26.07.2022 Views

KLC Step-by-Step Guide to Examine Homelessness & Affordable Housing in Your City

KLC’s Step-by-Step Guide to Examine Homelessness and Affordable Housing in Your City is a compilation of up-to-date information and resources, including local contacts for homelessness services. It also includes considerations for communities that want to attract housing developments and more.

KLC’s Step-by-Step Guide to Examine Homelessness and Affordable Housing in Your City is a compilation of up-to-date information and resources, including local contacts for homelessness services. It also includes considerations for communities that want to attract housing developments and more.

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS

You also want an ePaper? Increase the reach of your titles

YUMPU automatically turns print PDFs into web optimized ePapers that Google loves.

HOW TO<br />

A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO<br />

EXAMINE<br />

HOMELESSNESS<br />

AND AFFORDABLE<br />

HOUSING IN<br />

YOUR CITY<br />

KENTUCKY LEAGUE OF CITIES MEMBER & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT<br />

JULY 2022 EDITION<br />

klc.org<br />

800.876.4552


EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS<br />

AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING<br />

IN CONTENTS<br />

YOUR CITY<br />

Overview................................................................................................................................................................................ 3<br />

What is <strong>Homelessness</strong>?...................................................................................................................................................4<br />

Who Experiences <strong>Homelessness</strong> and <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Insecurity?...............................................................................6<br />

The Po<strong>in</strong>t-<strong>in</strong>-Time (PIT) and K-Count - “On the Street” Data <strong>in</strong> <strong>Your</strong> Own Community................... 10<br />

Causes of <strong>Homelessness</strong>................................................................................................................................................ 11<br />

Local Resources for Persons Experienc<strong>in</strong>g <strong>Homelessness</strong> .............................................................................13<br />

<strong>Affordable</strong> <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong>: A Commonwealth Crisis.......................................................................................................15<br />

Who Gets <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Fund<strong>in</strong>g, and How Can Cities Support the Process?..................................................18<br />

Can My <strong>City</strong> Use American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) Funds for <strong>Homelessness</strong> and <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong>?...... 21<br />

Grants................................................................................................................................................................................... 22<br />

Attract<strong>in</strong>g <strong>Affordable</strong> <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Developers........................................................................................................ 23<br />

Six <strong>Step</strong>s <strong>to</strong> Get Started <strong>in</strong> <strong>Your</strong> <strong>City</strong> ................................................................................................................... 25<br />

Helpful Contacts............................................................................................................................................................. 28<br />

Preferred Term<strong>in</strong>ology, Acronyms, and Glossary of Terms.......................................................................... 31<br />

Document and Audiovisual L<strong>in</strong>ks............................................................................................................................ 32


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

OVERVIEW<br />

Most people experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness <strong>in</strong> Kentucky are not highly visible. While they <strong>in</strong>clude people<br />

on the street or sleep<strong>in</strong>g under a bridge, most people who are experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness are liv<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> a<br />

car, doubled up with someone else, or bounc<strong>in</strong>g from place <strong>to</strong> place. Beyond that, there are those that<br />

are homeless for all <strong>in</strong>tents and purposes because they live <strong>in</strong> dilapidated homes they cannot afford <strong>to</strong><br />

repair. The face of “homelessness” is not what you th<strong>in</strong>k, and that is the most important po<strong>in</strong>t for anyone<br />

concerned about homeless and hous<strong>in</strong>g issues <strong>to</strong> understand.<br />

View a video profile about a Kentuckian who overcame homelessness - “You Never Know Who’s Homeless”<br />

<strong>City</strong> leaders want solutions. At the same time, cities must be practical, visionary, and creative.<br />

<strong>Homelessness</strong> and affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g affect most every city <strong>in</strong> Kentucky and are challenges that need <strong>to</strong><br />

be addressed <strong>by</strong> local leaders. In 2021, the Kentucky League of Cities (<strong>KLC</strong>) endeavored <strong>to</strong> research and<br />

present valuable <strong>in</strong>formation <strong>to</strong> <strong>KLC</strong> members about homelessness, hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>security, and affordable<br />

hous<strong>in</strong>g. The effort <strong>in</strong>cluded our first <strong>Homelessness</strong> Summit: <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> and Hope <strong>in</strong> November 2021. As an<br />

ongo<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>itiative, <strong>KLC</strong> cont<strong>in</strong>ues <strong>to</strong> provide practical and useful <strong>in</strong>formation, education, and contacts.<br />

While cities do not directly provide a lot of the services <strong>to</strong> <strong>in</strong>dividuals experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness, they can<br />

identify and support those services that exist, and they can serve as a community convener.<br />

<strong>City</strong> officials can educate themselves as <strong>to</strong> what their community looks like <strong>in</strong> terms of affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g<br />

s<strong>to</strong>ck, job wages, and can beg<strong>in</strong> <strong>to</strong> look at ways <strong>to</strong> attract projects <strong>in</strong> their city that address the lack of<br />

hous<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

Professionals <strong>in</strong> the homeless/social services sec<strong>to</strong>rs encourage city leaders <strong>to</strong> act because the local<br />

challenges of homelessness and hous<strong>in</strong>g will not be resolved without some level of <strong>in</strong>volvement from local<br />

leaders. One Kentucky professional said, “It has been my experience that if elected leadership doesn’t care,<br />

noth<strong>in</strong>g really is impactful over a long period of time, and the system doesn’t change.” Cont<strong>in</strong>ued progress<br />

is needed and is possible when people and organizations work <strong>to</strong> make a difference. While homelessness<br />

looks different <strong>in</strong> each community, it is a reality. Another professional stated, “Local government leadership<br />

is essential <strong>to</strong> address<strong>in</strong>g any community issue. <strong>Homelessness</strong> is no different. Local government leaders are<br />

uniquely qualified <strong>to</strong> consider issues from a holistic perspective and <strong>to</strong> leverage resources others cannot.”<br />

So, what is the role for cities regard<strong>in</strong>g homelessness? The first step is recogniz<strong>in</strong>g and acknowledg<strong>in</strong>g the<br />

problem.<br />

Refer <strong>to</strong> the Preferred Term<strong>in</strong>ology, Acronyms, and Glossary of Terms.<br />

“Effectively end<strong>in</strong>g homelessness means that the community has a response system<br />

that is able <strong>to</strong> prevent homelessness from happen<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> the first place, act<strong>in</strong>g <strong>to</strong><br />

ensure people are rehoused quickly when homelessness does occur, and the supports<br />

necessary <strong>to</strong> ensure homelessness does not occur aga<strong>in</strong>.”<br />

- Polly Ruddick, Direc<strong>to</strong>r, Office of <strong>Homelessness</strong> Prevention & Intervention<br />

Lex<strong>in</strong>g<strong>to</strong>n-Fayette Urban County Government<br />

3


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

WHAT IS HOMELESSNESS?<br />

<strong>Homelessness</strong> is a rare occurrence, and it isn’t what most people th<strong>in</strong>k it is. Kentucky’s most recent<br />

statistics pa<strong>in</strong>t an abstract picture that <strong>in</strong>cludes social and human issues, unaffordable hous<strong>in</strong>g, and<br />

disconnected systems of localized service providers. In every region of our commonwealth, there are<br />

organizations do<strong>in</strong>g great work, yet there rema<strong>in</strong>s a stigma associated with <strong>in</strong>dividuals and families<br />

without a home and even those provid<strong>in</strong>g homeless services. It is a reality that homelessness exists <strong>in</strong><br />

every community <strong>in</strong> Kentucky. Whether it is highly visible or not, it impacts health care, education, law<br />

enforcement, fire and EMS services, code enforcement, economic development, hous<strong>in</strong>g, and overall city<br />

management. And it impacts people.<br />

Persons experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness are often hard <strong>to</strong> identify <strong>in</strong> that others may have no idea that they are<br />

without a home. Typically, when we th<strong>in</strong>k homeless, we envision a person liv<strong>in</strong>g outdoors on the streets,<br />

<strong>in</strong> parks, hidden encampments, and occasionally <strong>in</strong> hotels or shelters when resources can be provided. But<br />

there are thousands of people <strong>in</strong> Kentucky “couch surf<strong>in</strong>g,” liv<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> cars, and mov<strong>in</strong>g from place <strong>to</strong> place<br />

without a permanent home.<br />

A Commonwealth Issue – Urban, Suburban, and Rural<br />

Each w<strong>in</strong>ter, Kentucky participates <strong>in</strong> the U.S Department of <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> and Urban Development’s (HUD)<br />

annual Po<strong>in</strong>t-<strong>in</strong>-Time (PIT) count. The PIT occurs on one night at the end of January. In 2021, the count<br />

was not conducted due <strong>to</strong> COVID. In 2022, the count was moved <strong>to</strong> February due <strong>to</strong> weather and ongo<strong>in</strong>g<br />

COVID concerns. The count is an effort <strong>to</strong> identify the number and characteristics of people stay<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>in</strong> emergency shelters, transitional hous<strong>in</strong>g programs specifically for people who are homeless, and<br />

those sleep<strong>in</strong>g outside or <strong>in</strong> other places not meant for regular human habitation (e.g., cars, abandoned<br />

build<strong>in</strong>gs). It also <strong>in</strong>cludes data supplied <strong>by</strong> services and nonprofits (<strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g churches) provid<strong>in</strong>g shelter<br />

<strong>to</strong> those experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness.<br />

As of January 2020 (most recent data), Kentucky Statistics Show<br />

An estimated 4,011 people experience homelessness on any given day. More than 600 were <strong>in</strong>dividuals<br />

experienc<strong>in</strong>g chronic homelessness.<br />

• Public school data reported <strong>to</strong> the U.S. Department of Education dur<strong>in</strong>g the 2018-2019 (most<br />

recent) school year shows that an estimated 24,177 public school students experienced<br />

homelessness over the course of the year.<br />

• One <strong>in</strong> 14 Kentucky children under age six are homeless.<br />

• Accord<strong>in</strong>g <strong>to</strong> the National Alliance <strong>to</strong> End <strong>Homelessness</strong>, there are 2,397 emergency shelter beds <strong>in</strong><br />

Kentucky (2019). It is important <strong>to</strong> note that emergency shelters are not available <strong>in</strong> every Kentucky<br />

county, and many shelters only serve certa<strong>in</strong> genders and household types (e.g., women and<br />

children only, men only) and have other types of restrictions.<br />

4


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

THE SPECTRUM OF HOMELESSNESS<br />

Chronic <strong>Homelessness</strong> – Chronic homelessness refers <strong>to</strong> persons most like the stereotyped profile<br />

of the homeless who are likely <strong>to</strong> be entrenched <strong>in</strong> the response system and for whom emergency<br />

shelters and the streets are more like long-term hous<strong>in</strong>g rather than an emergency arrangement. These<br />

<strong>in</strong>dividuals are likely <strong>to</strong> be older and/or have much higher rates of mental health and physical disabilities,<br />

<strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g substance use disorders. These are high utilizers of local first responder services. While people<br />

experienc<strong>in</strong>g chronic homelessness are those most often stereotyped as be<strong>in</strong>g “the homeless,” they<br />

accounted for only 11% of those who were <strong>in</strong>cluded <strong>in</strong> the most recent PIT count.<br />

Transitional <strong>Homelessness</strong> – The majority of those experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness enter the homeless<br />

response system only once and for a shorter period of time. Such persons are likely <strong>to</strong> be younger, have<br />

become homeless because of a catastrophic event such as loss of employment and/or excessive medical<br />

expenses, have been forced <strong>to</strong> spend time <strong>in</strong> an emergency shelter, and/or lack the support network <strong>to</strong><br />

help dur<strong>in</strong>g their hous<strong>in</strong>g crisis. The general public is less likely <strong>to</strong> see these households and less likely<br />

<strong>to</strong> connect this situation with the stereotyped profile of homelessness. Even though these <strong>in</strong>dividuals<br />

may never experience literal homelessness aga<strong>in</strong>, they are more likely <strong>to</strong> cont<strong>in</strong>ue <strong>to</strong> experience hous<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>in</strong>stability.<br />

Episodic <strong>Homelessness</strong> – Households that frequently experience homelessness typically have <strong>in</strong>consistent<br />

<strong>in</strong>come, mental health issues <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g substance use disorder, and a lack of ongo<strong>in</strong>g support systems.<br />

Beyond the emergency shelter system, those experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness often live <strong>in</strong> cars, encampments,<br />

with other people, <strong>in</strong> public/private spaces, or <strong>in</strong> hotels/motels. Among <strong>in</strong>dividuals experienc<strong>in</strong>g<br />

homelessness nationally, one <strong>in</strong> two are unsheltered, mean<strong>in</strong>g they are sleep<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> locations not meant for<br />

human habitation.<br />

HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING INSECURITY<br />

Acknowledge, Know, Act<br />

Acknowledge that the problem exists.<br />

• The problem is real.<br />

• The problem impacts real people, real families, and real communities.<br />

• The solution will take all of us work<strong>in</strong>g <strong>to</strong>gether.<br />

• The solution depends on our resolve and commitment.be/Htsb804iDRE<br />

5


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

WHO EXPERIENCES HOMELESSNESS?<br />

• Someone’s Parent<br />

• Someone’s Sibl<strong>in</strong>g<br />

• Someone’s Child<br />

People are often surprised that most people experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness aren’t who you would expect:<br />

• A substitute teacher who lost her apartment because her rent became unaffordable;<br />

• A 19-year-old who recently aged out of the foster care system and had no family support; or<br />

• A divorced dad who is pay<strong>in</strong>g child support and hous<strong>in</strong>g for his family but can’t afford hous<strong>in</strong>g for<br />

himself.<br />

Because Kentucky ranks high nationally <strong>in</strong> homeless families with children, a lack of family shelters and<br />

affordable family hous<strong>in</strong>g units are among the most urgent dimensions of <strong>to</strong>day’s local homelessness<br />

crisis. <strong>Homelessness</strong> and hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>stability have <strong>in</strong>creased <strong>in</strong> school aged children’s families and <strong>in</strong><br />

English as a second language households. S<strong>in</strong>ce 2014, there has been a steady rise <strong>in</strong> people made<br />

homeless <strong>by</strong> be<strong>in</strong>g victims of domestic violence. The prevalence of these significant subpopulations of the<br />

homeless, many of whom have experienced trauma, underscores the <strong>in</strong>creas<strong>in</strong>g need for specialized care<br />

that is “trauma <strong>in</strong>formed.”<br />

Data from the Vulnerability Index-Service Prioritization Decision Assistance Tool (VI-SPDAT) notes that<br />

over half of homeless and unsheltered <strong>in</strong>dividuals reported at least one chronic health condition (e.g.,<br />

kidney, liver, heart, emphysema, diabetes, asthma, cancer, hepatitis, and tuberculosis).<br />

In recent years, service providers <strong>in</strong> Kentucky have seen spikes <strong>in</strong> homelessness among the elderly,<br />

primarily because many live on social security and can’t afford rent or home repairs, bills, food, and<br />

medic<strong>in</strong>e.<br />

SUBPOPULATIONS<br />

Children and Youth<br />

In addition <strong>to</strong> students stay<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> emergency shelters or sleep<strong>in</strong>g outside, Department of Education data<br />

also <strong>in</strong>cludes students who are <strong>in</strong> “doubled-up” or “couch-surf<strong>in</strong>g” liv<strong>in</strong>g situations where they lack safe,<br />

stable hous<strong>in</strong>g. Such hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>stability can have a significant impact on a student’s ability <strong>to</strong> learn.<br />

The statistics are sober<strong>in</strong>g. Kentucky experts say that:<br />

• A homeless child is four times more likely <strong>to</strong> become a homeless adult.<br />

• High school aged girls experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness are more likely <strong>to</strong> become pregnant.<br />

• Children experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness have an <strong>in</strong>creased risk of social isolation, anxiety, unhealthy<br />

sleep, and substance misuse.<br />

6


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

• One study stated that over 70% of homeless children reported drug or alcohol abuse disorders.<br />

• Other research found that 42% of homeless high schoolers experienced bully<strong>in</strong>g, and one <strong>in</strong> three<br />

had attempted suicide.<br />

• On average, students <strong>in</strong> mobility move seven <strong>to</strong> eight times per year and are two <strong>to</strong> three years<br />

beh<strong>in</strong>d academically.<br />

Educa<strong>to</strong>rs stress that the statistics don’t change whether children are liv<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> a shelter, <strong>in</strong> a car, or<br />

whether they are doubled up.<br />

The McK<strong>in</strong>ney-Ven<strong>to</strong> Homeless Assistance Act (MV) is a federal law that requires public school districts<br />

<strong>to</strong> identify children and youth experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness and remove all educational barriers <strong>in</strong> order<br />

<strong>to</strong> provide these students with academic cont<strong>in</strong>uity and consistency. The McK<strong>in</strong>ney-Ven<strong>to</strong> Act def<strong>in</strong>es<br />

homelessness as “lack<strong>in</strong>g a fixed, regular, or adequate nighttime residence.” Typically, schools capture<br />

data relat<strong>in</strong>g <strong>to</strong> families and children <strong>in</strong> transition.<br />

All public schools must implement the McK<strong>in</strong>ney-Ven<strong>to</strong> Act; however, funds are limited and competitively<br />

awarded. As a result, MV represents an unfunded mandate for school districts. Only 11 Kentucky school<br />

districts received fund<strong>in</strong>g last year. A study <strong>by</strong> the Institute for Children, Poverty, and <strong>Homelessness</strong> noted<br />

that 58% of America’s rural students are not covered <strong>by</strong> the McK<strong>in</strong>ney-Ven<strong>to</strong> Act because of limited funds.<br />

Districts depend on other sources, such as grants, United Way funds, and their own school budgets, <strong>to</strong><br />

help deliver services <strong>to</strong> students <strong>in</strong> hous<strong>in</strong>g transition or doubled up. Fortunately, the American Rescue<br />

Plan Act will add significant fund<strong>in</strong>g <strong>to</strong> support the McK<strong>in</strong>ney-Ven<strong>to</strong> Act.<br />

Learn more about MV.<br />

Professional educa<strong>to</strong>rs say identification represents the greatest challenge <strong>in</strong> provid<strong>in</strong>g services <strong>to</strong> these<br />

students. N<strong>in</strong>ety percent of homeless families and 98% of the public do not know, misunderstand, or fail<br />

<strong>to</strong> recognize the educational def<strong>in</strong>ition of homelessness.<br />

View the most recent (2020-21) list of Kentucky Homeless Coord<strong>in</strong>a<strong>to</strong>rs <strong>by</strong> School District from the<br />

Kentucky Department of Education.<br />

PEOPLE YOU KNOW COULD BE HOMELESS<br />

View video profiles of Kentuckians who have experienced homelessness and<br />

found local resources <strong>to</strong> turn their lives around.<br />

Video: You Never Know Who’s Homeless<br />

Video: Profile – Homeless Children and Youth<br />

Video: On the Edge of Hope – Shel<strong>by</strong>ville’s Veteran’s Village<br />

7


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

Veterans<br />

It is estimated that there are more than 400 homeless veterans at any given time <strong>in</strong> Kentucky.<br />

The Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs (KDVA) Homeless Veterans Program gets homeless<br />

veterans off the streets and provides assistance <strong>to</strong> those at imm<strong>in</strong>ent risk of homelessness <strong>by</strong> connect<strong>in</strong>g<br />

them with resources across the state. The KDVA webpage <strong>in</strong>cludes an <strong>in</strong>take portal where personal<br />

<strong>in</strong>formation on a veteran may be submitted for assistance. Homeless Veterans - Kentucky Department of<br />

Veterans Affairs<br />

Resources through KDVA <strong>in</strong>clude but are not limited <strong>to</strong>:<br />

Immediate needs such as food, cloth<strong>in</strong>g, and access <strong>to</strong> shelter<br />

Access <strong>to</strong> homeless veteran providers<br />

Assistance with rent and utilities<br />

• A veteran can contact the National Call Center for Homeless Veterans at (877) 4AID-VET (877-<br />

424-3838) for assistance. If veterans do not have access <strong>to</strong> a phone or the <strong>in</strong>ternet, only then can<br />

they visit their closest VA medical center without call<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> advance. For more <strong>in</strong>formation, visit<br />

the VA website. VA Homeless Program<br />

• The Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation (KHC) also has programs and specialized services for veterans.<br />

Veterans Emerg<strong>in</strong>g Towards Transition (VETT) provides hous<strong>in</strong>g vouchers <strong>to</strong> homeless veterans<br />

with<strong>in</strong> the 87 counties served <strong>by</strong> KHC.<br />

• For more <strong>in</strong>formation, call (502) 564-9946.<br />

• Louisville Coalition for the Homeless – Bed Referral: (502) 637-2337.<br />

• There are also several nonprofit organizations <strong>in</strong> Kentucky specifically serv<strong>in</strong>g veterans. <strong>KLC</strong><br />

profiled the Veteran’s Village <strong>in</strong> Shel<strong>by</strong>ville, at the November 2021 <strong>Homelessness</strong> and <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong><br />

Summit. Learn more about the program here.<br />

VETERAN’S CLUB<br />

Visit the website Veteran’s Club: About Us: Contact Us (veteransclub<strong>in</strong>c.org)<br />

Veteran’s Club is a Kentucky-based program that works <strong>to</strong> help veterans<br />

receive hous<strong>in</strong>g, treatment, and job tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g.<br />

Mission Statement: To provide connection, heal<strong>in</strong>g, recovery, and hous<strong>in</strong>g<br />

for the veteran community.<br />

Vision Statement:<br />

* To provide heal<strong>in</strong>g <strong>to</strong> veterans and their families through equ<strong>in</strong>efacilitated<br />

men<strong>to</strong>r<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

* To provide hous<strong>in</strong>g and programm<strong>in</strong>g for homeless veterans through the<br />

Veterans Village Heal<strong>in</strong>g and Recovery Community.<br />

* To provide connection and support through family outreach, vocational<br />

tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g, and recreational therapy.<br />

CONTACT:<br />

Jeremy Harrell<br />

Veterans Village<br />

veteransclub<strong>in</strong>c.org<br />

502.310.2303<br />

jharrell@veteransclub<strong>in</strong>c.org<br />

8


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

Elderly<br />

By 2030, more than 74 million Americans will be 65 or older. Unfortunately, one of the fastest-grow<strong>in</strong>g<br />

challenges among U.S. seniors is hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>stability. Complicated <strong>by</strong> a myriad of health and other issues,<br />

homelessness is a real threat <strong>to</strong> seniors and communities.<br />

Accord<strong>in</strong>g <strong>to</strong> the National Coalition for the Homeless, <strong>in</strong>creased homelessness among elderly persons is<br />

largely the result of poverty and the decl<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g availability of affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g. There are at least n<strong>in</strong>e seniors<br />

wait<strong>in</strong>g for every one occupied unit of affordable elderly hous<strong>in</strong>g nationwide. Furthermore, the wait<strong>in</strong>g list<br />

for affordable senior hous<strong>in</strong>g is often three <strong>to</strong> five years. In addition <strong>to</strong> elderly persons, studies across the U.S.<br />

have shown a clear upward trend <strong>in</strong> the proportion of “older” persons (aged 50-64) among the homeless<br />

population. This is a group that frequently falls between the cracks of governmental safety nets.<br />

There are all types of reasons any person may become homeless, but there is always one common<br />

denom<strong>in</strong>a<strong>to</strong>r – lack of affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

MABEL’S STORY<br />

Mabel is now a 71-year-old central Kentuckian liv<strong>in</strong>g on social security. She worked her whole life but is not <strong>in</strong><br />

good health. She has no children or immediate family. Her small, Section 8 subsidized apartment was her oasis.<br />

Her out-of-state niece claimed <strong>to</strong> have lost her job and asked <strong>to</strong> move <strong>in</strong> with her, which she allowed. Come<br />

<strong>to</strong> f<strong>in</strong>d out, her niece was a drug dealer. Mabel had no idea. Police arrested her at Mabel’s apartment, and as a<br />

result, Mabel was evicted. She will never qualify for affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g assistance aga<strong>in</strong> provided <strong>by</strong> the Public<br />

<strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Authority (PHA) because felony crimes were committed <strong>in</strong> her home. She is now liv<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> a shelter. She<br />

is homeless.<br />

For any person experienc<strong>in</strong>g it, homelessness is not only a challenge but often a traumatic experience. For<br />

elderly people experienc<strong>in</strong>g hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>security, this only exacerbates f<strong>in</strong>ancial, health, and social challenges<br />

of ag<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

It’s not surpris<strong>in</strong>g that elderly people who are homeless will likely present <strong>in</strong>creas<strong>in</strong>g challenges for<br />

behavioral health and medical systems, <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g local EMS, community services, and hospital resources.<br />

Studies have demonstrated that allow<strong>in</strong>g an <strong>in</strong>dividual <strong>to</strong> rema<strong>in</strong> chronically homeless can cost taxpayers<br />

as much as $50,000 annually.<br />

With so many seniors liv<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> poverty or on the edge of poverty, hous<strong>in</strong>g, medic<strong>in</strong>e, or food become<br />

choices <strong>in</strong>stead of necessities. Do you know what your elderly relatives live on? For many, social security<br />

is their only safety net. Subsidized senior hous<strong>in</strong>g is available at age 62, and Medicare and Social Security<br />

benefits are available at age 65. Kentucky ranks 45th <strong>in</strong> Social Security benefits. More than 618,000 retirees<br />

take Social Security, with an average 2021 benefit of around $17,500 for the full year. If a senior lives solely<br />

on Social Security, even with subsidized hous<strong>in</strong>g costs, it’s not easy <strong>to</strong> make ends meet.<br />

Many people want <strong>to</strong> stay <strong>in</strong> their homes but cannot take care of their properties due <strong>to</strong> upkeep and tax costs,<br />

much less afford a new roof or a repair. This is someth<strong>in</strong>g that has a direct impact on cities as properties fall<br />

<strong>in</strong><strong>to</strong> disrepair and blight.<br />

F<strong>in</strong>ally, statistics from the U.S. Census revealed that more than 15 million adults, or nearly one <strong>in</strong> six<br />

Americans aged 55 and older, are childless. The levels of childlessness among adults are expected <strong>to</strong><br />

<strong>in</strong>crease, mean<strong>in</strong>g that more older people will be “on their own” <strong>in</strong> numbers like never before.<br />

9


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

THE POINT-IN-TIME (PIT) AND<br />

K-COUNT ‘ON THE STREET’ DATA<br />

IN YOUR OWN COMMUNITY<br />

Each year, the state conducts a statewide Po<strong>in</strong>t-<strong>in</strong>-Time (PIT) count of sheltered and unsheltered people<br />

experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness on a s<strong>in</strong>gle night <strong>in</strong> January <strong>in</strong> all Kentucky communities. Cities and <strong>in</strong>dividuals<br />

can help with the effort.<br />

HUD requires the annual count of the sheltered homeless and a count every other year for anyone that<br />

is unsheltered. In Kentucky, we conduct both the sheltered and unsheltered count annually. The count<br />

<strong>in</strong>cludes people liv<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> emergency shelters, transitional hous<strong>in</strong>g, and hotels/motels paid for <strong>by</strong> a<br />

charitable organization. Also <strong>in</strong>cluded are unsheltered <strong>in</strong>dividuals sleep<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> places not meant for human<br />

habitation, such as outside, <strong>in</strong> a vehicle, <strong>in</strong> a blighted or abandoned build<strong>in</strong>g, or <strong>in</strong> a tent. The thousands of<br />

<strong>in</strong>dividuals couch surf<strong>in</strong>g, doubl<strong>in</strong>g up, or liv<strong>in</strong>g at someone else’s residence are not <strong>in</strong>cluded <strong>in</strong> this count.<br />

The count for most of Kentucky is called the K-Count. It is a critical effort because it aims <strong>to</strong> demonstrate<br />

the hous<strong>in</strong>g services that each community needs for those experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness. K-Count helps<br />

HUD determ<strong>in</strong>e how much federal fund<strong>in</strong>g will be awarded <strong>to</strong> each community for homeless programs and<br />

allows service providers and professionals <strong>to</strong> moni<strong>to</strong>r trends and progress over time.<br />

Typically, <strong>in</strong> a community it is service providers who organize the K-Count. Volunteers go <strong>in</strong> small teams,<br />

<strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g a social/community services professional and hopefully a law enforcement professional. If you or<br />

your city staff would like <strong>to</strong> participate <strong>in</strong> this annual event, contact the Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation or<br />

the Homeless & <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Coalition of Kentucky.<br />

YOUR CITY CAN ASSIST WITH THE ANNUAL<br />

POINT-IN-TIME COUNT IN YOUR COMMUNITY<br />

For more <strong>in</strong>formation, contact:<br />

Cassie Carter, <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Program Manager<br />

Homeless and <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Coalition of Kentucky (HHCK)<br />

502-223-1834, ext. 106<br />

ccarter@hhck.org<br />

www.hhck.org.<br />

10


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

CAUSES OF HOMELESSNESS<br />

There is only one.<br />

The lack of affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g is the cause of homelessness. The <strong>in</strong>ability <strong>to</strong> ma<strong>in</strong>ta<strong>in</strong> hous<strong>in</strong>g is often<br />

due <strong>to</strong> <strong>in</strong>sufficient <strong>in</strong>come and the lack of support. A person becomes homeless as a result of traumatic<br />

life events <strong>in</strong> which the <strong>in</strong>dividual and/or family does not have the correct support systems <strong>in</strong> place <strong>to</strong><br />

ma<strong>in</strong>ta<strong>in</strong> their hous<strong>in</strong>g. It could be the loss of a job, medical bills, a divorce, domestic violence, a sudden<br />

change <strong>in</strong> mental health, or <strong>in</strong>creased physical disability needs. Truly, any event can cause an <strong>in</strong>dividual<br />

and/or family <strong>to</strong> become homeless. It can even be a small event that rippled <strong>in</strong><strong>to</strong> a series of events that,<br />

without the correct supportive services, lead <strong>to</strong> becom<strong>in</strong>g unhoused.<br />

Dur<strong>in</strong>g the 2022 Po<strong>in</strong>t-<strong>in</strong>-Time count, some <strong>in</strong>dividuals surveyed stated that their rents had gone up<br />

dur<strong>in</strong>g COVID, forc<strong>in</strong>g them out of their homes.<br />

People are all different. No <strong>in</strong>dividual has the same path <strong>to</strong> becom<strong>in</strong>g unhoused; therefore, hous<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>in</strong>terventions should always be built with variety <strong>in</strong> m<strong>in</strong>d. One person may need a few weeks <strong>to</strong> rega<strong>in</strong><br />

employment, while another person may need subsidized hous<strong>in</strong>g and long-term supportive services. The<br />

bot<strong>to</strong>m l<strong>in</strong>e - there is one constant and essential solution, affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

Shelters<br />

Shelters and short-term solutions are very different than considerations for develop<strong>in</strong>g affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g<br />

s<strong>to</strong>ck <strong>in</strong> your city.<br />

<strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> and Social Services Work <strong>in</strong> Tandem<br />

Many successful programs <strong>in</strong> Kentucky and across the nation serve those experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness with<br />

a model that seeks <strong>to</strong> house first, followed <strong>by</strong> <strong>in</strong>dividualized supportive services <strong>to</strong> ma<strong>in</strong>ta<strong>in</strong> hous<strong>in</strong>g. This<br />

can be referred <strong>to</strong> as “recovery <strong>in</strong> place.” Th<strong>in</strong>k of it <strong>in</strong> basic terms – before a person can thrive, he or she<br />

needs a place <strong>to</strong> sleep, eat, bathe, go <strong>to</strong> the bathroom, and rest. The goal is <strong>to</strong> provide a stable and safe<br />

environment, remov<strong>in</strong>g the stress of be<strong>in</strong>g unhoused before engag<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> any services. Self-sufficiency is<br />

always the end goal, but all <strong>in</strong>dividuals are unique, and some may need cont<strong>in</strong>uous support for the rest of<br />

their lives.<br />

Barriers <strong>to</strong> Shelter<br />

It is important <strong>to</strong> remember that emergency shelters are not the ultimate solution <strong>to</strong> homelessness. Still,<br />

they are an essential part of any effective response system so that people have a safe place <strong>to</strong> stay while<br />

permanent hous<strong>in</strong>g can be identified. <strong>Your</strong> city may have some facilities or shelters that present barriers<br />

for those experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness. When assess<strong>in</strong>g your community’s resources, it’s important <strong>to</strong> know<br />

what requirements exist for each facility. These requirements are typically <strong>in</strong>tended <strong>to</strong> protect the primary<br />

population be<strong>in</strong>g served but, <strong>in</strong> some <strong>in</strong>stances, are unnecessary.<br />

11


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

Barriers can <strong>in</strong>clude th<strong>in</strong>gs like no men, no women, no families, no pets, not accept<strong>in</strong>g an impaired person<br />

(drugs/alcohol), requir<strong>in</strong>g religious program participation, or far-reach<strong>in</strong>g crim<strong>in</strong>al background checks<br />

that are unrelated <strong>to</strong> a person’s ability <strong>to</strong> stay <strong>in</strong> a shelter without harm<strong>in</strong>g anyone else. This becomes<br />

especially important <strong>to</strong> consider dur<strong>in</strong>g cold weather months, dur<strong>in</strong>g which time temporary “warm<strong>in</strong>g<br />

centers” may be an option for your community.<br />

It’s also notable that many <strong>in</strong>dividuals/households with full-time jobs (<strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g city employees) qualify<br />

for hous<strong>in</strong>g programs and many more are already hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>secure with only “one paycheck away” from<br />

becom<strong>in</strong>g homeless.<br />

KEEPING PEOPLE AND PROPERTY SAFE<br />

Many cities post “Park Closes After Dark” signs <strong>in</strong> their city parks <strong>to</strong> prevent persons from gather<strong>in</strong>g<br />

or sleep<strong>in</strong>g. In order <strong>to</strong> do this, the city’s parks board can approve an ord<strong>in</strong>ance. Although the park<br />

is public property, this gives law enforcement the authority <strong>to</strong> ask persons <strong>to</strong> leave the park after<br />

dark or dur<strong>in</strong>g closed hours. For sample verbiage or more <strong>in</strong>formation, contact <strong>KLC</strong> Municipal Law<br />

at 800.876.4552.<br />

If cities take this measure, they should consider where unhoused <strong>in</strong>dividuals could go.<br />

12


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

RESOURCES FOR PERSONS<br />

EXPERIENCING HOMELESSNESS<br />

<strong>City</strong> employees are often the first <strong>to</strong> encounter persons experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness. Though encounters<br />

can be many different scenarios, one easy step cities can take is <strong>to</strong> have a list<strong>in</strong>g of services that are<br />

available.<br />

Various agencies provide list<strong>in</strong>gs of services. Most service providers are listed <strong>by</strong> Area Development<br />

District (ADD) or region. While the contact names will change, most agency contact list<strong>in</strong>gs will not<br />

change. These l<strong>in</strong>ks will provide a start<strong>in</strong>g po<strong>in</strong>t for local services whether <strong>in</strong>dividuals need social, mental<br />

health, or addiction services, or hous<strong>in</strong>g-related resources.<br />

Coord<strong>in</strong>ated Entry Lead Agency Contacts <strong>by</strong> ADD District (2022)<br />

Homeless & <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Coalition of Kentucky contacts for emergency shelter, domestic violence, and<br />

emergency rental assistance.<br />

Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation (KHC) Community Resource <strong>Guide</strong> is a database list<strong>in</strong>g many local services<br />

<strong>by</strong> county.<br />

Graphic provided <strong>by</strong> Jacquel<strong>in</strong>e S. Long Direc<strong>to</strong>r of <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> and Grants,<br />

Mounta<strong>in</strong> Comprehensive Care Center<br />

A person experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness is <strong>in</strong> crisis. A goal should be <strong>to</strong> th<strong>in</strong>k about persons experienc<strong>in</strong>g<br />

homelessness and look at current local and regional wraparound services. As part of the process, ask<br />

homeless <strong>in</strong>dividuals what they need.<br />

To assess what exists locally, <strong>in</strong>vite community stakeholders <strong>to</strong> participate <strong>in</strong> a meet<strong>in</strong>g <strong>to</strong> educate<br />

each other as well as city officials as <strong>to</strong> what exists. This group could <strong>in</strong>clude exist<strong>in</strong>g homeless services<br />

providers, social services providers, nonprofits, bus<strong>in</strong>esses, schools, jails, county at<strong>to</strong>rney, judges, soup<br />

kitchens, food pantries, veterans’ organizations, churches and the m<strong>in</strong>isterial association, public libraries,<br />

postal workers, utilities and code enforcement staff, police, fire, EMS, other first responders, hospitals,<br />

cl<strong>in</strong>ics, and mental health providers. And, it bears repeat<strong>in</strong>g, the group should also <strong>in</strong>clude persons who<br />

have experienced hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>security if that is possible and appropriate.<br />

13


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

Exercise: Where Are <strong>Your</strong> Services?<br />

Th<strong>in</strong>k about hous<strong>in</strong>g and homelessness resources <strong>in</strong> your city/county/region.<br />

Jot down a quick list of services for <strong>in</strong>dividuals liv<strong>in</strong>g on the street or <strong>in</strong> encampments.<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________<br />

Where are they located? _______________________________________________________________<br />

Do you have contacts? ________________________________________________________________<br />

Are you familiar with <strong>in</strong>take procedures?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________<br />

Do your shelters accommodate:<br />

Yes<br />

No<br />

q q Men<br />

q q Women<br />

q q Children<br />

q q Families<br />

q q Pets<br />

q q Persons <strong>in</strong> addiction<br />

Make a list of local services with contacts, addresses, and phone numbers for:<br />

Food _____________________________________________________________________________<br />

Domestic violence __________________________________________________________________<br />

Veteran’s programs/shelters _________________________________________________________<br />

Social services _____________________________________________________________________<br />

Mental health ______________________________________________________________________<br />

Does your city offer any type of hotel/motel or apartment conversion program for homeless<br />

<strong>in</strong>dividuals?<br />

What is its process?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________<br />

14


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING: A CRISIS<br />

IN THE COMMONWEALTH<br />

The current hous<strong>in</strong>g and build<strong>in</strong>g market is good for sellers but not buyers or renters. The demand for<br />

all types of hous<strong>in</strong>g cont<strong>in</strong>ues <strong>to</strong> be a challenge for cities across Kentucky, and there are huge gaps<br />

statewide for affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g. In fact, studies from 2017-2019 estimate that Kentucky is short anywhere<br />

between 78,000-100,000 affordable homes <strong>to</strong> rent. COVID has only made it worse. However, the good<br />

news is that there is a statewide system and strategies underway <strong>to</strong> respond <strong>to</strong> and prevent homelessness<br />

through the Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation, the state, and other partners.<br />

Basic Data<br />

<strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> <strong>in</strong>security is real <strong>in</strong> every county and community <strong>in</strong> Kentucky. These are <strong>in</strong>dividuals who may be<br />

“one paycheck away” from be<strong>in</strong>g removed from their homes. One example is people who own a home but<br />

may not be able <strong>to</strong> ma<strong>in</strong>ta<strong>in</strong> upkeep or repairs – often elderly persons.<br />

Each city has its own unique hous<strong>in</strong>g needs. For some communities, the need is for s<strong>in</strong>gle-family hous<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

Some cities do not have enough of any type of hous<strong>in</strong>g. For most Kentucky communities, there is not<br />

enough affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g, particularly for renters and low-<strong>in</strong>come residents.<br />

Who are these people? They often work at your restaurants, big box s<strong>to</strong>res, groceries, retail, healthcare<br />

facilities, childcare centers, and some may even work for local governments.<br />

<strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> and Urban Development (HUD) def<strong>in</strong>es affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g as hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> which the occupant pays<br />

no more than 30 percent of gross <strong>in</strong>come for hous<strong>in</strong>g costs, <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g utilities.<br />

For people who rent:<br />

• 40% of all Kentucky households report spend<strong>in</strong>g over 30% of their <strong>in</strong>come on rent;<br />

• 79% of Kentucky households (30% AMI and below) report pay<strong>in</strong>g over 30% of their <strong>in</strong>come on rent; and<br />

• 66% of Kentucky households (30% AMI and below) report pay<strong>in</strong>g over 50% of their <strong>in</strong>come on rent.<br />

Available rents have <strong>in</strong>creased 7.5% <strong>in</strong> the last 12 months, and a June 2022 CBS News report stated that<br />

rents nationwide have <strong>in</strong>creased <strong>by</strong> 15.2%.<br />

This means these renters have very little left for food, medic<strong>in</strong>e, cloth<strong>in</strong>g, transportation, and other<br />

necessities.<br />

Why? Because the “fair market” rent is not the actual cost of rent.<br />

Us<strong>in</strong>g an example from one Kentucky county, here’s a breakdown for a s<strong>in</strong>gle renter:<br />

Average renter hourly wage: $17.42<br />

<strong>Affordable</strong> rent for this person $906<br />

Actual average market rent $1,001<br />

Hourly earn<strong>in</strong>gs over rent commitment (<strong>to</strong> pay all other expenses) $3.42<br />

This means that only $3.42 of this person’s hourly wage goes <strong>to</strong> food, transportation, utilities, childcare, and all other<br />

necessities.<br />

15


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

EKU/<strong>KLC</strong> PARTNERSHIP STUDY – A HOUSING AND HOMELESSNESS<br />

SNAPSHOT FOR EVERY KENTUCKY COUNTY<br />

T<br />

The Kentucky League of Cities has partnered with the Eastern Kentucky University (EKU) Department<br />

of Government <strong>to</strong> provide a detailed snapshot of homelessness and hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> every Kentucky county.<br />

The succ<strong>in</strong>ct and reader-friendly research <strong>in</strong>cludes data on hous<strong>in</strong>g affordability, wages, market rents,<br />

number of renter households, the <strong>in</strong>come required <strong>to</strong> afford hous<strong>in</strong>g, and more. It also looks at 2022<br />

statistics on homeless <strong>in</strong>dividuals for each county, <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g children and veterans. This <strong>in</strong>formation is<br />

vital for cities and communities <strong>to</strong> accurately understand their hous<strong>in</strong>g gaps. Ideally, the data should<br />

be shared with other local officials, bus<strong>in</strong>ess leaders, developers, service providers, and others <strong>in</strong><br />

the community seek<strong>in</strong>g <strong>to</strong> address affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g and hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>security. To f<strong>in</strong>d your county<br />

snapshot, go here.<br />

KENTUCKY CENTER FOR STATISTICS<br />

Another excellent source for hous<strong>in</strong>g, homelessness and many other types of <strong>in</strong>formation is the<br />

Kentucky Center for Statistics. The center has the ability <strong>to</strong> create hyper-local and organization or cityspecific<br />

reports upon request for any city. For more <strong>in</strong>formation, contact Market<strong>in</strong>g Analytics Direc<strong>to</strong>r<br />

Jessica Fletcher, MPA or Research Analyst Sam Keathley. Go here for more <strong>in</strong>formation.<br />

The affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g shortage <strong>in</strong> Kentucky is especially hard for extremely low-<strong>in</strong>come (ELI) Kentuckians<br />

whose <strong>in</strong>comes are at or below the poverty guidel<strong>in</strong>e of 30% or their area median <strong>in</strong>come (AMI).<br />

Data from the National Low-Income <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Coalition website shows that 66% of extremely low-<strong>in</strong>come<br />

renters <strong>in</strong> Kentucky have a severe cost burden. Go here <strong>to</strong> enter your city’s zip code <strong>to</strong> see affordable<br />

home availability.<br />

For some perspective, the U.S. Health and Human Services (HHS) releases poverty guidel<strong>in</strong>es for all 48<br />

contiguous states. The 2022 guidel<strong>in</strong>e for one person is $13,590, a household of four is $27,750, and a<br />

household of eight is $46,630. The 2022 guidel<strong>in</strong>es here.<br />

Help Through COVID Fund<strong>in</strong>g<br />

The good news is that pandemic fund<strong>in</strong>g created additional opportunities.<br />

In February 2022, the Commonwealth of Kentucky, <strong>in</strong> partnership with the Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation<br />

(KHC), launched the Team Kentucky Homeowner Assistance Fund, a program that can help homeowners<br />

16


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

impacted <strong>by</strong> the pandemic rebound and avoid foreclosure.<br />

Kentucky funded the program through $85.4 million <strong>in</strong> federal American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds<br />

that the commonwealth received <strong>to</strong> protect homeowners impacted <strong>by</strong> COVID-19.<br />

Qualify<strong>in</strong>g homeowners can visit TeamKYHAF.ky.gov <strong>to</strong> apply for up <strong>to</strong> $35,000 <strong>in</strong> assistance <strong>to</strong> help<br />

with del<strong>in</strong>quent mortgage payments, property taxes, homeowner’s and/or flood <strong>in</strong>surance, homeowners<br />

association fees, and utility costs. If approved, the funds will be paid as a grant directly <strong>to</strong> mortgage<br />

servicers, utility companies, county property tax adm<strong>in</strong>istra<strong>to</strong>rs, <strong>in</strong>surance agencies, or homeowners<br />

associations.<br />

Each applicant will be assigned <strong>to</strong> a hous<strong>in</strong>g counselor who will help walk the homeowner through the<br />

submission process, <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g gather<strong>in</strong>g and sign<strong>in</strong>g documents and respond<strong>in</strong>g <strong>to</strong> questions.<br />

Before apply<strong>in</strong>g, homeowners should contact their mortgage servicer <strong>to</strong> weigh their options and see<br />

which program would provide the best long-term solution.<br />

A detailed description of the program can be found at ProtectMyKYHome.org. Kentucky Homeownership<br />

Protection Center Welcome (protectmykyhome.org)<br />

The program is available until all funds are expended or September 30, 2025, whichever comes first.<br />

In addition, Kentucky renters who suffered f<strong>in</strong>ancially due <strong>to</strong> COVID-19 have access <strong>to</strong> the $264 million<br />

Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Fund, which is still <strong>in</strong> place <strong>to</strong> assist them with hous<strong>in</strong>g and utility<br />

payments. To learn more and apply for assistance, visit TeamKYHHERF.ky.gov. Healthy at Home Eviction<br />

Relief Fund (ky.gov)<br />

EXERCISE:<br />

Do you know?<br />

The average rent <strong>in</strong> your city?<br />

The average hourly wage <strong>in</strong> your city?<br />

<strong>Affordable</strong> rent based on an hourly wage as compared <strong>to</strong> actual average rent?<br />

The overall number of available hous<strong>in</strong>g or apartment units?<br />

Th<strong>in</strong>k about the people <strong>in</strong> your city who work <strong>in</strong> big box s<strong>to</strong>res, fast food, healthcare assistance, and<br />

childcare. Can they afford their rent? If not, they are hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>secure.<br />

EXERCISE:<br />

Review the number of blighted properties your city has taken action upon <strong>in</strong> the last year or two. For<br />

some, were there circumstances where the person needed repairs they could not afford? Are you<br />

aware of the Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corp. funds for these types of repairs? HOME TBRA - HOME Investment<br />

Partnerships Program (kyhous<strong>in</strong>g.org)<br />

17


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

WHO GETS HOUSING FUNDING,<br />

AND HOW CAN CITIES SUPPORT<br />

THE PROCESS?<br />

Table 1<br />

Graphic from KHC<br />

Table 2<br />

Graphic from KHC<br />

18


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

Understand<strong>in</strong>g the Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation (KHC)<br />

The Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation (KHC) response is critical for both hous<strong>in</strong>g and homelessness<br />

<strong>in</strong> Kentucky. The mission of KHC is <strong>to</strong> <strong>in</strong>vest <strong>in</strong> quality affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g solutions for families and<br />

communities across Kentucky.<br />

KHC leverages private, federal, and state fund<strong>in</strong>g with f<strong>in</strong>anc<strong>in</strong>g sources and disperses them <strong>to</strong> services<br />

and hous<strong>in</strong>g providers. Sources <strong>in</strong>clude private tax credits, tax-exempt bonds, Fannie Mae/G<strong>in</strong>nie Mae,<br />

HUD programs, Treasury COVID relief programs, and Kentucky <strong>Affordable</strong> <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Trust Fund.<br />

It is important <strong>to</strong> understand that KHC can help communities with homelessness and hous<strong>in</strong>g issues <strong>in</strong><br />

many ways. For most HUD programs, cities are not direct recipients. Most KHC programs target nonprofits<br />

and/or for-profit hous<strong>in</strong>g developers.<br />

In addition, KHC funds the Healthy at Home Eviction Relief Rent & Utility Assistance, Section 8 <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong><br />

Choice Vouchers (87 counties) and hous<strong>in</strong>g for persons with HIV/AIDS.<br />

The term Cont<strong>in</strong>uum of Care (COC) means a group of representatives from relevant agencies with<strong>in</strong> a<br />

geographic area tasked with coord<strong>in</strong>at<strong>in</strong>g and plann<strong>in</strong>g the implementation of services for homelessness<br />

and hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>security.<br />

The Cont<strong>in</strong>uum of Care consists of HUD-funded and non-HUD-funded key stakeholders who provide a<br />

cont<strong>in</strong>uum of hous<strong>in</strong>g and services. An important role for cities is <strong>to</strong> get <strong>to</strong> know your local providers,<br />

understand local needs, and be supportive when you can <strong>in</strong> help<strong>in</strong>g them get funds through the<br />

Cont<strong>in</strong>uum of Care.<br />

At a m<strong>in</strong>imum, the Cont<strong>in</strong>uum of Care systems encompass the follow<strong>in</strong>g stakeholders: outreach,<br />

engagement, and assessment; shelter, hous<strong>in</strong>g, and supportive services; and prevention strategies.<br />

Relevant organizations <strong>in</strong>clude nonprofit homeless assistance providers, victim service providers, faithbased<br />

organizations, governments, bus<strong>in</strong>esses, advocates, public hous<strong>in</strong>g agencies, school districts, social<br />

service providers, mental health agencies, hospitals, universities, affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g developers, law<br />

enforcement, and organizations that serve veterans and homeless and formerly homeless <strong>in</strong>dividuals.<br />

For Kentucky, there are three Cont<strong>in</strong>ua of Care – Lex<strong>in</strong>g<strong>to</strong>n, Louisville, and the Balance of State (BoS),<br />

which <strong>in</strong>cludes 118 counties. KHC oversees and adm<strong>in</strong>isters Kentucky’s BoS Cont<strong>in</strong>uum fund<strong>in</strong>g. This is<br />

important for cities <strong>to</strong> understand because most of the hous<strong>in</strong>g and homelessness-related fund<strong>in</strong>g comes<br />

through this Balance of State Cont<strong>in</strong>uum of Care.<br />

Cities outside of Fayette and Jefferson counties will need <strong>to</strong> work with KHC and local providers and<br />

stakeholders <strong>to</strong> access Cont<strong>in</strong>uum of Care fund<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

19


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

Table 3<br />

.<br />

Graphic from KHC<br />

There is a Kentucky BoS CoC Advisory Board which <strong>in</strong>cludes representatives from all Area Development<br />

Districts (ADDs). Each ADD identifies its priorities. For cities, it’s important <strong>to</strong> know and discuss local<br />

and regional needs with the Coord<strong>in</strong>ated Entry Local Prioritization Lead for your ADD region. This is the<br />

group that identifies and establishes priorities for KHC’s fund<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

Go here for a list of Coord<strong>in</strong>ated Entry Leads. Coord<strong>in</strong>ated Entry Local Prioritization Community Lead<br />

Agencies (4).pdf<br />

Table 4<br />

Graphic from KHC<br />

20


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

CAN MY CITY USE AMERICAN RESCUE<br />

PLAN ACT (ARPA) FUNDS FOR<br />

HOMELESSNESS AND HOUSING?<br />

Homeless services and shelters?<br />

Yes. Treasury’s F<strong>in</strong>al Rule allows expenditures for homelessness emergency programs or services for<br />

homeless <strong>in</strong>dividuals, <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g temporary residences for people experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness.<br />

<strong>Affordable</strong> hous<strong>in</strong>g programs?<br />

Yes. The F<strong>in</strong>al Rule allows expenditures for programs or services <strong>to</strong> support long-term hous<strong>in</strong>g security,<br />

<strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g development of affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g and permanent supportive hous<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

<strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> vouchers, relocation assistance, or convert<strong>in</strong>g vacant and abandoned properties <strong>in</strong><strong>to</strong> affordable<br />

hous<strong>in</strong>g?<br />

Yes. However, the F<strong>in</strong>al Rule only enumerates these activities for households and communities<br />

disproportionately impacted. These would need <strong>to</strong> meet low-<strong>in</strong>come requirements outl<strong>in</strong>ed <strong>in</strong> the rule.<br />

Match<strong>in</strong>g federal hous<strong>in</strong>g-related grants?<br />

Generally, yes. However, the rules vary <strong>by</strong> each federal program. Check with the grant adm<strong>in</strong>istra<strong>to</strong>r <strong>to</strong><br />

determ<strong>in</strong>e whether ARPA money can count as the local match.<br />

Other hous<strong>in</strong>g programs?<br />

Most likely. Most Kentucky cities can consider their entire ARPA allocation as revenue loss, mean<strong>in</strong>g they<br />

can use the funds for any service traditionally provided <strong>by</strong> a government.<br />

For more <strong>in</strong>formation, contact <strong>KLC</strong> Research & Federal Relations Manager Joseph Coleman at jcoleman@<br />

klc.org or 800-876-4552.<br />

21


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

GRANTS<br />

There are also many grants available that support homelessness and hous<strong>in</strong>g projects.<br />

<strong>KLC</strong> now offers its members access <strong>to</strong> the GrantStation grant platform. Learn more about the<br />

GrantStation <strong>KLC</strong> member service.<br />

<strong>KLC</strong> also posts between 70-90 grants on its own website at any given time. Go here <strong>to</strong> view grants.<br />

THE IMPORTANCE OF IDENTIFICATION<br />

Social services professionals emphasize the importance of personal identification. Once a person<br />

experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness is fed and sheltered, one of the most important th<strong>in</strong>gs they need is<br />

identification <strong>in</strong> order <strong>to</strong> receive employment, assistance, and <strong>to</strong> function <strong>in</strong> society. Do you know<br />

how <strong>to</strong> help a person get an ID? Ask local service providers how <strong>to</strong> help people with this important<br />

step.<br />

22


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

ATTRACTING AFFORDABLE HOUSING<br />

DEVELOPERS TO YOUR CITY<br />

There are various types of fund<strong>in</strong>g for affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g projects, <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g federal and state his<strong>to</strong>ric tax<br />

credits, low-<strong>in</strong>come hous<strong>in</strong>g tax credits, Community Development Block Grants, KHC fund<strong>in</strong>g, National<br />

Stabilization program, TCAP/Exchange, Federal Home Loan Bank AHP Program, and <strong>Affordable</strong> <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong><br />

Trusts/Funds (such as Lex<strong>in</strong>g<strong>to</strong>n and Louisville).<br />

Developers that specialize <strong>in</strong> affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g and rehabilitation are look<strong>in</strong>g for certa<strong>in</strong> environments<br />

and requirements when decid<strong>in</strong>g <strong>to</strong> come <strong>in</strong><strong>to</strong> a community and develop projects.<br />

The Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation has an <strong>in</strong>teractive webpage <strong>to</strong> help city leaders identify its “partner<strong>in</strong>g<br />

developers,” s<strong>in</strong>gle-family hous<strong>in</strong>g developers currently work<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> their or other areas. Go here <strong>to</strong> view<br />

your county. S<strong>in</strong>gle-Family Development - <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Developers (kyhous<strong>in</strong>g.org)<br />

What do developers need most from communities <strong>in</strong>terested <strong>in</strong> affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g?<br />

• Community leaders on the same page<br />

• Commitment <strong>to</strong> support the project with<strong>in</strong> the community<br />

• Appropriate plann<strong>in</strong>g and zon<strong>in</strong>g and <strong>in</strong>frastructure <strong>in</strong> place<br />

• Flexibility <strong>to</strong> solve issues that arise<br />

• Realization that it takes time (maybe up <strong>to</strong> two years from start <strong>to</strong> f<strong>in</strong>ish)<br />

Kentucky developers are build<strong>in</strong>g very attractive projects <strong>in</strong> Kentucky cities but say there are still “not <strong>in</strong><br />

my back yard” (NIMBY) myths about affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g units. There’s a misconception that units detract<br />

from the community <strong>in</strong>stead of add<strong>in</strong>g value <strong>to</strong> neighborhoods.<br />

Some recent projects <strong>in</strong> Kentucky cities are even developed as mixed-use down<strong>to</strong>wn ventures. Developers<br />

are work<strong>in</strong>g with local organizations and cities <strong>to</strong> create mixed-use projects that <strong>in</strong>clude retail, restaurants,<br />

condos/lofts, and affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> the down<strong>to</strong>wn area. This is happen<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> small as well as larger<br />

cities.<br />

Adrienne Bush, Executive Direc<strong>to</strong>r of Homeless and <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Coalition of Kentucky, is happy <strong>to</strong> work with<br />

city officials and gives community presentations, provid<strong>in</strong>g real data and evidence about the myth that<br />

provid<strong>in</strong>g services will attract people experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness. (See contacts <strong>in</strong>formation.)<br />

Dur<strong>in</strong>g the November 2021 <strong>Homelessness</strong> Summit: <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> and Hope, <strong>KLC</strong> worked with two for-profit<br />

developers, AU Associates and Wabuck Development Company, Inc., do<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>credible work <strong>in</strong> Kentucky<br />

communities.<br />

View their presentations: 4 <strong>Affordable</strong> <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Solutions<br />

23


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING<br />

Located <strong>in</strong> the heart of the his<strong>to</strong>ric down<strong>to</strong>wn district of Spr<strong>in</strong>gfield, the Robertson Build<strong>in</strong>g is a<br />

beautiful rehab project done <strong>by</strong> AU Associates with assistance from the <strong>City</strong> of Spr<strong>in</strong>gfield, the<br />

Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corp., and several other partners. Built <strong>in</strong> 1896, the Robertson Build<strong>in</strong>g was<br />

orig<strong>in</strong>ally used as a dry goods supply s<strong>to</strong>re. Now, the Robertson Build<strong>in</strong>g has been given new<br />

life as the Robertson Apartments and commercial space. The iconic s<strong>to</strong>refront of the build<strong>in</strong>g has<br />

been modernized and carefully res<strong>to</strong>red <strong>to</strong> its former beauty <strong>to</strong> once aga<strong>in</strong> be used for commercial<br />

purposes, while the rest of the build<strong>in</strong>g has been artfully transformed and <strong>in</strong>cludes luxury apartments.<br />

(Image from <strong>City</strong> of Spr<strong>in</strong>gfield, Wash<strong>in</strong>g<strong>to</strong>n County, Kentucky (spr<strong>in</strong>gfieldky.org))<br />

Other Resources<br />

List of Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Authorities<br />

Help<strong>in</strong>g Homeless Veterans<br />

24


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

STEPS TO GET STARTED IN YOUR CITY<br />

What’s Next?<br />

Cities that are serious about tak<strong>in</strong>g action for people experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness and/or learn<strong>in</strong>g more<br />

about overall affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g solutions can consider the follow<strong>in</strong>g:<br />

<strong>Step</strong> 1 – Admit that the Problem Exists and Impacts Real People<br />

Know that the solution will take collaboration, resolve, and commitment.<br />

<strong>Step</strong> 2 – Data/Assessment<br />

Gather the facts, current services, gaps, and resources.<br />

Staff: Conduct a city assessment/survey with your city’s department heads and elected leadership. What<br />

does this issue look like <strong>in</strong> your city – encampments, people liv<strong>in</strong>g on streets/cars?<br />

What are the <strong>in</strong>teractions city staff have with <strong>in</strong>dividuals who are homeless and those seek<strong>in</strong>g hous<strong>in</strong>g or<br />

other social services? What currently happens dur<strong>in</strong>g those <strong>in</strong>teractions? What do these <strong>in</strong>teractions cost<br />

<strong>in</strong> terms of staff time, liability, or other quantifiable metrics?<br />

Public <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Authority (PHA): Make contact with your local hous<strong>in</strong>g authority and understand how<br />

they address homelessness and hous<strong>in</strong>g. Do they have any admission preference for people experienc<strong>in</strong>g<br />

homelessness?<br />

Conduct an <strong>in</strong>ven<strong>to</strong>ry of services, contacts, and key data:<br />

• Nonprofits and Service Providers<br />

• Coord<strong>in</strong>ated Entry Po<strong>in</strong>t Contact (ADD/KHC)<br />

• What is your affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g s<strong>to</strong>ck <strong>in</strong> terms of hous<strong>in</strong>g and rentals?<br />

• How do the rental prices compare <strong>to</strong> the average wage for renters <strong>in</strong> your city?<br />

Appo<strong>in</strong>t a person <strong>to</strong> record these f<strong>in</strong>d<strong>in</strong>gs (staff person, community member, college student).<br />

KNOW THE FACTS AND GATHER INFORMATION<br />

• How many people and families are homeless <strong>in</strong> my city?<br />

• Who <strong>in</strong>teracts with them regularly?<br />

• What services exist with<strong>in</strong> my city?<br />

• What are the gaps <strong>in</strong> terms of resources?<br />

25


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

<strong>Step</strong> 3 – Convene<br />

The city can serve as a community convener <strong>to</strong> discuss issues and create a plan.<br />

Designate someone <strong>to</strong> lead the effort – a city employee or someone else.<br />

Use the <strong>KLC</strong> <strong>Guide</strong> <strong>to</strong> Engag<strong>in</strong>g the Public for tips on conduct<strong>in</strong>g an effective <strong>to</strong>wn hall or public<br />

meet<strong>in</strong>g. <strong>KLC</strong> <strong>Step</strong>-<strong>by</strong>-<strong>Step</strong> <strong>Guide</strong> <strong>to</strong> Engag<strong>in</strong>g the Public at a Town Hall Meet<strong>in</strong>g<br />

A goal should be <strong>to</strong> th<strong>in</strong>k about persons experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness and look at current local and regional<br />

wraparound services. As part of the process, ask homeless <strong>in</strong>dividuals what they need.<br />

To assess what exists, <strong>in</strong>vite community stakeholders <strong>to</strong> participate, <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g exist<strong>in</strong>g service and social<br />

services providers and nonprofits, bus<strong>in</strong>esses, schools, jails, county at<strong>to</strong>rneys, judges, soup kitchens, food<br />

pantries, veterans’ organizations, churches and the m<strong>in</strong>isterial association, public libraries, postal workers,<br />

utilities, code enforcement staff, police, fire, EMS and other first responders, hospitals and cl<strong>in</strong>ics, and<br />

mental health providers. (See page 13.)<br />

<strong>Step</strong> 4 – Record<br />

Record and outl<strong>in</strong>e what each program offers, access, and contacts. Develop data metrics.<br />

<strong>Step</strong> 5 – Provide Basic Agreed Upon Information <strong>to</strong> All Involved<br />

Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g: Consider tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g for staff who <strong>in</strong>teract with those unhoused. Contact local homeless service<br />

providers or <strong>KLC</strong> can help with education/tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g. Make sure this tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g is consistent with the<br />

community’s goals, mission, and vision for a response system.<br />

Local Contacts List: Create a services referral system so every organization knows what the other is do<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

This <strong>in</strong>cludes <strong>in</strong>formation that is useful <strong>to</strong> agencies that do not provide services but frequently come <strong>in</strong><strong>to</strong><br />

contact with someone without a home, like law enforcement and hospitals/cl<strong>in</strong>ics.<br />

Share basic data gathered.<br />

<strong>Step</strong> 6 – Take Action<br />

Actively work on affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g. Ask your local public hous<strong>in</strong>g authority (PHA) <strong>to</strong> help educate key<br />

stakeholders.<br />

• Landlord Accountability<br />

Adopt a landlord agreement (ord<strong>in</strong>ance?) <strong>to</strong> encourage fair practices among landlords. Contact<br />

<strong>KLC</strong> Municipal Law <strong>to</strong> obta<strong>in</strong> examples from Kentucky cities.<br />

26


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

Work with hous<strong>in</strong>g developers <strong>to</strong> purpose low-<strong>in</strong>come tax credits, HOME, and AHTF fund<strong>in</strong>g. Try<br />

<strong>to</strong> <strong>in</strong>clude one-bedroom units <strong>in</strong> all developments as data shows the majority of homeless are<br />

s<strong>in</strong>gle <strong>in</strong>dividuals.<br />

Work with your public hous<strong>in</strong>g authority (PHA) <strong>to</strong>:<br />

- Evaluate preferences for people experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness (several ways <strong>to</strong> do this).<br />

- Evaluate eligibility criteria. Are there unnecessary eligibility criteria used beyond what is<br />

required <strong>by</strong> HUD that is screen<strong>in</strong>g out people who need assistance?<br />

- Educate and encourage more landlords <strong>to</strong> accept hous<strong>in</strong>g vouchers.<br />

- Remember, not everyth<strong>in</strong>g that the city does has <strong>to</strong> <strong>in</strong>clude “money.” Often it can be about<br />

elevat<strong>in</strong>g awareness of the problem and ask<strong>in</strong>g people <strong>to</strong> help how they can.<br />

- Consider hous<strong>in</strong>g tax credits. <strong>KLC</strong>’s advocacy team supports this effort and can provide<br />

<strong>in</strong>formation.<br />

Keep it Go<strong>in</strong>g and Start <strong>to</strong> Create a Plan<br />

• Participate <strong>in</strong> the annual K-Count, which is a physical count of all those experienc<strong>in</strong>g literal<br />

homelessness (emergency shelter, those <strong>in</strong> dedicated transitional hous<strong>in</strong>g, and unsheltered<br />

homelessness) on the last Wednesday night of every January. KHC organizes the Kentucky Count<br />

(K-Count) for the BoS CoC. You should designate someone <strong>in</strong> your local community <strong>to</strong> lead all<br />

local efforts for the K-Count.<br />

• Consider creat<strong>in</strong>g a formal, dedicated local task force <strong>to</strong> focus on homelessness or take the next<br />

natural steps.<br />

• Involve your legisla<strong>to</strong>r. There is also a bipartisan Kentucky Caucus on <strong>Affordable</strong> <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong>. View<br />

members here.<br />

F<strong>in</strong>ally, there are Kentucky cities and cities across the country do<strong>in</strong>g good th<strong>in</strong>gs. The Kentucky League<br />

of Cities will provide virtual and <strong>in</strong>-person network<strong>in</strong>g, education opportunities, and additional resources<br />

regard<strong>in</strong>g homelessness <strong>in</strong> the future.<br />

Watch for more <strong>in</strong>formation and go <strong>to</strong> the Kentucky League of Cities (klc.org) <strong>to</strong> follow the latest<br />

resources on homelessness and affordable hous<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

YOUR POWER TO CONVENE<br />

A city can serve as a convener <strong>in</strong> discussions on homelessness and hous<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

WHAT DO WE TALK ABOUT?<br />

<strong>Your</strong> Community Profile<br />

How many homeless people are with<strong>in</strong> our city?<br />

Who is <strong>in</strong> contact with them?<br />

What services are needed?<br />

When will they be provided?<br />

27<br />

Where do they stay?<br />

What services are be<strong>in</strong>g provided?<br />

Who can provide them?<br />

How do we keep track of the <strong>in</strong>formation?i


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

HELPFUL CONTACTS<br />

Coord<strong>in</strong>ated Entry Leads <strong>by</strong> ADD<br />

Adrienne Bush, Executive Direc<strong>to</strong>r<br />

Homeless and <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Coalition of Kentucky<br />

502-223-1834x101<br />

abush@hhck.org<br />

Cassie Carter, <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Program Manager<br />

Homeless and <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Coalition of Kentucky (HHCK)<br />

502-223-1834, ext. 106<br />

ccarter@hhck.org<br />

Johan Graham, President<br />

AU Associates, Inc.<br />

859-233-2009x1001<br />

johan@auassociates.com<br />

Jacquel<strong>in</strong>e S. Long, Direc<strong>to</strong>r of <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> and Grants<br />

Mounta<strong>in</strong> Comprehensive Care Center<br />

859-227-7755<br />

jackie.long@mtcomp.org<br />

Rick McQuady Direc<strong>to</strong>r, Office of <strong>Affordable</strong> <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong><br />

Lex<strong>in</strong>g<strong>to</strong>n-Fayette Urban County Government<br />

859-280-8044<br />

rmcquady@lex<strong>in</strong>g<strong>to</strong>nky.gov<br />

Polly Ruddick, Direc<strong>to</strong>r<br />

Office of <strong>Homelessness</strong> Prevention and Intervention<br />

Lex<strong>in</strong>g<strong>to</strong>n-Fayette Urban County Government<br />

859-258-3105<br />

pruddick@lex<strong>in</strong>g<strong>to</strong>nky.gov<br />

28


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

Wendy K. Smith, Deputy Executive Direc<strong>to</strong>r, <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Programs<br />

Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation<br />

502-564-7630x126<br />

wsmith@kyhous<strong>in</strong>g.org<br />

Kenzie Strubank, Homeless Programs Manager<br />

Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation<br />

502-601-0026<br />

kstrubank@kyhous<strong>in</strong>g.org<br />

Travis Weber, Branch Manager <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> and Community Projects<br />

Department for Local Government<br />

502-573-2382<br />

travis.weber@ky.gov<br />

Samuel Thorner, Manag<strong>in</strong>g Direc<strong>to</strong>r Multifamily Programs<br />

Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation<br />

502-564-7630x427<br />

sthorner@kyhous<strong>in</strong>g.org<br />

Eileen Ward, Kentucky Direc<strong>to</strong>r of Homeless Veterans<br />

502-545-4193<br />

Eileen.Ward@ky.gov<br />

Garry Watk<strong>in</strong>s, President<br />

Wabuck Development Company, Inc.<br />

270-259-5607<br />

garry.watk<strong>in</strong>s@wabuck.com<br />

Terri Johnson, Member Relations Manager<br />

Kentucky League of Cities<br />

859-977-3784<br />

tjohnson@klc.org<br />

29


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

Jeri McCullough, Direc<strong>to</strong>r of Member & Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Development<br />

Kentucky League of Cities<br />

859-977-3780<br />

jmccullough@klc.org<br />

Cassie Cooper, Member Education Manager<br />

Kentucky League of Cities<br />

859-977-3761<br />

ccooper@klc.org<br />

Tad Long, Community & Economic Development Manager<br />

Kentucky League of Cities<br />

859-977-3739<br />

tlong@klc.org<br />

30


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

PREFERRED TERMINOLOGY,<br />

ACRONYMS, AND GLOSSARY OF TERMS<br />

<strong>KLC</strong> has compiled a list of homelessness and hous<strong>in</strong>g-related commonly used terms and acronyms. Go<br />

here for the Glossary of Terms.<br />

In addition, respectful language is important when referr<strong>in</strong>g <strong>to</strong> fellow Kentuckians experienc<strong>in</strong>g<br />

homelessness or other issues. Advocates for these persons encourage all of us <strong>to</strong> make a conscious effort<br />

<strong>to</strong> refer <strong>to</strong> <strong>in</strong>dividuals as people first and not def<strong>in</strong>e the person <strong>by</strong> their current liv<strong>in</strong>g situation, social or<br />

medical issue, or disability. Be<strong>in</strong>g referred <strong>to</strong> <strong>by</strong> a term makes <strong>in</strong>dividuals experienc<strong>in</strong>g these situations<br />

feel further excluded from society. Mak<strong>in</strong>g a small effort <strong>to</strong> use respectful language makes a big difference<br />

and sets a <strong>to</strong>ne for others.<br />

Examples of preferred references <strong>in</strong>clude:<br />

• Instead of Homeless - Person experienc<strong>in</strong>g homelessness.<br />

• Instead of Addict - Person experienc<strong>in</strong>g addiction, substance misuse, or person <strong>in</strong> recovery.<br />

• Instead of Handicapped - Person with a mental or physical disability.<br />

• Instead of Mentally retarded - Person with a cognitive/developmental disability.<br />

*The KHC Community Resource <strong>Guide</strong> is a list of agencies across the Commonwealth of Kentucky as a<br />

resource for possible assistance and not a guarantee that assistance will be provided. Individuals must<br />

contact the agency directly <strong>to</strong> receive <strong>in</strong>formation and/or program qualifications. Please note: KHC does<br />

not fund all of the entities listed throughout the guide, and it is not guaranteed the listed agency will have<br />

available funds.<br />

Sources: The Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation; LFUCG Office of Homeless Prevention and Intervention;<br />

Jacquel<strong>in</strong>e Long, Mounta<strong>in</strong> Comprehensive Care Center, HUD, Erlanger-Elsmere School District;<br />

<strong>Homelessness</strong> Research Institute; Invisiblepeople.com; National Coalition for the Homeless; U.S. Census<br />

Bureau; U.S. Department of Education Office of Plann<strong>in</strong>g, Evaluation and Policy Development; Kentucky<br />

Department of Education; Center for Children <strong>in</strong> Poverty; Association for Child and Adolescent Mental<br />

Health; Gilroy Institute for Children, Poverty and <strong>Homelessness</strong>; and Homeless & <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Coalition of<br />

Kentucky.<br />

31


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

2021-2022 DOCUMENT AND<br />

AUDIOVISUAL LINKS<br />

Video: You Never Know Who’s Homeless<br />

Video: A Profile – Homeless Children and Youth<br />

Video: On the Edge of Hope – Shel<strong>by</strong>ville’s Veteran’s Village<br />

<strong>KLC</strong> November 9, 2021, Homeless Summit: <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> and Hope<br />

• Speaker Contacts<br />

• Presentation Resources:<br />

- State of <strong>Homelessness</strong> and <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> <strong>in</strong> Kentucky<br />

- Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation and <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> & <strong>Homelessness</strong> Programs<br />

- Local Strategies<br />

- Local <strong>Affordable</strong> <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Solutions and Attract<strong>in</strong>g Developers<br />

- Panhandl<strong>in</strong>g Regulations<br />

- Next <strong>Step</strong>s for <strong>Your</strong> <strong>City</strong><br />

Legislative Efforts<br />

• <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong>, Build<strong>in</strong>g, and Construction<br />

• Landlord and Tenant<br />

Digital Resources<br />

• Coord<strong>in</strong>ated Entry Leads <strong>by</strong> ADD<br />

• Resources/Services/<strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Contacts <strong>by</strong> County/Region<br />

• Start the Conversation <strong>in</strong> <strong>Your</strong> <strong>City</strong> - “<strong>KLC</strong> <strong>Step</strong>-<strong>by</strong>-<strong>Step</strong> <strong>Guide</strong> <strong>to</strong> Engag<strong>in</strong>g the Public at a Town<br />

Hall Meet<strong>in</strong>g”<br />

• Blog – It Starts with Home<br />

• Blog – Children and Youth<br />

• Blog – Senior Citizens<br />

32


GUIDE TO EXAMINE HOMELESSNESS AND<br />

AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN YOUR CITY<br />

• Blog – <strong>KLC</strong> Virtual <strong>Homelessness</strong> Summit: <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> & Hope Summary (November 2021)<br />

• Blog – K-Count (February 2022)<br />

• <strong>KLC</strong> Understand<strong>in</strong>g <strong>Homelessness</strong> (February 2021)<br />

• <strong>KLC</strong> Understand<strong>in</strong>g <strong>Homelessness</strong> Glossary of Terms (February 2021)<br />

• National League of Cities: Unlock<strong>in</strong>g <strong>Homelessness</strong> Report (February 2021)<br />

• National League of Cities: The Eviction Prevention Cohort Report (February 2021)<br />

• Local Tools <strong>to</strong> Address <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Affordability: A State-<strong>by</strong>-State Analysis - National League of Cities<br />

(nlc.org) (March 2022)<br />

<strong>KLC</strong> Partner Organizations: (Call <strong>KLC</strong> if you would like specific contact names)<br />

• Foundation for Appalachian Kentucky League of Cities<br />

• Homeless & <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Coalition of Kentucky<br />

• Kentucky Department for Local Government <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong><br />

• Kentucky <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Corporation<br />

• Lex<strong>in</strong>g<strong>to</strong>n-Fayette Urban County Government Office of <strong>Homelessness</strong> Prevention and Intervention<br />

• Mounta<strong>in</strong> Comprehensive Care Center<br />

• <strong>Affordable</strong> <strong>Hous<strong>in</strong>g</strong> Developers – Contact <strong>KLC</strong> for specific contact names.<br />

GOT A SPECIFIC QUESTION?<br />

<strong>KLC</strong> has created a network of partners around the issue of homelessness and hous<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

While we are not the experts, we know who <strong>to</strong> contact. Contact <strong>KLC</strong> Member Relations for<br />

assistance at 800.876.4552.<br />

33


100 East V<strong>in</strong>e Street, Suite 800, Lex<strong>in</strong>g<strong>to</strong>n, Kentucky 40507<br />

Tel. 859.977.3700 or 800.876.4552<br />

Fax 859.977.3703<br />

klc.org

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!