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Wentworth Falls Lake Sculpture Walk

Take a walk and discover the carved sandstone sculptures in the park. Created in 2000 as part of the Wentworth Falls Lake Sculpture Project, each sculpture depicts the seed pod of a native plant that can be found around the lake. About the Project The Wentworth Falls Lake Sculpture project began with the idea to create the first of several sculpture parks throughout the Blue Mountains, with permanent and changing artworks on public land. Sculpture parks or indeed any other art in public spaces are signposts of artistic communities, local involvement and pride. Public art in general enhances the natural or built environment, takes art out of the Gallery and into the open, for everyone to enjoy and interact with. The Blue Mountains was nominated for World Heritage Listing, for its natural beauty, and at the same time became the ‘City of the Arts’, due to its large and varied arts community. As a response to both, it was an obvious choice to use sandstone as a medium, and carving as a technique, to draw attention to the importance of native plants and the role they play within our environment, our culture and our heritage.

Take a walk and discover the carved sandstone sculptures in the park.
Created in 2000 as part of the Wentworth Falls Lake Sculpture Project, each sculpture depicts the seed pod of a native plant that can be found around the lake.

About the Project

The Wentworth Falls Lake Sculpture project began with the idea to create the first of several sculpture parks throughout the Blue Mountains, with permanent and changing artworks on public land. Sculpture parks or indeed any other art in public spaces are signposts of artistic communities, local involvement and pride.

Public art in general enhances the natural or built environment, takes art out of the Gallery and into the open, for everyone to enjoy and interact with. The Blue Mountains was nominated for World Heritage Listing, for its natural beauty, and at the same time became the ‘City of the Arts’, due to its large and varied arts community.

As a response to both, it was an obvious choice to use sandstone as a medium, and carving as a technique, to draw attention to the importance of native plants and the role they play within our environment, our culture and our heritage.

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Wentworth Fall Lake

SCULPTURE TRAIL


Wentworth Falls Lake SCULPTURE TRAIL

This eMag was compiled as a guide to the "Wentworth Falls Lake Sculpture Trail.

The following pages are © Blue Mountains City Council.

MORE information.

The trail starts here.

Website • Facebook • VISITOR eMag


contents

acknowledgements 2

foreword 3

Role of Public Sculpture 4

Vegetation Types of Wentworth Falls 8

11 Nick Dörrer

13 Ellan

15 Anna Baird

17 Mary Anderson

19 Michael Byrt

21 Vicki Skeen

23 Robyn Austin

25 Peter Baird

27 Doris Rainsford

29 Hugo Rojas

31 Alexis Apfelbaum

33 Marco Grilli

35 Maija Collishaw

37 Gabriella Hegyes

39 Sonja van As

41 Petrina Louise Fuda

Works in Progress 42

Biographies 50

Education Kit 56

1


acknowledgments

I gratefully acknowledge the following people and organisations

who have made contributions to this project:

Artists: Nick Dörrer, Ellan, Anna Baird, Mary Anderson,

Michael Byrt, Vicki Skeen, Robyn Austin, Peter Baird, Doris

Rainsford, Hugo Rojas, Alexis Apfelbaum, Marco Grilli, Maija

Collishaw, Sonja van As and Petrina Louise Fuda.

Technical assistants: Kevin Atkins, Ken Anderson, Max

Skeen, Malcolm Mc Causland and Harley Ives.

The original group of students who could not continue

the project, due to its delay: Julie Moremon, Jennifer Mc

Elligott, Denise Portanger, Rita Lynch, Natalie Topaz, Mick

Morrow, Raoul Olivares, Susan Ashley and Dawn Wilson.

Margaret Baker for information on native plants.

Elin Howe for the essay on public sculpture.

Esther Scholem for proof reading.

The local community and visitors for their support.

All those who have contributed towards the education kit.

Blue Mountains City Council

Blue Mountains Inaugural ‘City of the Arts’

New South Wales Government - Ministry for the Arts

Blue Mountains Organic Community Gardens

Nepean Community College

BMCC Staff

John Ellison - Cultural Officer

Lin Mountstephen - Cultural Development Co-ordinator

Jasmine Lance - Cultural Development Officer

Rick Goehner -Open Space & Recreation Planning Officer

Rachael Veldman -Open Space & Recreation Technical Officer

Supapon Raffan Lantay Lefkovich - Community Gardens Co-ordinator

Phillip Furken - Yellow Rock Quarry

Ian Hayes & Associates - Consulting civil and structural engineers

Rod Hunter, Stephen Hunter & Padraig Hungerford - Milestone

Masons

Phillip Tilt - Bobcat & Tipper Hire

Peter Morris & staff - Mountain Cranes and Rigging services

Louisa Murray - Information Officer, Royal Botanical Gardens

Warren Ross - Blue Mountains Community Arts Council

Gabriella Hegyes

Project Organiser

2


foreword

The Wentworth Falls Lake Sculpture project began with the idea

to create the first of several sculpture parks throughout the Blue

Mountains, with permanent and changing artworks on public

land. Sculpture parks or indeed any other art in public spaces are

signposts of artistic communities, local involvement and pride.

Public art in general enhances the natural or man made environment,

takes art out of the Gallery and into the open, for everyone

to enjoy and interact with. The Blue Mountains was nominated

for World Heritage Listing, for its natural beauty, and at the same

time became the ‘City of the Arts’, due to its large and varied arts

community. As a response to both, it was an obvious choice to

use sandstone as a medium, and carving as a technique, to draw

attention to the importance of native plants and the role they play

within our environment, our culture and our heritage.

Gabriella Hegyes

3


Role of Public Sculpture

This project’s co-ordinator, Gabriella Hegyes, has conceived a rich cultural

menu for visitors to this site. Located around the perimeter of a popular

picnic spot beside Wentworth Falls Lake, the large sandstone carvings are

visible from the road, and their plump inviting forms beckon the passer-by.

Once lured on to the site by these voluptuous shapes, one quickly realises

that the aesthetic experience is enriched by other information. The sculptures

represent the seed pods of native plants in the area and each sculpture

has been located near its referent for easy identification. This is public

art which aims to stimulate the visitor’s interest in both the

indigenous botanical phenomena and the artists’ interpretions.

The story of this project’s eventual realisation at Wentworth Falls Lake

sheds some light on the shape it has taken. It has had a long gestation

period. Originally it was conceived, in 1995, as a student project for a

sculptural component to enrich a proposed community permaculture garden

at Clairvaux. The students were drawn from Hegyes’ class at Nepean

Community College. The Clairvaux site eventually proved untenable, and

over the next few years Hegyes tenaciously negotiated various new sites

and agendas for the sandstone carvings until they finally materialised on

their present site. During this time many of the original students have become

practising professional artists. Hegyes also invited established professional

artists on board as the project’s shape changed. This chequered

history has served to enrich and broaden the scope of Hegyes’ original

agenda.

4


Conceived as a community project, it has attracted a community at every

stage of its development. After numerous false starts, the unfinished

sandstone blocks were eventually relocated in a group at the Wentworth

Falls site, where access to a power source was made available, enabling

the artists to use power tools for the initial shaping. The work, although

cordoned off from the public, was still highly visible, and attracted a

stream of regular locals as well as daytrippers, curious about progress.

Because the artists were volunteering their labour, they tended to work on

the carvings during the weekends and, when interviewed, many of them

joked that sometimes they felt like performance artists for the picnickers.

Nevertheless on-site production has served to establish a rapport with local

residents, and overtly demonstrate the labour involved in a way that work

produced in a studio, and then delivered to the site, cannot. This

interaction is invaluable for both artist and audience as both parties

develop an appreciation of one another’s concerns. When sculpture arrives

fully formed at a public site, it is easy for viewers to forget that it

represents someone’s labour. Likewise if artists merely visit a site with a

view to locating their work, they will not have the opportunity to form an

appreciation of the way that particular piece of public space is valued by

the people who frequent it. The necessity of working on site created the

opportunity for artist and audience to communicate on a range of interelated

site-specific topics from aesthetic practice to environmental issues, as

well as just enjoying everyday social conversation.

5


Selecting a range of native plants growing in abundance on the Wentworth

Falls site, Hegyes asked each artist to create a carving of the selected

plant’s seedpod. The medium - local sandstone blocks hewn from Yellow

Rock Quarry, Winmalee - is brittle and necessitated the artists working

with simple forms. They have isolated the dominant characteristics of each

seedpod and distilled these forms to create their aesthetic interpretations.

Each carving is labelled with botanical information and accompanied by an

engraving which depicts other aspects of the plant.

The combined effect on the viewer of this presentation is to intensify the

process of looking. Despite the sandstone medium, one is first struck by the

sensual, fleshy quality of the seedpod carvings - an effect enhanced by their

outsized scale and exaggerated forms as much as it is informed by their

subject matter. They literally beckon the viewer to take a closer

look. This initial invitation brings you up to the botanical information and

immediately you find yourself casting about the immediate area for the

relevant native plant. The excitement of identification intensifies if you

find one of the tiny seedpods, and this quickly returns your attention to

the carving, only this time you look with a more informed gaze. This

circular pattern of looking serves to facilitate understanding both of the

native flora and of its aesthetic translation.

The day that I visited the work-site I was very aware of the stream of

curious visitors and the good-natured banter which ensued as they chatted

with the artists. By this time the carvings were nearing completion, and

artists were working with hand tools. There are few sights more fascinating

than watching skilled people do their stuff, and this experience in turn

becomes the stuff of the witnesses’ stories. Many of those fortunate enough

to have seen these carvings evolve are locals and regular visitors to the site.

Their testimony will undoubtedly often punctuate the experience for future

visitors.

6


Contemporary debates around public art stress the need to move away

from the old public-monument model of art practice, and develop a participatory

model which engages its audience. Artists are now seeking a

model which develops a relationship between art production and audience

participation. Hegyes’ community-conscious approach appears to have

achieved these goals for a wide audience. The scale of the seedpod carvings

seems to have great appeal for small children, who I noticed were

quick to investigate the unattended work-in-progress. For both primary

and high schools the project will undoubtedly have field-trip appeal across

a range of subjects, and the adult visitor should also find the project

tempting. For the artists involved - all local people - it has been an invaluable

professional experience. This must especially apply to those who

started as students with little or no experience in stone carving. It must be

rewarding indeed to see their inviting finished carvings set out around the

foreshores of the lake.

From every stage in its long gestation this is a project which has involved

a range of communities, from those whose concerns revolve around the

environment to those wanting to explore aesthetic issues. This community

focus has contributed to its eventual participatory nature. It is public art

which during its evolution has, and continues to, work as a social catalyst.

Elin Howe

November 1999

7


Vegetation Types of Wentworth Falls

On Sunday 23 rd May 1813, Gregory Blaxland, a member of the first party of

white explorers to visit Wentworth Falls, recorded in his journal that the group

encamped on the side of a swamp, with a beautiful stream of water running

through it. Two years later, on Tuesday 16 May 1815, Governor Macquarie’s

touring party camped here on their return journey from Bathurst. Macquarie

observed that here was a very extensive pretty valley, with a lum of very fine

fresh good water, with tolerable good feed for cattle … I have this day named

the place Jamison’s Valley….

‘Jamison’s Valley’, which today is largely occupied by Wentworth Falls Lake

would have been known to Aboriginal people for many thousands of years before,

as a place of fresh water and an environment rich in resources – edible

plants and animals, timber, fibre, medicinal items and stone. A further abundance

of useful products was also to be found in the wider Jamison Creek

catchment which still contains representative stands of many Blue Mountains

vegetation communities today

Most widespread are the open-forests with canopies dominated by species

of Eucalypt and understories of diverse life forms layered from tall shrubs to

small herbs. They are found on the better-drained and relatively sheltered

valley sides, and follow Jamison Creek for much of its course before it leaps

over Wentworth Falls. Towards the ridges, where growing conditions become

tougher, the treed canopy thins to woodland and the lessening shade promotes

a colourful profusion of hard-leaved shrubs. Where exposure to wind,

sunlight and even fire is greatest, heath dominates. Plants here are toughened

and bonsaied in pockets of thin, dry, impoverished soil that develop between

expanses of sandstone that often record the presence of the original inhabitants

of the region.

8

Interspersed with these communities where drainage is poor, are the swamps

most frequently recorded by early travellers. On valley slopes these patches

of vegetation, that from afar looks grass-like or even mown, mark the zones of

seepage where groundwater surfaces along bands of claystone. Such ‘hanging’

swamps contain a tangled profusion of rushes, sedges and shrubs which


tolerate ‘wet feet’. Close to the streams deep deposits of poorly drained

peaty sands also favour swamp dwellers. Depending particularly on the time

since the last fire, the swamps will be either dominated by sedges or by

shrubs.

In the most sheltered places, usually below the cliffs that display their own

specialised collection of plants, forests grow tall and lush. Below Wentworth

Falls where soils are deeper, richer and moisture retentive, majestic Eucalypts

and Turpentines of the tall open-forests tower over soft-leaved shrubs and

tree ferns. In the most sheltered places these are replaced by closed-forest,

here represented by the Warm Temperate Rainforest community. Stands of

the distinctively lichen-blotched Coachwoods and the fragrant Sassafras filter

sunlight through to the fern carpeted silence of the forest floor.

Reflecting the range of environmental conditions that sustain the different

vegetation communities, are the seed pods of the plants, as diverse and

fascinating as the flowers themselves. From the rainforests come the spore

bearing ferns, descendants of plants from a time before flowering plants and

seeds. In these and other sheltered forests where growing conditions are

generous, many fruit, particularly of the understorey plants are fleshy or thinwalled

like those of the Geebungs. Such fruit are quickly eaten and spread

by birds. The long woody capsules of the Waratah, and the leguminous pod

of the Cedar Wattle will readily open and spill seed to the ground in these

more favourable locations.

As environmental conditions harshen so the seed pods become tough,

woody and gnarled. They are often held on the plant until opened by a hardbeaked

bird, a passing fire or drought. Eucalypts, Bottlebrush and Tea-trees

protect numerous seeds in thin walled woody capsules for years until shed

by opening valves. The projecting velvet-coated seed sacs of Banksias and

the thickened woody follicles of Hakeas are kept tightly closed, protecting

their winged seeds indefinitely until a new cycle of life is ready to begin again

in a community of plants in the Blue Mountains.

9


Juncus usitatus

Common Rush

The moist loamy-sands which fringe Wentworth Falls Lake provide ideal conditions for the growth

of dense tufts of this perennial rush. Its upright, mid-green stems are a slender .5–2 mm wide,

and extend some 60-100cm from underground rhizomes. Inconspicuous leaves tip long open

stem-clasping sheaths which colour downwards from yellow-brown to red-brown and glossy near

the base. From late spring to summer, small but numerous straw-brown, wind-pollinated flowers

line fragile spreading branchlets that extend for up to 6cm from the sheaths. Tiny seeds develop

in 1.5mm long, golden-brown, blunt elliptical capsules. Becoming sticky when wet, the seeds are

spread by passing animals. This rush was probably one of the ‘grasses’ valued as fodder by early

European travelers to this site.

Family: Juncaceae

10


1 Nick Dörrer

H: 190cm x W: 140cm x D: 90cm

11


Eucalyptus subsp. radiata

Narrow-leaved Peppermint

Look into the canopy of the woodland around the Lake and you will see the fine foliage of the

Narrow-leaved Peppermint silhouetted against the broader leaves of other eucalypts which share

the better-drained slopes. Glossy-green alternate adult leaves are long, thin and narrow, only 1.5

cm wide. An intense peppermint fragrance is released from oil dots when freshly fallen leaves are

crushed underfoot, adding to the enjoyment of walking by this graceful short-fibred tree. From late

spring to early summer, groups of up to 20 radiating white flowers cluster towards the ends of the

pendulous branches. The globular to pear-shaped, stalked woody fruit are 4-6mm wide and long.

Each has a thick rim and 3 or 4 enclosed valves which open to release fine reddish-brown seed.

Family: Myrtaceae

12


2 Ellan

H: 76cm x W: 153cm x D:110cm

13


Leptospermum grandifolium

Woolly Tea-tree

In late spring, white splashes of Woolly Tea-tree flowers colour the swamp margins and stream

banks around Wentworth Falls Lake. Clasping the spreading branches of this tall shrub, the 15mm

wide solitary flowers unfold from woolly buds. Five petals, underlain by densely hairy sepals, spread

from the rim of stamens and a bright green ovary that matures to a 10mm wide, domed and flaky

seed capsule. Many slender thread-like seeds are released from the five chambers of the mature

woody capsule as its surface lifts and spreads. New stems and foliage are silky hairy. The sharppointed,

alternate leaves are large, up to 3cm long and 7mm wide. They are grey-green in colour

with 3 to 5 parallel veins and a downy underside.

Family: Myrtaceae

14


3 Anna Baird

H: 63cm x W: 112cm x D:112cm

15


Gleichenia dicarpa

Pouched Coral Fern

Springing in green tangles from 2m long, branched stalks that are finely hairy, the fronds of this

terrestrial fern are a common sight wherever there is damp ground. Spreading a further 1–2m,

the many-forked leathery fronds terminate in 3-5cm long leaflets or pinnules which extend at right

angles from a central axis that is covered in brown hairs. The upper surface of the pinnule is green

to yellowish-green and glossy, and the underside is covered with pale hairs. Each pinnule is divided

into many 1-5mm long segments. The end segments of fertile fronds are then turned under to form

pouches. Each pouch contains two sporangia from which are released the reproductive spore. This

fern is a colonizer of damp ground, creeping towards disturbed areas on scaly rhizomes.

Family: Gleicheniaceae

16


4 Mary Anderson

H: 55cm x W: 108cm x D: 92cm

17


Callistemon citrinus

Crimson Bottlebrush

The crimson red ‘bottlebrushes’ of Callistemon citrinus create floral spectaculars along stream banks

and swamp edges from spring to summer. Each 12 cm long ‘bottlebrush’ displayed on the ends of

stiff upright branches, is a spike of hundreds of flowers, each with 5 tiny petals and long brilliant red

stamens. The nectar-rich flowers are sought by pollinating honeyeaters. Clusters of woody cupshaped

4-7mm wide capsules persist on the branches, protecting the numerous seeds for years.

Sunlight shining through the waxy, 3-7cm long lance-shaped leaves, reveals an abundance of oil

dots which release the citrus fragrance for which this Callistemon is named. Pink, softly-hairy new

growth continues to attract the eye to this 2-3m high shrub well after flowering.

Family: Myrtaceae

18


5 Michael Byrt

H: 75cm x W: 160cm x D: 160cm

19


Grevillea subsp. acanthifolia

Swamp Grevillea

Found only in the higher parts of the Blue Mountains, Grevillea acanthifolia grows in prickly thickets

in the damp peaty soils of hanging swamps. The flowers are arranged in a 5-10cm long upright

‘toothbrush’ towards the ends of long branches. Silvery-pink, softly hairy buds open to long upright

styles which may be pink or red. Although the flowering season is from spring to summer,

individual blooms may be seen at any time of the year. After pollination by honeyeating birds, two

seeds develop in a boat-shaped, thin-walled follicle which retains the remnants of the style as a tail.

The deeply divided leaves with ultimate wedge-shaped lobes, have sharp points and down-turned

edges. They are arranged alternately on tough branches which may be low spreading or dramatically

upright to 2m.

Family: Proteaceae

20


6 Vicky Skeen

H: 95cm x W: 45cm x D: 150cm

21


Patersonia sericea

Silky Purple-flag

Bright violet to mauve flowers supported on long stalks which rise from a grassy tuft of leaves

are a distinctive feature of this perennial herb. Each flower, which has three large, and three small

spreading petals, is surrounded by 30mm long, brown bracts. Individual flowers are given only one

sunny day of glorious colour, though colonies of plants bloom in succession from late winter to

spring. Rare white flowers are a special find. The flower stem is 30-50cm long and silky towards the

top. The many 2-3mm long waxy brown ridged seeds are enclosed in a 15-30mm long cylindrical

capsule. Each slender green leaf is 30-60cm long, flat to cylindrical and upright or spreading.

Lower margins are lined with dense hairs. This Patersonia is frequently encountered in open-forests,

woodland and swamp edges.

Family: Iridaceae

22


7 Robyn Austin

H: 120cm x W: 95cm x D: 105cm

23


Xanthorrhoea resinosa

Grass Tree

The most obvious feature of Grass Trees is the flowering spike which is supported on a stalk or

scape. In this species the scape is usually longer than the spike extending the overall height of

the plant to 2.5m. It rises from slender quadrangular blue-green leaves that arch gracefully over an

underground or short trunk. The spike is velvet brown in appearance from densely packed hairy

dark brown bracts. Shiny brown, hard-capsuled, prominent fruit develop from many creamy-white

flowers. The nectar is an invaluable energy source for insects, birds and small mammals, especially

after fire. Aboriginal people soaked the flowers in water to make a sweet drink. They also used the

scape and spike as a spear, glueing onto it stone tips and barbs with the yellow resin powdered

from the leaf bases.

Family: Xanthorrhoeaceae

24


8 Peter Baird

H: 155cm x W: 165cm x D: 110cm

25


Allocasuarina littoralis

Black She-oak

Cockatoos love Casuarinas. Hard woody seed cones are crunched loudly apart and debris rained

on unsuspecting passers-by as the birds feast on a harvest of seeds in the open-forests. In the

Black She-oak, a 5-15m tall, corky-barked tree, the stalked cone is a 12-10mm long ‘barrel’ with a

blunt end. Angular protruding valves on the cones open to release dark winged seeds. Cones are

found on those trees with female flowers. These grow in red tufts within the foliage. Each tiny flower

has two thread-like red stigmas. These trap pollen that is wind-blown from the rusty male flowers

which cluster at the end of branchlets, sometimes on a different tree, often on the same. Interestingly

the branchlets, or cladodes, are photosynthetic as the leaves are reduced to regularly spaced

rings of 6–8 tiny teeth.

Family: Casuarinaceae

26


9 Doris Rainsford

H: 75cm x W: 125cm x D: 160cm

27


Hakea teretifolia subsp. teretifolia

Dagger Hakea

Prickly thickets of this Hakea guard the wet heaths and swamp from all but the most intrepid visitor.

Needle sharp, cylindrical leaves up to 5cm long, characterise this rigid shrub which may be low

and spreading in windy locations or up to 3m tall when sheltered. From spring to summer a wonderful

abundance of softly hairy white flowers cluster on short stalks in the leaf axils. Segments of

the 4-6mm long floral tube roll back to one side. The white style, at first curved into the floral tube,

is released to reveal the pollen presenter. Moths, which are attracted to white flowers, are evening

pollinators. The 3cm long dagger-like, beaked fruit is a tough woody follicle which splits in half to

release two black winged seeds. Aboriginal people collected the nectar-rich flowers of Hakeas to

make sweet drinks.

Family: Proteaceae

28


10 Hugo Rojas

H: 55cm x W: 102cm x D: 210cm

29


Acacia elata

Cedar Wattle

One of the loveliest Acacias, it achieves graceful heights of 18m in sheltered valleys particularly on

the edges of rainforest. The cedar-like leaves are 30-40cm long and a light yellow when young. Described

as bi-pinnate, they are twice divided into 3-5 pairs of pinnae, then 10-20 pairs of pinnules.

The upper surface of each 5cm long pinnule is glossy green and paler beneath. Individual flowers

have 4 or 5 tiny petals and numerous pale yellow stamens. They gather into globular heads of up

to 50 flowers. Then up to 60 heads join in axillary clusters to put on a spectacular summer display.

The straight seed pod is up to 15cm long and 14mm wide, and dark grey to brown in colour. As

with other leguminous plants, the pod splits on both sides to reveal a row of plump seeds, each

joined to the pod by a stalk or funicle.

Family: Mimosaceae

30


11 Alexis Apfelbaum

H:46cm x W: 120cm x D: 56cm

31


Lambertia formosa

Mountain Devil

With the distinctive devil’s head seed pod of a short beak and two long horns, this is one of the

best known shrubs in the Blue Mountains. Hidden amongst whorls of sharp tipped, linear leaves,

the gnarled woody fruit colours with age from green to grey and eventually splits to reveal a winged

seed in each of the two valves. The fruit develops from erect clusters of 7 orange to bright red

flowers that are surrounded by red-green bracts. Each flower consists of a 4cm long floral tube with

a rolled back fringe, and a protruding style. Abundant in nectar they were favoured by Aboriginal

people as a source of sugary carbohydrate. Today they are sought by honeyeating birds and native

insects who are often denied this sweet pleasure by European bees which drill into the flower base

and drain away the liquid.

Family: Proteaceae

32


12 Marco Grilli

H: 78cm x W: 120cm x D:170cm

33


Banksia serrata

Old-man Banksia

Old-man Banksia is a revered archivist of the bush, recording and storing the passage of time and

events in its knobbly grey bark that fissures with age. With a gnarled ancient appearance it has a

distinguished place in the small tree layer of open-forests and woodlands. Its sturdy leaves are up

to 16cm long and evenly serrated. Green and waxy above, the underside is a velvety grey-green. In

summer thousands of flowers assemble in stocky creamy-grey spikes, and produce copious nectar

that attracts insects, birds and possums. Only some of the flowers develop into the large brown

velvety smooth seed pods which project like heavy eyelids from the shaggy grey hair of the long

withered styles. It may take years, or even a fire, before each pod opens to reveal two black winged

seeds.

Family: Proteaceae

34


13 Maija Collishaw

H: 55cm x W: 75cm x D: 133cm

35


Telopea speciosissima

Waratah

With a fiery red head of densely packed flowers and large petal-like bracts, supported proudly on

a few upright 2-3m long branches, the Waratah of Aboriginal dreaming stories, is the real attention

seeker in eucalypt forests. Most stunning is the wonderful symmetry of the thick red styles which

kneel side by side facing the apex of a flower head that may be up to 15cm wide. The name, ‘Telopea’,

which means ‘seen from afar’ is most apt. After flowering 10-20 winged seeds are pouched

in long woody follicles which mature from green to grey, and hang below the new red-tinged foliage

like drying bananas. The leaves too are distinctive, varying according to growing conditions. Always

long, often to 16cm, some are tough with uneven toothed margins and obvious veins, while others

are more softly waxy.

Family: Proteaceae

36


14 Gabriella Hegyes

H: 102cm x W: 52cm x D: 158cm

37


Isopogon anemonifolius

Broad-leaf Drumsticks

Like golden orbs of spring sunshine, the densely packed terminal flower heads of the Isopogon

radiate a yellow glow into the shrub layer of eucalypt forests and woodlands. Each yellow flower is

only 10-12mm long and is surrounded by furry bracts. After pollination the bracts become larger

and woody and cluster tightly around the globular fruiting head which becomes the ‘drumstick’. After

many years the bracts dry out and fall, releasing the seeds. The seed is a nut, 2-3mm long, and

covered with long fine hairs from which the name ‘Isopogon’ meaning ‘equal bearded’, is derived.

When not in flower this 1-2m tall upright shrub, is noticed for its foliage. Changing from rusty-red to

mid-green, the leaves are so deeply dissected into multiple flat narrow segments that the leaf blade

virtually disappears.

Family: Proteaceae

38


15 Sonja van As

H: 55cm x W: 100cm x D: 85cm

39


Persoonia pinifolia

Pine-leaved Geebung

Fine pine-like foliage distinguishes this Geebung from the other tall shrubs in open-forests of lower

altitudes. Densely packed on graceful drooping branches, each bright green leaf is 3-6cm long, and

cylindrical with a fine point and a faint groove on the upper surface. It is most commonly noticed in

autumn however, when the ends of the branches colour to bright yellow with 5-15cm long spikes

of flowers that nestle amongst the smaller terminal leaves. Each flower is a floral tube of 10-15mm

long, the ends of which roll back in 4 segments to reveal a projecting stigma. The branches then

become loaded with a fine crop of succulent red-green fruit that mature to bunches of bronze-purple

‘grapes’. High in vitamin C and potassium, they were a valued winter food resource for Aboriginal

people.

Family: Proteaceae

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16 Petrina Louise Fuda

H: 62cm x W: 150cm x D: 100cm

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Works in Progress

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Biographies

Nick Dorrer

Ellan

Born: Greece 1961

I have dabbled in many forms of art expression, from designing clothes

to sculpting in clay and wax. I also have a longstanding interest in native

plants, including native medicinal herbs as well as native landscape

gardening. However this is my first experience with sandstone. Combining

the knowledge of native plants with sculpting has inspired me to study the

seed form more intensely for purpose other than propagation.

I found sandstone sculpting both challenging as well as interesting:

Challenging because this medium is unforgiving if a mistake is made and

interesting how the stone evolves into the shape it suggests to me.

Anna Baird

Education:

1999-95 Master of Fine Arts, College of Fine Art, NSW

1985 BA Visual Arts, City Art Institute - Institute

1982 Associate Diploma VIS Arts Nepean CAE

Solo Exhibition:

1999 Contingent Form, Public Space & The Personal Kudos

Gallery, Paddington, NSW

1995 Structure & Form, Casula Power House, Casula, NSW

Group Exhibitions:

1999 “Off The Cuff”, Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

“Blue” YZ Space UWS Nepean, NSW

1998 “Staff Exhibition”, YZ Space UWS Nepean, NSW

“Emotional States”, Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba,

NSW

“Hand Luggage”, A Travelling Exhibition to Luxemburg

“Altered Characteristics”, MFA Show, Cofa, NSW

“Calibration,” MFA Show, Selvyn St, Paddington, NSW

“20/20” Group Show, Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba,

NSW

“Collaboration with An Absent Friend”, Cofa,

Paddington, NSW

“Collaboration with An Absent Friend 2” dec

Artspace, Katoomba, NSW

“Lusting Impressions”, Sweet Foray Gallery,

Katoomba, NSW

1997 “Unreasonable Encounters”, Sweet Foray Gallery,

Katoomba, NSW

“Erotica” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

1996 “A Touchy Subject” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

“Block Buster” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

1995 “Dimensionally Challenged”, Financially Accessible,

Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

Staff Show at YZ Space UWS Nepean, NSW

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Born: Sydney 1978

Visual Art Studies

1997 Lead light, Nepean Community College, Katoomba, NSW

1997-94 Advanced Sculpture, Nepean Community College,

Katoomba, NSW

Advanced Photography, Black & White, Nepean

Community College, Katoomba, NSW

1995-94 Experimental Photography, Nepean Community

College, Katoomba, NSW

1994-93 Photography- Black &White, Nepean Community

College, Katoomba, NSW

Sculpture, Nepean Community College, Katoomba, NSW

Selected Group Exhibitions:

1995 “Kaleidoscope of Images” Photographic Exhibition,

Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest,

NSW

Group Exhibitions:

1997 “Art in the Mountains” Wentworth Falls School of

Arts, Wentworth Falls, NSW

“Art Street 97” Winter Magic Festival, Katoomba, NSW

1996 “Boxed In” Photographic & Sculpture Exhibition,

NCC, Katoomba, NSW

“Conspiracy” Mixed Media Polymorph Body Art,

Enmore, Sydney, NSW

“After Image” Photographic & Sculpture Exhibition,

NCC, Katoomba, NSW

“Arts In The Mountains ‘96” Wentworth Falls School

Of Arts, Wentworth Falls, NSW

“Camp Creative” Katoomba, NSW


1995 “Desire” Photographic Exhibition Café 40 Gallery,

Katoomba, NSW

“Mountain Reflections” Photographic Exhibition,

Kedumba Gallery, Wentworth Falls, NSW

“Transformations” Photographic & Sculpture

Exhibition NCC, Katoomba, NSW

“Paper Labyrinths” Photographic Exhibition, Café 40

Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

1994 “Destiny” Photographic & Sculpture Exhibition, NCC,

Katoomba, NSW

“Youth Art” Katoomba Youth Centre, Katoomba, NSW

“Light Forms” Wentworth Falls School the Arts,

Wentworth Falls, NSW

“Impressions” Photographic Exhibition, Café 40

Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

“Eat” Wentworth Falls School the Arts,

Wentworth Falls, NSW

“Year of The Family” Photographic Exhibition, Café 40

Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

1993 “Focused” Photographic & Sculpture Exhibition, NCC,

Katoomba, NSW

Awards:

1997 “Art Street” First Place, 3D Art works, Winter Magic

Festival, Katoomba, NSW

1996 “Rod Kerr Memorial Award” Katoomba High School,

Katoomba, NSW

“3 Unit Visual Arts” Katoomba High School

Katoomba, NSW

Commissions:

1997 ‘Scattered” Sculpture Private Collection

1995 “Close Up” Photographic Private Collection

Private Collections represented throughout Australia

Mary Anderson

Education:

1996 Sculpture Workshops, Nepean Community College,

Katoomba, NSW

1994 Painting Workshops, Nepean Community College,

Katoomba, NSW

1965 Scholarship for Fine Arts East Sydney Technical College

Group Exhibitions:

1998 Blue Mountains Arts Council, Wentworth Falls School

Arts, Wentworth Falls, NSW

Michael Byrt

Born: Sydney 1961

Education:

1988 Higher Certificate, National Art School, Darlinghurst, NSW

1987 Art Certificate National Art School, Darlinghurst, NSW

1986 Art Certificate Meadowbank TAFE, NSW

1983 Diploma KVB, Graphic Design, Sydney

Solo Exhibition:

1989 Dension Sculpture Studio, Rozelle, NSW

Exhibitions:

1996 “Degree of Excellence”, UWS, NSW

1997 Go West Café, Katoomba, NSW

1993 Four Sculptors, TAP Gallery, Darlinghurst, NSW

1991 Old Brewery, Goulburn, NSW

1989 Multiple Visions, Art Incorporate, Sydney

1988 Exhibition in “A Minor”, NAS, Darlinghurst, Sydney

Wynne Exhibition, Art Gallery of NSW, Sculpture

1985 Sydney Morning Herald

Royal Easter Show

Drummoyne Art Award

Lane Cove Art Award

NSW Police Art Exhibition

Awards:

1996 Blue Mountains Art Exhibition

Environmental Award, “Storm Water Mural Project”,

Paddington, NSW

South Sydney Council, Keep Australia Beautiful

Minute Paper, Storm Water Pollution Policy, South

Sydney Council

1994 South Sydney Council, Keep Australia Beautiful

1993 Environmental Award for Excellence, Meadowbank

TAFE, NSW

1985 NSW Police Art Exhibition, Highly Commended

Winner, National Art Award, Cover Design, “The

Farmers Annual” 1986

Commissions

1997 Christmas Card Art Work, For the Hon Pam Allan MP,

Minister for the Environment

Community Mural, Police Youth Club, Redfern, NSW

Seven Kids Theatre Designs, Marian St Theatre,

Killara, NSW

Murals with South Sydney City Council

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Vicki Skeen

Born Australia 1954

Education:

1999 Candidate for Diploma in Fine Arts, Western Sydney

Institute of TAFE, Werrington, NSW

1995 Sculpture, Nepean Commuity College, Katoomba, NSW

1973 Certificate Fine Arts, National Arts School, Kogarah, NSW

Solo Exhibition

1994 Wentworth Falls School of Arts, Wentworth Falls, NSW

Group Exhibitions:

1996 “Nutters” Art Arena, Wollongong, NSW

1995 “Transformation” NCC, Katoomba, NSW

1994 “Destiny”, NCC, Katoomba, NSW

Art Related Activities

1996-99 Winter Magic Festival committee member

1998 Blue Mountains Community Arts Council, Vice-President

Radio 2 Blu presenter

1993 Society of Mountains Artists, secretary

1992 Blue Mountains Community Arts Council, secretary

Blue Mountains Artists for Life, founding member and

treasurer

1976 Mark & Geoffrey Designers, Paddington, Sydney, Artist

Robyn Austin

Group Exhibitions:

1999 “Erotica” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

“Emotional States” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba,NSW

“20/20 Vision” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

“From Small Things” Penrith Regional Gallery & The

Lewers Bequest, NSW

“Journeys”, Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

1997 “Below The Surface”, Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

“Body and Beyond” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba,NSW

1995 “Labyrinth” NCC, Katoomba, NSW

1994 “Light Forms” Wentworth Falls School of Arts,

Wentworth Falls, NSW

Represented in private collections in the USA and Australia.

Peter Baird

Born Scotland 1953

The emergence of the sculpture was an

intense physical process. The size and composition of the stone, its hard

and soft qualities, involved various chisel-ing, scutching and grinding

techniques. The proportions of the stone allowed various forms of the seed

pod to be created, which can be viewed from different angles.

The stone image, which represents the material form of the plant, encourages

me to be more conscious of the unique flora we have in our bush,

particularly around Wentworth Falls Lake.

Doris Rainsford

Born: Australia 1971

Education:

1998 Candidate for Fine Arts Certificate, Western Sydney

Institute of TAFE, Werrington, NSW

1997-1994 Sculpture Workshops, Nepean Community College,

Katoomba, NSW

1999-1994 Photography Workshops, Nepean Community College,

Katoomba, NSW

1997 Stained Glass Workshops, Nepean Community College,

Katoomba, NSW

Solo Exhibition

1999 “flowers, wings and other small things” Sweet Foray

Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

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Education:

1997 Graduate Diploma of Education, University of Western

Sydney Nepean, NSW

1996 Bachelor of Arts (Honours) Fine Arts, University of

Western Sydney Nepean, NSW

1995 Bachelor of Arts (Fine Arts), University of Western

Sydney Nepean, NSW


Selected Group Exhibitions:

1999 “Sited 99” Charles Darwin Walk, Wentworth Falls, NSW

“Fuse” The Red Exhibition, Penrith Regional Gallery

& The Lewers Bequest, NSW

Solo Exhibitions:

1998 “Uranium Ship” dec Art Space, Katoomba, NSW

1996 “Flight into the Unknown” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

Group Exhibitions:

1998 “Earth Woman Environment”, Blue Mountains Women’s

Health Centre, Katoomba, NSW

1997 “Hatched Healthway”, Perth Institute Contemporary Arts, WA

“World In a Match Box 1997”, City Art public space,

Melbourne, VIctoria

“Twentieth Annual Walker Ceramic Award” Victoria

Arts Centre, Melbourne, Victoria

1996 “Another Dose”, Arts Space, Woolloomooloo, NSW

“Mary Alice Evatt Art Award” Casula Power House,

Casula, NSW

Forum Feminism & Art “Dissonants” UWS & UNSW, Cofa

“Giftings 96”, Side on Studio Gallery, Stanmore, NSW

1995 “Multiformity”, Royal Arcade, Sydney Hilton, Sydney

“Origins”, Nepean Arthouse, Penrith, NSW

Art Related Activities

1998-99 Art Teacher, St Clair High School, St Clair, NSW

1999 Community Art teacher

Hugo Rojas

Born: Santiago, Chile 1971

Education:

1996 Graduate Diploma in Education (Secondary), University of

Western Sydney, NSW

1995 Bachelor of Arts (Visual Arts) University of Western of

Sydney, NSW

Solo Exhibition:

1995 Pulse Boxcar Gallery, UWS Nepean, NSW

Group Exhibitions:

1998 “Sustenance” Charles Darwin Walk, Wentworth Falls, NSW

“Sustenance” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

1996 Mary Alice Evatt Award Exhibition, Casula Power House, NSW

1995 Images of Men, Kinesis Gallery, Leichhardt,Sydney, NSW

Loom, Obscure Gallery, Building I UWS Nepean, NSW

Strange Bedfellows Exchange, H Block Gallery,

Queensland University Of Technology

Awards:

1995 Recipient, William Fletcher Trust Grant

1995 High Commendation, Chancellor’s Cup Day Art Competition

Experience:

1999 Art Teacher, Nepean H.S, Emu Plains, NSW

1998-97 Art Teacher, Evans H.S, Emu Plains, NSW

1996-95 Gallery Hand, Casula Powerhouse, NSW

1995 Exhibition Assistance, Australian Perspecta

Alexis Apfelbaum

Born USA 1965, arrived Australia 1966

Education:

1998 Certificate In Fine Arts, Werrington TAFE, NSW

1997-96 Sculpture, Nepean College, Katoomba, NSW

1997 Ceramics, TAFE, Penrith, NSW

Certificate in Welding, TAFE, Mount Druit, NSW

1994-92 Master of Arts-Art Therapy, University of Western,

Sydney, Kingswood, NSW

1992-91 Summer Intensive, Julian Ashton’s School of the Arts,

Sydney, NSW

1992-89 Macquarie School of Arts, Bathurst, NSW

Selected Group Exhibitions:

1999 “Sited 99” Charles Darwin Walk, Wentworth Falls, NSW

1996 Gasworks Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition, Albert Park, Vic

1994 “We Can Imagine’, Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers

Bequest, NSW

Group Exhibitions:

1998 “Ko-optic”, Trapezium Gallery. Werrington TAFE, NSW

1997 “Below The Surface”, Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

“Art in the Mountains”, Wentworth Falls School of Arts,

Wentworth Falls, NSW

1996 “Boxed In” Photographic & Sculpture Exhibition,

NCC, Katoomba, NSW

“After Image” NCC, Katoomba, NSW

“Art Street 96” Winter Magic Festival, Katoomba, NSW

Work in Public Space

1998-97 Floral Fest, Everglades

1997 “Hair Basket” Installation, MT Blue Hair, Katoomba, NSW

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Marco Grilli

Gabriella Hegyes

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1995 Diploma of Education, Hobart, Tamania

1993 BA of Visual Arts, University Western Sydney, Nepean, NSW

Selected Group Exhibitions:

1999 “siTed ’99” Charles Darwin Walk, Wentworth Falls, NSW

Group Exhibitions:

1998-96 “Emotional States” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

1998-96 “Erotica” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

1998-97 Beneldi House, Sydney, NSW

1992 “Papa” Paddington, NSW

Represented in private collections in Italy and Australia

Maija Collishaw

Born in Rigia-Lativia 1935 - arrived in Australia in 1949

Education:

1989 Associate Diploma Fine Arts, TAFE, Penrith , NSW

1987-85 Art Certificate, TAFE, Penrith, NSW

Solo Exhibitions:

1996 “Reflection” dec Artspace, Katoomba, NSW

Group Exhibitions:

1999 “Sited ‘99” Charles Darwin Walk, Wentworth Falls,NSW

1998 SMA Spring Exhibition, Hydro Majestic, Medlow Bath,

NSW

1997 Cultural Festival, Bankstown Town Hall, NSW

1996 “Boxed In” NCC, Katoomba NSW

SMA Spring Exhibition, Wentworth Falls School Of

Arts, NSW

1995 “Labyrinth” NCC, Katoomba, NSW

Awards:

1995 SMA Spring Exhibition, Wentworth Falls School of

Arts, NSW

Commissions:

Represented in private collections in Czech Republic, Lativia & Australia

Born Hungary 1954, arrived in Australia in 1977

Education:

1999 Post Graduate Diploma Visual Arts Monash University

Gippsland, Vic

1994 Bachelor of Arts (Visual Arts) University of Western

Sydney, NSW

1989 Higher Art Certificate National Art School Sydney, NSW

1988 Art Certificate West Wollongong TAFE, NSW

Solo Exhibitions:

1996 “Gift of Racism” dec Artspace, Katoomba, NSW

1993 “ Images from the Kimberley” School of Arts, Wentworth

Falls, NSW

Selected Group Exhibitions:

1999 “Bloom’n Art” Orange Regional Gallery, NSW

“Fuse” Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest,

NSW

“siTed ‘99, Charles Darwin Walk, Wentworth Falls, NSW

1998 “Gasworks Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition” Melbourne, Vic

Sculpture Acquisition Show” Lake Macquarie City Art

Gallery, NSW

“Sustenance” Charles Darwin Walk, Wentworth Falls, NSW

1997 “Locate/Relocate’ Art in Public Spaces, Albury Regional

Art Centre, NSW

1996 “Sculpture Acquisition Show” Lake Maquarie City Art

Gallery, NSW

1995 “LeurArt Practice” Site Specific Installations, Leura Mall, NSW

“Bias Binding” Cowwarr Art Space, Cowwarr, Vic

“Mary Alice Ewatt Art Award” Casula Powerhouse, NSW

“Bias Binding” Access Gallery, NGV,Vic

“(Dis) playing David Jones, Parramatta, NSW

1994 “Gasworks Outdoor Sculpture Show” Melbourne, Victoria

“Shifting” University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD

1989 “Capita” Fine Arts Grant, Cellblock Gallery, Sydney, NSW

1988 “Illawarra Bicentennial Exhibition” Wollongong City Art

Gallery, NSW

Group Exhibitions:

1998 “ Insieme” Trapezium Gallery, Werrington, NSW

1996 “ From The Mountains to the Sea” Sweet Foray Gallery,

Katoomba NSW

1994 “Gasworks” Platform Contemporary Public Art,

Melbourne, Victoria

“ International Sculpture Competition” Sanda, Japan


Sculpture of the Month” Blue Mountains City Council,

Katoomba, NSW

“Postcodes” NSW Arts Council Ultimo, Sydney, NSW

“By Women” Long Gallery Wollongong, NSW

Awards:

1993 Sculpture prize, Blue Mountains Community Arts

Council, Renaissance Centre, Katoomba, NSW

1988 Drawing Prize, Fifth Cordeaux Heights Art Purchase

Prize Exhibition Wollongong, NSW

Commissions:

1988 “Sails 1788-1988” Windang Bicentenial Project,

Wollongong, NSW

Art Related Projects:

1999 Project Co-ordinator “siTed ’99” site specific

installations, Charles Darwin Walk, Wentworth Falls, NSW

1998 Joint Project Co-0rdinator “Sustenance” site specific

installations, Charles Darwin Walk, Wentworth Falls, NSW

1997 Founding member, FreshAir Website, Blue Mountains

Contemporary Artists Association.

1998-95 Creator and curator of dec Artspace, Katoomba, NSW

Represented in public and private collections in Australia, Austria, Italy,

Hungary and USA

Sonja van As

Born: Holland 1962

Education:

1999 Candidate for Diploma in Fine Arts, Western Sydney

Institute of TAFE, Werrington, NSW

1998 Certificate IV Fine Arts, Western Sydney Institute of

TAFE, Werrigton, NSW

1997 Certificate in Occupational Studies Arts & Media Voca

tional, Werrington, NSW

Group Exhibitions:

1999 “Fresh Cuts” The Trapezium Gallery, Werrington

TAFE, Werrington, NSW

“Altered States” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

“Erotica” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

“Emotional States” Sweet Foray Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

1998 “Ko-Optic” The Trapezium Gallery, Werrington

TAFE, Werrington, NSW

1997 “Student Exhibition” Penrith TAFE, Penrith, NSW

Petrina Louise Fuda

Education:

1997 Certificate in Welding, Mount Druit TAFE, Mount Druit,

NSW

1997-96 Sculpture, Nepean College, Katoomba, NSW

1995 Certificate in Sculpture, Willoughby College of The

Arts, Willoughby, Sydney, NSW

1993-91 Associate Diploma in Graphic Design, The K.V.B

College of Visual Communication, North Sydney, NSW

1990-88 2H Graphics - Training in: Air brush, Illustration,

Advertising , Adelaide, South Australia

1986-84 Bond Private College Of The Arts, Darlinghurst, Sydney,

NSW

1983 Castle Hill College/Painting, CastleHill, NSW

Solo exhibition:

1996 “Breaking Free” dec Artspace, Katoomba, NSW

Selected Group Exhibitions:

1999 “siTed ‘99” Charles Darwin Walk, Wentworth Falls, NSW

1997 “Carnival” Fringe Festival, Span Galleries, Flinders

Lane, Melbourne, Vic

Group Exhibitions:

1997 Camden Art Show, Camden, NSW

OZ Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

Tina Wencher Awards, Menzuros, Melbourne, Vic

1996 “Surfacing” PCL Exhibitionist, Strawberry Hills,

Sydney, NSW

“House Warming” Sculpture & Painting Exhibition,

Private Gallery, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW

“Art in the Mountains 96” Wentworth Falls School of

Arts Gallery, Wentworth Falls, NSW

“Boxed In” The College Gallery, Katoomba, NSW

“I Can Do That” Exhibition for Environment Day,

Katoomba, NSW

“After Image” NCC, Katoomba, NSW

Commissions:

1997 Sculpture, 10ft Chair, Wood , Salon Shop Front,

Hiedelburge, Melbourne, Vic

1996 “Heshen & Brass Torso” Private Collection,

Darlinghurst,Sydney, NSW

1996 “Motor Bike” Copper Sculpture, Private Collection,

Sydney, NSW

Represented in Private Collections throughout Australia

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Education Kit

The aim of this project is to increase the appreciation of native plants and public

sculpture.

Each sculpture is situated near the appropriate native plant for easy identification.

Next to each carving, level with the ground there is a plaque, depicting

botanical drawings of the leaf, flower, seed pod, and the seed. This information

is accompanied by the plant’s scientific and common names. These plaques

were made not only to provide information, but also to make rubbings from, for

further study.

The Education Kit contains information on:

• History of stone carving & indigenous rock engravings.

• Historical and contemporary use of native plants in art, craft, design and

literature.

• Art and the natural environment.

• Geology, sandstone formations.

• Botanical information.

• Native plant propagation and garden use.

• Bush food and bush medicine.

• Reading list for further study.

The Education Kit aims to assist primary and secondary students and teachers

in enjoying and understanding the relationship between art and nature as shown

in this project. There are several activities designed for age groups ranging from

kindergarten to tertiary level.

The Education Kit can be purchased from:

Blue Mountains City Council PO Box 189., Katoomba 2780 NSW

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