and we go

back in May,” Atkiss explained.

Each month the cultural club

focuses on a new topic to learn about.

In January, they depicted the parts of

Columbia.

“We had an opening lesson about

where in the world did they think

Columbia was. Then we looked at

animals you might see in Columbia,

food that might be in Columbia, and

dancing,” Atkiss elaborated.

They didn’t stop there. The Montgomery students explored a variety of other topics as well.

NPHS AP Spanish students work with Montgomery Elementary students (Submitted photo)

“One of the groups was in charge of teaching body parts, one was in charge of teaching colors, days

of the week, and months… The Montgomery kids rotated between groups,” Atkiss said.

Using a more interactive and relevant approach in bringing awareness of Spanish-speaking

countries to younger children ultimately portrays information more effectively. Sometimes it even

requires teachers to step back and let others do the work. North Penn’s Spanish students filled those

shoes and became the teachers for the day.

“[The children] were definitely more relaxed. Had I been trying to get them to do the worksheets,

it would have been perceived differently than juniors and seniors doing it with them. They were way

more open to working… You could just see the kids were having so much fun,” Atkiss said. “Being

on the opposite end, being forced to be a teacher almost, it was an eye-opening experience for [the

Spanish students] too. They did awesome.”

Spanish 4 students, Laila Rihawi and Jordan Lawrence experienced this feeling as they were

teaching the Montgomery students. They first-handedly felt the atmosphere change with them working

with the kids rather than a teacher.

“It felt like we were actually having fun. It kind of becomes the dynamic where it’s like a little

sibling and an older sibling kind of thing, and I know that if it were a teacher they would probably just

be bored,” Rihawi

“Being taught by somebody that you can actually speak to, it’s not so teacher driven which is just

teaching teaching teaching, it’s more of a guide along kind of experience,” Lawrence added. “I would

say being able to help the kids, and being someone they can actually talk to… I feel like it did help

them.”

Relating to relevant ways of teaching younger students, using a topic that sparks their interest can

also be effective. In this instance, the AP students used the popular children’s movie, Encanto.

“Bringing awareness to the culture that surrounds the movie (Encanto) and the people that they

see in the movie, hopefully gives them a better understanding of the larger world,” Atkiss explained.

“I think that they went away with a positive experience of a new culture. I think they really enjoyed

working with the high schoolers; you could see that the elementary school kids had giant smiles on

their faces, and they were looking up to the older students. It was nice to see.”

Having different age groups from across the district come together to tackle a project really signifies

the type of connections that can be

made at North Penn and how much

of a unit we’ve become. Atkiss and

her Spanish students recognized this

during their work.

“This is great for North Penn

because it brings us all together…

Just kind of making that connection so

we’re a unified front rather than all the

different buildings, it’s nice,” Atkiss

explained.

“I think it’s really cool. North Penn

is a very community based district, and

having older kids with the younger

kids and teaching them, it shows how

involved North Penn is, and how

it’s not completely teacher-run, but

students really do a lot,” Rihawi added.

Working with older kids typically

has a lasting impact on younger

generations. On the flip side, one

wouldn’t usually expect the older

students to come away with more

than a fun experience. Having

the opportunity to work with the

Montgomery students, however,

left a good feeling resonating within

Lawrence.

“I think it definitely had an impact

on me because I had an interest

in education before, and this kind

of pushed it forward for me… Being able to do that in a classroom in front of kids it played into

perspective for me that this is something that I could possibly do,” Lawrence remarked.

Along with being a teacher and mentor for the day, it seemed to mean a little more than that for the

Cultural Club members.

“As a kid you obviously look up to somebody and you want to become a role model for them…

I think it’s definitely cool to be able to do that for the younger kids and I would heavily advise more

people to get involved if they can,” Lawrence concluded.

The Spanish students aren’t finished just yet; they will go back to Montgomery in May for a Cinco

de Mayo themed lesson that also focuses on the culture in Mexico.

“I hope this is a program that we can grow and foster with different elementary schools in the

district,” Atkiss concluded.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 15

GENERAL NASH STUDENTS ON A QUEST TO INSPIRE

OTHERS

BY JULIA SHEARER AND EMILY DAHMS, JANUARY 2022

Most authors spend their entire lives devoted to writing new books or other pieces to add to their

published collection. However, for a talented eleven and twelve year old at General Nash Elementary,

writing and publishing a book was just a stepping stone in their, well… very young careers.

Makayla Lewis, eleven years old, and Nokukhanya Ndlovu, twevle years old, are sixth grade

students currently attending General Nash. Along with being published child authors, these two girls

are aspiring entrepreneurs, singers, dancers, and actors, looking to make their next big mark.

The girls kicked off their writing careers with the creation of their first published work, The Quest of

the Dragon Diamond. The novel is about two sisters, May and Maya, who are going through a tough

loss, leading them to move to Camden Falls, Rokanda with their grandparents where they meet new

friends, partake in many adventures, and even end up saving their town along the way.

Lewis and Ndlovu were only around the ages of nine and ten when they got inspired to write this

story. Once the idea sparked them, they immediately took action and began brainstorming.

“It happened back in fourth grade. We were sitting in class like any other day, and Nokukhanya got

this idea of writing a book and she asked me, and I said that it was a great idea,” Lewis said.

“We got paper and a pencil, went over to where the books were, and we found some inspiration

from two books, one involving two girls; that’s how we got the inspiration for May and Maya, and

another book, where we got the idea of a boy named Theodore.”

The process of writing and revising did not always run as smoothly or as quickly as the girls had

hoped. It took two and half years until their book was finally published when they were in sixth grade.

Trial and error played a big role in their steps to publication.

“It was complicated because we had a wild imagination process. We started out with twenty

chapters, and most of it didn’t make sense… We ended up shortening it down to fourteen chapters that

got to the main plot,” Ndlovu explained.

“The process was definitely a long process, especially when we were starting to learn how to write

a book, but it was really fun…After we wrote the whole book, with the twenty chapters, we printed it

out. We read through the whole thing and kind of revised and edited it on paper,” Lewis said.

The girls knew what it took to work as a team to get the job done. Lewis and Ndlovu were able to

figure out a manageable process that worked for both of them, which resulted in productivity.

“Our writing process was sort of that I would write a rough draft of my ideas, and just scoot it over

to [Makayla]. I like to call it “Makaylafying” it, where she would add more detail,” Ndlovu described.

Of course, they couldn’t have accomplished this feat by themselves. Lewis and Ndlovu received an

abundance of support and help throughout their writing journey. The pair had assistance from multiple

teachers, their parents, as well as illustrators and professionals to take their work to the next level.

“My mom is a teacher, and she’s also an author so she definitely helped us a lot. She’s kind of like

our editor and manager,” Lewis explained. “We had a lot of people along the way, helping us get

through and write the book.”

“We also had our teacher Ms. Truesdell re-read it,” Ndlovu added. “We had our parents and friends

a bit inspire us and a bit help us.”

This idea wasn’t just a fun story that the girls came up with. They also wanted to portray important

messages for young readers. In between the entertainment of their story, a reader is also met with

inspiring themes.

“I think the theme [of the story] is that you can accomplish anything because the characters go

through a hard loss, but their family helps them heal through that… I feel like [the theme] is if you go

through hard times, there’s always an adventure waiting for you ahead,” Ndlovu elaborated.

“I think that another [theme] would be, when life can get tough, make sure to always see the good

side in things. You have other people on the other side waiting for you. That is definitely something

the girls and their friends had learned, and what we have learned throughout the experience of writing

this book,” Lewis added.

Similar to most kids their age, Lewis and Ndlovu have so much they want to accomplish throughout

their childhood. What sets them apart, is their decision to take action and achieve their goals to inspire

people around them.

“I definitely feel accomplished… and I definitely feel like I’ve done something to impact the world.

I want to inspire young people, like myself, to keep striving for their goals and go after what they want

to do and accomplish in life,” Lewis stated.

The pair didn’t stop there. Using the money made from their book signing, Lewis and Ndlovu

changed directions, and worked towards creating a small business; Diamond Dance International

Academy, which teaches local kids as well as kids anywhere in the world, different styles of dance.

“This summer we got the opportunity to teach in person at a daycare with little kids. It was so much

fun because we got to interact with them… it was so much fun watching them,” Ndlovu said.

“We really enjoyed that experience. We are also planning to do it again this year in person… I have

been dancing since I was four years old. I definitely like to teach kids the art of dance. We want people

to have fun with dance and express themselves through movement,” Lewis explained.

As for individually, the girls have very bright futures ahead of them. In Makayla’s case, she has

higher aspirations than just publishing a book. Even before becoming a child author, her dream was to

be an actor. She is working to make that dream her reality.

“I definitely want to continue to do acting. I’m taking acting classes right now. I’m in an agency, and

I really want to take a step up,” Lewis stated.

Nokukhanya is working towards similar goals. Just like Lewis, becoming a child author isn’t going

to stop her from starting her next chapter. She dreams of becoming a singer as well as taking the next

step as a dance instructor, and is climbing the ladder to achieve that.

“My mom has been doing research to get me singing lessons… We would love to continue our

academy, and also inspiring kids through our book, but also do what we (individually) have always

dreamed of,” Ndlovu summarized

Both of these girls have remarkable accomplishments for being any age, let alone eleven and twelve.

They have been recognized by many for their hard work, and the duo is using this encouragement to

motivate them to take their careers onward and continue to inspire along the way.

“We just know one thing: we just want to keep inspiring people to start something young, that way

they can build a bigger future for themselves,” Ndlovu concluded


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 16

OPINION

Editorials in The Knight Crier, unless otherwise stated, do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the entire staff.

GLIMPSE OF BIPARTISANSHIP IN FACE OF UA CRISIS

BY TYLER LETCHER, FEBRUARY 2022

In today’s political climate of attacks from one party to another, to even those in a party attacking

those in the same party, albeit not as extreme as its other members, a moment of bipartisanship is

something to be savored. However, when this does occur, it would be accurate to assume that it would

be under extreme circumstances. In the past few weeks, we’ve seen just this throughout the escalation

of the crisis between Ukraine and Russia, with it all coming to a head with Russia officially launching

attacks and a declaration of war against Ukraine on Feb. 23rd, 2022.

In the past few years, Russia and Ukraine have increased tensions between each other, with Ukraine

wishing for its independence and to join NATO, and with Russia believing that it has ownership of

the land and would view the nation’s NATO membership as a provocation towards it. As the Russian

invasion of Ukraine officially kicks off, NATO’s allies, including the U.S. have sprung to action,

condemning their attacks and launching sanctions against Russia.

The U.S., however, was split as to how effective its own leadership would be when it came to taking

action against the violence from the Russian side. Surprisingly, in an age of petty attacks between

parties, it seems as though a moment of bipartisanship is shining through in this time of crisis.

South Carolina Republican Senator Lindsay Graham, who has been one of the most outspoken

critics of the Democratic Party and supporter of former President Donald Trump and his efforts to

overthrow the 2020 election, stated that “The emergency supplemental needs to help our allies, needs

to provide more assistance to the Ukraine. We need to create a mechanism for Putin and his cronies to

pay a heavy price to deter further aggression.”

Joining Graham is Democratic Senator Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island in a bipartisan

congressional delegation to Munich this past week, along with more than 20 senators across the aisle.

They have stated that, “No matter what happens in the coming days, we must assure that the dictator

Putin and his corrupt oligarchs pay a devastating price for their decisions.”

Another one of the GOP’s strongest allies, former President Trump’s strongest supporters, and one

of President Biden’s heaviest critics, Senator Ted Cruz, offered rare praise of the president, stating,

“President Biden made the right decision today. Allowing Putin’s Nord Stream 2 to come online would

have created multiple, cascading, and acute security crises for the United States and our European

allies for generations to come. Today’s announcement is critical to preventing such scenarios.”

The crisis will inevitably lead to higher prices on daily use items such as groceries, gas, and tech

products. With these handicaps against the U.S. and global economy, tensions may begin to rise

against political figures as they have in past months with inflation and the Biden administration. If

production of some, if not all, of these resources begins to switch to nations not embargoed through a

Russian conflict, however, prices rising may not become as much of an issue.

Looking back upon wars such as the Persian Gulf War and crises such as the September 11th

attacks, presidents with relatively low approval ratings have seen their rankings approve in the wake

of these tragedies. George H.W. Bush had a 59% approval rating immediately before Operation Desert

Storm, and immediately after, saw a peak 89% approval rating. His son, George W. Bush, had a

51% approval rating on September 10th, however, a week after the attack, he saw a 91% approval

rating. This “rally ‘round the flag effect” has

historically been enforced in the wake of

these tragedies, and if the U.S. intervenes in

the Ukraine/Russia crisis, Biden’s approval

rating may grow as well.

But what does this all mean for the

future of our nation and its politics? Well,

for starters, it can be assumed that if Russia

escalates its attacks as it has insinuated it

will, the U.S. and its allies will intervene, as

they did in similar situations in the Korean

and Vietnam wars, although President

Biden has stated that troops will not be sent

at this time. If troops end up being sent,

Biden then becomes a wartime president,

and, as wartime presidents often do, he will

gain bipartisan support and heftier approval

numbers.

LESS LOCAL MIGHT MEAN LESS INFORMED

BY EMILY COURTNEY, DECEMBER 2021

We have come a long way from newspaper boys yelling ‘Extra! Extra!’ for a nickel to rolling over

in bed and seeing news from across the world right at our fingertips with our morning coffee.

Now, printed copies of newspapers are rare and have been cut out of most people’s lives. People

who are usually seen with them are people who grew up with them, people who challenge the daily

crossword puzzle, and the few who really do consume the news via printed byline.

The PBS documentary Storm Lake, which first aired in November, reflects this real-life situation.

The Storm Lake Times, run by the Cullen family, faces hardship and challenges as they try to keep

their business afloat. Art Cullen, a Pulitzer prize winning journalist explores how to survive in this

new day and age.

Although people may think they are in close proximity to local journalism because they pass the

newsstand everyday, unless they actually buy the paper, they are not doing much to help. Shopping

local also helps, asd it is the local businesses who are likely to buy ad space in local newspapers, thus

funding their efforts. It’s all connected.

Without these local journalists we would not be able to get such a variety of content to consume.

If it was just one company who regulated all the information the people received, there would be no

room for new ideas or improvements. Motivated by their interest along with what they want to share

out into the world, these people make it their mission to share stories and events that impact the people

around them and people nationwide.

Even though it may not feel as though local journalism is the predominant source of news; it isn’t far

behind TV channels and news conglomerates. They are the backbone of getting information quickly

and efficiently, making sure they are delivering the best content possible.

However, people are not as accommodating as they used to be. Either people do not want to pay for

it or do not want to go out and buy a physical newspaper they will not need in three days time.

“People aren’t supporting journalism like they used to,” Art Cullen said in the PBS documentary

Storm Lake.

People no longer sit down just to read the news or they just do not have the time to do so.

“People getting along doesn’t really make news,” Cullen added.

The attention span of the new generation has been cut in half comparatively to the people who grew

up before the explosion of popularity in cell phones. The cell phone has cut the accessibility of local

news exponentially.

“People want the news for free and don’t find it worth it,” Cullen explained.

Because of cell phones and the internet, access to the news has become easier than ever. News

apps are free with unlimited amounts of articles to look at, undermining organizations trying to make

a profit. When scrolling though an article or a recipe and a box appears that calls for a monetary

exchange, people will immediately click away and change to a website that does not require money or

a subscription—it’s just easier that way.

This all relates back to the prospect of major corporations and big businesses taking over all

prospects of consumerism. The mom and pops shops that sponsor the local newspaper are being run

out of business by online stores such as Amazon. And the pandemic has not helped. Them shutting

down is always creeping around the corner and terries local newspapers.

As newspapers begin to see the light at the end of the tunnel, citizens of small towns can prevent

this and help revive them back to life. By buying local newspapers and supporting neighborhood

businesses, it revitalizes the whole community and benefits everyone.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 17

THE FUNDIMENTAL UNDER-FUNDING OF PUBLIC ED

BY EMILY COURTNEY, NOVEMBER 2021

Across the nation, the amount of money a school gets is related to a number of different factors: the

local tax bracket, how much teachers are getting paid, and how much support they are getting from

their individual state and the federal government. However, this is not enough for certain locations.

According to the Century Foundation, most public schools in America are collectively underfunded

by about 150 billion dollars every year. Almost ⅔ of the nation’s schools face a “funding gap,” meaning

they are not receiving the amount of money they need in order to achieve a flourishing school year.

“Your education is contingent upon your zip code” is a popular saying in Pennsylvania and reflects

how not all kids are able to get the same opportunities within the same state.

So why is this happening?

One blatantly obvious reason is that the money is going

to other resources. About 75% of a school’s budget is

used for teachers’ salaries and benefits. In addition, pieces

of it are regularly used in order to pay off debts, which are

paying back borrowed money for large products.

“The other 20% is everything else. Anything that the

district buys, supplies, textbooks, utilities, transportation,

insurance— anything other than people and debt is

covered by that 20%. So, when you look at it from that

perspective, it’s a really small portion,” CFO of the NPSD

Mr. Stephen Skrocki explained.

NPSD is on the fortunate end of this spectrum, with a

budget of over 200 million dollars. Real estate taxes from

businesses help support and add revenue to the district’s

budget.

That does not mean certain aspects of the school are

not neglected.

How much money the special education program as

well as the community’s retirement is not receiving, and

GOOGLE MEETS ACCESSIBILITY

BY JULIA SHEARER, NOVEMBER 2021

Last school year, the learning environment nationwide was altered; having students learn through a

screen. While most of us never want to see that again in our schools, there are still some minor aspects

of that learning style that could benefit students who are back in school.

As someone who is heavily involved in athletics, and sacrifices school days and weekends for

traveling, it can be hard to keep up with all of my work. Missing multiple Thursdays, Fridays, and

Mondays due to late flights and games can pile up, along with the missed work that comes with it.

Since Google meets are easily accessible and can be used anywhere that is necessary, they are helpful

for those like me who miss many days of school for outside events.

Last year when I was in this situation and needed to find a way to know what I was missing, the

online learning style proved to be very resourceful. Being able to attend virtually in my room or

the airport, though not ideal, was a way for me to keep up with

learning and work that needed to be done. This year, since that

option is no longer available, I am left with stress over missing

tests and in-class assignments that I do not have access to online.

Here at North Penn, entering Google meets is strictly limited to

students who have been exposed to, or have, COVID. Though that

logic makes sense, I believe that the policy could bear to be more

lenient, depending on different students’ circumstances.

For a teacher, setting up a Google Meet takes more effort than

necessary, since a majority of the class is in person. If desired for

students not present in person, there could be a posted agenda or

assignment so the student can still be filled in, just from a distance.

It is argued that some students may try to take advantage of this

new opening, which is most likely true. The intention of my wish

is not to open up the online learning environment again, but to

just have it available when students actually need it. To be able to

access Google meets, there should be a policy in which students

must state their reasoning for needing this, and later be approved

based on the validity of it.

how much money the charter schools are receiving has been a large focus within the district.

“Special Ed. for example, started off in the federal government in the 1970s promising to pay for

the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. They promised to pay up to 40% of the costs, to split

it up and pay for special education students. They never provided more than 20% of the funding and

right now, they are down to about 16%. So, while the costs of special education are increasing, and

the funding from the federal government is decreasing, ” NP Board Director Ms. Tina Stoll explained.

Moreover, cyber charter schools have a budget of 500 million dollars but do not have any

infrastructure. Whether that money is going directly back into the district, and if it really benefits

the students is a mystery. This highlights the fight for charter school reform. People across the local

area such as members of the school board, state representatives, and senators are coming together to

prioritize which districts really need more money.

“That is another thing that gets stuck in the State and the Senate and it just does not get any further,”

Stoll added.

However, schools in close proximity are facing much

more serious funding issues. These districts do not have

the ability to pick and choose what they spend their money

on. Their main concern is making sure that the schools

are functioning properly. They do not have the budgetary

space to think about providing abundant resources.

“School districts that do not have a commercial tax

base really struggle because the state [they are in] does

not keep up with its fair share of subsidies of the school

district. If you are in a district with more residential

properties, you may not have the financial resources to

have strong programs like North Penn,” Skrocki said.

Ways that this may be able to change is by reaching

out to legislators themselves. Students, families, or really

anybody can reach out to these people and advocate for

better funding of public schools not only in their local area

but the entire nation.

To be able to utilize Google meets, the student should request access to it well in advance of their

absences. Doing this and allowing teachers to prepare for the setup and online assignments would

result in the process running smoothly for both student and teacher. Though it can be minorly

inconvenient for teachers, having a week’s notice will ensure that they are prepared to provide a strong

yet comfortable temporary online learning experience.

Communication would play a huge role in this process, meaning the student would have to reach

out to many people; including administrators as well as all of their teachers. Making sure that everyone

involved is in the know will make this process easier.

Tying back to needing valid reasoning for online access, if the student really wanted to move

forward with the process then they would bring their needs to the administrators, who would aid them

with setting up their online accessibility. If their request is approved, the steps following would flow

easily from there.

Once approved for temporary online learning, the student would take responsibility and contact all

of their teachers, explaining the circumstances and what needs to

be done to meet their needs. Taking control and being responsible

for working out their own schedule is how the student would

ensure a smooth transition into Google meet classes.

Many disagree with the idea of bringing back the temporary

Google meet learning style, but what they fail to acknowledge

is that working online is a huge part of our lives today. In the

past few years, especially during covid, people have begun to

work from home, and they do almost everything on a computer.

Though it is still foreign to learn from home on a school basis, the

idea should not be entirely shut out just because of its abnormality.

On the other side, I believe that modernizing learning could be

a good thing for our education. Straying away from the traditional

format of education may take some adjusting, but its convenience

and benefits could change how we view modern learning.

Overall, for the select students who deal with the same

struggles of missing short periods of school for various reasons,

having an easily accessible option to tune into class can alleviate

the stress and academic burdens that come with being absent.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 18

FIGHT FOR ABORTION MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER

BY JULIA NARDONE, MAY 2022

A fear once only talked of in recent years is coming to fruition; the ability to have a legal abortion.

For decades women have fought for the right to vote, to hold jobs, and to be in positions of power,

and now more than ever, the right to their own bodies.

In 1973, the Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade stated that a woman has a constitutional right to an

abortion until the fetus could survive outside the womb which at the time, was around twenty-four

weeks or about five and a half months. As of today with the current technology, that window has

shrunk to around twenty-two weeks.

Now, it is a real possibility that Roe v. Wade will be overturned based on a leaked drafted opinion

sent to Politico by a clerk written by Justice Samuel Alito on May 2, 2022. In his 98-page opinion, he

called for the court to override Roe v. Wade, something that would be devastating to women across

the country and possibly lead to the overriding of other important cases regarding race and gender.

"The Constitution makes no reference to abortion and no such right is implicitly protected by any

constitutional provision," Alito wrote. He said the Roe was "egregiously

wrong from the start" and that its reasoning was "exceptionally weak,

and the decision has had damaging consequences."

An argument used by those who are pro-life is one mainly backed

by religion. However it is not right to force others who do not follow

the same religion or religion at all to abide by a law that is a blatant

violation of privacy. Just beause abortion goes againhst one religion

doesnt mean it goes against all religions.

“If she is developed enough to be menstruating and become

pregnant, and reached sexual maturity, she can safely give birth to a

baby,” Dr. Ingrid Skop, an obstetrician in San Antonio who belongs to

the American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians and Gynecologists,

said in an article from the New York Times.

Skop said that “even a girl as young as 9 or 10, impregnated by a

father or a brother, could carry a baby to term without health risks.”

A 9 or 10 year old would be in 4th grade. Imagine letting a 4th

grader who had been impregnated by a family member give birth to a

child when they barely know how to read.

AS STUDENT POPULATION EVOLVES, SO TOO

SHOULD LITERATURE CURRICULUM

BY YAMUNI KAIJUMI, FEBRUARY 2022

Is it necessary to include classic works of literature in our English curriculum simply because they

are considered “classics?”

I do enjoy reading classical literature because the pieces are considered to be well written even in

our current time period, and they address universal human concerns, but these pieces of literature are

so often written from one perspective – a white. male author.

Our classrooms are filled with students from all over the globe and as a district, it is our responsibility

to make sure students feel at home in North Penn despite their background.

I understand that our district is trying to make an effort to include more books by authors of color

in the English curriculum, but as a student in the classroom, I don’t believe the recent changes to the

English curriculum were enough in representing students from various backgrounds.

Certainly, it is important to recognize that the district has made efforts, as Director of Curriculum

and Equity Dr. Pamula Hart notes.

“I feel like the secondary English curriculum has made great strides to include more voices within

their literary selections. However, we acknowledge nothing is perfect. The balance today is much

better than it was in the past. We are hoping to continue to update our literature to reflect the voices of

our changing student body while also keeping some literary classics so students are exposed to them

at some point in their academic experience,” Hart said.

As a student who has been part of this district from Kindergarten, I feel out of place in North Penn,

especially in my AP Lang class. The major works of literature in our curriculum we have thus far

studied are written by white male authors.

It’s hard to feel a sense of belonging when the majority of what I’m reading is presented from a

white perspective. I don’t feel like my cultural background is being represented and I doubt I am the

only student feeling this way as the majority of the students in my class are also people of color.

“I personally do believe we need more books by authors of color in our curriculum because I think

it will broaden our perspectives of many ethnicities. Especially with our current issues of racism

and discrimination, I think reading books from different backgrounds is a great way to show unity,

During the Trump presidency, three new Supreme Court Justices were added into the Supreme

court, all of which lean conservatively. Most notably and recently is Justice Amy Coney Barret who

has openly expressed her ardent opposition to abortion many times and does not give much hope

to those hoping to sustain Roe v. Wade. Even with the replacement of Justice Stephen Breyer with

Kentaji Brown Jackson, no liberal seats were gained.

Aside from reasons like rape or incest, women could want an abortion based on their financial

instability, possible medical complications, or not having the desire or need to have a child at the time

to instead pursue their careers or passions first.

Laws like these are blatant acts of the prevention of a woman’s right to her body, and those who

claim it is protecting the rights of the “unborn baby” are purely focused on limiting the rights of the

woman. Once the baby is born, all of the care for the baby’s life is forgotten and many of the babies

that were forced to be born are put up for adoption or put through the foster care system, which is

already stretched far too thin and the addition of more unwanted babies born into the country will

worsen an already serious problem. It is not fair to force children to be born into a life where they

cannot live to their full potential.

In the likely event that Roe v. Wade is overturned, it will have

catastrophic effects on the whole country, causing many women

to have to go long distances in order to receive medical attention

in a state that hasn’t outlawed abortion, or worse, perform unsafe

abortions where the mother is at risk. Outlawing abortion doesnt stop

all abortions, just the safe ones.

“If Roe is overturned, women will continue to seek abortion

care,” the founder and CEO of Whole Woman’s Health Hagstrom

Miller said in an article from the Texas Tribune. “But they will be

forced to look to illegal methods or go out of state, creating… ‘two

Americas’.”

Abortion is healthcare whether it disagrees with some people’s

morals or not. What makes America the country it is is that every

person has the freedom to themselves, whether it’s their voice or their

beliefs, and nothing should infringe upon that. When America is all

about freedom, why is it that some can be free to make their own

choices and others can’t?

especially when all English classes are required to read books by authors of color,” junior Jiya Patel

said.

English is one of the few subjects that allow students to express themselves authentically and learn

from the experiences of others. It has the potential to connect students to their own cultures while also

fostering a sense of belonging in our community.

“I do believe it is important to have students’ cultures represented in the books we read because

not only does it make it easier for the students to connect to the story but also understand the message

from the author. I know that any time I read any book or works of literature that reflects on my culture,

even if it is only a small mention, it definitely catches my attention and I can make connections,” Patel

explained.

The English curriculum in this district needs to be adjusted to reflect the diverse student population

so that children and teenagers can see themselves reflected in the books they read.

“Besides the classic American Dream, Salem Witchcraft trials, Romanticism and minor focus on

transcendentalism, we have read only a few pieces of literature from colored authors like “Letter from

Birmingham Jail” by MLK, “Learning to Read and Write” by Federick Douglass and “Learning to

Read” by Malcolm X. As an AP Lang student, I understand we need to read specific pieces of work for

the curriculum, but I think we need to incorporate more novels and books written by different authors

of color because it can definitely deepen our knowledge of different writing styles. I think it would also

interest more students to read books that relate to their lives and culture,” Patel added.

The main books included in the AP Lang curriculum at North Penn, which my class has read

include The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and

The Crucible by Arthur Miller. During class, I hear many conversations between my peers about their

dissatisfaction with these books because it is hard to create a personal connection and I agree with

these statements.

North Penn needs to continue to evaluate their English Curriculum with an eye toward a more

diverse student body, while being culturally respectful. It’s important that all students feel culturally

represented when issues like discrimination and racism pollute our society. The new generation of

students entering our district is more diverse than past generations and our English curriculum needs

to be a reflection of this increasing diversity.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 19

DEAR "OUR GENERATION," ENOUGH IS ENOUGH...

BY MOLLY AGRISS, DECEMBER 2021

In the past 4 months of school, the amount of school shooting threats, bomb threats, vandalism, and

cyberbullying I have seen and heard on the news and throughout my and other schools is absurd. The

worst part about all of this is that kids think this is normal.

Being a high school student in 2021 is extremely different from the high school experience my

parents and teachers experienced. All generations have something that will define them, and I am

starting to lose hope that my generation will ever come out of this bad place we seem to be stuck in.

My generation has become immune to seeing terrible things happening. We scroll through TikTok

watching people rip soap dispensers off the wall and teachers’ belongings being stolen. We walk

through the halls as people punch each other and bystanders stop to take video. We hear about

neighboring schools that are in lockdown for hours on end. Day after day I hear and see things like

this happen. Scenarios like these have become a normal part of teenagers’ lives all across the world.

Recently, Instagram accounts have been circling throughout the North Penn School District, these

accounts consist of names like, “np hottest”, “np eats”, and so many more. These accounts comprise

of taking pictures of other students and posting them on the accounts to make fun of other kids. While

a lot of the pictures sent in are from people’s friends and meant to be a joke there are also numerous

posts meant to intentionally make fun of other students. These Instagram pages are used to bring kids’

amusement at the cost of tearing down other students in the process. Is this really how we want to be

defined? Is this something we want to be known for?

Accounts like these may seem funny as you are scrolling through, but take into consideration the

students whose pictures are getting posted without their permission. They have been violated and now

have to open Instagram to see people making fun of them. There is no escape anymore, no safe space.

Social media has created the ideal way to cyberbully anyone you feel like without getting caught.

You can say whatever you want about whomever you want and don’t have to face any punishments

because it can all be done anonymously. People in my generation have become so used to things like

this happening that we don’t even recognize the wrong in actions like these.

Within the past week, a TikTok trend called National Violence Day has been circulating worldwide.

Shootings and bomb threats have been reported all around the nation. North Penn alerted parents

and guardians about this concern assuring them that no threats have yet to be directed towards our

school district. Although they sent out this email, many teachers, students, and parents are wary about

December 17th in schools.

My generation has become so prone to violence throughout schools that when trends like these

come up we do not think too deep into it.

In 2018 the CDC issued reports showing suicide rates, “ [The] rates of suicide among young people

jumped 56% between 2007 and 2016, after declining between 1999 and 2007,” Time news reports in

their “Depression and Suicide Rates…” written by Markham Heid.

These statistics matter because if you look and it when all the social media platforms were released

it matches up very well. Twitter was released in 2007, Instagram was released in 2010, Snapchat in

2011, Tiktok in 2016. Notice how they were all released in the span that suicide rates jumped.

It is so obvious that social media is impacting our generation greatly. Social media is a huge part

of the problem, but it can’t take all of the blame. High schoolers have brains they know the actions

they make and how it affects others, so why are we making decisions like these? Why are we doing

something that we know will deliberately hurt someone else? Personally, I am sick of constantly

hearing about how our generation is doing terrible things and how we are becoming desensitized.

I want our generation to be known for something positive for once. We need to start really thinking

about the actions we are taking. I think we have become so used to being able to just press one button

and be done, that we forget to go back a read what we are really about to put out for everyone to see.

How long are we going to stand by and tolerate the damage that we as a generation are causing to each

other and schools?

WHAT'S ACTUALLY BEHIND THE COVER OF THE

BOOK DEBATE?

BY AIDEN MILLER, NOVEMBER 2021

A high school library is the epicenter to some of the most vital resources a student can come across

for educational matters and personal creative exploration, yet they have been found next on the list of a

targeted conservative agenda. With resources and novels being cherry-picked due to broad reactionary

outrage across the country, North Penn libraries are not exempt from this action.

“This is child pornography and you will be held accountable,” said Samantha Ferry of Hatfield

Township, when referring to a controversial book in one of the many North Penn libraries at a school

board meeting on October 21, 2021. “You should be in jail,” she additionally shouted at a board

member.

The book in question, Gender Queer, a memoir by author Maia Kobabe, depicts a coming of age

tale in graphic novel form for LGBTQ youth, or specifically gender non-conforming individuals. It’s

a memoir with mature subjects, directly aimed at maturing audiences. Only one copy of Gender Queer

is owned by North Penn School district, only being found in the library of North Penn High School,

yet it’s being denounced as if the piece finds itself in any type of academic curriculum.

“Your children are being taught reverse racism and gender fluidity,” a staunch exclamation presented

by Ferry further into the meeting.

These allegations of indoctrination within conspiratorial and accusatory buzz phrases of

pornography and promiscuity are a myth. Libraries exist for leisure, only being used when necessary,

and the books held are checked out only by a reader’s choice. Libraries exist to inform all topics, even

those that can lead to potential discomfort. Gender Queer is no exception.

The book has 230 pages of comics, of which very few actually display explicit content, yet all pages

convey mature themes that are essential for a piece directed at teenagers who are discovering their

sense of self, as the piece is directed at young adults, not adolescents. Policing media that could inflict

hypothetical discomfort on additionally hypothetical children is only a factor in this performative

display.

Parents have the right to prevent their own children from reading content such as Gender Queer, but

that right diminishes past their own families. These parents do not have the right to attempt censuring

source material that could prove to be a valuable resource to other students or parents.

The failure to spark outrage by these same parents over sexually explicit and erotic heterosexual

content within our libraries is fitting. By their view, a book like Atonement by Ian McEwan, also found

in the North Penn High School library, should cause an uprising due to the book’s frequent and graphic

sexual innuendos. Vivid scenes of explicity found in Atonement are incomparably more crude held

up to those of Gender Queer. Yet these shallow outbursts cannot withstand their intrinsic motivations,

as this is once again not about protecting children, but instead demonizing LGBTQ individuals and

content that isn’t popularized by straight audiences.

Despite this, Gender Queer has still been under scrutiny, with accusations of pedophilia and

pornography, and LGBTQ individuals have indirectly felt the effects of such backlash.

The United States is severely deprived of beneficial sex education. Most schools have a basis of

abstinence for their comprehensive sexual health curriculums, even though such strategies have been

proven futile. Courses that dive into topics of pregnancy and STD prevention, consent, and positive

sexual health are untaught due to the taboo placed on sex in the United States. Sexuality and gender

identity are barely thought of, core concepts that LGBTQ students are therefore shunned from.

As a result of this ultimate failure, it’s vital that students, including those that do not identify as

straight, have access to these library resources that can contribute to answering their questions about

their overall health and well-being. These students deserve media that validate their identities, and

assure them that diverging from heteronormativity should be accepted. Narrow perceptions of the

content within Gender Queer should not dictate the sweeping of this book off all shelves, as public

schools were designed to uphold and accommodate viewpoints of all students.

Censuring this content is not only met with detrimental factors like shunning adolescents from

complex world issues, but it’s also unconstitutional. In a 1982 United States Supreme Court ruling,

Island Trees School District v. Pico by Pico, it was determined the first amendment imposes limitations

on a school board’s endeavor to withdraw books from public school libraries. Constitutional rights like

freedom of speech and expression are still observed in a classroom setting.

Understanding the vitality of queer-positive literature in educational settings is of utmost importance

in regards to representation. All people like to feel seen in unique ways, and that aspect does not cease

when LGBTQ individuals come into consideration. Instead of pointing fingers and shouting names,

expand horizons and embrace opposing viewpoints, especially at a moment in time when minorities

need to be heard.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 20

CURT IN CLOSING

BY MILAN VARIA, FEBRUARY 2022

LANSDALE– “I’ll miss the people. The tremendous relationships with individuals. From my days

as a teacher to my last days as a superintendent, there have been countless numbers of people who

have helped me grow into the person I am. I owe so much gratitude to these people,” North Penn

School District Superintendent Dr. Curtis Dietrich said as he reflected on the last 12 years of his career.

On Thursday, February 17th, 2022, Dietrich announced he will retire at the end of June.

Throughout his time at North Penn, Dietrich was a leader in the community. From first being an

assistant superintendent to becoming the district’s superintendent, he has remained an important figure

in the district for every student, parent, and teacher, but his work in education started much earlier.

Dietrich has displayed an ability to lead ever since he graduated college.

“I felt a call to leadership. I was elected to the school board immediately after college. I was

encouraged to run for the board by some who felt they weren’t satisfied with the current candidates.

Since I had been the student government president of my class and represented my class in front of

the school board, the board members thought I would be a good fit, and I was elected after college,”

Dietrich said.

Soon after that, he dove deep into the education system, where he worked at all different levels.

Few have the perspective Dietrich has, and

his insights led him to where he is today.

“Initially, I was a part of our family

business, but the more I got involved with

the school board, the more I wanted to make

a career in the field of education. I started

by teaching chemistry and biology, then

became an assistant principal, then principal,

which then led to me becoming the assistant

superintendent and superintendent at North

Penn. I felt that call to leadership; I always

was a leader as a student and felt like I had

something to offer in the field of education,”

Dietrich said.

It was these experiences that shaped

Dietrich into who he is today, but there was

one early moment he remembers that pushed

him to fully envision his goals. In his time

as a high school principal, Dietrich recalls

helping a student who helped him realize the

effects of school, outside and inside of the

classroom, to a new dimension.

“One memory I have in particular stems

back to the time when I was a high school

principal. We had a student who was ready

to give up. He was an intelligent student who

was not achieving to his capability, had other

compounding, conflicting aspects of his life impacting him, and was ready to withdraw. He told me he

could not do this anymore,” Dietrich said. “I worked with him to overcome some of those immediate

challenges and to take the long view of things and be able to go on and earn his diploma. He made

contact with me some years later and was so grateful that I believed in him and stood by him and

encouraged him– memories like that stand out to me. Vulnerable moments where you have someone

who’s at a crossroads and reaching out for help; when you are there for somebody, and they come back

years later thanking you– that’s memorable.”

Dietrich also thanked Dennis Nemes, a former high school principal, who helped and encouraged

him throughout his early career. Nemes was Dietrich’s mentor and pushed him to become a principal,

which led to the ripple effect that landed Dietrich in the position he holds today.

Because of moments like these, Dietrich was able to face other difficult tasks in his educational

career, but one recent and pivotal moment is the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Across the nation,

many high school superintendents stepped down from their positions during the pandemic. Whether

it was due to stress or personal issues, high schools suffered from a lack of clear leadership. Despite

facing the same circumstances, Dietrich stayed with North Penn and guided the district throughout its

battles with the virus.

“I had no intention of leaving during a pandemic. I think by the time I finish at the end of June, we

should be pretty well through it, and that was very important to me. I don’t think the captain abandons

ship when you hit some rough sailing. I felt like we needed leadership and wanted to see the district

through that time period. I could have left earlier, but I didn’t want to do that. I did not want my legacy

to be that I left during a time when we hit choppy waters and needed a new captain. It was a big

consideration, but I wanted to see our way through this,” Dietrich said.

During this time, Dietrich knew he was nearing the end of his time with the district. Because of this,

Dietrich called upon what he learned throughout his years in the education system and worked with

many younger superintendents, serving as a guiding figure, or what those superintendents called him:

a “leader among leaders.” He became just like the mentor he once had.

“It was awesome to be seen as a leader among the leaders. When people are in crisis, like we

were during the pandemic, they look to others that are in leadership positions. Even leaders in other

districts looked for someone to emerge from the group; an individual who can have thoughtful and

appropriate responses to tackle situations,” Dietrich said. “As one of the more elder members of that

group, many of the superintendents looked to me. My ability to look at that situation and decide what

the plan should be helped lead others. That was a really interesting time period, and you feel like

you’ve arrived at a point of your career where others look to you, who are in the same position. It’s an

interesting phenomenon that is hard to describe.”

As this challenge eventually ends, Dietrich took time to reflect on the future of education. Though

he will be leaving soon, at least from an administrative perspective, Dietrich believes that education

will continue to a more technological-based shift, with online classes becoming normal in the schedule

of a school student. He says he has seen the

benefits firsthand, and that a hybrid model of

education may not be too far away.

Though Dietrich does believe this, he

still views the relationship between students

and those they work with as something

significant. COVID-19 might have thrown a

wrench into these relationships, but Dietrich

emphasized that they are still important to

develop students.

“The relationship that students have

with their teachers and their administrators

is still key and is difficult to have in an

online environment. It’s also important to

prioritize socialization between the students

themselves. Being able to do that is still a

part of the schooling process, and I believe

that the value of those two relationships will

not change,” Dietrich said.

As new advances and ideas arise,

challenges will come with them. Dietrich

thinks that two main issues will come to the

next superintendent.

“I think, commonly in education, there

will be financial challenges. One of the

very first things that I encountered as

superintendent was a significant downturn in

the economy. We needed to take steps that were difficult but necessary. I anticipate that at some point

in time, we will see that cycle again, where overcoming the financial challenges will be paramount

for the superintendent,” Dietrich said. “I also think that as you look forward to the next few years, we

are still going to navigate through where we stand and what we believe in as a nation. There’s a lot of

division and a lack of understanding of one another, and that is something that cannot continent. We

have to be able to grow and move forward and come out as better people.”

As for what’s next, Dietrich does not have everything figured out but has activities like traveling,

seeing his grandchildren, and going to road Penn State games at the top of his list. He also isn’t

counting out his love of education and his roots.

“Professionally, we’ll see what the future holds. There might be some opportunities to use my years

of experience and do some projects involving education. I’m also interested in reconnecting with my

roots. My roots are in the dairy farming industry; I grew up on a dairy farm; my family has an ongoing

dairy farm. I know it’s going to be an exciting time,” Dietrich said.

With a little over four months left with the district, Dietrich offered a bit of early-parting advice for

everyone he has worked with.

“Be true to yourself, do what is right, and be able to lay your head down on your pillow at night

knowing you gave it your all. You won’t have regrets because you’ll realize that did you what was

necessary and did what was right, and the outcome was the outcome you wanted,” Dietrich concluded.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 21

RETIREES

THE WRIGHT TIME TO CALL IT A CAREER

BY JESSICA WENDOWSKI, MAY 2022

While it takes some people many years and multiple tries to find their career, this treasured North

Penn teacher was lucky enough to jump right into her teaching career and spend all 35 years of it here

at North Penn High School.

Mrs. Lisa Wright is a beloved math teacher whose teaching journey is coming to an end. At the end

of this school year, Wright will be retiring after 35 years of teaching different types of math.

“Over the almost 35 years, I’ve pretty much taught everything in the department. I taught Geometry,

Algebra 1, back when I started we had a course called General Math and I taught that. Then I kind of

circulated through the other offerings. I taught a computer programing minor and one year I taught

AP Statistics, but pretty much for the last 24, 25 years, I’ve predominantly taught Pre-calc Honors and

Calc Honors,” Wright explained.

Not only had she taught a little bit of everything, but for 21 of her years at North Penn, she was the

Department Chair of Math for the high school.

“I was able to fortunately provide my input into just the math sequence and programming as well

which helped me feel a little more like I had an even greater impact,” Wright said.

With teaching in the high school for as long as Wright has, she was able to meet many people who

positively impacted her time at North Penn.

“Other than of course teaching 35 years of students, all with very unique personalities, I’ve also

had the pleasure to work with a lot of colleagues. In both the math department, and the high school in

general, that has really provided me with their own perspective into their own subject area and their

philosophy on teaching as well,” Wright emphasized. “I think through each of the years and through

all the people that I’ve worked with, has helped me refine my teaching craft and I would not be where

I am today without the input of everybody that I’ve worked with.”

As nothing is set in stone right now for what Wright plans to do after retirement, she explains that

after 35 years and an even harder past two years, all she wants to do is just take a breathe, relax and

enjoy herself.

“I want to pick up reading again and I enjoy gardening and I will probably do some of that. I have

a family so I’m hoping to be a little more involved with my kids and my grandchildren,” Wright

stated. “I always find it important to find something that challenges me so I’m gonna look for my next

challenge.”

After a long, growthful journey, it is now time for Wright to enjoy herself and her life outside of

North Penn High School. Although she will have time to breathe and relax, she has made it very clear

that she will passionately miss her time teaching here.

“Maybe after I relax a little bit, then I might think of what I want to be when I grow up because I’m

a firm believer that once you stop learning, you start dying,” Wright stated.

IN THE WAKE OF RETIREMENT, NEW CHAPTER BEGINS

BY JULIA SHEARER, MAY 2022

Not everyone is committed enough to dedicate twenty-nine years of their lives on one thing.

However, if you love what you do like Dianne Wakefield, time will fly. The long-time North Penn

science teacher will be retiring after this school year.

In 1993, Wakefield began what would turn out to be a successful career at North Penn High school.

Throughout the years she has taught Astronomy and AP and Honors Physics. She has seen many

students and teachers come and go, things changing before her eyes.

“I think I’ve changed, my students have changed, cultures have changed, the way kids dress have

changed. I would say the change has been good for the most part. It’s a nice place to work,” Wakefield

explained.

Along with her science classes, Wakefield was also the advisor of the Indian Cultural Association,

Robotics, and African American Awareness Association.

“[The clubs] are different from teaching, but there is a very positive impact on my life being with

those groups,” Wakefield said.

Wakefield has made the most of her time here, building bonds with students and teaching subjects

that she is passionate about.

“Being able to teach what I love, as content, is pretty satisfying. The best moments are the time in

the classroom with my students, I cherish them all,” Wakefield elaborated.

Spending almost three decades in North Penn high school has brought a lot of lessons and

experiences for her.

“I’m taking away 29 years of meeting new people, teaching new courses, and being with colleagues

that I appreciate. There’s too much positive. Very little negative,” Wakefield said.

You don’t always have to let go of something you’ve been doing for a long time, especially if you

feel passionately about it like Wakefield does about her field.

“I am probably going to continue to do something that is related to my field… I don’t want to give

up physics; I will probably tutor,” Wakefield said.

Wakefield is choosing to make the most of her retirement by setting goals and doing things she

loves.

“I want to be healthy, I want to be with my family. I want to wake up late. My biggest goal is to sleep

in until at least 8 every day,” Wakefield explained. “I have grandchildren now so I really want to spend

time with my grandchildren. I want to travel… I just want to enjoy the next phase.”

Through it all, Wakefield is especially appreciative of her students, and will keep memories of them

close to her after her departure from North Penn.

“I think this place has given me a chance to grow. I’ve let my peers and my content enrich itself, but

I am going to miss the interaction with my students. I know that’s going to be the hardest thing; not

knowing where they’re going or what they’re doing. I will miss that,” Wakefield concluded.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 22

SALUTE TO RETIREMENT FOR CHIEF SULLIVAN

BY JULIA NARDONE, MAY 2022

Not many know the value of being a part of the JROTC program. For those who do, it is one of the

most meaningful high school experiences they have with the pioneer for it all: Chief Dee Sullivan.

After fifteen years of running the JROTC program at North Penn High School, Sullivan is retiring

with lots of love for the program, her cadets, and all of the good work they have done throughout the

years. Alongside Major Jean-André Parmiter, they teach a variety of classes including Science of

Flight, Frontiers of Aviation, Aerospace Science, and Global Studies.

Before becoming a teacher at North Penn, Sullivan began her career in the US Air Force. She

enlisted in 1982 and from there, traveled around Europe treating military members as an Aerovac tech

and also doing humanitarian missions during over twenty-five years of service.

Sullivan began her teaching career at North Penn in 2007 to a program that didn't even have an

American Flag and transformed it into the distinguished program it is today. She teaches the leadership

portion of the course while Major Parmiter teaches the science and history portion. Among her favorite

topics to teach is flag folding which is the traditional method of folding a flag.

“The support of the community as well as the district to help us get the assets that we need to be

able to execute all the different things we do has definitely helped but the biggest thing is the cadets,”

Sullivan said. “The kids themselves are the ones that say “hey Chief can we do this?” and it’s cool

watching them from the planning stages to the actual day to the after stages, seeing a cadet execute the

steps necessary to make it a success.”

The JROTC program not only includes military education but also ample volunteer service that

gives the cadets experiences that can grant scholarships and life skills to be successful in the future.

“One of the best things is watching the cadets when they first come in and they're a little bit

apprehensive and they're not confident and with all the wonderful things we’re able to do in the

community they have to step out of their comfort zone and be in charge,” Sullivan said. “That gives

them self confidence and they know that they can do anything they put their mind to.”

Sullivan admitted that her retirement will be very difficult for her. She is moving to Delaware with

her husband and she still plans to travel as much as she can as her life in the air force has given her a

love for travel.

“I'm going to have such a hard time leaving, I love [my cadets] so much,” She said emotionally, still

planning on communicating with her cadets whenever they reach out.

“One of the biggest honors for an enlisted person is to be able to give what they call a first salute.

Several of my cadets throughout the years have asked me to give them [their first salute] when they

become officers because I’m enlisted so even though I was in for twenty-five years they outrank me

the minute they get commissioned. I've been blessed to go to their commissioning ceremony to give

them their first salute,” Sullivan said with gratitude. At the time of writing, she was asked to give a

first salute to one of her cadets in the Air Force Academy and is visiting Colorado to do so in mid-May.

More than anything is that Sullivan will miss her cadets and the memories made along the way.

“They're nuts, they’re crazy, they're fun. I never know what to expect from them and I love all of the

ideas they come up with. Sometimes they succeed and sometimes they don't but they still grow from

the experience,” She said, wishing her graduating cadets luck in the future as well as her current ones

continuing in the program. “The biggest thing is don't be afraid to fail, don't be afraid to try something

new. You're only going to grow from it.”

AFTER ILLUSTRIOUS CAREER, COYLE SPRINGS INTO

RETIREMENT

BY MILAN VARIA, MAY 2022

Walking to B-Pod in North Penn High School, classrooms mainly encompassing languages like

Latin, Spanish, German, and French stick out. Amongst those classrooms, however, is where Japanese

teacher Sensei Noriko Coyle resides. She will be leaving B-107 home, but also leaving behind quite

the legacy at North Penn.

Coming from working at Sony in Japan in the music industry, then teaching for an engineering firm

in Horsham, Coyle arrived at North Penn in 1999. After finding out about the opportunity through her

connections, Coyle went on to become the school’s Japanese teacher.

Flash forward to now, 23 years later, Coyle will leave the doors of North Penn one last time in June.

When reflecting on her career, Coyle mentioned what she hoped to leave behind: a strong teacher who

was there for her students.

“I want to leave behind a legacy of a teacher who was genuine, compassionate, and has done her

best. I want my students to carry strong character, kindness, and patience for others because they see it

in me. I want to leave a smile on their faces when they think of me,” Coyle said.

For this, there is plenty of evidence that her students loved her. Coyle recalled in 2011, North Penn

was cutting programs and considered cutting Japanese from the school’s curriculum. Despite this, her

students rallied behind her, gathered as much support as possible, and played a pivotal role in helping

Coyle keep Japanese at the high school.

“Many of my students, even some on vacation at that time, stood up for me and fought to save the

Japanese program and my position. They went to the school admin, local newspapers, and local radio

stations to do so. That experience always motivates me to be strong,” Coyle said.

For efforts of encouraging students to be passionate about what they care about and to lead other

students to certain goals, Coyle had been recognized with two awards in her career: one from the

American Association of Teachers of Japanese and was named on the Superintendent’s Honor Roll.

For Coyle, it is the people that mattered the most. Coyle said that her students opened her up

to a new world that created an environment where she could also learn, and her colleagues in the

world language department were always there to support her. Her unique way of teaching stuck with

everyone around her and ultimately made her realize what education meant to her.

Her teaching style is often intertwined with her cultural background. As Coyle is Japanese herself,

she helped students explore Japanese culture in the classroom, which added a nuanced approach to her

already carefully crafted classroom experiences.

“I've always shared my real life experiences with authentic materials to connect and engage with

my students. Students often have a chance to try something new. It could be, making Japanese food; it

could be throwing soybeans to demon - these are a cultural things. Writing haikus, catching real gold

fish, you know, all these kinds of things help them learn something new,” Coyle added.

Coyle hopes that experiences like these helped her students view their own lives in different ways

and that they will continue to learn a foreign language, whether it is Japanese or not.

“While science, technology, engineering, and math key skills to success for everyone in today's

world, I seriously think learning a foreign language is very essential, especially when [students] are

young. It will change their perspective that they experience other cultures and then you know, they'll

appreciate their own culture a lot more," Coyle said. "That’s what teaching is all about, creating a

better world for your students."


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 23

WESTERLUND VENTURING INTO THE BUSINESS OF

RETIREMENT

BY ACHILLES TRIANTAFYLLOS, JANUARY 2022

For 38 years overall, and 30 years at North Penn, Ms. Linda Westerlund has been all business. But

after February 4th, she will instead be in the business of retirement.

Westerlund’s path to her career in the halls of North Penn was a little less than direct, but since

landing here in the mid 90s she has certainly been a key part of the fabric of North Penn life.

“I moved to Lansdale with my family in 1994 and was hired by North Penn that summer. I have

been a teacher at the high school since then. I was a legal assistant for 6 years in several different law

firms. I also ran a daycare center out of my home for 2 years,” Westerlund explained.

When Westerlund retires, she plans to travel in and out of the US with her boyfriend and wants to

also visit her family in Tennessee.

“There are places in the United States and out of the United States

that we would like to see. I would like to be able to visit my family in

Tennessee more. I hope to spend more time with my two sons; and,

hopefully, I will have grandkids one day,” Westerlund said.

This can be one of the hardest decisions a teacher can make, but

after 30 years, Westerlund has come to the conclusion she will retire on

February 4th. Although she will retire from full time teaching, she plans

to substitute whenever she can.

“This was absolutely the hardest decision I have ever made. I really

thought I would teach until I was 90. But, I am getting older and there

are things I would like to do while I still can. I also know that I will miss

North Penn dearly so I plan to sub as many days as I can,” Westerlund

expressed.

But teaching wasn’t always the plan for Westerlund. Her mother

originally wanted her to go into business. Westerlund took business

classes in high school and her father was in retail. She had been intrigued

by the business world, but eventually, she knew teaching was the

profession for her.

NOCE A MIGHTY ROLE MODEL FOR EDUCATORS

BY PEYTON STAGLIANO, MAY 2022

From when she was young, North Penn FCS teacher, Kathy Noce, always knew she wanted to be

a teacher. As she prepares for retirement after 25 years as a teacher, Noce can proudly say she has

fulfilled all her hopes and dreams right here at North Penn High School.

Noce always knew she wanted to be a teacher but after graduating from Drexel University she had

a difficult time finding a way to get her career started.

“Coming out of college there were no teaching positions open and I wasn’t willing to relocate since

my family was here,” Noce stated. “I took a position as a social service agency director and was in

charge of Delaware County helping provide aides to people in the area who needed one.”

Noce’s job before becoming an FCS teacher was as an assistant dean at her alma mater, Drexel

University. Even though she struggled to find a teaching position, after only two years she converted

from teaching at Interboro School District to North Penn. Her first three years

in the district she worked at Penndale Middle School as an FCS teacher but

was then moved to North Penn High School as part of the District Department

Chair of FCS. Being on the chair means that she is responsible for the FCS

curriculum for not only the high school but all three middle schools as well.

Even though she is on the board, she still teaches multiple classes.

“The courses I teach now are preschool lab 1, 2, and 3 as well as intro

to education semester classes. Preschool lab is a very fun course that

allows students to be independent and create their own lesson plans for the

preschoolers.” Noce said.

Noce says what keeps her coming back every year is her students and her

love for watching them learn and grow as individuals.

“The things I enjoy most about teaching are my students. I always enjoy

the preschool lab especially because I get to watch the interactions and

relationships flourish between my students and the preschoolers,” Noce said.

Noce finds her class are different since hers are electives and not required

courses. She feels she gets students who are passionate and excited to learn.

“Being a teacher of an elective course is very different because your

students choose to be here and take this class. My students always want to be

here,” Noce explained.

“I majored in Business in college. After I graduated I realized that I really, really wanted to be a

teacher. I then went back to college to get certified to teach business.When I was a little girl, I would

line up my dolls and stuffed animals and would have “class” and would “teach” them. I have always

loved being around children and young adults,” Westerlund said.

It is clear, Westerlund is crazy about the business world, so much so that she is currently president of

PA FBLA. FBLA is another way Westerlund can combine her love of teaching and business. She and

her students have traveled to multiple states and have competed at national conferences.

“FBLA has been amazing! I have enjoyed working with so many students in so many different

ways. Many, many students were able to compete at the region, state, and national level. I was so lucky

to have been able to travel with students to the national conference in many states – California, Texas,

Florida, Tennessee, Illinois, Maryland, Georgia, to name a few, “ Westerlund explained.

Through her time as FBLA adviser, many North Penn students have also excelled in state and

national FBLA leadership positions.

“Several students served as State Officers for PA FBLA, which put

us on the Executive Committee and allowed me to work closely with

students and advisers from across the State. I have also served on the

Board of Directors and am currently the Board President. I have made

many really close friendships through PA FBLA,” Westerlund said.

It’s not difficult to figure out that Westerlund is retiring feeling fulfilled

and blessed to have had these years at North Penn.

“Working with students in the classroom and through FBLA has been

an honor and a privilege. I know how lucky I have been to get to work

with students on a daily basis. To see FBLA students succeed at things

they are interested in was so rewarding for me. Spending my days in my

classroom with all of my students has been awesome. I truly love each

and every student that I have had the opportunity to work with. Being

able to teach students about something they are interested in has been

rewarding as well. I have had the privilege of working with students for

several years – in more than one of my classes, as well as in FBLA. I can

honestly say that I have never ever felt like I was working and I enjoy

every minute with my students,” Westerlund reflected.

Noce has been able to build some great relationships with her students because they all share the

same passion and love for teaching as she does.

“Over the years I have built great friendships with my students and I have been so lucky to work

with so many great students. I like that I can learn from them and they can learn from me. My motto

is ‘I am a teacher first and then a friend’,” Noce said.

Besides from the interactions between her students and the preschoolers, every year Noce gets to

experience the send off of all she has mentored. The end of the year is a bittersweet moment for her

and she will forever miss the emotions she feels at the end of every school year.

“My favorite memories every year are the senior graduations as well as our preschool graduations.

Yes, you get to watch the little ones grow but you also watch your students grow. Every year I know

I am sending students to college who are going on to do great things whether they choose to become

a teacher or not,” Noce said.

In retirement Noce has plenty to do to keep her busy including visiting her children and grandchildren.

“I have three grandsons, one lives in Florida and my youngest son is now

moving to California. So I hope to be with my grandchildren a lot more and do

more of the grandparent thing.” Noce was also very excited because she will

be welcoming a new grandchild in September.

Over the years, Noce had some goals that she always knew where her main

goals as a teacher. She knew reaching them would present some difficulties

all in itself but if she stayed focused on what teaching really means to her, her

goals would come much more easily.

“One of my biggest goals I had as a teacher was to be a role model for my

students,” Noce explained. “I wanted to demonstrate how to be motivated, have

fun and just have passion. Passion is so important with a job like teaching.”

When asked if she felt she was able to achieve these goals Noce smiled and

simply responded with “Yes.”

Through all of her years teaching, Noce has learned many things about

herself and her students. Even though she is retiring she knows she can

continue to carry what she learned with her, “In my sixth period class we have

a motto I will never forget: remember you may be small but you are mighty.”


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 24

AS THE TABLES TURN, REICHWEIN ROCKS INTO

RETIREMENT

BY MOLLY AGRISS, DECEMBER 2021

After 23 years Mr. Curt Reichwein, a passionate, fun-loving technology-education teacher, will step

out of his classroom to follow the beat of a different tune.

Reichwein will retire from teaching but will step into the ownership of a record store in Phoenixville.

“I’ve had this incredible lifelong hobby, I have been collecting records my whole life. A guy who

owns a store that I frequently shop at is retiring from his retirement job, the record store. So he asked

me if I wanted to buy his record store,” Reichwein stated.

Reichwein went back and forth about this decision for a month, not knowing what to do. This was

an amazing opportunity, but he didn’t know how he could leave the job that he loves.

“Truth be told I was not planning on retiring, I figured I would at least go another two years,”

Reichwein explained. “[But] I had gone to bed the night before saying okay I am going to call in the

morning and say I will buy the store. I woke up in the middle of the night and said to my wife, ‘You

know I just can’t do this. This is insane, I still love teaching, my department is amazing, we are doing

great things with kids, I never planned to leave now, it’s not the right time and all these other things.’

And then my wife then said to me, ‘Why is it that we only let kids have dreams, why can’t you have

a dream that you chase’ and I looked her in

the eye and said, ‘Okay you’re right we can

do this.’”

With such a tough decision as this one,

Reichwein is feeling all different types of

emotions.

“It’s exciting and terrifying all at the same

time because it’s such a massive change,”

Reichwein said.

Music has been a part of Reichwein’s life

for as long as he can remember. From the time

that he was a little kid, he has always been

obsessed with buying records and listening to

them. Music means everything to him.

“Music, next to my wife and my children

is the most important thing in my life,”

Reichwein stated. “Music for me has never

been a background thing, it’s always been a

foreground thing.”

For Reichwein every moment has a song.

He has his own soundtrack for his life and his

memories.

“Music is the soundtrack to your life.

Every single event that has happened in

your life you can tie to a song. Every time I

hear, ‘Here Comes the Sun’ by the Beatles, it

reminds me of the first time I held my daughter. The song is forever tied to her and me in that bonding

moment,” Reichwein shared.

“The day I open my record store for the first time I am going to bring the first record I ever purchased,

and that is going to be the first song I ever play in the store.”

His passion for music, as well as teaching, are qualities that have been very apparent to his

colleagues.

“Curt is a living encyclopedia of music, a passionate educator, a pillar of ethics, a superb mentor,

and an amazing friend. I love him like a brother and wish him the very best on his next life adventure.

If he sells records like he teaches, he’ll have the best record shop in the country,” NPHS Tech-Ed

teacher Dr. Mike Voicheck explained.

From just knowing Mr. Reichwein from this 25 minute interview, I already know North Penn is

going to be missing a great teacher. Reichwein talks so passionately about teaching and his students,

you can just tell he’s an amazing teacher.

“The kids are great, and I know that sounds cliche because anybody who retires or leaves says that.

But the truth of the matter is that it is true. The kids are why we come here, the kids are why we get up

each morning to do this every day. Sharing in their excitement, when that lightbulb goes off and they

get it. I am going to miss them the most,” Reichwein shared.

Talking about leaving North Penn made Reichwein quite reflective as he looked back on the

experience he’s had and the people he has met.

“When I walk out of this room on Thursday

I will most likely shed a tear. It’s a part of me

and when you lose something that is part of you

there is a void,” Reichwein shared tearing up.

Reichwein may not be the only one shedding

a tear when he leaves.

“Curt has a genuine passion for teaching

and working with students that stretches well

beyond the curriculum. He sets the stage for

our Engineering Academy as he is often the first

teacher the students meet in the Introduction

to Engineering Design course. His passion

and drive ignite a fire in the students that carry

with them for their entire lives! Working with

Curt has been an absolute pleasure and saying

goodbye is like saying goodbye to a family

member, it’s impossible! To say he will be

missed is a gross understatement!” Mr. Mike

Boyer, NPHS Tech. Ed teacher reflected.

For Reichwein his 23 year teaching chapter

is ending but a new chapter where his dreams

come true is starting.

“Come see Deepgroove record in

Phoenixville, Pennsylvania on Bridge Street

sometime in February.”

A MESSAGE FROM THE KNIGHT CRIER ADVISOR

Thank you to all of our Knight Crier readers. In a time period where many people doubt the value of journalism, it is our goal to develop good writers at North Penn High School who

can someday continue to produce quality, free press so that journalism and media can thrive. Free press is the foundation of democracy and everyone has a story to tell. From these two

basic principles, good writers are born.

Kevin Manero, Knight Crier Advisor

ABOUT THE NORHT PENN KNIGHT CRIER

North Penn High School’s The Knight Crier is a student-run digital publication that provides daily news and diverse perspectives of the North Penn community.

The Knight Crier is also a full-year course that students can take. We encourage members of the staff and student body to offer contributions to this publication.

Submissions and letters to the editors regarding any articles can be sent to knightcrier@npenn.org.

All of our articles are available online, some of which have been shortened for this print edition. To read the full article, simply grab your smart phone, open

your camera, and scan the QR code.

Learn more at knightcrier.org


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 25

SENIOR GOODBYES

JULIA NARDONE

When I first entered high school in 10th grade here at North Penn, I was completely lost as to what I wanted to do with my life. In

picking my courses for 11th grade after a year of being so uninvolved, I knew that I had to try journalism, even though taking the step

to do something new was daunting. I ended up choosing to take Mr. Manero’s news journalism course anyways thinking, “If I dont try it

now I’ll regret it”. Taking that step ended up being one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. Being in The Knight Crier as both a writer

and an editor has given me more opportunities than I could’ve imagined having as a high school student. I am grateful to have had the

opportunities to interview so many influential people such as members of Congress, School Board directors, North Penn administrators,

and more during my time here. I am beyond grateful for The Knight Crier staff, Mr. Manero, and most importantly, my co-executive

editor Milan Varia who will go on to do great things in college. While my time at North Penn has been turbulent to say the least in the

past two years, one thing has remained constant: the stories of our district. I am grateful for each and every story I got to tell in my two

years of being in The Knight Crier, and I thank everyone who helped me grow to be able to.

MILAN VARIA

My time at North Penn High School was definitely unique to

say the least. With intense courseloads attached to two surgeries

while dealing with the pandemic, there was quite a lot on my plate,

but all of it was formative and helped me become the person I am

today. For my entire junior year, I sat at home with a broken leg and

crutches by my side, I learned so much from everyone around me

- virtually speaking. Through The Knight Crier, I found my voice.

Eventually, those virtual staff meetings became in-person for me,

and my time as one of two Executive Editors started. Coming

into class every morning and seeing the Great Gatsby cutouts in

the front of the classroom, talking with my staff and, exchanging

many quips with my fellow Executive Editor, Julia Nardone, made

going to school more worthwhile. Everyone always says it’s the

people you’ll miss most, and they couldn’t be more right. I never

realized how fast the time would pass, but I am grateful. Even if

I could have every wish I made granted, I wouldn’t switch out

my experience with The Knight Crier for anything. To Julia, I am

extremely happy to have worked with you this entire school year.

You’re going to do things that are greater than you can fathom.

Hopefully I’ll stop “pulling a Milan.” To Mr. Manero, saying thank

you simply isn’t enough. I’ve said it many times before, but my

life has changed for the better in so many ways. In your hands,

a lost boy became someone ready to take on the world. When I

leave the K-Pod entrance one last time, the one experience I will

remember most is my time in my second home at K239: my time

with The Knight Crier.

FRANKY WALSH

With my senior year coming to a close, a lot of nostalgia has begun to fill me about all the fantastic times I’ve had growing

up in this building. I entered this building for the first time 4 years ago as a ninth grader taking science of flight. I remember

my first day coming in from the cafeteria and trying to find my way from there to H-pod. I remember my 10th grade year of

taking photography based off a random meeting with Mr. Rabb who instilled in me a passion for photography and the arts. I

then stumbled my way into K-227 where I was struck with the fast tempo and high energy of Mr. Manero in public speaking.

When the pandemic was cast over my 11th grade year, I felt lost and terrified of not having a direction of the future, But luckily

I was paired with Manero for 11th grade English where he helped me find my love of literature. With the end of a strange 11th

grade year and a desire to complete the 3peat with Mr. Manero, I took a chance on News Journalism. Joining the staff of the

Knight Crier my senior year was the best way to fully experience North Penn and joining the newspaper further developed my

photography skills. I also got so much more from being apart of the Knight Crier in addition to photography. I’ve been able to

stand on the sidelines of football games and get a completely different view of the game, I was given the opportunities to go to

school board meetings and further lean about the politics of North Penn, and most importantly, I’ve learned a different way of

thinking and problem solving to make journalistic photos. I’d never would’ve been able to do this without the people who’ve

instilled so much time in me and helped form a drive in me to be better like Mr. Rabb, Mrs. Carrick, and Mr. Manero. I also

wouldn’t have ever been able to be successful if it wasn’t for the joint efforts of the staff but most importantly our executive

editors Milan Varia and Julia Nardone who constantly have to put up with my shenanigans creative prowess.


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 26

CLASS OF 2022

This list reflects all information seniors submitted for the 2022 senior

survey, by May 12, 2022, our print deadline.

MOHAMED ABDALLA

TAYMIYYAH ABDULLAH-DAVIS

SOPHIA AGATONE

NICOLE AGUILAR-BARBOZA

FAHMIDA AHAMMAD

ZOE AHLMARK

SAHARIAR AHMED

SIMON AHN

FRANCISCO AJANEL LOPEZ

ASEF AJMAIN

SAMEEN ALAM

ETHAN ALBANO

MAX ALEXANDER

EMILY ALLEN

RACHEL ALTEMUS

NY’MIRAH ALVIN

ABDELAH ALYASRI

ZOHA AMAN

AMÉRICA AMAYA

SYDNEY AMEIGH

DANIELLE ANDREA

MUHAMMAD ANJUM

ELIZABETH ARTADINATA

NALA ASHANTI

HANDOO ASHVIN

JORDON ATKINSON

LIAMS AUMENT

MARY AVALOS

WILNIEL AYALA

JESSICA BAEK

MIRZA YUSUF BAIG

JACK BAILER

JORDAN BAILY

BROOKE BAITINGER

RILEY BAKER

DANIELLE BAKER

GILLIAN BAKER

BROOKE BAKER

BRIANNA BALDWIN

GRAZIANA BALLADARES

ANGELICA BALLADARES

DEILY BALLADARES

RYAN BANHA

BEN BARBOSA

KYLIE BARCO

TASHAUN BARNES

BENJAMIN BARON

LIAM BARRON

SAM BARUFFI

GIONNA BAXTER

JADA BEACH

SEAN BEAHAN

TYLER BEAM

COLETTE BECHTEL

DYLAN BECK

ETHAN BECK

MATTHEW BENNER

ERIK BERGEY

MARTINA BESHAYE

MARTINA BESHAYE

DOMINIQUE BETHEL

LEAH BEZAR

ISHA BHATT

WILL BIEGERT

MCCC

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MCCC

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

EMPLOYMENT

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

MCCC

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

TOWSON UNIVERSITY

THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

GAP YEAR

EMPLOYMENT

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

NAVY

UNKNOWN

MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

LOYOLA MARYMOUNT UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

UNKNOWN

UNKNOWN

UNKNOWN

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

EAST STROUDSBURG UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

MCCC

OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY

SHIPPENSBURG UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

THADDEUS STEVENS COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

WIDENER UNIVERSITY

WIDENER UNIVERSITY

SPELMAN COLLEGE

JOHNSON AND WALES UNIVERSITY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

LUKE BITTING

EMILY BLANCHARD

BRYAN BLANCO

RILEY BLATTNER

MADISON BLIZZARD

ASHLEY BOHLING

TYLER BOHN

DARLYN BOLLA

BRYANNA BOLOGNESE

ALEX BOND

MATTHEW BOQUIST

YEILIN BORJA

JESSICA BOTROS

MAX BOWN

JASMIN BOYA

GERSON BOYA

SABRINA BOYCE

ANNORA BRADLEY

KAYLA BRANDT

JACQUELINE BRASTER

PATRICK BREEN

PATRICK BRENTSON

JESSICA BRESSLER

NICHOLAS BRESSLER

ELLA BROADHURST

CHASE BRODY

ALI BROOKS

BAILEY BROOKS

SKYLAH BROWN

JACOB BRUNO

NICOLAS BUCHNER

VU BUI

CLAIRE BURCIK

ELLA BURGET

DYLAN BURKETT

SKYLER BUSFIELD

SAMANTHA CABEZA

GIANNI CACCESE

JULIA CANTZ

MICHAEL CAPP

OLIVIA CAPUTO

AVA CARANGI

RICHIE CARMODY

MAX CARRACAPPA

JOHN CARSON

KELLYANN CASHLEY

MOLLY CASPAR

TUPAC CASTRO

ISABEL CASTRO

ANDREW CATALANOTTO

ISABELLA CATANESE

NATALIE CECIL

DAVID CHA

RADHIKA CHANDARANA

ALEXIS CHARLES

DELINA CHARLES

FERNANDO CHAVEZ

ANNA CHEN

CONNOR CHERBY

AH CHO

SARAH CHOI

GINA CHOI

SOPHIA CHOI

RACHEL CHOI

FARHAN CHOWDHURY

SELENA CHUNG

BRIDGET CLIVER

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

EAST STROUDSBURG UNIVERSITY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE

EMPLOYMENT

FRANCISCAN UNIVERSITY OF STEUBENVILLE

MCCC

EAST STROUDSBURG UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

MCCC

MCCC

EMPLOYMENT

THOMAS JEFFERSON UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

EAST STROUDSBURG UNIVERSITY

SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

ARCADIA UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA

MCCC

MCCC

EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA

EMPLOYMENT

BOSTON COLLEGE

EMPLOYMENT

GAP YEAR

UNKNOWN

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

MERCYHURST UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PARIS COLLEGE OF ART

ST. JOSEPHS UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

MCCC

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

LA SALLE UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 27

PEIGHTON CLUGSTON

ETHAN COHEN

NATALIE COLCHER

RUSSELL COLE

TIM COLLINS

SOPHIA COLLINS

JAYLA COLLINS

STEVEN COLLOPY

STEVEN COLLOPY

CANDACE CONNELLY

JOHAN CONTRERAS

PETER COOKE

RONEIL COOPER

JACKSON COOPER

KAYLEE CORBI

ANGELA CORDOVA

MATTHEW CORRADO

DAYNA CORREALE

LI-FEN CORREALE

ROXY CORTES

GINA COSENTINO

OUMAR COULIBALY

HANNA COX

ALEX CRAVENER

JULIA CRAWFORD

GENESIS CRUZ

QUINTEN CURRY-HALL

NELSON CUYUCH

MACKENZIE CZAJKOWSKI

SAMANTHA D'ORAZIO

MARISSA DACOSTA

LINDSAY DANKO

ANJALI DAVARA

SAMANTHA DEANGELO

HALEY DECKER

JOE DEFAZIO

ELIZABETH DELGADO

NICHOLAS DEMARIA

JILLIAN DEMETRIUS

JONATHAN DEMIS

JENNIFER DENNING

GRACE DENTON

HOCINE DERRICHE

HANNAH DESROCHER

BAYLEN DETWEILER

ARPITA DEVI

AARYA DHAKAL

ERIKA DIAZ

MARIN DICKMAN

ADRIANNA DINAPOLI

ANGELINA DINENNO

BRANDON DINH

NICHOLAS DIPIPPO

SAMANTA DISHA

TYLER DOHERTY

JOHN DOLAN

KIMBERLY DOMINGUEZ

CHRISTINA DOPPEL

OWEN DORAN

MALACHI DOSUNMU

AVERY DOWNING

CASSIDY "ADRIAN" DOYLE

CORINNE DRAGWA

TROY DRUMMOND

TALIYA DRUMMOND-COFER

KATHY DUARTE

SOPHIA DUONG

AMANDA DURAN

BROWN DYLAN

OLIVIA EARLEY

MADISON EARLY

KATHRYN EBY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA

MCCC

EMPLOYMENT

KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY

WALNUT HILL COLLEGE

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

EASTERN UNIVERSITY

MCCC

UNKNOWN

MOORE COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN

EMPLOYMENT

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

ARCADIA UNIVERSITY

MCCC

IMMACULATA UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

NEW JERSEY CITY UNIVERSITY

AIR FORCE

EMPLOYMENT

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

AIR FORCE

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

MCCC

DELAWARE VALLEY UNIVERSITY

GWYNEDD MERCY UNIVERSITY

ARCADIA UNIVERSITY

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY

GAP YEAR

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH FLORIDA

MCCC

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

MCCC

MCCC

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

GWYNEDD MERCY UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

ST. JOSEPH'S UNIVERSITY

PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

UNKNOWN

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

TOWSON UNIVERSITY

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF THE SCIENCES

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

EMPLOYMENT

OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY

MCCC

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY

SKYLAR ECKERT

MADISON EDELMAN

JALEN EDWARDS

RAFIC EID

NATALIE ELLIOTT

AINSLEY ENGLEMAN

MADDISON EVANS

JUSTIN EVANS

CAITLIN FALCO

JUSTIN FARLEY

CHEYDE FAULKNER

BROOKE FEENIE

INDIA FELDER

BENJAMIN FILLGROVE

ANNA FIORE

CADENCE FIORE

JAMES FITZGERALD

ZACHARY FITZGERALD

MEGAN FLANAGAN

CONNOR FLYNN

JAKE FODEN

KAYLA FOULDS

JOHN FRANCIS

KIMBERLY FRANCISCO MARTINEZ

SARA FRASE

JULIA FREDERICKS

CODY FROSHOUR

RILEY FROST

MOHAMMED FUAD

KYLE FUHRMEISTER

KAILEE GADD

JUSTINE GALICHON

LINDSAY GALLAGHER

AZIYAH GARLAND

JUSTIN GARTNER

JABRIE GAYMON

CURTIS GEORGE

PEYTON GEORGE

ALLISON GIANFICARO

MIKE GIARDETTI

ANDREW GIBSON

EMMA GIBSON

LINSEY GILBERT

ALEXIA GIORGI

THOMAS GIORGIANNI

MARIAM GIRGIS

JOVANI GONZALEZ

CARLOS GONZALEZ

JACK GORHAM

OLIVYA GRANDY

RILEY GRASS

KATRINA GRAY

KAITLYN GREEN

AMIRA GREEN

OLIVIA GREENBERG

AIDAN GREENE

DANIEL GREGORY

JACOB GRIECO

BRYELLE GRIFFIN

BRIELLE-SOLVEIG GRIFFITH-KEYSER

MADISON GRONBACK

BYRON GUERRA

HADASSA GUERRIER

CAROLINE GUO

ROLAND GUY

JACOB HABER

TRINITY HALSTEAD

DYLAN HAMMOND

JEFFREY HAN

KATHRYN HANLEY

OLIVIA HANNIGAN

AMARI HARDY

EASTERN UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY

HOWARD UNIVERSITY

KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY

BUCKS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

UNKNOWN

MCCC

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

LA SALLE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

CLARK ATLANTA UNIVERSITY

GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

PACE UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

MCCC

ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

MASSACHUSETTS MARITIME ACADEMY

UNKNOWN

UNKNOWN

PURDUE UNIVERSITY

DUQUENSE UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

DELAWARE VALLEY UNIVERSITY

KING’S COLLEGE

UNKNOWN

MCCC

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

UNKNOWN

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

EASTERN UNIVERSITY

VIRGINIA TECH

SHIPPENSBURG UNIVERSITY

MCCC

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

EMPLOYMENT

UNKNOWN

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

FULL SAIL UNIVERSITY

URSINUS COLLEGE

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

HOLY FAMILY UNIVERSITY

MARINE CORPS

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

DELAWARE VALLEY UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

MCCC

UNKNOWN

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE

EMPLOYMENT

PACE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

MCCC

WILKES UNIVERSITY

CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE

ARCADIA UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 28

SHREYA HARIKRISHNAN

HANNAH HARTNETT

GREG HARTWIG

SHAKIB HASAN

RYLEE HAYDEN

BRIAN HAYES

ROBERT HEATH

TRISTAN HEIDT

JULIA HEIN

KYLIN HEINS

SAMARA HEISEY

SIERRA HEISEY

GRACE HELLER

JOSHUA WILLIAM HELLMANN

REBEKA HENDRICKS

ANGELIQUE HENNING

MELISSA HERNANDEZ

KAITLIN HERSH

MATTHEW HERVIEUX

SHEYLA HIDALGO HENRIQUEZ

ANYEH HILL

JACK HILL

ISABELLE HILL

JORDAN HITTLE

ARIEL HITTLE

THOMAS HOANG

FIONA HODGSON

MANU HOGAN

LUKE HOLSINGER

JACK HOLZEL

LARS HOMAN

WILLIAM HOMONY

YOUNGBEAN HONG

SAZZAD HOQE

TAJRIMA HOQUE

MOHAMMED HOQUE

CAMERON HORNE

AIDAN HOY

LILLIAN HUBER

MOLLY HULL

RYAN HUNDLEY

AETHAN HUONG

MASON HUSKINS

FARAAZ HUSSAIN

LUNA HUTCHINSON

VAN HUYNH

NICOLE IACONO

NEVAEH IAMURRI

ABANOUB IBRAHIM

LISANNY INFANTE

ADITYA INGLE

RAYHAN ISLAM

RAUF ISLAM

THOMAS JACOBS

RAFFY JALAL

PRINCE-JUDAH JAMES

ALAYNA JAMES

MIANY JEAN

JEDORE JEFFERSON

DAQUAN JEFFERSON

RYLIN JEFFRIES

DAVID JENKINS

JONATHAN JENKINS

MAX JEONG

ERIN JESBERGER

MICHAEL JIMENEZ-MORALES

MICHAEL JIMENEZ-MORALES

ALEN JOBI

ELENA JOHANSON

ANIYAH JOHNSON

ANGELINA JOHNSON

JAMES JOLLY

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA

ARMY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

URSINUS

MCCC

PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

UNKNOWN

JOHNSON AND WALES UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

EMPLOYMENT

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

ST. JOSEPH'S UNIVERSITY

ARCADIA UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MCCC

GAP YEAR

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

CABRINI UNIVERSITY

EAST STROUDSBURG UNIVERSITY

MCCC

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON

MCCC

RIDER UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

HIGH POINT UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

URSINUS COLLEGE

BLOOMSBURG UNIVERSITY

DIGIPEN UNIVERSITY

MCCC

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY

MCCC

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

ARCADIA UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

EMPLOYMENT

CABRINI UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

ARMY

EMPLOYMENT

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

CHEYNEY UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

BOWIE STATE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

MCCC

UNKNOWN

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MCCC

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

TEXAS A&M

MCCC

TAYLOR JONES

BRIAN JONES

SOPHIE JOSSE

DAVID JUAREZ

LEXTYN JUCKNIEWITZ

JOSEPH JUDGE

CHLOE KACZKURKIN

JASMINE KAM

RHIANNON KAMNIK

YANA KANANI

ALEXIS KANDY

ASHLEY KANG

RENEE KANG

HANNAH KANG

BRIAN KARCHNER

MARGARET KEELEY

NOELLE KELLY

CARTER KEMMERLING

GABRIEL KEMP

CRAIG KENDZIERSKI

SIERRA KENNEDY

MATTHEW KERMIS

GAKLIN KHALIL

FAHMI KHAN

GRACE KIM

MARK KIM

ADAM KIM

JULIA KIM

GRACE KIM

GRACE KIM

ANDREW KIM

SARA KING

ALYSSA KISTER

ASHLEY KITCH

SCOTT KLEIN

JAMES KLEMMER

ZACHARY KLINE

MARK KNECHEL

DAKODA KNOLL

KORINNE KOBIERSKI

ISABELLA KOCH

REBECCA KOESTER

JAIMAN KONDISETTY

EDWARD KONG

DANIEL KONYK

CHRISTINE KOO

JASON KOSMIN

MAGDALENE KRANNICH

JACOB KRAUSS

ASSUNTA KRIEGER

NOELLE KUHNS

JUSTIN KWAK

SO EMILY KWON

AISLYN LABADIE

HANNAH LABRUM

JASON LACIANCA

BROOKE LAMBERT

AMANDA LANASA

BRIAN LANDES

JENNA LANGTON

JOSHUA LANTIERI

SAYA LAPREZIOSA

JACOB LARKIN

JOSEPH LARKINS

CHRISTOPHER LAROSA

ROSHAN LASHKARI

SAAD LATIIF

ASHLEY LAUB

TRIPPETTI LAUREN

MATTHEW LAV

KELLY LE

SEOYEON LEE

MCCC

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

UNKNOWN

MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY

THOMAS JEFFERSON UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

MCCC

UNKNOWN

WIDENER UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

THOMAS JEFFERSON UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

BUCKS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

MCCC

NAVY

THOMAS JEFFERSON UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PRATT INSTITUTE

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

THOMAS JEFFERSON UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY

LAFAYETTE COLLEGE

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

DICKINSON COLLEGE

MCCC

IMMACULATA UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY

BUCKS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

EXCHANGE STUDENT - SCHUBART

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

SALISBURY UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

BALL STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

URSINUS COLLEGE

CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND

WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

GAP YEAR

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 29

CAITLIN LEE

PHILLIP LEE

KENNEDY LEE

ETHAN LEIBIGER

INDIA LEIDY

TIMOTHY LEMON JR

KAYDEN LENTZ

JENNIFER LESSA

ERIC LEWIS

DESTINY LEWIS UPCHURCH

LAVENA LI

BRAYDEN LIEBEL

BEN LIM

HANA LINNEMAN

JOLYNN LIU

HONGJIE LIU

JULIANNA LO STRACCO

LEIGHANNA LOMBARDI

CHARLES LONDON

JEREME LONG

NICOLE LOSTAUNAU

CARLY LOWE

AMBER LUBY

OANH LUONG

ANTHONY LUONG

PATRICK LYNCH

LIAM LYNCH

KELSIE MACINTOSH

JULIA MACOSKO

BRIGID MAGEE-SKINNER

AUDRIE MAHAFFEY

RAJAT MAHEY

ANDREW MAIER

TRINITI MAINOR

SHOUVIK MAJUMDER

IRIS MALDONADO

MICHAEL MALIN

HANNAH MALLITZ

QUINN MARETT

GABBY MARONEY

CAEDEN MARQUETTE

JASON MARRERO

JACOB MARTINELL

HANNAH MARTINEZ

BEN MARTORANA

STEVEN MASCIANTONIO

MAX MASTROPIETRO

THOMAS MCCAFFERY

SEAN MCCARTNEY

VICTOR MCCOY

OLIVIA MCCOY

MEGAN MCCOY

AARON MCDONNELL

KAYLA MCDONNELL

YASIR MCDOWELL

GRACE MCGARRY

JOHN MCGILL

KAYLIN MCGRAW

LINDSEY MCGUCKIN

CATHERINE MCGUIRE

OLIVIA MCGURIMAN

EMMA MCHOUL

KEVIN MCLAUGHLIN

MAYA MEAUX

KATIE MECRAY

ELIAS MEJIA

JIMENA MEJIA

KAYDENS MEKSAVANH

ELYSE MICHAEL

ELAINA MILLER

ZACHARY MILLER

BRANDON MILLER

MCCC

SAVANAH COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

LA SALLE UNIVERSITY

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

MCCC

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

GAP YEAR

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

ARMY

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

ARMY

ARMY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MAINE

UNKNOWN

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

UNDECIDED

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

BRIDGEWATER STATE UNIVERSITY

AIR FORCE

UNKNOWN

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

UNKNOWN

UTI

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

LIM COLLEGE

UNKNOWN

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

CENTRAL PENN COLLEGE

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

EMPLOYMENT

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

UNKNOWN

MCCC

KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY

KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MCCC

WYATT MILLER

DARREN MILLER

AMIYA MILLETT

KAILA MILLS

RYAN MINDICK

PAIGE MITCHELL

ARUSHI MITTAL

OWEN MOCKUS

DHRUV MODI

KHADEJAH MOHIUDDIN

MARC MOKAN

ZEYAD MOKHTAR

CLETUS MOLONEY

SERAJUM MONIRA

BEATRIZ MORAIS

BIA MORAIS

MADISON MOROSKY

WILLIAM MORROW

MASON MOSCARDELLI

KATRINA MOSELEY

BENJAMIN MOSTOCHUK

SAJIA MOWRIN

KELLY MUELLER

TIMOTHY MUELLER

ELIZABETH MUELLER

RILEY MULLIN

ALLISON MURDOCK

AIDEN MURRAY

JAKE MYERS

RACHEL MYHRE

TRIBIE MYKERSON

JULIA NARDONE

OMED NASIRY

JOYANTA NATH

ERIC NAULTY

ABDULLAH NAWFEL

JUSTIN NGORN

BRIAN NGOV

DEYANA NGOY

CLAYTON NGUYEN

TYLER NGUYEN

JULIAN NGUYEN

RYAN NICHOLSON

MATT NINO

KARISHMA NITHOO

MD NOMAN

JULIA NORMAN

ALEXA NORMAN

HEATHER NORWITZ

DEVIN NUGENT

MAHIDHAR NUTHANAPATI

KELLIE O'BRIEN

KYLE O'CONNELL

JOHN O'MARA

ERIN O"DONNELL

RIVER WILLIAM OCDEN

AIDEN ODOM

TYLER OGUR

SUN OHM

NICOLE OLEYKOWSKI

JONATHAN OREA

SADIA ORTHI

WAIL OSMAN

VERONICA OTT

ANDREA PANAITESCU

AUGUSTO PANGO

NAMAN PARIKH

DHRUV PATEL

SHIVEN PATEL

TANVEE PATEL

VEDANT PATEL

ANGELINA PATEL

PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY

LA SALLE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

BLOOMSBURG UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

MCCC

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MCCC

RIDER UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

DELAWARE VALLEY UNIVERSITY

MCCC

EMBRY-RIDDLE AERONAUTICAL UNIVERSITY

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

MCCC

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

JOHNSON AND WALES UNIVERSITY

MCCC

SACRAMENTO CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

YORK ELECTRICAL INSTITUTE

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MCCC

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

EASTERN UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

UNKNOWN

JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

MCCC

ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

GWYNEDD MERCY UNIVERSITY

CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 30

ANGELINA PATEL

AASVI PATEL

OM PATEL

ROSHNI PATEL

VRUTTI PATEL

BHAVI PATEL

PRIYANKA PATEL

KARINA PATEL

DHRUV PATEL

CHARLOTTE PATTERSON

AKSHITA PAWAR

AUBREY PEACOCK

MATTHEW PEDICONE

ELIJAH PEREZ

GENESYS PEREZ-BERRIOS

FRANK PERILLO

GAVIN PERRI

JAKE PETTIT

ETHAN PEYTON

JONATHAN PFISTER

DAN PHAM

ANDREW PHAM

GISELLE PHUNG

JOSHUA PIROLLI

ALLISON PIRONTI

JOSHUA PLATT

IMANI PLAZA

MARISSA POHWAT

MADISON POLANSKY

SAM POLEN

OLEKSIY POLISHCHUK

NICHOLAS POLISI

MARCHELLE POOLER

DOMINIC PORRECA

DANIELLE PRESTON

TRAVIS PRINTZ

JULIA PROTOPOPESCU

KAYLA PUGLIESE

CHRISTOPHER PUIA

MILIND PULUGURA

THOMAS PYLE

VINCENT QIAN

OLIVIA QUALLET

EMMA QUIGLEY

SARA QUIGLEY

SHREYA RAGI

SADIA RAHAT

HASNA RAHMAN

MUHSININ RAHMAN

MOHAMMED RAHMAN

JORDAN RAMIREZ

BENJAMIN RAMOS

ADEEBH RANGARI

DYLAN RASMUSSEN

CONNER RASMUSSEN

NICHOLAS RAY

ANIKA RAZZAK

ELIZABETH REALE

JOSEPH REARDON

WILLIAM REAVIS

GAVIN REEVES

TYLER REFFORD

JOELLE REID

JAELLE REID

STEVEN REIGNER

GERALD REINERT

DYLAN REINHARD

OURANIA RENGEPES

BRANDON REYES

LOURDES REYES

ENMANUEL REYNOSO

SHANIYA RIDDICK-JOHNS

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MCCC

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

THOMAS JEFFERSON UNIVERSITY

THOMAS JEFFERSON UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

UNKNOWN

CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MERCYHURST UNIVERSITY

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA

JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

ITHACA COLLEGE

CAMBRIDGE NURSING ACADEMY

SHIPPENSBURG UNIVERSITY

BLOOMSBURG UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MARYLAND INSTITUTE COLLEGE OF ART

MARYLAND INSTITUTE COLLEGE OF ART

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

MERCY COLLEGE

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

PLYMOUTH STATE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

CARLOW UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

UNKNOWN

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

FLORIDA A&M

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

EMPLOYMENT

MORAVIAN UNIVERSITY

BLOOMSBURG UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

UNKNOWN

UNKNOWN

ZACHARY RIDDLE

DAVID RILEY

YENNIFER RIVERA

ABBEY ROBINSON

NICK ROCCATO

GRACE ROMANOSKI

AMIR ROSE

NAMIR ROSE

SHAMIRA ROVIRA

RICHARD ROYLES

NATALYA ROZINSKI

DELANEY RUSSELL

MENA SALAMA

JULIETT SALAZAR

MINDA SAM

THOMAS SAMOJLOWITSCH

DAMON SANCHEZ

LIZBETH SANCHEZ

ELLA SANFELICE

IYSIC SANTANA

JENNA SANTINI

ALANNAH SANTOS

ZAHARA SARWAN

NICHOLAS SAVA

RILEY SAXMAN

DONOVAN SAYSANA

FRANKIE SCARPIELLO

ALLISON SCHEITER

ROBERT SCHLEAR

NICHOLAS SCHNEIDER

ELIJAH SCHULDASKI

DYLAN SCHURR

TIMOTHY SCHWAR

DILLON SCOTT

MACKAYLA SECODA

BRIDGET SELB

TOBI SELIGMAN

MAYA SELLERS

EMILY SESSLER

DARREN SEYMOUR

ADITI SHAH

SHREENA SHAH

NADIA SHARIFI

RYAN SHARKEY

SUMONA SHARMA

KRISH SHETH

DAVID SHIN

SULIN SHIN

LAURA SHOLLENBERGER

CONNOR SHUTTER

MOHAMMED SIAM

SARAH SIKDER

AIDEN SILFIES

MAYA SIMPSON

IRENE SIMTOCO

DAMIAN SIN

SARA SLAWINSKI

DANNY SLOAN

MICAH SLUGG

PATRICIA SMIETANA

SEAN SMITH

SEAN SNYDER

MATTHEW SNYDER

JAYDEN SOBECK

NICK SOCKWELL

ANGELINA SOEDJARTANTO

ISABELLA SOLIS

ISABELLA SPARANGO

KAYLEE SPENCER

JACK SQUERI

ARJUN SRIKOTI

TREVOR STAAB

KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

CORNELL UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

DELAWARE VALLEY UNIVERSITY

EASTERN UNIVERSITY

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

ST. JOSEPH'S UNIVERSITY

MCCC

CAIRN UNIVERSITY

MCCC

EMBRY RIDDLE AERONAUTICAL UNIVERSITY - DAYTONA

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

ARMY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

INDIAN RIVER STATE COLLEGE

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON

EMPLOYMENT

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

EMPLOYMENT

VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY

VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY

CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC

MERCY COLLEGE

MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY

MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY

GWYNEDD MERCY UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

NORTHHAMPTON CCC

UNKNOWN

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

MARINE CORPS

EAST STROUDSBURG UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

EMPLOYMENT

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

PURDUE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH


May 2022 The Knight Crier

Page 31

LUKE STAKELBECK

ELIZABETH STARK

RYAN STENGEL

CAMERON STEWARD

ALEX STEWART

SHANNON STIMSON

HUNTER STITES

CHLOE STOCKMAN

LEAH STOKES

AMANDA STRENGER

ALEX STUMP

RYAN SULLIVAN

NOUR SUSU

AIDAN TAMBURRO

CAYDIN TATE

NICHOLAS TAYLOR

ALEX TAYLOR

CAITLIN TECKLIN

JASMINE TEET - BRYANT

DAFNE TERRONES

ERNESTO TEUTLE

DEJA THAXTON

EVELYN THOMAS

BREONNA THOMPSON

GIA THONGSANOY

ABIGAIL THORNTON

DHRUV THOTA

TANAV THOTA

JACOB TOLL

NICOLE TORNETTA

VANCE TORRES-MILLER

ERICA TOWNS

JULIE TRAN

ACHILLES TRIANTAFYLLOS

LOGAN TRIPLER

BHAAVI TRIVEDY

JESSICA TROXEL

SAMANTHA TRUNK

FLORA TSANG

SREYA TULI

ISABEL (SABRINA) TURNER

RYAN UHLER

MARISA UINI

EMILY ULRICH

SIDRATUL URBI

CAROLINA VALERIO

SENOVIA VANN

MILAN VARIA

EMILY VARILLA

LOUIS VAZQUEZ

RITVIK VENKAT

ANANYA VENKATACHALAM

DYLAN VERWEY

RUBEN VILLACORTA

JORDAN VILLARD

KYLIE VOEKS

EVAN VOLLMER

MEGAN VON ABO

NITTIDDA VONGPHACHANH

GLORIA VU

DEV VYAS

JAIVIL VYAS

EMMA WADE

DYLAN WAELTZ

MADISON WALDSPURGER

SAMANTHA WALTER

SETH WALTON

ANTHONY WANG

ERIC WANG

ALEX WARSAW

ADLENA WASHINGTON-BROWN

EMILY WATTS

MCCC

MERCY COLLEGE

MCCC

UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

EAST STROUDSBURG UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

EMPLOYMENT

TOWSON UNIVERSITY

ARCADIA UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

UNKNOWN

PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

MCCC

EMPLOYMENT

KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY

ALBRIGHT COLLEGE

MCCC

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MCCC

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

STEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

MARINE CORPS

BLOOMSBURG UNIVERSITY

ARCADIA UNIVERSITY

SOUTHERN NEW HAMPSHIRE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

ARCADIA UNIVERSITY

BLOOMSBURG UNIVERSITY

MARINE CORPS

WILKES UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MCCC

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

LA SALLE UNIVERSITY

COAST GUARD

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

HARVEY MUDD COLLEGE

MCCC

UNKNOWN

MCCC

SLIPPERY ROCK UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

PENN COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY

EAST STROUDSBURG UNIVERSITY

CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

PURDUE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

TOWSON UNIVERSITY

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

MCCC

NATHAN WAULS

JAMES WEASNER

DANIEL WEAVER

KYLE WEISS

REBECCA WEISS

CLAIRE WESCOE

LIAM WESOLOWSKI

PATRICK WHELIHAN

LAYLA WHITE

PEYTON WHITEHILL

ELLA WHITING

SYDNI WIBLE

DONOVAN WILLIAMS

TRINITY WILLIAMS

ELISHA WILSON

SAMUEL WILSON

ALLYSON WOLFE

EMILY WOODLAND

LOREN WOODRUFF

RYAN WOOLAVER

EMMA WORTHINGTON

MAREHAM YACOUB

SARAH YAKATAN

CALEB YANAGAWA

FANNY YANG

LILI YAP

SREENIDHI YARATHA

EUNICE YI

JUSTIN YOTHERS

KEVIN YU

NATHAN YU

EMILY YUN

JAYNE YUNASKA

DOMINIC ZAFFINO

SAJID ZAHID

ADAM ZAHIR

DYLAN ZAHIR

METHILA ZAMAN

GAVIN ZANCK

MIA ZIEGLER

ANTHONY ZIRPOLI

AVA ZOLLARS

KARA ZWISLEWSKI

JULIE ZYNWALA

KNIGHT CRIER STAFF:

Julia Nardone - Executive Editor

Milan Varia - Executive Editor

Molly Agriss - Content Editor

Emily Dahms - Content Editor

Franky Walsh - Staff Photographer

CJ Fiore - Staff Writer

Maureen Gambogi - Staff Writer

Yamuni Kaijumi - Staff Writer

Allyson Leddy - Staff Writer

Marissa Leibowitz - Staff Writer

Tyler Letcher - Staff Writer

Aiden Miller - Staff Writer

SHIPPENSBURG UNIVERSITY

ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MCCC

EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY

MCCC

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

MCCC

MCCC

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

ARCADIA UNIVERSITY

EASTERN UNIVERSITY

EMPLOYMENT

MCCC

PENN COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

NAZARETH COLLEGE

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

ELIZABETHTOWN COLLEGE

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

GWYNEDD MERCY UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

UNKNOWN

MCCC

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

DELAWARE VALLEY UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

URSINUS

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

GWYNEDD MERCY UNIVERSITY

UNKNOWN

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

LA SALLE UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

ARMY

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

MCCC

Maggie Robinson - Staff Writer

Eva Schuster - Staff Writer

Julia Shearer - Staff Writer

Peyton Stagliano - Staff Writer

Nina Walls - Staff Writer

Jessica Wendowski - Staff Writer

Emily Courtney - Staff Writer

Darren Ezernack - Staff Writer

Achilles Triantafyllos - Staff Writer

Kevin Manero - Advisor

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

Mr. Pete Nicholson, NPHS Principal

Mr. Kyle Berger, NPHS Activities Director

Erin G. Crew, Print Edition Extraordinaire

Gus Scaduto, Digital First Media

The North Penn Community

The North Penn School District


CURT IN CLOSING

BY MILAN VARIA

PAGE 20

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