Presentation - Pacific Gas and Electric Company

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Presentation - Pacific Gas and Electric Company

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CATEGORIES OF ATTENDEES

ASSOCIATION RED STARS

INDUSTRY GREEN STARS

EDUCATION SILVER STARS

GOVERNMENT YELLOW STARS

PG&E BLUE STARS

CONSULTANT NO STARS


Steve Kline

PG&E Vice President

Chief Sustainability Officer


California Workforce Education

and Training

Panama Bartholomy

California Energy Commission


Sector Strategy Context

Lisa Paulo, CPUC ED

Ellen Avis, Donald Vial Center


Energy Efficiency Workforce

and Sector Strategies

Lessons from the California Workforce, Education

& Training Needs Assessment

PG&E Sector Strategies Initiative

February 29, 2012

Ellen Avis (ellenavis@berkeley.edu)

UC Berkeley Labor Center

Don Vial Center on Employment in the Green Economy


New Jobs by Occupational Type

Specialized

Green, 2%

Professional

, 17%

Other, 15%

Key findings

Traditional

Trades,

67%

• $11b in EE investment

creates only 5,000 new jobs

in 2020

• Most jobs in traditional

trades

•Over 1000 existing training

programs

• Many niche green programs

have low placement rates


Sector Strategies

• Partnerships of employers, trainers, labor,

colleges and others for workforce planning

• Dual customer focus

• Employers have ‘skin in the game’ through

funding or hiring commitments

• Career pathways with stackable credentials


CA’s Workforce Training Infrastructure:

Commercial Building Trades Pathways

Pre-Apprenticeship

Community Colleges

Community-based

Organizations

Regional

Occupational

Programs

Training, < 1 Year

Apprenticeship

Carpentry:

Weatherization, Solar, Audits

Electrical:

Solar, Audits

Plumbing, Pipefitting,

Steam fitting:

HVACR, Solar Thermal

Sheet Metal Work:

HVAC, Audits

Labor:

Weatherization, Audits

1,840

880

500

330

420

Other: 500

TOTAL: 4,470

Work experience plus training,

3-5 years

Journey-Level Employment

Skills Upgrade

Apprenticeship

Journey Upgrade

Utility Energy

Center Programs

Community College

Upgrade Courses

Private Training

Organizations

Incumbent Worker

Training


Questions

• What workforce issue is impeding market expansion in

this area?

• What market segment is being targeted?

• What occupational track is this focused on? (trades,

professional, contractor, etc)

• What are the existing training resources?

• What are the appropriate certification mechanisms to

ensure high road work?

• What is the relationship between this job category and

the contractors doing EE work?


California Advanced Lighting

Controls Training Program (CALCTP)

Mark Ouellette

ICF International


CALCTP Mission

� Provide support to help sell, select, design and install

lighting systems for new and existing commercial,

industrial and institutional facilities that are:

� Energy-efficient & cost effective

� Installed and function correctly

� Improve the quality of the lighting for commercial facilities

� This program increases business activity for

contractors and creates jobs for skilled electricians


Enormous Opportunity to Save Energy

Through Retrofits

� Approximately 9 billion

square feet of existing

indoor non-residential

facility space in

California

� Millions of square feet

of outdoor lighted

space

� Vast majority have no

controls

Electrical Costs in

Non-residential Buildings

14%

2%

14%

1%

13%

15%

6%

35%

Outdoor lighting Indoor lighting Fans and pumps

Water heating Office equipment Space heating

Space cooling Other


A Collaborative Effort

� Program Started in 2008, expanded in 2010 with a $5

Million Department of Labor grant

� CA LMCC/IBEW-NECA

� ICF International

� Community College Chancellors Office: Advanced

Transportation Technology and Energy (ATTE) campuses

� California Lighting Technology Center, UC Davis

Pacific Gas and Electric

� Southern California Edison

� San Diego Gas and Electric

� Sacramento Municipal Utilities District

� 9 CA Workforce Investment Boards


CALCTP: A Comprehensive Program for

Electricians and Contractors

CALCTP Program Includes:

� Business Development Seminars

� CALCTP Sales Training Course—funded by TomKat

Charitable Trust

� CALCTP Systems Course (for mid-level nonelectricians)

� CALCTP Technical Course


Two Step Process To Become A Certified

Electrical Contractor

� 28 Training Facilities

Across the State

� 1,448 Electricians

Trained and Certified

Electricians


CALCTP Business Development Seminar

� For Electrical Contractors (Employers)

� Business training fees paid by contractors

� Job Creation Via Business Development

� New Construction is way down; retrofitting is the big

countercyclical opportunity for Contractors

� Full Day Class

� Marketing

� Sales

� PR

� Project Development

� Finance


Two Step Process To Become A Certified

Electrical Contractor

� Contractor has top management

successfully complete the

CALCTP Business

Development course.

� Contractor ‘s middle managers

have successfully completed

the CALCTP Systems course

� 55 Certified Electrical

Contractors

� 259 Contractors Making

Progress Toward

Certification


Electric Hub at CALCTP Website

www.calctp.org


Impact of CALCTP Program for Electricians

“The CALCTP program connected the dots for me. It would have

taken me six years in the field to cover what I learned. This program

is a must for all electricians.”

Macario Musquez, Electrician, Collins Electrical Co., Inc.


Impact of CALCTP on Electrical Contractors

“As a result of the

program, we have hired

a sales professional and

are adding energy

auditing to our services.

The program has

expanded our business

model”


Preliminary Energy Sector

Employment and Regional

Training Information


Topics

� Region’s Energy Sector Workforce

� Real-time employment opportunities

� Projected employment opportunities

� Projected demand and supply

� Profiles and Feedback from Energy Professionals

� Regional Training and Education Infrastructure

� Next Steps


Region’s Energy Sector

Workforce


Real-Time Employment Opportunities

SolarTech

Weekly Jobs Summary

Q4 2011

Extracted from 326 Energy Efficiency Job Ads

70%

Energy efficiency – total unique Q4 2011 postings: 326

Sources of Data: employer websites, Craigslist, SimplyHired, LinkedIn

Regional Scope: San Francisco Bay Area (includes North Bay, East Bay,

San Francisco, Peninsula, and South Bay)


Real-Time Employment - Most Common

Skills Listed on Energy Sector Job Ads

� Employers seek:

� 2-5 years working experience in highly quantitative

environments

Electrical Engineering/Construction experience (25%)

� Software Development (25%);

� HVAC (15%)

� Project Management Skills (10%)

� Solid writing / presentation skills

� Good soft skills

Sources:

•Workforce Institute 2012 - Analysis conducted for/discussions with Advisory Council

•SolarTech, Weekly Jobs Summary, Q4 2011


Top-Level Energy Professional

Taxonomy used in 2016 projections


Energy Sector Industries –

2016 Projections

1. Industrial Building Construction

2. Commercial and Institutional Building Construction

3. Nonresidential electrical contractors

4. Nonresidential plumbing and HVAC contractors

5. Air Purification Equipment Manufacturing

6. Industrial and Commercial Fan and Blower Manufacturing

7. Heating Equipment (except Warm Air Furnaces) Manufacturing

8. Air-Conditioning and Warm Air Heating Equipment and Commercial

and Industrial Refrigeration Equipment Manufacturing

9. Relay and Industrial Control Manufacturing

10. Architectural Services

11. Engineering Services

12. Drafting Services

13. Building Inspection Services


Industry and Occupations Data through

2016

� Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency

� 67 Occupations Codes

Trades to Service Occupations

� Across 13 Relevant Industry Codes

Manufacturing to Construction to Service

� In 19 PG&E Service Area Counties

� Mapped to Instructional Programs


Preliminary Energy Sector Data – 2016

Projections

� Region’s energy sector trends track statewide energy

sector trends

� 2006-2011 - 11.0% decline in employment

� vs. 11.4% statewide

� 2011-2016 - 6.6% employment growth

� vs. 5.1% statewide

� Opportunity for greater alignment between training

offerings and employer needs, with focus on skilled

workers

� Challenging to line up data given employer preferences for

experienced candidates versus recent graduates


Projected Job Openings 2012 - 2016

Top 20 Occupations = 60% of job Openings

Electricians

Plumbing

Carpentry

Managers

General

Management

Finance

Accounting

Top 20 Jobs Represent 80% of

Total Annual Openings

Civil

Mechanical

Electrical

Managers

General


Statewide Energy Workforce 2020

� 2/3 jobs will be in construction trades

� 17% in architecture and engineering,

management, and public administration (including

utility and third-party program administrators)

� 16% in manufacturing, advertising, office

administration, and other industries

Data from per the California Workforce Education and Training Needs

Assessment for Energy Efficiency, Distributed Generation, and Demand

Response, University of California, Berkeley, 2011


Uber Energy Professionals –

Profile and Feedback


Uber Energy Professional (UEP) Profile

� 21-Question Survey

Company & Job Profile

� Energy Efficiency Industry Experience

� Educational Background

� Interview

� Job Functions, Tasks

� Knowledge, Skills, Abilities (KSAs)

� Industry Trends, Occupational Changes

� Knowledge Maps


UEP Profile

Company Primary & Secondary Line of Business

Primary Secondary

Job Function


UEP Profile: Work Experience

Years in Energy Efficiency

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

Relevant EE Practices to Current Job

Building

Envelope

HVAC Weatherization Lighting Operations &

Maintenance

Other


UEP Profile: Education

Architecture

Other

Business

Science &

Math

Engineering

Master's

Doctorate

Associate

Bachelor's


Feedback from Employers

� Concern: education program lag time

� Emphasis: Up-skilling incumbents

� Concern: Competition from other training and

education providers– prefer internal training

� Employers intrigued: Broader PG&E education

and training perspective



CA Employer Feedback is Consistent

with Other Regions

On-the-job training

In-house classroom

Online training

Only hire workers who are already trained

Trade apprenticeship programs

Community college courses

Other

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%

Data from Green Jobs in the in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and

Virginia, ICF International, 2011 – Training Used by Employers to

Prepare Workers for Green Jobs

DC

MD

VA


Contract Education Example: Energy

Efficiency in Building Systems

� Ten Week, 80 hour evening course

� Expert practitioner guest lecturers

� Curriculum Elements

� Energy Efficiency Business Cases

� Envelope

� Lighting

� HVAC

� Integrated Design

� Renewables and On-Site Power

� Class Projects, Career Roundtable, Fieldtrips


Preliminary Assessment of Regional

Education and Training

Infrastructure


Sources of Talent

Incumbent Workers

Dislocated Workers

Student Pipeline


Capitalizing on the Dislocated Worker

Talent Pool

Re-purposing

Careers


Market Penetration by IOU Energy Training Centers

Industry Area

Market Actors

(Statewide)

Estimated Reach

by Centers

Percent Reached

(Statewide)

HVAC and Refrigeration 19,700 9,427 44%

Government Agency/Regulatory/Inspector 12,500 3,263 26%

Engineering/Architectural Design 58,200 13,053 22%

Lighting 68,300 8,339 12%

Construction 161,200 9,064 6%

Boilers/Water Heating Sales 56,000 3,263 6%

Other 55,800 2,901 5%

Motors 49,400 2,538 5%

Facility Operations and Maintenance 163,000 3,263 2%

Energy Technology Research/Consulting N/A 5,801 N/A

Pumping/Hydraulic Equipment N/A 2,175 N/A

Renewables N/A 5,076 N/A

Don’t Know/Refused N/A 2,175 N/A

Source, Opinion Dynamics (2010) p58

WE&T Report, page 191


University Programs Statewide

Departments and Programs

Multidisciplinary Energy and Energy

Efficiency Specific Programs

Engineering Programs

Number of

Programs

Average Number

of Graduates Per

Year Per Program

Number of

Graduates, 2009

16 37 592

Civil Engineering 45 49 2,212

Mechanical Engineering 58 46 2,651

Electrical Engineering 54 56 3,049

Architecture 24 58 1,402

Construction Management 15 22 330

Scope of University Programs, 2009

Total 212 45 10,236

WE&T Report, page 133


CSUs in PG&E Service Area

680

250

122

CSUs with Tier 1 Programs

Civil

Engr

ME Elect

Engr

Arch Constr

SLO X X X X X

Chico X X X

Sacramento X X X X

Fresno X X

East Bay X

San Jose X X

Bakersfield X

Numbers indicate total

annual job openings by region


Community College Programs Statewide

Occupational Group/Program

Focus

Architecture, Architectural

Technology, and Architectural

Drafting

Engineering Technology and

Drafting, including Civil,

Mechanical, and Electrical

Total

Programs

Average

Associate

Degree Units

Total # of

Degrees

Awarded (08-

09)

Average

Certificate

Units

Total # of

Certificates

Awarded

(08-09)

98 31 251 33 195

193 32 190 33 316

Engineering, General 69 42 208 27 26

Construction Trades

(Construction Management,

Construction Crafts

Technology, Carpentry,

Electrical, Public Works,

Plumbing, and other)

Environmental Control

Technology (HVAC)

138 30 189 36 546

71 37 46 37 402

Total 569 34.4 884 33.2 1,485

Source: California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office

WE&T Report, page 161


Community Colleges in PG&E Service Area

915

373

185

Community Colleges with Tier 1 Programs

Bay Area

De Anza

Diablo Valley

Evergreen

Foothill

Laney

San Jose

Santa Rosa

Sacramento/

North

American River

Butte

Cosumnes River

Shasta

Central

Valley

Delta

Fresno

Merced

Central

Coast

Cuesta

Hartnell

Numbers indicate total

annual job openings by region


To Be Addressed

Carpenter

Cement Mason

Electrician

Trade

HVAC Service Tech & Mechanic

Heat and Frost Insulator

Laborer

Stationary / Operating Engineer

Plumber / Pipefitter / Steamfitter

Roofer / Waterproofer

Sheet Metal Worker

Sprinkler Fitter

WE&T Report


Summary

� Colleges provide a pipeline of students for energy

efficiency occupations

� CSUs and CCs are also a source of customized

programs designed to meet specific industry

needs (e.g., contract and extension programs)


Technology-Enabled Learning

Robert Marcial, PG&E

Lisa Nonamaker, ICF International


Pathway Model Demonstration


Summary Points

� Programs and incentives driving demand

� Positive job growth for the Sector

� Structural mismatch in candidate skills

� Need for flexible training arrangements,

� Include all types of education and training

programs in approach


The Need

A workforce capable of

deeper penetration of the market

to meet CPUC Strategic Plan goals


Visualizing the Solution

Integrated Energy

Solutions

(Graduate Level)

CSU East Bay

Business Engineering

Business

Development

(Workforce Institute)

Commercial

Energy Auditor

(CC San Francisco)

Core

Curriculum

University

Transfer

(Foothill, planned)

Commercial

PV Design

(Foothill)

Sustainability

Engineering

(Foothill)


Approach

� Capitalize on multiple talent sources

� Incumbent workers

� Dislocated workers

� Student pipeline

� Build industry/education partnerships

� For priority occupations

� Sustainable and Flexible

� Execute

� Collaborative model


Proposed Outcomes

� Clear Focus

� Priority occupations

� Leveraged resources

� Deliverables

� Leadership

� Industry and education

� A Workable Plan

� Collaborative model


Working Sessions


Building the Sector Strategy

Working Session 1

� Identify priority workforce needs

� Suggest alternatives for collaboration

Lunch

Working Session 2

� Establish leadership

� Recommend high-level plan


Schedule

Working Session 1 -- 45 Minutes

Lunch -- 30 Minutes

Working Session 2 -- 45 minutes

Readouts -- 30 minutes

Conclusions and wrap up


Feedback from

Working Sessions


A Platform for Deeper Market

Engagement

Sector Strategy

Addressing Priority

Workforce Needs

Facilitating Stakeholder

Engagement

Creating Sustainable

Career Pathways

Developing Replicable

Best Practices

Applied

to

Deeper

Engagement

Commercial

& Industrial

Market


Sector Strategy: Key Elements

Leadership

� Steering Committee

� Advisory Councils for specific education programs

The Plan

� Priority occupations

� Target career pathways

� Execution team development and planning

Execution

� Long-term strategy

� 2012 Deliverables


What’s Next

Crystallize

Recommendations from

Working Sessions

Into Action Plan

Develop the

Leadership Team

Create the Plan

Develop the

Execution Team

Execute

Feb 29 April 30


Wrap-up


AB 32 Mandates

2020:

� Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 30% from BAU*

� Achieve statewide energy mix of 33% renewables

2050:

� Reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 80% of 1990

levels

*Business as Usual

*Business As Usual


AB 32 Workforce Policy

Ensure that California will have a green technology

workforce

to address the challenges and opportunities

presented by the transition to a clean energy future.


Sector Strategy: PG&E Role

Build Foundational Elements

� Manage a data-driven approach

� Identify priority workforce needs

� Map existing education programs

� Add Energy Center capacity via online technology

Facilitate Stakeholder Engagement

� Convene leadership meetings

� Develop and leverage synergistic relationships

� Create a common communications platform


Sector Strategy: Moving Ahead

Energy Efficiency

Industry

IOUs

CPUC / CEC

Education

Labor

Workforce Investment

System


Thank You

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