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Discovery of Bathurst Plains including the First Crossing of the Blue Mountains

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— PRESENTED TO —<br />

THE BOYAL AUSTRALIAN H ISTORICAL SOCIETY<br />

S e p t e m b e r ,1947


m<br />

E.T. No. 1.<br />

Com m on w ealth <strong>of</strong> A u s t r a lia .<br />

. ' — —■ ' ■■■■" St<br />

| POSTMASTER-G&f EKAL' S DEPARTMENT, HEW SOUTH WALES.<br />

f<br />

TELEGRAM.<br />

n .<br />

t» This message has been received subject to <strong>the</strong> Post and Telegraph Act and Regulations.<br />

g<br />

S<br />

A ll co.uplainU to be addressed In writing to <strong>the</strong> Deputy Postmaster-General.<br />

Station from, No. <strong>of</strong> words, check, and time lodged.<br />

Remarks.<br />

f* Q U s ^ v i^ ~ _____ ____ ___<br />

ty^LchU ^ ‘i « ^ a /Ax ^<br />

/<br />

< ? £ >


LEGRAM.<br />

S t 8481<br />

MEtfT, NEW SOUTH WALES.<br />

This message has been received subject to <strong>the</strong> Post and Telegraph Act and Regulations.<br />

A ll coaiplainta to be addxe^ned in writing to th» Deputy Postmaster-General. \<br />

Station from, No. <strong>of</strong> words, c h e c k , and time lodged.<br />

Remarks.<br />

9<br />

w<br />

lr»<br />

O<br />

K


"y g F ': '<br />

J^leWsJ&d p tfr^ rfic le j ^ e p o rP j oj* A^^H'ijggs^.<br />

---------■ \ t ) c o p p c c l l o p vVi*lfj?, —~ — —<br />

T j > e<br />

T F i r s f ( V o c ^ « _ p<br />

V<br />

o r T r i e .<br />

3 1 m e M o u . o f e i a s<br />

1813<br />

C o i r ^ J ^ i l e d b y T r < ^ b K W W l k e r .<br />

I ^ W Q O d i l<br />

— —


y ------ ‘ | (N fO (= X .— f >cu q e& . I 4<br />

Advertisement, Sydney f e t i n g ... ... » 3<br />

,, “ calling for Subscriptions ... 4<br />

Article, <strong>Blue</strong> Mountain Centenary- (ff#W.4 ... 13,16<br />

Address to School Children,- (F.W.) ... ... 18,21<br />

Account <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Celebrations ... ......... ...26,31<br />

Blaxland's Route Map ... ... ......... 17<br />

,, , Wentworth, & Lawson, Article ... 22,26<br />

,, ’s Journal, Review. ... ... ... 35<br />

Centenary Celebrations ... ... ... ... 2,3,7<br />

,i Preparations ... ... ... ... 4|35<br />

,, Committee Meetings ... ... ... 5,7,8<br />

,, <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Western <strong>Plains</strong> ... .......... ...38- 54<br />

Cox, Willi am ... ... ... ... ... 41<br />

Evans, George William, portrait ... .......... ...41<br />

,, s Diary ... ... ... ... ... 4I*«46<br />

,, s Map <strong>of</strong> Route ... ... ... ... 47<br />

"Evans' Crown", Mountain near Parana .......... ...39,40<br />

<strong>First</strong> Sydney Public Meeting ... ......... 1,2<br />

Government Aid sought ... ... ........ . 8<br />

Junction, Fish, and Campbell Rivers ......... 48<br />

Lecture in Sydney, (F.Walker) ... ... ... 4<br />

,, ,, <strong>Bathurst</strong>, ,, ,.. ... ... 32<br />

Mount Biaxland located ... ... ........ ....10<br />

,, ,, a Trip to ... ... ... ... XX<br />

,, Correspondence. ... ... 11,12,13<br />

Macquarie Rouse ................................ ...49-52<br />

,, Governor ... ... ... ... ... 41<br />

Meeting, Public, in Sydney ................. ...1,2<br />

Our Benefactors * ... ... ... ......... ...35<br />

08Connell <strong>Plains</strong> ... ... ... ......... ...48<br />

Photo. B.M.C.C«mmittee .......... ......... ...33<br />

Post-card View, Mt Victoria ... ......... ...34<br />

Precedence, a question <strong>of</strong> ... ......... ...16<br />

"Rosenthal", Little Hartley .................. 37<br />

Settlers, <strong>the</strong> first in <strong>the</strong> W e s t ................. 53-54<br />

•Vestera Road, Little Hartley ................. 37


I N l C l E X 7<br />

I_H_ D B X - P a ges .55_ t o _ 1 0 7<br />

A d d r e s s to s t u d e n t s at B a t h u r s t , F . W a l k e r<br />

A l l Saints' C a t h e d r a l , B a t h u r s t<br />

B i r t h d a y <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> D i s c o v e r y <strong>of</strong> B a t h u r s t ........<br />

" B r u c e d a l e " ,o ld r e s i d e n c e <strong>of</strong> S u t t o r F a m i l y . ...<br />

Bushy, Mrs, P o r t r a i t .............................<br />

C a s s i d y ,M a j o r , R e m i n i s c e n c e s <strong>of</strong> . ...<br />

C e n t e n a r y C e l e b r a t i o n s , <strong>Bathurst</strong>, Hov. 1 5 - 2 2 , 1 5 8 3<br />

, t ,, Documents,<br />

,, ,, <strong>Bathurst</strong>,<br />

C o a c h i n g Days, The ................... .....<br />

D i s t r i c t <strong>of</strong> B a t h u r s t ,G r o w t h o f ........<br />

E v a n s , G " ¥ . ,G r a n d s o n <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> e xplorer . . .<br />

" E v e n s ' C r o w n ”, Tarana .. .. .........<br />

Evans, G e o r g e W i l l i a m , P o r t r a i t<br />

F i r s t Settlers, The ..........<br />

,, Church, 5 he ... ,Tirnm<br />

G o l d D i s c o v e r y , The ..........<br />

" H e r e f o r d ”,<br />

H o l y T r i n i t y C h u r c h,Kelso,<br />

H i s t o r y o f B a t h u r s t , E a r l y .. . ..<br />

Lee, J o h n ......................<br />

Lee, G e o r g e .................<br />

M a c q u a r i e H o u s e ..........<br />

M e t h o d i s t C h u r c h , B a t h u r s t<br />

O b e l i s k , G e n e r a l Stewart<br />

Old M e m o r i e s , B u i l d i n g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> R a i l w a y<br />

P i o n e e r s , Some <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> old ................<br />

R e s i d e n c e <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> early days, a ..<br />

R u r a l Scene, B a t h u r s t .......................<br />

R o m a n C a t h o l i c C a t h e d r a l , B a t h u r s t<br />

R u t h e r f o r d , J a m e s , F a m i l y H o m e <strong>of</strong> ............<br />

,, ,, P o r t r a i t ................<br />

R a i l w a y B u i l d i n g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> l i n e to B a t h u r s t<br />

S u t t o r Family, old r e s i d e n c e <strong>of</strong> ............<br />

St J o s e p h ' s M o u n t , ...........................<br />

S t e w a r t , J . H . R e s i d e n c e <strong>of</strong> .................<br />

,, M a j o r General, .......................<br />

,, J . H . ,P o r t r a i t .......................<br />

S u t t o r Family, <strong>the</strong> . . .<br />

St S t e p h e n ' s P r e s b y t e r i a n Church, B a t h u r s t<br />

Turpin, M r s , D a u g h t e r o f G.7 . E vans<br />

6 3 - 6 6


1<br />

Z r K f<br />

C R O S S IN G T H E MOUN-<br />

.T A M S .<br />

CENTENARY CELEBRATIONS.<br />

S P E E C H B Y T H E GOVEBNOB.<br />

. The proposed celebration ol tie centenary<br />

ot <strong>the</strong> crossing <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong> by Blaxland,<br />

Wentworth, and Lawson, was discussed at<br />

a public meeting in <strong>the</strong> Sydney Town Hall on<br />

Tuesday alternoon.<br />

The Lord Mayor presided, and amongst those<br />

present were <strong>the</strong> Governor, Mr. Frank Walker,<br />

(president o f <strong>the</strong> Celebration committee), Colonel<br />

Rupert Carrington, C.V.O., D.S.O., <strong>the</strong><br />

Rev. Archdeacon Gun<strong>the</strong>r, Mr. D. R. Nall,<br />

M.L.C., Mr. J. Dooley, M .L .A ., Messrs. Collett<br />

(Mayor <strong>of</strong> Parramatta), J. Ryan, J. W .<br />

Eergh<strong>of</strong>er, H. G. Reinits, J. Bloome, and Captain<br />

Lamb (<strong>the</strong> organising secretary).<br />

The Lord. Mayor garve a brief histo*ical resume<br />

<strong>of</strong> tho colony’s history prior to <strong>the</strong> expedition<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> three explorers, a?d pointed<br />

out <strong>the</strong> benefits that had resulted to New<br />

South Wales as a result o f <strong>the</strong> successful<br />

crossing <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> hi<strong>the</strong>rto impassable range. He<br />

hoped that a liberal response "•""''I be made<br />

towards subscribing funds ±01 tua . proposedcelebration,<br />

and stated that he had received<br />

a cheque for £50 from Mr. W. Dixon.<br />

Lord Chelmsford moved <strong>the</strong> following resolution:—That<br />

afrangements be made to celebrate<br />

ihe centenary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> gallant efforts <strong>of</strong><br />

Blaxland, Wentworth, and Lawson In crossing<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>n impenetrable and unassailable <strong>Blue</strong><br />

<strong>Mountains</strong> 1n May, 1813, and thus assisting to<br />

develop <strong>the</strong> present magniflc-nt pastoral and<br />

farming lands.<br />

His Excellency said:—“ We all travel so very<br />

easily nowadays that we hardly reflect on <strong>the</strong><br />

difficulties involved in laying down a road or<br />

railway, and moreover, are apt to forget all <strong>the</strong><br />

toil, Thought, knowledge, and care that have<br />

to be exercised by <strong>the</strong> men who had planned<br />

out <strong>the</strong> particular road or railway. One hundred<br />

years ago <strong>the</strong> colony <strong>of</strong> New South Wales was<br />

cribbed, cabined, and confined by an impenetrable<br />

mountain range, over which many attempts<br />

had been made to traverse. All sort*<br />

<strong>of</strong> legends <strong>the</strong>n prevailed as to <strong>the</strong> conditions<br />

<strong>the</strong>re prevailing,' and as to those who inhabited<br />

<strong>the</strong> ranges. About that time <strong>the</strong> colony experienced<br />

a drought, and Governor Macquari*<br />

felt that <strong>the</strong> last stage was reached In <strong>the</strong><br />

colony’s existence unless something was done<br />

In penetrating <strong>the</strong> mountains to <strong>the</strong> north and<br />

West. In consequence <strong>the</strong>re<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> three brave<br />

meu. <strong>the</strong> centenary <strong>of</strong> whose success it was<br />

| orop^scd to celebrate next year, set ont, and<br />

a fto r. untold hardships, achieved <strong>the</strong>ir goal.<br />

His Excellency reminded his hearers that<br />

| when honoring ihc three explorers, <strong>the</strong> action<br />

I <strong>of</strong> Governor Macquarie, in immediately taking<br />

steps r.o have <strong>the</strong> road surveyed by Surveyor<br />

Evuns. should not be overlooked.<br />

There were certain outstanding features<br />

which marked out <strong>the</strong> achievement as worthy<br />

; ot commemoration—firstly, because it was <strong>the</strong><br />

I first successful attempt <strong>of</strong> exploration ever<br />

| m rdt in Australia, also it was <strong>the</strong> first supcet'Sful<br />

crossing o f <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong>, since<br />

I wlita ini e<strong>the</strong>r road has been followed over<br />

those mountains, except <strong>the</strong> one travelled by<br />

<strong>the</strong> explorers. There was, however, even a<br />

sti onger reason. He did not believe in com ­<br />

memorating <strong>the</strong> centenary <strong>of</strong> every eveni, and<br />

before doing so, would apply <strong>the</strong> following<br />

test: Was <strong>the</strong> event o f such importance that,<br />

without it happening, history would have to<br />

be written ano<strong>the</strong>r way? .In this case no one<br />

could doubt but that <strong>the</strong> crossing <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong><br />

<strong>Mountains</strong> exercised a momentous influence on<br />

<strong>the</strong> very existence <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> continent. He had,<br />

<strong>the</strong>refore, great pleasure In seconding <strong>the</strong> resolution.<br />

. ■ I ___-------------<br />

Councillor Bergh<strong>of</strong>er (Blaxland Shire), having<br />

f seconded <strong>the</strong> foregoing, Mr. Frank Walker<br />

moved <strong>the</strong> second resolution, as follow s:—<br />

"That it bo decided to formulate some practical<br />

and workable schemes by which a consideraible<br />

amount <strong>of</strong> money may be raised in<br />

thu city, suburbs, and country towns.”<br />

Mr. J. Ryan (Lithgow) in seconding briefly out<br />

lined <strong>the</strong> proposed programme, which consisted<br />

<strong>of</strong> (1) permanent improvements, (2) pavilion<br />

Mount York, memorial at Mount Blaxland,<br />

(•>) decoration <strong>of</strong> ouelisK at Mount York by <strong>the</strong><br />

trustees, (4) decoratiun <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> marked tree by<br />

<strong>the</strong> Katoomba Municipality, (5) banquet on <strong>the</strong><br />

day <strong>of</strong> celebration, at which two <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> foremost<br />

Australian orators were to make orations,<br />

(G), general celebrations in all mountain cen-<br />

1 tres from Penrith to Orange, (7) bonfires on<br />

<strong>the</strong> principal peaks <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> range.<br />

Mr. Hall, Minister for Justice, in moving <strong>the</strong><br />

third resalutlon, stated that he had been asked<br />

by <strong>the</strong> Premier to attend <strong>the</strong> meeting that afternoon,<br />

and, to express <strong>the</strong> entire sympathy <strong>of</strong><br />

tiie Government with <strong>the</strong> movement. He <strong>the</strong>refore<br />

had great pleasuru in moving that we establish<br />

a permanent record for all time to<br />

those intrepid explorers, Blaxland, Wentworth,<br />

and Lawson. Mr. H. G. Remits, In seconding,<br />

, said that he as treasurer had received <strong>the</strong> sum<br />

<strong>of</strong> £125 to date.<br />

Mr. Dooley proposed <strong>the</strong> last resolution,<br />

which was seconded by <strong>the</strong> Rev. Archdeacon<br />

Gun<strong>the</strong>r, and was as follow s:—"That a strong<br />

metropolitan and suburban sub-committee be<br />

formed <strong>of</strong> influential citizens working in conjunction<br />

with <strong>the</strong> present executive com m ittee."<br />

On <strong>the</strong> proposal <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Lord Mayor, it was<br />

decided that <strong>the</strong> Sydney committee should con ­<br />

sist <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> District Commander, Colonel W allack,<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir W orships <strong>the</strong> Mayors <strong>of</strong> Mascot,<br />

Hunters Hill, Botany, W averley, Granville, Balmain,<br />

Glebe, W illoughby, lirumiuoyuc, Reufern,<br />

and Lane Cove. Messrs. C. D. ratterson.<br />

-T<br />

(


I)<br />

F. C. Govers, H. G. Braddon, C. G. Wade,<br />

H. T. M. Badgery. W . Dixcon. S. Jones, S. N.<br />

M'Lennan, R. Venning Thomas, and T. M.<br />

Shakespeare, toge<strong>the</strong>r with those <strong>the</strong>n p resent,<br />

and with power to add to <strong>the</strong>ir number.<br />

It was decided to form a deputation, consisting<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Presidents and Mayors <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

various shires and municipalities interested,<br />

as well as’ leading citizens <strong>of</strong> Sydney and <strong>the</strong><br />

suburbs a n d . <strong>the</strong> members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> committee,<br />

who should interview <strong>the</strong> Government with a<br />

view <strong>of</strong> obtaining a subsidy<br />

On <strong>the</strong> propositicm <strong>of</strong> Alderman Collett<br />

(Mayor <strong>of</strong> Parramatta), seconded by Mr. J-<br />

Bloome, it was decided to ask <strong>the</strong> Lord Mayor<br />

to accept <strong>the</strong> joint treasurership; and also,<br />

on <strong>the</strong> motion <strong>of</strong> Mr. Ryan, to ask His Excellency<br />

whe<strong>the</strong>r he could see bis way clear to<br />

accept <strong>the</strong> positipn <strong>of</strong> chairman ot <strong>the</strong> Sydney<br />

com m ittee.<br />

The date <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> next meeting was left to too<br />

president and <strong>the</strong> organising secretary to a r­<br />

range.<br />

BLUE MOUNTAIN PIONEERS.<br />

MOVEMENT TO MEMORIALISE<br />

EXPLORERS.<br />

It was not a large ga<strong>the</strong>ring, but thorougsly<br />

earnest one, which assembled in <strong>the</strong> Townhall<br />

yesterday to continue a movement originated<br />

in <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> Mountain townships to<br />

celebrate <strong>the</strong> centenary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Blaxland, Wentworth,<br />

and Lawson expedition to discover a<br />

crossing over <strong>the</strong> main range.<br />

The Lord Mayor, who presided over <strong>the</strong><br />

ga<strong>the</strong>ring, proposed <strong>the</strong> desirability <strong>of</strong> m aking<br />

arrangements to celebrate <strong>the</strong> gallant<br />

efforts <strong>of</strong> Blaxland, Wentworth, and Lawson<br />

In crossing <strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>n impenetrable and unassailable<br />

<strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong> in May, 1813 and thus<br />

assisting to develop t':e present magnificent<br />

pastoral and farming lands.<br />

The State Governor, Lord Chelmsford, cordially<br />

supported <strong>the</strong> proposal. It was a hundred<br />

years since <strong>the</strong> colony seemed to be going<br />

to be “ cribbed, cabined, and confined” by <strong>the</strong><br />

mountains to <strong>the</strong> north and west. For 25 years<br />

from <strong>the</strong> beginning <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> settlement attempts<br />

had been made to get through <strong>the</strong>6e formidable 1<br />

barriers. Eight unsuccessful attempts were<br />

made. At a critical period a severe drought<br />

occurred, and Governor Macquarie realised that<br />

something must be done in <strong>the</strong> way <strong>of</strong> opening<br />

new grazing and agricultural land if <strong>the</strong> colony<br />

were to be rescued from its deplorable condition.<br />

Then, as was well known, three men<br />

set out on a successful attempt to open up <strong>the</strong> |<br />

back country, which feat it was proposed to<br />

commemorate next year. While <strong>the</strong>y proposed<br />

to commemorate that fine achievement, ho<br />

thought <strong>the</strong>y should not forget that Governor<br />

Macquarie backed up <strong>the</strong>ir successful work.<br />

No one who was acquainted with <strong>the</strong> history I<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> crossing <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong> and <strong>the</strong><br />

wonderful industrial development which had<br />

followed it could doubt that <strong>the</strong> enterprise had<br />

had an unusual influence upon <strong>the</strong> welfare <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> colony <strong>of</strong> New South Wales. (Applause.)<br />

Mr. J. W. Bergh<strong>of</strong>er supported <strong>the</strong> motion,<br />

which was unanimously carried.<br />

A large working committee, consisting <strong>of</strong> all<br />

those present, besides <strong>the</strong> mayors <strong>of</strong> several<br />

suburban and country municipalities, was<br />

formed, and a plan <strong>of</strong> campaign arranged.<br />

F R ID A Y , SE P T E M B E R 1 3 , 1912.<br />

CENTENARY CELEBRATIONS.<br />

If a p rogra m m e such as th a t ou tlin ed a t<br />

K a to o m b a on S a tu rd a y can be ca rried ou t<br />

a t M oj*n t 'Y ork n ext M ay, th e even t w ill b e<br />

u niqu e in A u stra lia n h isto ry . T he p r o ­<br />

gram m e is e q u a lly v a ried and com prehensive.<br />

I t w ill b e sp ecta cu la r on a g rea t<br />

scale, b u t it w ill a ls o com bin e m any item s<br />

ca lcu la ted to p rod u ce perm anent effeet.^JL<br />

m em orial p a v ilio n occu p ies ja—m o miineat<br />

^ S t h t a T l o ^ i t e d in<br />

such a b ea u ty s p o t as M ou nt Y o rk reserve,<br />

w ill be a w ork o f perm anent u tility . X or<br />

is M ou nt B la x la n d t o be fo r g o tte n . S om e­<br />

th in g i n t h e w a y


3 13<br />

w ill be m ustered t o sine A u stralian p a trio<br />

tic son g s. A n effort w ill be m ade to h av e j<br />

every section o f <strong>the</strong> C om m onw ealth defence<br />

Iforces adequ ately represented, also <strong>the</strong> Xm- I<br />

perial n av y, t o w hich, b eyon d all oth er<br />

ea rth ly pow er, we ow e <strong>the</strong> p o s s ib ility <strong>of</strong><br />

being able to celebrate a trium ph <strong>of</strong> peaceful<br />

co lo n iz a tio n achieved 100 years a go.<br />

X o t on ly th rou g h ou t <strong>the</strong> d a y , but a lso<br />

a t n ight, <strong>the</strong> celeb ra tion s w ill be con tin u ­<br />

ed, and w hat w ith bonfires and general<br />

illu m in ation s <strong>the</strong> m ou n tains w ill be a blaze<br />

o f lig h t from P en rith t o ' O range. A lto g e ­<br />

<strong>the</strong>r <strong>the</strong> scope o f <strong>the</strong> program m e is rem arkable,<br />

and its successful rea lisa tion w ill entail<br />

a g rea t expenditure <strong>of</strong> effort and or- ,<br />

1ganisin g a b ility . There is, how ever, con - |<br />

siderable enthusiasm behind <strong>the</strong> m o v e ­<br />

m ent, and it is hoped th at this w ill tri ’ p !<br />

<strong>the</strong> required m om entum . T he crossin g <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> m ou n tains in 1 8 1 3 was a d istin ct landm<br />

ark in A u stra lia n h istory. I t was <strong>the</strong><br />

first successful attem p t to penetrate th e inte<br />

r io r <strong>of</strong> th is S ta te , and its results A a v e a<br />

trem endous stim ulus to settlem ent and p r o ­<br />

d u ction in th ose ea rly days. Few A u stra - •<br />

lian events in <strong>the</strong> first years o f <strong>the</strong> nineteenth<br />

century are m ore w o rth y o f com ­<br />

m em ora tion than this achievem ent o f B la x - ,<br />

land, W entw orth, and L a w son , and every<br />

A u stra lia n w ho realises its significance w ill<br />

b e d isp osed t o a ssist in p rom o tin g th e success<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> centenary celebrations. There<br />

are, o f course, difficulties t o be overcom e,<br />

and th e first o f <strong>the</strong>se is financial. A la rge<br />

sum w ill be required for perm anent mem -<br />

} o ria ls and u n a void able incidental expenses.<br />

I f citizen s gen erally w ill set th e exam ple b v<br />

v o lu n ta rily subscribin g, <strong>the</strong> G overnm ent<br />

m ay be m ore w illin g to give a su bstan tial<br />

g ra n t in a id, im ost, if n ot all, <strong>of</strong> w hich j<br />

w ould be spent in perm anent im provem ents<br />

to a p op u la r and b ea u tifu lly situated reserve.<br />

T h e m agnitude o f <strong>the</strong> celebrations<br />

must depend en tirely on <strong>the</strong> extent o f <strong>the</strong><br />

financial su p p ort accord ed. S y m p a th y is<br />

n a tu ra lly very g ra tify in g , b u t unless it develop<br />

s a cash expression th e anxieties <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> com m ittee entrusted w ith <strong>the</strong> prepara- I<br />

to r y w ork w ill be in no degree lightened.<br />

CflOSSI{Jq THE BLUE MOUNTAINS.<br />

Ce n t e n a r y c e l e b r a t io n s .<br />

PROGRESS OF ARRANGEMENTS.<br />

LITHGOW, Monday.—At a largely-attended<br />

meeting <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> executive <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Crossing</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong> Centenary Committee, on Saturi<br />

day, Mr. Ryan reported that he had interviewed<br />

Col. W allack, D istrict Commandant, during his<br />

recent visit to lathgow. The Commandant<br />

■was sympa<strong>the</strong>tic and promised to give every<br />

assistance towards <strong>the</strong> success <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> proposed<br />

military display at Mount York. Col. W aiiack<br />

had promised to visit <strong>the</strong> site next month, and<br />

was disposed to sanction <strong>the</strong> attendance <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Garrison Band on celebration day.<br />

The matter <strong>of</strong> arranging for children’ s choirs<br />

was left in <strong>the</strong> hands <strong>of</strong> Mr. Laws and <strong>the</strong><br />

president (Mr. Frank W alker), <strong>the</strong> president<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Historical Society, and Cr. Waterhouse,<br />

who were requested to interview <strong>the</strong> conductors<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Sydney Liedertafel. and o<strong>the</strong>r musical<br />

societies. It was stated that <strong>the</strong> Minister for<br />

Works had approved <strong>the</strong> rendering <strong>of</strong> assistance<br />

by Mr. C. H. Caswell, C.E., in preparing<br />

a sketch <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> site at Mount York, plans for<br />

<strong>the</strong> necessary road, and o<strong>the</strong>r improvements,<br />

and locating <strong>the</strong> route taken by <strong>the</strong> explorers<br />

from Mount York to Mount Blaxland. Mr.<br />

Cormack promisad <strong>the</strong> support <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Tourist<br />

Bureau in securing adequate publicity for <strong>the</strong><br />

celebrations.<br />

Mr. Shakespeare, manager <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Country<br />

Press Association, wrote that suitable articles<br />

would be embodied in <strong>the</strong> literary supplement<br />

Issued by <strong>the</strong> association, and published in 60<br />

papers. ______________<br />

r-i —-<br />

________Meetings. __________<br />

BOSSING OF THE BLUE MOUNTAINS CENTENARY.<br />

O 4 PUBUC MEETING will be held in <strong>the</strong> Vestibule<br />

ot <strong>the</strong> Town-hall, OCTOBER 22, 4 p.m.<br />

BUSINESS: Forming a Sydney Committee to work in<br />

conjunction with <strong>the</strong> Mountain Committee.<br />

Public cordially invited to attend. The Lord Mayor<br />

will preside. State Governor will be present.<br />

FRAMi WALKER, President,<br />

tnH President Australian Historical Society.<br />

Captain CECIL LAMB,<br />

R.A.G.A. (ret.),<br />

________________Organising Secretary.


4 B<br />

•fF ra sr- c E o ssiiT s b l u e m o u h t a i u s ,<br />

PREPARING FOR THE CENTENARY.<br />

The project ot fittingly celebrating <strong>the</strong> firs*<br />

crossing qf <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong> by Messrs*<br />

Blaxland, Wentworth, and Lawson in May,<br />

1S1J, is being taken up with enthusiasm by<br />

<strong>the</strong> residents <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> various towns on tba<br />

mountains, as well as by a large number


j<br />

I<br />

CROSSING THE BLUE IHOUN-<br />

J ' TAINS.<br />

J r<br />

________ #_______<br />

. ^ e n t h u s ia s t ic m e e t in g a t<br />

y<br />

KATOOMBA.<br />

; BIS PROGRAMME APPROVED.<br />

A t a m eeting o f <strong>the</strong> C rossing <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong><br />

i M ountains C entenary C om m ittee, held a t<br />

IK a to o m b a T o w n H all on S a tu rd a y ev»n-<br />

Iing, <strong>the</strong> p rogra m m e suggested b y th e execu-<br />

Itiv e w as b ro u g h t forw a rd and explained b y<br />

H r. j . Ryian, one <strong>of</strong>,th e vice-presidents, d iscussed,<br />

and <strong>the</strong> fo llo w in g agreed t o :— I<br />

I I t w as resolv ed th at fo r <strong>the</strong> present <strong>the</strong><br />

exact d a te o f th e celebration be left open,<br />

i p r o p o s a ls fo r h old in g it on M ay 24 (E m ­<br />

p ire D ay) and M ay 28 (th e actu al d ate <strong>of</strong> ,<br />

crossin g ) were defeated.<br />

i<br />

I t w as agreed th at a perm anent p a v ilion<br />

be erected a t M ou nt Y ork , if funds p erm it.<br />

The question o f erecting statues a t v a rious<br />

con sp icu ous sp ots a t M ount Y o rk w as<br />

left fo r futftre con sid era tion .<br />

M r. H ow ell u ndertook , on behalf o f <strong>the</strong><br />

trustees o f M ount Y o rk reserve, to see that<br />

<strong>the</strong> obelisk was re-painted, <strong>the</strong> letterin g recon<br />

stru cted , and decorated on <strong>the</strong> day <strong>of</strong><br />

celeb ra tion . I t w as also resolved t o ask<br />

<strong>the</strong> K a to o m b a C ouncil to d ecora te <strong>the</strong><br />

1m arked tree.<br />

A m o tio n was carried th a t a su itable inj<br />

expensive m em orial be erected a t M ount<br />

B laxland. i<br />

i T he erection o f a tem p ora rv p la tform for<br />

|<strong>the</strong> o ra to r s <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> dav (M essrs. H olm an<br />

[and De&kin were su g gested) w a s left fo r <strong>the</strong><br />

execu tiv e to deal w ith, as w as a lso <strong>the</strong><br />

p rovisio n o f stan ds fo r bands and1 ch oirs,<br />

a lso ca terin g a ccom m od a tion , etc., fo r <strong>the</strong><br />

(visitors.<br />

! Thff p rop osed a lte ra tio n o f <strong>the</strong> roa d s g o ­<br />

ing to M ount Y ork , <strong>the</strong> clea rin g aw ay o f<br />

, trees o b s tru ctin g <strong>the</strong> view s a lon g <strong>the</strong><br />

roa d s, and <strong>the</strong> preparation o f sufficient<br />

grou n d a t M ou nt Y ork to m eet all needs—<br />

all <strong>the</strong>se th in gs were left in <strong>the</strong> hands <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> executive.<br />

The recom m en dations o f M r. 0 . 11. C asw<br />

ell, C .E ., fo r <strong>the</strong> im provem ent o f <strong>the</strong><br />

reserve and its p repara tion fo r celebration<br />

d ay, were referred to <strong>the</strong> executive. A p p lica<br />

tio n is to be m ade, b y th e executive, to<br />

<strong>the</strong> m ilita ry departm ent, fo r a b ou t 100<br />

ten ts and a cou p le <strong>of</strong> m arquees.<br />

T h e execu tive will a lso m ake arrangem<br />

ents, if p ossib le, for a m ilita ry and n a v a l i<br />

disp lay, and fo r detachm ents o f b o y scou ts<br />

and sen ior cadets to be in vited .<br />

A s t o <strong>the</strong> scop e o f <strong>the</strong> in v ita tio n s, a m o­<br />

tio n w as ca rried th a t th e execu tive take<br />

<strong>the</strong> m a tter in h an d and rep ort t o <strong>the</strong> com - •<br />

m ittee at a la te r date^^_<br />

M r. L a w s ’ <strong>of</strong>fer t o con vene a m eetin g ot<br />

s ch o o l teachers t o discuss th e q u estion <strong>of</strong><br />

h a v in g s ch o o l ch o irs a t M ou n t Y o r k on ]<br />

ce leb ra tion day w e s a ccep ted. M r. L a w s<br />

w ill r e p o r t <strong>the</strong> resu lt o f <strong>the</strong> m eetin g t o th e i<br />

com m ittee. !<br />

The execu tiv e w ill deal w ith <strong>the</strong> p r o p o s a l )<br />

th at a ssista n ce be sou g h t fro i'll a ll m ou n - ;<br />

ta in ‘ow ners o f veh icles o f every d escrip - ’<br />

tion .<br />

T he p r o p o sa l th a t n ig h t en tertainm ents ‘<br />

be held in th ose m ou n ta in centres w hich<br />

had su ita b le h alls w as referred t o th e ex- i<br />

ecu tive. ,<br />

T h e v a rio u s lo c a l a u th o ritie s w ill b e cojnm<br />

lunicated w ith regarding, th e p r o p o sa l th a t<br />

a line o f bonfires b e ligh ted on p rom in en t<br />

peaks from P a rra m a tta t o O range on celeb<br />

ra tio n n ight. *<br />

it w as resolved th a t a p p lica tio n b e invited<br />

b y a d vertisem en t in v a rio u s papers<br />

t(fT th e p o s itio n o f o rg a n is in g secretary —<br />

each a p p lica n t t o s ta te his ow n t e r m s .<br />

•It w as u n a n im ou sly agreed th a t th e S ta te<br />

G overnm ent be a p p roa ch ed fo r a g ra n t <strong>of</strong><br />

£ 1 0 0 0 ; th e tim e and oth er d eta ils o f such<br />

d e p u ta tion<br />

tive.<br />

t o be arran ged b y th e execu­<br />

T h e execu tiv e w ill a lso deal w ith th e p r o ­<br />

p osa l th a t each cen tre be asked t o organ ise<br />

at least one en tertain m en t in aid o f <strong>the</strong> i,<br />

celeb ra tion s. . ________ -.JP<br />

A register o f a ccom m od a tion on th e '<br />

m ou n tain s w ill be com p iled 1)v <strong>the</strong> o rg a n ising<br />

secretary', when appoin ted .<br />

The fo llo w in g m a tters were left fo r <strong>the</strong><br />

execu tive: C o -op era tion o f clergym en <strong>the</strong><br />

preM ous S u nday t o be requested: co -o p e ra -<br />

tion o f E d u ca tion D epartm en t and teach?rs<br />

to be a lso sou g h t in g iv in g lessons on<br />

early e x p lo ra tio n ; flags t o be asked for<br />

d e cora tion o f M ou n t V ic to r ia sta tio n and<br />

streets, th rou ch w hich p rocession w ill pass<br />

a lso fo r M t. \ o r k ; residen ts generally t o be<br />

asked t o d ecora te th eir o w n prem ises<br />

th rou g h ou t <strong>the</strong> m ou n tain s; R a ilw a y C om ­<br />

m ission ers t o be d ep u tation ised reV arding<br />

special train s and cheap ra tes, a lso re deco<br />

ra tin g engines on celebration d av. In<br />

wj tI3, tl,le last nam ed suggestion ,<br />

<strong>the</strong> M a yor o f B a th u rst (A id . R ig b v ) said<br />

* at a certain w ell-know n gentlem an ta lk -<br />

he S a Pr Lze' an


IS [blank]


i<br />

i ins: th e com m ittee or in carrying o u t <strong>the</strong><br />

[resolutions o f <strong>the</strong> com m ittee, b u t n o t t o<br />

have <strong>the</strong> righ t t o v o te a t executive m eetin<br />

g s .<br />

I T his dealt w ith <strong>the</strong> w hole o f <strong>the</strong> p ropos-<br />

I als draw n up b y <strong>the</strong> executive.<br />

O T H E R M A T T E R S .<br />

A t <strong>the</strong> m eeting on S a tu rd ay M r. F ran k<br />

! W alker, president o f <strong>the</strong> com m ittee, occu ­<br />

pied <strong>the</strong> chair, and <strong>the</strong> fo llo w in g representa<br />

tiv e s were present:—M r. H . G . R ien its<br />

(treasurer o f th e com m ittee), Cr. J . W.<br />

B ergh <strong>of</strong>er (vice-presiden t), Alderm en L indeman<br />

and C. L . Dash (K a to o m b a C ou n cil),<br />

M r. L a w s (B lackheath P rogress A ssocia ­<br />

tio n ), M r. L . H . H ow ell (M ount Y ork tru s­<br />

tees), M essrs. P . M ulheran and T. H . B urrell<br />

(W entw orth F alls P .A .), M r. R . B.<br />

P aterson (L eu ra P rogress A ssocia tio n ),<br />

M r. L . S . B ra d ford (L aw son T ou rist A s­<br />

s o c ia tio n ), M r. P . M a<strong>the</strong>w s (M t. V ic to r ia<br />

P .A .), A id. C ollier (<strong>Blue</strong> M ountains S h ire<br />

C ou n cil), C apt. H udson (K a to o m b a S ch o o l<br />

o f A r ts ), A id . R ig b y (M a yor o f B a th u rst),<br />

Mr. J o b Cum m ens (H a rtley V alley P .A .),<br />

M essrs. PI. O . J oh n ston , J . C obby, and J .<br />

Cliff (M edlow B a th P .A .), M r. W. C. P lu m -<br />

er (M t. V ic to r ia P .A .), A id . Davies (M ayor<br />

<strong>of</strong> K a to o m b a ), Mr. N. D elaney (B lack ­<br />

heath P .A .), M r. G eorge P h illip s (B la ck ­<br />

heath P .A .), M r. J o h n M cC all (L ith g ow<br />

P A .), Dr. K irk lan d and M r. J . H enderson<br />

(L ith g o w C aledonian S o c ie ty ), M r. .Tas.<br />

P a d ley (L ith g o w P rogress A s s o c ia tio n ),!<br />

M r. J . R yan (vice-p resid en t), Mr. A . E .<br />

P ark er (M ount V icto ria P .A .), M r. Sam .<br />

W ilson (k on . secreta ry ), M r. J o h n N eate<br />

(B lackheath S ch o o l <strong>of</strong> A r ts ). A p ologies<br />

were received fro m Cr. W aterhouse and <strong>the</strong><br />

H a rtley representatives.<br />

T h e president extended a h earty w elcom e<br />

to <strong>the</strong> delegates. A lready a g o o d deal <strong>of</strong><br />

enthusiasm h ad been im parted in to <strong>the</strong><br />

m ovem ent, and everyth ing in d ica ted a g r e a t<br />

success fo r <strong>the</strong> celebration .<br />

C orresp onden ce was received from variou s<br />

quarters, n o tify in g <strong>the</strong> a ppointm en t o f delegates,<br />

e tc . T he “ D aily T elegraph ” C o. I<br />

w ro te th a t th ey regretted <strong>the</strong>y cou ld n o t<br />

see th eir w a y t o open, a fund through <strong>the</strong><br />

colum ns <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> paper in aid <strong>of</strong> th e celeb<br />

ra tio n s , but en closed a cheque fo r five |<br />

guineas to w a rd s <strong>the</strong> o b ject.<br />

A lo n g letter was read fr o m a com poser. '<br />

ih S yd ney, <strong>of</strong>fering his services in 1con ­<br />

du ctin g a ch o ir o f sch ool children o n cele- ;<br />

b ra tio n day. T h e letter w as received, and j<br />

referred to th e executive.<br />

A letter w as read from a leading p icture<br />

film s com pany in Sydney, <strong>of</strong>fering to<br />

take a m ov in g picture record o f th e p r o ­<br />

ceedings, e tc ., and desired to secure <strong>the</strong><br />

so le righ ts.<br />

Cr. B ergh <strong>of</strong>er said he had received t h e 1<br />

letter, and had w ritten in reply ask ing <strong>the</strong><br />

com p any t o maJre a delinite <strong>of</strong>fer as t o f<br />

w h a t <strong>the</strong>y were prepared to p ay for <strong>the</strong><br />

(privilege. T o th a t he had received n o reply.<br />

A fter oth ers had discus:;od <strong>the</strong> m at-<br />

j<br />

j ter, it was agreed to lea ve it in th e ’<br />

hands o f th e execu tiv e.<br />

A n oth er otter w as t o issue an h isto rica l<br />

b roch u re, w hich w ou ld c o s t a t le a st ,£1000<br />

w ould com p rise 5 0 0 pages, and h ave 3 0 0<br />

illu stra tio n s. JLiie ollieiai p a tro n a g e o f tne<br />

com m ittee wras asked,, a lso a rticles and<br />

oth er m a tte r th a t m igh t be required L e ft<br />

w ith <strong>the</strong> execu tive.<br />

M r. L a w s p roposed M r. ltedfern, o f M t. ,<br />

V icto ria , as <strong>the</strong> second jo in t non. secret- [<br />

a ry w ith M r. W ilson. S econ d ed by Cr. C o l­<br />

lier, and carried.<br />

M r. H . G . R ien its, treasu rer, sta te d th a t<br />

<strong>the</strong> su b scrip tion s s o fa r am ounted t o £ ? 2 .<br />

w hich w as in th e G overn m en t S a v in g s<br />

an(* <strong>the</strong>re<br />

£ 2 0 in prom ises.<br />

w as a lso an a m ou n t oi<br />

I The^ ch airm an sa id M r. J o y n to n S m ith ,<br />

M .L .C ., o f K a to o m b a , w as very sy m p a ­<br />

th etic to w a rd s <strong>the</strong> m ov em en t, and w ould<br />

j com e d o w n h an d som ely in th e m atter o f a<br />

d o n a tio n la ter on . H e (th e ch a ir m an ) sug-<br />

|gested th a t a circu la r m ig h t be issued to<br />

p rom in ent men, descendants o f <strong>the</strong> e x p lo r­<br />

ers, and oth ers, ask ing fo r financial assistan<br />

ce, and read o u t a d ra ft <strong>of</strong> th e p r o -<br />

j posed, circu la r. 4<br />

j M r. R y a n m ov ed th a t 1 0 0 0 circu lars be<br />

[ap p rov ed fo r p r in tin g and d istrib u tion .<br />

S econ ded by M r. B u rrill and carried .<br />

I t w as resolv ed , o n th e .m otion <strong>of</strong> M essrs.<br />

R u rrill and M a<strong>the</strong>w s, th a t cop ies <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

son g s m entioned b y M r. M cC orm ick be<br />

purchased.<br />

T he ch airm an sa id he h ad delivered a<br />

lectu re a t Law son on th e p reviou s n ig h t t o<br />

a crow d ed audience, and h ad im pressed on<br />

his hearers <strong>the</strong> im p orta n ce o f <strong>the</strong> com in g<br />

celeb ra tion s. H e <strong>of</strong>fered t o d eliv er addresses<br />

a t L ith g o w and B a th u rst in a id <strong>of</strong><br />

he fund, and sa id he h a d o v er 1 5 0 0<br />

lides illu stra tin g th e lecture.<br />

A le tte r fro m th e O range C ou n cil sta te d<br />

th a t <strong>the</strong> d e le g a te h a d rep orted th a t he<br />

w as <strong>the</strong> on ly d eleg a te w est o f <strong>the</strong> M oun- I<br />

ta in s present a t th e M t. V ic t o r ia m eet- i<br />

ing, and fo r th a t reason <strong>the</strong> O range C oun :<br />

cil h ad decided t o w ith d raw from repre- I<br />

sen ta tion . In view' o f <strong>the</strong> statem en t in a.<br />

d a ily p a p er g iv in g an e n tirely different<br />

reason fo r w ith d raw a l, it w'as resolv e d ,<br />

th a t <strong>the</strong> ch airm an w rite p r iv a te ly t o th e ;<br />

M a yor o f O range o n th e m a tter, and pioint ;<br />

o u t <strong>the</strong> n a tio n a l sign ifican ce o f th e m o v e ­<br />

m ent.<br />

A t th is sta g e <strong>the</strong> d eleg a tes adjou rn ed fo r<br />

tea, and resum ed a t 7 p .m ., when, in an<br />

address exten d in g o v e r h alf an h ou r, M r.<br />

R yan ou tlin ed th e p r o p o sa ls <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ex- :<br />

ecu tive fo r <strong>the</strong> ce le b ra tio n . lie estim a ted<br />

that <strong>the</strong> c o s t o f th e celeb ra tion w ou ld be<br />

kit <strong>the</strong> lea st £ 1 5 0 0 to £ 1 6 0 0 . On th e<br />

m o tio n o f M essrs. Dash and I jaw s <strong>the</strong> rep<br />

ort was received.<br />

T h e fo llo w in g gentlem en w ere added to<br />

<strong>the</strong> ex ecu tiv e : T h e U n d e r s e c r e ta r y fo r<br />

1- d u ca tio n and <strong>the</strong> Chief In sp ector. The ,<br />

Iflori. J o v n to n Stniifch and M r. M ark F o y


7 2.<br />

vere adicled. t o <strong>the</strong> com m ittee.<br />

IM r. P a d ley suggested a ride niatch for<br />

ill places fr o m O range to . S t. M arys. T his<br />

vaa left w ith <strong>the</strong> executive.<br />

The president suggested th a t a mom her- ■<br />

ship m igh t be obta in ed as a means<br />

o f p op u la risin g <strong>the</strong> m ovem ent and ra ising<br />

m oney. M em bers thought it a g o o d<br />

p roposa l, and <strong>the</strong> chairm an, M essrs. R im - ’<br />

its and I>ash were appoin ted a Com m ittee :<br />

to g o in to <strong>the</strong> m a tte r and rep ort to n ext }<br />

meeting.<br />

i The next m eeting o f <strong>the</strong> executive w as I<br />

Ifixed fo r L aw son in a fo rtn ig h t's tim e. I<br />

and <strong>the</strong> n ext m eeting o f <strong>the</strong> com m ittee w ill<br />

be held, a m on th hwiee at W en tw orth F a lls.<br />

A h sarty v o te o f thanks w as accorded<br />

<strong>the</strong> M a vor o f K a to o m b a fo r th e us? <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Council Cham bers. A id. Biavies responded, 1<br />

nr»d said <strong>the</strong> K a to o m b a C ouncil w ould help<br />

j<strong>the</strong> m ovem ent in a^-v w av nossible.<br />

A h eartv v o t e <strong>of</strong> thanks t o <strong>the</strong> chairm<br />

an con cluded <strong>the</strong> proceedings a ’-ou t 9 .1 5 .<br />

l<br />

i<br />

AFTER A<br />

HUNDREB VtfiKS.<br />

--------- *•----------<br />

CROSSING THE MOUNTAINS.<br />

____<br />

CENTENARY CELEBRATIONS IN VIEW.<br />

E arly In May, next year, <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> M ountains,<br />

at a spot somewhere between Blaxland<br />

and Mount York, w ill undergo a rem arkable<br />

j transform ation, and fo r a whole w eek a vast<br />

;l| enclosure will m erge into a veritable Coney<br />

Island, where everything will be entirely<br />

Australian. A nd all this is to perpetuate <strong>the</strong><br />

m em ory o f three great explirers—<strong>the</strong> three<br />

Australians who were first to cross <strong>the</strong> p icturesque<br />

ranges, and incidentally <strong>the</strong> prime<br />

. m overs in <strong>the</strong> opening up o f <strong>the</strong> great coun-<br />

, try behind <strong>the</strong>m, Lawson, Blaxland, and<br />

W entw orth.<br />

r W hat is npw wild bush, for 168 hours will<br />

j fairly hum w ith am usem ents—<strong>the</strong>atres, balls,<br />

1 picture-show s, buckjum ping, and cattle- I<br />

j throw ing contests, boom erang hurling com - !<br />

/ petition, Australian native corroborees, picnic •<br />

excursions, m otor trips, and a host o f o<strong>the</strong>r i<br />

0 public enjoym ents.<br />

The new ly-form ed. "T he <strong>Crossing</strong> o f <strong>the</strong><br />

1 <strong>Blue</strong> M ountains Celebration Com m ittee,” o f<br />

w hich Captain Cecil W alter Lam b (form erly<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> R oyal Australian Garrison A rtillery)<br />

is organising- secretary, proposes to do all<br />

J this and more. The <strong>of</strong>ficials o f <strong>the</strong> connnit-<br />

1 tee are all energetic people, and <strong>the</strong> president,<br />

-Mr. Frank W alker, i3 Flso <strong>the</strong> president<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> Australian H istorical Society.<br />

] H e 'h a s had large experience in w ork o f <strong>the</strong><br />

sort, and lo r years has organised for various<br />

| societies.. ___ _____ U<br />

j<br />

Captaiu Lam b, <strong>the</strong> organising secretarv, I<br />

has had a, strenuous career. Soon a fter his '<br />

retirem ent from <strong>the</strong> R oyal A rtillery he raised<br />

£1300 fo r Lho Sydney H ospital Centenary<br />

Fund. H o jo in e d <strong>the</strong> service on June 21,<br />

JS90. a n d for fourteen years did excellent<br />

work. H e was under fire in <strong>the</strong> Boer W ar.<br />

and was m entioned in all <strong>the</strong> despatches for<br />

his m arked adm inistrative ability. H is retirem<br />

ent w as due to a tem porary breakdow n<br />

in health consequent on injuries received in<br />

engagem ents in South A frica. H e becam e<br />

enrolling <strong>of</strong>ficer o f <strong>the</strong> M illions Club.<br />

The com m ittee purposes asking <strong>the</strong> public<br />

to put its hands in to its pockets and sub- '<br />

I scribe to a schem e which prom ises to re- j<br />

j pay handsom ely. The G overnm ent is to be !<br />

approached regarding a pound for pound :<br />

! subsidy, and <strong>the</strong>, m iltary and naval authori-<br />

! ties will no doubt assist with bands and<br />

i tents.<br />

"It will be a regular B clhi D urbar,” said<br />

Captain Lam b this m orning. “ It will bo<br />

j m ade historical, instructional, educational,<br />

attractive, and am using. W e w ant to per- 1<br />

petuate <strong>the</strong> m em ory o f those three gallant<br />

m en—Law son. B laxland, and W en tw orth. It<br />

w ill be a British Em pire affair, and one in ,<br />

which <strong>Blue</strong> M ountain residents will join in |<br />

with all. A th in g o f <strong>the</strong> sort has been j<br />

m ooted b y <strong>the</strong> B lue M ountain foil; fo r a<br />

long time past. T hey are already w orking<br />

j hard in <strong>the</strong> right direction.”<br />

The first public m eeting will be held in<br />

<strong>the</strong> Sydney T ow n H all on O ctober 21, when<br />

<strong>the</strong> L ord M ayor is to be asked to take <strong>the</strong><br />

chair.<br />

! |<br />

f<br />

CROSSING THE MOUNTAINS.<br />

MEETING OF CENTENABY<br />

• 12 COMMITTEE.<br />

0 * 3 r ________________<br />

At <strong>the</strong> Invitation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> president <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong><br />

Mountain Shire ihe members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> executive<br />

committee <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Crossing</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong><br />

Centenary Committee, met in <strong>the</strong> Shire<br />

Chambers, Lawson, on Saturday night.<br />

The president, Mr. Frank Walker, occupied<br />

<strong>the</strong> chair, and was supported by Messrs. Ryan,<br />

Waterhouse, Cormack (Tourist Bureau), A. W.<br />

Collett (Mayor <strong>of</strong> Parramatta), and o<strong>the</strong>rs.<br />

The hon. secretary, Mr. A. S. Redfern, having<br />

read <strong>the</strong> inward correspondence, and several<br />

matters <strong>of</strong> detail having been discussed,<br />

<strong>the</strong> question pf approaching <strong>the</strong> Government<br />

for financial assistance was dealt with.<br />

Mr. Ryan pointed out that as <strong>the</strong> estimates<br />

for <strong>the</strong> coming financial year would soon be in<br />

course <strong>of</strong> preparation, it behoved <strong>the</strong>m to approach<br />

<strong>the</strong> Government without delay, o<strong>the</strong>rwise!<br />

<strong>the</strong>y might be informed that as no provision<br />

had been made <strong>the</strong>reon, <strong>the</strong> matter<br />

would have to stand over to <strong>the</strong> following<br />

vear. He. <strong>the</strong>refore, suggested <strong>the</strong> formation<br />

<strong>of</strong> a Sydney committee, whose function would<br />

not consist in formulating <strong>the</strong> programme, but


8 23<br />

who would co-operate with <strong>the</strong> present executive,<br />

both in asking <strong>the</strong> Government lor<br />

assistance, and arranging for <strong>the</strong> presence on<br />

<strong>the</strong> day <strong>of</strong> celebration o f representatives <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> naval and m ilitary forces, <strong>the</strong> Senior<br />

Cadets, etc.<br />

It was <strong>the</strong>refore decided to appoint <strong>the</strong> following<br />

gentlemen (subject to <strong>the</strong>ir assent<br />

being obtained) members <strong>of</strong> such committee:—<br />

The Premier, <strong>the</strong> Chief Commissioner for<br />

Railways, <strong>the</strong> Under-Secretary and Chief Inspector<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Department <strong>of</strong> Public Instruction.<br />

Colonel W allack, Admiral King-Hall,<br />

<strong>the</strong> Lord Mayor <strong>of</strong> Sydney, <strong>the</strong> Mayors <strong>of</strong> all<br />

suburban municipalities, <strong>the</strong> presidents <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Chambers <strong>of</strong> Commerce and Manufactures, and<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Labor Council, <strong>the</strong> Sydney daily paper<br />

representatives, <strong>the</strong> Colonial Architect, <strong>the</strong><br />

Tourist Bureau, Messrs. J. Cook, Carr, and<br />

Cann, Ms.P., and Brinsley Hall, Miller, and<br />

Dooley, Ms.L.A., <strong>the</strong> chairman o f <strong>the</strong> Stock<br />

Exchanges, Messrs. T. Hitchman, Varley,<br />

Southwell. Colonel Lassetter, and <strong>the</strong> presidents<br />

and cha4rmen <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Commercial Travellers’<br />

Association, Automobile, and Pioneer<br />

Clubs, and <strong>the</strong> Institute <strong>of</strong> Architects.<br />

The question <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> appointment o f an organising<br />

secretary was left in <strong>the</strong> hands <strong>of</strong> a<br />

small sub-committee to interview <strong>the</strong> applicants<br />

and to report <strong>the</strong>reon.<br />

BLUE MOUNTAINS CENTENARY.<br />

GOVERNMENT AID SOUGHT.<br />

A meeting <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> committee that is making<br />

arrangements for commemorating <strong>the</strong><br />

centenary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> first crossing <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Blua<br />

<strong>Mountains</strong>, which occurs next year, was h eli<br />

at <strong>the</strong> Town Hall yesterday, Mr. Frank W alker<br />

presiding.<br />

The chairman expressed gratification at ths<br />

prospect <strong>of</strong> securing a grant from <strong>the</strong> Federal<br />

Government towards <strong>the</strong> celebrations. He<br />

thought that <strong>the</strong>y should ascertain as early<br />

as possible <strong>the</strong> extent to which <strong>the</strong> State<br />

Government was prepared to assist.<br />

On <strong>the</strong> motion <strong>of</strong> Mr. F. A. Artlett (Mayor<br />

<strong>of</strong> Glebe), it was decided that a deputation<br />

iwait on <strong>the</strong> Premier, <strong>the</strong>' arrangements to be<br />

'left in <strong>the</strong> hands <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> president.<br />

The <strong>Crossing</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Bine <strong>Mountains</strong>.<br />

M E E T IN G O F T H E B O A R D O F<br />

C O N T R O L .<br />

A m e e tin g o f th e B o a rd o f C on tro l o f<br />

th e a b o v e C e le b ra tio n s w as h eld in th e<br />

S ch o o l o f A rts, .W e n tw o rth F a lls, o n Satu<br />

rd a y n ig h t last. P resen t— M r F ra n k<br />

W a lk e r , in th e c h a ir , su p p orted b y M es- ,<br />

srs S. W ilso n a n d A . S. R e d fe r n (Join t<br />

hon S e c s .), R e in its (h o n . T r e a s ), J. R y a n ,;<br />

N. B a ssett, T. B u r r ill, A . L a w es, R . M u l- j<br />

h eran, J. P lu m m e r, J. C liff, C. H . L in d e -<br />

m an , J . H . B lo o m e , J. S in cla ir, J. P a a d -<br />

ley, J. T . W a ll, P a rram a tta C o u n cil, I<br />

C ob b , P . M atth ew s and L . S om ers B ra d - j<br />

fo rd .<br />

T h e P resid en t, o n risin g , b rie fly in ­<br />

trod u ce d C aptain C ecil L a m b , th e p r o s ­<br />

p e c tiv e O rg a n isin g S e creta ry , and, in so<br />

d o in g , and in e u lo g is in g th e g a lla n t C aptain<br />

, v en tu red to exp ress th e h o p e th a t<br />

w ith C aptain L a m b a t th e h elm , su ccess<br />

w as assu red .<br />

T h e m in u tes o f th e p rev io u s m eetin g<br />

h a v in g b een d e a lt w ith , th e P re sid e n t<br />

read a c ircu la r, w h ich h e h a d sent o u t<br />

to m any o f th e p r o sp e ctiv e m em b ers o f<br />

th e S yd n ey C om m ittee. T o th is h e sta t­<br />

ed th a t a lre a d y h e h ad re ceiv ed o v e r<br />

fo r ty re p lie s fr o m g e n tle m e n w h o all e x ­<br />

p ressed th e ir m o s t c o r d ia l sy m p a th y and<br />

a ssu ra n ce o f h e a rty co -o p e ra tio n .<br />

In w a rd c o r r e s p o n d e n c e w as n ext d e a lt<br />

w ith , a n d in clu d e d letters fr o m —<br />

T h e T o w n C le rk , K a to o m b a , s t a t ic s th a<br />

his C o u n cil in te n d e d d e c o ra tin g th e “ M ark<br />

ed T r e e ” o n th e d a y o f ce le b ra tio n .<br />

F r o m M r G. J. W a te rh o u s e , re sig n in g<br />

his p o sitio n as V ice P resid e n t on th e<br />

sco re o f ill-h e a lth , and d o n a tin g a h a n d ­<br />

som e su b scrip tio n .<br />

F rom M r R . B. P a te rso n and o th e rs,<br />

a p o lo g isin g fo r n on -a tte n d a n ce .<br />

P r io r to th e te a a d jo u rn m e n t, M r J.<br />

R yan rea d th r o u g h a d r a ft co n stitu tio n<br />

and ru le s, w h ich h e p ropose d . In so<br />

d o in g , h e th o u g h t th a t w h ilst m e m b e rs<br />

w ere ch e w in g th e p h y sica l cu d th y m ig h t<br />

at th e sa m e tim e ch ew t h e 'c u d o f r e fle c ­<br />

tio n th ereon !<br />

A n a d jo u rn m e n t w as th en m a d e to th e<br />

R o sly n tea room s, w h e r e a m ost e x ce lle n t<br />

rep ast h ad been p rovid e d .<br />

T h e in n e r m an h a v in g b een th u s stim ­<br />

u la ted , b u sin ess w as resu m ed s h o rtly a f­<br />

ter sev en o ’c lo c k .<br />

T h e P resid e n t, .a fte r re co u n tin g th e delib<br />

e ra tio n s o f thd s u b -co m m itte e a p p o in t­<br />

ed to d ea l w ith th e a p p lica tio n s f o r th e


2 . 4 [ b U ^ ) < J


post o f O rgan isin g S ecretary, stated th ey<br />

w ere u n anim ou s in th eir decision, and<br />

recom m en d ed th e appoin tm en t o f Captain<br />

C ecil L am b.<br />

M r L aw es, on, b eh a lf o f his fe llo w -co m -<br />

m ittee m en, stated th at Captain L am b<br />

w as head and sh ou ld ers a b o v e th e oth er<br />

a p p licants, and was, in his opin ion , th e<br />

best m an fo r th e p osition .<br />

C aptain L a m b , at <strong>the</strong> requ est o f <strong>the</strong><br />

P resid en t, <strong>the</strong>n read extra cts from a len ­<br />

gth y rep o rt w h ich he had draw n up as to<br />

h ow th e a ffa ir shou ld b e con du cted .<br />

On th e term in a tion o f his address, several<br />

question s w ere p u t to him , all o f<br />

w hich w ere sa tisfa ctorily answ ered.<br />

T h e P resid en t <strong>the</strong>n requ ested him to<br />

w ith d raw , and th e m atter o f his a p p oin t­<br />

m en t w as debated.<br />

F in a lly , it w as m ov ed , secon d ed and<br />

ca rried , th at th e m eetin g approves o f th e<br />

a p p oin tm en t o f C aptain L am b as O rgan ­<br />

isin g S ecreta ry, su b je ct to a satisfagtory<br />

a greem en t b e in g draw n up and sign ed by<br />

both p arties, th e P resid en t to sign on beh<br />

a lf o f th e C om m ittee. T h e sca le o f<br />

rem u n eration w as fix ed a t £3 per w eek,<br />

com m ission on a ten per cen t basis o n ail i<br />

m on ies ob ta in ed by his in d ivid u a l e ffo r ts )<br />

and certa in expenses.<br />

C aptain L a m b h aving retu rn ed thanks,<br />

it w as d ecid ed th a t a fo rm a l d ep utation<br />

sh ou ld w ait on <strong>the</strong> G overn m en t and try<br />

to ob ta in a p o u n d £pr p ou n d subsidy, and<br />

a lso th a t a m eetin g sh ou ld sh ortly be<br />

h eld in S yd ney u n d er th e ch airm an sh ip<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> L o r d M ayor.<br />

T h e p rop o sed C on stitu tion and R u les<br />

w ere th en read as fo llo w s :—<br />

( 1 .) T h e o b je c t o f th e con stitu tion is<br />

t o d ev ise m eans fo r e ffe ctu a lly ce l­<br />

e b ra tin g th e cen ten ary o f th e first<br />

cro ssin g o f th e B lu e M ountains by<br />

B la xla n d , W en tw orth and L aw son<br />

in 1813.<br />

( 2 .) T h e w h o le o f th e arran gem en ts to<br />

secu re th is end shall b e co n tr o lle<br />

d b y th e C om m ittee o f C on trol,<br />

co m p o se d o f 3 rep resen ta tives from<br />

each C ou n cil, P rogress A ssocia tion<br />

o r o th er p u b lic o r sem i-p u b lic bod y<br />

p a rticip a tin g in th e m ov em en t. B ut<br />

this com m ittee sh a ll h a v e p ow er<br />

to add to its n u m ber any person<br />

w h o se co -o p e ra tio n m ay be deem ­<br />

ed o f va lu e.<br />

, ( 3 .) T h e C om m ittee o f C on trol shall,<br />

u nless o th erw ise d eterm in ed , m eet<br />

a t least o n c e in each m on th at<br />

such p la ces and o n such dates as<br />

m ay b e a g reed upon.<br />

( 4 .) A n ex ecu tiv e to deal w ith in terim<br />

o r u rg en t b u sin ess shall con sist<br />

o f th e P resid ent, th ree V ice P residen<br />

ts, th e tw o h on . S ecreta ries;<br />

a nd th e h on . T reasu rer. T h e exe<br />

cu tiv e m a y a t any tim e, if its<br />

m em b ers d eem it n ecessa ry , sum ­<br />

m on a sp ecia l m e e tin g o f <strong>the</strong>. C om ­<br />

m ittee o f C on trol.<br />

( 5 .) S u b -com m ittees m ay be a p p oin ted<br />

to d ea l w ith th e fo llo w in g m atte<br />

r s: ( a ) , fin a n ce ; ( b ) , s ch o o l<br />

d isp la y s; ( c ) , g en era l d isp la y s ;<br />

( d ) , w o r k s and im p ro v e m e n ts; ( e ) ,<br />

m isc e lla n e o u s a rra n g em en ts f o r Cel<br />

e b ra tio n D a y ; ( f ) , o rg a n isin g w ork<br />

in th e m e tro p o lis; ( g ) , p u b licity ;<br />

( h ) , a n d a n y o th e r sp ecia l fu n c­<br />

tio n s as m a y b e d eterm in ed by th e '<br />

C o m m itte e o f C on trol. E a ch su b­<br />

c o m m itte e sh a ll w o rk on th e genera<br />

l lin e s o f th e p rogra m m e a d o p t­<br />

ed , a n d w ill b e exp ected to rep ort<br />

m o n th ly to th e C om m ittee o f C on ­<br />

trol. M em bers o f <strong>the</strong> ex ecu tiv e<br />

m a y a ct e x -o ffic io as m em b ers o f<br />

a ll su b -com m ittees.<br />

( 6 .) A ll e x p e n d itu re sh a ll b e sa n ction ­<br />

ed , a n d a c-^ u n ts p assed by th e<br />

C om m ittee C C o n tro l, b u t th e hon.<br />

Sec. a n d h on . T reas. m ay to g e th ­<br />

e r a u th o r ise p a y m en t o f petty<br />

cash ite m s o r u rg e n t a cco u n ts incu<br />

rre d in ca rry in g o u t th e a d o p t­<br />

e d p rogra m m e.<br />

( 7 .) T w e lv e m em b ers shall co n sist a<br />

q u o ru m a t m eetin g s o f th e C om ­<br />

m ittee o f C on tro l. T h e q u oru m<br />

at m e e tin g s o f each su b -com m ittee<br />

sh a ll b e th ree.<br />

( 8 .) T h e d e ta il w o rk o f <strong>the</strong> O rg a n isin g<br />

S ecreta ry sh a ll be d irecte d b y <strong>the</strong><br />

ex6cu tive.<br />

( 9 .) A d d itio n a l ru les a n d am en d m en ts<br />

o f th e fo r e g o in g m ay b e a d op ted<br />

a t any m e e tin g o f th e C om m ittee<br />

o f C on tro l w ith o u t p revio u s n o tice .<br />

M r L a w es, in sp ea k in g to th e m to io n ,<br />

w as fe a r fu l o f d ou b le -b a n k in g .<br />

M r B ra d fo rd th o u g h t n o tic e o f m otion<br />

sh o u ld b e g iv en , in asm u ch as a la r g e n um ­<br />

b e r o f co m m itte e m e n w e re absent. In<br />

a d d itio n , a m o tio n rescin d in g th e o r ig in ­<br />

al m o tio n p assed a t M t. V ic to r ia , c o n stitu<br />

tin g th e p r e se n t e x ecu tiv e, w o u ld h iv e<br />

to b e passed.<br />

M r R yan a g re e d to th is, and n o tic e w as<br />

g iv en a cco rd in g ly .<br />

T h is c o n clu d e d th e busin ess.


10 27<br />

a n h i s t o r i c s p o t .<br />

MOUNT BLAXLAND LOCATED.<br />

The disputed point as to <strong>the</strong> exact location<br />

<strong>of</strong> Mount Blaxland was definitely settled on<br />

Monday last, when a *arty, representing <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong> Centenary Celebration Committee,<br />

<strong>including</strong> Mr. Frank Walker (president)<br />

and Mr. J. W. Berghoter (vice-president),<br />

visited <strong>the</strong> locality where <strong>the</strong> mountain<br />

was supposed to be, and with <strong>the</strong> help<br />

<strong>of</strong> some valuable maps, brought by Mr. Caswell,<br />

<strong>of</strong> Lithgow, <strong>the</strong> matter was settled.<br />

The mountain is that isolated peak, in <strong>the</strong><br />

form <strong>of</strong> a sugarloaf, which towers up above<br />

<strong>the</strong> Cox River, and is uistant about eight<br />

miles in a south-westerly direction from <strong>the</strong><br />

village <strong>of</strong> Hartley. On <strong>the</strong> opposite side <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> stream are two o<strong>the</strong>r peaks (locally<br />

known as "The Bro<strong>the</strong>rs” ), which are, undoubtedly,<br />

<strong>the</strong> two named after <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r explorers,<br />

Wentworth and Lawson. The party<br />

climbed <strong>the</strong> almost perpendicular sides <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

first-named peak, which rises to a height <strong>of</strong><br />

about 1800 or 2000 feet above <strong>the</strong> stream,<br />

and having gained <strong>the</strong> summit were rewarded<br />

by one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> most magnificent views it is<br />

possible to conceive. Here, Blaxland and<br />

his heroic companions stood, and, taking a<br />

final farewell <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> rolling country to <strong>the</strong><br />

westward, slowly and painfully retraced <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

steps to <strong>the</strong> settlement.<br />

The p.-esident, in a short address, proposed<br />

a toast to <strong>the</strong> memory <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> gallant explorers,<br />

which was duly honoured, and Mr. Bergh<strong>of</strong>er<br />

also added a few remarks. It was decided<br />

to prepare a brass inscription-plate, to<br />

be affixed to a large rock at <strong>the</strong> summit,<br />

bearing <strong>the</strong> following words:—<br />

“ This mountain, which marks <strong>the</strong> terminal<br />

point <strong>of</strong> Blaxland, Wentworth, and<br />

Lawson’s expedition across vhe <strong>Blue</strong><br />

<strong>Mountains</strong>, was reached on May 31, 1813,<br />

and was named Mount Blaxland, in honour<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> explorer, by Governor Maci<br />

quarie. Erected by <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> -Jountains<br />

j Centenary Committee, May 31, ~913.”<br />

It Is intended also to erect a cairn <strong>of</strong><br />

stones, with a flagpole in <strong>the</strong> centre, sufficiently<br />

large, to be visible for miles around.<br />

The party descended <strong>the</strong> mountain, and, after<br />

arranging for <strong>the</strong> fixing in position <strong>of</strong> ano<strong>the</strong>r<br />

platte on <strong>the</strong> stump <strong>of</strong> a tree which formerly<br />

bore <strong>the</strong> initials <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> explorers, bill<br />

was unfortunately destroyed some years ago,<br />

<strong>the</strong> return journey was commenced, most oi<br />

which lay over <strong>the</strong> old <strong>Bathurst</strong>-road, con-<br />

' strutted by William Cox in 1814.<br />

CROSSING OF MOUNTAINS<br />

CENTENARY.<br />

A TBIP TO MOUNT BLAXLAND.<br />

The president, Mr. Prank Walker, accom ­<br />

panied 'by Mr. J. W . Bergh<strong>of</strong>er (vice-pre.si- 1<br />

dent), and Messrs. Badley and Cresswell, from ■<br />

Lithgow, and a number <strong>of</strong> local residents, paid '<br />

a special visit to Mount Blaxland on Monday '<br />

in connection with <strong>the</strong> forthcoming centenary.<br />

This cone-shaped mountain, which is about<br />

1600ft high, is distant about six miles from<br />

Hartley. It rises, abruptly from <strong>the</strong> banks <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> Oox River, and was <strong>the</strong> terminal point <strong>of</strong><br />

Blaxland’s expedition in 1813. Its nor<strong>the</strong>rn<br />

face is inaccessible to anything without wings,<br />

Irat on <strong>the</strong> sou<strong>the</strong>rn side <strong>the</strong> ascent is more<br />

gradual, becoming steeper as <strong>the</strong> summit la<br />

neared. Up this historic landmark <strong>the</strong> party<br />

chambered, and at last reacted its apex, breath<br />

less, but triumphant. The view from this<br />

elevation is beyond description.<br />

W herever i<strong>the</strong> eye turned It rested on mountainous<br />

country, range 'beyond range; while <strong>the</strong><br />

familiar peaks, such as Mount Walker, Mount<br />

York, Mount Victoria, The Bro<strong>the</strong>rs, Mouut<br />

Binda, etc., were easily and quickly identified.<br />

Upon this elevated platform, Blaxland and his<br />

heroic companions took <strong>the</strong>ir final glance at<br />

<strong>the</strong> rolling country westward, ere retracing<br />

th'eir painful steps <strong>the</strong> way <strong>the</strong>y had come.<br />

T o commemorate i<strong>the</strong>se pioneers, and <strong>the</strong><br />

story o f <strong>the</strong>ir achievement, it was decided to<br />

have a brass plate prepared, bearing <strong>the</strong> fo l­<br />

lowing inscription:—<br />

This mountain marks <strong>the</strong> terminal point ot<br />

(Blaxland, WentwoTth, and Lawson’s expedition<br />

across <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong>, May 31,<br />

1813, and was named Mount Blaxland b y<br />

Governor Macquarie. Ereated by <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong><br />

Mountain Centenary Committee, May 31,<br />

W 3 . "<br />

This will be securely fastened to <strong>the</strong> rock,<br />

and serve Jor all time to record <strong>the</strong> fact as<br />

stated aboive.<br />

The president t!Hen addressed a few remarks<br />

to <strong>the</strong> company, commemorative <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> visit<br />

to this historlo spat, and proposed a toast lo<br />

<strong>the</strong> memory <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> explorers, which was honored<br />

in <strong>the</strong> usual way.<br />

Mr. Bsrgh<strong>of</strong>er expressed <strong>the</strong> great pleasure<br />

and satisfaction he felt ait being present on<br />

such a memorable occasion.<br />

TKe party was <strong>the</strong>n photographed, and tbe<br />

descent <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> mountain was accomplished in<br />

safety.<br />

After arranging for a suitable inscription tJ<br />

be affixed to <strong>the</strong> stump <strong>of</strong> a large tree, whi :-h<br />

was originally marked by Blaxland, but which<br />

had been unfortunately cut down and d estroy^ ,<br />

<strong>the</strong> party separated, well pleased with <strong>the</strong> day's<br />

outing.<br />

____


1 1<br />

BLUE MOUNTAINS CENTtNAKY.<br />

T R IP T O M O U N T B L A X L A N D .<br />

The president o f <strong>the</strong> Australian H istorical<br />

Society, Mr. F rank W alker, accom panied by<br />

Mr. J. W . Bergh<strong>of</strong>er (vice-president), and<br />

Messrs. Padley and Cresswell, from Lithgow,<br />

and a num ber o f local residents, paid a<br />

special visit to Mount Blaxland yesterday in<br />

connection w ith <strong>the</strong> forthcom ing centenary.<br />

This cone-shaped mountain, which is about<br />

1600ft. high, .is distant about six miles from<br />

H artley. It rises abaiptly from <strong>the</strong> banks<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> Cox Kilter, and^vas <strong>the</strong> terminal point<br />

o f Blaxland’ s expedition in 1813. Its nor<strong>the</strong>rn<br />

face is inaccessible to anything without<br />

wings, but on <strong>the</strong> sou<strong>the</strong>rn side <strong>the</strong> ascent is<br />

more gradual, becom ing steeper as <strong>the</strong> sum ­<br />

mit is neared. U p this historic landmark <strong>the</strong><br />

PWty clam bered, and at last reached its apex,<br />

breathless but triumphant.<br />

The >view from this elevation is beyond description.<br />

W herever <strong>the</strong> eye turned it rested<br />

on mountainous country, range beyond range,<br />

whilst <strong>the</strong> farfiiliar peaks, such as Mount<br />

W alker, Mount York, Mount Victoria, Mount<br />

Binda, and The Bro<strong>the</strong>rs, were easily and<br />

quickly identified. Upon this elevated platform<br />

Blaxland and his heroic com panions<br />

took <strong>the</strong>ir final glance at <strong>the</strong> rolling country<br />

westward, ere retracing <strong>the</strong>ir painful steps<br />

<strong>the</strong> w ay <strong>the</strong>y had come.<br />

To com m em orate <strong>the</strong>se pioneers and <strong>the</strong><br />

story o f <strong>the</strong>ir achievement, it was decided to<br />

have a brass plate prepared, bearing <strong>the</strong> fo l­<br />

low ing inscription: “ This mountain marks<br />

<strong>the</strong> term inal point <strong>of</strong> Blaxland, W entworth,<br />

and L aw son’s expedition across <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong><br />

<strong>Mountains</strong>, M ay 31, 1813. and was named<br />

M ount Blaxland by Governor M a c q u a r i e .<br />

Erected by <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> Mountain Centenary<br />

Committee, M ay 31, 1913.” This will be securely<br />

fastened to <strong>the</strong> rock, and it will serve<br />

for all time to record <strong>the</strong> fact as stated before.<br />

The president <strong>the</strong>n addressed a few remarks<br />

to <strong>the</strong> com pany, com m em orative <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> visit to <strong>the</strong> historic spot, and proposed<br />

a toast to <strong>the</strong> mem ory <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> explorers, which<br />

was honored in <strong>the</strong> usual way. Mr. B ergh<strong>of</strong>er<br />

also <strong>of</strong>fered some remarks, expressing<br />

<strong>the</strong> great pleasure and satisfaction he felt at<br />

being present on such a mem orable occasion.<br />

The party was <strong>the</strong>n photographed, and <strong>the</strong><br />

descent o f <strong>the</strong> mountain was accom plished in<br />

, safety.<br />

Arrangem ents were also made for a suitable<br />

inscription to be affixed to <strong>the</strong> stump <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> tree which was originally marked by<br />

Blaxland, but which som e iconoclast had<br />

w ilfully cut down and removed.<br />

y<br />

r .< * -<br />

V<br />

MOUNT BLAXLAND.<br />

TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.<br />

Sir,—There is nothing more definite than<br />

;he date <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> naming <strong>of</strong> Mount Blaxland.<br />

[t was on November 26, 1813, and my fa<strong>the</strong>r, .<br />

3. W. Evans, was <strong>the</strong> man who named it, in j<br />

honour <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> man who first saw it. T h a t'<br />

was some 17 months before Governor Macquarie<br />

saw it.<br />

In his letter in your paper <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> 3rd' Inst<br />

Mr. F. Walker, <strong>the</strong> president <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Historical<br />

Society, states in reference to Evans’ Journal:<br />

“ His journal, which is an accurate and<br />

faithful record <strong>of</strong> his adventures, begins from<br />

Blaxland’s fur<strong>the</strong>st point, but makes no mention<br />

<strong>of</strong> his (Evans’) having named <strong>the</strong> conical-shaped<br />

m o u n .-n after Blaxland, yet in<br />

Evans’ map, which is appended to <strong>the</strong> journal,<br />

appears <strong>the</strong> name Mount Blaxland.”<br />

Now, sir, this is diam etrically opposed to<br />

facts, for <strong>the</strong> journal states “ I stopped this<br />

evening (November 26, 1813), near <strong>the</strong> toot<br />

<strong>of</strong> a very handsome mount, which I have<br />

taken <strong>the</strong> liberty to call Mount Blaxland,<br />

also two peaks ra<strong>the</strong>r north <strong>of</strong> it, and which<br />

<strong>the</strong> rivulet separates,<br />

Wentworth and Law-<br />

son sugar loaves.”<br />

Again, at <strong>the</strong> end <strong>of</strong> Evans’ report to<br />

Governor Macquarie, is <strong>the</strong> follow ing: Extent<br />

<strong>of</strong> survey—From Emu Island to Mount Blaxland,<br />

553 miles* from Mount Blaxland to end<br />

<strong>of</strong> my journey, 98& m iles; total, 154J miles.<br />

(Signed) G. W . Evans.<br />

My fa<strong>the</strong>r named many mountains, rivers,<br />

and plains before and after <strong>the</strong>y were seen<br />

by Governor Macquarie, and <strong>the</strong>y still bear<br />

<strong>the</strong> names.<br />

I note with great satisfaction that Mr. F.<br />

W alker acknowledges that my fa<strong>the</strong>r, “ G. W.<br />

Evans,” was <strong>the</strong> first man to accomplish <strong>the</strong><br />

complete passage <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> mountains.<br />

I am, etc.,<br />

MARY LEMPRIERE TURPIN.<br />

m6 t j x t b la x la js td .<br />

TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.<br />

Sir,—Mrs. Turpin, in your issue <strong>of</strong> to-daJS<br />

again takes me to task in respect to th«|<br />

authority for <strong>the</strong> naming <strong>of</strong> Mount Blaxland*<br />

"nil gives a quotation from her fa<strong>the</strong>r’s jour^<br />

nzil, under date November 26, 1813, in whictal<br />

he states: “ . . . \ have taken <strong>the</strong> liberty;<br />

to call (<strong>the</strong> mountain before mentioned) Moun*<br />

U’ a.dand, also tvro peaks ra<strong>the</strong>r north <strong>of</strong> it,<br />

ami which <strong>the</strong> rivulet separates, Wentworthi<br />

slid Lawson's sugar loaves ” This certainlj;<br />

seems conclusive, and as my copy <strong>of</strong> G. W<<br />

iCvans’s journal begins with <strong>the</strong> date November<br />

27, 1813, <strong>the</strong>re is evidently a portion<br />

missing- Be this as it may, I would lij#3 t*<br />

ask Mi’s. Turpin, as additional authority foe*<br />

Imy statement that Macquarie bestowed tha<br />

name <strong>of</strong> Mount Blaxland, how <strong>the</strong> following!<br />

jean be explained:—In <strong>the</strong> “ Sydney Gazette” oC<br />

) December 15, 1815, an account is given nt<br />

Governor Macquarie’s first expedition to <strong>the</strong><br />

Warrasamba River, which <strong>the</strong>n goes on<br />

~ describe Blaxland's share in this exp edition -


1 2<br />

2C j<br />

'■and how he (Blaxland) proposed to Macquarie*<br />

a plan <strong>of</strong> crossing <strong>the</strong> mountains by follow-*<br />

ing <strong>the</strong> ridge between <strong>the</strong> two rivers. Thiai<br />

plan, as it turned out, was entirely successful,<br />

and at <strong>the</strong> end <strong>of</strong> this account appears<br />

an announcement in Blaxland’s own words:}<br />

‘Mount York is <strong>the</strong> western summit <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

mountains; <strong>the</strong> vale Clwyd, <strong>the</strong> first valley ati<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir foot, from which a mountain (afterwards<br />

named Mount Blaxland by his Excellency<br />

Governor Macquarie) is about eight miles,-<br />

which terminated our journey.” This refer**<br />

i ence, combined with <strong>the</strong> same statement int<br />

- Macquarie’s general order, as detailed in my<br />

previous letter and Evans’s journal, seems to<br />

; point to some uncertainty as to who really;<br />

bestowed <strong>the</strong> name upon <strong>the</strong> mountain. Tlyp)<br />

generally accepted <strong>the</strong>ory has been that Macquarie<br />

was responsible fo r <strong>the</strong> name, an#<br />

' 3 it is necessary, in view <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> fixing in<br />

position <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> inscription plate on Mount<br />

i Blaxland, to ensure accuracy on <strong>the</strong> point.<br />

] pcssibly this correspondence may induce<br />

o<strong>the</strong>rs to shed some additional light on <strong>the</strong><br />

mystery, so that <strong>the</strong> matter may be settled<br />

once and for all.<br />

I am. etc., PRANK WALKER,<br />

Nov. 5. President Aust. Historical Society.<br />

MOUNT BLAXLAND.<br />

TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.<br />

Sir,—I noticed in your issue <strong>of</strong> to-day, re<br />

“ An Historic Spot,’’ that <strong>the</strong> disputed point<br />

as to <strong>the</strong> exact position <strong>of</strong> Mount Blaxland<br />

was definitely fixed on Monday last, when a<br />

party representing <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> Mountain centenary<br />

celebration committee, <strong>including</strong> Mr.<br />

Frank Walker, president, visited <strong>the</strong> locality<br />

where <strong>the</strong> mountain was supposed to be. Now,<br />

Sir, Mount Blaxland was first named by my<br />

fa<strong>the</strong>r, George William Evans, late Deputy<br />

Surveyor-General <strong>of</strong> this colony. It was named<br />

in honour <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> leader <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> first exploring<br />

party, that being <strong>the</strong> far<strong>the</strong>st point<br />

reached by that party; <strong>the</strong> date <strong>of</strong> such naming<br />

was November 28. 1813. It was not named<br />

by Governor Macquarie. The Lands Department<br />

in Sydney agrees with this. It is a<br />

great pity that <strong>the</strong> truth and <strong>the</strong> whole truth<br />

should not be handed down to posterity. Blaxland,<br />

Lawson, and Wentworth did noble work<br />

in opening up tht; track, but <strong>the</strong>y did not cross<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong>. G. W. Evans did—right<br />

over <strong>the</strong> watershed and on as far as <strong>Bathurst</strong>.<br />

I am, etc.,<br />

Oct. 30. MARY LEMPRIERE TCRPIN.<br />

TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.<br />

Sir,— In Tuesday’s paper I noticed a sta tj- |<br />

ment that Mount Blaxland had been rediscovered.<br />

There must be some misapprehension I<br />

in <strong>the</strong> matter, as Surveyor Evans, who named<br />

Mount Blaxland, shows <strong>the</strong> position <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

■mount on his plan, which is dated 1813, and<br />

it lias been recorded on Lands Department<br />

maps ever since. It is, <strong>of</strong> course, on <strong>the</strong><br />

track <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> old <strong>Bathurst</strong>-road, which road<br />

has been frequently deviated since Governor<br />

^iacquarie’s time, and hence it is not so well<br />

known to travellers as it was in <strong>the</strong> eariy<br />

days.<br />

Mr. R. H. Cambage and I have fo r many<br />

years undertaken <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> going over <strong>the</strong><br />

botanical tracks <strong>of</strong> Allan Cunningham, one <strong>of</strong><br />

my early predecessors, and Mount Blaxland<br />

was visited by Cunningham in 1817, 1822, and<br />

on many o<strong>the</strong>r occasions. We published notes<br />

on Mount Blaxland in <strong>the</strong> “ Proceedings <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Royal Society <strong>of</strong> New South Wales for 1909,’*<br />

p. 123, with a locality map. On <strong>the</strong> occasion<br />

<strong>of</strong> our trip to Mount Blaxland in 1904 we<br />

recorded in our notebooks every plant we<br />

could find on <strong>the</strong> summit, and amongst o<strong>the</strong>rs<br />

we found Eucalyptus pulvigera, a rare and<br />

remarkable species only known from two or<br />

three o<strong>the</strong>r localities, and a- specimen is growing<br />

in <strong>the</strong> native plant border in <strong>the</strong> Botanic<br />

Gardens, alongside Government House Grounds,<br />

from seed we brought down on that occasion.<br />

Mr. Cambage and I have walked over all <strong>the</strong><br />

old <strong>Bathurst</strong> roads and <strong>the</strong>ir deviations from<br />

Emu <strong>Plains</strong> to <strong>Bathurst</strong>, and we have marvelled<br />

how <strong>the</strong> old pioneers made <strong>the</strong>ir way.<br />

Some day we hope that <strong>the</strong> Tourist Bureau, or<br />

some o<strong>the</strong>r organisation, will personally conduct<br />

parties over at least <strong>the</strong> old road from<br />

Emu <strong>Plains</strong> to <strong>Bathurst</strong> that Governor Macquarie<br />

used, and which probably very few<br />

people in <strong>the</strong> State have ever traversed.<br />

I am, etc., J. H. MAIDEN,<br />

Botanic Gardens, Oct. 31. Director.<br />

TO THE EDITOR OF THE HERALD.<br />

Sir,—I was extremely interested in <strong>the</strong><br />

two letters appearing in to-day's paper above<br />

<strong>the</strong> names <strong>of</strong> Mrs. M. L. Turpin and Mr. J. H.<br />

Maiden, in connection with <strong>the</strong> above subject.<br />

and crave <strong>the</strong> courtesy cf a portion <strong>of</strong><br />

your space to reply <strong>the</strong>reto. It has never<br />

been my intention in any way to seek to<br />

belittle <strong>the</strong> exploits <strong>of</strong> our noble pioneers, <strong>of</strong><br />

whose work in <strong>the</strong> past Australia has every<br />

reason to feel proud. George W illiam Evans<br />

accomplished splendid work in <strong>the</strong> opening<br />

up <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> far westward country beyond Blaxiand's<br />

far<strong>the</strong>st point, and in <strong>the</strong> coming celebrations<br />

in connection with <strong>the</strong> centenary <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> first crossing <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong> he will be<br />

accorded due recognition. But, placing sentiment<br />

altoge<strong>the</strong>r on oqe side, it is absolutely<br />

necessary that references to our past history<br />

should be a3 nearly accurate as circumstances<br />

will permit, and it is with this object that I<br />

am csking your help. Now, as to <strong>the</strong> matter<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> naming <strong>of</strong> Mount Blaxland. A b <strong>the</strong><br />

m ajority <strong>of</strong> your readers aro aware, George<br />

W illiam Evans. Deputy Surveyor-Geueral <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>n colony, was instructed by Governor<br />

Macquarie to carry out explorations a? iar as<br />

possible to <strong>the</strong> westward <strong>of</strong> Blaxlands<br />

terminal point, and in November, 1813, he left<br />

Sydney for <strong>the</strong> purpose. His Journal, which<br />

is an accurr.te and faithful record <strong>of</strong> his<br />

adventures, begins from Blaxland’s fui <strong>the</strong>st<br />

point, but makes no mention <strong>of</strong> his (Evans)<br />

having named <strong>the</strong> conical-shaped mountain<br />

after Blaxland, yet in Evans’s map, which is<br />

appended to <strong>the</strong>- journal, appears <strong>the</strong> same.<br />

V.i %<br />

m o u n t b l a x l a n d .


13<br />

iiourit Blaxland. Now, on <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r hand,<br />

Governor Macquarie’s general order, dated<br />

Sydney, June 10, 1815, which is a most important<br />

and valuable document, describes in<br />

detail <strong>the</strong> whole circumstances attending <strong>the</strong><br />

first crossing <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong>, although <strong>the</strong><br />

worthy Governor, whilst making mention <strong>of</strong><br />

Bass and Caley, entirely overlooks <strong>the</strong> several<br />

expeditions undertaken by Dawes, Barallier,<br />

and Hacking. The order <strong>the</strong>n goes on<br />

to describe <strong>the</strong> tour undertaken by Macquarie<br />

anil party in April, 1815, when <strong>the</strong> road,<br />

recently constructed under <strong>the</strong> supervision <strong>of</strong><br />

William Cox, was <strong>of</strong>ficially opened. All<br />

tntough this document Macquarie gives minute<br />

particulars <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> various places upon which<br />

lie bestowed names, such as Spriugwood,<br />

Prince Regent’s Glen, Pitt’s Amphi<strong>the</strong>atre,<br />

Vale <strong>of</strong> Clwyd, Mount York, Cox River, etc..<br />

etc., until he comes to <strong>the</strong> neighbourhood <strong>of</strong><br />

Blaxland’s terminal point. The exact wording<br />

<strong>the</strong>n is as follow s:—“ . . . In commemoration<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir” (Blaxland, Wentworth,<br />

and Lawson’s) “ merits, three beautiful high<br />

hills, joining each o<strong>the</strong>r at <strong>the</strong> end <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

touT at this place, have received <strong>the</strong>ir names<br />

in <strong>the</strong> following order, viz.:—Mount Blaxland,<br />

Wentworth’s Sugar Loaf, and Lawson’s Sugar<br />

Loaf. . . .” Your readers will notice, inter<br />

alia, that here we have <strong>the</strong> best authority for<br />

<strong>the</strong> order in which <strong>the</strong> names <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> three<br />

. explorers should be mentioned. It seems to<br />

me tla t Governor Macquarie himself gave<br />

<strong>the</strong>se celebrated hills <strong>the</strong> names <strong>the</strong>y will<br />

bear for all time, as, taking <strong>the</strong> context <strong>of</strong> his<br />

general order, it is a record <strong>of</strong> nomenclature,<br />

,as well as a faithful description <strong>of</strong> tbo country<br />

passed over, ad Macquarie’s little failing<br />

in regard to names, more particularly where<br />

his own name has been bestowed, is well<br />

known. It is quite probable that wheL Evans<br />

returned from his expedition and submitted<br />

Ills journal and map to Macquarie <strong>the</strong> former<br />

may have suggested <strong>the</strong> name to <strong>the</strong> Governor,<br />

as it is down as such on Evans’s map,<br />

but <strong>the</strong>re is no written recOTd <strong>of</strong> this sue -<br />

position, whilst, on <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r hand, <strong>the</strong> <strong>of</strong>ficial<br />

document is unequivocal, and cannot bo put<br />

aside. It is only fair to Evans, who, in <strong>the</strong><br />

shade <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> limelight thrown upon L-axland,<br />

Wentworth, and Lawson, has not received <strong>the</strong><br />

recognition to which he is entitled, that a<br />

couple <strong>of</strong> lines should be added to <strong>the</strong> plate,<br />

which it is intended to affix to a rock on <strong>the</strong><br />

summit <strong>of</strong> Mount Blaxland, stating that from<br />

this point George William Evans continued<br />

exploration westward, being <strong>the</strong> first man to<br />

sccpmplish <strong>the</strong> complete passage <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

mountains. In regard to Mr. Maiden’s letter,<br />

1 might say that one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> first things to<br />

attract my attention on gaining <strong>the</strong> summit<br />

i f Mount Blaxland was <strong>the</strong> peculiar species<br />

<strong>of</strong> eucalyptus, <strong>of</strong> which Mr. Maiden gives <strong>the</strong> (<br />

name (E. pulvigera), <strong>of</strong> w'hich <strong>the</strong> leaves j<br />

possess a remarkably pungent odour when (<br />

crushed in <strong>the</strong> hand. I am, etc.,<br />

FRANK WALKER, ,<br />

President Australian Historical Society.<br />

Nov. 1.<br />

‘'I/.<br />

: 7 3 .<br />

*<br />

“ THE CONQUERED HILLS.”<br />

BLUE MOUNTAIN CENTENARY.<br />

A S S A U L T O N T H E W E S T E R N R A M P A R T S<br />

T H E M E N W H O B L A Z E D T H E T R A IL .<br />

(B y Fran k W alker, President <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> A u s ­<br />

tralian H istorical Society.)<br />

(Special to <strong>the</strong> Sun.”)<br />

1 __________<br />

i<br />

Behind <strong>the</strong>m were <strong>the</strong> conquer'd hill*; <strong>the</strong>y<br />

faced<br />

The vast green West, with glad, «tr»nge<br />

beauty graced;<br />

And every tone <strong>of</strong> every cave and tree<br />

Was as a voice <strong>of</strong> splendid prophecy.<br />

So sang H en ry K endall in his inspiring<br />

poem, “ The <strong>Blue</strong> M ountain Pioneers,” and<br />

w ithout doubt <strong>the</strong> “ voice o f splendid proph<br />

ecy” was indeed heard when thfe joyfu l<br />

news o f B laxland, W entw orth, and L a w ­<br />

son's discovery circulated throughout <strong>the</strong><br />

in fan t settlem ent. R epsated attem pts to<br />

scale that m ountain barrier w hich for upw<br />

ards o f 25 years resisted every assault, had<br />

alm ost brought about a feeling o f despair<br />

am ongst <strong>the</strong> colonists, and <strong>the</strong> m ost op tim ­<br />

istic o f <strong>the</strong>m hardly dared to think that <strong>the</strong><br />

secret so carefu lly guarded for all those<br />

years, would ever be w rested from those<br />

frow nin g heights. But fam ine and starvation<br />

reared <strong>the</strong>ir ugly crests am ongst <strong>the</strong><br />

com m unity, and it becam e absolutely necessary,<br />

if <strong>the</strong> settlem ent w as to live, that new<br />

territory should be won.<br />

A nd so G regory B laxland, w ho had given<br />

<strong>the</strong> subject m uch study; at last conceived<br />

a plan <strong>of</strong> a tta ck which, if feasible in operation,<br />

m ust succeed. A ssociated w ith him<br />

w ere tw o near neighbors and friends, W illiam<br />

Charles W en tw orth —<strong>the</strong>n a youth o f 19<br />

but destined in later years to shine forth<br />

as a bright particular star in <strong>the</strong> firm am ent<br />

o f colonial politics—and L ieutenant W iiliani<br />

L aw son. M ay 11, 1813, w as <strong>the</strong> m om entous<br />

date on w hich <strong>the</strong> expedition set out, and no<br />

doubt m any a hearty prayer and wish from<br />

a section o f <strong>the</strong> com m unity follow ed !t<br />

that <strong>the</strong> quest would turn out a successful<br />

one. To <strong>the</strong> m ajority o f <strong>the</strong> inhabitants it<br />

would perhaps n ot appeal. The story <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

attem pted conquest o f <strong>the</strong> m ountains no<br />

doubt was w ell known, and <strong>the</strong> patriotic end<br />

eavor o f B laxlan d and his oom panions<br />

would be set dow n as only one m ore attem pt<br />

| that w as predestined to failure._______


1 4<br />

G R E G O R Y B L A X L A N D .<br />

D E P A R T U R E OF T H E E X P E D IT IO N .<br />

N o flourish o f trumpets, no shouts and<br />

hurrahs from any acclaim ing crow d accom ­<br />

panied <strong>the</strong> little party as <strong>the</strong>y turned to <strong>the</strong><br />

north and began <strong>the</strong>ir rem arkable journey.<br />

The old m aps distinctly show B laxland’s<br />

property on <strong>the</strong> banks o f South Creek, con ­<br />

sisting only o f a few hundred acres, but no<br />

rem ains o f <strong>the</strong> buildings that stood on <strong>the</strong> j<br />

site are preserved to us. The route taken, |<br />

prior to <strong>the</strong> ascent o f <strong>the</strong> first range, would j<br />

be parallel to <strong>the</strong> river, and gradually clos- 1<br />

ing in upon it as <strong>the</strong> ford was approached. !<br />

The river was reached at 4 o’clock in <strong>the</strong> j<br />

afternoon, so <strong>the</strong> actual start would have '<br />

taken place late in <strong>the</strong> forenoon. Ejnu !<br />

Island, where <strong>the</strong> old ford existed, has now<br />

disappeared, but originally it occupied that<br />

sem i-circular bend o f <strong>the</strong> river about one<br />

mile north o f <strong>the</strong> railw ay bridge. A cJOse<br />

Inspection o f <strong>the</strong> locality at <strong>the</strong> present? day<br />

will reveal traces o f <strong>the</strong> old river course, now<br />

silted up, and between this and <strong>the</strong> far bank<br />

Of <strong>the</strong> present stream, where <strong>the</strong> Em u Gravel<br />

Com pany is procuring its road material, is<br />

about <strong>the</strong> place where Emu Island form erly<br />

stood. On <strong>the</strong> island w a s a G overnm ent<br />

stockyard, w ith <strong>the</strong> necessary buildings.<br />

Instead o f attack ing <strong>the</strong> range in a direct<br />

w esterly course a fter crossing <strong>the</strong> stream,<br />

Blaxland and hi3 little com pany turned more<br />

to <strong>the</strong> south-w est. This was evidently done<br />

with a purpose, as <strong>the</strong> leader o f <strong>the</strong> expedition<br />

in his prelim inary exam ination <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

locality had discovered what, to him,<br />

seem ed a more practicable assent o f <strong>the</strong> first<br />

range, and had a ccord ingly settled upon this<br />

as <strong>the</strong> route to be follow ed. The direction<br />

would take <strong>the</strong> party to where <strong>the</strong> new railw<br />

ay deviation (w hich, singularly enougn.<br />

; was used fo r <strong>the</strong> first time on M ay 11, <strong>the</strong><br />

actual anniversary o f <strong>the</strong> starting o f <strong>the</strong><br />

expedition), is m ade; but, o f course, B la x ­<br />

land’s route' w as som e distance nearer <strong>the</strong><br />

river and on a parallel course.<br />

In this connection it is interesting to not>><br />

that a year later, when W illiam Cox started<br />

<strong>the</strong> construction o f <strong>the</strong> first road to <strong>Bathurst</strong>,<br />

he deviated entirely from B laxland’s original<br />

track, and attacked <strong>the</strong> range in a direct<br />

w esterly course from <strong>the</strong> river. The remains<br />

o f this old road, still in a good stats<br />

o f preservation, are visible at <strong>the</strong> presenc<br />

day at about a m ile and a half from <strong>the</strong><br />

existing road.<br />

D IF F IC U L T IE S A N D D A N G E R S.<br />

N ext m orning <strong>the</strong> real business o f <strong>the</strong> u n ­<br />

dertaking began, and <strong>the</strong> explorers’ troubles<br />

were not long in com ing. Deep gullies a n l<br />

gloom y recesses confronted <strong>the</strong>m on every<br />

haad. .Thick brastrarood and ston y ground,<br />

im peded <strong>the</strong>ir progress, and <strong>the</strong> aw fu l solitude<br />

o f <strong>the</strong>se regions depressed <strong>the</strong>jr spirits.<br />

L urking savages dogged <strong>the</strong>ir footsteps night<br />

and day, and m ore than one encounter with<br />

venom ous reptiles is recorded. Still <strong>the</strong>y<br />

struggled on w ith splendid courage, nevfrr<br />

for a m om ent losing-heart, and though som e­<br />

tim es <strong>the</strong>ir daily progress was barely a cou p’.e<br />

o f miles, <strong>the</strong>y advanced slow ly, but surely,<br />

tow ards <strong>the</strong>ir appointed goal.<br />

F o r 21 days <strong>the</strong> unequal con test w ent on,<br />

{ and at n ightfall, w hen <strong>the</strong>y m ade <strong>the</strong>ir cam p<br />

In <strong>the</strong> m idst o f som e gloom y, forest, or on <strong>the</strong><br />

brink o f som e trem endous precipice whose<br />

dark and dism al depths contained <strong>the</strong>y knew<br />

not what, <strong>the</strong>y closed <strong>the</strong>ir eyes iiv <strong>the</strong> sleep<br />

that w as so m uch needed, never know ing<br />

w he<strong>the</strong>r <strong>the</strong>y would open <strong>the</strong>m again,<br />

am ongst <strong>the</strong> ob jects that had grow n so dreadfully<br />

fam iliar. W h a t m agnificent courage<br />

w as <strong>the</strong>irs, and all with no hope o f m aterial<br />

gain, but w ith <strong>the</strong> simple desire that <strong>the</strong><br />

com m unity at large m ight be benefited by<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir exertions.<br />

On M ay 28, exactly seventeen days after<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir ascent o f <strong>the</strong> first range, <strong>the</strong> party<br />

em erged upon <strong>the</strong> sum m it o f M ount Y ork, and<br />

feasted <strong>the</strong>ir delighted eyes upon <strong>the</strong> vision<br />

o f fresh grass, and pure water, w hich <strong>the</strong>y<br />

could distinctly see in <strong>the</strong> valley beneath'<br />

<strong>the</strong>m. W ith trem endous difficulty <strong>the</strong> precipice<br />

was descended, and fo r <strong>the</strong> first time<br />

; for m any days both men and horses revelled<br />

in <strong>the</strong> good things which bountiful nature<br />

provided. The m ountains were again<br />

clim bed, and a cam p form ed near <strong>the</strong> western<br />

edge o f <strong>the</strong> cliffs. N ext day <strong>the</strong> jou rn ey


15 35<br />

l- I tU T fc -N A N T W IL L IA M L A W S O N .<br />

was resumed, and three days later <strong>the</strong> weary<br />

explorers stood at length upon <strong>the</strong> summit<br />

<strong>of</strong> that rem arkable mountain, on <strong>the</strong> banks<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> Cox River, afterw ards so appropriately<br />

named M ount Blaxland by Surveyor George<br />

W illiam Evans, tw o o<strong>the</strong>r conical peaks in<br />

<strong>the</strong> vicinity being nam ed after Blaxland's<br />

com panions.<br />

A N E W W O RLD .<br />

W hat were Blaxland's feelings as he stood<br />

upon this vantage ground and allow ed his<br />

eyes to roam over <strong>the</strong> rolling country to<br />

|<strong>the</strong> westward, which, alas! he was destined<br />

not to set foot upon. Truly, as a conqueror<br />

he m ight regard himself, and <strong>the</strong><br />

thought would naturally arisen filling him<br />

with a sense o f awe, that he and his com -<br />

|panions were <strong>the</strong> first white men who, since<br />

<strong>the</strong> Creation, were privileged to get this<br />

|glim pse o f a new and wonderful world. If<br />

<strong>the</strong> spirit o f prophecy imbued him at this<br />

time, what a glorious opportunity was his<br />

to project his vision into <strong>the</strong> years to com e<br />

and try to foretell what changes a century<br />

would behold. But history is silent on this<br />

point, and Blaxland's thoughts on this m em ­<br />

orable occasion can be naught else than conjecture.<br />

The clo<strong>the</strong>s o f <strong>the</strong> three men were torn to<br />

rags by <strong>the</strong> thorny undergrowth which <strong>the</strong>y<br />

had struggled through for so many days, <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

boots were alm ost in tatters from <strong>the</strong> rugged<br />

and stony path <strong>the</strong>y had traversed, and all<br />

werei suffering from bodily ailm ents, brought<br />

on b y exposure and insufficient food. Under<br />

<strong>the</strong>se cc-.ditions it were m adness to proceed<br />

furthc -, and believing that <strong>the</strong>y had<br />

accom plished w hat <strong>the</strong>y had desired to do,<br />

<strong>the</strong> order was reluctantly given to retrace<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir steps. N ot to B laxland was granted<br />

<strong>the</strong> privilege o f first setting foot in <strong>the</strong> P romised<br />

Land beyond <strong>the</strong> ranges. N ot to him<br />

was given <strong>the</strong> honor o f conquering <strong>the</strong> full<br />

extent o f m ountainous cou ntry; that w as reserved<br />

fo r his successor, George W illiam<br />

E vans, and B laxland could only look with<br />

longing eyes upon <strong>the</strong> great heritage that<br />

was so soon to be won. But he and his com -<br />

par»*ms had “ blazed <strong>the</strong> trail.” They had<br />

made possible <strong>the</strong> w ork o f those w ho a fterw<br />

ards turned <strong>the</strong> discovery to practical account,<br />

and to <strong>the</strong>se men <strong>the</strong> honors that fall<br />

to <strong>the</strong> pioneers belong.<br />

A no<strong>the</strong>r six days o f hardship and danger<br />

ensued, rendered som ew hat easier now by<br />

reason o f <strong>the</strong> fa ct that a pathw ay had been<br />

I formed, and on <strong>the</strong> 6th June, <strong>the</strong> peaceful w a­<br />

ters o f <strong>the</strong> Nepean, w inding like a silver ribbon<br />

through <strong>the</strong> verdant landscape, once<br />

m ore greeted <strong>the</strong>ir tired eyes. The joy fu l news<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> safe return o f <strong>the</strong> party, and o f <strong>the</strong><br />

w onderful discoveries that had been made,<br />

soon spread fa r and wide, and <strong>the</strong> general rejoicin<br />

gs were m ingled w ith hearty thanksgivings,<br />

that at last <strong>the</strong> ranges had been<br />

crossed, and <strong>the</strong> daw n o f a new era had been<br />

ushered in.<br />

M E N W E SH O U LD D E L IG H T TO H ONOR.<br />

In <strong>the</strong> light o f latter-day knowledge, we<br />

can accurately gauge <strong>the</strong> far-reach in g e f­<br />

fects that this m em orable exploit had upon<br />

<strong>the</strong> destiny o f A ustralia. W e are indirectly<br />

reaping <strong>the</strong> advan tages at <strong>the</strong> present day<br />

o f B laxland, W entw orth, and L aw son ’s enterprise,<br />

and every acre o f <strong>the</strong> lim itless west,<br />

in <strong>the</strong> possession o f thousands o f A ustralia’s<br />

sons, is a g ift at <strong>the</strong> hands o f <strong>the</strong>se brave<br />

men, w hom it should be our duty to honor.<br />

This glorious cou ntry, with all its w ealth and<br />

possibilities, w ith its m agnificent clim ate and<br />

boundless resources, was fisrt m oulded fo r<br />

our use by <strong>the</strong> sturdy and faith fu l pioneers<br />

whose sterling w orth and in tegr'ty o f purpose,<br />

and whose unselfish labors in <strong>the</strong> days<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> “ long ago,” gave us <strong>the</strong> heritage that<br />

is ours to-day. L et us see to it that we do<br />

our part in com m em orating <strong>the</strong> lives and<br />

w orks o f <strong>the</strong>se great men in a w ay that shall<br />

bring credit to ourselves and honor to <strong>the</strong> m e­<br />

m ories o f those w ho “ blazed <strong>the</strong> trail.” Surely<br />

it was o f such men as B laxland, W en t­<br />

worth, and Law son, o f George W illiam Evans,<br />

W illiam Cox. and m any o<strong>the</strong>rs that W ill<br />

O gilvie w as thinking when he w rote:—<br />

They arc sleeping in <strong>the</strong> graveyards, in <strong>the</strong>ir silent graves<br />

apart,<br />

With empty arms and eager, that would hold <strong>the</strong>m, to<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir heart,<br />

These statesmen <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> buried years, <strong>the</strong>se loyal men<br />

long doad,<br />

' Are <strong>the</strong>y turning in <strong>the</strong>ir dreaming, to <strong>the</strong> dull tramp<br />

overhead?<br />

\Yher <strong>the</strong>y pin <strong>the</strong> stars and garters, when <strong>the</strong>y write<br />

<strong>the</strong> titles rare,<br />

|The men who earned <strong>the</strong> honors, are <strong>the</strong> men who won’t<br />

be <strong>the</strong>re. ___ __________ ... J ...............


j<br />

16<br />

A QUESTION OF<br />

PRECEDENCE<br />

EXPLORERS AND THEIR STATUS.<br />

W IL L IA M C H A R L E S W E N T W O R T H .<br />

“ W h o was <strong>the</strong> acknow ledged leader <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>Blue</strong> M ountain E xpedition o f 1813?” asks Mr.<br />

Charles W illiam s. Our correspondent e'jes<br />

on to sa y :—<br />

“ One can usually tell from <strong>the</strong> order in<br />

w hich <strong>the</strong> nam es are given w ho <strong>the</strong> principal<br />

m an is in undertakings o f this kind, but<br />

<strong>the</strong> task is n ot so easy in <strong>the</strong> present instance.<br />

We seem to hear m ost about B laxland;<br />

but w hile in som e accounts o f <strong>the</strong><br />

expedition his nam e is placed first, in o<strong>the</strong>rs<br />

it is W en tw orth ’s nam e that is given first,<br />

and in o<strong>the</strong>rs again it is L aw son ’s. A s a<br />

m atter o f fact, it is W en tw orth ’s nam e that<br />

is placed forem ost in m o s t ,o f <strong>the</strong> accounts<br />

I have read, not in new spaper articles, but<br />

in books, <strong>the</strong> authors o f which, one would<br />

think, w ould be careful in a m atter o f that<br />

kind. Can you tell me definitely whe<strong>the</strong>r<br />

W entw orth w as <strong>the</strong> leader o f <strong>the</strong> expedition,<br />

and if he was, w ho cam e next in point o f<br />

im portance? It is certainly strange that<br />

<strong>the</strong>re should be so m uch confusion over this<br />

m atter.”<br />

The m atter is one about w hich <strong>the</strong>re should<br />

really be no confusion at all, not is <strong>the</strong>re<br />

any confusion in <strong>the</strong> m inds o f tnose fam iliar<br />

w ith <strong>the</strong> details o f <strong>the</strong> expedition. The point<br />

raised b y our correspondent, how ever, is an<br />

interesting one.<br />

A s fa r as <strong>the</strong> leadership o f <strong>the</strong> expedition<br />

is concerned, that honor unquestionably belonged<br />

to B laxland. It was B laxland, in<br />

fact, w ho organised <strong>the</strong> expedition, and<br />

when he invited his friends, L aw son and<br />

W entw orth, to accom pany him on <strong>the</strong> jo u r­<br />

ney he had already com pleted his plans.<br />

L ike m any o<strong>the</strong>rs, Mr. W illiam s has noted<br />

1 <strong>the</strong> carelessness shown by various writers<br />

with regard to <strong>the</strong> order in w hicn th ey have<br />

nam ed <strong>the</strong> explorers. The point m ay apj>ear<br />

a trifling one, but our correspondent's letter<br />

proves how m isleading so small a m atter<br />

m ay be. It is n ot so long a go since one o f<br />

thT! descendants o f G regory B l:ixland felt<br />

. called upon to protest publicly against <strong>the</strong><br />

! w ay in w hich <strong>the</strong> latter’s nam e ■was subordinated<br />

to those o f L aw son and W entw orth.<br />

A lthough, as already pointed out, <strong>the</strong>re is<br />

no question as to w ho w as <strong>the</strong> “ ack n ow ­<br />

ledged leader” o f <strong>the</strong> expedition, <strong>the</strong>re is<br />

considerable difference o f opinion as to who<br />

should rank a fter Blaxland. One set o f<br />

authorities tells us that <strong>the</strong> nam es, placed<br />

in <strong>the</strong> order o f <strong>the</strong>ir im portance, are B U x-<br />

land, Law son, and W entw orth, while ano<strong>the</strong>r<br />

group o f historical experts will insist that<br />

<strong>the</strong> nam es should run B laxland, WTentw orth,<br />

and Law son. The con test fo r second place<br />

is, <strong>the</strong>refore, betw een L aw son and W en t-<br />

i w orth._________ ■ ______ ________


1 7<br />

Blaxland him self, In his Journal, gives no<br />

Indication as to which o f his com panions he<br />

regarded as his righthand man, but o f <strong>the</strong><br />

tw o <strong>the</strong>re m ust have been one upon w hom<br />

he relied m ore than upon <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r. In tiie<br />

absence o f any definite inform ation on ‘ he<br />

point, one can on ly surmise what <strong>the</strong> probabilities<br />

are. The outstanding facr as far as<br />

W entw orth is concerned is that he w as a<br />

m ere youth, a lad <strong>of</strong> 19. H e was little m ore<br />

than a b oy fresh from school, and could not<br />

have had any practical knowledge o f <strong>the</strong><br />

w ork required o f him. Lieutenant Lawson,<br />

on <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r hand, was a man o f 38, and<br />

had som e experience o f exploration. H is<br />

qualifications were such that after <strong>the</strong> e x ­<br />

pedition o f 1S13 he received some im portant<br />

i <strong>of</strong>ficial appointm ents, one ^ being that as<br />

com m andant in charge o f thff <strong>Bathurst</strong> district,<br />

in succession to W illiam Cox, <strong>the</strong><br />

m aker o f <strong>the</strong> first W estern road.<br />

A m o n g <strong>the</strong> historians <strong>of</strong> Australian exploration<br />

<strong>the</strong> only one who deals w ith <strong>the</strong> question<br />

under discussion is <strong>the</strong> Rev. G eorgs<br />

Grimm, and m ost people will be inclined to<br />

think that Mr. Grimm, in <strong>the</strong> follow ing extract<br />

from his “ Australian E xplorers,”<br />

clinches <strong>the</strong> whole argument. R eferring to<br />

<strong>the</strong> three mem bers o f <strong>the</strong> expedition, ho<br />

w rites:—<br />

The forem ost o f this m em orable trio was<br />

G regory Blaxland, a native o f Kent, and<br />

born o f an old English fam ily in 1779. The<br />

second on <strong>the</strong> expedition was W illiam L aw ­<br />

son, w ho was form erly lieutenant in <strong>the</strong><br />

102nd Regim ent, but had latterly retired to<br />

“ Veteran H all,” his own country seat near<br />

Prospect. These two leaders, on whom <strong>the</strong><br />

w hole responsibility devolved, were joined<br />

b y a third person, <strong>the</strong>n wholly unknown,<br />

but w ho afterw ards made for him self a<br />

name not to be forgotten in New South<br />

W ales. This was <strong>the</strong> em bryo patriot and<br />

statesm an, W illiam Charles W entw orth.<br />

Blaxland was now in his 35th year, Lawson<br />

about <strong>the</strong> same age, but W entw orth was<br />

barely out o f his teens, and pr<strong>of</strong>essedly<br />

joined th


18<br />

tJ/ v i t ■2 £ '- 'J7a3 —<br />

4 /<br />

Centenary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>First</strong> Grossing<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong><br />

rO T H E SCHOOL, CH ILD R EN O F NEW S O U T H W ALES.<br />

ON <strong>the</strong> 28th <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> current<br />

month one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> m ost<br />

notable centenaries connected<br />

w ith <strong>the</strong> h istory <strong>of</strong><br />

New South Wales will<br />

take place a t <strong>the</strong><br />

Y ork. The celebrations, which will<br />

com m em orate th at centenary, are designed<br />

t o honor <strong>the</strong> m em ory <strong>of</strong> three<br />

<strong>of</strong> our m ost w orth y pioneers, viz.,<br />

CJregory Blaxland, W illiam Charles<br />

W entw orth, and Lieutenant W illiam<br />

Law son, who a century a go solved<br />

<strong>the</strong> problem <strong>of</strong> what lay behind <strong>the</strong><br />

G reat D ividing Range, and as <strong>the</strong> result<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir expendition threw open<br />

to cu ltiv ation and settlem ent m illions<br />

<strong>of</strong> acres <strong>of</strong> maguificent country<br />

which had lain fallow since <strong>the</strong> creation.<br />

Those, o f you who are fam iliar with<br />

som e <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> phases <strong>of</strong> A u stralia* hiito<br />

r y in <strong>the</strong> year 1813 will remember<br />

th a t a t th is period <strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>n colon y<br />

<strong>of</strong> New South Wales was em braced in<br />

a mere strip <strong>of</strong> territory , 40 miles<br />

wide, from east to w est, and barely<br />

one hundred miles in extent from<br />

north t o south. F o r upwards <strong>of</strong> 25<br />

years no fewer than nine distinct a t­<br />

tem pts were made by various exp lorers<br />

to penetrate <strong>the</strong> G reat D ividing<br />

Range, t o see what kind <strong>of</strong> country<br />

■lay beyon d, but all w ithout avail,<br />

j Each expedition returned t o <strong>the</strong>' *ettlem<br />

ent baffled and beaten, declaring<br />

|th at progress westw ards could never<br />

t be made, and th a t <strong>the</strong> colon y must<br />

fo r ever be confined w ithin <strong>the</strong> lim its<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> C ounty <strong>of</strong> Cum berland.<br />

These are stran ge w ords, viewed<br />

from ou r sta n d p oin t, but <strong>the</strong>y were<br />

believed in, and even prom inent <strong>of</strong>ficials<br />

echoed <strong>the</strong> opin ion th a t fur<strong>the</strong>r<br />

7 'a"r.rr!]es w ould be useless, and mere<br />

w aste o f tim e. These were <strong>the</strong> opin ­<br />

ions held up till <strong>the</strong> close <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

year 1812, when even such courageous<br />

and dauntless explorers as Da wee,<br />

B arralier, i)a.ss, C a le j, H ack in g, and<br />

oth ers had con centrated th eir<br />

energies in to <strong>the</strong> task <strong>of</strong> forcin g<br />

passage over <strong>the</strong> m ountains t o<br />

whole<br />

a<br />

<strong>the</strong><br />

cou n try beyond—b u t all In vain.<br />

T hen' cam e <strong>the</strong> clim ax. The great'<br />

M acquarie ruled <strong>the</strong> destinies o f <strong>the</strong><br />

you ng colon y , and he, t o o , was ae<br />

keen as his predecessors in solvin g<br />

i<br />

<strong>the</strong> problem . H e u ndertook one o r


1 9<br />

else t o look for it but beyond<br />

those<br />

tantalisin g height* which had so<br />

lon g defied <strong>the</strong> efforts o f men to surm<br />

ount <strong>the</strong>m ?<br />

I t this crisis appeared <strong>the</strong> man<br />

who was eventually t o be regarded<br />

as <strong>the</strong> saviour <strong>of</strong> his cou ntry—G regory<br />

B laxland. He had conceived a<br />

scheme which he was anxious to put<br />

in to , practice, and that was to follow<br />

J<strong>the</strong> ridge, which he knew m ust ex--<br />

Iist, keeping <strong>the</strong> eastern and western<br />

1stream s on his right and left, and<br />

neTer crossing <strong>the</strong>m if it could be<br />

avoided. H e confided his idea to<br />

IG overn or M acquarie, w ho prom ised<br />

|every assistance, and having enlisted<br />

<strong>the</strong> sym p ath y o f tw o friends, W illiam<br />

Charles W entworth and Lieutenant<br />

W illiam L aw son, who consented t o<br />

accom pany him , he made his preparation<br />

s for departure. On <strong>the</strong> 11th<br />

M ay, 1813, <strong>the</strong> three friends, in com ­<br />

pany w ith four men servants, horses<br />

and d og s, set out from B la ila n d ’s<br />

farm a t S ou th Creek, and a t 4<br />

o ’clock <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> same d ay crossed <strong>the</strong><br />

Nepean a t Em u Island, and by sundown<br />

<strong>the</strong> p a rty made <strong>the</strong>ir first cam p<br />

a t th e fo o t o f <strong>the</strong> first range.<br />

N ext m orning <strong>the</strong> real business <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> undertaking began, and <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

troubles were n ot lon g in com ing.<br />

Deep gullies and gloomy recesses con ­<br />

fronted <strong>the</strong>m on every hand. Thick<br />

brushwood and ston y ground im peded<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir progress, and <strong>the</strong> aw ful s o l­<br />

itude <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>se regions weighed down<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir spirits and depressed <strong>the</strong>m.<br />

Lurking savages dogged <strong>the</strong>ir fo o t­<br />

steps night and day, and m ore than<br />

on® encounter with venom ous reptiles<br />

is recorded. : S till <strong>the</strong>y struggled<br />

painfully onward, never for a m om ­<br />

ent losing heart, and though som e­<br />

times <strong>the</strong>ir daily progress was bareft/<br />

/"tro o f r t i r e &<br />

a - d a y art lAe.<br />

a tr e r tx ^ e . / A e.y ct-0 ra t* .t£ < ) 'f'7 o rrZ y / l/i/ -<br />

J ’u .reJ y A »r r * r * C i f f o r f<br />

slow ly but p w o l y to w a rd s t h w — r*f*-<br />

ty a eeu yle -o f roiloo th ey—n dfan oed<br />

g o a l. F o r 21 days <strong>the</strong> un- j<br />

equal co n test w ent on, and a t n ightfall,<br />

when <strong>the</strong>y m ade <strong>the</strong>ir csm p in<br />

<strong>the</strong> m idst <strong>of</strong> som e g lo o m y fore st, or<br />

on <strong>the</strong> brink o f som e trem en dou s.raviDo,<br />

none knew, as <strong>the</strong>y closed <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

eyes in <strong>the</strong> sleep th a t was so much<br />

|needed, whe<strong>the</strong>r <strong>the</strong>y w ould open j<br />

\<strong>the</strong>m again a m on gst <strong>the</strong> ob je cts th a t j<br />

Ihad g row n so dreadfully fam ilia r W hat j<br />

I cou rage and heroism are here<br />

dis- '<br />

played, and all fo r n o hope o f reward I<br />

| but o f <strong>the</strong> sim p le sense <strong>of</strong> doing I<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir duty t o th eir cou n try and<br />

brin ging aid t o <strong>the</strong>ir fellow men.<br />

Surely it is ou r privilege t o h onor<br />

<strong>the</strong>se brave men fo r <strong>the</strong>ir endurance<br />

and th eir splendid achievem ents<br />

th ose far-<strong>of</strong>f days.<br />

On M ay 28th, cx a ctly seventeen<br />

days after th eir ascent o f <strong>the</strong>' first<br />

ran ge, <strong>the</strong> p a rty em erged upon tho<br />

sum m it o f M ount Y ork ,<br />

in<br />

and feasted<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir delighted eyes upon <strong>the</strong> vision<br />

<strong>of</strong> fresh grass and pure w ater, which<br />

th ey could d istin c tly see in <strong>the</strong> v a l­<br />

ley beneath <strong>the</strong>m . W ith trem endous<br />

: difficulty <strong>the</strong> precipice was descended,<br />

and for tho first tim e fo r m any days<br />

b oth men and horses revelled in <strong>the</strong><br />

g o o d things w hich bountiful nature<br />

p rovided . The m ountain w as again<br />

clim bed, and a cam p form ed near <strong>the</strong><br />

w estern edge o f <strong>the</strong> cliffs. N ext day<br />

<strong>the</strong> journey w as resum ed and three<br />

days la ter <strong>the</strong> w eary exp lorers s to o d<br />

a t length upon <strong>the</strong> sum m it <strong>of</strong> th at<br />

rem arkable m ou n tain on <strong>the</strong> banks <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> C ox R iver, afterw ards a p p ropriately<br />

named M ount B laxland by<br />

S u rveyor G eorge W illiam Evans,<br />

w hilst tw o oth er con ica l peaks in <strong>the</strong><br />

| v icin ity received <strong>the</strong> names <strong>of</strong> Went-<br />

j w o rth ’s and L a w son s S u garloa vcs rej<br />

sp e ctirrly . With cloth es to r n t o plec-<br />

I es by <strong>the</strong> sharp rock s w ith b o o ts<br />

in ta tte rs from <strong>the</strong> rugged and ston y<br />

path <strong>the</strong>y had traversed, and a ll<br />

suffering from ailm ent* b roa g h t on by


exposure and insufficient food, B la x­<br />

land realised that this m ust be his<br />

far<strong>the</strong>st poin t. N ot t o him was<br />

granted <strong>the</strong> privilege o f first setting<br />

fo o t on tho rollin g cou ntry to <strong>the</strong><br />

westw ard ; tttat was reserved for his<br />

successor, E vans, and he could only<br />

look with lo n g iD g eyes upon <strong>the</strong> j<br />

heritage th a t was so soon t o be w on.<br />

R eluctantly <strong>the</strong> order was given to<br />

retrace <strong>the</strong>ir steps, and after anoth ­<br />

er six days o f h ardship, rendered<br />

now som ew hat easier by reason <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> fact th a t a “ blazed tra ck ” a w a ited<br />

<strong>the</strong>m , <strong>the</strong>y once m ore reached <strong>the</strong><br />

banks <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Nepean, and <strong>the</strong> joyful<br />

news <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> great discovery s o o n ,<br />

spread far and w ide.'<br />

W ithin a few weeks G eorge W illiam<br />

Evans, ano<strong>the</strong>r w orth y pioneer, fol-<br />

I low ed In tb6 first exp lorers’ fo o t-<br />

! steps, and succeeded in penetrating<br />

over 90 m iles beyond B laxlan d 's fur<strong>the</strong>st<br />

poin t. H e returned, filled with<br />

delighted praise <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> beauty and<br />

extent o f <strong>the</strong> cou ntry, and M acquarie,<br />

now th at his dearest wishes were<br />

accom plished, lo st no tim e in setting |<br />

a b ou t <strong>the</strong> con stru ction <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> great<br />

road which was to open up <strong>the</strong> rich<br />

cou ntry in <strong>the</strong> west, and carry upon<br />

Its surface thousands o f eager colon ­<br />

ists anxious t o acquire <strong>the</strong>ir share <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> new territory . W illiam Cox was<br />

<strong>the</strong> fourth a cto r in <strong>the</strong> dram a o f <strong>the</strong><br />

i ''C on q u est o f <strong>the</strong> M ou ntain?,” and<br />

] righ t welt did he perform his part.<br />

I In <strong>the</strong> short space <strong>of</strong> six m onth* a<br />

fine road, w ith bridges, culverts, cmj<br />

bankmentu, and all <strong>the</strong> details which<br />

j go t o make up an im p ortan t underi<br />

takin g <strong>of</strong> this nature, extending for<br />

! a distance o f upwards o f 100 miles,<br />

j<br />

j was com pleted and ready for traffic,<br />

and on <strong>the</strong> 25th A pril, 1815, Governi<br />

o r M acquarie, with a distinguished<br />

com pany <strong>of</strong> gentlem en, get ou t on his<br />

journey over <strong>the</strong> new rea d , and <strong>of</strong>fi-<br />

|d a ily opened fo r all tim e <strong>the</strong> great<br />

trade rou te t o <strong>the</strong> West.<br />

On <strong>the</strong> 28th May <strong>of</strong> th is year <strong>the</strong><br />

centenary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> first crossin g o f <strong>the</strong><br />

m ountains w ill be celebrated a t M ount<br />

Y ork , th is being th e date, a century<br />

a g o , when G reg ory B laxland and<br />

p a rty first set fo o t on th is rugged<br />

m ou n tain, and cam ped som ewhere<br />

near where <strong>the</strong> obelisk stands t o ­<br />

day. I t is a gran d privilege th a t we<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> present gen eration are spared<br />

to w itness and take p a rt In <strong>the</strong> com ­<br />

m em oration <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> greatest event in<br />

A ustralian h istory . N ot on ly can we<br />

rejoice th a t th e prolific w estern country<br />

w as so opportu n ely added to our<br />

te r rito ry , w ith a ll th a t it stands<br />

for. in wealth and influence, but<br />

a b ove a ll, we are h onorin g <strong>the</strong> m em ­<br />

ory o f <strong>the</strong> pioneers w ho have helped<br />

t o m ake our cou n try w hat it is t o ­<br />

day. We review <strong>the</strong>ir lives and<br />

w orks, p raisin g <strong>the</strong>m for <strong>the</strong>ir Indom<br />

ita b le courage and perseverance,<br />

fo r th eir sterlin g w orth and in tegrity<br />

and fo r <strong>the</strong> n oble sp irit th a t possessed<br />

<strong>the</strong>m in <strong>the</strong>ir w illingness t o risk<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir lives s o th a t g o o d t o t h e 'c o m ­<br />

m unity m ight result. T heir exam ple<br />

should stir even <strong>the</strong> least o f us t o renewed<br />

efforts fo r our beloved land,<br />

and a loyal-h ea rted endeavour to<br />

tr y , like <strong>the</strong> heroes <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> past, to<br />

leave <strong>the</strong> w orld “ a little b etter than<br />

we found i t .” Surely i t was <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ee<br />

very men th at W ill O gilvic, one <strong>of</strong> our<br />

m ost gifted poet*, was thinking when<br />

he w rote :—<br />

"T h e y are sleeping in <strong>the</strong> graveyards,<br />

in <strong>the</strong>ir silen t graves a p a rt.<br />

With em pty arm s, and eager, th a t<br />

w ould h old <strong>the</strong>m t o <strong>the</strong>ir heart,<br />

These statesm en o f <strong>the</strong> buried years,<br />

<strong>the</strong>se lo y a l men lon g dead,<br />

Are <strong>the</strong>y turning in <strong>the</strong>ir dream ing,<br />

t o <strong>the</strong> dull tram p overhead ?<br />

When <strong>the</strong>y pin <strong>the</strong> sta rs and garters,<br />

when <strong>the</strong>y w rite <strong>the</strong> title s rare,<br />

The men who earned <strong>the</strong> h onors are<br />

<strong>the</strong> men w ho w on ’t be th ere.”<br />

** • * «* ♦* *•<br />

S ch olars ! T he destinies <strong>of</strong> th is<br />

i g loriou s cou n try are in you r hands.


It rests with you w hat <strong>the</strong> future<br />

years w ill bring, and you alone have<br />

<strong>the</strong> m aking o r <strong>the</strong> m arring <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>m .<br />

May <strong>the</strong> lives o f <strong>the</strong>se heroic men.<br />

and <strong>the</strong> sto ry <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir e x p loits,<br />

whose noble work you w ill sh ortly<br />

join in com m em oratin g, give you inspiration<br />

for <strong>the</strong> years t o com e, and<br />

so aid you in reaching th a t standard<br />

<strong>of</strong> perfection which w ill com bine in<br />

m aking you good citizen* and faith ­<br />

ful and loyal subjects o f his G racious<br />

M sjesty <strong>the</strong> K in g.<br />

F R A N K W A L K E R ,<br />

President Australian H isto rica l<br />

fiyuney. May 8, 1913. S ocie ty .<br />

I<br />

I<br />

BLUE MOUNTAIN PIONEERS<br />

-------- 'BY H . C. K E N D A L L .—<br />

The dauntless three ! for tw enty days and nights<br />

These heroes battled w ith <strong>the</strong> haughty heights ;<br />

F or tw enty spaces <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Btars and sun<br />

These R om ans kept <strong>the</strong>ir harness buckled on ;<br />

By gaping gorges, and by cliffs austere,<br />

These fa<strong>the</strong>rs struggled in <strong>the</strong> great old yea r ;<br />

Their feet <strong>the</strong>y set on strange bills scarred by fire,<br />

Their stron g arm s forced a path through brake and b ria r ;<br />

They fough t with Nature till <strong>the</strong>y rcached <strong>the</strong> throne<br />

Where m orning glittered on <strong>the</strong> great U nknown !<br />

There, in a tim e with praise and prayer suprem e,<br />

Paused B laxland, Law son, W entw orth, in a dream ;<br />

There, w here <strong>the</strong> silver a rrow s <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> day<br />

Hmote elope and spire, <strong>the</strong>y halted on <strong>the</strong>ir w ay.<br />

Behind <strong>the</strong>m were <strong>the</strong> conquered hills— <strong>the</strong>y faced<br />

The vast green West, with gla d , strange beantv graced ;<br />

And every tone o f every cav« and tree<br />

Was as a voice <strong>of</strong> splendid prophecy.


22<br />

BLAXLAND,<br />

WENTWORTH<br />

AND<br />

LAWSON.<br />

HE ACHIEVEMENT OF A HUNDRED<br />

YEARS<br />

O N E H U N D R E D Y E A R S AGO.<br />

M en o f n erv e and iron sinew ,<br />

B red o f E n g la n d ’s b lo o d and b on e;<br />

W e ll ye fa ced <strong>the</strong> desert fastness,<br />

P aths o f w ild u n b rok en stone.<br />

W e, to -d a y , y o u r n am es w ou ld h on ou r,<br />

A n d y o u r n o b le d eed s a ccla im ;<br />

E n g la n d ’s m oth ers b red and b ore ye<br />

F o r th e h o n o u r o f h e r nam e.<br />

M en o f n erve and iron sinew ,<br />

B red o f E n g la n d ’s b lo o d and b o n e ;<br />

Y e a re w ith us still, and livin g<br />

In <strong>the</strong> h eart w hich d ares alone.<br />

W e , a N a tion ’s praise w ou ld give ye<br />

(M en o f G od and N a tu re’s g r a c e ),<br />

F o r th e sp irit o f o u r F a th ers<br />

A n d th e h o n o u r o f o u r race.<br />

— C lara W eb b er.<br />

O ld Sydney basked lazily in <strong>the</strong> sun<br />

in th e early part o f th e year 1813. The<br />

p la cid w aters o f th e h arbou r, as g rea t a<br />

haven <strong>the</strong>n as it is to -d a y , ca rried upon<br />

its b ro a d b o som on ly a fe w sm all ships<br />

w h ich it ro ck e d g en tly as th ou gh b ro o d ­<br />

in g in p rophe tic vision u p on th e grow th<br />

o f th e baby flo tilla it n ursed, in to - <strong>the</strong><br />

m igh ty m erca n tile n avy o f o u r ow n tim e.<br />

B u ilt upon th e plan o f an old w orld tow n ,<br />

m adg ru d er by <strong>the</strong> la ck o f sk illed artizans<br />

and <strong>the</strong> cru d en ess o f e a rly C olon ial m ater<br />

AGO.<br />

ia l, a n cien t S yd n ey stre tch e d i t s 1 quain t<br />

a n d n a rrow streets fr o m th e sparK ling<br />

w a ters o f th e h a r b o u r to th e c lo s e ly env<br />

ir o n in g sh a d es o f th e w o o d la n d s. H ere<br />

an d th ere th e lo n g w h ite line o f c o iw ic t<br />

m ade roa d s sp re a d th e ir slen d er ten ta cle s<br />

to th e g rea t w est, le a d in g to th e h om e­<br />

steads o f th e e a r lie r settlers. T h e g re g -<br />

a rio u sn css o f m an h ad m ade its e lf felt<br />

a m o n g s t th ese p io n e e rs a n d a v illa g e had<br />

sp ru n g in to ox ista n ce , o n ly fo u rte e n m iles<br />

in la n d . T h is w as P a rra m a tta , n ow <strong>the</strong><br />

se co n d tow n in th e State. F u r th e r a field<br />

th e in cessa n t a d v a n ce o f th e d a rin g A n g lo<br />

S axon co n tin u e d to w a rd s th e h azy blue o l<br />

th e h ills on th e w estern h orizon a n d <strong>the</strong><br />

fla ts w ere cle a re d and cu ltiv a te d and in<br />

th e m ea d ow la n d s th e im p o rte d ca ttle<br />

b ro w se d to fa tn ess. S lo w ly b u t su rely<br />

thp. b lu e o f th e h ills d eep en ed as m en<br />

re cla im e d th e v irg in w ild s to th e brin k<br />

o f th e N epean . B e y o n d , w h ere th e sun<br />

d ip p ed b eh in d th e r o llin g h e ig h ts at<br />

ev e n in g , all w a s m y stery . A t lo n g in tervals,<br />

sm all p a rtie s o f w a y w o rn m en w ou ld<br />

e m e r g e fr o m th e ra v in es in th e h illsid<br />

es, a n d te ll o f jo u r n e y s in to th e ro ck y<br />

fastn esses w h e re solitu d e and m a je sty sat<br />

h an d in h a n l ; te ll o f days o f a w esom e<br />

s o jo u r n a m id st u n sca le a b le c liffs a n d im ­<br />

p e n e tra b le fo r e s ts ; te ll o f p r iv a tio n and<br />

d a n g ers as ro m a n tic as th o se e n co u n te r­<br />

ed in th e jo u r n e y s o f C ortez o r P iz a rro.<br />

T h e sp irit o f a d v e n tu re u rg ed m en on,


an d every su cceed in g fa ilu re added zest<br />

to <strong>the</strong> c o n flic t betw een m an k ind and <strong>the</strong><br />

M ou ntains. A n d so, fo r o v e r a sco r e o f<br />

y ea rs, w h ile this u n eq u a l b a ttle w as bein<br />

g silen tly w aged, <strong>the</strong> little strip o f<br />

la n d that la y betw ixt th e P a cific and th e<br />

M ou n tain b a rrier w as p eop led , cu ltiv ated<br />

and sto ck e d and p rog ress seem ed to sleep.<br />

GREGORY BLAXLAND.<br />

...... '■ "" 'U ib b s a a H K K n n<br />

G overn or M acquarie knew th at leth a rg y<br />

o f this so rt was fatal. H is desire was<br />

to lift his C olon y ou t o f <strong>the</strong> dream y langu<br />

or that pervaded <strong>the</strong> S ou<strong>the</strong>rn seas and<br />

fo u n d a v irile o ffs h o o t o f th e stron gest<br />

colo n izin g fo r c e <strong>the</strong> w orld h as ever k n ow n<br />

H e knew th a t <strong>the</strong> b u ild in g o f great cities<br />

w as not to be h oped fo r in a la n d -lock ed<br />

con tin en t and that co m m e rce lim ited to<br />

I <strong>the</strong> p roduct o f fo u r th ou san d square m iles<br />

j o f a gricu ltu ra l land w ou ld never th ron g<br />

|<strong>the</strong> fin est p ort in <strong>the</strong> S ou<strong>the</strong>rn H em isph<br />

ere w ith m erchantm en. T h e d oin gs o f<br />

D aw es ( 1 7 8 9 ) , P aterson ( 1 7 9 3 ), H osk in g<br />

( 1 7 9 4 ) , B ass (1 7 9 6 ), W ilso n ( 1 7 9 8 ), B ar j<br />

i<br />

ra llie r (1 8 0 2 ) a n d " C ayley ( 1 8 0 4 ) , w ere<br />

w a tch e d w ith th e d eep est in terest. H ope<br />

refu sed to d ie e v en w hen , o n e b y one,<br />

th ese galla n t m en retu rn ed to add a n o th ­<br />

e r fa ilu r e to th e list. T h e fa in t-h e a rte d<br />

p ron o u n ce d th e con q u est o f <strong>the</strong> ro ck y<br />

b a rrie r as im p o ssib le . It w as fo o lis h ­<br />

n ess akin to m adness, th is s triv in g to<br />

ureak th rou g h an o b sta cle erected b y <strong>the</strong><br />

A lm ig h ty to se t a lim it to m a n ’s a m b ition .<br />

B u t h ow m any th in g s are p r o n o u n ce d im ­<br />

p o ssib le u n til th ey h ave been a cco m ­<br />

p lish e d ? G od d oes n o t p u t fe tte rs upon<br />

a m b itio n , n o r say to m an, “ th us far<br />

s b a lt th ou g o , and n o fu r th e r .” A m b ition<br />

is th e P rom eth ea n fir e , th e D ivin e sp a rk ,<br />

w h ich w arm s a n d illu m in a tes <strong>the</strong> sou ls<br />

o f m en , and g iv e s co u ra g e to en d ea vou rs,<br />

and stren gth to s a crifice , w h ich sets <strong>the</strong><br />

Jfe e t o f ea rn est m en firm ly on th e p in ­<br />

n a cles o f <strong>the</strong> w o rld , sh ield s th em in <strong>the</strong><br />

a byss and d isco v e rs to th eir fa ith fu l eyes<br />

<strong>the</strong> fro z e n se cre ts o f <strong>the</strong> p oles. W ith<br />

<strong>the</strong> y ea r 1813 ca m e d isaster to th e C olon<br />

ists. D ro u g h t in its sev erest fo r m fell<br />

u p on <strong>the</strong>m . S tock d ied h elp less, t h e r e 1<br />

w as n o ou tle t— n o re lie f cou n try . A f - '<br />

flu e n c e tu rn ed to in d ig e n ce and <strong>the</strong><br />

w o r k o f y ea rs seem ed fa te d to d e stru c­<br />

tion . The h u n g ry eyes o f h ard y m en<br />

tu rn ed to th e H ills. W as th ere n o g a te- 1<br />

w a y ? N o passa ge to fresh fie ld s and<br />

pastu res n ew ? A m orta l n eed w as u pon<br />

th em . A n d lo ! fr o m <strong>the</strong> m id st o f d ire j<br />

n ecessity ca m e su ccou r, and H e w h o f i r s t 1<br />

let in th e d a y lig h t u pon th e d a rk n ess o f<br />

j this earth e lu cid a te d <strong>the</strong> th in gs w hich<br />

|w ere o f use to h u m an ity b y <strong>the</strong> a g e n cy<br />

o f H is servan ts. G regory B la x la n d h ad<br />

j a fa r m at S ou th C reek , n ear W in d sor.<br />

H e w a s a q u ie t m an , b u t u n d e r his quiet<br />

e x te rio r th ere w as th e in d om ita b le c o u r ­<br />

age a n d <strong>the</strong> re s o lu te p u rp o se o f <strong>the</strong> l rue<br />

e x p lo re r. H e h ad gain ed th e co n fid e n ce<br />

o f G ov ern or M a cq u a rie, a m an o f s tro n g ­<br />

ly en te rp risin g n a tu re w h o, in 1 8 1 0 , attem<br />

p ted to p e n e tra te th e M ou n tain ra n ge<br />

by th e W a rra n g a m b a river. T h is exp<br />

e d itio n fa ile d , as a ls o did a secon d attem<br />

p t m ade b y B la x la n d , w h o , th is tim e,<br />

essayed to rea ch th e h ig h la n d , w h ich app<br />

ea red to run w estw a rd b etw een th e W a r ­<br />

ra n g a m b a a n d G rose rivers. On th is<br />

o cca sio n , th e a b o rig in a l servants fa ile d<br />

him , and he re s o lv e d n ot to d ep en d on<br />

<strong>the</strong> n atives in h is n ext tria l. H e w as<br />

ce rta in th e u n d e r ta k in g cou ld be ca rrie d<br />

o u t s u cc e ssfu lly , d esp ite a ll th e p rev iou s<br />

fa ilu re s. W ith th e con sen t o f <strong>the</strong> G ove<br />

rn o r, w ho a p p ro v e d o f h is plan s to<br />

reach th e m ain ta b lela n d a n d to k e e p to<br />

<strong>the</strong> sou th o f th e s o u rc e o f a ll tr ib u ta r y J<br />

strea m s ru n n in g in a n o rth e rly d ir e ctio n 1<br />

to th e G rose riv e r, h e again set o u t on j<br />

T u esd a y , M ay 1 1 th , 1 813, a c co m p a n ie d !


W IL L IA M C H A R L E S W E N T W O R T H .<br />

by L ieu ten a n t L aw son and W illia m C h arles<br />

W e n tw o rth , fo u r servan ts and fo u r pack<br />

h orses. E m u F ord w as crossed and th e<br />

dev oted p a rty cam p ed in <strong>the</strong> sh adow o f<br />

<strong>the</strong> earth gian ts, w h ich fo r th ou sa n d s o f<br />

years had s to o d gu ard o v er a C on tin en t<br />

and fo r a quarter o f a cen tu ry h ad b a ffled<br />

th e attem p ts o f b ra v e m en to w rest i<br />

th eir secret fro m th em , but w hich n ow j<br />

w ere fated to relin q u ish th e k ey o f <strong>the</strong><br />

g o ld e n w est ere <strong>the</strong>. w axin g and w anin g<br />

o f a n oth er m oon . T h e deta iled h istory<br />

o f th e p orten teou s tw en ty days that<br />

lapsed fr o m <strong>the</strong> strik in g o f th e cam p at<br />

<strong>the</strong> fo o t o f M ountains to th e m om en t<br />

w hen , w ith ey es d im m ed by g ra te fu l tears<br />

<strong>the</strong> v a lia n t tr io gazed fr o m th e n oble pin ­<br />

n a cle o f M ou n t Y o r k in to th e W estern<br />

va le is w ell know n. T h e rou te ch osen j<br />

w as a co n tin u ou s rid g e w in d in g a b ou t<br />

in g rea t ben d s, but b ea rin g a w estern ten ­<br />

den cy. On ei<strong>the</strong>r h an d w ere p recip itou s<br />

c liffs fa llin g sheer in to <strong>the</strong> valleys. T h e<br />

p e cu lia r r id g e was co v e re d w ith dense<br />

scru b w h ich had to be hew n th rou g h .<br />

; A ll a ttem p ts to e v a d e its m assed v e g e ­<br />

ta tion e n d ed in fa ilu re , th e party b ein g<br />

b ro u g h t to a halt o n th e b rin k o f vertic<br />

a l ch asm s h undreds o f fe e t deep. H orse<br />

fe e d g o t sca rcer w ith each d a y ’s travel.<br />

On <strong>the</strong> fir s t Sunday, <strong>the</strong> party rested ,<br />

and it w as <strong>the</strong>n th a t th e m a rv ellou s solitu<br />

d e b egan to h ave p o w e rfu l e ffe ct, b lc x -<br />

j la n d ’s jo u r n a l n aiv ely sta tes: “ T h e leis-<br />

: u re a ffo r d e d opportu n ity fo r th e m en 10<br />

; ru m in ate u p on th e d a n g er to an extent<br />

|th at at on e tim e m ade fu r t h e r p r o g re ss<br />

j d o u b tfu l.” O f th is p o r tio n o f th e M ou n t-<br />

j ains, H en ry H a c k in g (e x -q u a rte r m a ster<br />

j H .M .S. S iriu s) h a d w ritte n 19 y e a rs bej<br />

fo r e : “ W e saw b u t on e n a tiv e in th is deso<br />

la te re g io n , a n d he fle d a f o u r ap-<br />

! p r o a c h .” G o v e rn o r K in g , co m m e n tin g up<br />

I on G e o rg e C a le y ’s exp e d itio n o f .1804,<br />

w h ich w as u p o n th e rig h t tr a c k , but<br />

o n ly rea ch ed as fa r as L in d e n , says:<br />

“ A s resp ects t b » e x ten sion o f a g ricu ltu re<br />

— th a t id e a m u st b e g iv en up. T h e r o ck s<br />

a re b a rre n and fo r b id d in g , stra n g e to m en<br />

a n im a ls and b ir d s .” T h e re w as a h u m orist<br />

in O aley’s p a rty w h o , u p o n seein g tw o<br />

v e ry s o lita ry lo o k in g crow;*, said, “ The<br />

p o o r b ird s h av e lo s t th e ir w a y .” B la x-<br />

la n d ’s p a rty a d v a n ce d at th e ra te o f a<br />

m ile and a h a lf o n so m e days. On th e sev<br />

en th day ou t, th e h o rse s w e re b ro u g h t alo<br />

n g a cle a re d tr a c k a little o v e r six<br />

m iles, ca rry in g a n a d d itio n a l b u rd en o f<br />

g ra ss fo r th eir o w n fo o d . W ater had<br />

to b e lifte d fr o m a depth o f 600 feet. On<br />

th e e ig h th d a y th e rid g e n a rro w e d to i<br />

a b o u t 60 fee.t w id e, and p r o g re s s w as o b - 1<br />

stru cte d by a p e r p e n d icu la r r o ck a b o u t<br />

30 fe e t h igh. B y r e m o v in g som-3 la rg e<br />

lo o s e portion/?, a p a ssa ge w as e ffe cte d .<br />

T h is sp ot is n o w k n ow n as L in d en . T n o<br />

n ext d a y ’ s p r o g r e s s p u t th e p a rty to <strong>the</strong><br />

“ fu rth e s t w e s t” p o in t e v e r reach ed hy<br />

w h ite m an. T h e ten th d a y ’ s jo u r n e y saw<br />

th e ca m p p itch e d m id w a y b e t w e e i ila ;:e l-<br />

b r o o k a n d L a w son . F o u r m iles w a s acco<br />

m p lish e d o n th e fo llo w in g d ay, May<br />

2 1st, w hen th e e x p e d itio n w as on <strong>the</strong><br />

spot n o w o c c u p ie d by W e n tw o rth F a lis.<br />

It w as h ere th a t th e p a rty w e re in d a n g er<br />

o f an a tta ck b y th e b la ck s. On th e 2 2nd<br />

o f M a y ’ th ey c o v e r e d 8 % m iles and ret.ched<br />

a p o in t b e tw e e n L eu ra and K a ty om b a ,<br />

o v e r lo o k in g K a n im b la V a lley. A n attem<br />

p t w as m ade to d escen d , but w ith no<br />

su ccess. T h e y n ow to o k a m ore n o rth ­<br />

e rly co u rse, a n d it is p r o b a b le th a t th e<br />

o ld tr e e , b etw een K a to o m b a and M ed low<br />

B a th , w as m a rk e d on th e 2 3 rd o f M ay.<br />

T h e site o f B la ck h e a th w as passed on<br />

th e 2 7 th . N e x t d a y , as th e sun w as<br />

settin g , <strong>the</strong> n o w w ea ry and ra g g e d baud<br />

h alted o n th e e d g e o f a p recip ice . B e­<br />

lo w th em , in th e sla n tin g g o ld e n ra y s lay<br />

a cres o f w e ll-g ra s s e d land. N ot a ctu a lly !<br />

<strong>the</strong>. p la in s o f th e in te rio r, b u t th e th resh ­<br />

o ld o f th at m ig h ty re g io n w h ich has<br />

p o u re d its w e a lth a lo n g th e b la zed tra ck<br />

fo r fiv e sco re y e a rs in e v e r in cre a sin g<br />

strea m s. A t th a t m om en t. N ew S ou th<br />

W a le s cea sed to b e a m ere settlem en t, ft<br />

b e ca m e on e o f <strong>the</strong>. g ra n d est S tates in th e<br />

m ost firm ly fo u n d e d E m p ire th e w o rld l>a ■<br />

seen. T h is ffict w as realized by G o v ern or<br />

I M acqu arie w ith a d m ira b le a la crity . T h e


2 5<br />

[ n o t ca rry much, g rea te r s ig n ific a n ce tlia r<br />

|“ p r o v id in g p a stu ra g e to th e fine: flo ck s<br />

i o f m erin o s h e e p ,” b u t to th e m en o f <strong>the</strong><br />

p rese n t d a y , w ho h av e th e a d v a n ta g e o f<br />

ta k in g a re tro s p e ctiv e v ie w , th e a ccom ­<br />

p lish m e n t o f th e c r o s s in g h as a trem e n d ­<br />

o u s p u rp o rt. S u rely it is p a rd o n a b le fo r<br />

us t o ta k e p r id e in aucli a ch ievem en ts<br />

b y o u r co m p a trio ts. B rita in has reared<br />

sp len d id son s and n on e m ore w orth y o f<br />

h o n o r than th ese th ree—<br />

B L A X L A N D , W E N T W O R T H & L A W S O N .<br />

T H E B L U E M O U N T A IN S — 1 8 1 3 -1 9 1 3 .<br />

1813.<br />

WILLIAM LAWSON.<br />

n ew s o f th e a ch ievem en t no soon er rea ch ­<br />

ed h im th an he set in m otion a ll th e<br />

, G overn m en ta l m ach in ery at his disposal.<br />

M r. G eorge VV. E vans, on e o f th e a s s is t -'<br />

. ant land su rv eyors, w as in stru cted to fo l-<br />

i lo w th e tra il o f th e P io n e e r party and to<br />

i ascertain th e gen eral p rop erties o f <strong>the</strong><br />

j soil to th e w estw ard o f th e M ountains.<br />

A tten d ed b y fir e m en , E van s retrod <strong>the</strong><br />

M ountain pass and, a fte r a seven w eek s’<br />

trip , retu rn ed to rep o rt a jo u rn e y o f 150<br />

m iles in la n d , in w h ich h e h ad fo u n d " an<br />

exten sion o f tilla ge and pasture land su f­<br />

ficie n t fo r a cen tu ry to c o m e ." H e p’.s o<br />

rep o rte d a riv er w h ich G overn or M acq<br />

u a rie, in a desp atch , said, “ w as su p p osed<br />

to em p ty itself in to th e o cea n on th e !<br />

w estern sid e o f N.S. W a les at a d istance<br />

o f fr o m tw o to th ree h u n d red m iles fro m<br />

th « term in a tion o f th e tow n . T his<br />

w ou ld m ean that th e w estern coa st o f i<br />

A u stra lia w as su p p osed at th at tim e to |<br />

be a h u n d red m iles th is sid e o f C on d oblin<br />

R ut. as lim ited as w as <strong>the</strong> estim ate « f<br />

M acqu arie, <strong>the</strong> stream o f h um an ity set<br />

tow a rd s th e new la n d s; flo ck s and h erds<br />

w e re soon fa tten in g u p on <strong>the</strong> n u tritiou s<br />

; grasses, a n d year by year, th rou g h <strong>the</strong><br />

! M ou ntain pass, <strong>the</strong> w ains w ent forth<br />

w ith th e m erch a n d ise fr o m o th er lands,<br />

and retu rn ed to tile sea laden w ith i<br />

' fle e ce s. T h e cra m p in g fetters o f th e |<br />

H ills h ad b een b rok en . F rom an a fe a o f<br />

4000 sq u a re m iles, N ew South W ales had<br />

: spread in a n .om en t to g rea ter diir.enj<br />

sion s than m any o f <strong>the</strong> E u rop ea n K in g- •<br />

|dom s. T o <strong>the</strong> sim p le m ind o f B iax-<br />

| land, th e a ch ievem en t o f cro ssin g did<br />

T h e ra n g es r o s e lik e ra m p a rts in <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

w a y ;<br />

P r o te c tin g fr o m th e ir a rd en t eyes, <strong>the</strong><br />

sigh t<br />

O f secrets h id d e n in a co u n try , g re y<br />

W ith im m e m o ria l a g e s o f th e n igh t.<br />

L o n g , h ad th o se m ou n ta in s tem pted<br />

F a n c y ’s w in gs,<br />

Y e t sn apped th e p a th s o f m a n y darin g<br />

feet.<br />

B u t w h en th e w a rm b lo o d o f th e B ritish<br />

sin g s<br />

In V e n tu re ’ s p a ssion — w h at w ith sta n d s<br />

its h e a t?<br />

E v e r, th e fe w —<br />

T h e fie r y fe w , it is, w h o d riv e<br />

T h e ir fla s h in g so u ls in to th e n earer<br />

N ig h t<br />

A n d w ith th e e v il d a rk n ess striv e ,<br />

T h a t ro u n d th e ir b r o th e r s ’ fe e t <strong>the</strong>re<br />

m a y b e lig h t.<br />

E v e r, th e fe w !<br />

F r o m ten d e r E n g lish la n e and la w n ,<br />

F r o m la n d o l tra n q u il b rea th ,<br />

T h ey cam e to to il w h ere ch a sm s yaw n<br />

W ith r o c k y ja w s o f death.<br />

T h e m o u n ta in th ic k e t’s a rm s w ere w id e,<br />

T h e m ou n ta in g o rg e w as d e e p ;<br />

T h e y th ru st i.he th ic k e t’s a rm s asid e<br />

A n d p a n ted u p th e eteep .<br />

A llu re d by o n e appea l a lon e—<br />

T h e ir s o u ls ’ in siste n t ca ll—<br />

T h e y w restled w ith th e g re a t U n k now n<br />

An,d clu tc h e d th e ir cou rse th ro u g h ail.<br />

A n d w h en , at last, fr o m Y o r k 's stu p en d ­<br />

ou s rise,<br />

T h e b ea m in g m ea d ow s r o lle d beneath<br />

th eir eyes.<br />

H o w lea p ed th e ir v o ice s in th e m ou n ta in<br />

a ir!


H ow leaped th eir hearts to see <strong>the</strong><br />

rich n ess th ere!<br />

F o r <strong>the</strong>m , to -d a y , o u r reveren ce app ears—<br />

Tlig. first o f all o u r fearless pion eers.<br />

F o r {'W en tw orth ’s, , B la x la n d ’ s , ' L a w son ’ s<br />

nam es shall sM ne<br />

T h e fore m o st, alw ays, o f th at g lo rio u s<br />

line.<br />

A n d th eir h ig h cou ra g e and th e ir gra n ite<br />

w ill<br />

L iv e in th e hearts o f tru e A u stra l­<br />

ians, still!<br />

1913.<br />

A h u n d red years! N ow , all <strong>the</strong> w onders<br />

see<br />

W ro u g h t by <strong>the</strong> fin g ers o f a cen tu ry.<br />

T h e rid g e w h ich , th en , th e stu b b orn bush<br />

b estrod e,<br />

H as lo n g been con q u ered by a cu n n in g<br />

road.<br />

W h e re th en , th e clo a k o f d esola tion lay,<br />

T h e h u m m in g tow n ship s stand and th rive<br />

to-day.<br />

W h ile th rou g h th em rush, in stream s<br />

that n ever cease,<br />

T h e sw ellin g stores o f m etal, grain and<br />

fleece—<br />

A s y ie ld s th e g low in g con tin en ta l heart,<br />

Its treasu res fo r th e roa rin g city m art.<br />

T h e slen d er fewr, u p on a n arrow stran d.<br />

H ave g row n to m illion s in a m igh ty land.<br />

B e-rin g ed it was, w ith vast and sailless<br />

Seas<br />

A n d n ow h e r co m m e rce flo w s th rou g h<br />

cro w d e d quays.<br />

T h e h elots h eld by strip es and anguish ,<br />

<strong>the</strong>n,<br />

H ave g iv en place to fr e e and h appy m en.<br />

* * * *<br />

W ith ea rn est eyes th at fe a r o r th reaten<br />

j none,<br />

1A u stra lia tu rn s to m eet th e risin g sun!<br />

— C .P.<br />

T H E D A Y .<br />

T h e m orn in g o f th e 28th b rok e b ea u tifu<br />

lly clea r, but v e ry co ld . T he early<br />

sun rays s h o t o v er th e h ills w ith th e<br />

b rig h tn ess o f p o lish e d steel, and th e<br />

a cco m p a n y in g gen tle breeze b ore on its<br />

w in gs a ch illn ess th at m igh t have com e<br />

d ir e ct fro m <strong>the</strong> A n ta rctic. T h e e x p ectant<br />

M ou ntaineers w ere a lert and rea d y<br />

fo r th e g re a t festiv a l at an ea rly h ou r,<br />

1and th e b lu e sm ok e ro se p erp en d icu la rly<br />

fro m every h abitation in p rep aration fo r<br />

I th e m o rn in g m eal. Im m ed iately a fte r<br />

| b rea k fa st th e peop le m ov ed fo rth to view<br />

th e d e cora tion s o f th eir several tow n ­<br />

ships. K a toom b a w as fe sto o n e d w ith<br />

<strong>the</strong> co lo r s o f <strong>the</strong> G ov ern or in broa d<br />

bands o f ribbon . Japanese lantern s in<br />

I every co n ce iv a b le c o lo r h u n g a cro ss <strong>the</strong><br />

m ain th o ro u g h fa re s , th e G reat W e ste rn<br />

1 ro a d b e in g e x ce e d in g ly lavish in its disp<br />

lay. F r o m a ll p u b lic b u ild in g s a n d <strong>the</strong><br />

p rin cip a l b u sin ess h ou ses h u n g b u n tin g<br />

o f a ll so rts ; th e m ost p r e d o m in a n t bein<br />

g th e S ta r-crossed fla g o f A u stra lia ,<br />

th e U nion J a ck and th e S tars and S tripes j<br />

o f th e U n ited States. T h e e ffe c t w as as I<br />

p retty as it w as v a ri-co lo re d , a n d it i s ;<br />

c e rta in K a to o m b a n e v e r lo o k e d g a y e r .1<br />

A t a little b e fo r e 10 a .m ., a co n tin g e n t o f<br />

ch ild re n 300 stron g , fr o m th e K a toom b a*<br />

P u b lic S ch o o l, m a rch ed , u n d er th e co m ­<br />

m and o f M r. M. D unne and his s ta ff, to<br />

th e ra ilw a y sta tio n , th ere to m e e t <strong>the</strong><br />

train set a p a rt fo r th e tra n sp o rt o f th e '<br />

1s ch o la r s ea st o f M ou n t V icto ria . A s<br />

K a to o m b a w a s o n e o f th e last le v ie s to<br />

be ta k en u p, th e re w as so m e d iffic u lty in<br />

fin d in g ro o m , b u t b y a p roce ss o f p ack ­<br />

in g , g o o d h u m o re d ly b o rn e by th e happy<br />

ju v e n ile s , th e fe a t w as a cco m p lish e d and<br />

th e train stea m ed ou t to w a rd s M ount<br />

V ic to r ia a v e rita b le fo r e s t o f m in ia tu re<br />

fla g s w a v in g fr o m its w in d o w s a n d lusty<br />

ch eers risin g fr o m its tig h tly -w e d g e d<br />

b u rd en , h e a rd u n til th e fir s t r o ck cu ttin g<br />

w as passed. B y th is tim e, h u n d reds o f<br />

a d u lts had g a th e re d on th e p la tfo r m ,<br />

a w a itin g th e fo llo w in g train s, w h ich cam e<br />

a lo n g w ith a tire d and la ck a d a isica l air<br />

w h ich su g g e ste d a p r o fo u n d a p a th y on<br />

th e p a rt o f th e ra ilw a y d ep a rtm en t as to<br />

w h en and b y w h o m th e M ou n ta in s w ere<br />

fir s t cro sse d . T h e H y d ro M a je stic w as a<br />

b la ze o f c o lo r a n d m ade a p retty p ictu re<br />

in th e m o r n in g lig h t. A lo n g th e G reat<br />

W e ste rn ro a d , w h ich is p r a c tica lly <strong>the</strong><br />

old tr a c k o f th e p io n e e rs, v e h icle s o f e v ­<br />

e ry d e scrip tio n fr o m a sp rin g ca rt to a<br />

m o d e rn m o to r ca r, m a d e w e stw a rd in<br />

g rea t n u m bers. M any p e d e stria n s m ade<br />

a p ilg rim a g e to th e M arked T ree, w hich<br />

h ad been d e c o ra te d fo r th e o c c a s io n by<br />

th e M u n icip al C ou n cil. B la ck h e a th w as<br />

a lso in e x ce p tio n a l gala a rra y , its M ain<br />

i Street b e in g p a rt o f th e o rig in a l track.<br />

■T h e sta tion h o u se s a t b o th M ed low B ath<br />

' and B la ck h ea th w e re a rtistica lly trim m ed<br />

j in g re e n e ry and b u n tin g , sh o w in g great<br />

taste o n th e p a rt o f th o se w h o h ad ch a rg e<br />

o f th a t w o rk . A s if to k eep th e tr a v e llin<br />

g p u b lic a liv e to th e m o d e .}f J ravel<br />

u sed b y th e e x p lo re rs, th re e sw agm en<br />

' w ere seen tr u d g in g a lo n g th e o ld road<br />

m a k in g s lo w ly b u t su rely t o w a r is <strong>the</strong><br />

p la in s b ey on d . A t M ou n t V icto ria , n ever<br />

w as seen su ch e n e rg e tic bustle. T h e<br />

! q u iet tow n sh ip seem ed to b e su rp rised<br />

fr o m a R ip -V a n -W in k le slu m b e r in to a<br />

w id e -a w a k e h o sp ita lity . F r o m th e ra ilw<br />

a y sta tion to th e Im p e ria l h o te l, <strong>the</strong><br />

v is ito rs p o u re d in a c o n tin u ou s stream [


27<br />

Cr. * C. BERGHOFER,<br />

Fa<strong>the</strong>r <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Celebrations.<br />

u n d er th e D eautnul d ecora tion s. T h e '<br />

Im p eria l v era n d a h g lea m ed w ith n aval j<br />

a nd m ilita ry u n ifo rm and th e sheen o f ]<br />

silk e n top -h a ts, on ly b ro u g h t to lig h t on<br />

State occa sion s. T he M ou ntain w orth ies<br />

fra tern ized w ith th e w orth ies o f <strong>the</strong><br />

C ity, th e State, th e C om m on w ealth and<br />

I th e E m p ire. A fte r th e fo rm a litie s o f intr<br />

o d u ctio n , every m an d rop p ed into- that<br />

easy a ssocia tion w hich co m e s n atu rally<br />

w hen m en m eet to d o h o n o r to th e m ei<br />

o ry o f th e n o b le dead. T h e ch oicest bit<br />

o f d e cora tio n in th e w h o le festiv a l was<br />

on th at sh o rt b it o f road fro m th e P ost<br />

O ffic e to th e m ain gate o f th e park. It<br />

w as b ow ered in fern s, and arch ed by tw o<br />

very g ra ce fu l span s o f fo lia g e . A sq u a d ­<br />

ron o f N .S .W . L a n cers p ran ced g a ily a lo n g<br />

th is p o r tio n o f th e road a t 11 o ’clo ck to<br />

ta k e up a p osition as g u a rd o f h o n o r in<br />

th e P a rk and w h a t w ith th e gloss o f <strong>the</strong><br />

w e ll-g ro o m e d h orses, th e g litte r o f silver<br />

a ccou tre m e n ts, th e g r a c e fu l disp osition<br />

o f w a v in g fe rn s, th e to u ch e s o f b rig h t<br />

c o lo u r in th e b u n tin g, th e sm art escort<br />

! w ith slen d er la n ces at rest and pennants<br />

|w a vin g in th e crisp b reeze and th e w ell-<br />

! d ressed o n lo o k e rs, th e scen e w as a g or-<br />

|g e o u s and anim ated on e, n ever to be fo r-<br />

1 g o tte n in th e h istory o f M ou nt V ictoria .<br />

In th e p a rk <strong>the</strong> sch o o l ch ild ren w ere disposed<br />

in square on th e risin g grou n d im ­<br />

m ed ia tely fa c in g th e p la tform . A la rg e<br />

sheet at th e rea r o f th e dais b o re <strong>the</strong><br />

n am es o f th e E x p lorers, o v e r an en larged<br />

p ictu re o f K in g G eorg e IV and th e R oyal<br />

C oat o f A rm s. On <strong>the</strong> le ft o f th ese was<br />

th e n am e o f G overn or M acquarie 1813, i.nd<br />

on th e r ig h t th a t o f L o rd D enm an, 1913.<br />

A fa n fa r e o f b u g le s a n n ou n ced th e ap--<br />

p roach o f th e G o v e rn o r, and th e stra in s<br />

o f “ G od S ave th e K in g ” flo a te d o v e r ilie<br />

vast th r o n g as th e V ice R e g a l p a rty step p<br />

' ed in to v ie w . T h e re w as n ow a co n co u rse<br />

; o f fu lly 8 0 0 0 p e o p le a n d ev e ry p o in t o f<br />

! van ta g e w as ta k en up. T h e s ch o o l ch ild<br />

ren n u m b e red 1 2 0 0 , d r a fte d fr o m P a rra ­<br />

m atta, P r o sp e ct, L a w son , L e u ra , K a to o m ­<br />

ba and B la ck h e a th on th e east, and P o r t­<br />

land, W a lle r a w a n g , M a rra n g a roo, B ow en<br />

fels, L ith g o w , O a k ey P a rk and H a rtle y<br />

V a le on th e w est. T h e y w e re m arsh allet<br />

in to p la ce by th e ir re sp ectiv e teach ers<br />

and e v e ry th in g w o r k e d in p e r fe c t o rd e r.<br />

T h e re ce p tio n g iv e n to <strong>the</strong>. G o v e rn o r by<br />

th e ch ild re n w as v e ry e ffe c tiv e , th ree<br />

h earty ch e e rs and th e w a v in g o f 1200<br />

fla g s b e in g a w e lco m e th a t any m an<br />

m igh t b e p r o u d o f. A fte r th e banquet,<br />

<strong>the</strong> e s co rt o f L a n cers fo rm e d up o p p o site<br />

<strong>the</strong> Im p e ria l h o te l u n d e r th e com m a n d<br />

! o f C aptain H u d son . A s so o n as th e G ove<br />

rn o r and h is p a rty w e re sea ted in th eir<br />

m otor, th e short sh a rp w o rd o f com m a n d<br />

cam e fr o m C aptain H u d son “ A tte n tio n !<br />

F o r m — e s c o r t !” a n d th e L a n cers fe ll in -<br />

kto th e ir p r e scrib e d p la ce s a n d th e h is-<br />

|toric p r o ce ssio n s ta rte d fo r th e scen e o f<br />

<strong>the</strong> fin ish o f th e jo u r n e y o f 100 y ea rs<br />

a sp ecia l c a r b e in g e n g a g e d fo r th e d escen<br />

d ants o f <strong>the</strong> E x p lo re rs, a ll o f w hom<br />

w ere ch e e r e d as th e y m o to r e d by. F u lly<br />

5000 p e o p le w en t to M ou n t Y o r k to w itness<br />

th e u n v e ilin g c e r e m o n y ; p r o b a b ly th e<br />

greatest m u ltitu d e th a t th e M ou ntain<br />

spu r w ill see u n til th e y ea r 2 0 1 3 . T h e<br />

g rea t ce re m o n y w as c o m p le te d at a b o u t<br />

th e sam e h o u r (5 .3 0 p .m .) in w h ich th e<br />

E x p lorers a rriv e d a t th e s p o t on e h undred<br />

y ea rs a g o. B e lo w , th e H a rtle y V a l­<br />

ley sp rea d its p e a c e fu l fie ld s , and th e<br />

lo n g W e s te rn ro a d s b ra n ch e d th ro u g h th e<br />

V alley to th e d ista n t h ills. T h e sun wen<br />

dow n b eh in d M ou n t B la x la n d . T h e day<br />

w as d o n e ; a p a ra g ra p h in A u stra lia n<br />

h istory h a d been w ritte n and th e b ra v e<br />

had been h on o re d .<br />

AT MOUNT VICTORIA.<br />

T h e V ic e R e g a l p a rty a rriv e d at M ou n t<br />

V icto ria b y sp ecia l train a t 11 o ’c lo c k ,<br />

a b ou t h a lf-a n -h o u r b e h in d tim e. T h e distin<br />

g u ish ed v isito rs in clu d e d H is E x ce l­<br />

len cy th e State G o v e rn o r, S ir G erald<br />

S trick la n d , a tte n d e r b y Capt. T a lb o t, H is<br />

E x ce lle n cy A d m ira l S ir G eorg e K in g H all,<br />

K .C .B . and sta ff, a n d th ey w e re w e lco m ­<br />

ed on a lig h tin g on th e p la tfo r m by Mr.<br />

F ran k W a lk e r , P r e sid e n t o f th e A u stra l­<br />

ian H isto rica l S o cie ty , th e P r e sid e n t o f<br />

<strong>the</strong> B lu e M ou n ta in S h ire, Cr. J. T . W a ll, j<br />

j <strong>the</strong> P r e sid e n t o f th e B la x la n d S h ire, Cr. !<br />

i.___j J- W . B e rg h o fe r, th e M a yor o f K a to o m - j


T h e ch ild re n h a v in g su n g “ L et th e<br />

H ills R e s o u n d ,” H is E x ce lle n cy S ir<br />

G erald S trick la n d a d d ressed th e “ b o y s<br />

and g ir ls .” H e sa id he h ad been h o n ­<br />

o red by an in v ita tio n to a d d ress th em on<br />

th e d ay th e y w e re ce le b ra tin g . H e<br />

w ou ld ta k e th e k e y n o te fr o m th e a p ­<br />

peal m a d e t o th em b y M r. R e a y to d o<br />

h o n o r to th em selv es th at d ay, and n o t<br />

on ly th a t d a y b u t e v e ry day. T h e h istory<br />

o f th o se w h o had don e h o n o r to<br />

th em selv es, th e ir co u n try and th e B ritth<br />

e ir b est to r e fle c t h o n o r o n th em selv es,<br />

th eir te a ch e rs a n d co n d u cto rs.<br />

T h e p r o ce e d in g s co m m e n ce d w ith th e<br />

h ym n o f th a n k sg iv in g , “ T h e O ld H u n ­<br />

d r e d th ,” a fte r w h ich M r. W a lk e r said th ey<br />

w ore a ll d e lig h te d to h ave th e ir E x ce lle n ­<br />

cies w ith th em , as th ey w e re a ssem b led<br />

on w h at w ou ld be a m em o ra b le o cca sio n .<br />

T h e ir fu n c tio n h a d begu n w ell. T h ey<br />

had b een fa v o re d w ith d e lig h tfu l w ea th e r<br />

and he w as su re th a t as th e day h ad b e ­<br />

gu n, so it w ou ld con tin u e to th e en d .<br />

H e n ow h ad m u ch p lea su re in a sk in g H is<br />

E x ce lle n cy th e G o v e rn o r to b e k in d en ­<br />

ou g h to n am e th e p a rk . (C h e e r s ).<br />

H is E x ce lle n cy , S ir G erald S trick la n d ,<br />

w ho w as re ce iv e d w ith ch e e rs, said he<br />

had th e h o n o r, by th e in v ita tion o f th e<br />

I com m itte e , to d e d ica te th e p a rk as “ Mt.<br />

V icto ria P a r k ” in p e rp e tu a l co m m e m o ra ­<br />

tion o f th e day, and o f th e even t o f 100<br />

years ago.<br />

THE OBELISK AT MOUNT YORK.<br />

: ba, A id . G eorg e D avies, th e M ayor o f B at<br />

! u rst, A id . R ig b y and o th er m em bers o f<br />

j <strong>the</strong> C en ten ary C om m ittee. A gu ard o f<br />

h on or w as d raw n up on th e p la tform and<br />

th e R o y a l A rtille ry Band played th e “ N ation<br />

a l A n th e m .” A fte r m a k in g a b rie f in ­<br />

sp ection o f th e gu ard o f h o n o r and also a<br />

d eta ch m en t o f th e A u stralian L an cers, und<br />

e r Capt. E. A . K . H u d son , w hich fo r m ­<br />

ed th e e scort, th eir E x cellen cies and th e (<br />

oth er v isito rs en tered m otors and w ere<br />

driven to th e Im p eria l h o te l, w h ere th e _<br />

rece p tio n to o k p la ce and w h ere, subsequently’,<br />

a la rg e num ber o f th e d escen d ­<br />

ants o f th e E x p lorers w ere in trod u ced .<br />

P rom in en t a m on g st th ese w ere M r. C.<br />

R. B laxland and his d a u g h ter M iss R u th<br />

B laxlan d , M r. F red B laxlan d o f C oom ber,<br />

Mr. E d w in B laxland and Mrs. R. J. A.<br />

R o b e rts, a g ra n d daughter.<br />

T h ese fo rm a litie s o v e r, a m ove w as<br />

m ade fo r <strong>the</strong> P ark, w h ere <strong>the</strong> ch ild ren<br />

w ere a lrea d y m assed, fla n k ed by m ilitary<br />

a nd n a v a l cadets. T h e R oyal A rtille ry<br />

band a n d th e L ith g ow band w ere in a t­<br />

ten d a n ce, and, as <strong>the</strong> d istin g u ish ed v is ­<br />

ito rs m ou n ted th e g a ily -d ecora ted p la t­<br />

fo rm , played th e “ N ational A n th em .” T h e<br />

scen e fro m <strong>the</strong> fro n t w as an exceed in g ly<br />

im p ressiv e on e as th e vast assem blage<br />

m u st h a v e n u m bered betw een e ig h t and<br />

ten th ou san d persons.<br />

M r. A . E. R e a y , th e co n d u cto r, sp ok e a<br />

fe w w o rd s o f en cou ra g em en t to <strong>the</strong> ch ild ­<br />

ren , p o in tin g o u t .to th em th e im p ortan ce<br />

o f th e o cca sio n and u rg in g <strong>the</strong>m to d o<br />

WILLIAM COX— T h e fir s t road-makcr.<br />

C h eers w e re th en g iv e n fo r th e ir E x ­<br />

ce lle n cie s th e G o v e rn o r and th e A d m ira l.


( > 2 { > U l v » k 3


29<br />

ish race fro m w hich <strong>the</strong>y had all sp ru ng,<br />

sh ou ld b e an in cen tiv e to th em to d o<br />

th e ir d u ty w ith <strong>the</strong> h elp and gu id a n ce o f<br />

P rovid en ce. In lea rn in g th eir lesson s<br />

th ey m ig h t th in k it a m atter o f sm all im ­<br />

porta n ce, w h eth er <strong>the</strong>y passed th eir exa<br />

m in a tion s th is year o r next year. A nd<br />

it m ig h t be rem ark ed th a t it was n o t a<br />

m a tter o f su ch great im p orta n ce if <strong>the</strong><br />

M ou ntains h ad been crossed at <strong>the</strong> b e­<br />

gin n in g o f th is cen tu ry, o r n inety years<br />

a g o, o r la ter. B u t it w as, h ow ev er, a<br />

m a tter o f th e grea test im p ortan ce to each<br />

o f th em , and to a n ation and cou n try , to<br />

d o to -d a y at on ce— and w ell, w h a tever<br />

cou ld he don e and n ot p u t it o f f till to ­<br />

m o rro w o r next year o r later. (A p p la u s e ).<br />

T h a t w as th e grea test fe a tu r e o f th e exa<br />

m p le set by B laxland and his collea g u es<br />

in th eir stren u ou s d eterm in a tion to o v ercom<br />

e every ob sta cle a t a ll cost. I f th e<br />

b o y s and g irls fo llo w e d in th e sam e w ay<br />

|th ey w o u ld m eet w ith th e sam e success and<br />

I rew ards. A lth ou g h <strong>the</strong> B lue M ountains<br />

j had been crossed th ere w ere still m an y<br />

o th e r th in gs to be a ch ieved in life fo r<br />

th em selv es and th eir fa m ilies, th eir<br />

cou n try and th e B ritish race. (C h e e rs).<br />

“ A d v a n ce, A u stra lia F a ir ” w as co n trib ­<br />

uted b y <strong>the</strong> ch ild ren and was fo llo w e d by<br />

a sele ctio n b y th e band.<br />

GEORGE WILLIAM EVANS,<br />

Surveyor and Discoverer <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

<strong>Plains</strong>.<br />

Merriment at Mediow Bath.<br />

E M P IR E D A Y .<br />

T h o u g h F r id a y w as m a rk ed by e x tra illu<br />

m in a tion s, S a tu rd ay w as th e re c o g n is ­<br />

ed E m p ire D ay. It w as a lso th e o p e n ­<br />

in g d a y o f th e w e e k ’s fe stiv ity in c o m ­<br />

m e m o ra tio n o f th e cro ssin g . A t an ea rly<br />

h o u r, y o u n g M e d io w w as astir. A fte r<br />

b e in g a ssem b led and a d d ressed on th e<br />

s u b je c t o f E m p ire D ay— its m ea n in g and I<br />

its m ora ls— th e . ch ild re n w ere e n terta in ­<br />

ed a t “ G le n a ra ,” each ch ild b e in g p re se n t­<br />

ed w ith s o u v e n ir b o o k s . N eed less to<br />

a d d th e d a y w a s h a p p ily spen t b y th e<br />

y o u n g brigade-<br />

In th e e v e n in g , th e C asino at th e H y ­<br />

d ro M a je stic w as th e scen e o f a fin e en ­<br />

te rta in m e n t, th e fo llo w in g c o n tr ib u tin g to<br />

th e h a rm on y — M isses M a cD on ald , C liffo<br />

rd , M u sg rove, M essrs N eill, M oore and<br />

M aster L oosen .<br />

A b o u t 75 to u rists p u t in a d a y h ere o v e r<br />

th e w eek en d , th e. m a jo r ity g o in g o u t to<br />

J e n ola n C aves.<br />

C E N T E N A R Y C E L E B R A T IO N S .<br />

T h e r e s i d e n t s o f M e d i o w B a t h w o r k e d h a r d<br />

t o f i t t i n g l y c e le b r a t e t h e ir p a r t in t h e C e n t e n ­<br />

a r y , a n d t h e p r e t t y l i t t l e t o w n s h i p w a s o n e o l<br />

t h e m o s t p i c t u r e s q u e o n t h e M o u n t a i n s . T h e<br />

o w n e r o f t h e H y d r o M a j e s t i c , a s w e ll a s v i s i ­<br />

t o r s t o t h a t f a r -f a m e d r e s o r t , e n t e r e d i n t o t h e<br />

p r o je c t o f t h e lo c a l r e s i d e n t s w ith s p i r i t , a n d<br />

m u c h o f t h e s u c c e s s t h a t a t t e n d e d t h e f u n c ­<br />

t i o n s a t M e d i o w B a t h w a s d u e t o M r a n d M r s<br />

M a r k F o y , a b ly a s s i s t e d b y M r G . L o o s e n ,<br />

t h e m a n a g e r . T h e m a i n c e r e m o n y o f t h e d a y<br />

w a s t h e l a y i n g o f t h e f o u n d a t i o n s t o n e o f a<br />

m e m o r i a l d r i n k i n g f o u n t a in s u b s c r ib e d f o r b y<br />

th e p e o p le . T h e S t a t e P r e m ie r , M r J a s . M c ­<br />

G o w a n , p e r f o r m e d t h e c e r e m o n y , a n d in t h e<br />

c o u r s e o f h is r e m a r k s s a id it w a s a v e r y a p p r o<br />

p r ia t e w a y t o h o n o r t h e m e m o r y o f t h e E x ­<br />

p l o r e r s , b e c a u s e it w a s t h r o u g h t h e w a n t o f<br />

w a t e r t h a t t h e y w e r e i n d u c e d t o s e e k t h e r o a d<br />

o v e r t h e M o u n t a i n s a s a n o u t le t fo r t h e s e t t l e<br />

m e n t . T h e e x t e n t o f t h e p e o p l e ’ s o b l i g a t i o n<br />

t o t h e e n t e r p r is e a n d c o u r a g e o f t h e E x p l o r e r s<br />

c o u ld n o t b e o v e r -e s t i m a t e d .<br />

B e n e a t h t h e s t o n e w a s p la c e d a n o r i g i n a l<br />

o d e b y M r G . R y a n , o f M a n l y , a n d a c o p y o f<br />

t h e “ B lu e M o u n t a i n E c h o . ”<br />

a d d r e s s w a s a v e r y f in e o n e .<br />

T h e P r e m i e r 's<br />

T h e s p e c ia l p r iz e f o r t h e d e c o r a t e d m o t o r<br />

c a r w a s w o n b y M r s M a r k F o y , w i t h a. c a r<br />

b e a u t i f u lly f e s t o o n e d w i t h w is te r ia b l o o m s .<br />

T h r o u g h o u t t h e d a y , t h e c a r w a s q u it e a f e a ­<br />

t u r e , a l l a l o n g t h e r o u te .


I n t h e e v e n i n g a g r a n d b a ll w a s h e ld in t h e<br />

C a s in o , t h e g r o u n d s o f t h e H o t e l M a je s t ic<br />

b e i n g a b la z e o f g l o r y w ith c o s t ly c o lo r e d<br />

e le c t r i c i llu m i n a n t s a n d f a n c y fir e w o r k s .<br />

A t t h e s u p p e r , w h ic h w a s s e r v e d in a m a n ­<br />

n e r in k e e p i n g w i t h t h e b e s t tr a d it io n s o f t h e<br />

g r e a t h o u s e , t h e P r e m ie r , M . J . M c G o w a n ,<br />

p r e s id e d . A f t e r t h e l o y a l t o a s t , t h e f o l lo w i n g<br />

w e r e h o n o r e d .— “ T h e d a y w e c e l e b r a t e ,”<br />

p r o p o s e d b y M r D . R . H a l l, M in is t e r fo r J u s ­<br />

t i c e , ” a n d a c k n o w le d g e d b y M r E . S . C a r r ,<br />

M . H . R . “ T h e lo c a l c o m m i t t e e ,’ ’ a b ly p r o ­<br />

p o s e d b y M r C . C a r m ic h a e l, M in is t e r fo r E d u ­<br />

c a t io n . I n d e a li n g g e n e r a lly w ith t h e c e le b r a :<br />

t i o n s , t h e M i n i s t e r p a id a h i g h c o m p li m e n t to<br />

t h e w o r k e r s a l l a l o n g t h e l i n e , a n d t o t h e u n ­<br />

d o u b t e d e n t h u s ia s m d i s p la y e d b y t h e p e o p le .<br />

H e a ls o v o i c e d a d e s e r v i n g e u lo g y t o M r a n d<br />

M r s F o y o n t h e s u c c e s s o f M e d l o w ’ s c e le b r a ­<br />

t i o n s .<br />

M e s s r s W . A . T u c k e r a n d M r W S u t t o n r e ­<br />

s p o n d e d . T h e f o r m e r a p p e a le d fo r a g r a n t<br />

fo r t h e lo c a l m e m o r i a l , a n d M r S u t to n c o n ­<br />

c lu d e d a h a p p y s p e e c h b y p r o p o s i n g t h e t o a s t<br />

o f t h e h o s t, a n d h o s t e s s , M r a n d M r s M a r k<br />

F o y , t h e b u m p e r b e in g a c k n o w le d g e d in a<br />

j o c u l a r v e i n .<br />

Hazelbrook Celebrations.<br />

p re se n te d w ith a to y m em en to. A la rg e<br />

b o n fir e w a s lit a t 6 o ’c lo c k . T h is w as<br />

p repare d b y M r. H a rrison a n d a ffo r d e d<br />

m u ch d e lig h t to th e y o u n g ste rs. T h e fo l<br />

lo w in g w e re th e p rize w in n ers a t th e<br />

r a c e s :—<br />

G irls, 14 yearB a n d o v e r : G. M ood y 1,<br />

L . A d a m s 2.<br />

L a d ies e g g and s p o o n ra ce : M iss H a rris 1,<br />

L . A d a m s 2.<br />

N ail d r iv in g (F ir s t prize o a k tr a y p r e ­<br />

sen ted by M r. G. G a r r e t t ): M iss<br />

C h ap m an 1, M rs. H u n d t 2.<br />

P en n y p o lish in g i M iss P rie stly 1, M iss<br />

M on a gh a n 2. (F ir s t p rize Set o f<br />

ca rv e rs p r e se n te d by L e v e r B r o s ).<br />

|B oy s, 14 y ea rs a n d o v e r : — F in n ey 1, N.<br />

F o y 2.<br />

H o p , step and ju m p : N. F o y 1, L. S teph ­<br />

en s 2.<br />

M ens sa ck ra ce : M. N oon an 1, W . C o lle tt<br />

2.<br />

K ic k in g th e fo o t b a ll: A. S ch o u le r 1.<br />

V e te ra n s ra ce : J. S ch o u le r 1.<br />

T h re a d a n d N eedle ra ce : — C am p bell 1,<br />

— C oh en 2.<br />

75 y a rd s S p rint C h a m p io n sh ip : V . L e v ­<br />

itt 1, M. N o o n a n 2.<br />

H ap py H a z e lb ro o k w as n ot behind hand<br />

in h o n o rin g th e C en ten ary o f th e E x­<br />

p lo r e rs’ g rea t fe a t, and, d esp ite <strong>the</strong> opp o­<br />

sition o f th e elem ents, th e d isp lay refle<br />

cte d th e h ig h est c re d it on <strong>the</strong> tow n .<br />

On Saturd ay, M essrs. F in n ey and C larke,<br />

w ith assistants, d ecora ted <strong>the</strong> sta tion , but<br />

th e d o w n p o u r on S unday d estroyed <strong>the</strong><br />

g o o d w ork . On th e fo llo w in g m orn in g <strong>the</strong><br />

la d ies to o k a hand in re sto rin g <strong>the</strong> ru in ­<br />

ed w o rk , and by n ig h tfa ll h ad ev ery th in g<br />

lo o k in g v ery b e a u tifu l. T h e gales o f<br />

T u esd a y w ere to o m uch f o r th e banner erected<br />

by M rs. T u rn er on <strong>the</strong> B ath urst<br />

ro a d , so it w as rem oved and placed on<br />

th e sta tion lam p room . On T u esday<br />

a fte rn o o n , th e s ch o o l ch ild ren m arch ed<br />

to M rs. A . H . S ch o u le r’s resid en ce,, “ O chil<br />

H ills ,” w h ere th ey w ere treated to re ­<br />

fresh m en ts. G ath ered a rou n d th e U nion<br />

J a ck , th e fla g w as u n fu rle d du rin g <strong>the</strong><br />

sin g in g o f “ T h e O ld H u n d re d th .” R a ces<br />

and va riou s o th e r sports w ere <strong>the</strong>n ca r­<br />

ried ou t on a g o o d track m ade fo r th e o c ­<br />

ca sion by M essrs C alder and C ollett. A n<br />

address w as a fte rw a rd s d eliv ered by Mr.<br />

S ch ou ler, a n d tea w as served by a c o m ­<br />

m ittee o f la d ies in ch a rg e o f M esdam es<br />

C ollett, T u rn e r and M orrow . Mr. L ig -<br />

gin s ca te red e ffe c tiv e ly and m et w ith<br />

m u ch praise. A t <strong>the</strong> co n clu sio n o f <strong>the</strong><br />

sp orts p rogra m m e , each little on e w as<br />

ARNOLD RIGBY, Mayor <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong>.


Celebrations at Blackheath.<br />

The Chain <strong>of</strong> Bon Fires,<br />

T h ou g h business at th e ’H eath has n ot been<br />

all that <strong>the</strong> g o o d people w ou ld have w ished<br />

during <strong>the</strong> past m onth <strong>the</strong> slum p in no wav<br />

dam pened ei<strong>the</strong>r <strong>the</strong> spirits or <strong>the</strong> enterprise<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> tow n sp eop le in <strong>the</strong>ir effort to place on<br />

record <strong>the</strong>ir honor for <strong>the</strong> E m pire or <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

appreciation o f and gratitude to <strong>the</strong> E xp lorers.<br />

As allegiance to Mount V ictoria was sw orn, it<br />

was agreed that <strong>the</strong> local centenary celebrations<br />

be m erged in with E m pire Day festivities.<br />

Consequently <strong>the</strong> tow n was gay w ith<br />

bunting and evergreens w hen E m pire Day<br />

dawned. H eaded by <strong>the</strong> Blackheath brass<br />

band, th e schoolch ild ren , under M r. Laws<br />

(h ea d -tea ch er), m arched through <strong>the</strong> p rin cipal<br />

streets to <strong>the</strong> public hall, w here <strong>the</strong>y made<br />

a picture that th e M ountains m ight w ell be<br />

proud <strong>of</strong>.<br />

M r. H . J. C ollier occn p ied <strong>the</strong> chair and<br />

after a short speech introduced <strong>the</strong> R ev. M r.<br />

Bowers o f St. A id an 's C hurch w ho addressed<br />

<strong>the</strong> ch ild ren , en forcin g on <strong>the</strong>m <strong>the</strong> duty <strong>of</strong><br />

loyalty to <strong>the</strong>ir K in g and country. H e was<br />

follow ed by M r. G . A. Cow ie (Presbyterian)<br />

and th e R ev. J. M orrison (B aptist) w ho addressed<br />

<strong>the</strong> ch ildren in m uch <strong>the</strong> same strain<br />

as also d id <strong>the</strong> Jhead-master, M r. Laws.<br />

Cheers w ere <strong>the</strong>n given for <strong>the</strong> K in g and th e<br />

E xp lorers.<br />

An adjourn m en t was <strong>the</strong>n m ade to <strong>the</strong><br />

m otor cars in w aiting into w hich <strong>the</strong> children<br />

clim bed and w ere driven to Little Blackheath<br />

where <strong>the</strong> picn ic and sports w ere held.<br />

A sp len did program m e had been arranged<br />

for <strong>the</strong> day and <strong>the</strong> yuungsters had a rattling<br />

good tim e. T h e tow n speople responded<br />

heartily. L u ncheon was provided and was<br />

follow ed by tea at 5 o ’clo ck , aftei w hich <strong>the</strong>y<br />

were brou ght safely back to Blackheath where<br />

<strong>the</strong>y w ere given a free entertainm ent in<br />

B lack’ s Picture Palace, <strong>the</strong> accom m odation o f<br />

w hich was taxed to <strong>the</strong> fullest extent. A p r o ­<br />

gram m e o f pictures in keeping with <strong>the</strong> o c ­<br />

casion was exhibited, and som e excellen t<br />

m usic o f an appropriate nature was supplied<br />

by <strong>the</strong> B lackheath Orchestral S ociety. M r.<br />

Black and <strong>the</strong> orchestra earned <strong>the</strong> hearty<br />

thanks o f all present for <strong>the</strong>ir w ork.<br />

T h e bon-fire and fireworks w hich were post-<br />

[ poned till <strong>the</strong> n ight o f <strong>the</strong> Centenary were<br />

very successful, but <strong>the</strong> beauty from afar was<br />

spoilt by <strong>the</strong> heavy mist.<br />

T o f u l f i l h e r s h a r e o f M r . P a d l e y ’ s<br />

s c h e m e f o r a c h a i n e f b o n f i r e s o v e r t h e<br />

M o u n t a i n s a n d p l a i n s f r o m P a r r a m a t t a t o<br />

O r a n g e , K a t o o m b a m a d e g r e a t p r e p a r a t i o n<br />

b u t t h e M a i d o f t h e .M i s t s t h r e w h e r<br />

m a n t l e o v e r t h e h i l l s , e f f e c t i v e l y d i m ­<br />

m i n g t h e g l o r y o f t h e f i r e k i n g . A l t h o u g h<br />

t h e d a y h a d b e e n b e a u t i f u l l y c l e a r a n d<br />

b r i g h t , t h e t r a i n s r e t u r n e d f r o m M o u n t<br />

V i c t o r i a t h r o u g h a s l i g h t h a z e w h i c h w i t h<br />

t h e c o m i n g o f n i g h t t h i c k e n e d a n d i n t e n ­<br />

s i f i e d i n t o a t y p i c a l M o u n t a i n m i s t<br />

t h r o u g h w h i c h l o o m e d , l i k e g l o w w o r m s ,<br />

w i t h a h a l o , t h e h u n d r e d s o f C h i n e s e l a n ­<br />

t e r n s h u n g b e f o r e p r i v a t e r e s i d e n c e s a n d<br />

a c r o s s t h e m a i n s t r e e t s . A t a n e a r l y<br />

h o u r o f t h e e v e n i n g , M e s s r s . H u d s o n , P a n -<br />

n e ll a n d H e n d r y s a w t o t h e i g n i t i o n o f<br />

t h e g r e a t p i l e o f t i m b e r w h i c h w a s t o<br />

f o r m o u r l i n k i n t h e g r e a t c h a i n o f b l a z ­<br />

i n g b e a c o n s . F u l l y 2000 p e o p l e w e n t i n ­<br />

t o t h e p a r k t o s e e t h e b o n f i r e a n d t h e<br />

; f i r e w o r k s , b u t s o d e n s e w a s t h e m i s t t h a t<br />

! o n e h a d t o g o w i t h i n t w e n t y y a r d s o f t h e<br />

b u r n i n g p i l e t o b e s u r e i t w a s b u r n i n g .<br />

A t c l o s e q u a r t e r s t h e f i r e w a s m o r e in<br />

e v i d e n c e b y i t s h e a t t h a n b y i t s b r i l l i a n c y .<br />

G r e a t r o c k e t s w e r e s e n t a l o f t , b u t a p a r t<br />

f r o m t h e r o a r a n d h i s s o f t h e d e p a r t i n g<br />

p y r o t e c h n i c t r a v e l l e r s , n o t h i n g w a s s e e n<br />

o f t h e m a f t e r t h e y h a d r i s e n t w e n t y f e e t .<br />

T r u l y t h e y w e r e b o r n t o “ b u s t ” u n s e e n .<br />

A f t e r a n h o u r ’ s a t t e m p t t o l i g h t u p t h e<br />

i n s c r u t a b l e w ith l i m e l i g h t , a n d w h e n<br />

m a n y e y e s h a d p e e r e d i n t o t h e i m p e n d i n g<br />

g l o o m i n s e a r c h o f t h e l i g h t s o n d i s t a n t<br />

h i l l s , t h e p r o j e c t w a s “ g i v e n b e s t ” a n d<br />

t h e r e m a i n s o f a s e l e c t l o t o f s a l t p e t r e<br />

g o o d s s t a c k e d a w a y f o r a f i n e n i g h t . A l l<br />

o t h e r M o u n t a i n t o w n s d i d l i k e w i s e .


32<br />

CROSSING OF THB MOJN-<br />

T A IM<br />

DISC O V ER Y OF BATHURST<br />

PLAINS.<br />

M R . W A L K E R ’ S L E C T U R E .<br />

M r . F r a n k W a l k e r , P r e s id e n t o f th e<br />

H is t o r ic a l S o c ie t y , w a s lis t e n e d to in ­<br />

t e n t ly in t h e M a s o n i c H a ll la s t n i g h t o n<br />

t h e o c c a s io n o f h is le c tu r e o n “ T h r<br />

F i r s t C r o s s i n g o f t h e B lu e M o u n t a i n s .’ ’<br />

M r . W a lk e r i llu s tr a te d h is t h e m e w ith<br />

v a lu a b le la n t e r n s lid e s .<br />

D r . T . A . M a c h a t t i e p r e s id e d in th e<br />

a b s e n c e o f t h e M a y o r .<br />

A f t e r t r a c i n g t h e s t u p e n d o u s w o r k o f<br />

B la x la n d , L a w s o n , a n d W e n t w o r t h , M r .<br />

W a lk e r t o u c h e d u p o n th e s u b s e q u e n t<br />

d is c o v e r y o f th e B a t h u r s t P la i n s a n d th e<br />

fo r m a t io n o f a r o a d o v e r t h e m o u n t a in s<br />

to t h e f u t u r e Q u e e n C ity o f t h e W e s t .<br />

“ S u r v e y o r G e o r g e W i llia m E v a n s , ”<br />

h e r e m a r k e d , “ w a s s e n t o u t w ith in ­<br />

s t r u c t io n s to f o l lo w B la x la n d ’ s tr a il to<br />

its t e r m i n a t i o n o n th e m o u n t a i n t-hat<br />

h e a s c e n d e d , a n d th e n to c o n t in u e e x ­<br />

p lo r a tio n w e s t w a r d a s f a r a s h e p o s s ib ly<br />

c o u ld . W h e n E v a n s r e tu r n e d a n d p r e ­<br />

s e n t e d h i s r e p o r t n o tim e w a s lo s t b y<br />

M a c q u a r i e in f o r m i n g h is p la n s fo r th e<br />

c o n s t r u c t io n o f a r o a d a c r o s s t h e m o u n ­<br />

t a in s . I t w a s h is d a r li n g s c h e m e , a n d ,<br />

e n e r g e t i c a n d r e s o u r c e fu l a s h e w a s<br />

n o t a s k w a s to o b i g fo r h im . I n t h f<br />

n ic k o f t im e c a m e t h e m a g n a n i m o u s o f ­<br />

f e r o f W i ll i a m C o x , o f C la r e n d o n , a<br />

p e r s o n a l fr ie n d o f M a c q u a r i e ’ s , t o s u ­<br />

p e r in t e n d t h e c o n s t r u c t io n o f t h e ro a d<br />

T h e o ffe r w a s a c c e p t e d w ith a la c r it y ,<br />

a n d o n J u ly 1 8 , 1 8 1 4 , t h e w o r k w a s<br />

c o m m e n c e d . T h e p r o g r e s s o f t h is w o n ­<br />

d e r fu l r o a d f r o m d a y to d a y m a y b e<br />

t r a c e d in C o x 's e x c e lle n t jo u r n a l , f a i t h ­<br />

f u l l y a n d m e t h o d i c a lly k e p t f r o m s ta r t<br />

to fin is h . I t r e c o r d s h o w , in t h e s h t r t<br />

s p a c e o f s ix m o n t h s , a c a r r ia g e -r o a d ic o<br />

m ile s in l e n g t h , c o m p le t e w ith b r id g e s ,<br />

c u lv e r t s , e m b a n k m e n t s , a n d a ll th e<br />

lit t le e t c e t e r a s o f s u c h a n u n d e r t a k in g ,<br />

w a s a c c o m p lis h e d , w ith o u t th e l o s s o f a<br />

s i n g l e m a n , o r t h e in flic t io n o f s e r io u s<br />

i n ju r y u p o n a n y o n e o f C o x ’ s n u m e r o u s<br />

w o r k i n g p a r ty . I t w a s w ith o u t d o u b t<br />

th e g r e a t e s t e n g in e e r i n g f e a t , t a k i n g<br />

e v e r y t h i n g in t o a c c o u n t , t h a t h a s e v e r<br />

b e e n a t t e m p t e d in A u s t r a lia , a n d fo r<br />

u p w a r d s o f 2 6 y e a r s it c a r r ie d<br />

t h e v o lu m e o f tr a ffic b e tw e e n<br />

S y d n e y a n d B a t h u r s t . P o r t io n s o f<br />

it s t i ll r e m a in , a n d p r o v e b y th e ir<br />

p r e s e n t c o n d i t io n th e s u b s t a n t i a l n a ­<br />

tu r e o f t h e w o r k .<br />

“ In th e e a r ly t h ir t ie s t h e c o n d it io n o f<br />

th e o ld r o a d c a lle d f o r s o m e d r a s t i c a t ­<br />

t e n t io n , a n d M a j o r (a f t e r w a r d s S ir T h o ­<br />

m a s ) M i t c h e l l w a s e n t r u s t e d w ith t h e<br />

w o r k o f r e f o r m i n g it. H e s u r v e y e d n e w<br />

lin e s , r e d u c e d t h e m a n y s e v e r e g r a d e s ,<br />

c u t t i n g o u t w h o le s e c t io n s o f C o x ’ s o r i g ­<br />

in a l w o r k , a n d s o t h e r e w a s g r a d u a l l y<br />

b u ilt u p t h e p r e s e n t W e s t e r n -r o a d ,<br />

w h ic h e v e r y y e a r is u n d e r g o i n g a l t e r a ­<br />

t io n s a n d r e - g r a d i n g s . P r is o n e r s w o i k -<br />

i n g in c h a in s w e r e e m p l o y e d f o r y e a r s<br />

u p o n M i t c h e l l ’ s -r o a d , a n d th e m any<br />

i g r u e s o m e r e m i n d e r s o f t h e a w f u l ; ' s v b -<br />

! t e m ,” in th e Bhape o f “ d a r k c e l l s ,”<br />

c o n v ic t e n c a m p m e n t s , f l o g g i n g s t o n e s ,<br />

a n d g r i m s t o n e b u i l d i n g s o f a p a s t a g e ,<br />

a re still e x t a n t a l o n g t h e c o u r s e o f t h is<br />

h is t o r ic h i g h w a y . L o n e l y g r a v e s o f th e<br />

u n w illin g la b o r e r s a n d t h e ir g u a r d s ,<br />

a re m e t h e r e a n d t h e r e , r e m i n i s c e n t o f<br />

t h e t im e s w h e n t h e m i li t a r y w e r e c h ie fly<br />

e m p lo y e d in t h e w o r k o f g u a r d i n g th e<br />

p r is o n e r s a t t h e ir w o r k . O ld in n s , s o m e<br />

o f t h e m t r a n s f o r m e d in a p p e a r a n c e , sr.d<br />

d o i n g d u t y a s b o a r d i n g e s t a o h s h n i.’.n i-s,<br />

still lin e th e r o a d , a n d i f s t o n e s < o u ld<br />

s p e a k , w h a t f a s c i n a t i n g t a l e s cr.u ld<br />

t h e y u n f o ld o f t h e c o a c h i n g a n d l -u t h -<br />

r a n g i n g d a y s , o f t h e m o t l e y t h r o n g s<br />

th a t p a s s e d a n d r e p a s s e d t h e m o n th e ir<br />

w a y to th e g o l d f i e l d , a n d o f t h e lo n e ly<br />

d a y s a n d n i g h t s , w h e n t h e p r in c ip a l<br />

a n d o n ly e v e n t w a s t h e a r r iv a l a n d r e -<br />

p a r tu r e o f t h e d a ily c o a c h .<br />

“ T h e c e n t e n a r y c e le b r a t io n s u.re d e ­<br />

s ig n e d to h o n o r t h o s e b r a v e m e n w h o , '<br />

a c e n t u r y a g o , r e lie v e d t h e ir c m n t r y<br />

f r o m its d ir e n e c e s s i t i e s , a n d h v th e ir<br />

c o u r a g e a n d d e t e r m in a t io n s u c c e e d e d<br />

in t h e c o n q u e s t o f th e m o u n t a i n s , w h ic h<br />

f o r s o m a n y y e a r s h a d f o r m e d a n i m ­<br />

p a s s a b le b a r r ie r t o f u r t h e r p r o g .t s s a n d<br />

p r o s p e r it y . T h e i r p a t r i o t i s m a n d d e ­<br />

v o t io n t o w h a t t h e y b e lie v e d to b e t h e ir<br />

d u t y , n o t o n ly s o lv e d a m o m e n t o u s<br />

p r o b le m in t h e ir t i m e , b u t h a s m a l e<br />

p o s s ib le th e m a n y a d v a n t a g e s w e c n j jy<br />

a t t h e p r e s e n t d a y . T h e i r s u c c e s s H e lp ­<br />

e d t h o u s a n d s o f A u s t r a l i a ’ s s o as to<br />

fo u n d h o m e s a n d f a m i li e s a n d f o r t u n e s 1<br />

in t h e n e w E l D o r a d o o f t h e w e s t . I t (<br />

a ls o w a s i n s t r u m e n t a l in c h a n g i n g a ;<br />

s m a ll s t r ip o f t e r r i t o r y i n t o t h e v a s t - '<br />

n e s s o f a c o n t in e n t , a n d in m a k i n g I<br />

a v a ila b le f o r s e t t l e m e n t h u n d r e d s o f<br />

t h o u s a n d s o f a c r e s o f l a n d , w h e r e n o w<br />

a r e t h r i v i n g t o w n s a n d h o m e s t e a d s , a n d<br />

w h e r e s h e e p a n d c a t t le in t h e ir m i llio n f<br />

f in d a b u n d a n t p a s t u r a g e . I t c h a n g e d<br />

A u s t r a l i a ’ s d e s t i n y , a n d le d h e r in t o r<br />

t h e u p w a r d p a t h o f p r o g r e s s a n d p r o s - fc<br />

p e r it y , f r o m w h ic h s h e h a s n e v e r d e - c


33 T\<br />

r t e d .”<br />

At <strong>the</strong> instance <strong>of</strong> Dr. M achattie an<br />

clam atory v ote <strong>of</strong> thanks was carried<br />

lecturer, who briefly responded.<br />

— -<br />

---------------<br />

" ■‘'• '■'I<br />

GROUP OF REPRESENTATIVE MEN AT THE FIRST MEETING


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A. S. R E D F E R N ) Hon. Secs.


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< ?« / A t r t f A S - d ,«* t.c t 77o r X fy . r f& r fk o / e r . C a r t e r o / r fr T e n / e v u ty


CROSSING OF THE MOUNTAINS.<br />

GREGORY BLAXLAND’S JOURNAL.<br />

It is just 100 years ago this month since<br />

Blaxland, Lawson, and W entw orth accom ­<br />

plished <strong>the</strong> task o f scaling <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> M ountains,<br />

and thus opened up a w ay to <strong>the</strong><br />

interior <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> continent. The centenary <strong>of</strong><br />

that great event is to be celebrated at<br />

Mount York on <strong>the</strong> 2Sth inst. G regory<br />

Blaxland was <strong>the</strong> originator and leader <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> m em orable expedition, and his Journal<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> tour, which has been issued in book<br />

form , com es as a very seasonable publication.<br />

It has been produced under <strong>the</strong> editorship<br />

o f Mr. F rank W alker, president <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> Australian H istorical Society, and will<br />

prove an instructive little volum e to those<br />

interested in mountain exploration. A fe a ­<br />

ture o f <strong>the</strong> work that will be much appreciated<br />

is <strong>the</strong> m arginal notes with which<br />

num erous passages o f <strong>the</strong> Journal have been<br />

annotated by Mr. W alker. The book is<br />

liberally supplied with illustrations, <strong>including</strong><br />

portraits o f Blaxland, Law son, and<br />

W entw orth, besides a num ber <strong>of</strong> view s<br />

typical <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> rugged nature o f <strong>the</strong> country<br />

that had to be traversed by <strong>the</strong> explorers,<br />

and a plan show ing <strong>the</strong> route which <strong>the</strong>y<br />

follow ed.<br />

Now that <strong>the</strong> centenary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> crossing <strong>of</strong><br />

• h ij.<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong> is close upon us, an interesting'<br />

little book, edited by Mr. Frank Walker, pre-,<br />

I U v ro<br />

/ C f/ 3 .<br />

sident <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Australian Historical Society,<br />

makes an opportune appearance. This is “ A<br />

Journal <strong>of</strong> a Tour <strong>of</strong> <strong>Discovery</strong> Across <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong><br />

<strong>Mountains</strong>,” by Gregory Blaxland. To <strong>the</strong><br />

I ><br />

uninitiated <strong>the</strong> references and directions <strong>of</strong><br />

this journal would convey nothing, but Mr.!<br />

Walker explains <strong>the</strong>m, and gives an account<br />

cf <strong>the</strong> hardships and struggles which <strong>the</strong> explorers<br />

endured before <strong>the</strong>y saw from Mount<br />

! York <strong>the</strong> plains <strong>of</strong> Hartley spreading below<br />

<strong>the</strong>m. The secret <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir success was, <strong>of</strong><br />

i course, that <strong>the</strong>y kept to <strong>the</strong> high ground, and<br />

followed <strong>the</strong> natural line <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> main ridge,;<br />

which still supplies <strong>the</strong> only practicable<br />

Iroute. Indeed, to this very day, as Mr. W alker<br />

shows by a map, <strong>the</strong> great Western Road'<br />

^follows substantially <strong>the</strong> same track as did!<br />

|<strong>the</strong> expedition, until <strong>the</strong> “ Marked Tree” was|<br />

; reached. From <strong>the</strong>re <strong>the</strong>y continued almost<br />

due west, straight to Mount York, while <strong>the</strong><br />

Iroad and railway line bends southward. Mr.<br />

Walker is to be congratulated on an excellent<br />

-little volume, which acquires additional<br />

■interest since in a few days’ time—May 28,<br />

; to be exact—<strong>the</strong> centenary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> arrival at<br />

Mount York will be <strong>the</strong> occasion <strong>of</strong> a general<br />

i| celebration on <strong>the</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong>. fS. T. Leigh.)__),<br />

CROSSING THE MOUNTAINS.<br />

-------- -------------<br />

PREPARING FOR CELEBRATIONS<br />

GREAT CHAIN OF BONFIRES.<br />

KATO O M BA, M onday.<br />

A m eeting <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> board o f control was held,<br />

at K atoom ba on Saturday, Mr. F rank W alk er<br />

presiding. Progress reports were read, sh ow ­<br />

ing that m atters in connection with <strong>the</strong> celebrations<br />

on <strong>the</strong> 28th inst. were in a forw ard<br />

state, and <strong>the</strong> m eeting was advised o f <strong>the</strong><br />

various arrangem ents that had been m ade<br />

for <strong>the</strong> reception and entertainm ent o f visitors.<br />

Transit m atters were exhaustively<br />

dealt with, and <strong>the</strong> executive w as em pow ered<br />

to make final arrangem ents w ith regard to<br />

motor and vehicle traffic.<br />

The architect reported that <strong>the</strong> pavilion<br />

was in a forw ard state, and he anticipated<br />

that <strong>the</strong> building would be com pleted su f­<br />

ficiently to admit o f <strong>the</strong> cerem ony <strong>of</strong> dedication<br />

and unveiling on <strong>the</strong> day oif <strong>the</strong> celebrations.<br />

The organising secretary gave details<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> program m e arranged fo r <strong>the</strong> d a y ’s<br />

ceremonies, which were approved. M atters in<br />

connection with children's dem onstration<br />

also were dealt with.<br />

All <strong>the</strong> mountain towns will be decorates<br />

by day and illuminated at night on <strong>the</strong> 2Sth.<br />

It was reported that <strong>the</strong> proposed chain o f<br />

bonfires, from Em u <strong>Plains</strong> to <strong>Bathurst</strong>, was<br />

well advanced in detail-, <strong>the</strong> w ork h aving<br />

been taken up in <strong>the</strong> various centres w ith<br />

great enthusiasm. The next m eeting o f <strong>the</strong><br />

com m ittee will be held at Mt. V ictoria on<br />

Saturday, when <strong>the</strong> opportunity will be taken<br />

to inspect <strong>the</strong> various w orks in progress at<br />

Mt. York.<br />

OUR BENEFACTORS.<br />

TO THE EDITOR.<br />

Sir,—Referring to a recently mooted proposition to<br />

erect a suitable memorial <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> great services <strong>of</strong> Governor<br />

Macquarie to Australia, your recent article would,<br />

no doubt, be welcome to many <strong>of</strong> your readers. It<br />

should be welcome to every patriotic Australian.<br />

Going back to a still earlier period than that <strong>of</strong> Macquarie,<br />

<strong>the</strong>re stands out <strong>the</strong> great name <strong>of</strong> Sir Joseph<br />

Banks, <strong>the</strong> companion <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> world-famous navigator,<br />

Cook, and himself a world-famous botanist, whose<br />

private wealth enabled him to exercise his natural generosity<br />

in fur<strong>the</strong>rance <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> science to which he devoted<br />

a long life. He it was who first interested <strong>the</strong> people <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> Mo<strong>the</strong>r-country in a <strong>the</strong>n unknown land, i.r.d, beyond<br />

dout*, materially hastened <strong>the</strong> coming <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> first settlement<br />

in Australia—a settlement in which he took a warm<br />

and active interest to his latest days.<br />

Why have we no worthy monuments to those distinguished<br />

men? We have statues <strong>of</strong> Cook, <strong>of</strong> Phillip, first<br />

Governor <strong>of</strong> New South Wales; <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> “ Good Governor,”<br />

Bourke; <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> admirable Dailey, and <strong>of</strong> that distini<br />

I


7 - 6 £ > I a a |


guished statesman, Sir John Kobertson; brat where is any<br />

statue <strong>of</strong> Wentworth, who devoted so much <strong>of</strong> a strenuous<br />

life, and gained for his native land <strong>the</strong> freedom we<br />

now enjoy; and where any memorial to Sir Henrv Parkes,<br />

<strong>the</strong> greatest, perhaps, <strong>of</strong> Australian statesmen?<br />

Let us begin <strong>the</strong> good work. Let us in <strong>the</strong> first plane<br />

set up amidst suitable surroundings worthy memorials<br />

<strong>of</strong> Banks and Macquarie, and, ere long, also <strong>of</strong> those distinguished<br />

Australians who lived and labored in later<br />

years, so that generations yet unborn may see and learn.<br />

Surely <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> irrmense wealth <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Mo<strong>the</strong>r-State, a<br />

very minute fraction might be readily devoted to such<br />

purpose.—Yours, etc.,<br />

J.Y.G.<br />

October 18.<br />

(Our correspondent is evidently not aware that a movement<br />

for a memorial to Sir Joseph Banks was started in<br />

Sydney some time ago.. Mr. Maiden, <strong>the</strong> secretary, informs<br />

us that <strong>the</strong> sum in hand is now about £300, and<br />

that he will be glad to acknowledge any donations to<br />

increase this.—Ed. “ D.T.” )


a *7


38<br />

T H E people o]<br />

<strong>the</strong> Central - n>est<br />

are about to celebrate<br />

at <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

t h e hundredth<br />

anniversary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

discovery<br />

by George William<br />

Evans <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> rich<br />

lands which he<br />

named <strong>the</strong> O ’Connell,<br />

Macquarie,<br />

a n d <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

<strong>Plains</strong>. Evans, who<br />

Was Deputy Surveyor<br />

- General <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> Colony, had<br />

been instructed by<br />

Governor M acquarie<br />

to follow up<br />

<strong>the</strong> discoveries <strong>of</strong><br />

Blaxland's expedition,<br />

which had<br />

turned back on<br />

|reaching <strong>the</strong> summit<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> mountain<br />

named after <strong>the</strong><br />

|leader. Evans (who<br />

Was accompanied<br />

by two free men<br />

and three prisoner5)<br />

started out<br />

°n November 20,<br />

1813, and accomplished<br />

h i s<br />

t a s l( admirably.<br />

Penetrating <strong>the</strong> unknown<br />

country to<br />

o point 98 J miles<br />

from Mount Blaxand.<br />

His experi-<br />

|ences are recounted<br />

The<br />

Centenary<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Western <strong>Plains</strong>.<br />

1813 = 1913.<br />

in his Diary, which<br />

we publish on ano<strong>the</strong>r<br />

page. In<br />

that journal he expresses<br />

his surprise<br />

and delight as mile<br />

after mile o f magnificent<br />

country<br />

continues to unfold<br />

itself before his<br />

eyes. H e realises<br />

that no longer need<br />

<strong>the</strong> infant settlement<br />

fear starvation,<br />

and indulges<br />

in prophetic visions<br />

<strong>of</strong> what <strong>the</strong> future<br />

has in store for <strong>the</strong><br />

young colony as a<br />

result <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> conquering<br />

<strong>of</strong> t h e<br />

mountains and <strong>the</strong><br />

discovery <strong>of</strong> a vast<br />

area <strong>of</strong> fertile<br />

land. From a formerly<br />

narrow iirip<br />

<strong>of</strong> territory,<br />

bounded on <strong>the</strong> one<br />

side by <strong>the</strong> waters<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Pacific, and<br />

on <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r<br />

j by a hi<strong>the</strong>rto un-<br />

I approachable rangz<br />

<strong>of</strong> l<strong>of</strong>ty mountains,<br />

<strong>the</strong> colony<br />

suddenly expanded<br />

into greatness,<br />

and <strong>the</strong> western<br />

boundary w a s<br />

pushed backward<br />

to what seemed an<br />

incredible extent.<br />

(^ S y c Z ls t C y J W Z u / T ’ . * /y 'o n / 2 / p / 3j


E V A N S ’S C R O W N , N E A R T A R A N A .<br />

On December 1st, 1813, Evans stood on this remarkable outcrop <strong>of</strong> rock, and got his first glimpse <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> plains on <strong>the</strong> distant edge<br />

<strong>of</strong> which <strong>the</strong> City <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> was eventually to stand.


'r / a / ^ e / P e s / c & r t r / s u ?<br />

[n connection with <strong>the</strong> forthcoming celebrations to mark <strong>the</strong> 100th anniversary<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> settlement <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> district, <strong>the</strong> Diary <strong>of</strong> George William Evans,<br />

Deputy Surveyor-General, who discovered <strong>the</strong> fertile plains in 1813, is <strong>of</strong> especial<br />

interest. The Diary is addressed to Governor Macquarie, who had directed Evans<br />

to explore <strong>the</strong> unknown country west <strong>of</strong> Mount Blaxland—<strong>the</strong> terminal point <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> expedition <strong>of</strong> Blaxland, Lawson, and Wentworth.<br />

/JL. //. /3<br />

GOVERNOR MACQUARIE,<br />

I Lnder whose instructions'Evans fol<br />

|Wed up <strong>the</strong> discoveries <strong>of</strong> lilaxland.<br />

WILLIAM COX,<br />

Who supervised <strong>the</strong> construction <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> first road over <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong>.<br />

George William Evans,<br />

To whom Is due <strong>the</strong> credit for <strong>the</strong> discovery <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Western <strong>Plains</strong> 100 years ago. He was <strong>the</strong> first<br />

white man to make <strong>the</strong> entire passage from east to west <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong>.


4 2 8?<br />

C e r t / c n a r / 0/ ? t i e ? fe < r / a r /7 7 y < T / fts<br />

Centenary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Western<br />

<strong>Plains</strong>.------- ^ n tn s 'JPcar/- .<br />

Friday, November 19, 1813.<br />

DIRECTED <strong>the</strong> provisions and o<strong>the</strong>r necessaries to be<br />

conveyed across <strong>the</strong> Nepean to <strong>the</strong> NE pointt <strong>of</strong> Forest<br />

Land, commonly called Emu Island, which was done,<br />

[tiid by <strong>the</strong> time that everything was arranged evening approached.<br />

Saturday. November 20.<br />

^HE night was most uncomfortable, and <strong>the</strong> morning<br />

being wet prevented our departing so early as I<br />

lieant. Feeling anxious to proceed, I made up my mind<br />

lo make <strong>the</strong> best <strong>of</strong> our way to <strong>the</strong> end <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> mountains,<br />

|nd on my return to measure <strong>the</strong> distance <strong>of</strong> Messrs.<br />

ittaxland, Wentworth, and Lawson’s Teeeut excursion,<br />

appeared to me that while <strong>the</strong> horses were fresh it was<br />

plan likely to meet with your approbation, as I could<br />

lien refresh <strong>the</strong>m on good grass, and take my time in<br />

Ixploring to <strong>the</strong> westward, which I conceived <strong>the</strong> object<br />

If <strong>the</strong> greatest importance. On returning, should I not<br />

l^ve sufficient provisions to subsist on, to complete<br />

Measuring <strong>the</strong> track <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> above-named gentleman, I<br />

j°uld send in a man and horse to meet me with a small<br />

p p ly . On halting this day I was happy I arranged it<br />

my labour would have been lost, in consequence <strong>of</strong><br />

lames Burns having several times mistaken his former<br />

Tack. I cannot make any estimate <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> distance, <strong>the</strong>refre<br />

shall defer entering into particulars with respect to<br />

nature <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> country, except that <strong>the</strong> two last miles,<br />

as near as I can form an idea, was through<br />

a ridge <strong>of</strong> forest land, good grass, and found<br />

some water, where I mean to remain tha<br />

night. All much fatigued.<br />

T<br />

Sunday, November 21.<br />

HE morning very much overcast, with a<br />

thick fog. However, I had <strong>the</strong> horses<br />

loaded, and travelled on, mostly on ridges<br />

overrun with brush. At about 11 o’clock 1<br />

passed <strong>the</strong> pile <strong>of</strong> stones alluded to by <strong>the</strong><br />

former party. Soon after we were on a very<br />

high hill, which was clear <strong>of</strong> mist, but to<br />

my great disappointment <strong>the</strong> country to <strong>the</strong><br />

eastward being covered with vapour, I could<br />

not be satisfied with <strong>the</strong> prospect which must<br />

have presented .itself had <strong>the</strong> wea<strong>the</strong>r been<br />

clear. We made <strong>the</strong> best <strong>of</strong> our way on, and<br />

halted at 2 o’clock.<br />

Monday, November 22.<br />

HE wea<strong>the</strong>r bad. Determined to proceed.<br />

T We loaded <strong>the</strong> horses, when one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>m<br />

turned stubborn, having lain down and rolled<br />

several times over his load. He at length<br />

became steady. Our track was through a<br />

thick brush. At 9 o’clock we were on a very<br />

high mountain, but could not see any <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

low country. It is now disagreeable travelling.<br />

The brush is so very thick, and <strong>the</strong><br />

surface <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ridges is covered with pieces<br />

<strong>of</strong> sharp granite, intermixed with quartz.<br />

The horses seemed to step with caution. We<br />

. stopped at 1 o’clock where <strong>the</strong>re was a spacious<br />

valley, covered with grass and rushes,<br />

a stream <strong>of</strong> water running through it. On<br />

opening our baggage I found <strong>the</strong> bottles <strong>of</strong><br />

medicines broken.<br />

T<br />

Tuesday, November 23.<br />

HE night was excessively wet, and continues<br />

so. I was necessitated to move,<br />

as we could not keep in a fire or get bark<br />

to make a hut. It rained hard most <strong>of</strong> th•»<br />

day. Am much afraid some <strong>of</strong> our bread will<br />

! be spoiled. The track is still through a<br />

brush, much <strong>the</strong> same as yesterday. The v a l­<br />

leys on my right, which are numerous, lead<br />

to ravines. They are clear <strong>of</strong> trees and<br />

covered with rushes. The holes or drains in<br />

<strong>the</strong> centre are full <strong>of</strong> good water. At 3<br />

o’clock we halted, <strong>the</strong> wea<strong>the</strong>r ra<strong>the</strong>r clear.<br />

No sooner were we comfortable and dry than<br />

one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> severest storms came on I ever<br />

witnessed. It put out our fire in an instant,<br />

and beat in our hut upon us. At 5 o’clock<br />

<strong>the</strong> wind became strong and cleared <strong>the</strong> elements.<br />

Wednesday, November 24.<br />

E all rested well, which was a preservation to us,<br />

W not having done so since our departure, and which<br />

we felt <strong>the</strong> effects <strong>of</strong>, as nothing could be procured for<br />

shelter but green boughs that were not sufficient to screen<br />

us from rain. We start quite refreshed. At 9 o’clock<br />

came to <strong>the</strong> end <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> range, from which <strong>the</strong> prospect is<br />

extensive and gives me sanguine hopes. The descent is<br />

rugged and steep. I stowed away here a week’s provisions<br />

in some hollow cliffs in hopes <strong>of</strong> it being sufficient<br />

for our use back from this place. It was 12 o’clock when<br />

we got into a valley <strong>of</strong> good feed, and appears a fine part<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> country. I have no doubt but <strong>the</strong> points <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

ridges or bluffs to <strong>the</strong> NW and S (<strong>the</strong> country seems to<br />

open in <strong>the</strong> form <strong>of</strong> this angle) are <strong>the</strong> termination <strong>of</strong><br />

what is called <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong>, and that we are now<br />

over <strong>the</strong>m. At 10 o’clock I stopped on <strong>the</strong> bank <strong>of</strong> a<br />

riverlett,* which is a rapid stream from <strong>the</strong> north-east,<br />

its course springing from <strong>the</strong> very high mountains. Tho<br />

two dogs went <strong>of</strong>f after game without success, and came<br />

to us severely cut.<br />

* Evans intended to wnte “ rivulet,” hence <strong>the</strong> name “ River Lett”<br />

has been retained to <strong>the</strong> present day. In <strong>the</strong> day’s record for November<br />

26 he drops into ano<strong>the</strong>r form in describing this stream, and here<br />

calls it River Lett.<br />

Thursday, November 25.<br />

HE horses appeared fatigued, <strong>the</strong>refore determined on<br />

T remaining this day where we are, being abundance<br />

ex- T r 'a r u T a r y C r A e n<br />

& S T 'a Z S ifer'.


J 2 7 / a r r/ C / ir o r t? * , / '/ / / / ta / rt f r a n c s .<br />

C


q o C M a w k ]


J27c*t7y 7f/77ta>tf £/&su£ °[ I ^ JL<br />

£ e * i / u i / i r y e f / f i e / / < * j/ < r r > r<br />

came to a very high mount, whence I was much pleased<br />

with <strong>the</strong> sight westward. I think I can see 40 miles<br />

which had <strong>the</strong> look <strong>of</strong> an open country. To <strong>the</strong> south o?<br />

me <strong>the</strong>re are large hills, much higher than <strong>the</strong> one I am<br />

cn, with pasture to <strong>the</strong>ir tops. This range is ra<strong>the</strong>*’<br />

overrun with underwood and larger timber growing <strong>the</strong>reon,<br />

but <strong>the</strong> sides are as green as possible. In descending<br />

for two miles <strong>the</strong> verdure is good; <strong>the</strong> descent <strong>the</strong>n becomes<br />

steep for a quarter <strong>of</strong> a mile leading into a fine<br />

valley. At <strong>the</strong> end I met a large rivulet arising from<br />

<strong>the</strong> sou<strong>the</strong>rn hills. We shot ducks, and caught several<br />

trout weighing at least 51b or 61b each. Distance travelled,<br />

5£ miles.<br />

M<br />

Wednesday, December 1.<br />

Y course is down <strong>the</strong> rivulet. It appears to lead me<br />

north <strong>of</strong> west. On <strong>the</strong> north side <strong>of</strong> it at this<br />

place is a remarkable sugarloaf hill,* having a stone on<br />

<strong>the</strong> peak <strong>of</strong> it, which I have named after myself. I am<br />

more pleased with <strong>the</strong> country every day. It is a great<br />

extent <strong>of</strong> grazing land, without being divided by barren<br />

spaces, as on <strong>the</strong> east side <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> mountains, and well<br />

watered by running streams in almost every valley. I<br />

took a walk to <strong>the</strong> top <strong>of</strong> a very high mount, where I can<br />

see at least 50 miles west, which gives me great spirits.<br />

Distance travelled, miles.<br />

* This l<strong>of</strong>ty peak. 3200ft above sea-level, is now known as Evans’s<br />

Crown, in <strong>the</strong> neighbourhood <strong>of</strong> Tarana. It is plainly visible from<br />

<strong>the</strong> railway line. From this elevation Evans obtained his first glimpse<br />

o j <strong>the</strong> locality where <strong>the</strong> future city <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> was to stand.<br />

B<br />

Thursday, December 2.<br />

EING a wet morning, it was late before I could go<br />

forward. One <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> horses having a sore back, we<br />

were necessitated to put more weight on <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>rs. In<br />

consequence <strong>the</strong>re<strong>of</strong> our progress is trifling. On considering<br />

<strong>the</strong> fine country we have passed through this day,<br />

I think it equal to Van Diemen’s Land, <strong>the</strong> river winding<br />

through fine, fiats and round <strong>the</strong> points <strong>of</strong> small ridges<br />

that gradually descend to it, covered with <strong>the</strong> finest grass<br />

and intermixed with <strong>the</strong> white daisy, as in England. I<br />

shall not name <strong>the</strong> river until I am certain <strong>of</strong> its real<br />

course. Distance, 4| miles.<br />

I<br />

Friday, December 3.<br />

NOW find <strong>the</strong> mimosa in clusters on <strong>the</strong> banks <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

river. I am happy to think it favours me so much<br />

as to run <strong>the</strong> course I wish it. The country continues<br />

sood, particularly for grazing. Yet it has not been altoge<strong>the</strong>r<br />

so pleasing to <strong>the</strong> eye as before, being in some<br />

places overrun with a shrub among <strong>the</strong> grass, somewhat<br />

<strong>the</strong> same as on <strong>the</strong> Cowpastures, near <strong>the</strong> Stone Quarry<br />

Creek. The land is still <strong>of</strong> a light sandy nature, thinly<br />

wooded with small gums. We have not yet seen any<br />

natives, but can see <strong>the</strong>ir late tracks. Distance, 5| miles.<br />

M<br />

Saturday, December 4.<br />

Y progress is through an exceeding good tract <strong>of</strong><br />

country. It is <strong>the</strong> handsomest I have yet seen,<br />

with gentle rising hills and dales well watered. The<br />

distant hills, which are about five miles south, appear as<br />

grounds laid out, divided into fields by hedges. There<br />

,’fio+o. ^./Y aZ H er.<br />

A Portion <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>First</strong> Western Road beyond<br />

Mount Blaxland.<br />

Deviations have altered <strong>the</strong> road as originally planned.<br />

are few trees on <strong>the</strong>m, and <strong>the</strong> grass quite green. I still<br />

keep <strong>the</strong> river, and at times I walk a few miles south or<br />

north, as seems to me most requisite. The dogs killed a<br />

Jtangaroo, and <strong>the</strong> river supplies us with an abundance <strong>of</strong><br />

fish.*<br />

T<br />

* No distance travelled recorded this day. (Dec. 4.)<br />

Sunday, December 5.<br />

HE night was very wet. We were uncomfortable, having<br />

no means to shelter ourselves from it, as <strong>the</strong><br />

trees will not bark. It has rained most <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> day. About<br />

4 p.m. a violent thunderstorm came on. since <strong>the</strong> clouds<br />

seem to disperse; wind blowing fresh from <strong>the</strong> west. We<br />

remained near <strong>the</strong> river, as it is Sunday. The horses are<br />

getting fat, but I am sorry to observe <strong>the</strong>ir backs are<br />

getting sore. The saddles should have been lined. Straw<br />

stuffing is too hard to render it easy. We put our blankets<br />

under <strong>the</strong>m. I walked out this evening some miles.<br />

I cannot speak too highly <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> country; indeed, Tam<br />

now at a lo ss what to say, as it exceeds my expectations,<br />

and daily ^ets better. We are on an allowance <strong>of</strong> bread,<br />

having los so much by <strong>the</strong> bad wea<strong>the</strong>r on <strong>the</strong> mountains.<br />

W e require little pork in <strong>the</strong>se parts. A kangaroo can<br />

be procured at any time; <strong>the</strong>re are also emus. We killed<br />

some ducks this day.<br />

T<br />

Monday, December 6<br />

HEJj,night was very bad. I was greatly afraid <strong>the</strong><br />

wea<strong>the</strong>r would continue so. This morning it had a<br />

better appearance. The river now forms large ponds


q z Q > h / ) l c ]


o / ’t / e o r 'y e 7 f/ 7 7 ^ n *<br />

^3 45<br />

C e t i f e *<br />

>/ f c j/ e / j t t / % * / * ts ’<br />

[at <strong>the</strong> space <strong>of</strong> a mile or <strong>the</strong>reabouts. I came upon a fine<br />

■ plain <strong>of</strong> rich land, <strong>the</strong> handsomest country I ever saw—<br />

lit surpasses Port Dalrymple. This place is worth speakling<br />

<strong>of</strong> as good and beautiful. The tract <strong>of</strong> clear land<br />

[occupies about a mile on each side <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> river. I have<br />

[named it after <strong>the</strong> Lieutenant-Governor “ O’Connell <strong>Plains</strong>,”<br />

Ion which we saw a number <strong>of</strong> wild geese, but too shy<br />

■to let us near <strong>the</strong>m. The timber around is thinly scatt<br />

e r e d . I do not suppose <strong>the</strong>re are more than 10 gum-<br />

I trees on an acre. Their bark is amazingly thick, at least<br />

12 inches. At 3 o’clock I stopped a t <strong>the</strong> commencement<br />

■<strong>of</strong> a plain, still more pleasing and very extensive. 3<br />

I cannot see <strong>the</strong> termination <strong>of</strong> it north <strong>of</strong> me. The soL<br />

1 is exceedingly rich, and produces <strong>the</strong> finest grass, inter-<br />

I mixed with a variety <strong>of</strong> herbs. The hills have <strong>the</strong> look<br />

I <strong>of</strong> a park and grounds laid out. I am at a loss for<br />

|language to describe <strong>the</strong> country. I named this part<br />

“Macquarie <strong>Plains</strong>.” * I have walked till I am quite<br />

I fatigued, being so anxious to look about me. There is<br />

Igarae in abundance. If we want a fish, it is caught im-<br />

| m ed ia tely—<strong>the</strong>y seem to bite at any time. Had I brought<br />

quantity <strong>of</strong> salt we could cure some 1001b <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>m. I<br />

|am quite astonished at <strong>the</strong> number <strong>the</strong> men catch every<br />

■ evening. The dogs thrive on <strong>the</strong>m. I shall bring one<br />

|home with me. Distance travelled, 6 miles.<br />

"Lieutenant Lawson received a grant <strong>of</strong> 1000 acres at Macquarie<br />

I <strong>Plains</strong>, and shortly afterwards erected Macquarie House. «t.ill standing,<br />

and in possession <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> family for 36 years.<br />

I<br />

Tuesday, December 7.<br />

PROCEEDED over <strong>the</strong> plains, following <strong>the</strong> water, which<br />

I have named “ Fish River.” At about foiy miles I<br />

■ was brought up by a stream, nearly as large, from <strong>the</strong><br />

■ southward. I imagine I shall be necessitated to travel<br />

|UP it some distance to find a ford. I determined upon<br />

I so doing, and traced it about two miles, when we stopped<br />

I to secure ourselves from an approaching thunderstorm<br />

I that came on most severely, and threatens a wet night.<br />

|Distance travelled, 51 miles.<br />

W<br />

Wednesday, December 8.<br />

E are in spirits from <strong>the</strong> good appearance <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

morning. We hope it will be fine, as none <strong>of</strong> us<br />

■ have been thoroughly dry <strong>the</strong>se three days and nights, i<br />

I ste no signs <strong>of</strong> a ford at present, <strong>the</strong>refore am obliged tc<br />

[continue tracing up <strong>the</strong> stream. At two miles begins<br />

|a Plain <strong>of</strong> rich land, which I call “ Mitchell <strong>Plains</strong>.” Observing<br />

from a hill that <strong>the</strong> course <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> water springs<br />

I from <strong>the</strong> SE, I made up my mind to contrive a bridge to<br />

I convey our luggage over. It was done in <strong>the</strong> following<br />

I banner:—By driving two forked logs in <strong>the</strong> mud as far in<br />

I <strong>the</strong> water as we dare venture, and by laying a piece <strong>of</strong><br />

l wood in <strong>the</strong> forks, forming a gallows; a party swam across<br />

l and did <strong>the</strong> same on <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r side. We <strong>the</strong>n felled trees,<br />

|as large as six <strong>of</strong> us could carry, and rolled <strong>the</strong>m down<br />

I <strong>the</strong> bank. As soon as one end was carried into <strong>the</strong> water,<br />

■ <strong>the</strong> stream sent it round, and <strong>the</strong> ropes secured round th«?<br />

lend prevented it being carried too far. We lifted two<br />

|°f <strong>the</strong>se up, which reached from one gallows to <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r,<br />

land two from each bank to a gallows, over which we<br />

■Passed our necessaries, and swam <strong>the</strong> horses, first eon-<br />

I ''eying to <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r side a rope that held <strong>the</strong>m, o<strong>the</strong>rwise<br />

force <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> water would have carried <strong>the</strong>m a great<br />

distance, as it did <strong>the</strong> men who swam across.* I am<br />

much pleased with our exertions, which took some hours,<br />

and enabled us to reach <strong>the</strong> junction <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> rivers by<br />

sunset. The country is beautiful; no mountains to be<br />

seen. There are high hills at great distances, but can<br />

observe <strong>the</strong>m green to <strong>the</strong>ir tops.<br />

<strong>of</strong> water “ Campbell River.” t<br />

Y1<br />

I named <strong>the</strong> last run<br />

* This was <strong>the</strong> first bridge built in <strong>the</strong> western district,<br />

t No record <strong>of</strong> distance travelled this day, beyond that undertaken<br />

in following up <strong>the</strong> river to find a ford (four miles). This had<br />

to be retraced, rr, ra<strong>the</strong>r, two miles <strong>of</strong> it, to <strong>the</strong> camp, on <strong>the</strong><br />

previous evening.<br />

Thursday, December 9.<br />

IHAVE called <strong>the</strong> main stream “ Macquarie River.” At<br />

21 miles commenced a most extensive plain. The<br />

|hills around are fine indeed. It requires a clever person<br />

to describe this country properly. I never saw anything<br />

to equal it. The soil is good. I think <strong>the</strong> lower parts<br />

o f <strong>the</strong> plains are overflowed at times, but do not see marks<br />

to any height. The small trees on <strong>the</strong> lower banks <strong>of</strong><br />

tb > river stand straight, not lying down, as you see <strong>the</strong>m<br />

or <strong>the</strong> banks <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> river and creeks at <strong>the</strong> Hawkesbury.<br />

The grass here might be mowed, it is so thick and long,<br />

particularly on <strong>the</strong> flat lands. Distance travelled, 8J<br />

miles.<br />

Friday, December 10.<br />

ESTERDAY’S track left me much north<br />

<strong>of</strong> west. To-day it is south <strong>of</strong> it.<br />

The extent <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> plain following <strong>the</strong><br />

river is 11 miles, and about two wide on<br />

each side, <strong>the</strong> whole excellent good land,<br />

and <strong>the</strong> best grass I have seen in any part<br />

<strong>of</strong> New South Wales. The hills are also<br />

covered with fine pasture, <strong>the</strong> trees being<br />

so far apart must be an acquisition to its<br />

growth. At <strong>the</strong> termination <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> plain<br />

is a very handsome mount. I named it<br />

i “ Mount Pleasant," from <strong>the</strong> prospect It<br />

commands to <strong>the</strong> NE.* The river now winds<br />

itself round <strong>the</strong> points <strong>of</strong> forest hills,<br />

nearly <strong>the</strong> same as described some days<br />

since. Emus are numerous. The dogs<br />

will not give chase. I imagine <strong>the</strong>y are<br />

bad ones. We have not been able to get a<br />

shot at any <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> geese; although plentiful,<br />

<strong>the</strong>y are so shy; but we frequently shoot<br />

ducks. Nothing astonishes me more than <strong>the</strong><br />

amazing large fish that are caught. One<br />

is now brought in that weighs at least<br />

151b. They are all <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> same species.<br />

I call <strong>the</strong> plains last passed over “ <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

<strong>Plains</strong>.” Distance travelled, 7J miles.<br />

"This plain was destined in later years to form <strong>the</strong><br />

site whereon <strong>the</strong> city <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> was built.<br />

Saturday, December 1 1.<br />

HE fine pasture continues, but <strong>the</strong>re is a<br />

T great alteration in <strong>the</strong> look <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

country. The river leads me among hills,<br />

<strong>the</strong> points <strong>of</strong> which end in rocky bluffs near<br />

<strong>the</strong> water. At about four miles I was<br />

brought up by one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>m, which appears<br />

to be <strong>the</strong> termination <strong>of</strong> a range <strong>of</strong> high<br />

hills from <strong>the</strong> south, and is <strong>the</strong> only mass<br />

<strong>of</strong> rocks I have met with since leaving <strong>the</strong>


q + f H a n f c ]<br />

<<br />

i '<br />

■<br />

*


<strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong>. I determined on halting<br />

for a few hours, that I may be enabled<br />

to look about me. I ascended a peak and<br />

found that <strong>the</strong> river turned about NW<br />

around <strong>the</strong> points <strong>of</strong> stupendous green hills<br />

to <strong>the</strong> south and south-west. I cannot discern<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir end. The tops <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> distant<br />

ones sfy)w <strong>the</strong>mselves for a great extent.<br />

On <strong>the</strong> north side <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> river is also a ridge<br />

<strong>of</strong> pasture hills that range westward, to<br />

<strong>the</strong> east appears <strong>the</strong> fine country I came<br />

over. I am pleased to find <strong>the</strong> large hills<br />

are covered with grass, nor can I discern<br />

any rocky ranges with pine trees, except<br />

<strong>the</strong> one I am on. The pines have a very<br />

romantic appearance—so very different from<br />

any o<strong>the</strong>r part. The largest <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>m is<br />

about 4ft in circumference. I am fearful<br />

<strong>of</strong> bad travelling for a few miles. It is<br />

not so inconvenient to ourselves as to <strong>the</strong><br />

horses with <strong>the</strong>ir sore backs. The north<br />

side looks well, but we cannot cross <strong>the</strong><br />

water. I have found a pass for <strong>the</strong> horses<br />

and gone forward. It is not quite so bad<br />

travelling as I expected. There are many<br />

rocks, but <strong>the</strong> pasture is good. Distance<br />

travelled 6£ miles.<br />

Sunday, December 12.<br />

E stopped this day. I took a walk<br />

W for a few iniles to <strong>the</strong> SW, and found<br />

it a fine country for pasture, being steep,<br />

healthy hills thickly covered with grass.<br />

Water in almost every valley.<br />

Monday, December 13.<br />

HE hills are still steep, and not quite<br />

T so fine as those we have passed. They<br />

are ra<strong>the</strong>r rough with rocks, yet <strong>the</strong> pasture<br />

is good. The gums are much larger,<br />

and intermixed with <strong>the</strong> box-tree. The soil<br />

is <strong>of</strong> a stiffer nature, having pieces <strong>of</strong> alabaster<br />

rock among it. The highlands in<br />

general throughout have a great deal about<br />

<strong>the</strong>m. That on <strong>the</strong> surface is quite white<br />

in some places, and <strong>of</strong> a yellow cast in<br />

o<strong>the</strong>rs. I do not know what to make <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

river, its course seems so irregular. The<br />

direction to-day has been from SW to NE.<br />

The hills are so very high and close that<br />

from any one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>m its run cannot be distinguished.<br />

I have hopes <strong>of</strong> coming to<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir end and being able to judge what part<br />

<strong>the</strong> river leads to.*<br />

*No record <strong>of</strong> distance travelled this day.<br />

Wednesday, December 15.<br />

UR road is very rugged, and <strong>the</strong><br />

O hills increase in size, but covered with<br />

fine grass. I was upon a very high one, but<br />

could not determine <strong>the</strong>ir end; from <strong>the</strong> b<br />

to W <strong>the</strong>y are stupendous. The only °P®P<br />

country to be observed is from NW to E.<br />

These hills surpass any grazing tract on <strong>the</strong><br />

east side <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> mountain. In <strong>the</strong> valleys<br />

<strong>the</strong> grass is long and thick, which makes it<br />

fatiguing to pass over <strong>the</strong>m. I begin to<br />

think <strong>of</strong> returning. The dogs not Tienig<br />

good <strong>the</strong>re is no certainty <strong>of</strong> obtaining<br />

skins for our feet. The stones and grass<br />

have cut our shoes to pieces. Distance<br />

travelled, 7 miles.<br />

Thursday, December 16.<br />

IMADE up my mind to return in <strong>the</strong> morning,<br />

seeing no hope <strong>of</strong> approaching <strong>the</strong><br />

end <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> high range <strong>of</strong> hills. I would most<br />

willingly proceed fur<strong>the</strong>r, but <strong>the</strong> horses'<br />

backs are so bad, and no idea can be formed<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> situation we are in with respect to<br />

our feet. With patching and mending we<br />

may manage to reach home. I am now 98£<br />

measured miles from <strong>the</strong> limitation <strong>of</strong> Mr.<br />

Blaxland’s excursion. Most part <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

distance is through a finer country than I<br />

can describe, not being able, for want <strong>of</strong><br />

language, to dwell on <strong>the</strong> subject, or explain<br />

its real and good appearance with pen and<br />

ink.<br />

(These extracts take us to <strong>the</strong> end ol<br />

Evans's journey. The remainder <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> diary<br />

describes <strong>the</strong> return journey, which was<br />

completed on Saturday, January 8, 1814.)<br />

Tuesday, December 14.<br />

HE country is much about <strong>the</strong> same for<br />

T two miles. The hills <strong>the</strong>n get steeper<br />

and not so good; indeed, it is <strong>the</strong> worst part<br />

I have been over since leaving <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong><br />

<strong>Mountains</strong>. This place resembles <strong>the</strong> hills<br />

about Mount Hunter at <strong>the</strong> Cowpastures. I<br />

hope we shall soon be through <strong>the</strong>se high<br />

lands, being bad travelling, and I am afraid<br />

we shall soon feel <strong>the</strong> need <strong>of</strong> shoes. The (<br />

river still winds much, and forms some very<br />

curious bends. Killed a kangaroo and two


To <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> <strong>Plains</strong>.<br />

« T 7 ELSO” asks what route Surveyor Evans tra-<br />

I V versed in his memorable journey to <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>Bathurst</strong> <strong>Plains</strong>.—He followed <strong>the</strong> tracks <strong>of</strong><br />

Blaxland, Wentworth, and Lawson to <strong>the</strong>ir final<br />

camping place beyond <strong>the</strong> mountains, <strong>the</strong>n took <strong>the</strong><br />

Fish River as a guide, crossing it near its junction<br />

with <strong>the</strong> Campbell River. He never left <strong>the</strong><br />

watercourse except for an occasional excursion into<br />

<strong>the</strong> bush. On <strong>the</strong> return journey a wider area was<br />

covered some distance from <strong>the</strong> stream, <strong>the</strong> outward<br />

track being entirely ignored. The above<br />

sketch <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> route is taken from <strong>the</strong> explorer’s<br />

diary. (The original map is now in <strong>the</strong> British<br />

Museum.) The outward journey is marked by small<br />

dashes, <strong>the</strong> homeward by longer dashes and dots.<br />

Excerpts from <strong>the</strong> diary are published in ano<strong>the</strong>r<br />

portion <strong>of</strong> this issue.


A I V / L i O v / #<br />

A Historic H om e<br />

in <strong>the</strong><br />

W estern District. ei/A/fat %<br />

BY FRANK WALKER<br />

/ 2 .. r f . t f .<br />

HE exact date <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> erection <strong>of</strong> Macquarie<br />

House is uncertain-—probably<br />

about 1820, as William Lawson was<br />

appointed Comman^jpit and Justice<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Peace at <strong>Bathurst</strong> towards<br />

<strong>the</strong> end <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> previous year, and<br />

would in all probability see to <strong>the</strong><br />

erection <strong>of</strong> his house on <strong>the</strong> land he<br />

owned as soon as possible after his<br />

<strong>of</strong>ficial appointment was made. In<br />

1832 his son William acquired <strong>the</strong><br />

property, and ^resided <strong>the</strong>re for upwards <strong>of</strong> twenty<br />

years. During his fa<strong>the</strong>r’s occupation <strong>the</strong> old home<br />

must have had, on certain occasions, Governor Maejuarie<br />

as an inmate, and in all probability <strong>the</strong> great man<br />

uring his visits to <strong>Bathurst</strong> was a welcome guest at <strong>the</strong>?<br />

ospitable home <strong>of</strong> his friend and bro<strong>the</strong>r <strong>of</strong>ficer. The<br />

ost interesting account <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> old residence, as it apeared<br />

nearly 70 years ago, is to be found in Lieutenantolonel<br />

Mundy’s entertaining work, “ Our Antipodes.” This<br />

lallant <strong>of</strong>ficer was A.D.C. to Governor Pitzroy, and in<br />

$46 accompanied him on a tour across <strong>the</strong> mountains to<br />

athurst. The description is so entertaining, and affords<br />

uch an excellent idea <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> general aspect <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> dis*<br />

'ict in those days, that it is worth reproducing. Tha<br />

arty consisted <strong>of</strong> his Excellency Sir Charles and Lady<br />

itzroy, Mr. George Fitzroy (<strong>the</strong> private secretary), Mr.<br />

!, Deas Thomson, <strong>the</strong> Colonial Secretary, and <strong>the</strong> narator.<br />

They left Sydney on November 9, 1846, and were<br />

ccompanied by two mounted police as escort and five<br />

ervants. The narrative <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> journey is brim full <strong>of</strong><br />

nteresting anecdotes and shrewd observations on <strong>the</strong><br />

ppearance <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> country and its inhabitants, whilst it<br />

s not wanting in humour. In due time <strong>the</strong> neighbourhood<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> was reached, and now <strong>the</strong> gallant Colonel<br />

ay be allowed to speak for himself:—<br />

fr F ,ROTTING with a free rein along <strong>the</strong> natural road,<br />

1 smooth as a racecourse—no little treat, after three<br />

days <strong>of</strong> cautious driving—a few miles brought us to Macquarie<br />

^<strong>Plains</strong>, <strong>the</strong> seat (as <strong>the</strong> guide-books say) <strong>of</strong> ' Mr.<br />

William Lawson, where we were most kindly received and<br />

comfortably accommodated. The house looks over a wide<br />

extent <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> plains. In its rear are extensive <strong>of</strong>fices,<br />

farm buildings, stockyards, stables, etc., requisite for one<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> largest grazing and breeding ^establishments in Australia.<br />

i Detached, at a sliort distance, is a ' garden, useful<br />

and ornamental, a mixture <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> flower and kitchen garden.<br />

full <strong>of</strong> English productions—roses, and o<strong>the</strong>r old floral<br />

friends!in great pr<strong>of</strong>usion, cherries, peaches, apples, pears,<br />

and grapes, abundance <strong>of</strong> fine vegetables, not one <strong>of</strong> which<br />

plants, ■ornate or esculent—or, indeed, any that I know<br />

<strong>of</strong>—is indigenous to this originally outlandish and unproductive.<br />

country. . . . Besides Mr." Lawson’s family,<br />

<strong>the</strong>re were several guests at Macquarie <strong>Plains</strong>, and <strong>the</strong><br />

house was stretched, by <strong>the</strong> hospitality <strong>of</strong> its owners, large<br />

enough to contain <strong>the</strong> whole <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Governor’s party, a<br />

spacious additional room having been, however, tem porarily<br />

erected for purposes <strong>of</strong> refection. In this same<br />

room <strong>the</strong>re dined, to meet his Excellency, no fewer than<br />

35 ladies and gentlemen, whom <strong>the</strong> provincial journal<br />

described as a ‘select- party <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> elite <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong>,’ a<br />

phrase conveying <strong>the</strong> idea <strong>of</strong> an extraordinary degree <strong>of</strong><br />

social sifting. Yes, at this Australian country seat, 150<br />

miles from Sydney, at which emporium European’supplies<br />

arrive, after four or five months’ voyage, enhanced nearly<br />

double in price, and with <strong>the</strong> superadded risk, difficulty,<br />

and expense consequent on a dray journey <strong>of</strong> ano<strong>the</strong>r halfmonth<br />

across almost impassable mountains, we found a welldamasked<br />

table for thirty or forty persons, handsome china<br />

and plate, excellent cookery, a pr<strong>of</strong>usion <strong>of</strong> hock, claret,<br />

and champagne, a beautiful dessert <strong>of</strong> European fruits—<br />

in short, a really capital English dinner. . . One <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

delicacies at Mr. Lawson’s table on this occasion was <strong>the</strong><br />

freshwater cod-perch, or Grystes peelli, only found on<br />

this side <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> mountains. One fish was more than sufficient<br />

for <strong>the</strong> whole party.”<br />

ACQUARIE HOUSE was reached on November 14, <strong>the</strong><br />

M journey thi<strong>the</strong>r having occupied exactly five days.<br />

The party remained several days under Mr. Lawson’s hospitable<br />

ro<strong>of</strong>, and fur<strong>the</strong>r on in <strong>the</strong> narrative we get ano<strong>the</strong>r<br />

glimpse <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> old home. Says <strong>the</strong> Colonel:—“ This |<br />

was a day <strong>of</strong> excessive sultriness, a day on which Diogenes<br />

would have desired Alexander to ‘stand fast’ between him<br />

and <strong>the</strong> sun, instead <strong>of</strong> countermarching <strong>the</strong> king to <strong>the</strong><br />

rear <strong>of</strong> his tent. The plains were burnt brown and hard<br />

as a brick; <strong>the</strong> sky, from zenith to horizon, was one<br />

unveiled glare. The fervour <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> atmosphere was visible<br />

in <strong>the</strong> hollow, quivering in <strong>the</strong> misty wreaths. But <strong>the</strong><br />

grain fields were full <strong>of</strong> quail, so with two bro<strong>the</strong>r-sportsmen<br />

I sailed out for <strong>the</strong>ir destruction in what might<br />

appropriately have been called <strong>the</strong> warm’ <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> evening.<br />

Upwards <strong>of</strong> thirty couple were soon bagged, <strong>the</strong> son <strong>of</strong><br />

Nimrod,*'with his twenty years <strong>of</strong> Indian experience, fo l­<br />

lowing up <strong>the</strong> sport with untiring vigour, while Fitzroy<br />

and myself, Stumbling upon a small branch <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> nearly<br />

dry Macquarie, deposited our guns and raiment on th? bank I<br />

<strong>of</strong> a waterhole, and hastening into <strong>the</strong> 'stream remained^<br />

* Mr. Apperley, <strong>the</strong> great sporting writer.


some time, wallowing, with our noses above <strong>the</strong><br />

V like a couple <strong>of</strong> Mr. Gordon Cummins’s hippo-<br />

. . . If <strong>the</strong> wea<strong>the</strong>r was unsuitable to outdoor<br />

, nei<strong>the</strong>r did it better accord with a drawing-room<br />

s day by Lady Mary Fitzroy at <strong>Bathurst</strong>, nor with<br />

-party <strong>of</strong> forty or fifty persons, followed by a ball<br />

larie <strong>Plains</strong>. I did not attend <strong>the</strong> former <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>se<br />

>ns, but rumour whispered—untruly, <strong>of</strong> course—<br />

ous discord had arisen, owing to certain fair ones,<br />

g, it was thought, too strongly <strong>of</strong> ‘<strong>the</strong> shop,’ hav-<br />

^cured to mingle with <strong>the</strong> local aristocracy in <strong>of</strong>fer-<br />

>eir devoirs to <strong>the</strong> Governor's much-respected lady,<br />

ause <strong>of</strong> this not uncommon jealousy <strong>of</strong> position in<br />

; 'ncial and colonial circles is obvious enough—where<br />

! iries are ill-marked, trespasses are common. Apropos<br />

j is subject, at later date I had <strong>the</strong> pleasure <strong>of</strong> making<br />

f r acquaintance with a lady in a neighbouring colony<br />

on some question <strong>of</strong> female precedence, did undoubt-<br />

{ assert that she was ‘<strong>the</strong> rankest lady present.’ As<br />

<strong>the</strong> ball, <strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>rmometer stood steadily at 92deg.,<br />

le we. on <strong>the</strong> contrary, danced furiously on <strong>the</strong> brick<br />

r..<strong>of</strong>-<strong>the</strong> verandah f-rom 9 o’clock till daylight. Patent<br />

her boots and white satin shoes soon became like <strong>the</strong><br />

titudinous sea, ‘one red’ ; <strong>the</strong> air we brea<strong>the</strong>d was like<br />

Sydney brickfielder in hue; <strong>the</strong> music, or ra<strong>the</strong>r <strong>the</strong><br />

d, was excruciating—I can find no milder term for it.<br />

imly reminded me—especially after I had retired to<br />

and it came o’ er my soul in dreams—<strong>of</strong> a description<br />

ome old book where a company <strong>of</strong> musicians, playing<br />

laricorns, dulcimers, and such-like instruments <strong>of</strong> tor-<br />

, are described as causing ‘so delectable a noise, <strong>the</strong><br />

was never before heard.’ . . . . Everyonfc danced<br />

l his or her, might, from <strong>the</strong> veteran captain who<br />

grated fif*y years ago| and who led <strong>the</strong> dancers all<br />

it, to his well-grown and handsome granddaughters,<br />

T h a t a delightful peep this is into <strong>the</strong> pastimes <strong>of</strong><br />

' <strong>the</strong> long ago! The very bricks on <strong>the</strong> verandah,<br />

r whose surface <strong>the</strong> flying feet <strong>of</strong> youth and age chased<br />

y <strong>the</strong> glowing hours, are still <strong>the</strong>re, somewhat rough<br />

t uneven now; but what stories <strong>the</strong>y could tell were <strong>the</strong>y<br />

owed with speech! The long, creeper-covered verandah<br />

■i looks out oyer <strong>the</strong> plains, and <strong>the</strong> remains <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

i. English garden, so eloquently referred to by <strong>the</strong> facile<br />

<strong>of</strong> this observant soldier, may yet be traced, and<br />

tless many <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> existing sturdy plants, long ago<br />

{ ft <strong>of</strong> all semblance <strong>of</strong> blooms, are <strong>the</strong> reiics <strong>of</strong> some<br />

miliar shrub which formerly delighted English eyes.<br />

iere are queer, crooked staircases and long low rooms in<br />

interior <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> old house, which once echoed to <strong>the</strong><br />

>yous songs and laughter <strong>of</strong> that gay company, assembled<br />

<strong>the</strong>re well on to seventy years ago. Flocks <strong>of</strong> quail<br />

till haunt <strong>the</strong> quiet fields, probably <strong>the</strong> very descendants<br />

ihose which escaped <strong>the</strong> gallant Colonel’s gun, and <strong>the</strong><br />

Id stables on <strong>the</strong> rise yonder are exactly <strong>the</strong> same, save<br />

>r plainly visible signs <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> strain and stress <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Massing years. Away in <strong>the</strong> distance, when <strong>the</strong> setting<br />

fun lights up <strong>the</strong> windows and ro<strong>of</strong>s <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong>, marking<br />

(he spot where a big city now covers <strong>the</strong> plains, <strong>the</strong> prospect<br />

from <strong>the</strong> old home in <strong>the</strong> days <strong>of</strong> Fitzroy was a far<br />

lifferent one, and <strong>the</strong> rolling plains and gently swelling<br />

lills were but sparsely populated, <strong>the</strong> ultimate destiny<br />

<strong>of</strong> this region being closely wrapped up in <strong>the</strong> mists <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> future years.<br />

HERE is something infinitely pa<strong>the</strong>tic about this old<br />

T homestead, now hastening on to a time when its<br />

walls cannot longer hold toge<strong>the</strong>r. The crumbling plaster<br />

in many places has fallen away, and <strong>the</strong> red bricks in all<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir nakedness stand revealed to <strong>the</strong> eye. The woodwork'<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> verandah is seamed and cracked, and <strong>the</strong><br />

silent though deadly work <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> white ant is apparent<br />

where cedar is not used. And what wonderful preservation<br />

this splendid timber shows, where all around is<br />

decay! The great doors, four or five inches through; <strong>the</strong><br />

solid and substantial casements and wainscoting; <strong>the</strong><br />

sturdy balustrades encircling <strong>the</strong> old staircase—all <strong>the</strong>se<br />

seem pro<strong>of</strong> against time itself, and are apparently indestructible.<br />

Here is a trapdoor—where does it lead to?<br />

Descend <strong>the</strong> steep flight <strong>of</strong> stairs at <strong>the</strong> rear <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> building,<br />

leading to regions unknown, below <strong>the</strong> floor <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

house, and a sinister-looking apartment, measuring aboui<br />

five feet square, with an arched ro<strong>of</strong>, is revealed by. <strong>the</strong><br />

light <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> candle. Here* in utter darkness, devoid <strong>of</strong><br />

air or ventilation <strong>of</strong> any sort, <strong>the</strong> delinquent servant <strong>of</strong><br />

that unfortunate class so numerous in <strong>the</strong> days <strong>the</strong> Colonel<br />

writes about, spent many a miserable hour ruminating<br />

on his painful lot. The remains <strong>of</strong> a solid and substantial<br />

door, once no doubt firmly fixed into position by iron bolts<br />

and bars, is fur<strong>the</strong>r evidence <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> former use to which<br />

this grim apartment was put, and it is not without some<br />

feeling <strong>of</strong> relief that <strong>the</strong> old dungeon is left once more<br />

Ito its cobwebs and dust. Macquarie House will eventually<br />

pass away and become but a memory; but <strong>the</strong> district<br />

it has seen emerge into a strong and4usty manhood<br />

will continue to thrive and prosper, and <strong>the</strong> story <strong>of</strong> its<br />

progress can never be dissociated from <strong>the</strong> strong human<br />

|element which in <strong>the</strong> early stages <strong>of</strong> its career helped<br />

so largely to direct its infant steps.<br />

A s a reward for <strong>the</strong>ir heroic undertaking in<br />

discovering a route over <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong>,<br />

Blaxland, Lawson, and Wentworth were<br />

each granted 1000 acres <strong>of</strong> land in <strong>the</strong><br />

territory discovered soon afterwards hy<br />

Deputy Surveyor-General Evans, and named<br />

by him O ’ Connell, Macquarie, and <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

<strong>Plains</strong>. Lawson chose his grant on M acquarie<br />

<strong>Plains</strong> (<strong>Bathurst</strong>), and erected a substantial<br />

residence, which he called<br />

Macquarie, or, as it is generally<br />

spolfen <strong>of</strong>, Macquarie House.<br />

This old building, dating from<br />

about 1820, is still in existence.


53 ,0?<br />

___ /e u n r V &/■'f i e /P e e /fcr v r /^ /tr r n i’<br />

r r ./ 3.<br />

The <strong>First</strong> Settlers<br />

This interesting sketch <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> men who were<br />

connected with <strong>the</strong> first settlement <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>Bathurst</strong> district a hundred years ago is from<br />

<strong>the</strong> pen <strong>of</strong> a descendant <strong>of</strong> one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> pioneers.<br />

in The West.<br />

It reminds us <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> difficulties that<br />

had to be faced, and <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> energy and<br />

enthusiasm with which <strong>the</strong>se were overcome.<br />

BY “ PIONEER.’<br />

HUNDRED YEARS ! How things<br />

have changed in that time! If those<br />

first ten pioneers who followed so<br />

quickly in <strong>the</strong> footsteps <strong>of</strong> Blaxland,<br />

Wentworth, Lawson, and<br />

Evans over <strong>the</strong> wild <strong>Blue</strong> Mountain<br />

ranges to accept <strong>the</strong> Government’s-<strong>of</strong>fer<br />

<strong>of</strong> .free grants <strong>of</strong> land<br />

at Kelso and <strong>Bathurst</strong> could return<br />

to-day, what would be ttieir feelings?<br />

Would <strong>the</strong>y recognise in 'th e .<br />

wide, well-kept’, tree-lined streets’, with <strong>the</strong>ir beautiful<br />

parks and l<strong>of</strong>ty buildings, and <strong>the</strong>ir throngs <strong>of</strong> gay humanity,<br />

with all <strong>the</strong> modern conveniences <strong>of</strong> travel, <strong>the</strong> silent<br />

scene, peopled only with dusky aboriginals and wild animals,<br />

that, greeted <strong>the</strong>m o n . <strong>the</strong>ir arrival with camping<br />

outfit to form <strong>the</strong> nucleus <strong>of</strong> this now flourishing city?<br />

T<br />

<strong>First</strong> Ten Settlers.<br />

HE first 'ten settlers were,- I believe, Messrs. James<br />

Vincent, John Nevell, Richard Mills, Thomas Kite,<br />

Joseph Moulder, George Kable, William Lee, Thomas<br />

Cheshire, John. Dargin, and.rApplett, and <strong>the</strong>y were men<br />

who wrote <strong>the</strong>ir names indelibly on <strong>the</strong>’ pages <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> early<br />

history <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> colony. Some <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> younger branches <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong>se old families still reside within <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> districts—notably<br />

<strong>the</strong> Lees, Kites, and Kables. The Moulder<br />

family is well known about Orange and Condobolin.<br />

Amongst <strong>the</strong> best known <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Mills family is Dr. Arthur<br />

Mills, <strong>of</strong> Sydney, whose uncle, George Mills, was <strong>the</strong> first<br />

white child born in <strong>Bathurst</strong>, and to whom <strong>the</strong> Government<br />

<strong>of</strong>fered a grant <strong>of</strong> 100 acres <strong>of</strong> land. The Nevells<br />

are now resident in <strong>the</strong> Mudgee and Rylstone districts <strong>of</strong><br />

New South Wales and in Western Queensland. In <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

identity is sunk that <strong>of</strong> James Vincent, whose only surviving<br />

child became <strong>the</strong> wife <strong>of</strong> John Nevell, and <strong>the</strong>y still<br />

hold <strong>the</strong> Vincent grant <strong>of</strong> land, <strong>the</strong> Nevell grant, on part<br />

<strong>of</strong> which <strong>the</strong> Kelso railway station now stands, having<br />

been sold within <strong>the</strong> last few years. The whereabouts<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> descendants <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Cheshires, Appletts, and Dargins<br />

have passed from <strong>the</strong> writer's knowledge.<br />

Farming with Garden Hoes.<br />

OR years <strong>the</strong> pioneers’ holdings were unfenced, land-<br />

F marks at first, and later a ploughed furrow, being used<br />

to define <strong>the</strong> boundaries <strong>of</strong> each farm. The Government<br />

supplied <strong>the</strong> seed wheat, which was put in by means <strong>of</strong><br />

a garden hoe, and when <strong>the</strong> crops were harvested each<br />

farmer had to return to <strong>the</strong> Government as much seed<br />

grain as he had been supplied with. This rule assured<br />

a plentiful supply <strong>of</strong> seed always in <strong>the</strong> Government stores.<br />

A great, improvement in farming came when wooden<br />

ploughs were obtainable Mr. James Rankin was one <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> first to own one in <strong>Bathurst</strong>. He <strong>of</strong>fered to giv';<br />

<strong>the</strong> plough to Mr. Nevell if he would carry it home on<br />

his back. The distance was about a couple .<strong>of</strong> miles, and<br />

<strong>the</strong> plough was heavy; but it was a great prize, so <strong>the</strong><br />

hardy pioneer accepted <strong>the</strong> <strong>of</strong>fer and carried it home.<br />

Hand Mills for Grinding Flour.<br />

HE wheat was reaped by hand and bound in sheaves,<br />

T <strong>the</strong>n stacked, thatch for covering being made from<br />

rushes from <strong>the</strong> river-banks. It was afterwards threshed<br />

with a flail and ground into flour with steel hand-mills.<br />

In <strong>the</strong> early days <strong>the</strong> assigned servants (convicts) were<br />

each given seven quarts <strong>of</strong> wheat on Saturday, and that<br />

afternoon <strong>the</strong>y ground <strong>the</strong>ir weekly supply <strong>of</strong> flour from<br />

it. Tools were, <strong>of</strong> course, rare, and <strong>the</strong>re is still in<br />

existence a very roughly made hammer that twro <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

old <strong>Bathurst</strong> neighbours went into partnership to share<br />

<strong>the</strong> expense <strong>of</strong> buying.<br />

T<br />

Kite’ s Cabbage Garden.<br />

HEN <strong>the</strong>re was K ite’s cabbage garden. There were<br />

numerous inquiries about this when it became known<br />

that Mr. Kite had announced that he would give a cabbage<br />

garden to any man who was capable <strong>of</strong> minding “ his<br />

own business.” Each applicant for it was subjected to<br />

a rigorous cross-examination by Mr. Kite on his ability<br />

to mind ,his own business, and <strong>the</strong> conversation generally<br />

ended by Mr. Kite saying: “ Well, this cabbage garden is<br />

my business. May I ask what you have to do with It?”


J f/ 3 -, ■ ~ j% e -/ 7 K r fJ c / / / e .r s / * * r f e / P e e / . C c A i/ftttr r r /r f /%'e Jfe*?/?/?/ /% t/,r tv<br />

5 4<br />

The c, tbbage garden, <strong>of</strong> course, never found ano<strong>the</strong>r<br />

owner, and became <strong>the</strong> joke <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> district.<br />

The <strong>First</strong> Church.<br />

HE first free settlers lived in Kelso, <strong>the</strong> penal settlement<br />

being ^at <strong>Bathurst</strong>, a mile distant, <strong>the</strong> Mac­<br />

T<br />

quarie River flowing between. The first church built<br />

over tfte <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong> was <strong>the</strong> Church <strong>of</strong> England at<br />

Kelso, and <strong>the</strong> Bible used at <strong>the</strong> opening service in <strong>the</strong><br />

present building, which succeeded a small wooden one, is<br />

now in <strong>the</strong> possession <strong>of</strong> Mrs. H. W. Nevell, Chinchilla,<br />

Queensland, her fa<strong>the</strong>r, <strong>the</strong> late Mr. W. E. Sampson, having<br />

exchanged his pocket Bible for <strong>the</strong> large church Bible<br />

with <strong>the</strong> Rev. Keane when he (Mr. Keane) was returning<br />

to England. This Bible is in an excellent state <strong>of</strong> preservation,<br />

and is bound in dark red calf with gold letter-<br />

, ing. It was printed in 1772 in <strong>the</strong> old English type,<br />

making it somewhat difficult for <strong>the</strong> present-day student<br />

to read. It also contains <strong>the</strong> 14 books <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Apocrypha,<br />

which are not usually bound in <strong>the</strong> Bibles <strong>of</strong> to-day. Upon<br />

its pages are many marginal notes and marked texts <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> preachers who have passed from us. I will quote a<br />

few:—22nd chapter Proverbs, 6th verse (<strong>the</strong> Bishop’s sermon<br />

at Thorpe, August 9, 1816); 7th chapter Hebrews,<br />

25th verse (Mr. Scott, November 26, 1815); 2nd chapter<br />

Exodus, 8, 9, 10 verses (Mr. Jefferson’s charity sermon<br />

at Ramsay, December 1, 1816). Then <strong>the</strong>re are <strong>the</strong> names<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Revs. Whinfield. Harrison, Scott (<strong>the</strong> younger)—<br />

entries that have stood <strong>the</strong> test <strong>of</strong> time for nearly a<br />

hundred years, for I fancy <strong>the</strong>se were all English clergymen.<br />

who used <strong>the</strong> book before it was brought to help<br />

in Divine worship in our sou<strong>the</strong>rn clime. This Bible<br />

was also used at <strong>the</strong> opening <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> first churches at<br />

<strong>Bathurst</strong> and Mudgee.<br />

An Interesting Book.<br />

OOKS were rare when Parson Keane (as he was known<br />

B by his flock) lived in <strong>Bathurst</strong>, and interest attaches<br />

also to a small book, “ Rise and Progress <strong>of</strong> Religion<br />

in <strong>the</strong> Soul,” bearing in his handwriting <strong>the</strong> inscription,<br />

“ From Mr. Keane to Mr. Vincent and Mr. and<br />

Mrs. Nevell, for <strong>the</strong>ir joint use. May God’s blessing<br />

attend that use. Parsonage, January 1st, 1835.” Though<br />

<strong>the</strong> writing has not faded on <strong>the</strong> leaf, yellow with age,<br />

no doubt <strong>the</strong> giver, as well as <strong>the</strong> recipients, has long<br />

since joined <strong>the</strong> great majority, leaving perhaps but few<br />

such silent witnesses <strong>of</strong> his great life-work amongst <strong>the</strong><br />

early settlers <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> mo<strong>the</strong>r State <strong>of</strong> Australia.<br />

A<br />

O<strong>the</strong>r Early Settlers.<br />

MONGST o<strong>the</strong>r early settlers at <strong>Bathurst</strong> were Messrs.<br />

Richard Lewis, George Cox, and W illiam Lawson<br />

(commandant at <strong>Bathurst</strong>, and discoverer <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Mudgee<br />

country). These three men finally established <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

homes at Mudgee in 1821. There are also included in<br />

<strong>the</strong> old <strong>Bathurst</strong> days <strong>the</strong> familiar names <strong>of</strong> MacPhillamy,<br />

Suttor, Gorman, Rotton, Charlton, Langley, Dr. Cluett,<br />

Jack Tye, and many o<strong>the</strong>rs, who added <strong>the</strong>ir quota to <strong>the</strong><br />

records <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> western district close on a century ago.<br />

OldWesternRoadCentenary.<br />

K in d ly G iv e T h is to C a te re r.<br />

Ano<strong>the</strong>r Relic.<br />

—I_ ------------------ MOTHER — relic „ <strong>of</strong> _______ <strong>the</strong> — old _____________ <strong>Bathurst</strong> ____ Says „ sm<br />

a<br />

Is aall<br />

I wooden cask, seven inch^g high, four and a half<br />

j inches in diameter (outside measurements), holding ono<br />

quart, with four iron hoops around it. that contained tin;<br />

only spirits that were used at <strong>the</strong> twenty-first birthday<br />

Party <strong>of</strong> William Lee, mentioned before as one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

first settlers. It was a present from <strong>the</strong> late Mr. John<br />

Nevell, on condition that <strong>the</strong> cask was returned to him<br />

as a memento <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> occasion, and, though it bears <strong>the</strong><br />

signs <strong>of</strong> age, it has only one broken stave, and three <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> hoops are quite firm.


MAJOR CASSIDY<br />

BATHURST’S CRAND OLD<br />

MAN.<br />

HIS EXPERIENCES IN<br />

BATHURST.<br />

I N T E R E S T I N G L I F E S T O R Y .<br />

P e r h a p s th e r e is n o p u b lic m a n<br />

Setter k n o w n t h i o u g h o u t t h e l e n g t h<br />

.1 nd b r e a d t h o f th e W e s t e r n d is t r ic t<br />

i lan M a j o r C a s s id y .<br />

C e r t a in ly th e r e<br />

> n o n e m o r e p o p u la r . “ O ld M a j o r , 1’<br />

as he is c a lle d b y t h o s e w h o k n o w h im<br />

b est, is th e old es't n a tiv e o f b a -<br />

'h u rst a t p r e s e n t liv i n g in t h e d i s ­<br />

trict.<br />

A n d it is q u e s t io n a b le w h e th e r<br />

I here is a n o ld e r n a t iv e o f B a t h u r s t |<br />

liv in g o u ts id e t h e d i s t r i c t . H e .vas |<br />

born a t K e ls o in 1 8 3 1 , b u t 18 y e a r s '<br />

after S u r v e y o r E v a n s f ir s t s a w th e<br />

P la in s , a n d 16 y e a r s a f t e r t h e fir s t<br />

s e ttle m e n t w a s f o r m e d .<br />

M a j o r ’ s lif e<br />

story w o u ld t a k e u p p a g e s , a n d w h a t<br />

he. k n o w s a b o u t B a t h u r s t , b o t h in t h e<br />

dark a n d its m o d e r n d a y s , w o u ld t a k e<br />

up e v e n m o r e . F r o m c h ild h o o d h e ,<br />

has le d a s t r e n u o u s l i f e , a n d h a s b e ^ n i<br />

one o f th e g r e a t e s t s p o r t i n g m e n > ><br />

this o r a n y o th e r p a r t o f t h e w o r ld . (<br />

E ven t o - d a y h e n e v e r m i s s e s a r a c e 1<br />

m e e tin g . D u r i n g h is l o n g c a r . ; ? "<br />

M a jo r C a s s id y h a s b e e n a m o n g s t "n e<br />

S ta te’ s c h a m p io n c r i c k e t e r s , r u n n e r s ,<br />

qu oit p la y e r s , a n d p i g e o n s h o t s . B e -<br />

sid es3 h e h a s a lw a y s — a n d s t i ll d o e s —<br />

take a g r e a t in t e r e s t in h o r s e r a c i n g<br />

and s p o r t o f a l! d e s c r i p t io n s . H e<br />

has s e e n w h a t n o o t h e r liv in g m a n<br />

has s e e n . H e s a w B a t h u r s t fir s t<br />

settled u p o n , a f t e r K e l s o h a d b e e n th e<br />

P rin cip a l p la c e o f r e s i d e n c e ; s a w U<br />

Place u n d e r th e m ilit a r y r e g i m e , c o n ­<br />

victs m a k i n g th e r o a d s , e v e r y p u b ­<br />

lic b u ild i n g e r e c te d , v o te d at<br />

every e le c t io n , s a w e v e r y im p o r t - {<br />

r a c e<br />

m e e t i n g a n d c r i c k e t r;t t.1' ~.h,<br />

t h e f ir s t t r a in a r r iv e in B a t h u r s t } e v e r /<br />

a g r i c u lt u r a l s h o w , tw o p e r s o n s p la c e d<br />

I N T H E T H I R T I E S .<br />

“1 w a s b o r n a t K e l s o in 1 8 3 1 ,” s a id<br />

in t h e s t o c k s w h e n s u c h a p u n is h m e n t<br />

M a j o r . “ B a t h u r s t w a s th e n : ; " o w n<br />

w a s in v o g u e , a n d w a s a m e m b e r o f<br />

a s <strong>the</strong>. .s e t tle m e n t . I w e n t to J r-<br />

th e f ir s t v o lu n t e e r c o r p s f o r m e d in<br />

n e y ’ s S c h o o l i t K e l s o , a n d a m o n g i .<br />

B a t h u r s t . I n f a c t , M a j o r C a s - |<br />

m y s c h o o l m a t e s w e r e J o h n F o r d , M ‘ -<br />

s id y h a s s e e n e v e r y t h in g w o r th<br />

G o w e n (w h o a f t e r w a r d s b e c a m e a<br />

s e e i n g in B a t h u r s t f o r t h e p a s t<br />

n o te d c o m i c a c t o r ) , J o h n C a s e y , a n d<br />

6 0 o r 7 0 y e a r s . T o -d a y , t h o u g h Z;<br />

T h o m a s S lo a n e (fa t h e r o f T o m S l o a n e ) . '<br />

y e a r s o f a g e , h e is b y n o m e a n s plat’<br />

w h o is th e o n ly o n e I k n o w o f l i v i n g , j<br />

e d o u t. T h o u g h n o t in t h e s a m e s ta te<br />

T h e fir s t m e n o f t h e W e s t a t t h a t<br />

o f h e a lth a s o f a fe w s h o r t y e a r s a g O j {<br />

t i m e w e r e O ld W i l l i a m K i t e , W i l l i a m j<br />

M A J O R C A S S I D Y .<br />

t h e M a j o r s t ill c a r r ie s h is g r e a t ng


m a n a p ip e t o s m o k e . H e "had lo t<br />

h a d it in h is m o u th l o n g b e f o r e a c o n ­<br />

sta b le c a m e u p a n d s n a t c h e d i t , b r o k e<br />

it t o p ie c e s , a n d c h a s e d u s a w a y .<br />

P U B L I C E X E C U T I O N S .<br />

T h o u g h I d id n o t a c t u a lly s e e t h e m<br />

h a n g e d , I r e m e m b e r s e e i n g a b la -k -<br />

fe llo w a n d a >vhite m a n h a n g i n g o u t ­<br />

side t h e o ld g a o l , w h ic h w a s s it u a t e d<br />

w here th e C o u r t H o u s e n o w s t a n d s .<br />

I a ls o r e m e m b e r s e e i n g a y o u n g f e l ­<br />

a t b u r n t F l a t , n e a r M i . T a n a r . A t<br />

•t h a t m e e t i n g , h o rs os o w n e d b y J o h n<br />

| T a .it a n d D e M e s t i ■?, a n d o t h e r s to o k<br />

p a » t . J a m e s H o './a e s w a s t h e b e s t<br />

j o c k e y o f t h o s ° d a y s . F r o m th e r e<br />

t h e c o u r s e w s s h ifte d to<br />

P o o r M a n ’ s<br />

H o llo w , w h e r e th e r e s id e n c e o f M r .<br />

T a g o S m ith n o w s t a n d s .<br />

T w o o f th e<br />

b e s t h o r s e s e v e r I s a w w e re D e C lo u e t ’ s<br />

J o h n a n d T a i t ’ s C o s s a c k . In<br />

fa c t . ’ ‘ h in k C o s s a c k w a s t h e b e s t<br />

l is h m e n a r r iv e d b y C o b b a n d C o . ’ s<br />

c o a c h e s , a n d th e r o a d f r o m B a t h u r s t i<br />

to R y d a l w a s lin e d w i t h t h o u s a n d s<br />

s p e c t a t o r s . 411 B a t h u r s t w e n t o u t t o !<br />

m e e t t h e m . N o f e w e r th a n 21 b o o t h s ;<br />

w ere s o ld .<br />

low h a n g e d fo r a c r i m i n a l a s s a u lt o n j h o r s e I h a v e e v e r s e e n . T h e p a ir h a d T h e o n ly tw o o th e r p l a y e r s t h a t I r e ­<br />

a g ir l. H e w a s f r o m B l a c k m a n ’ s ! ’ r ? a t c h f o r , £ i c o a s id e , t h e b e s t tw o m e m b e r p la y e d f o r B aJth u rst w e r e<br />

S w a m p ( O r a n g e ) , a n d I k n e w h im I o u t v £ th r e e , tw o m i le s . C o s s a c k J o h n D a r g i n a n d R e v . T r e s s . T h e<br />

w ell.<br />

i w o n . T h e b e s t jo c k e y s o f t h o s e d a y s la t t e r w a s a t h o r o u g h srood b o w le r ,<br />

E A R L Y R A C I N G .<br />

w e r e J o e M a t h e w s (a n a m a t e u r r id e r ) a n d t o o k fiv e o f t h e E n g l i s h m e n ’ ? w ic ­<br />

T h e fir s t r a c e m e e t i n g I r e m e m b e r a n d C u t t s . H e r e fo r d w a s t h e s c e n e k e ts — a f e a t t h a t h a d n o t b e e n d o n e in<br />

was h e ld a t A llo w a y B a n k , n o w o w n - ^ o f t h e n e xt r a c e s , a n d it w a s h e r e th a t A u s t r a l ia u p t o t h a t t i m e . I a ls o<br />

t'd b y M r . S . W i llia m s . T h e m e e t i n g P a s h a , o w n e d b y J o h n D e C lo u e t , p r o v ­ p la y e d in t h e fir s t m a t c h e v e r p la y e d<br />

e x te n d e d o v e r th r e e d a y s . N o c h a r g e ed h i m s e lf t o b e th e b e s t h o r s e o f t h e o n th e S n o r t s G r o u n d .<br />

w as m a d e f o r a d m i s s i o n , a n d t'he p r iz e - d a y . A ft e r t h a t r a c i n g w a s c o n d u c te d<br />

H I S M I L I T A R Y C A R E E R .<br />

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man with whom he had <strong>the</strong> wager to fcnQw .f j had seen anybody cojn_<br />

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eally; f o r g e t w h a t h a p p e n e d h im .<br />

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VISIT OF THE STATE COVERNOR.<br />

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s io n .<br />

1 1 .3 0 a .m ., C iv i c R e c e p t io n to h is<br />

E x c e l le n c y t h e G o v e r n o r a n d O p e n in g o f<br />

K i n g ’ s P a r a d e .<br />

N o o n , L a y i n g o f t h e C o m m e m o r a t i o n 1<br />

M e m o r i a l F o u n d a t io n S t o n e .<br />

1 2 .3 0 p . m ., C h i ld r e n ’ s L u n c h c n S h o w<br />

G r o u n d .<br />

1 p . m ., O ffic ia l L u n c h e o n o n S h o w<br />

G r o u n d . !<br />

: 2 p . m ., G r a n d S p e c t a c u la r D r ill |<br />

a n d M a y p o le D is p la y s b y S c h o o l i<br />

C h ild r e n o n t h e S h o w G r o u n d , t o b e \<br />

f o llo w e d b y S p o r t s .<br />

3 - 3 0 p . m ., V i c e - R e g a l R e c e p tio n in<br />

C o u r t -H o u s e a n d G a r d e n P a r t y in M a -<br />

c h a t tie P a r k .<br />

7 p . m .. B a n q u e t t o h is E x c e lle n c y th e<br />

G o v e r n o r ( b y t h e c i t iz e n s ) .<br />

9 p . m .. Grand C e n t e n a r y C o s t u m e B a ll<br />

. in t h e M a s o n ic H a ll.<br />

U p o n th e ir a r r iv a l in B a t h u r s t t h is<br />

m o r n in g t h e G o v e r n o r a n d p a r ty w ill<br />

j b e m e t a t t h e r a ilw a y s t a t i o n , a n 1 a f t e r ­<br />

w a r d s d r iv e n t o “ K i l r u s h ,'’ th e rcs'ti<br />

e n c e o f M r . J o h n M e a g h e r , M L . C . ,<br />

; w h e r e th e y w ill b e e n te r ta in e d a t b r e a k -<br />

1 f a s t .<br />

THE ro u te a n d o r d e r .<br />

T h e g r a n d p r o c e s s io n t o -d a ;- p r t m i f c s<br />

i to b e m o s t i n t e r e s t i n g . T h e' h i s t o i k a l<br />

a n d h u m o r o u s t a b le a u w ill b e p i o i n i n e n t j<br />

fe a t u r e s . T h e v a r i o u s i n s t i t u t io n s h a .o<br />

e a c h f o r m e d s e p a r a t e t a b le a u , a n d k e e n •<br />

c o m p e t it io n f o r s u p r e m a c y i s a n t ic ip a t e d .<br />

T h e p r o c e s s io n w ill f o r m u p o>i t h e t a . l -<br />

w a y , l e a v i n g a t 1 0 .3 0 s h a r p , a n d w ill<br />

p r o c e e d u p K e p p e l-s t r e e t , t o W i 'l i a m , to<br />

P ip e r , to G e o r g e , t o D u r h a m , to W illi i n . ,<br />

to H o w ic k . t o G e o r g e , p a s t th e C o u r t<br />

H o u s e t o William, t o C h u r ; ’i s t r e e t , e n d<br />

to G e o r g e , t h u s s u r r o u a i i i g th e K i n g s<br />

P a r a d e . After <strong>the</strong> laying <strong>of</strong> th e f o a i v ’ a<br />

tio n s t o n e , c o m p e t it i v e s e c t io n s o f t h e<br />

p r o c e s s io n will p r o c e e d b y w a y o f G e o r g e<br />

a n d D u r h a m s t r e e t s to t h e S h o w ' G r o u n d<br />

to b e j u d g e d .<br />

T h e o r d e r o f t h e p r o c e s s io n i s : —<br />

M o u n t e d P o li c e , M i li t a r y B a n d , m ilit a r y ',<br />

c a d e t s , M o d e l B a n d , f r i e n d ly s o c i e t i e s 1<br />

a n d tr a d e u n io n s , a ld e r m a n a n d v i s i t o r s ,<br />

h is to r ic a l d i s p la y , d e c o r a t e d m o t o r c a r s , !<br />

d e c o r a te d b i c y c le s , B a t h u r s t C i t y L a n d , ;<br />

tr a d e d i s p la y s , g i r l s ’ p o n y t u r n o u t (in j<br />

s a d d le , b o y s ’ p o n y t u r n o u t (in s a d d l e ) , 1<br />

b u s in e s s t u r n o u t s , s p e c t a c u la r d i s p l a y s , j<br />

h u m o r o u s d i s p l a y s , d e c o r a t e d s u lk y , o n e I<br />

a n d t w o h o r s e t r o lly t u r n o u t s .<br />

T h e c a r a r r a n g e m e n t s f r o m th e f o u n ­<br />

d a t io n s to n e to t h e S h o w G r o u n d a r e : —<br />

N o . 1 c a r — S i r F r a n c i s S u t t o r , h i s E x c e l ­<br />

le n c y , a n d t h e M a y o r ; N o , 2 c a r — C a p t .<br />

T a lb o t , M i s s S t r i c k l a n d , H o n . J o h n<br />

M e a g h e r , a n d th e M a y o r e s s ; N o . 3 ca r'—<br />

M r . A . C. C a r m ic h a e l, M i s s C . S t r i c k ­<br />

la n d , M r s . C a r m ic h a e l, a n d M i s s S u t t o r -<br />

N o . 4 c a r — H o n . F . J a g o S m i t h , L i e u t .-<br />

C o lo n e l D u d l e y W T iite , M i s s B ir c h M r s<br />

J a g o S m i t h ; N o . 5 c a r — M r . J o a n M i ll e r ,<br />

M r s . E - S . C a r r , M r . E . S . C a r r , ivnsa<br />

M i lle r ; N o . 6 c a r — O ffic ia ls a n d c o m m i t ­<br />

t e e ; N o . 7 c a r — M e s s r s . L . S u t t o i a n d<br />

H e r b e r t C . S u t to r , M r s . N . L . S u t t o r<br />

a n d M r s . H . C . S u t to r .<br />

T H E S P O R T S .<br />

T h o s e w h o p a tr o n is e t h e s p o r t s m e e t<br />

i n g o n t h e S h o w G r o u n d t o -d a v w ill h a v e ,<br />

a n o p p o r t u n it y o f s e e i n g o iie o f f e<br />

fin e s t s p e c t a c u la r d r ill a n d m a y p o le d i s ­<br />

p la y s e v e r p r e s e n t e d to t h e B a t h u r s t , u h -<br />

lic . A b o u t 2 0 0 0 s c h o o l c h ild r e n a r e to<br />

t a k e p a r t. L a r g e e n t r ie s h a v e b e e n<br />

r e c e iv e d in a ll t h e e v e n t s f o r t h e c h ild<br />

r e n ’ s s p o r ts . H i s E x c e l le n c y th e<br />

G o v e r n o r a n d s u it , t h e M i n i s t e r f o r E d u ­<br />

c a t io n , a n d s e v e r a l m e m b e r s o f f a i l i a -<br />

m e n t w ill b e p r e s e n t , a n d w ill v ie w t n e<br />

s p e c t a c u la r d r ill a n d m a y p o le d i s p l a y .<br />

A f e a t u r e o f th e a f t e r n o o n ’ s s p o r t s w ill<br />

b e r a c e s d e v o te d to c h ild r e n u n d e r i>


y e a r s o r a g e ., m e s u m o t £ 5 h a s b ee n<br />

se t a p a r t f o r t h is p u r p o s e , a n d a U .rge<br />

n u m b e r o f t o y s p u r c h a s e d , a n d th e s e<br />

w ill b e c o m p e t e d f o r in a s e r ie s o f n i c t s<br />

f o r t h e lit t le t o t s , c o m m e n c i n g a t 4<br />

p .m . o n t h e w e s t e r n e n d o f t h e e n .lo -<br />

su re .<br />

S I L v £,k XKOWr-L.<br />

A b e a u t i fu l s ilv e r tr o w e l, t o b e u se d<br />

b y a n d p r e s e n t e d to S ir G e r a ld S t r ic k ­<br />

la n d in l a y i n g t h e f o u n d a t i o n s to n e o f<br />

t h e E v a n s ’ M e m o r i a l t o - d a y , w a s o n vie w<br />

a t M r . L . W i n t e r ’ s e s t a b lis h m e n t d u r in g<br />

t h e w e e k . I t b e a r s th e f o llo w i n g in - j<br />

s c r i p t i o n , f in e ly e x e c u te d a t M r . W i n ­<br />

t e r ’ s : — “ T h i s tr o w e l w a s u s e d b y iiis<br />

E x c e lle n c y S ir G e r a ld S t r ic k la n d ,<br />

K . C . M . G . , G o v e r n o r o f N e w S o u th<br />

W a l e s , t o l a y t h e fo u n d a t io n s t o n e o f<br />

th e C e n t e n a r y M e m o r i a l in c o m m e m o r a ­<br />

tio n o f t h e d is c o v e r y o f th e B a th u r s t<br />

P la in s in 1 8 1 3 b y D e p u t y -S u r v e y o r -<br />

G e n e r a l G . M . E v a n s . B a t h u r s t , N o v .<br />

19, 1 9 1 3 .”<br />

G R A N D C E N T E N A R Y B A L L .<br />

T h e g r a n d c e n t e n a r y b a ll w i ll b e h e ld<br />

> in th e M a s o n ic H a ll t o - n i g h t a t 9 o ’ c lo c k .<br />

H is E x c e l le n c y t h e G o v e r n o r a n d s u ite j<br />

w ill b e p r e s e n t , a n d w ill d a n c e in th e<br />

o p e n d a n c e * . T h e l a d i e s ’ c o m m it t e e ;<br />

h a s l e f t n o s t o n e u n t u r n e d t o m a k e<br />

] e v e r y t h i n g a s p le a s a n t a s p o s s ib le .<br />

I S p e c t a t o r s w ill b e w e ll c a t e r e d fo r . A<br />

I re c o r d a t t e n d a n c e s h o u ld r e s u lt.<br />

j T H E C O N T I N E N T A L .<br />

; T h e B a t h u r s t D is t r i c t B a n d , 1 n d er<br />

I th e c o n d u c to r s h ip o f M r . S . L e w i n s , w ill<br />

r e n d e r th e f o l lo w i n g p r o g r a m m e in<br />

, M a c h a t t i e P a r k a t t o - n i g h t ’s c o n t in e n ­<br />

t a l : — M a r c h , “ C o n q u e r o r ” ; w a ltz ,<br />

“ W i llo w d e n ” ; d e s c r ip t iv e fa n t a s ia ,<br />

“ A b y s s i n i a n E x p e d i t i o n ” ; s e le c t io n ,<br />

j “ S o u v e n ir d e R u s s e ” ; s o n g , “ M a is ie<br />

M i n n i e ” ; i n t e r m e z z o . “ D a n c i n g in th e<br />

M o o n ” ; s e le c t io n , “ E n g l i s h S o n g s ” ;<br />

o v e r tu r e , “ V i l l a g e B r id e ” ; m a r c h , “ I m -<br />

p e r a t o r .”<br />

T I M E - T A B L E O F S P O R T S .<br />

2 p . m . — D i s p la y s o f d r ill, m a y p o le s ,<br />

k in d e r g a r t e n , g a m e s ; 3 .3 0 — T u g -o f -w a r .<br />

g i r l s ’ r a c e s , b o y s ’ h a n d i c a p ; 4 — 100<br />

y a r ^ s ( 1 4 -1 6 , 1 6 -1 8 y e a r s ) ; 4 .3 0 — 100<br />

; y a r d s c h a m p io n s h ip , s a c k r a c e [12-14<br />

y e a r s ); 4 . 4 o - - r e l a y r a c e ; 4 .5 0 — m i le h a n ­<br />

d ic a p ; 5 .5 — ju n i o r o b s t a c le r a c e (u n d e r<br />

1 5 ), s a c k r a c e ( 1 6 - 1 8 ) ; 5 .3 0 — s e n io r o b - i<br />

s ta c le r a c e (o v e r 1 5 ) ; 5 .4 0 , s a c k r a c e j<br />

( 1 4 -1 6 y e a r s ) .<br />

SURVEYOR EVANS’ ACHIEVEMENT.<br />

M R .<br />

W A L K E R ’ S A D D R E S S T O<br />

S T U D E N T S .<br />

“ I t is a n i n s p i r i n g t h i n g to s e e t h e s e<br />

y o u n g p e o p le p r e s e n t t o - d a y , a n d t h i n k ,<br />

t h a t in th e ir h a n d s l ie s t h e f u t u r e o f<br />

■ th is g r e a t a n d g lo r i o u s c o u n t r y ,” w a s<br />

. M r . F . W a l k e r ’ s p r e fa t o r y r e m a r k in t h e<br />

S c h o o l o f A r t s y e s t e r d a y a f t e r n o o n , w h e n<br />

h e d e liv e r e d a le c t u r e o n t h e h is t o r ic a l<br />

p h a s e o f t h e c e n t e n a r y c e le b r a t io n s . T h e<br />

| M a y o r (A ld e r m a n A . R i g b y ) p r e s id e d ,<br />

j a n d a m o n g t h o s e o n t h e p l a t f o r m w e r e<br />

M r . P o w e ll ( M a y o r o f W a t e r l o o ) , M a j o r<br />

j L o n g m u i r , C a p t a in P r i n g l e , a n d M e s s r s ,'<br />

, W . S . S m i t h a n d F e r g u s o n . T h e h a ll<br />

! w a s w e ll fille d .<br />

I T h e le c t u r e r u r g e d t h e c h ild r e n to<br />

e m u la t e t h e e x a m p le o f t h e g r e a t m e n<br />

o f th e p a s t. H e a p p r e c ia t e d t h e fa c t<br />

th a t A u s t r a lia n h is t o r y n o w o c c u p ie d a<br />

p r o m in e n t p la c e in t h e e d u c a t io n s y l l a ­<br />

b u s o f t h e s c h o o ls . T h e r e w a s a g r e a t<br />

d e a l o f i n t e r e s t a n d a t t r a c t io n in A u s ­<br />

tr a lia n h i s t o r y , m o r e s o to t h e m , a s A u s ­<br />

t r a lia n s .<br />

M r . W a l k e r s k e tc h e d t h e f u t i le e ffo r t s<br />

o f G o v e r n o r P h i llip to p ie r c e t h e b a r r ie r<br />

o f t h e u n k n o w n , a n d , c o m i n g tj^ "t h e<br />

. s u c c e s s fu l " a c h ie v e m e n t o-f: B la x la n d ,<br />

W e n t w o r t h , a n d L a w s o n , e m p h a s i s e d t h e<br />

g r e a t i m p o r t a n c e o f t h e ir g r e a t a n d<br />

c o u r a g e o u s w o r k . I t w a s o n e f r a u g h t<br />

; w ith g r e a t p e r il, a n d on o n e o c c a s io n<br />

in th e s ile n t f a s t n e s s e s Qf _ t h e <strong>Blue</strong><br />

M o u n t a i n s t h e y w e r e s u r r o u n d e d b y<br />

b la c k s , b u t f o r t u n a t e l y f o r t h e m th e ir<br />

d o g s k e p t o ff a n a t t a c k . I n t h e m o r n ­<br />

i n g t h e y r e a lis e d h o w n a r r o w ' t h e ir<br />

e s c a p e h a d b e e n . T h e n c a m e t h e g r e a t<br />

E v a n s , w h o , f r o m t h e fin a l p o in t o f B la x -<br />

la n d ’ s j o u r n e y , s a w t h e w id e a n d s w e e p ­<br />

i n g p la in s o f t h e w e s t . I n d o m it a b le<br />

c o u r a g e b r o u g h t s u c c e s s t o h is e f f o r t s ,<br />

a n d h is d ia r y e v id e n c e d h o w i m p r e s s e d<br />

h e h a d b e e n w ith t h e b e a u t i fu l c o u n t r y<br />

h e h a d d is c o v e r e d . H e h a d n a m e d<br />

M o u n t P le a s a n t s o o n a c c o u n t o f its<br />

p le a s a n t v ie w . H e f o llo w e d t h e c o u r s e<br />

o f t h e r iv e r a s f a r a s E v a n s ’ P l a i n s ,<br />

b u t o n h i s r e tu r n jo u r n e y w e n t w 'ide o f<br />

t h e b a n k s . G o v e r n o r M a c q u a r i e w a s<br />

j u b i la n t a t t h e a c h ie v e m e n t o f E v a n s ,:<br />

a n d C o x , w ith 3 0 c o n v i c t s , s t a r t e d o n t h e<br />

c o n s t r u c t io n o f t h e w e s t e r n r o a d . T h is<br />

fe a t w a s a c c o m p lis h e d in s ix m o n t h s .<br />

I n c o n c lu s io n , M r . W a l k e r p a id a t r i ­<br />

b u t e t o t h e b e a u t y o f B a t h u r s t , a f a i r e r<br />

to w n th a n w h ic h h e h a d n o t s e e n . T h e<br />

t o w n w a s fir s t f o u n d e d a t K e l s o , b u t<br />

i o w i n g t o flo o d s it w a s r e m o v e d a c r o s s


t h e r iv e r , a n d w a s n o w t h e B a t h u r s t o f<br />

th e p r e s e n t d a y . ( A p p l a u s e .)<br />

R e lic s o f th e e a r ly d a y s w e r e s h o w n ,<br />

in c lu d in g d u e l l i n g p i s t o l s , d r e s s sw o r d s^<br />

a n d lo a d e d w a l k i n g s t i c k s . T h e la tte r<br />

1 w e r e v e r y h a n d y in m e e t i n g w ith b u s h -<br />

I r a n g e r s .<br />

T h e M a y o r r e fe r r e d t o t h e e d u c a tio n a l<br />

v a lu e o f t h e le c t u r e , a n d in a s k i n g tw o<br />

s t u d e n t s t o p r o p o s e a n d s e c o n d a v o te<br />

■ o f t h a n k s t o M r . W a l k e r , m e n t io n e d th at<br />

t h e y w e r e tw o o f t h e y o u n g e s t p e o p le<br />

w h o h a d e v e r b e e n c a lle d u p o n t o p e r ­<br />

fo r m t h a t d u ty .<br />

M a s t e r J a c k W i l l i a m s , o f t h e B a t h u r s t<br />

H ig h S c h o o l, s a id t h e y s h o u ld fe e l t h a n k ­<br />

fu l to M r . W a lk e r f o r h is a b le a d d r e s s .<br />

S u c h a s u b je c t m u s t a lw a y s b e o f in ­<br />

te r e s t to t h e p e o p le o f B a t h u r s t — th e<br />

p r e m ie r c i t y o f t h e P l a i n s . T h e s u b ­<br />

je c t w a s a ll t h e m o r e in t e r e s t in g a t <strong>the</strong><br />

p r e s e n t t i m e o n a c c o u n t o f th e c e n te n a r y<br />

c e le b r a t io n s . ( A p p l a u s e .)<br />

M a s t e r E d w a r d C u r r a n , o f th e P a tr i­<br />

cia n B r o s .’ S c h o o l, in s e c o n d i n g th e<br />

V o te o f t h a n k s , s a id t h e y h a d all g r e a t ly<br />

b e n e fit t e d b y t h e v e r y in s t r u c tiv e le c tu r e .<br />

T h e v o t e w a s c a r r ie d b y a c c la m a tio n .<br />

M r . W a lk e r r e s p o n d e d .<br />

( C h e e r s w e r e t h e n g i v e n f o r t h e le c ­<br />

tu r e r , th e K i n g , a n d t h e M a y o r .<br />

RIFLE MEETINC.<br />

A t la s t, t h e B a t h u r s t C a d e t C h a lle n g e<br />

S h ie ld , t h e s p le n d id g i f t o f th e B a t h ­<br />

u r s t p e o p le , is to b e c o m p e t e d f o r o n c e<br />

m o r e . T h e o ld j u n i o r c a d e t s h a v e p a s s ­<br />

ed a w a y , a n d , P h o e n ix -lik e , th e p r e s e n t<br />

s e n io r c a d e t s h a v e t a k e n th e ir p la c e .<br />

D u r i n g th e p e r io d o f c h a n g e th e m a g n i ­<br />

fic e n t s h ie ld h a s a d o r n e d t h e w a lls o f<br />

th e B a t h u r s t D i s t r i c t S c h o o l, w h o se<br />

; r e p r e s e n t a t iv e s w o n it s o m e f o u r y e a r s<br />

i a g o . T h e d e s ir e o f th e d o n o r s w a s to<br />

e n c o u r a g e r ifle s h o o t i n g a m o n g t h e r is -<br />

j i n g g e n e r a t i o n 'l— '1 h a t th e s e sh ie ld<br />

m a t c h e s d id so in p a s t i s p r o v e d b y th e<br />

i w o n d e r f u lly k e e n c o n t e s t s , e x t e n d in g<br />

o v e r m a n y y e a r s ,A e t w e e n B a t h u r s t an d<br />

; O r a n g e f o r t h e s h ie ld , w h ic h w a s w on<br />

: o u t r ig h t b y t h e © r a n g e ju n i o r c a d e t s in<br />

1906 . T h e in t e r e s t in t h e n e w sh ie ld<br />

' c o m p e t it io n is b r i n g i n g t e a m s f r o m<br />

M u d g e e , L i t h g o w , a n d P e n r i t h , I t is a<br />

' p i t y o u r o ld r iv a ls — O r a n g e — a r e n o t re-<br />

, p r e s e n te d . N e v e r t h e le s s t h e e n tr ie s — 8<br />

■ t e a m s f o r t h e s h ie ld a n d 8 0 f o r t h e in d i­<br />

v id u a l m a t c h e s — c o n s t it u t e a r e c o r d e n ­<br />

try . T h e s h ie ld is o n e x h ib it io n ir. M r .<br />

S h u lz e ’ s w in d o w , n e x t t h e R o v a l H o te l.<br />

T h e v i s i t i n g c a d e ts a r e : — W i n d s o r 3 5 ,<br />

M u d g e e 2 7 , P e n r it h 3 0 , a n d L i t h g o w 30.<br />

T h e tw o f i r s t -n a m e d c o m p a n i e s a r e p a y ­<br />

i n g t h e i r o w n e x p e n s e s .<br />

OLD MEMORIES<br />

A PIONEER POLITICIAN.<br />

W H O F O U G H T F O R T H E<br />

R A I L W A Y .<br />

W E S T E R N<br />

A m o n g s t th e l a r g e c o n c o u r s e o f v is it-<br />

1 o rs t o B a t h u r s t f o r t h e C e n t e n a r y c e le -<br />

I b r a t io n s is a la d y w h o s e p r e s e n c e w ill<br />

I r e k in d le t h e e m b e r s o f m e m o r v w ith in<br />

th e m i n d s o f th e o ld e r p o r tio n o f B a t h ­<br />

u r s t ’ s c itiz e n s . T h is is M r s . E l l e n D o n ­<br />

n e lly , o f M i l s o n ’ s P o in t . M r s . D o n ­<br />

n e lly i s o n e o f t h e s u r v iv in g , d a u g h t e r s<br />

o f t h e l a t e M r . W i ll i a m C u m r n in g s , o n e<br />

o f th e p io n e e r p o li t i c ia n s w h o r e p r e s e n t ­<br />

e d t h e o ld E a s t M a c q u a r i e e le c t o r a t e in<br />

P a r li a m e n t , b a c k in th e d a y s w h ic h aro<br />

; n o w o n ly a m e m o r y .<br />

I M r s . D o n n e ll y s p e n t m a n y y e a r s o f<br />

j h e r l i f e in th e w e s t, a n d . w ith in th e<br />

! v ic in it y o f B a t h u r s t , a n d s h e n a t u r a l ly<br />

| c h e r is h e s a k e e n in t e r e s t in t h i s , th e<br />

1 p r e m ie r c i t y o f t h e w e s t e r n p l a i n s .<br />

! M r . C u m m i n g s w a s f o r a . p e r io d o f<br />

18 y e a r s o n e o f t h e m e m b e r s f o r th e<br />

! o ld E a s t M a c q u a r i e e le c t o r a te . M r .<br />

W illia m S u t t o r w a s , d u r i n g t h e g r e a t e r<br />

; p o r tio n o f t h a t t i m e , t h e o t h e r m e m b e r .<br />

; M r . C u m m i n g s w a s a lw a y s r e g a r d e d a s<br />

■ th e r e p r e s e n t a t iv e , n o t o n ly o f E a s t<br />

M a c q u a r ie , b u t o f t h e g r e a t w e s t e r n i n ­<br />

te rio r. H e c o n t in u o u s ly u r g e d u p o n<br />

P a r l i a m e n t . th e c la im s o f t h i s g r e a t<br />

a r e a , s o r ic h i n i t s p o te n t ia lit ie s . T h e<br />

m a k i n g a n d r e p a ir in g o f r o a d s , b r i d g e s ,<br />

a n d p u b lic b u ild i n g s t h r o u g h o u t t h e<br />

w e s t, w e n t o n w ith a n e n e r g y w h ic h<br />

d e r iv e d i t s s p r i n g f r o m t h e P a r li a m e n t ­<br />

a r y e f f o r t s o f M r . C u m m i n g s .<br />

M r . C u m m i n g s ’ g r e a t e s t a c h ie v e - :<br />

m e n t, h o w e v e r , w a s t h e s t r e n u o u s f i g h t<br />

w h ic h h e p u t u p i n P a r li a m e n t in<br />

th e d ir e c tio n o f c o m m e n c i n g t h e c o n ­<br />

s tr u c tio n o f t h e ^ r e a t w e s t e r n r a ilw a y .<br />

F o r u p w a r d s o f T o u r y e a r s , in t h e f a c e<br />

o f s t r o n g o p o p s i t io n , M r . C u m m i n g s<br />

b a ttle d b r a v e ly f o r a g r a n t o f £ 5 5 , 0 0 0<br />

fo r th e c o m m e n c e m e n t o f t h is g r e a t<br />

u n d e r t a k in g . H e p o in t e d oU t to h is<br />

fe llo w p a r lia m e n t a r ia n s t h a t u n t il th e<br />

“ I r o n H o r s e w e n t o v e r t h e m o u n t a i n s ,<br />

th e g r e a t w e s t e r n c o u n t r y w o u l d n e v e r<br />

b e o p e n e d u p .” A t la s t h e r e a c h e d t h e<br />

g o a l o f h is a m b i t i o n , a n d t h e g r a n t<br />

i o f £ 5 5 , 0 0 0 w a s s a n c t io n e d b v th e<br />

H o u s e . T h u s it w ill b e s e e n M r . ' C u m -<br />

f ; m i n g s p la y e d a g r e a t p a r t in t h e o p e n ­<br />

i n g u p o f o u r g r e a t w e s t e r n c o u n t r y .<br />

W e o f th e p r e s e n t d a y . w h o t r a v e l in a<br />

fa s t , w e ll-e q u ip p e d m a i l t r a in , s h o u ld j<br />

k e e p g r e e n in o u r m e m o r ie s t h is p io - ]<br />

;____ ; n e e r p o litic ia n w h o f o u g h t s o s t r e n u - h i ' - ~


12-4 Q.Uk]


o u s ly m t h e d ir e c tio n o f s ta r tin g - o u r<br />

p r e s e n t w e s t e r n r a ilw a y s y s t e m .<br />

M r . C u m m i n g s , in a d d r e s s i n g th e<br />

A s s e m b l y o f t h e d a y s o f o ld , h a d c e rta in<br />

p e c u lia r itie s o f p r o n u n c ia t io n w h ic h<br />

w o u ld h a v e s u b je c t e d h im t o a c e r ta in<br />

a m o u n t o f r id ic u le , b u t f o r t h e s t r o n g<br />

1 t h r e a d o f c o m m o n s e n s e a n d c o r r e c t r e a ­<br />

s o n in g w h ic h r a n t h r o u g h t h e w h o le o f<br />

h is s p e e c h e s . B u t h e w a s a p a s t -m a s t e r<br />

in th e a rt o f r e p a r t e e H e h a d th e<br />

I r is h m a n ’ s g i f t o f m a k i n g a r e a d y a n ­<br />

sw e r , a n d it w e n t h a r d w ith t h o s e w-ho i<br />

e s s a y e d to c r it ic is e t h e s a y i n g s o r d o -<br />

m g s o f t h e m e m b e r f o r E a s t M a c q u a r ie .<br />

T h e r e w a s b u t o n e m a n in t h e H o u s e ,<br />

| t h e s m a lle s t c h a n c e <strong>of</strong> c o m in g<br />

j o ff s c a t h e le s s in a c o n flic t o f w it, a n d<br />

; th a t w a s M r . D a i le y . M r . C u m m i n g s ’<br />

( s u c c e s s in g e t t i n g w h a t h e d e m a n d e d<br />

fo r h i s c o n s t it u e n t s w a s d u e in a g r e a t<br />

m e a s u r e t o h is im p o r t u n ity . H e p le a d ­<br />

e d h is c la im s in a lo u d v o ic e , a n d w ith<br />

a n a lm o s t p e r p e t u a l r e it e r a t io n , u n til<br />

th e y w e r e s u b s t a n t i a lly a c k n o w le d g e d .<br />

P r o b a b ly n o m a n o f h i s d a y d id s o m u c h<br />

m P a r li a m e n t t o w a r d s t h e b u ild i n g u p i<br />

o f th e w e s te r n d i s t r i c t , th a n th e -la t e M r . i<br />

C u m m in g s . A s a p r iv a te m e m b e r o f i<br />

s o c ie t y , a s a h u s b a n d , a s a fa t h e r , a n d !<br />

a s a f r i e n d , M r . C u m m i n g s w a s tr u ly i<br />

e s t im a b le . H e le d a u s e fu l lif e a n d<br />

g r e w g r e y in t h e d i lig e n t d is c h a r g e o f<br />

h is dutie.s.<br />

M r . C u m m i n g s m e t a n u n t im e l y d e a th<br />

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th r o w n f r o m h i s b u g g y in t h e v ic in ity<br />

° f . P e e l, a n d d ie d a s a r e s u lt o f th e<br />

in ju r ie s w h ic h h e r e c e iv e d .<br />

M r . C u m m i n g s , w a s a l a r g e h e a r te d<br />

a n d h o n e s t m e m b e r o f th e L e g i s la t u r e<br />

a n d o n e o f t h e m o s t p r a c t ic a l m e n w h o<br />

; e v e r s a t w ith in i t s w a lls .<br />

I t is p a s s i n g s t r a n g e t h a t s o m e e ffo r t<br />

h a s n o t b e e n m a d e in t h is d is tr ic t to<br />

m e m o r ia lis e t h e a c h ie v e m e n t s o f th e<br />

la te M r . C u m m i n g s . S u r e ly , h i s s t r e n ­<br />

u o u s f i g h t f o r t h e g o o d o f o u r g r e a t<br />

w e s t la n d i s w o r t h y o f s o m e r e c o g n i-<br />

t i o n .........................<br />

( A s s i s i *<br />

FIRST SETTLERS.<br />

OLD NAMES RECALLED.<br />

K E L S O C H U R C H .<br />

(B y “ P i o n e e r ” in t h e “ S y d n e y M a i l . ” )<br />

A H u n d r e d y e a r s ! H o w t h i n g s h a v e<br />

c h a n g e d in t h a t t i m e ; I f t h o s e fir s t<br />

te n p io n e e r s w h o f o llo w e d s o q u ic k l y in<br />

th e f o o t s t e p s o f B la x la n d , W e n t w o r t h ,<br />

L a w s o n , a n d E v a n s o v e r t h e w ild B lu e<br />

M o u n t a in s r a n g e s to a c c e p t t h e G o v ­<br />

e r n m e n t ’ s o f f e r o f f r e e g r a n t s o f la n d<br />

a t K e l s o a n d B a t h u r s t c o u ld r e t u r n t o ­<br />

d a y , w h a t w o u ld b e t h e i r f e e l i n g s ?<br />

W o u ld th e y r e c o g n i s e in t h e w id e , w e llk<br />

e p t , t r e e -lin e d s t r e e t s , w ith t h e ir b e a u ­<br />

t ifu l p a r k s a n d lo f t y b u i l d i n g s , a n d t h e ir<br />

t h r o n g s o f g a y h u m a n i t y , w ith a ll t h e<br />

m o d e r n c o n v e n ie n c e s o f t r a v e l, t h e s ile n t<br />

s c e n e , p e o p le d o n ly w ith d u s k y a b o r i g i ­<br />

n a ls a n d w ild a n im a l s , th iit g r e e t e d<br />

th e m o n th e ir a r r iv a l w i t h c a m p i n g<br />

o u tfit t o f o r m th e n u c le u s o f t h i s n o w<br />

f lo u r is h in g c i t v ?<br />

F I R S T T E N S E T T L E R S .<br />

T h e f ir s t te n s e t t le r s w e r e , I b e l i e v e ,<br />

M e s s r s . J a m e s V i n c e n t . J o h n N e v e l l ,<br />

R ic h a r d M i l l s , T h o m a s K i t e , J o s e p h<br />

M o u ld e r . G e o r g e K a b l e , W i ll i a m L e e ,<br />

T h o m a s C h e s h ir e , J o h n D a r g i n . a n d Ar>p<br />

le t t , a n d th e v w 'ere m e n w h o w r o t e t h e ir<br />

-n a m e s i n d e lib ly o n t h e p a g e s o f t h e<br />

e a r ly H is to r y o f th e c o lo n y . S o m e o f th e<br />

y o u n g e r b r a n c h e s o f t h e s e o l d f a m i li e s<br />

s till r e s id e w ith in th e B a t h u r s t d is t r ic t s —<br />

n o ta h lv t h e L e e s . K it e s , a n d K a b l e s .<br />

T h e M o u l d e r f a m i 'v is w e ll k n o w n a b o u t<br />

O r a n g e a n d C o n d o b o lin . A m o n g s t t h e<br />

b e s t k n o w n o f th e M i ll s f a m i l y is D r .<br />

A r th u r M i l 's , o f S v d n e v , w h o s e u n c le .<br />

G e o r g e M i l l s , w a s t h e ftr s t w h it e c h ild<br />

b o r n in B a t h u r s t , a n d t o w h o m th e G o v ­<br />

e r n m e n t o ffe r e d a g r a n t o f 1 0 0 a c r e s o f<br />

la n d . T h e N e v e lls a r e n o w r e s id e n t in<br />

t h e M u d g e e a n d R y l s t o n e d i s t r ic t s o f<br />

N e w S o u t h W’ a le s a n d in W e s t e r n<br />

Q u e e n s la n d . I n th e ir i d e n t i t y is s u n k<br />

th a t o f J a m e s V i n c e n t , w h o s e o n l y s u r ­<br />

v i v i n g c h ild b e c a m e t h e w ife o f J o h n<br />

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g r a n t o f la n d , t h e N e v e l l g r a n t , o n p a r t<br />

o f w h ic h t h e K e l s o r a i lw a y s t a t io n n o w<br />

s ta n d s , h a v in g b e e n s o ld w ith in th e la s t<br />

fe w y e a r s . T h e w h e r e a b o u t s o f t h e d e ­<br />

s c e n d a n t s o f t h e C h e s h i r e , A p p l e t t s ,<br />

a n d D a r g i n s h a v e p a s s e d f r o m t h e<br />

w r ite r ’ s k n o w le d g e .


F o r y e a r s th e p i o n e e r s ’ h o ld in g s w e re<br />

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a p lo u g h e d f u r r o w , b e i n g u s e d to d e fin e<br />

‘ h e b o u n d a r ie s o f e a c h fa r m . T h e G o v ­<br />

e r n m e n t s u p p lie d t h e se e d w h e a t, w h ic h<br />

w a s p u t in b y m e a n s o f a g a r d e n h o e ,<br />

a n d w h e n ’ h e c r o p s w e r e h a r v e s te d e a c h<br />

fa r m e r h a d t o r e tu r n to th e G o v e r n m e n t<br />

as m u c h s e e d g r a i n a s h e h a d b e e n s u p ­<br />

p lie d w ith . T h is r u le a s s u r e d a p le n t i­<br />

fu l s u p p ly o f s e e d a lw a y s in th e G o v ­<br />

e r n m e n t s to r e s . A g r e a t im p r o v e m e n t<br />

m f a r m i n g c a m e w h e n w o o d e n p lo u g h s ,<br />

w e r e o b t a in a b le . M r . J a m e s R a n k in<br />

w a s o n e o f th e fir s t to o w n o n e in B a t h ­<br />

u r s t. H e o ffe r e d t o g i v e t h e p lo u g h to<br />

M r . N e v e l l if h e w o u ld c a r r y it h o m e<br />

on h is b a c k . T h e d is t a n c e w a s a b o u t a<br />

c o u p le o f m i le s , a n d t h e p lo u g h w a s<br />

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c a r r ie d it h o m e .<br />

T h e w h e a t w a s r e a p e d b y h a n d a n d<br />

b o u n d in s h e a v e s ; t h e n s t a c k e d , th a t c h<br />

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f r o m t h e r i v e r -b a n k s . I t w a s a fte r w a r d s<br />

th r e s h e d w i t h a fla il a n d g r o u n d in t o<br />

flo u r w ith s t e e l h a n d -m i lls . I n th e e a r ly<br />

d a y s th e a s s i g n e d s e r v a n t s (c o n v ic ts )<br />

w e r e e a c h g i v e n s e v e n q u a r t s o f w h e a t<br />

•on S a t u r d a y , a n d t h a t a ft e r n o o n th e y<br />

g r o u n d t h e ir w e e k ly s u p p ly o f flo u r f r o m<br />

it. T o o ls w e r e , o f c o u r s e , r a r e , a n d<br />

th e r e is s t i ll in e x is t e n c e a v e r y r o u g n lv<br />

m a d e h a m m e r t h a t t w o o f t h e o ld B a ­<br />

th u r s t n e ig h b o r s w e n t in to p a r tn e r s h ip<br />

to s h a r e t h e e x p e n s e o f b u y i n g .<br />

T h e n t h e r e w a s K i t e ’ s c a b b a g e g a r d e n , i<br />

T h e r e w e r e n u m e r o u s in q u ir ie s a b o u t<br />

t h i s w h e n it b e c a m e k n o w n t h a t M r .<br />

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g i v e a c a b b a g e g a r d e n to a n y m a n w h o<br />

w a s c a p a b le o f m i n d i n g “ h i s ow n b u s i -<br />

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|je c t e d t o a r i g o r o u s c r o s s -e x a m in a t io n<br />

b y M r . K i t e o n h i s a b ility e n d e d b y<br />

M r . K it e s a y i n g : “ W e l l , t h is c a b b a g e<br />

g a r d e n is m y b u s in e s s . M a y I a s k w h a t<br />

y o u h a v e t o d o w i t h i t ? ” T h e c a b b a g e<br />

g a r d e n , o f c o u r s e , n e v e r f o u n d a n o t h e r<br />

o w n e r , a n d b e c a m e th e j o k e o f th e d i s ­<br />

t r ic t.<br />

T H E F I R S T C H U R C H .<br />

T h e f ir s t fr e e s e t t le r s liv e d in K e l s o ,<br />

th e p e n a l s e t t le m e n t b e i n g a t B a t h u r s t ,<br />

a m i le d i s t a n t , t h o M a c q u a r ie R iv e r<br />

f lo w in g b e t w e e n . T h e fir s t c h u r c h b u ilt<br />

o v e r th e B lu e M o u n t a i n s w a s th e<br />

C h u r c h o f E n g l a n d a t K e l s o , a n d th e<br />

B ib le u s e d at t h e o p e n i n g s e r v ic e in th e<br />

p r e s e n t b u ild i n g , w h i c h s u c c e e d e d a<br />

s m a ll w o o d e n o n e , i s n o w in p o s s e s s io n<br />

o f M r s . H . W . N e v e l l , C h in c h illa ( Q .)<br />

h e r fa t h e r , t h e la te M r . W . E . S a m p s o n ,<br />

| h a v in g e x c h a n g e d h is p o c k e t B ib le f o r<br />

) t h e la r g e c h u r c h B i b le w ith t h e R e v .<br />

K e a n e w h e n h e ( M r . K e a n e ) wra s r e t u r n ­<br />

i n g t o E n g l a n d . T h i s B i b le i s in a n<br />

e x c e lle n t s t a t e o f p r e s e r v a t io n , a n d is<br />

b o u n d in d a r k r e d c a l f w ith g o l d le t t e r -<br />

I t w a s p r in te d in 1 7 7 2 in t h e o ld<br />

h -n g lis h t y p e , m a k i n g it s o m e w h a t d iffic<br />

u lt f o r t h e p r e s e n t - d a y s t u d e n t to<br />

re a d . I t a ls o c o n t a in s t h e 14 b o o k s o f<br />

th e A p o c r y p h a , w h ic h a r e n o t u s u a llv<br />

b o u n d in th e B i b le s o f t o -d a y . U p o n its<br />

p a g e s a re m a n y m a r g i n a l n o te s a n d<br />

m a r k e d t e x t s o f t h e p r e a c h e r s w h o h a v e<br />

p a s s e d f r o m u s . I w ill q u o t e a f e w —<br />

2 2 n d c h a p t e r P r o v e r b s , 6 t h v e r s e ( t h r<br />

B i s h o p ’ s s e r m o n a t T h o r p e , A u g u s t q ,<br />

1 8 1 6 ); 7 th c h a p t e r . H e b r e w s , 2 5 t h v e r s e<br />

(M r . S c o t t , N o v e m b e r 2 6 , 1 8 1 5 ); 2 n d<br />

c h a n t e r E x c d u s . 8 . o 1 0 v e r s e s ( M r .<br />

T"ffprsor>’ s c h a r itv s e r m o n a t R a m s a v<br />

'V r e m h - 'r i , 1 8 1 6 ) T ^ n t h e r e a r e t h e<br />

" s m e s o f 'he R e v s W h i n f i e l d , H a r r i s o n .<br />

co tt (th e v o u n g e r ) — e n t r ie s t h a t h a v e<br />

s t o o d th e te s t o f t im e f o r n e a r ly a<br />

’’ U n d r e d e v a r s , f o r I f a n c y th e s e w e r e<br />

M E n g l is h c l e r g y m e n , w h o u s e d th e<br />

° k b e f o r e it w a s b r o u g h t t o h e lp in<br />

r h y m e w o r s h ip in o u r s o u th e r n c lim e .<br />

T S is B ib le wra s a ls o u s e d a t t h e o p e n i n g<br />

o f t h e first c h u r c h e s a t B a t h u r s t a n d<br />

M u d eree.<br />

B o o k s wre r e r a r e w h e n P a r s o n K e a n e<br />

'a s h e w a s k n o w n b v h is flo c k ) liv e d ip<br />

B a t h u r s t , a n d i n t e r e s t a t t a c h e s a ls o t o a<br />

s m a ll b o o k . " R i ^ e a n d P r o g r e s s o f R e -<br />

licrion in t h e S o u l .” b e a r i n g in h is h a ^ d<br />

w r itin g th e in s c r ip t io n , “ F r o m M r<br />

K e a n * t0 M r . V i n c e n t a n d M r . a n d M r *<br />

N e v e ll. f o r t h e : r j o i n t u s e . M a v G o d ’ s<br />

M e s s i n g a t t e n d t h a t u s e . P a r s o n a g e<br />

J a n u a r y 1 st 1 8 3 5 .” T h o u g h t h e w r itin tr<br />

h a s n o t fa d e d o n th e l e a f , y e l l o w w ith<br />

asre, n o d o u b t th e g i v e r , a s w e ll a s th e<br />

r e c ip ie n t s , h a s lon g - s i n c e jo i n e d th e<br />

e r e a t m a jo r i t y , l e a v i n g p e r h a p s b u t fe w<br />

s u c h s i le n t w itn e s s e s o f h i s g r e a t lif e -<br />

w o rk a m o n g s t th e e a r lv s e t t le r s o f th e<br />

m o t h e r S t a t e o f A u s t r a lia .<br />

A n o t h e r r e lic o f t h e o ld B a t h u r s t d a y s<br />

, is a s m a l l w o o d e n c a s k , s e v e n in c h e s<br />

h i g h , f o u r a n d a h a lf i n c h e s in . d i a ­<br />

m e t e r ( o u t s id e m e a s u r e m e n t s ) , h o ld i n g<br />

1 o n e q u a r t , w ith f o u r ir o n h o o p s a r o u n d<br />

it, th a t c o n t a in e d t h e o n lv s p ir it s t h a t<br />

w e r e u s e d a t t h e t w e n t y -f ir s t b ir t h d a y<br />

p a r ty o f W i llia m L e e , m e n t io n e d b e f o r e<br />

a s o n e o f t h e fir s t s e t t le r s . I t w a s a<br />

p r e s e p t f r o m t h e la te M r . J o h n N e v e l l ,<br />

O n condition t h a t t h e cask was returned<br />

to h im a s a m e m e n to o f th e o c c a s io n ,<br />

a n d , t h o u g h it b e a r s t h e s i g n s o f a g e ,<br />

j it h a s o n ly o n e b r o k e n s t a v e , a n d t h r e e<br />

j


o f th e h o o p s a r e q u it e n r m .<br />

A m o n g s t o t h e r e a r ly s e t t l e r s a t B a t h ­<br />

u rst w e re M e s s r s . R ic h a r d L e w i s . G e e .<br />

C o x , a n d W i llia m L a w s o n c o m m a n d a n t<br />

j a t B a t h u r s t , a n d d is c o v e r e r o f t h e M u d<br />

! g e e c o u n t r y ) . T h e s e t h r e e m e n fin a ll><br />

e s t a b lis h e d t h e ir h o m e s a t M u d g e e in<br />

1.821. T h e r e a r e a ls o in c lu d e d in th e<br />

o ld B a t h u r s t d a y s th e f a m i li a r n a m e s o f<br />

M c P h i lla m y , S u t t o r . G o r m a n , R o t t o n ,<br />

C h a r lt o n , L a n g l e y , D r . C lu e t t , J a c k T y e ,<br />

1 a n d m a n y o t h e r s , w h o a d d e d th e ir q u o t a<br />

j to t h e r e c o r d s o f t h e w e s t e r n d is t r ic t<br />

1 c lo s e o n a c e n t u r y a g o .<br />

CITY OF<br />

THE WEST.<br />

THE BIRTHDAY OF<br />

BATHURST.<br />

CENTENARY OF EVANS’<br />

DISCOVERY.<br />

P R E S E N T C I T Y O F T H E<br />

P L A I N S .<br />

Tbis is <strong>the</strong> centenary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> birthday <strong>of</strong> :<br />

<strong>Bathurst</strong>. One hundred years ago Surveyor<br />

George William Evans and his party <strong>of</strong> discoverers<br />

stood on Evans’ Crown, a remarkable<br />

rocky outcrop near Tarana, and looking before<br />

him caught <strong>the</strong> first glimpse <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> locality<br />

where th« future city <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> was to<br />

stand. Yesterday in that city <strong>the</strong> Governor,<br />

Sir Gerald Strickland, laid <strong>the</strong> foundation-<br />

Btone <strong>of</strong> a memorial to <strong>the</strong> explorer—<strong>the</strong> man<br />

who had forced an entrance through <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong><br />

<strong>Mountains</strong>, and discovered <strong>the</strong> remarkably rich


SURVEYOB GEOEGE WILLIAM<br />

EVANS.<br />

f f h e G o v e r n o r la id t h e f o u n d a t io n -s t o n e o f<br />

a m e m o r ia l t o t h e e x p lo r e r a t B a t h u r s t<br />

, y e s t e r d a y .<br />

plains beyond. One hundred years ago <strong>the</strong><br />

place where <strong>Bathurst</strong> stands had been untrodden<br />

by <strong>the</strong> foot o[ white man—being <strong>the</strong> haunt<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> aboriginal and <strong>of</strong> kangaroos and emus, j<br />

Indeed, it was a magnificent hunting-ground. !<br />

Now <strong>the</strong>re stands on that site a prosperous<br />

city—<strong>the</strong> largest inland city in New South<br />

Waies—with a population <strong>of</strong> over 10,000, while<br />

<strong>the</strong> population <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> district is over 25,080.<br />

<strong>Bathurst</strong>'s prosperity was in its early days<br />

due to agriculture and pastoral resources. Then<br />

In <strong>the</strong> ’ fifties it was <strong>the</strong> centre <strong>of</strong> a big gold<br />

rush. Later on, as <strong>the</strong> terminus <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> railway,<br />

it flourished as <strong>the</strong> distributing centre for <strong>the</strong><br />

fine district to <strong>the</strong> southward. Now, though<br />

robbed <strong>of</strong> much <strong>of</strong> this incentive to growth, it<br />

has discovered ano<strong>the</strong>r—fruit cultivation.<br />

Around <strong>Bathurst</strong> <strong>the</strong>re sre some o f <strong>the</strong> largest<br />

orchards to be found in New South Wales, and<br />

recent years have seen a very large increase<br />

in <strong>the</strong> area devoted to apple-growing. As a<br />

result <strong>the</strong> city is still forging ahead. The fact<br />

that <strong>the</strong> city is actually 2333 feet above <strong>the</strong><br />

sea level makes it one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> healthiest places<br />

in which to reside. It is generally recogniscd<br />

as a sanatorium for pulmonary patients, as it<br />

possesses a fine salubrious climate. Ihe city<br />

is distant 145 miles by rail from Sydney, and<br />

yet, such is <strong>the</strong> enterprise <strong>of</strong> its people, that<br />

its public buildings and its park3 surpass those<br />

<strong>of</strong> any municipality outside <strong>of</strong> Sydney, t o r<br />

aes<strong>the</strong>tic beauty and charm this city, viewed<br />

from an elevation, is superb. It is a garden<br />

city—<strong>the</strong> houses being interspersed in a field<br />

<strong>of</strong> verdure. It is perhaps <strong>the</strong> most beautiful<br />

city in <strong>the</strong> State. It has certainly <strong>the</strong> right to<br />

<strong>the</strong> title <strong>of</strong> “ The Queen City <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> W est.”<br />

DISCOVERY BY EVANS.<br />

I It is strange that, although <strong>Bathurst</strong> has<br />

j erected a fine South African Soldiers’ Memorial<br />

! and o<strong>the</strong>r monuments, this is <strong>the</strong> first occasion<br />

j on which it has thought <strong>of</strong> perpetuating <strong>the</strong> ,<br />

j name <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> explorer to whom it owes its I<br />

existence. Evans’s Crown, at Tarana, and<br />

Evans’s Lookout, near Blackheath, are named<br />

after him, but in <strong>Bathurst</strong> City <strong>the</strong>re is up to<br />

<strong>the</strong> present no permanent memorial. And yet<br />

<strong>the</strong> people <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> are not slow. They<br />

have anticipated even <strong>the</strong> present centenary<br />

by a fortnight. It will be remembered that<br />

a few months ago <strong>the</strong> centenary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Crossing</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong> was celebrated<br />

with due pomp and enthusiasm at Mount V ictoria,<br />

when <strong>the</strong> names <strong>of</strong> Bl&xland, Lawson,<br />

and Wentworth were honored. Their success<br />

was attained in June, 1813. At <strong>the</strong> time <strong>the</strong> |<br />

young colony hi<strong>the</strong>rto hemmed in by what j<br />

was regarded as impassable mountains, was ,<br />

prospecting around for more territory—good j<br />

land for flocks, herds, and agriculture. Con- j<br />

sequently, when it was found that <strong>the</strong> mountain<br />

barrier could be crossed Governor Macquarie<br />

lost no time in despatching an expedition<br />

to spy out <strong>the</strong> land to <strong>the</strong> westward. Surveyor<br />

George W illiam Evans was given <strong>the</strong><br />

honor <strong>of</strong> leading <strong>the</strong> party, which started on<br />

November 20, 1913, from Emu Island (now<br />

known as Emu <strong>Plains</strong>), distant about 36 miles<br />

from Sydney, carrying with <strong>the</strong>m <strong>the</strong> Governor's<br />

instructions as follow :— “ You are to<br />

proceed in as nearly a west direction as <strong>the</strong><br />

nature <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> country you have to explore<br />

will admit, and you are to continue this<br />

journey as far as your means will enable<br />

you."<br />

In five days Evans and hi* five men, equipped<br />

with horses, ammunition, and ample stores<br />

for a two months' trip, had crossed <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong><br />

<strong>Mountains</strong> and arrived at <strong>the</strong> commencement ,


HOLY TRINITY CHURCH AT KELSO,<br />

W h ic h i s t lie o l d e s t c h u r c h w e s t o f t h e B l u e M o u n t a i n s . A w o o d e n c h u r c h w a s e r e e le d in 1826, a n d (h e p r e s e n t b u iid in -<br />

,was substituted on <strong>the</strong> site la 18S5.


<strong>of</strong> a valley on <strong>the</strong> western side <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>m, having<br />

passed over several tracts <strong>of</strong> tolerably<br />

good soil, but also over much rugged and<br />

very difficult mountainous country. Proceeding<br />

through this valley, which Evans<br />

described as “ beautiful and fertile,’*<br />

with a rapid stream running through<br />

it, he arrived at <strong>the</strong> termination <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> tour made by Blaxland, Wentworth,<br />

and Lawson. Continuing westward, he crossed<br />

a well-grassed but rugged and broken country,<br />

which was subsequently called <strong>the</strong> Clarence<br />

Hilly Ranges.<br />

ALMOST DISHEARTENED.<br />

After that, Evans endured some <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> anxieties<br />

inseparable from <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> an explorer.<br />

His diary shows that he made <strong>the</strong> following<br />

record on November 29:—“ I stopped in very<br />

bad spirits, not being able to get on. We are<br />

completely entangled among <strong>the</strong> hills, and we<br />

are able to make very little westing in our<br />

course. W ere it not for <strong>the</strong> horses, <strong>the</strong> difficulty<br />

to ourselves would be nothing. They are<br />

sometimes difficult to manage, and soon tire<br />

among <strong>the</strong> highlands. When so <strong>the</strong>y wrill not<br />

move. After travelling 2% miles we are on a<br />

l<strong>of</strong>ty hill from whence <strong>the</strong> country north-west<br />

is all forest hills as far as I could see, which<br />

was about 15 miles. Every o<strong>the</strong>r direction was<br />

obscured by high ranges. It is impossible<br />

<strong>the</strong>re can be a better grazing track <strong>of</strong> land with<br />

<strong>the</strong> same good appearance, as far as I have<br />

been able to get a sight <strong>of</strong> it to <strong>the</strong> westward.”<br />

As indicating <strong>the</strong> slow progress ihat was<br />

made by Evans and his men it may be mentioned<br />

that on that day <strong>the</strong>y only‘ travelled 3^<br />

miles. On <strong>the</strong> following day (November 30),<br />

Evans was able to write in a more hopeful<br />

j strain. His entry in <strong>the</strong> diary w7as as follows:—<br />

“ I have at length reached <strong>the</strong> ridge I so much<br />

wished to after walking about two miles, where<br />

I had a prospect to <strong>the</strong> north for a great distance.<br />

A mist arises from a part I suppose to<br />

bo a river or a large lagoon about 20 miles <strong>of</strong>f.<br />

The country in this direction has a fine appearance,<br />

<strong>the</strong> trees being thin and <strong>the</strong> hills covered<br />

with grass. A quarter <strong>of</strong> a mile fur<strong>the</strong>r along<br />

<strong>the</strong> range I came to a very high mount, whence<br />

I was much pleased with <strong>the</strong> sight westward.<br />

I think I can see 40 miles, which had <strong>the</strong> look<br />

<strong>of</strong> an open country. To <strong>the</strong> south <strong>of</strong> me <strong>the</strong>re are<br />

large hills, much higher than <strong>the</strong> one I am<br />

on, with pasture to <strong>the</strong>ir tops. This range is<br />

ra<strong>the</strong>r overrun wTith underwood and larger timber<br />

growing <strong>the</strong>reon, but <strong>the</strong> sides are as green<br />

as possible. In descending for two miles <strong>the</strong><br />

Tverdure is gooa; <strong>the</strong> descent <strong>the</strong>n becomes steep<br />

for a quarter <strong>of</strong> a mile leading into a fine valley.<br />

At <strong>the</strong> end I met a large rivulet arising<br />

from <strong>the</strong> sou<strong>the</strong>rn hills. We shot ducks, and<br />

caught several trout weighing at least 51b. or<br />

61b. each. Distance travelled. 5% miles.”<br />

FINDING THE BATHURST PLAINS.<br />

He followed <strong>the</strong> course <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> rivulet. On<br />

<strong>the</strong> north side <strong>of</strong> it wras a remarkable sugarloaf<br />

hill, having a stone on <strong>the</strong> peak <strong>of</strong> it. He<br />

writes:—“ I have named this hill after myself.”<br />

The l<strong>of</strong>ty peak he speaks <strong>of</strong> is actually 3200ft.<br />

above sea level, and is now known as Evans’s<br />

Crown. It is not far from Tarana, and plainly<br />

visible from <strong>the</strong> railway line. Standing on <strong>the</strong><br />

top <strong>of</strong> this peak on Wednesday, December 1,<br />

Evans obtained his first glimpse <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

<strong>Plains</strong>, and, in <strong>the</strong> far distance, <strong>the</strong> site where<br />

<strong>the</strong> future Queen City <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> W est wfas to stand.<br />

At this stage he writes in his diary:—“ I am<br />

more pleased with <strong>the</strong> country every day. It is<br />

a great extent <strong>of</strong> grazing land, without being<br />

divided by barren spaces, as on <strong>the</strong> east side<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> mountains. It is well watered by running<br />

streams, in almost every valley.” Next<br />

day his language was even more eulogistic.<br />

“ On considering <strong>the</strong> fine country we have passed<br />

through this day,” he wrote, “ I think it equal<br />

to Van Diemen’s Land. The river winds through<br />

! fine flats and round <strong>the</strong> points <strong>of</strong> small ridges<br />

\that gradually descend to it, covered with <strong>the</strong><br />

finest grass, and intermixed with <strong>the</strong> white '<br />

daisy, as in England.”<br />

This river he named <strong>the</strong> Fish River, as it<br />

supplied an abundance <strong>of</strong> fish. He followed it<br />

until it junctioned with ano<strong>the</strong>r stream, which<br />

he called Campbell River, after Mrs. Macquarie’s<br />

maiden name. He <strong>the</strong>n discovered and<br />

named <strong>the</strong> Macquarie <strong>Plains</strong>, on w’hich Lawson’s<br />

house was subsequently erected, Lawson having<br />

received a grant <strong>of</strong> 1000 acres <strong>of</strong> land as a reward<br />

for his w'ork. Subsequently he came t<br />

<strong>the</strong> main river, which he promptly named M acquarie<br />

River.<br />

It was on Friday, December 10, that Evans<br />

reached what he described as “ a very handsome<br />

mount.” To this he gave <strong>the</strong> name Mount<br />

Pleasant—which it retains to this day, Mount i<br />

Pleasant being <strong>the</strong> home <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Stewart family, I<br />

descendants <strong>of</strong> Major-General Stewart. From<br />

Mount Pleasant Evans writes that he saw a<br />

very fine plain. It is on that plain that <strong>the</strong><br />

stately city <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> stands to-day.<br />

BLACKS FLEE FROM THEM.<br />

Although, when settlement took place, <strong>the</strong><br />

blacks, by <strong>the</strong>ir thieving propensities, caused<br />

considerable annoyance, <strong>the</strong>y did not attack <strong>the</strong><br />

Evans expedition. Traces <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>m were discovered<br />

by Evans, but only six were observed<br />

by <strong>the</strong> party, and <strong>the</strong>se were frightened by <strong>the</strong><br />

presence <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> white -men, and made <strong>of</strong>t into


[<strong>the</strong> bush.<br />

EVANS REWARDED.<br />

When Evans returned to Sydney and reported<br />

to <strong>the</strong> Governor his discovery <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

<strong>Plains</strong>—named after <strong>the</strong> Principal Secretary for<br />

<strong>the</strong> Colonies, Lord <strong>Bathurst</strong>—<strong>the</strong> latter immediately<br />

set Captain William Cox to work to<br />

build a road to <strong>Bathurst</strong>. The convicts engaged<br />

on <strong>the</strong> work were urged to strenuous efforts by<br />

<strong>the</strong> promis <strong>of</strong> remissions <strong>of</strong> sentences and par<br />

dons. As a result <strong>of</strong> this “ speeding-up process,<br />

<strong>the</strong> road to <strong>Bathurst</strong> was completed in<br />

1S13, when <strong>the</strong> Governor and Mrs. Macquarie<br />

visited <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> <strong>Plains</strong>. As a reward for<br />

his discovery, Evans was granted 1000 acres <strong>of</strong><br />

lanu in Tasmania, in addition to a small pecuniary<br />

payment. Evans died in Hobart, at Warwick<br />

Lodge, in 1852, at <strong>the</strong> age <strong>of</strong> 74 years—<br />

just when <strong>the</strong> plains he had disc<strong>of</strong>ered were<br />

i in <strong>the</strong> first convulsions <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> gold rush. His<br />

j tomb in <strong>the</strong> old neglected cemetery in Hobart<br />

; bears <strong>the</strong> inscription:—“ Here is resting <strong>the</strong><br />

Iremains <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> fa<strong>the</strong>r <strong>of</strong> Australian explorers.”<br />

LOOKING BACKWARD.<br />

SOME OF THE OLD PIOXEEES.<br />

It is a peculiar fact that <strong>Bathurst</strong>, unlike<br />

j most <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> important towns <strong>of</strong> New South<br />

Wales, has never had its history properly *<br />

compiled. There is no question that its history<br />

if properly written would make most interesting<br />

reading, for it would treat <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> early<br />

convict settlement, <strong>the</strong>n <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> pastoral and<br />

agricultural industry, <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> gold discoveries,<br />

and <strong>the</strong>n <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> thrilling encounters with bushrangers.<br />

But <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> early days it is exceedingly<br />

difficult to ga<strong>the</strong>r au<strong>the</strong>ntic information.<br />

Traditions abound, but when carefully sifted<br />

<strong>the</strong>y are found to be very far from actual<br />

facts.<br />

It is undisputed that <strong>Bathurst</strong> was originally<br />

a convict settlement, <strong>the</strong> free settlers at Kelso,<br />

which is about two miles distant, being pro-<br />

J hibited from entering <strong>the</strong> area. It was not<br />

more than a few years however before this<br />

ban was removed and free settlers soon were<br />

found scattered over <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> <strong>Plains</strong>. The<br />

first ten settlers according to <strong>the</strong> descendant<br />

<strong>of</strong> one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> pioneers were Messrs. James Vincent.<br />

Thomas Kite, John Nevell, W illiam Lee,<br />

Joseph Moulder, John Dargrin, George Kable,<br />

I Richard Mills, Thomas Cheshire, and T. Ap-<br />

|plett. Some <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> descendants <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>se fine<br />

old pioneers are still to be found in <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

district, though many have wandered to<br />

<strong>the</strong> most distant parts <strong>of</strong> Australia. Residents<br />

in <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> districts point out <strong>the</strong> younger<br />

branches <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Lees, <strong>the</strong> Kites, and <strong>the</strong> Kables.<br />

Amongst tile best known <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Mills family is<br />

Dr. Arthur Mills, <strong>of</strong> Sydney, whose uncle, Mr.<br />

George Mills was <strong>the</strong> first white child born<br />

in <strong>Bathurst</strong>, and to whom <strong>the</strong> Government<br />

<strong>of</strong>fered a grant <strong>of</strong> 100 acres <strong>of</strong> land. The<br />

Moulder family is well known in <strong>the</strong> Orange<br />

and Condobolin districts. The Nevells have<br />

migrated to Mudgee, and Rylstone, in Queensland.<br />

Mr James Vincent’s only surviving child<br />

became <strong>the</strong> wife <strong>of</strong> Mr John Nevell, and <strong>the</strong>y]<br />

still hold <strong>the</strong> original Vincent grant <strong>of</strong> land, \<br />

011 part <strong>of</strong> which <strong>the</strong> Kelso railway station j<br />

now stands, that portion having been sold a ;<br />

few years ago Among o<strong>the</strong>r early settlers at [<br />

<strong>Bathurst</strong> was Messrs George Cox, Richard j<br />

Lewis, and W illiam Lawson These three :<br />

men finally established <strong>the</strong>ir homes at Muagee<br />

in 1821 There are also included in those very I j<br />

early days <strong>the</strong> familiar names <strong>of</strong> MacPhillamy,<br />

Webb, Suttor, Gorman, Rotton, Charlton Langley,<br />

Jack Tye, and many o<strong>the</strong>rs.<br />

Among <strong>the</strong> original settlers at <strong>Bathurst</strong> was<br />

Mr. George Ranken. He was <strong>the</strong> first <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

name to come to Australia, early in last century,<br />

and both he and his wife were most enterprising<br />

people. He built <strong>the</strong> bridge that enabled ><br />

<strong>the</strong> people to get <strong>the</strong>ir produce to market. It<br />

was carried away after long years by a great<br />

flood. He planted a vineyard, <strong>of</strong> which <strong>the</strong><br />

wfne, if it had been kept, would have been<br />

priceless now. and Mrs. Ranken was famous for<br />

her dairy and her cheeses. Besides, <strong>the</strong>y<br />

brought out a number <strong>of</strong> German immigrants,<br />

who have done well in this country. Mr. George<br />

Ranken left four properties to his surviving<br />

soils, Saltram, Sheet <strong>of</strong> Bark. Killoshiels, and<br />

Eglington, but no Ranken owns an acre in <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>Bathurst</strong> district now. It is remembered that<br />

Mr. George Ranken was one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> first <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

pioneers to own a plough—and a wooden one<br />

at that. Previously, wheat and all o<strong>the</strong>r crops<br />

had been put in by means <strong>of</strong> a garden hoe.<br />

THE SUTTOR FAMILY.<br />

The best-known family in <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> district<br />

is probably <strong>the</strong> descendants <strong>of</strong> that sturdy<br />

representative colonist, Mr. George Suttor—<br />

<strong>the</strong> grandfa<strong>the</strong>r <strong>of</strong> Sir Francis Suttor. President<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Legislative Council. He took an im ­<br />

portant part in <strong>the</strong> founding <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

settlement, and his family has ever since been<br />

prominent in <strong>the</strong> records <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> State. Mr.<br />

George Suttor was born at Chelsea, in 1776, and •


sailed with his wife to Australia, in 1799, arri\-<br />

ing in <strong>the</strong> following year. After an interesting<br />

career during which he held several Government<br />

appointments, he obtained Governor Brisbane’s<br />

permission to take up land in <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

district. Then prosperity smiled on his<br />

efforts. In a few years under his son’s management<br />

his sheep were numbered by thousands,<br />

( t<br />

and his cattle bv hundreds.<br />

His son, Mr. William Henry Suttor, was 16<br />

years old when he went with his fa<strong>the</strong>r to tbs<br />

<strong>Bathurst</strong> district, taking less than 400 sheep, a<br />

few cattle, one horse, and <strong>the</strong> promise <strong>of</strong> a<br />

grant <strong>of</strong> land. He settled at Brucedale, on <strong>the</strong><br />

. Winburndale Rivulet, about eight miles nor<strong>the</strong>rly<br />

from <strong>Bathurst</strong>. Here <strong>the</strong> sheep and cattle<br />

increased very quickly, and large farming operations<br />

were carried on. Unlike many <strong>of</strong> his<br />

neighbors, he never had any trouble with <strong>the</strong><br />

aborigines, who, under <strong>the</strong> leadership <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

; chief, Windradine, or Saturday, committed ravages<br />

upon <strong>the</strong> settlers’ flocks and herds around<br />

<strong>the</strong> early settlement at <strong>Bathurst</strong>. He attributed<br />

his immunity from <strong>the</strong>ir attacks to his<br />

treatment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>m, and <strong>the</strong> kindly interest he<br />

took in <strong>the</strong>ir welfare. He had learned to<br />

ppeak <strong>the</strong>ir language. His favorite black boy,<br />

Pen-nee-grah, was his guide in many excursions<br />

among <strong>the</strong> hills and valleys <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> generally<br />

rough country over which his flocks and<br />

herds afterwards roamed. On one occasion<br />

only did <strong>the</strong>y show any hostility. His hut was<br />

; suddenly and silently surrounded by a trible <strong>of</strong><br />

sable warriors, all prepared for war. He<br />

courageously, met <strong>the</strong>m in <strong>the</strong> door, addressed<br />

<strong>the</strong>m in <strong>the</strong>ir own language in jovial and<br />

friendly terms. For a moment or two <strong>the</strong>y<br />

listened to him with lowering brows; <strong>the</strong>n consulted<br />

in an undertone, and suddenly left. Withing<br />

24 hours <strong>the</strong>y killed several men at Millahmurrah<br />

and W attle Flat. His cheerful courage<br />

at that time saved his life.<br />

The only servants <strong>the</strong> settlers had in those<br />

days were <strong>the</strong> assigned convicts. Many <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>Se<br />

were wonderfully devoted and faithful to <strong>the</strong><br />

interests <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir masters when <strong>the</strong>y were well<br />

treated. As a rule, Mr. Suttor never<br />

had any trouble with his men. On<br />

one occasion he tried <strong>the</strong> power <strong>of</strong><br />

superstition upon <strong>the</strong> minds <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>m to<br />

discover a thief. Many petty <strong>the</strong>fts had occasioned<br />

a good deal <strong>of</strong> annoyance on <strong>the</strong> farm;<br />

so he ranged all <strong>the</strong> men up in line. “ Now,”<br />

he said, “ I shall read a few verses from <strong>the</strong><br />

Bible, and give each <strong>of</strong> you a piece <strong>of</strong> straw,<br />

and <strong>the</strong> man who has <strong>the</strong> longest piece will be<br />

<strong>the</strong> thief.** The verses were read, and <strong>the</strong><br />

straws distributed. The men’s backs were<br />

ii towards him, with one hand behind, into which<br />

<strong>the</strong> straw was placed. He watched <strong>the</strong>m narrowly,<br />

and presently he detected one glancing<br />

furtively at his hand to discover what sort <strong>of</strong><br />

straw he had. “ You are <strong>the</strong> thief!” said <strong>the</strong><br />

, master. The man was so taken aback that he<br />

<strong>the</strong>re and <strong>the</strong>n confessed <strong>the</strong> fact.<br />

So his life passed somewhat uneventfully until<br />

<strong>the</strong> year 1830. In this year <strong>the</strong>re was a very<br />

serious outbreak <strong>of</strong> prisoners at <strong>Bathurst</strong>,<br />

headed by one Ralph Entwistle. The tyranny<br />

and oppression <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> times was <strong>the</strong> cause <strong>of</strong><br />

this. At one time as many as 80 men, all<br />

armed, formed Entwistle’s gang. At length<br />

<strong>the</strong>se men deliberately and in cold blood shot<br />

an overseer <strong>of</strong> Mr. Evernden’s, <strong>the</strong> police<br />

magistrate, at his farm at Bartlett’s, near<br />

George's <strong>Plains</strong>. On <strong>the</strong> news <strong>of</strong> this outrage<br />

reaching <strong>Bathurst</strong>, Major Macpherson, <strong>the</strong> <strong>of</strong>ficer<br />

in charge <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> soldiers stationed <strong>the</strong>re,<br />

called a meeting <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> inhabitants. Twelve<br />

volunteered to follow <strong>the</strong> gang. W illiam Suttor<br />

was chosen leader, and his bro<strong>the</strong>r Charles<br />

second in command. They started <strong>the</strong> same<br />

evening for Charlton, Mr. ArkelVs station on<br />

Campbell’s River, at which place news had come<br />

that <strong>the</strong> men had lately jeen seen. The volunteers<br />

stopped <strong>the</strong>re that night. The next day,<br />

by <strong>the</strong> aid <strong>of</strong> two blacks, <strong>the</strong>y succeeded iiw<br />

tracking and overtaking <strong>the</strong> gang—now reduced<br />

to about 20 men—near sundown, among <strong>the</strong><br />

Abercrombie Ranges. This place is a few milet*<br />

from <strong>the</strong>. Trunkey goldfield. The bushranger#<br />

were alarmed by <strong>the</strong> noise made by <strong>the</strong> approaching<br />

party, and at once commenced to fire<br />

upon <strong>the</strong>m. The fire was briskly returned, and<br />

after some 300 rounds on both sides had been<br />

expended, <strong>the</strong> leader o f <strong>the</strong> volunteers ordered<br />

a charge. The pursued were dislodged from<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir camp, but, <strong>the</strong> day being too far advanced<br />

to follow up <strong>the</strong> advantage, <strong>the</strong> volunteers<br />

fell back upon Mulgunnia, an out-station<br />

<strong>of</strong> Arkell’s. During <strong>the</strong> engagement <strong>the</strong> leader<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> convicts urged his men to make sure <strong>of</strong><br />

Suttor, whom he mistook for <strong>the</strong> police magistrate.<br />

One bullet did pass through Suttor’s<br />

hat, and many bullets struck a small tree behind<br />

which he had ensconsed himself. That<br />

night <strong>the</strong>ir horses strayed away, and <strong>the</strong> pursuit<br />

was followed up by Lieutenant Brown with<br />

mounted police from <strong>Bathurst</strong>. Having defeated<br />

<strong>the</strong> police under Lieutenant Brown, who<br />

lost two men and five horses killed, <strong>the</strong> gang<br />

surrendered at <strong>the</strong> Lachlan River to combined<br />

forces <strong>of</strong> Lieutenant Macalister with police<br />

from Goulbum, and Captain W alpole with soldiers<br />

from Sydney. Macalister <strong>the</strong> day before<br />

had been, if not defeated, at least wounded and<br />

worsted by <strong>the</strong>m. Ten <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>. men were tried at<br />

-JLipecial assize court held at <strong>Bathurst</strong>, and were J


f'Xecuteri. On several o<strong>the</strong>r occasions Mr. Suttor 1<br />

distinguished himself in capturing men <strong>of</strong> this<br />

class—men who were robbing his own stations<br />

—and delivering <strong>the</strong>m up to justice.<br />

In 1833 he married <strong>the</strong> daughter <strong>of</strong> Mr. Henry<br />

Francis, who, with his family, had recently arrived<br />

in <strong>the</strong> colony. In <strong>the</strong> conduct <strong>of</strong> his<br />

business he was always ready to adopt new<br />

and progressive Ideas; so, in 1838, in order to ‘<br />

provide <strong>the</strong> necessary provisions for his establishment,<br />

he brought over <strong>the</strong> mountains <strong>the</strong><br />

first steam flour mill erected in <strong>the</strong> west. Before<br />

this <strong>the</strong> employees had to grind <strong>the</strong>ii* own<br />

wheat with small steel mills.<br />

Mr. Suttor was a member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> first Parliament<br />

in Australia, and was prominent in <strong>the</strong><br />

matter <strong>of</strong> stopping <strong>the</strong> transportation <strong>of</strong> convicts.<br />

For many years—until 1872, with only<br />

short periods <strong>of</strong> intermission—he remained a<br />

legislator, retiring after nearly 30 years <strong>of</strong><br />

political work. As a squatter he was very<br />

successful, and established stations on <strong>the</strong> Macquarie,<br />

<strong>the</strong> Bogan, <strong>the</strong> Lachlan, and <strong>the</strong> Darling<br />

Rivers. His son, Sir Francis Suttor, is at<br />

present President <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Legislative Cpuncil and j<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Royal Agricultural Society, and oiie <strong>of</strong> [<br />

teh most popular and respected men through- j<br />

out <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> district.<br />

THE STEWART FAMILY.<br />

Mount Pleasant, so named by <strong>the</strong> discoverer,<br />

Surveyor Evans, was taken up originally by<br />

Major-General "William Stewart, who was at<br />

ore time in <strong>the</strong> Horse Guards. As a reward for<br />

nls Peninsula services—he fought under W ellington<br />

right through <strong>the</strong> campaign—he w m |<br />

given permission to select. 30C0 acres in any [<br />

part <strong>of</strong> Australia. Ho arrived in Australia<br />

with his regiment in 1825. At that time Bath- ]<br />

urst was a Government settlement—chiefly<br />

sheep and cattle—conducted by convict labor, j<br />

No one was allowed to cross <strong>the</strong> river without<br />

an order from <strong>the</strong> magistrate. Major-general<br />

Stewart was. however, promised <strong>the</strong> first selection<br />

as soc n as <strong>the</strong> land was thrown open. His<br />

son now possesses a letter from <strong>the</strong> Governor<br />

saying tia t he would take it as a personal<br />

favor if <strong>the</strong> major-general would as speedily as j<br />

possible txtrcise his right. This he did. He j<br />

selected 3000 acres at <strong>the</strong> junction <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Mac- I<br />

quarle River and <strong>the</strong> Evans <strong>Plains</strong> Creek. He<br />

afterwards bought <strong>the</strong> remainder <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Mount<br />

Pleasant parish, making his e3iate altoge<strong>the</strong>r<br />

15,000 acres <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> best land in tho district.<br />

The Government upset price at <strong>the</strong> time that<br />

<strong>the</strong> original grant was made was 5s per acre.<br />

Major-general Stewart died at <strong>the</strong> homestead,<br />

now a fine palatial residence, in 1SS4, and was<br />

buried in <strong>the</strong> vault on <strong>the</strong> hill from whic’j<br />

Evans viewed <strong>the</strong> plain. A monument marks<br />

<strong>the</strong> location <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> vault. His son, Mr. J. H.<br />

Stewart, has resided on <strong>the</strong> property all his<br />

life, and took a great interest in farming operations.<br />

The estate was worked by tenants,<br />

no less than 28 families occupying <strong>the</strong> farms.<br />

Last year Mr. Stewart sold about 11,000 acres<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> estate to Mr. A. C. Reed.<br />

HACQUAKIE HOUSE.<br />

THE HOME OF THE LAWSONS.<br />

As a reward for his diligent services in finding<br />

a passage over <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong> <strong>Mountains</strong>, <strong>the</strong><br />

Government gave William Lawson a grant <strong>of</strong><br />

1000 acres <strong>of</strong> land. This he took up on <strong>the</strong><br />

Macquarie <strong>Plains</strong>, and erected a substantial<br />

residence, which was known as Macquarie<br />

House. The exact date <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> erection <strong>of</strong> Macquarie<br />

House is uncertain—probably about 1820,<br />

as William Lawson was appointed commandant<br />

and justice <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> peace at <strong>Bathurst</strong> towards<br />

<strong>the</strong> end <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> previous year, and would in all<br />

probability see to <strong>the</strong> erection <strong>of</strong> his house on<br />

<strong>the</strong> land he owned as soon as possible after his<br />

<strong>of</strong>ficial appointment was made. In 1832 his son<br />

W illiam acquired <strong>the</strong> property, and resided<br />

<strong>the</strong>re for upwards <strong>of</strong> 20 years. During his<br />

fa<strong>the</strong>r's occupation <strong>the</strong> old home must have<br />

had, on certain occasions, Governor Macquarie<br />

as an inmate, and in all probability <strong>the</strong> great<br />

man during his visits to <strong>Bathurst</strong> was a wel- j<br />

come guest at <strong>the</strong> hospitable home <strong>of</strong> his<br />

friend and bro<strong>the</strong>r <strong>of</strong>ficer. The photograph 1<br />

published in this issue shows <strong>the</strong> old building<br />

in a very fair state <strong>of</strong> repair.<br />

IN THE COACHING DAYS.<br />

C O B B A N D C O .’ S C O A C H E S .<br />

When tho gold fever broken out in <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

district <strong>the</strong>re was a big demand for conveyances.<br />

It was not, however, until Mr. James<br />

Ru<strong>the</strong>rford, in 1861, introduced Cobb and Co.’b<br />

coaches that anything like regularity could be<br />

depended upon. He settled at <strong>Bathurst</strong>, and as ;<br />

a managing pairtner <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> big firm estab- 1<br />

iished <strong>the</strong> coaching business on a good foot- !<br />

ing. Mr. E. W. Webb recalls <strong>the</strong> fact that<br />

in those days it was thought a great perform ­<br />

ance to journey from <strong>Bathurst</strong> to Sydney in<br />

24 hours by coach. The horses were changed<br />

every 12 or 15 miles. On many occasions <strong>the</strong><br />

bushrangers held <strong>the</strong> coach up and looted <strong>the</strong><br />

luggage <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> passengers. Mr. Ru<strong>the</strong>rford also


gave a fair share <strong>of</strong> his attention to squatting<br />

pursuits and mining. He spent a fortune<br />

in endeavoring to establish .<strong>the</strong> iron industry<br />

in <strong>the</strong> State but want <strong>of</strong> adequate encouragement<br />

from <strong>the</strong> Government and <strong>the</strong> high cost<br />

<strong>of</strong> labor crippled his effort. His descendants<br />

are to be found in <strong>the</strong> district at <strong>the</strong> present<br />

time.<br />

THE GOLD DISCOVERY.<br />

It was not until <strong>the</strong> settlement was about 40<br />

years old that gold was discovered in <strong>the</strong> district.<br />

The question as to who found <strong>the</strong> gold<br />

forms an interesting subject for discussion, but<br />

it is generally admitted throughout <strong>the</strong> district<br />

that although Mr. Hargraves got tho<br />

credit <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> discovery It was John Lister, toge<strong>the</strong>r<br />

with James and William Tom, who were<br />

<strong>the</strong> rightful claimants. It was in 1851 that Mr.<br />

E. H. Hargjaves, a geologist, happened to be<br />

staying at Springfield, <strong>the</strong> home <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Toms<br />

family. In conversation <strong>the</strong> lads mentioned<br />

that ihey had seen yellow metal, and Hargraves<br />

took two <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>m, James and William,<br />

?nd John Lister into partnership, under a verbal<br />

agreement to divide <strong>the</strong> Government reward<br />

<strong>of</strong> £20,000 should <strong>the</strong>y find payable gold. Under<br />

Hargiaves’s directions <strong>the</strong>y built a cradle<br />

for washing for gold. This identical cradle is<br />

still in <strong>the</strong> possession <strong>of</strong> William Tom, though<br />

much decayed. After several unsuccessful attempts<br />

Hargraves returned to Sydney, leaving<br />

<strong>the</strong> three lads to go on prospecting. They<br />

found a nice lot <strong>of</strong> gold in xfae Summer-bill<br />

Creek, and in accordance with <strong>the</strong>ir arrangement<br />

sent it on to Mr. Hargraves in Sydney.<br />

This gentleman took it to headquarters, and<br />

with <strong>the</strong> very same gold set <strong>the</strong> country on<br />

fire, and afterwards received <strong>the</strong> handsome reward.<br />

The Government some years later<br />

gave <strong>the</strong> two young Toms and John Lister<br />

a sum <strong>of</strong> about £2000 between <strong>the</strong>m. Mr.<br />

W. H. Webb, <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong>, is a nephew <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

bro<strong>the</strong>rs Tom, who discovered <strong>the</strong> gold. The<br />

rush to <strong>the</strong> alluvial field caused <strong>Bathurst</strong> to<br />

boom for a time. Mr. Webb recalls <strong>the</strong> fact<br />

that <strong>the</strong> Chinese eventually were allowed a<br />

footing, when <strong>the</strong> white man could no longer<br />

make <strong>the</strong> game pr<strong>of</strong>itable. The yellow men<br />

came up in long strings, and <strong>the</strong> money <strong>the</strong>y<br />

Bent home to China in those days ran into big<br />

sums. Although <strong>the</strong> alluvial was largely worked<br />

out at that time, <strong>the</strong>re has ever since been<br />

considerable mining In <strong>the</strong> district. On <strong>the</strong><br />

Upper Turon, at Palmer’s Oakey, <strong>the</strong>re are<br />

hundreds <strong>of</strong> praspqeting holes where <strong>the</strong>y<br />

cradled in <strong>the</strong> old days. Even at <strong>the</strong> present<br />

time 300 or 400 men are engaged in alluvial<br />

mining in <strong>the</strong> locality, but <strong>the</strong> sensational finds<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> early days are few and far between.<br />

In <strong>the</strong> “ boom” days a man who did not make<br />

£30 a week at Green Swamp thought he was<br />

very unlucky.<br />

A RED-LETTER DAY.<br />

HISTORICAL PROCESSION.<br />

SOME ALLEGORICAL DISPLAYS.<br />

BATHURST, Wednesday.—To-day was a redletter<br />

day in <strong>the</strong> history <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong>. It was<br />

<strong>the</strong> big day <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> celebrations in commemoration<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> hundredth anniversary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> discovery<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> <strong>Plains</strong> by Surveyor-General<br />

Evans, and, under wea<strong>the</strong>r conditions which<br />

were ideal, was given over to ono long round <strong>of</strong><br />

festivities and epoch-making functions, in<br />

which <strong>the</strong> Governor, Sir Gerald Strickland, was<br />

<strong>the</strong> principal participant. His Excellency was<br />

accompanied by two <strong>of</strong> his daughters and attended<br />

by Captain Talbot, A.D.C. In <strong>the</strong> party<br />

were Miss Suttor, Mr. Carmichael (<strong>the</strong> Minister<br />

for Education), and Lieutenant-Colonel<br />

White. They arrived in <strong>Bathurst</strong> by <strong>the</strong> mail<br />

train this morning. His Excellency and<br />

party, toge<strong>the</strong>r with several representative<br />

Pathurst citizens, were <strong>the</strong> guests <strong>of</strong> Mr. John<br />

Meagher, M.L.C., at breakfast at "Kilrush.’’<br />

O P E N I N G P R O C E E D I N G S .<br />

The day’s proceedings opened with an historical<br />

procession through <strong>the</strong> principal streets<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> city. The line <strong>of</strong> route, which was gaily<br />

decorated with bunting, was thronged with<br />

thousands <strong>of</strong> spectators, <strong>including</strong> visitors from<br />

all parts <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> State. The processioD, which<br />

was a picturesque affair, was made up chiefly<br />

<strong>of</strong> decorated vehicles and allegorical displays.<br />

The latter Included a representation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Garden <strong>of</strong> Eden, by <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> branch <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Grand United Order <strong>of</strong> Free Gardeners; a representation<br />

<strong>of</strong> an alluvial gold-m iner; a family<br />

<strong>of</strong> early settlers, and a tribe <strong>of</strong> blacks, by <strong>the</strong><br />

students <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> Experiment Farm; and<br />

a model city beautification garden plot by Mr.<br />

L. Giddey, <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> Technical College.<br />

The local militia and cadets and three local<br />

j bands also took part.


_<br />

I<br />

i<br />

MEMORIAL TO EVANS.<br />

AUSTRALIA’S DEBT TO SURVEYORS<br />

AND ENGINEERS.<br />

SIR GERALD STRICKLAND’ S<br />

TRIBUTE.<br />

After its progress through <strong>the</strong> city, <strong>the</strong> procession<br />

drew up in a cordon around <strong>the</strong> north- *<br />

ern end ot King’s Parade— a recently-created<br />

beauty spot in <strong>the</strong> heart <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> city—where, in^<br />

<strong>the</strong> presence <strong>of</strong> an immense crowd, <strong>the</strong> Governor<br />

was accorded a welcome by <strong>the</strong> Mayor<br />

and citizens, and presented with an illuminated<br />

address, after which he formally opened <strong>the</strong><br />

parade and laid <strong>the</strong> foundation-stone <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

memorial to Surveyor-General Evans, <strong>the</strong> discoverer<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> <strong>Plains</strong>.<br />

Amongst those present, besides <strong>the</strong> Mayor<br />

(Aid. Rigby) and aldermen <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong>, were:<br />

Mr. Carmichael (Minister for Education) and<br />

Mrs. Carmichael, Mr. E. S. Carr, M.H.R., and<br />

Mrs. Carr, Sir Francis Suttor (president <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Legislative Council), Mr. John Meagher, M.L.C.,<br />

Mr. P. Jago Smith, M.L.C., Mr. John Miller,<br />

M.L.A., Mr. Frank Walker (president <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Historical Society <strong>of</strong> New South Wales), Mr.<br />

Turpin and Mrs. Turpin (only surviving daughter<br />

<strong>of</strong> Surveyor-General Evans), Mr. Ernest<br />

Evans <strong>of</strong> Temora (grandson), and Miss Evans<br />

(great-granddaughter), Mrs. Rigby (Mayoress),<br />

and Mrs. W. H. Suttor (widow <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> late W. H. ,<br />

Suttor) and he* daughter, Mrs, UaUii;u.u..<br />

His Excellency, after returning thanks for <strong>the</strong><br />

addreBS, and for <strong>the</strong> expressions <strong>of</strong> loyalty to<br />

<strong>the</strong> King contained <strong>the</strong>rein, performed <strong>the</strong> ceremony<br />

<strong>of</strong> declaring <strong>the</strong> King’s Parade open and<br />

<strong>of</strong> laying <strong>the</strong> foundation-stone <strong>of</strong> a memorial to<br />

Surveyor-General Evans. In <strong>the</strong> course <strong>of</strong> his<br />

remarks he congratulated <strong>the</strong> Mayor and those<br />

who had been associated with him for <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

forethought and enterprise in making <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

so beautiful a city, and adding to its attractions<br />

by this parade. Speaking with reference to <strong>the</strong> j<br />

projected memorial to Evans, Sir Gerald said]<br />

that this was an occasion for calling to mind j<br />

<strong>the</strong> great services due to Australia by <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>of</strong>ession<br />

to which Surveyor Evans belonged.<br />

(Hear, hear.) Surveyors and civil engineers had<br />

done more to make Australia <strong>the</strong> Australia that<br />

we know than we were prone to recognise without<br />

reflection. It was really <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

surveyors and <strong>the</strong> engineers which formed <strong>the</strong> j<br />

greatest contrast between <strong>the</strong> occupation <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong>se plains by <strong>the</strong> black men and <strong>the</strong> occupation<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>se plains by <strong>the</strong> Anglo-Saxon race. !<br />

(Hear, hear.) Much had been done to Australia I<br />

by education, much had been done by constitutional<br />

government, and <strong>the</strong> understanding ot<br />

our liberty in <strong>the</strong> great Empire <strong>of</strong> King George<br />

V .: but when it came to <strong>the</strong> bedrock <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> primary<br />

industries from which we lived, and from<br />

which <strong>the</strong> towns had <strong>the</strong>ir prosperity, we must<br />

look to <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> engineers. (Cheers.)<br />

D E S C E N D A N T O F P I O N E E R S .<br />

Sir Francis Suttor, President <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Legislative<br />

Council, and a member <strong>of</strong> one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

pioneer families, who was introduced as<br />

"<strong>the</strong> originator <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> centenary celebration<br />

movement.” delivered a brief address. Whe<strong>the</strong>r<br />

or not he was <strong>the</strong> originator <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> movement,<br />

he said, did not matter. He was delighted to<br />

be <strong>the</strong>re to see <strong>the</strong> success <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> celebrations. ■<br />

Proceeding in reminiscent vein, Sir Francis said<br />

that 100 years ago <strong>the</strong>re were not as many people<br />

in <strong>the</strong> whole <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> mainland <strong>of</strong> Australia as<br />

<strong>the</strong>re were in <strong>Bathurst</strong> to-day. Surveyor-General<br />

Evans, by his discovery <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

<strong>Plains</strong>, not only showed that <strong>the</strong>re was a magnificent<br />

future before <strong>the</strong> whole <strong>of</strong> Australia,<br />

but opened up <strong>the</strong> whole <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> western country<br />

easy <strong>of</strong> acceS3 after breaking over <strong>the</strong> <strong>Blue</strong><br />

<strong>Mountains</strong>.<br />

T R I B U T E T O T H E E X P L O R E R S . 1<br />

Referring to <strong>the</strong> achievement <strong>of</strong> Blaxland,<br />

Wentworth, and Lawson, Sir Francis said th a t'<br />

on many occasions he felt ths-.t full credit was<br />

not given to <strong>the</strong> leader <strong>of</strong> that part^, who was<br />

unquestionably Blaxland. A short time ago he<br />

was at a demonstration when Wentworth was<br />

put before Blaxland by an eminent statesman.<br />

He afterwards asked this gentleman why he did<br />

this, and he replied, "Because Wentworth had<br />

such a magnificent career afterwards.” (Laughter.)<br />

This struck him (Sir Francis) as a good<br />

reason why <strong>the</strong> credit should not be taken away<br />

from Blaxland. Wentworth was a boy, and afterwards<br />

went to a university in England, and subsequently<br />

became one <strong>of</strong> our greatest orators<br />

and statesmen. This, however, was no reason<br />

why <strong>the</strong> credit should not be given to Blaxland.<br />

Evans also deserved a great deal more<br />

credit than he got for his magnificent work !n<br />

opening up this magnificent western country.<br />

It wp.s left to Evans to complete <strong>the</strong> crossin?<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> mountains, and to discover <strong>the</strong>se mag- !<br />

nificent plains, after much trouble and labor,<br />

and <strong>the</strong>y could readily understand his feelings<br />

as <strong>the</strong> first whit'e man to see such a magnificent<br />

panorama unfolded before him. Evans<br />

had no idea <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> great prosperity <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong>


72<br />

to come, and at <strong>the</strong> time whoa he wrote about<br />

<strong>the</strong>se plains, and when from <strong>the</strong> top <strong>of</strong> Mount<br />

Pleasant (which he named) he saw <strong>the</strong> magnificence<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> plains, he said that <strong>the</strong>re was<br />

enough country to keep all <strong>the</strong> animals that<br />

were bred in Australia for 100 years. Sir Francis<br />

was glad to say that Evans was very much j<br />

mistaken. It was quite proper, said Sir Fran- j<br />

cis, in conclusion, that <strong>the</strong>y should place upon<br />

this site a memorial to Evans, who was <strong>the</strong> |<br />

discoverer not only <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong> <strong>Plains</strong>, but j<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Lachlan River, <strong>the</strong> Macquarie River, and'<br />

<strong>the</strong> beautiful valley <strong>of</strong> Wellington, and Oastlereagh<br />

River. Evans was also more than an<br />

explorer. Married twice, he was <strong>the</strong> fa<strong>the</strong>r <strong>of</strong><br />

19 children, and It w&B gratifying that that<br />

day <strong>the</strong>y had amongst <strong>the</strong>m a daughter, grandson<br />

and great-granddaughter <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> man who<br />

100 years ago, discovered <strong>the</strong> plains upon which<br />

<strong>the</strong>y now stoua (Cheurs). Amidst renewed<br />

cheering <strong>the</strong> Governor led forward <strong>the</strong>se three<br />

descendants <strong>of</strong> Evans—Mrs. Turpin and Mr.<br />

Ernest Evans and daughter, <strong>of</strong> Temora—on to<br />

<strong>the</strong> open space In front <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> foundation stone,<br />

where <strong>the</strong>y could be seen by <strong>the</strong> vast crowd.<br />

Cheers for <strong>the</strong> King, <strong>the</strong> Governor, <strong>the</strong> Mayor,<br />

Sir Francis Suttor, and <strong>the</strong> descendants <strong>of</strong><br />

j Evans concluded this portion <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> festivities.<br />

OFFICIAL LUNCHEON.<br />

TH E SPEECHES.<br />

BATHURST, Wednesday.—The Governor, in<br />

responding to <strong>the</strong> toast <strong>of</strong> his health, said<br />

that it was interesting to see such a well-laidout<br />

city as <strong>Bathurst</strong>, with its architectural<br />

beauty, <strong>the</strong> trees and streets and <strong>the</strong> good ordpr<br />

in which <strong>the</strong>y were kept. Opportunities for<br />

energy and enterprise were not limited to <strong>the</strong>se<br />

places. He hoped that <strong>the</strong>y would all unite<br />

in honoring <strong>the</strong> memory <strong>of</strong> Surveyor-General<br />

Evans, <strong>the</strong> discoverer <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> finest district in<br />

New South Wales.<br />

Mr. W. H. Webb proposed <strong>the</strong> toast <strong>of</strong> “ Ministers<br />

and Parliam ent/’<br />

Sir Francis Suttor, in responding, referred<br />

to some remarks made by Mr. Webb concerning<br />

<strong>the</strong> ladies’ vote, and said it reminded<br />

him <strong>of</strong> an incident. A short time ago he<br />

entertained four ladies at Parliament House,<br />

and <strong>the</strong> discussion turned on this subject. He<br />

asked w'ho was to battle for <strong>the</strong>m? ftot one<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>m could tell him, but he was <strong>the</strong> unfortunate<br />

one. (Laughter.) Referring to early<br />

<strong>Bathurst</strong>. Sir Francis said that he was one <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> few who remembered <strong>the</strong> name <strong>of</strong> <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

as “ <strong>the</strong> settlement.’ * That was some time back<br />

in <strong>the</strong> history <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> place. The Macquarie<br />

River was once a magnificent stream <strong>of</strong> deep<br />

waterholes, and people crossed it in boats,<br />

or swam <strong>the</strong>ir horses across, from Kelso to<br />

<strong>Bathurst</strong>. He recollected, too, when a school- |<br />

boy, <strong>the</strong> executions which took place outside<br />

<strong>the</strong> old gaol door, on <strong>the</strong> site <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> present<br />

j court-house. After Kerr discovered gold—<strong>the</strong><br />

famous “ Hundredweight” —he (Sir Francis),<br />

with o<strong>the</strong>rs, rode in from Brucedale to <strong>Bathurst</strong><br />

in a tandem, carrying <strong>the</strong> gold in <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

hands. It created a great sensation. They<br />

stopped outside <strong>the</strong> old “ Free Press” <strong>of</strong>fice,<br />

and, in <strong>the</strong> words <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> paper at <strong>the</strong> time,<br />

“ were greeted by a large crowd.” There were<br />

only 150 present. Compare that incident with<br />

to-day, and <strong>the</strong>y would see what progress had<br />

been made. (Cheers.)<br />

Mr. E. H. Carr, JM.H.R.. also responded.<br />

: The Governor subsequently addressed a large<br />

ga<strong>the</strong>ring <strong>of</strong> children from <strong>the</strong> local public<br />

and priyate schools, and concluded by granting<br />

<strong>the</strong>m holidays for <strong>the</strong> remainder <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> week.<br />

V IC E -R E G A L R E C E P T IO N<br />

G A R D E N P A R T Y .<br />

A N D<br />

During <strong>the</strong> afternoon <strong>the</strong> Governor held a<br />

reception at <strong>the</strong> Court-house, and later on, to ­<br />

ge<strong>the</strong>r with <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> vicej<br />

regal party, attended a garden party held in<br />

i his honor in Machattie Park. Both functions<br />

Iwere very largely attended. The male members<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> party were subsequently shown over <strong>the</strong><br />

Experimental Farm. During <strong>the</strong> day Sir Fran-<br />

' cis Suttor presented Miss Strickland with some<br />

1gold specimens from Rowley’s Reef, Hawkins<br />

hill, Hill End, encased in a silver casket.<br />

C H IL D R E N S SP O R T S A N D<br />

S P E C T A C U L A R D IS P L A Y .<br />

Children’s sports were held on <strong>the</strong> Showground.<br />

A feature <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> afternoon was a<br />

grand spectacular display by 2000 children from<br />

<strong>the</strong> local public and denominational schools.<br />

The youngsters, who were clad in white, and<br />

carried Australian flags, were mustered into<br />

groups forming <strong>the</strong> letters <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> name Evans.<br />

Then, to <strong>the</strong> accompaniment <strong>of</strong> music by <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>Bathurst</strong> District Band, <strong>the</strong> white figures moved<br />

in flag drill. The display was witnessed by <strong>the</strong><br />

Governor, who warmly congratulated <strong>the</strong> children<br />

on <strong>the</strong>ir performance.


EARLY HISTORY OF<br />

BATHURST<br />

S T O R Y O F T H E D I S C O V E R Y .<br />

W h e n D e p u t y -S u r v e y o r o f L a n d s<br />

G e o r g e W i ll i a m E v a n s w a s d ir e c t e d to<br />

m a k e a s u r v e y o f t h e t r a c k o v e r th e<br />

B lu e M o u n t a i n s , f o l lo w i n g o n th e d i s ­<br />

c o v e r ie s o f B la x la n d , L a w s o n , a n a<br />

W e n t w o r t h , h e f o u n d t h e ir fu r th e s t<br />

c a m p t h r e e m ile s w e s t o f th e V a lle y o f<br />

C lw y d d .<br />

H e p u s h e d o n 9 8 m i le s fr c r a<br />

q u a r ie '.h e n o r d e r e d t h e r o a d to b e<br />

[ m a d e . I t w a s c o m m e n c e d in J u ly ,<br />

1 8 1 4 , a n d f in is h e d in J a n u a r y , 1 8 1 5 .<br />

; L ie u t e n a n t C o x , c h i e f m a g i s t r a t e , a t<br />

W i n d s o r , s u p e r v i s e d t h e w o r k , w h ic h<br />

I w a s c a r r ie d f o r w a r d in s t a g e s , t o e a c h<br />

o f w h ic h M a c q u a r i e g a v e n a m e s —<br />

' S p r i n g w o o d , J a m i e s o n . V a l l e y , B la c k -<br />

j h e a t h , C o x R iv e r , F i s h R iv e r , S i d -<br />

I m o u t h V a l l e y , C a m p b e ll R i v e r , a n d<br />

J B a t h u r s t — t h e l a s t a f t e r L o r d B a t h ­<br />

u r s t , S e c r e t a r y o f S t a t e f o r t h e C o l o ­<br />

n ie s .<br />

I n M a y , 1 8 1 5 , a n o ffic ia l p a r t y s e t<br />

o u t f r o m t h e c o a s t t o c r o s s t h e m o u n ­<br />

t a i n s , a n d f o r m a l l y o p e n t h e n e w r o a d .<br />

T h e G o v e r n o r h a d in h i s e n t o u r a g e<br />

M r s . M a c q u a r i e , h is s e c r e t a r y , M r .<br />

R t . R e v . D R . Q U I N N<br />

F ir s t C a t h o l i c B is h o p o f B a t h u r s t .<br />

R t . R e v . D R . D U N N E .<br />

P r e s e n t C a t h o lic B is h o p o f B a t h u r s t .<br />

th a t p o i n t , a n d d is c o v e r e d B a t h u r s t<br />

P la in s .<br />

T h i s w a s in 1 8 1 3 . G o v e r n o r M a c<br />

C a m p b e l l ; C a p t a i n A n t i l l , o f t h e 7 3 r d<br />

R e g i m e n t ; L i e u t e n a n t W a t t s , o f tlhe<br />

1 4 6 t h ; M r . R e d f e r n ( s u r g e o n ) , S u r ­<br />

v e y o r -G e n e r a l O x l e y , M r . L e w i n , a<br />

j p a in t e r a n d n a t u r a lis t , a n d a t B a t h -


74<br />

15<br />

u r s t P l a i n s lie w a s j o i n e d b y E v a n s .<br />

T h e y a r r iv e d a t t h e p la i n s o n M a y 4.<br />

a n d s t a y e d f o r a w e e k . M a c q u a r ie<br />

fix e d th e s ite f o r t h e t o w n s h ip , a n d<br />

o n S u n d a y , M a y 7 , 1 8 1 5 , t h e o ffic ia l<br />

o p e n in g ' o f t h e r o a d , a n d p r a c t ic a lly<br />

t h e f o u n d a t i o n o f B a t h u r s t , t o o k p la c e<br />

I n t h e f o l lo w i n g m o n t h tihe G o v e r<br />

n o r i s s u e d a “ G a z e t t e ” n o t i c e , c o m ­<br />

m a n d i n g t h o s e w h o h a d a s is t e d in<br />

m a k i n g t h e r o a d t o “ a p p e a r b e fo r e<br />

h i m ” a t E a s t e r n G r e e k s t o c k y a r d , a n d<br />

g r a n t s o f h o r n e d c a t t l e w e r e m a d e to<br />

T h o m a s H o b b y ,<br />

R ic h a r d L e w i s , J o h n<br />

T y e , T h o m a s G o r m a n , W i l l i a m D y e ,<br />

i S a m u e l F r e e m a n , D a n i e l E y r e s , Jaim es<br />

I K e l l y , W i l l i a m ' M a r t i n , M a t t h e w<br />

M u c k l o w , a n d M r s . G r e e n , w id o w o f<br />

T h o m a s G r e e n . E a c h w a s o rd e re d<br />

to b r i n g h is o w n b r a n d i n g ir o n , as<br />

tn e c a t t l e w e r e t o c o m e o u t o f th e<br />

G o v e r n m e n t h e r d .<br />

T h e fir s t g r a n t o f la n d g i v e n in t h e<br />

B a t h u r s t d i s t r i c t w a s to M a u r i c e C h a r ­<br />

le s O ’ C o n n e ll, o f t h e 7 3 r d R e g i m e n t<br />

— 1 0 0 0 a c r e s , M a r c h 2 2 . 1 8 1 4 .<br />

O n J u n e 1 0 , 1 8 1 5 , W i l l i a m H e n r y<br />

A k o c k w a s g r a n t e d 4 0 0 a c r e s , J o s e p h<br />

B i g g 2 0 0 a c r e s , J a m e s G h i s h o l m e 1 5 °<br />

a c r e s , R o b e r t J o b 2 0 0 a c r e s . O n O c ­<br />

t o b e r 3 1 , 1 8 1 5 , J. L id d e a x d N 'ic h o ls<br />

w a s g r a n t e d 7 0 0 a c r e s ; o n O c t o b e r 8 ,<br />

1 8 1 6 , J o h n M a r t i n , 5 3 0 a c r e s ; a n d j<br />

R ic h a r d R o u s e , 4 5 0 a c r e s . O n J a n u -|<br />

a r y 1 3 , 1 8 1 8 , R ic h a r d R o u s e r e c e iv e d<br />

a n o t h e r 1 5 0 a c r e s , T h o m a s S . A m o s<br />

8 0 0 a c r e s ; J o h n P a lm e r 1 5 5 ° a c r e s , 1<br />

J o h n P y e 3 0 0 a c r e s , a n d o n S e p t e m ­<br />

b e r 2 0 , 1 8 1 8 , W a lt e r L a n g 7 0 0 a c r e s .<br />

I n 1 8 2 0 t h o s e w h o h a d s e :t :e d in<br />

th e d i s t r i c t w e r e L o w e , o f S i d m o u t h ,<br />

o n t h e F islh R i v e r ; H a s s a l l , o f O ’ C o n ­<br />

n e ll’ s P l a i n s ; a n d L a w s o n a n d J o h n<br />

S t r e e t , o f M c q u a r ie P l a i n s . T h e r e<br />

w e r e a f e w s m a l l f a r m s c l o s e to t h e<br />

t o w n s h ip , a n d t h e l a r g e e s t a t e k n o w n<br />

a s M o u n t P l e a s a n t , b e l o n g i n g to<br />

C o lo n e l S t e w a r t , o f t h e 3 r d R e g i m e n t ,<br />

w h o r e t ir e d w ith t h e r a n k o f g e n e r a l,<br />

w a s s e t t le d o n a t E v a n s ’ P la in s .<br />

C o lo n e l S t e w a r t d ie d t h e r e in 1854-<br />

O n t h e o t h e r b a n k o f t h e r iv e r<br />

w e r e s e t t le d C a p t a in H a w k i n s , C a p ­<br />

t a i n P i p e r , t h e R a n k i n b r o t h e r s , K i t e<br />

o f K e l s o , L e e a n d S m i t h , t h e W e s t<br />

b r o t h e r s , a n d S t u a r t M a c k e n z i e C o x ,<br />

o f t h e H e r e f o r d E s t a t e . A t W A m b u r n -<br />

d a le C r e e k G e o r g e S u t t o r h a d a g r a n t .<br />

W i llia m C o x h a d a g r a n t o n t h e r i g h t<br />

b a n k o f th e M a c q u a r i e R i v e r , a n d in<br />

1 8 1 7 w a s in c h a r g e o f t h e d is t r ic t .<br />

H e e s t a b lis h e d a s t a t i o n , w h ic h h e<br />

c a l l e d B u r r e n d o n g , n e a r t h e j u n c t i o n<br />

o f t h e C u d g e g o n g a n d t h e M a c q u a r i e .<br />

I I n 1815 R ic h a r d L e w i s w a s a p p o in t e d<br />

s u p e r i n t e n d e n t o f t h e d i s t r i c t u n d e r<br />

C o x ’ s o r d e r s , at a s a l a r y o f £$o p e r<br />

a n n u m . I n 1 8 2 2 G e o r g e S u t t o r w a s<br />

m a d e s u p e r i n t e n d e n t , 's u c c e e d i n g !<br />

J azn e s B la c k m a n . O n A u g u s t 2 3 , |<br />

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R o y a l V e t e r a n C o m p a n y , w a s a p p o i n t ­<br />

e d c o m m a n d a n t a n d j u s t i c e o f th e<br />

P e a c e a t B a t h u r s t in s u c c e s s i o n to<br />

W i ll i a m C o x .<br />

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th e o t h e r s i d e o f t h e B lu e M o u n t a i n s<br />

w a s , o f c o u r s e , a n e v e n t i n t h e h i s ­<br />

t o r y o f B ia th u r st. T h i s p r i m i t iv e a p ­<br />

p lia n c e w a s p u t u p in 1 8 2 4 b y H a w ­<br />

k i n s , t h e fir s t c o r o n e r . I t w a s n o t<br />

t ill 17 y e a r s l a t e r t h a t t h e f ir s t s t e a m<br />

g r i n d i n g m i ll w a s c o n v e y e d to th e<br />

t o w n s h ip . T h e f i r s t m a i l c o a c h r a n<br />

in 1 8 2 4 , w h e n J a m e s S m i t h a n d T h o ­<br />

m a s F u l'la r , o f P a r r a m a t t a , m a d e a<br />

s t a r t , a n d u n d e r t o o k t o c a r r y p a s s e n ­<br />

g e r s t h e r e in f o u r d a y s a t £\ p e r h e a d .<br />

L e t t e r s w e r e t a k e n f o r i s e a c h . A t<br />

t h i s t i m e t h e d i s t r i c t w a s f l o u r i s h i n g<br />

I n 1 8 2 6 it w a s e s t i m a t e d t h a t 2 5 ,0 0 0<br />

h e a d o f c a t t le a n d a b o u t 7 0 ,0 0 0 s h e e p<br />

w e r e o w n e d b y t h e s e t t l e r s . N e v e r ­<br />

t h e l e s s , c o n d i t io n s w e r e s t i ll p r i m i t iv e<br />

a m o n g t h e l a n d h o l d e r s . M a n y w h o<br />

c o u ld r e c k o n t h e m s e l v e s w o r t h u p to<br />

,£ 1 0 ,0 0 0 in s t o c k w e r e y e t l i v i n g in<br />

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t h e ir fir s t h o m e s . B a t h u r s t w a s f a m ­<br />

o u s a b o u t t h a t t i m e ; f o r i t s c h e e s e ,<br />

t h e R a n k i n c h e e s e ( c a lle d a f t e r a M r s .<br />

R a n k i n , i t s p r o d u c e r ) b e i n g s o ld u p<br />

to a s h i l l i n g a p o u n d w h o l e s a l e . A s<br />

la t e a.s 1 8 2 7 th e t o w n s h ip v.'r.a d e s o r i b -


i<br />

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e d a s a G o v e r n m e n t s e t t l e m e n t , e v e r y j<br />

h o u s e in t h e p l a c e b e i n g G o v e r n m e n t . I<br />

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h a d m a d e i t s a p p e a r a n c e , t h e m o n o p o ­<br />

lis t b e i n g o n e K i t e , o f t h e “ D u n C o w .”<br />

T h e n c a m e t h e “ G o ld e n F l e e c e ,”<br />

k e p t b y a n e x - b a n d m a s t e r o f t h e 4 0 th<br />

R e g i m e n t , W i l l i a m B l i z a i d , a r.d tihe<br />

“ K i n g W i l l i a m , ” b y R ic h a r d M i ll.<br />

I n 1 8 2 4 t h e s e t t le r s w e r e g r e a tly<br />

t r o u b le d b y t h e n a t i v e s , a n d th e r e is<br />

o n r e c o r d a p u n i t iv e e x p e d i t i o n , u n ­<br />

d e r t h e le a d e r s h i p o f M a j o r M o r r is e f,, !<br />

c o n s i s t i n g o f f o u r m a g i s t r a t e s , 4 0 p o ­<br />

lic e , a n d s o m e s e u l e r s , w h o m a d e o v e r<br />

t o w a r d s M u d g e e , a n d in a n e n c o u n te r<br />

th a t t o o k p la c e m a n y . n a t i v e s w ere<br />

. k ille d .<br />

T h e s e t t le r s o f 1825 s t i ll h a d th e<br />

m e m o r i e s o f A e o ld la n d s t r o n g in<br />

th e ir m i n d s . O n e i n c id e n t o f th e<br />

t im e s s h o w e d h o w t h e e a r l y . c o lo n ists,<br />

s t ill c l u n g t o E n g l i s h t r a d i t i o n s o f c li<br />

j m a t e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g s . Ic w a s thi,<br />

e s t a b l i s h m e n t o f th e B a t h u r s t H u n t ,<br />

M u c h w e i g h t y c o n s id e r a t i o n w a s g iv e n<br />

to t h e p r o p r i e t i e s , s p e c ia lly t h e u n i­<br />

f o r m . T h e c lu b h a d f o r i t s q u a r r y |<br />

a t t h e m e e t s o n ly t h e d i n g o , b u t i t (<br />

w o u ld a p p e a r t h a t th e a n im a l h a d th e<br />

s a t i s f a c t io n o f k n o w in g t h a t h e w a s<br />

I b e i n g p u r s u e d b y g e n t le m e n p r o p e r ly<br />

a t t ir e d a c c o r d i n g to b o o k . T h e u n i­<br />

fo r m w a s a g r e e n j a c k e t , t u r n e d u p<br />

j w ith v e lv e t , t h e s e m b l a n c e o f a d i n g o<br />

b e i n g o n t h e c o lla r , t h e b u t t o n s b e in g<br />

o f b r a s s , w ith “ B a t h u r s t H u n ';” s t a m p ­<br />

e d u p o n t h e m . In t h e h is t o r i c a l r e ­<br />

c o r d s w e h a v e to n o te t h a t a m e e t i n g ,<br />

as w h ic h th e q u e s t io n o f d r e s s w a s d is<br />

c u s s e d , w a s a s t o r m y o n e , a n d s e e m ­<br />

i n g l y th e c l i n c h i n g a r g u m e n t w a s t h e<br />

g r a v e a n d e m p h a t i c s t a t e m e n t o f o n e<br />

m e m b e r t h a t “ h e w o u ld r a t h e r g o to<br />

th e d e v il in a f r o c k -c o a t t h a n t o h e a v e n<br />

in a j a c k e t . ”<br />

I n 1 8 2 8 t h e o ffic e r in c o m m a n d 01<br />

t h e d i s t r i c t w a s L i e u t e n a n t J a m e s<br />

H o n . S e c r e t a r y C e n t e n a r y C e l'o b r a tic n .s.<br />

B r o w n , o t t n e 5 7 tn R e g i m e n t ; th e<br />

| s u p e r i n t e n d e n t , A . M ‘ L e o d , la t e 5 7 th<br />

| R e g i m e n t ; t h e s u p e r i n t e n d e n t o f t h e<br />

G o v e r n m e n t s t o c k , J o h n M a x w e l l ; a n a<br />

th e c h ie f c o n s t a b le , J a m e s B la c k m a n .<br />

' T h e C h u r c h o f E n g l a n d c l e r g y m a n<br />

- w a s t h e R e v . J o h n E b p y K e a n e .<br />

T h e B a t h u r s t B a n k w a s o p e n e d in<br />

1 8 3 5 — th e f i r s t c o u n t r y b a n k in <strong>the</strong>?<br />

c o l o n y .<br />

B a t h u r s t w a s t h e n n o t d o i n g<br />

m u c h in t h e w a y o f a g r i c u lt u r e , b e i n g<br />

a l m o s t e n t ir e ly e n g a g e d in sh e w o o l-<br />

g r o w i n g .<br />

Q u a r t e r S e s s i o n s w e r e h e ld<br />

in t h a t y e a r , D i l l o n ’ s I n n b e i n g t h t<br />

c o u r t -h o u s e . M a j o r C r o k e r , o f ih e<br />

1 7 th R e g i m e n t , t o o k u p h i s q u a r t e r s<br />

a t B a t h u r s t G o v e r n m e n t H o u s e in<br />

1 8 3 2 . T h e f i is t p u b l ic c e l e b r a t io n o t<br />

D i v i n e w o r s h ip w a s h e ld o n F e b r u a r y<br />

12 o f t h a t y e a r . I t w a s in th e P r e s - j<br />

b y t e r ia n f o r m . T h e C h u r c h o f E n g - ;<br />

la n d h a d its h o u s e in B a t h u r s t in 1 8 3 7 . |<br />

I n 1 8 4 2 t h e r e w e r e W e s l e y a n a n d P r e s - :<br />

b y t e r ia n c h u r c h e s , t h e t o w n s h ip s t ill<br />

j b e i n g u n d e r m i li t a r y r u le .<br />

(H . C . B e a v i s , P h o t o .)<br />

M R . J. B A I N .


THE PIONEERS<br />

O L D B A T H U R S T F A M I L I E S .<br />

W i t h t i e e a r ly h i s t o r y o f B a t h u r s t<br />

m u s t a lw a y s b e a s s o c ia t e d t h e o r i g i n a l<br />

C o x e s , L e e s , H a w k i n s , R a n k i n s , S u i­<br />

to r s , S t e w a r t s , R u t h e r f o r d s , a n d o th e r<br />

fo u n d e r s o f n o w w e ll-k n o w n B a t h u r s t<br />

f a m ilie s .<br />

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o f t h e r o a d o v e r t h e B lu e M o u n t a i n s<br />

in 1 8 x 4 a t th e o r d e r s o f G o v e r n o r M a c ­<br />

q u a r ie w a s 'th e fir s t r e a l e v e n t in t h e<br />

h is t o r y o f t h e t o w n s h ip . M r . C o x in<br />

r e tu r n r e c e iv e d a g r a n t o f la n d .on th e<br />

r ig h t b a n k o f t h e M a c q u a r i e R iv e r , a n d<br />

w a s o n e o f t h e fir s t t o p u r c h a s e a s h ip -<br />

in t h e d i s t r i c t w e r e t h e H a w k i n s , w l o ,<br />

in d e e d , c l a i m t o h a v e b e e n l i v i n g o n<br />

th e p l a i n s p r i o r to a n y ' g r a n t s b e i n g<br />

m a d e . I n 1 8 2 0 , a t l e a s t , T . F i t z h e r -<br />

b e r t H a w k i n s , a n e x -n a v a l c a p t a i n ,<br />

f o r m e r ly o f t h e C o m m i s s a r i a t D e p a r t ­<br />

m e n t , w a s a w a r d e d a g r a n t n e a r K e l s o ,<br />

k n o w n a s B la c k d o w n , a n d n o w o w n e d<br />

b v M r . R o b e r t G ih n o u r . H i s s o n ,<br />

h o w e v e r , T . J. H a w k i n s ,- o b t a in e d<br />

W a l m e r e s t a t e , o n t h e o p p o s i t e b a n k<br />

o f th e r iv e r , w h ic h is s t i ll in th e p o s ­<br />

s e s s i o n o f th e f a m i ly .<br />

A n o ld f a m i ly w h o s t i ll r e s id e in<br />

B a t h u r s t a r e t h e R a n k i n s , o r i g i n a l l y<br />

la n d e d p r o p r ie t o r s in S c o t la n d . ivjr.<br />

G e o r g e R a n k i n , h o w e v e r , e m i g r a t e d to<br />

A u s t r a lia in 1 8 2 1 , s e t t l i n g f ir s t in V a n<br />

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la n d to A u s t r a l i a w ith h i s r e g i m e n t ,<br />

a n d t o o k u p t h e e s t a t e o f M o u n t P l e a ­<br />

s a n t, n e a r B a t h u r s t , w h ic h w a s g i v e n<br />

its n a m e b y t h e e x p lo r e r E v a n s , o n<br />

a c c o u n t o f th e m a g n if i c e n t<br />

it's s u m m i t .<br />

v ie w f r o m<br />

I t is c u r io u s to n o te how-<br />

m a n y o f th e o r i g i n a l s e t t le r s in 'th e<br />

B a t h u r s t P l a i n s w e r e f r o m t h e L a n d<br />

o f C a k e s .<br />

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s t a n c e o f t h e f a c t . W i l l i a m H e n r y<br />

S u .'t o r , g r a n d f a t h e r o f t h e p r e s e n t h e a d<br />

o f t h e f a m i ly , S ir F r a n c i s S u t t o r , w a s<br />

16 y e a r s o ld w h e n in 1 8 2 1 h e a c c o m ­<br />

p a n ie d h i s f a t h e r , G e o r g e S u t t o r , to<br />

t a k e u p a g r a n t o n t h e B a t h u r s t j<br />

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h o w e v e r , -a lr e a d y b e e n a lllo fte d t h a t ,<br />

th e S u t t o r s t o o k u p a g r a n t a b o u t e i g h t |<br />

j D i e m a n ’ s L a n d , w h ic h h e s o o n a b a n - |<br />

^d o n e d fo r N e w S o u t h W a l e s , o b t a i n i n g<br />

ja g r a n t n e a r B a t h u r s t in 1 8 2 2 .<br />

H O X . J O H N M E A G H E R , M . L . C .<br />

m e n t o f m e r in o s h e e p f r o m t h e C a p e ,<br />

w h o s e d e s c e n d a n t s n o w f o r m t h e C eleb<br />

r a te d i M u d g e e f lo c k s . E a r ly s e ttle r s<br />

T h e M 'P h i l l a m y s a r e a n o t h e r i n ­<br />

s t a n c e o f a S o t t i s h f a m i l y w h ic h s e t - !<br />

tie d in B a t h u r s t a t a n e a r ly d a t e , a n d '<br />

a r e n o w in p o s s e s s i o n o f t h r e e l a r g e<br />

e s t a t e s a t C h a r l t o n , O r t o n P a r k , a n d<br />

G o r m a n ’ s H ill. A b o u t 1 8 2 0 C o lo n e l<br />

m ile s n o r th o f B a t h u r s t , w h i c h , u n d e r<br />

th e n a m e o f B r u c e d a l e , i s o n e o f t h e<br />

i f £ w g r a n t s , lik e W a l m e r a n d M o u n t


<strong>Bathurst</strong>’s 100th<br />

^Birthday<br />

HOW THE DISTRICT HAS CROWN.<br />

L A T E J A M E S R U T H E R F O R D .<br />

Pleasant,<br />

grantees.<br />

O n e o f t h e P io n e e r s .<br />

s t ill h e ld b y th e o r i g i n a l<br />

W i ll i a m L e e , w h o s e t t le d n e a r K e l s o<br />

in t h e s a m e y e a r , w a s a n a t i v e o f C u m ­<br />

b e r la n d , in t h e n o r th o f E n g l a n d , w h o<br />

c a m e t o t h i s c o u n t r y a t a n e a r ly a g e .<br />

T h e L e e f a m i l y , it n e e d h a r d l y b e s a id ,<br />

is o n e o f t h e b e s t -k n o w n<br />

|a t t h e p r e s e n t d a y .<br />

in B a t h u r s t<br />

T h e n a m e o f th e l a t e M r . J a m e s<br />

R u t h e r f o r d , B a t h u r s t ’ s “ G r a n d O ld<br />

M a n , ” w h o w a s w ith u s u n t il a c o u p le<br />

o f y e a r s a g o , is o n e w h ic h w ill p e r ­<br />

h a p s b e i m p e r i s h a b l y a s s o c ia t e d w ith<br />

th e h i s t o r y , n o t o n ly o f B a t h u r s t , b u t<br />

o f A u s t r a l ia .<br />

H i s c h i e f c la i m t o th is<br />

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w h ic h he. a c c o m p lis h e d fir s t a s a p a r t ­<br />

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c o a c h i n g fir m o f C o b b a n d C o . S o<br />

fa r a s B a t h u r s t is c o n c e r n e d , h e w ill<br />

be r e m e m b e r e d b y p o s t e r it y p r in c ip a lly<br />

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t h e p r o g r e s s o f t h e c i t y a n d i t s in ­<br />

s t i t u t io n s .<br />

O X E O F A U S T R A L I A ’ S L E A D I N G<br />

P R O V I N C I A L C I T I E S .<br />

T h e c e le b r a t io n s in t h e m i d s t o f<br />

w h ic h B a t h u r s t n o w f in d s h e r s e l f m a r k<br />

t h e a t t a i n m e n t o f t h e i o o t h a n n i v e r ­<br />

s a r y o f t h e d i s c o v e r y o f B a t h u r s t<br />

P l a i n s . O n e . h u n d r e d y e a r s i s a b r i e f<br />

p e r io d in t h e w o r l d 's h i s t o r y , b u t i n<br />

th a t t i m e t h e s c e n e w e s t o f t h e B lu e<br />

M o u n t a in s — a s in d e e d a l s o o n t h e<br />

c o a s ta l s id e — h a s u n d e r g o n e a w o n d e r ­<br />

f u l t r a n s f o r m a t io n . T h e o u t l o o k f r o m<br />

t h e w e s t e r n r i d g e o f t h e G r e a t D i v i d ­<br />

ing- R a n g e is n o w a l t o g e t h e r d i f f e r e n t<br />

o t h a t b e h e ld b y D e p u t y -S u r v e y o r -<br />

G e n e r a l E v a n s , w h e n , j u s t a c e n t u r y I<br />

a g o , h e c r o s s e d t h e B lu e M o u n t a i n s '<br />

on t h e t r a il b la z e d a s h o r t t i m e p r e ­<br />

v io u s ly b y B la x la n d , W e n tw o r tfh , a n d<br />

L a w s o n . W h e r e t h e n t h e r e w a s o n ly<br />

a v a s t s t r e t c h o f e m e r a ld -c a r p e t e a<br />

p ila in s, ^ r o k e n h e r e a n d t h e r e w ith<br />

p a tc h e s o f b u s h , <strong>the</strong>re, is n o w a p r o s ­<br />

p e r o u s a n d g r o w i n g d i s t r i c t o f w h ic h<br />

B a t h u r s t is t h e c e n t r e . K e l s o o n t h i<br />

e a s t e r n b a n k o f th e M a c q u a r i e w a s<br />

th e s c e n e o f t h e f ir s t s e t t l e m e n t , b u t<br />

it w a s e a r l y p e r c e iv e d t h a t t h e o t h e i<br />

s id e o f t h e r iv e r w a s t h e n a tu r a l s i t e<br />

fo r a c i t y , a n d s o s o o n a f t e r w a r d s t h e<br />

m u s t a r d s e e d w h ic h s u b s e q u e n t l y g e r ­<br />

m i n a t e d a n d b l o s s o m e d in t o t h e m e t r o ­<br />

p o li s o f th e W e s t w a s p la n t e d .<br />

T h e s t o r y o f t'he d i s c o v e r y , f o r m i d ­<br />

a b le a s w a s t h e t a s k o f t h o s e r e s p o n ­<br />

s i b le , m a y b e t o ld in a f e w w o r d s . O n<br />

N o v e m b e r 1 9 , 1 8 1 3 , E v a n s , a c t i n g u n ­<br />

d e r t h e d ir e c t i o n s o f G o v e r n o r M a e - j<br />

q u a r i e , c r o s s e d t h e N e p e a n a t E m u j<br />

I s l a n d “ to e x p lo r e t h e u n k n o w n c o u n ­<br />

t r y w e s t o f M t . B l a x l a n d ,” w h ic h<br />

m a r k e d th e l im i t o f t h e t r a c k b la z e d<br />

b y t h e t r i o o f in t r e p id e x p lo r e r s 01<br />

w h ic h B la x la n d w a s a m e m b e r . E v a n s


j<br />

i a n d h is w e ll-e q u ip p e d p a r t y e n c o u n ­<br />

te r e d w e t w e a t h e r , a n d t h i s , a d d e d t o<br />

th e r o u g h n a t u r e o f t h e c o u n t r y , e n ­<br />

t a ile d d e la y s w h ic h b r o u g h t N o v e m b e r<br />

2 6 b e f o r e t h e a c t u a l s t a r t i n g p o in t o f<br />

t h e e x p e d it io n — M t . B la x la n d — w a s<br />

j<br />

4r e a c h e d . T h e c o u n t r y w h ic h n o w<br />

c o n f r o n t e d E v a n s a s y e t h a d n o t b e e n<br />

tr o d b y w h ite m a n W i t h g r e a t d it 1<br />

! fic u lt y , t h e p a r t y s u r m o u n t e d th e '<br />

m a in r i d g e , r e a c h i n g E v a n s ’ s C r o w n , |<br />

n e a r T a r a n a , o n D e c e m b e r 1, a n a<br />

fr o m t h i s p e a k , 3 2 0 0 f e e ? a b o v e se a<br />

le v e l, t h e r e w a s u n f o ld e d to th e e y e s<br />

o f w h ite m e n fo r th e fir s t t i m e t h t<br />

v a s t s t r e t c h <strong>of</strong> p la in s u p o n w h ic h<br />

B a t h u r s t n o w s t a n d s . “ B a t h u r s t<br />

P l a i n s ” w a s th e n a m e w h ic h a t o n c t-<br />

s u g g e s t e d i t s e lf to E v a n s , w h o c o n -<br />

|s id e r e d t h a t n o - b e t t e r c o m p li m e n t<br />

! c o u ld b e p a id b y h i m to t h e th en<br />

S e c r e ta r y o f S t a t e f o r C o lo n i e s , that)<br />

to s u g g e s t ) to th e G o v e r n o r t h a t th e<br />

d i s t r i c t s h o u ld be. n a m e d a fte r<br />

E a r l B a t h u r s t . T h e a c t u a l s e t ­<br />

t le m e n t d id n o t t a k e p la c e<br />

till tw o y e a r s la t e r , t h e c e n t e n a r y o f<br />

w h ic h w ill b e 1 9 1 5 . I t w a s in th is<br />

y e a r , M a y 7 , 1 8 1 5 , to b e p r e c i s e , "I at<br />

j o v e r n o r M a c q u a r i e c r o s s e d th e M o u .i -<br />

:a in s a n d s e le c t e d t h e s it e f o r t h e to w n .<br />

M a n y G o v e r n o r s h a v e v is ite d t h e r i s -<br />

tric t s i n c e , b u t , n e x t' to M a c q u i i i e ,<br />

th e n a m e o f n o n e w ill b e s o c l o s :I y<br />

j a s s o c ia t e d w ith t h e h is t o r y o f B i/.h -<br />

u r s t a s th a t o f S ir G e r a ld S t r i c k 1 m d ,<br />

to w h o m h a s b e e n a llo t t e d t h e li'J io r<br />

j o f l a y i n g t h e f o u n d a t i o n s t o n e 01 d ie<br />

m e m o r ia l in c o m m e m o r a t io n o f th e<br />

a c h ie v e m e n t o f r r e c o r d th e b e g i r v . i g<br />

o f w h ic h is i m p e r i s h a b l y lin k e d w ith<br />

; th e n a m e o f G o v e r n o r M a c q u a r i e .<br />

N a t u r a l l y r o u g h a n d p r im it iv e at<br />

f i r s t , a s s e t t l e m e n t e x t e n d e d a l o n g th e<br />

M a c q u a r i e a n d t h e L a c h l a n , t h e b a b y<br />

t o w n s h ip g r e w a n d p r o s p e r e d u n til<br />

|it a t t a in e d th e p o s it i o n o f m e t r o ­<br />

p o lis o f th e w e s t w h ic h i t h a s<br />

e v e r s i n c e h e ld in u n d is p u t e d p o s s e s ­<br />

s io n . A g r i c u l t u r e s o o n b e c a m e th e<br />

c o m p a n i o n o f g r a z i n g . T h e lo n e ly s e t ­<br />

t le r s , H o w e v e r , a l t h o u g h b l e s s e d w ith I<br />

a r ic h c o u n t * } ’ , s u ffe r e d m u c h a t t h e I<br />

h a n d s o f d e p r e d a t o r } ' n a t i v e s — fr o n<br />

a t t a c k s b y w h o m , b y t h e w a y , E v a n s<br />

a n d h is p a r ty h a d b e e n s i n g u l a r l y fr e e<br />

— a n d m u r d e r s a n d r e p r is a ls f o llo w e d .<br />

It w a s a t . t h is t im e th a t t h e “ B la c k<br />

R e b e l l io n ” b r o k e o u t , a n d in t h e s u b ­<br />

se q u e n t! p u n it iv e m e a s u r e s t h e u n f o r ­<br />

t u n a t e a b o r i g i n a l s w e r e r u t h le s s ly<br />

s l a u g h t e r e d . B u t t h e s e w e r e n o t t h e<br />

o n ly t r a g e d i e s w h ic h d i s f i g u r e d t h e<br />

e a r ly h i s t o r y o f t h e d i s t r i c t . A n o t h e r<br />

B I S H O P M A R S D E N .<br />

F i r s t A n g l i c a n B is h o p o f B a t h u r s t .<br />

a n d m o r e s e r io u s t r o u b le a r o s e t h r o u g h<br />

th e a c t io n o f a m a g i s t r a t e , w h o s e b a r ­<br />

b a r it y le d a n u m b e r o f c o n v i c t s a n d<br />

I 'ic k e t -o f-le a v e m e n to t a k e to t h e b u s h .<br />

B lo o d s h e d f o llo w e d , a n d t h r e e e n c o u n ­<br />

te r s t o o k p la c e b e f o r e t h e o u tla w ’s w e r e<br />

fin a lly c a p t u r e d . T e n o f t h e m w e r e<br />

h a n g e d a t B a t h u r s t , a n d ‘Jhe r e c o r d o f<br />

th e t r a g i c e v e n t is s t ill p r e s e r v e d in<br />

th e a r c h iv e s o f H o l y T r i n i t y C h u r c h ,<br />

K e l s o , t h e o ld e s t c h u r c h W e s t o f th e<br />

B lu e M o u n t a i n s .


I t w a s in 1 8 5 1, w h e n H a r g r e a v e s<br />

m a d e h i s f a m o u s d is c o v e r y o f g o l d a t<br />

O p h i r , t h a t B a t h u r s t f i r s t b o o m e d .<br />

W ith tlhe s u b s e q u e n t d i s c o v e r y o f g o ld<br />

i a t H i l l E n d , t h e p o p u la t io n o f t h e l i s -<br />

! tric t s u d d e n ly s w e lle d a s i f u n d e r th e<br />

l a s t P a r li a m e n t . H e is j u s t n o w f i g h t ­<br />

i n g f o r a c o n t in u e d p e r io d o f r e p r e ­<br />

s e n t a t i o n . W h e t h e r h e w i ll s u c c e e d ,<br />

o r w h e t h e r h e w il' b e d i s p l a c e d b y a n ­<br />

o t h e r B a t h u r s t n a t iv e , M r . E r n e s :<br />

i D u r a c k , is th e p i o b le m o f t h e h o u r .<br />

R t. R e v . D R . L O N G .<br />

P r e s e n t A n g l i c a n B is h o p o f B a t h u r s t .<br />

in flu e n c e o f a m a g i c w a n d , a n d fo r<br />

s o m e y e a r s ■ B a t h u r s t w a s a d e c id e d h<br />

p r o s p e r o u s t r a d i n g c e n t r e . I t w a s .,t<br />

th is t i m e o f f a b u lo u s p r o s p e r i t y , N o ­<br />

v e m b e r 1 3 , 1 8 6 2 , t h a t th e t o w n w a s<br />

p r o c l a im e d a m u n ic ip a l it y , t h e ju b ile e<br />

o f w h i c h w a s c e le b r a t e d la s t y e a r . M r .<br />

R . Y . C o u s i n s w a s t h e fir s t m a y o r .<br />

T h i s g e n t le m a n a n d a ll h is c o l l e a g u e s ,<br />

w ith t h e e x c e p t io n o f M r . J . W . A s h ­<br />

w o r t h , n o w 8 6 y e a r s o f a g e , a r e s in c e<br />

d e a d . T h e la t e M e s s r s . W i llia m L e o<br />

, a n d W . H . S u t t o r w e r e t h e f ir s t P a r ­<br />

lia m e n t a r y r e p r e s e n t a t iv e s o f th e d is<br />

I tr ic t u n d e r r e s p o n s i b l e g o v e r n m e n t<br />

g r a n t e d in 1 8 5 6 . T h a t w a s in <strong>the</strong><br />

d a y s o f d o u b le -s e a t e d c o n s t it u e n c i e s .<br />

M r . J o h n M i lle r , a n a tiv e o f th e d i s ­<br />

t r ic t , w a s t<strong>the</strong> r e p r e s e n t a t i v e in (<strong>the</strong><br />

T H E O L D S C O T C H K I R K .<br />

F o r m e r l y o n th e s ite n o w o c c u p i e d b y<br />

G a r t r e lP s b a k e r y , W i ll i a m - s t r e e t .


O L D C O U R T H O J S F. A N D f i A O T .


83<br />

THE F/BLY BI&TCEY OF<br />

BATHURST<br />

SOME HIGHLY INTERESTING<br />

PACTS.<br />

T H E P I O N E E R S .<br />

I n 1 8 2 4 -2 5 , t h e n a tiv e s g a v e a g r e a t<br />

d e a l o f t r o u b le in t h e B a t h u r s t d is t r ic t ,<br />

a n d in t h e la t t e r e n d o f S e p t e m b e r th e<br />

C J o m m a n d a n t, M a j o r M o r r is e t , fo u r<br />

m a g i s t r a t e s a n d a b o u t f o r t y s o ld ie r s an d<br />

s ix m o u n t e d s e t t le r s , le ft B a t h u r s t fo r<br />

M u d g e e , t h e o v e r s e e r a n d s e v e r a l o f <strong>the</strong><br />

s e t t le r s k n o w in g th a t p a r t o f t h e c o u n ­<br />

t r y w e ll. M a n y o f th e n a t i v e s w e r e k ille d<br />

in a n e n c o u n t e r w ith t h e m , o n e b e in g<br />

t h e w e ll-k n p w n c h ie f “ B lu c h e r ;” th is<br />

•was in t h e e a r ly p a r t o f S e p t e m b e r , 1824.<br />

A n o t h e r n a tiv e c h ie f o f th e B a t h u r s t d i s ­<br />

tr ic t w a s o n e n a m e d “ W i n d r o d i n e ,” b e t ­<br />

t e r k n o w n to th e c o lo n is ts a s “ S a t u r ­<br />

d a y ,” w h o fe ll in a f i g h t w ith a trib e<br />

f r o m t h e s o u th , a n d d ie d o n 2 1 s t M a r c h ,<br />

1 8 2 9 — d e a t h b e i n g c a u s e d t h r o u g h a<br />

w o u n d in t h e k n e e w h ic h m o r t ifie d . H e<br />

d ie d in t h e B a t h u r s t H o s p it a l a n d w a s<br />

b u r ie d n e a r it , h is b o d y b e i n g w r a p p e d<br />

in h i s m a n t le a n d h is w e a p o n s d e p o s ite<br />

d in t h e g r a v e w ith h im . F o r m a n y<br />

y e a r s h e w a s t h e t e r r o r 'o f t h e s u r r o u n d ­<br />

i n g c o u n t r y , h is h e ig h t w a s a b o u t six<br />

f e e t , a n d h e w 'as n o t e d fjor h is k in d n e s s<br />

to w o m e n a n d c h ild r e n . A t o n e t i m e ,<br />

fiv e h u n d r e d a c r e s w a s o ffe r e d fo r h is<br />

h e a d , b u t h e s u r r e n d e r e d t o G o v e r n o r<br />

B r is b a n e a n d w a s in t r o d u c e d t o h im a t<br />

P a r r a m a t t a . T h e r e h e r e s id e d fo r a<br />

s h o r t t im e in t h e D o m a i n a n d , f r o m t h a t<br />

p e r io d , lo o k e d u p o n t h e w h ite m a n w ith<br />

g r e a t e r e a s in e s s o f s p ir it . A n o t h e r n o t ­<br />

e d B a t h u r s t n a tiv e w a s a g u id e n a m e d<br />

“ P i p e r ,” w h o a c c o m p a n ie d M a j o r M i t ­<br />

c h e ll cm h is e x p e d it io n to t h e r iv e r s D a r .<br />

l i n g a n d M u r r a y , in 1 8 3 6 , a n d o n h is<br />

r e tu r n w ith th e p a r tv to h e a d q u a r t e r s<br />

w a s r e w a r d e d b y M a j o r M i t c h e ll w ith h is<br />

o w n r e d c o a t , a n d a c o c k e d h a t a n d fe a -<br />

. t h e r , w h ic h h a d o n c e b e l o n g e d t o G o v ­<br />

e r n o r D a r l i n g . H is p o r t r a it , t h u s c o s ­<br />

t u m e d , w a s d r a w n b y M r . F e r n y b , u g h ,<br />

a jid s o o n a p p e a r e d in p r in t s h o p s . P i ­<br />

p e r e n jo y e d a ll h i s n e w ly a c q u i r e d c o n ­<br />

s e q u e n c e w i t h - a h i g h h e a d , a n d th o s e<br />

w h o k n e w h im g a v e h im s m a ll s u m s o f<br />

m o n e y ; w ith t h i s , h e p u r c h a s e d s ilk<br />

h a n d k e r c h ie fs a n d w o r e t h e m o n h is<br />

b r e a s t , g o w n s f o r h is g i n s ( f o r h e h a d<br />

t w o ), a n d , t o h is c r e d it, h e a b s t a in e d<br />

f r o m i n t o x i c a t i n g d r in k , lo o k i n g d o w n<br />

w ith c o n t e m p t o n t h o s e whlo s o i n d u lg ­<br />

ed, e s p e c i a lly fils o w n r a c e . B e f o r e returning<br />

to B a t h u r s t , h e w a s d e c o r a t e d<br />

W'ith a b r a s s p la t e o n w h ic h h e w a s<br />

styled “ C o n q u e r o r o f t h e I n t e r i o r ,” n p t ,<br />

a s usual, “ K i n g , ” f o r h e s a id th e r e w e r e<br />

too m a n y k in d s .<br />

I d 1 8 2 6 , B a t h u r s t a p p e a r e d t o b e in a<br />

f lo u r is h in g c o n d it io n , a n d th e d i s t r i c t<br />

h a d a c q u ir e d a f a m e f o r its c h e e s e .<br />

A m o n g s t t h e m a k e r s w e r e C a p t a in P i ­<br />

p e r , M r . I n n e s a n d M r s . R a n k in . T h e<br />

le t t e r ’ s c h e e s e b o r e h e r n a m e , a n d w a s<br />

so ld w h o le s a le a t g d a n d 1 / p e r l b .<br />

C h e e s e s w e r e s e n t to S y d n e y in m a n y<br />

h u n d r e d w e ig h t s a t a t i m e . M r . H a w -<br />

k i n d ’ s w a t e r m i ll, a n d a ls o t h a t o f M r .<br />

I n n i s , a ffo r d e d g r e a t a s s i s t a n c e to t h e<br />

s e t t le r s ; b o t h w e r e e r e c te d in 1824.<br />

In 1 8 2 5 , th e B a t h u r s t H u n t h a d b e e n<br />

e s t a b lis h e d , fo r th e p u r g c s e o f c o u r s i n g<br />

t h e n a t i v e d o g , w h ic h c a u s e d m u c h d e ­<br />

s t r u c t io n to th e f lo c k s . T h e u n if o r m o f<br />

t h e m e m b e r s w as. a g r e e n j a c k e t , t u r n ­<br />

e d u p w ith v e lv e t , a n d o r n a m e n t e d w ith<br />

a n a tiv e d o g e m b r o id e r e d o n th e c o lla r<br />

g i l t b u tt o n s w ith “ B a t h u r s t H u n t ”<br />

s t a m p e d o n t h e m . E a c h m e m b e r k e p t a<br />

c e r t a in n u m b e r o f d o g s , a n d d a v s w e r e<br />

fix e d f o r a g e n e r a l tu r n o u t. I t w a s d u r ­<br />

i n g t h e fo r m a t io n o f t h e a s s o c ia t i o n t h a t<br />

a s o le m n m e e t i n g w a s c o n v e n e d to d e ­<br />

c id e u p o n t h e d r e s s t h a t w o u ld b e m o s t<br />

a p p r o p r ia te ficr t h e c h a s e . T h e a s s e m ­<br />

b l a g e w a s a s t o r m y o n e f o r s o m e t i m e<br />

w h e n a t la s t o n e o f th e m e m b e r s a r o s e<br />

a n a w’i t h s o m e c o n s id e r a b le g r a v it y o b ­<br />

s e r v e d “ t h a t h e w o u ld r a t h e r g/j to t h e<br />

d e v il in a fr o c k c o a t t h a n t o h e a v e n in a<br />

ja c k e t. T h i s s e t t le d t h e m a t t e r , a n d<br />

fr o c k c o a t s w e r e c a r r ie d , n o m . c o n . to<br />

t h e e v e r L a stin g f a m e o f t h e p r o f^ ser.<br />

_ I n 1 8 2 6 , t h e “ S y d n e v G a z e t t e ” a d v e r ­<br />

tise d t h e B a t h u r s t C la s s i c a l a n d M e r ­<br />

c a n t ile S c h o o l, w h e r e y o u n g g e n t le m e n<br />

c o u ld b e b oard ecT a n d e d u c a t e d f o r t h ir t y<br />

g u in e a s p e r a n n u m . M r , H o llo w a y wras<br />

th e p r o p r ie t o r . E v e n in t h o s e d a y s B a ­<br />

t h u r s t w a s n o t w ith o u t i t s L i t e r a r y S o ­<br />

c ie t y w h ic h w a s in s t itu t e d in 1 8 2 6 , u n -<br />

d e r t h e d ir e c tio n o f a p r e s id e n t , v i c e -<br />

p r e s id e n t , a n d c o m m i t t e e o f fiv e m e m ­<br />

b e r s , t h e e n tr a n c e fe e b e i n g t h r e e g u i n ­<br />

e a s a n d a n n u a l s u b s c r ip t io n t w o g u in e a s .<br />

B a t h u r s t o f t o - d a y p o s s e s s e s o n e o f t h e<br />

fin e s t S c h o o l j<strong>of</strong> A r t s in N e w S o u t h<br />

w a l e s , w h ic h b e g a n its e x is t e n c e in<br />

1855 th e b u ild in g b e i n g e r e c te d in 1 S 6 0 -<br />

6 1 . N o t o n ly s c h o o ls , b u t c o l l e g e s g r a c e<br />

th e t o w n s h ip .<br />

I n 1 8 2 7 , B a t h u r s t is d e s c r i b e d a s a<br />

t o w n p u r e ly G o v e r n m e n t a l, e v e r y t e n e ­<br />

m e n t b e i n g o c c u p ie d b y G o v e r n m e n t o f -<br />

n c e s . A G o v e r n m e n t f a r n , a d jo i n e d th e<br />

s e t t le m e n t , a n d w a s e s t im a t e d a t a lb s s o f


;& 2o oo p e r a n n u m . T h e h e r d o f c a ttle<br />

a t t h i s f a r m , a n d t h e o n e a t W e l l in g t o n<br />

V a l l e y , w a s e s t im a t e d a t 5 0 0 0 h e a d . P r e ­<br />

v io u s to t h i s d a te , ,a s e t t le r t a k i n g a<br />

g r a n t o f 2 0 0 0 a c r e s h a d a p r e s e n t m a d e<br />

h im b y th e G o v e r n m e n t o f t w e n t y c o w s<br />

to s t a r t w ith , to m a k e u p in s o m e m e a ­<br />

s u r e fo r t h e e x p e n s e o f v i c t u a llin g a n d<br />

c lo t h i n g tw e n t y C i'o w n p r is o n e r s . T h is<br />

s y s t e m w a s a b o lis h e d b y G o v e r n o r B r is ­<br />

b a n e .<br />

T h e e s t im a t e d n u m b e r o f c a t t le a t<br />

B a t h u r s t a t t h e c lo s e o f 1 8 2 6 w a s a b o u t<br />

2 5 ,0 0 0 h e a d , a n d t h e r e w e r e a b o u t 7 0 ,0 0 0<br />

s h e e p . F r e q u e n t ly m e n w ith £ 5 0 0 0 to<br />

£> 1 0 ,0 0 0 , in la n d a n d s t o c k , w e r e s till l i v ­<br />

i n g in t h e ir o r i g i n a l h u t s c o m p o s e d o f<br />

r a m m e d e a r t h , b u t th e r e w a s a lw a y s<br />

p le n t y o f g o o d c h e e r w ith in . A t th is<br />

p e r io d th e p a s t u r a g e w a s in a b a d s t a t e<br />

o w i n g to th e l o n g c o n t in u e d d r o u g h t , a n d<br />

s e t t le r s w e r e s e e k i n g n e w p a s t u r a g e in<br />

th e M u d g e e d i s t r i c t , •th e n r e c e n t ly d is - ■<br />

c o v e r e d .<br />

I n 1 8 2 S , th e o ffic e r in c o m m a n d o f th e<br />

d i s t r i c t w a s L i e u t e n a n t J a m e s B r o w n ,<br />

5 7 th R e g i m e n t ; S u p e r in t e n d e n t o f G o v ­<br />

e r n m e n t S t o c k , M r . J o h n M a x w e ll;<br />

C h i e f Q o n s t a b le , M r . J a m e s B la c k m a n ;<br />

C le r k o f th e B e n c h , M r . J o h n W e b b ; A s ­<br />

s i s t a n t S u r g e o n , M r . R ic h a r d s o n ; th e<br />

C o r o n e r w a s s t ill M r . F . F . H a w k i n s ;<br />

t h e C h u r c h o f E n g l a n d c l e r g y m a n , th e<br />

R e v . J o h n E s p y K e i n e . O n e s e r g e a n t<br />

a n d t h ir t e e n p r iv a te s w e r e s t a t io n e d o n<br />

th e B a t h u r s t P l a i n s , b e s id e s m o u n t e d<br />

t r o o p e r s .<br />

I n 1 8 3 3 th e P o lic e M a g i s t r a t e w a s<br />

T h o m a s E v e r n d e n , E s q ., la t e o f th e 3 r d<br />

R e g i m e n t , o r B u f f s . I t w a s L ie u t e n a n t<br />

E v e r n d e n w h o h a d b e e n a p p o in t e d to<br />

c o m m a n d t h e t r o o p o f c a v a lr y th a t h a d<br />

b e e n r a is e d a n d e q u ip p e d f r o m t h e 3 r d<br />

R e g i m e n t b y C o lo n e l S t e w a r t , th e n<br />

L i e u t e n a n t -G o v e r n o r . T h is tr o o p c o n ­<br />

s is te d o f p ic k e d m e n f r o m t h e r e g i m e n t ,<br />

a n d w e r e o r g a n i s e d tq> p u t d o w n t h e<br />

b u s h r a n g e r s , t h e n so t r o u b le s o m e in<br />

th e w e s t e r n d is t r ic t s . O n t h e 4 th N o ­<br />

v e m b e r . 1 8 2 5 , th e fir s t d e ta c h m e n t o f<br />

tr o o p s o f c a v a lr y f o r m e d t h e p r e v io u s<br />

y e a r h a d fa lle n in w ith a p a r t y o f b u s h ­<br />

r a n g e r s , a m o u n t i n g to s e v e n in n u m b e r ,<br />

in t h e d is t r ic t o f B a t h u r s t , a n d M a u r ic e<br />

C o n n e ll, w h o w a s r e p o r te d t o b e tone o f<br />

th e m o s t n o t o r io u s o f th e g ’a.ng, w a s<br />

k ille d o n t h e s p o t b y C o r p o r a l B r o w n .<br />

U n t i l 1 8 3 0 , M r . K i t e , t h e w e a lth y<br />

la n d h o ld e r , m o n o p o lis e d t h e w h o le o f th e<br />

h o te l t r a d e , b u t in 1831 t h e r e w e r e th r e e<br />

i n n s , T h o m a s K i t e ’ s “ D u n C o w ,” W i l ­<br />

l i a m B li z z a r d ’ s “ G o ld e n F l e e c c ,” a n d<br />

R ic h a r d M i l l ’ s “ K i n g W i l l i a m .” W i l ­<br />

lia m B liz z a r d w a s fo r m e r ly b a n d m a s t e r<br />

in t h e 4 8 t h R e g i m e n t , a n d h e d ie d a t<br />

B a t h u r s t o n 18th F e b r u a r y , 1 S 32.<br />

O n o r a b o u t ig t h J u ly _ 1 S 3 1 , C a p t a in<br />

P a y m e , o f D u n n ’ s P la in s , wias m u r d e r ­<br />

e d b y b u s h r a n g e r s . H e h a d o n ly a r r i v ­<br />

e d in t h e c o lo n y e i g h t e e n m o n t h s p r e ­<br />

v io u s ly , ,a n d h a d p u r c h a s e d t h e f a r m<br />

fflo m C a p t a in S e a ly . H e w a s a s e a f a r ­<br />

i n g m a n , h a v i n g r e tir e d in t o Y o r k s h i r e<br />

m a n y y e a r s p r e v io u s ly to s e t t le a n d f a r m .<br />

H e h a d n o f a m i ly a n d le f t a g r e a t d e a l<br />

o f p r o p e r t y . “ S i n c e t h e lo c a t io n o f<br />

l a n d s b y t h e V e t e r a n P e n s i o n e r s , a n d<br />

d is t r ib u t io n o f s m a ll g r a n t s t o n a t i v e<br />

la n d s , c u lt iv a t io n b e g a n in r e a l e a r n e s t ,’ ’<br />

s t a t e s th e “ S y d n e y G a z e t t e ” o f F e b r u ­<br />

a r y , 1 8 3 2 .<br />

T h e s ite o f t h e B a t h u r s t t o w n s h ip wra s ,<br />

until 1832, at K e ls o , a b o u t a m ile f r o m<br />

<strong>the</strong> present s it e . I n M a y , 1 8 3 2 , it w a s<br />

urged t h a t t h e l a y i n g o u t o f t h e t o w n ­<br />

ship on <strong>the</strong> o p p o s it e s id e o f t h e r iv e r ,<br />

should be c a r r ie d out. a n d a t t h e la t t e r<br />

end <strong>of</strong> th e y e a r th e n e w t o w n s h i p w a s<br />

o p e n e d . I n M a y , 1 S 3 4 , t h e “ S v d n e v<br />

G a z e t t e ” s t a t e s t h a t , “ a f t e r a te d io u s<br />

d e la y o f a b o u t a y e a j a n d a h a lf s i n c e<br />

t h e o p e n i n g o f th e t o w n s h ip , a r i s i n g<br />

f r o m f o r m s o f o ffic e , s e v e r a l a l l o t m e n t s<br />

in t h e n e w t o w n s h ip h a v e b e e n s o l d ,<br />

w h ile b u ild i n g s w e r e r a p id ly s p r i n g i n g<br />

u p a r o u n d .”<br />

In 1 8 3 2 , t h e r e r e s id e d in t h e B a t h u r s t |<br />

d is tr ic t a n o ld m a n n a m e d “ T o m m y R o w - i<br />

d e n ,” o n e o f t h e F i r s t F l e e t , o f t h e<br />

c o r p s i<strong>of</strong> R o y a l M a r i n e s , w h o h a d s e r v e d<br />

H is M a j e s t y fo r f i ft y -o n e y e a r s ,f o r w h ic h<br />

h e r e c e iv e d a p e n s io n o f 2 /3 a d a y . H e<br />

b o a s te d t h a t h e h a d n e v e r e x p e r ie n c e d a<br />

d a y ’ s illn e s s in h is l if e , a n d h e w a s jv e ll<br />

k n o w n in t h e d i s t r ic t s o f W i n d s o r a n d<br />

C o r n w a llis , a s “ o ld T o m m y R o w d e n .”<br />

H e w a s 'One o f th o s e w h o h a d w itn e s s e d<br />

t h e e a r ly fo u n d a t io n o f A u s t r a l ia . A n ­<br />

o th e r w e ll-k n o w n c h a r a c t e r in th e d i s ­<br />

tr ic t w a s “ D a v i d th e W e l s h m a n ” ( D a ­<br />

v id A r t h u r ) , w h o h a d s q u a t t e d in th e<br />

n e ig h b o r h o o d o f IJuree; h e d ie d a t th e<br />

b e g i n n i n g o f 1 8 3 5 , a n d in h i s lif e a l l o w ­<br />

e d h i m s e l f n o t e v e n t h e n e c e s s a r i e s y e t ,<br />

a t h is d e a t h , h e l e f t l e g a c i e s to th e<br />

a m o u n t o f £ 6 0 0 .<br />

P r e v io u s t o 1 8 3 2 , th e m a i ls w e r e c o n ­<br />

v e y e d t o a n d f r o m S y d n e y b y c o n t r a c ­<br />

to r s , w h o tr a n s fe r r e d t h e m to t h e m o u n t ­<br />

e d p o lic e a t P e n r it h , a n d t h e y B r o u g h t<br />

t h e m to a;nd f r o m B a t h u r s t ; t h is m e t h o d<br />

w a s a b o lis h e d in 1 8 3 2 , a n d W a t s f o r d ,<br />

th e S y d n e y a n d P a r r a m a t t a c o a c h p r o -<br />

p r i e ( :r s , w e r e u n d e r c o n t r a c t t o e a r n '<br />

th e m r i g h t t h r o u g h , th e la t t e r t a k i n g<br />

fiv e h o u r s lo n g e r in t h e c o n v e y a n c e .<br />

M a j o r C r o k e r , 1 7 th R e g i m e n t , w a s in<br />

c o m m a n d o f th e d is t r ic t a t t h is p e r io d ,


h a v in g a r r iv e d f r o m h e a d q u a r t e r s o n th e i<br />

1 4th J a n u a r y , 1 9 3 2 , w ith M r s . C r o k e r<br />

a n d f a m i l y ; h e r e s id e d a t G o v e r n m e n t<br />

H o u s e , B a t h u r s t . A b o u t th is t i m e th e<br />

R e v . D r . L a n g p a id a v is it t o t h e d i s ­<br />

t r ic t , a c c o m p a n ie d b y a n e w ly -a r r iv e d<br />

m in is te r o f th e P r e s b y t e r ia n C h u r c h , M r .<br />

’T h o m p s o n , w ith th.6 v ie w o f e s t a b l i s h ­<br />

i n g a p la c e o f w o r s h ip f o r th a t b o d y .<br />

T h e first p u b l ic c e le b r a t io n o f D iv in e<br />

W o r s h ip , a f t e r t h e f o r m o f P r e s b y t e r i a n -<br />

is m , t o o k p la c e i n B a t h u r s t o n S u n d a y ,<br />

1 2 th F e b r u a r y , 1 8 3 2 , th e o ffic ia tin g m in ­<br />

is t e r b e i n g M r . T h o m p s o n , w h o a r r iv e d<br />

in t h e c o lo n y in t h e “ C a s t le S t e r l i n g .”<br />

T h e r e w a s n o R o m a n C a t h o lic p r i e s t ; npt<br />

o n e h a d e v e n v is ite d th e d is tr ic t s in c e<br />

1 8 3 0 , th e la s t o n e b e i n g th e R e v . M r .<br />

T h e r r y ; a n d th e “ S y d n e y G a z e t t e ” s ta te s<br />

t h a t th e R o m a n C a t h o lic s w e r e e n tir e ly<br />

th e p o o r e r c l a s s a n d m o s t u n e n lig h t e n e d<br />

p o r tio n o f th e c o m m u n i t y , s t a n d in g m o s t<br />

in n e e d v f p a s to r a l a id .<br />

In 1 8 3 2 , B a t h u r s t r a n k e d fir s t a s a<br />

w o o l s t a t io n , a n d w a s n o t in a n y w ay<br />

c o n s id e r e d a n a g r ic u lt u r a l d is t r ic t . G r a in<br />

s e n t to S y d n e y w a s c h a r g e d 2 /6 p e r<br />

b u s h e l f o r t r a n s p o r t , a n d t r a v e l l i n g in<br />

th o s e d a y s w a s n o a m u s e m e n t — t h e p r o ­<br />

g r e s s o f t h e m o u n t a in d r a y ■was s lo w ,<br />

i f n o t s u r e ; t h e e r r a tic p r o p e n s it ie s o f<br />

t h e b u llo c k s a n d d r iv e r s , m a d e e v e ry<br />

o t h e r d a y a h a lt d a y ; a n d th e in t e r m in ­<br />

a b le s u c c e s s io n o f h i g h m o u n t a i n g r a d e s ,<br />

r o u g h r o a d s , r u g g e d r o c k s , b r o k e n<br />

b r i d g e s , a n d o th e r d i s a g r e e a b le s , w e re<br />

a c o n s t a n t s o u r c e o f to r t u r e t o t h e B a t h - ;<br />

u r s t s e t t le r . Y e t B a t h u r s t p r o d u c e i<br />

f o u n d a r e a d y m a r k e t in S y d n e y , e s p e - j<br />

d a i l y c h e e s e , w h ic h w a s g e n e r a lly so ld j<br />

a t t h e C o lo n i a l P r o d u c e W a r e h o u s e , 100<br />

P i t t -s t r e e t , k e p t b y D a v i d B e ll.<br />

T h e “ S y d n e y G a z e t t e ,” c o m m e n t in g<br />

o n th e d iffic u ltie s o f r o a d t r a v e llin g ,<br />

s t a t e s : “ H is E x c e l le n c y t h e G o v e r n o r ,<br />

in 1 8 8 2 , m a y p o s s ib ly b r e a k f a s t a t h is<br />

s e a t o f g o v e r n m e n t , S y d n e y , a n d d i n e at<br />

t h e V i c e - R e g a l L » :d g e , B a t h u r s t , ta k e<br />

m o r n in g e x c u r s io n s t o W e l l i n g t o n ; b u t<br />

u n t il s t e a m e x c a v a t o r s s h a ll h a v e r e m o v ­<br />

e d m o u n t a i n s a n d m a d e r o a d s fo r<br />

s t e a m c o a c h e s to r u n , w e , in 1 8 3 2 , m u st<br />

b e c o n t e n t w ith t h e s o b e r , o ld -fa s h io n e d<br />

p a c e r f n in e m ile s a n h o u r a n d a v a il<br />

o u r s e lv e s o f th e a c c o m m o d a t i o n s o f<br />

W e a t h e r b o a r d H u t , a n d t h e h o s p ita lit y<br />

o f th e h o s t o f ‘ T h e T h r e e A u s t r a lia n<br />

G o v e r n o r s ,’ o ld P ie r c e C o l l e t t .”<br />

T h e p r ic e o f f u e l a t B a t h u r s t w a s e x ­<br />

t r e m e ly h i g h , s o m u c h s o , t h a t w h e n<br />

te n d e r s w e r e c a lle d f o r s u p p l y i n g th e<br />

m ilit a r y o f t h a t t o w n w ith it, t h e te r m s<br />

w e r e s o e x c e s s iv e t h a t n o n e w e r e a c c e p t ­<br />

e d . C o a l a t th is p e r io d ( F e b r u a r y , 1832)<br />

h a d b e e n d is c o v e r e d o n t h e m o u n t a in<br />

r o a d , a n d a p i t w a s at o n c e o p e n e d n e a r<br />

th e w e s t e r n b a s e o f M o u n t Y o r k , in th e<br />

V a l e o f C lw v d d , a t a s p o t k n o w n a s<br />

“ C o a l P it S w a m p ;” b u t t h e d iffic u ltie s<br />

o f t r a n s p o r t a ls o r e n d e r e d t h is c o m m o d ­<br />

i t y a n e x p e n s iv e ite m .<br />

O n 2 0 t h J a n u a r y , 1 8 3 2 , a t t h e s a le o f<br />

G o v e r n m e n t s t o c k , 1 5 0 s h e e p b r o u g h t<br />

7 /6 t o 8 /6 p e r h e a d , t h e wctes it is s u e d w e r e £ 1 a n d £ 5 r e s p e c ­<br />

t iv e ly . T h e fir s t G o v e r n m e n t c a s h<br />

tr a n s a c t io n s w e r e w i t h th e C o m m i s s a r i a t ,<br />

w h e n q u a r t e r ly p a y m e n t o f p e n s i o n s w 'as<br />

o r d e r e d t o b e m a d e f r o m t h e B a n k o f<br />

B a t h u r s t to s u c h r e c ip ie n t s a s liv e d<br />

w ith in t h e d is tr ic t.<br />

T h e C o u r t o f Q u a r t e r S e s s io n s , a t<br />

t h is d a te , w a s h e ld a t D i l l o n ’ s I n n , a n d<br />

tw o b r a n c h jfc-st O ffices h a d b e e n e s t a b ­<br />

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s e c o n d a t O ’ C o a n e l l P la i n s . A b o u t t h is 1<br />

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to M r . W e n t w o r t h , w h o w a s o n t h e e v e<br />

o f m a k i n g B a t h u r s t h is f u t u r e a b o d e .<br />

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f r o m I n d ia , w h o p u r c h a s e d t h e f a r m o f<br />

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m e n t.<br />

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c e i v i n g s t o le n s h e e p a -c o n s id e r a b le e x ­<br />

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le a s e .<br />

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B a t h u r s t n o t o n ly in c lu d e d t h e C o u n t y&