25.08.2022 Views

Pioneer magazine, 2019, Vol. 66, No.4

You also want an ePaper? Increase the reach of your titles

YUMPU automatically turns print PDFs into web optimized ePapers that Google loves.

2019 n volume 66 n number 4

pioneer

The

History of

Pioneer

Magazine

Published by the Sons of Utah Pioneers


VOLUME

NO

2019 n

66 n

4

pioneer

THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OF THE

SONS OF UTAH PIONEERS

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL:

PRESIDENT: Wayne K. Hinton

PRESIDENT-ELECT: Bradley Clayton

PAST PRESIDENT: Anthony C. Tidwell

features

2 A Pioneer Retrospective,

by William W. Tanner

16 July 1937: True Pioneer Stories:

How Isabella Park Kenner, a

Thespian Aged 17, Took Brigham

Young to a Leap Year Ball,

by Harold H. Jensen

19 October 1937: Lost on the Handcart

Trail, by D. J. G.

20 May/June 1983: English Convert

Becomes Bishop, Rancher,

Prisoner, by Noel R. Barton

22 November 1993: Along the Way:

Mule Cars in Pioneer Utah, by

Leonard J. Arrington

24 November 1993: Songs of the

Hearth, by Kellene Ricks Adams

29 January/February 1994: The

Incomparable Maude Adams:

Somewhere in Time, by Kellene

Ricks Adams

32 November/December 1994:

Christmas Cooking: Pioneer

Culinary Tradition Was Shaped

by Time and Circumstance,

by F. Charles Graves

36 Summer 1996: Trial Through

Separation: Pioneer Journal Reveals

the Personal Side of Plural

Marriage Persecution

iv

42 Winter 1996: Beautiful, Troublesome

City Creek, by W. Randall

Dixon

47 Winter 1997: Deseret Views:

Payback Time, by Paul W. Hodson

48 Winter 1997: Preparing for the

Trek: Finalizing Plans for the Journey

West, by Richard E. Bennett

54 Autumn 1999: Seuhubeogoi:

What Cache Valley Meant to

the Shoshone, by Scott R.

Christensen

58 2005, No. 3: The Nauvoo Legion

on Parade, by Susan Easton Black

63 2008, No. 1: The Pioneer Trek:

Reenactment of 1947, by Booth

Maycock

68 Mural of the Ute Rangers by Lynn

Fausett; Brigham Young’s Empire

Mill 1864–1883, by Charles Peterson,

1890

departments

1 President’s Message:

by Wayne Hinton

COVER: January 1958

cover of SUP News

PUBLISHER: Dr. William W. Tanner

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & MAGAZINE DESIGNER:

Susan Lofgren

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD:

Dr. Thomas G. Alexander

Robert C. Folkman

Dr. F. Charles Graves

Dr. A. Keith Lawrence

Kent V. Lott, Publisher Emeritus

FINANCIAL: John E. Elggren

SUBSCRIPTIONS: Pat Cook

Email: nssup3@gmail.com

or go to the website. Annual subscription

cost is $25 per year or $45 for two years.

SUP WEBSITE: www.sup1847.com

NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS:

3301 East Louise Avenue, SLC, Utah 84109

(801) 484–4441

Email: sup1847@gmail.com

SUP LIBRARY &

AFFILIATE FAMILYSEARCH CENTER:

LIBRARY DIRECTOR: John Smith

OFFICE & LIBRARY HOURS:

10 am – 5 pm, Mon. – Thurs.

MISSION STATEMENT: The Mission of

the National Society of the Sons of Utah

Pioneers is to come to know our fathers

and turn our hearts to them; we preserve

the memory and heritage of the early

pioneers of the Utah Territory and the

western U.S.; we honor present-day

pioneers worldwide who exemplify the

pioneer qualities of character; and we

teach these same qualities to the youth

who will be tomorrow’s pioneers.

THE PIONEER VALUES: We honor the

pioneers for their faith in God, devotion to

family, loyalty to church and country, hard

work and service to others, courage in

adversity, personal integrity, and unyielding

determination.

© 2019 National Society of the Sons

of Utah Pioneer


President’s Message

I by Wayne Hinton

Getting

out each

wonderful

issue of Pioneer

magazine in a

timely manner is

a great challenge.

Unless you have worked in publishing,

you likely have no idea what must take

place before an issue is printed. The

magazine board must choose a theme

and find qualified authors to write

about it. The finished articles must be

gathered and submitted to the copy

editors for editing, fact-checking, and

proofreading. The graphic artist lays out

the articles and other magazine features

and chooses artwork and graphics to

illustrate the theme. The nearly finished

issue is proofed a final time and then

sent to the printer.

Our publisher, Dr. William Tanner,

loses sleep over every

step involved in the publishing

of each quarterly

issue. I am grateful for

that sleepless night when

he came up with the idea

of doing a retrospective

issue that would allow

us to trace the progress

of Pioneer

from its origins

eighty-three years ago

through its becoming the

publication it is today.

While we rejoice in

what Pioneer

has become,

it is important to know

where the magazine

began in 1936 and

to recall the various

iterations of Pioneer

since that time.

Bill Tanner

introduces this issue with an engaging,

detailed overview of the history of

Pioneer. In line with Bill’s instructions to

the editorial board, Bob Folkman, Keith

Lawrence, Susan Lofgren, and Kent Lott

reviewed past issues of the magazine to

come up with intriguing, representative

articles to share with readers. Others

on the board read the selected articles

and participated in final decisions about

which articles to include.

The articles in this retrospective

issue represent a diversity of subjects

ranging from the actress Maude Adams

and Christmas recipes to Overland Trail

experiences. It is the hope of the Pioneer

editorial board that you will find this

issue stimulating and that it will be an

effective marker of the progress of the

National Society of the Sons of Utah

Pioneers itself. Without the earliest baby

steps taken decades ago on a shoestring

budget, the magazine we have today

would not be possible.

I believe I speak for all Pioneer

readers

in expressing gratitude to the early

editors and authors, to the businesses

that advertised—when Pioneer

had

to sell advertising to pay publishing

costs—and to all who contributed to the

growth and success of this outstanding

publication.

This is an issue to cherish and

retain. The advertisements should evoke

fond memories. Comparisons of the

layout and design of past and recent articles

should remind us of the gifts and

vision of Susan Lofgren—the editor-inchief

who has shaped Pioneer

for twenty

years and more—and should give proof

that, in very real ways, Susan is Pioneer

magazine. The selections themselves

should remind us of the magazine’s

consistent mission: to help readers

revere our Utah pioneer forbears and

to understand, learn from, and enjoy

Utah’s pioneer history.

I offer my sincere thanks to all

who have contributed to this interesting

issue.

WAYNE HINTON

SUP NATIONAL PRESIDENT 2020

Over 70 years ago the Sons of

Utah Pioneers formed a Centennial

Reenactment Trek that

departed from Nauvoo, Illinois,

on July 14, 1947. See “The

Pioneer Trek: Reenactment of

1947” (Pioneer, 2008.1) reprinted

in this issue on page 63.

Pioneer

1


VOLUME

NO

2

2019 n

66 n

4


Publisher’s Message

I by William W. Tanner

A

Retrospective

This

issue of

Pioneer

1936

is unique

in its reach

back to the

magazine’s beginnings as “The

Official Organ of the Sons of

Utah Pioneers.” In this issue,

we want to give readers a taste

of past issues of Pioneer. We

want them to know where the

magazine began and how it

evolved. We have tried to include

interesting elements from early

issues of the magazine, and we

feature important representative

articles from the magazine’s

more recent years. We hope that

you, our readers, will enjoy this

retrospective as much as we

have enjoyed putting it together.

Pioneer 3


VOLUME

NO

The first issue of Pioneer was

printed in June 1936; the magazine’s

original title was The Pioneer.

There were six issues that year—

June, July, August, September/

October, November, and December

1936/January 1937. During

its eighty-three years in existence,

Pioneer has sometimes been a

monthly publication, sometimes

a bimonthly one, and since 1995

it has been published quarterly.

Sometimes its publication has

been sporadic. At first, its volume

numbers changed every twelve

issues rather than annually. For example,

volume 1 extends from June

1936 to July 1938. Publication was

intermittent during World War II,

and by the time the 1954 “Spring

Edition” came out, Pioneer had

only managed to reach volume 6,

number 1, even though it had been

in existence for eighteen years.

Initially, Pioneer served as

both a source of SUP news and as

a historical record of the pioneer

era in Utah. To reflect this emphasis,

the magazine’s name was

changed to SUP News in November 1954. The

volume number changed back to 1 at this time;

volume 2 began in January 1955, and volume

numbers have remained consistent ever since.

In January 1966 the magazine’s name was

quietly changed back to The Pioneer. It became

simply Pioneer in January 1983.

The magazine’s appearance has changed over

time, too, as print technology has advanced. During

the first forty years or so, it was most often

printed with black ink on white or lightly tinted

paper. But even the first issue had a pink cover

printed in black ink. In the second issue, some

pages were printed with green ink on colored

paper, perhaps a sign of things to come. Pioneer

is today a beautiful full-color magazine that its

1936 publisher and editors hardly could have

imagined.

On the cover of that very first June 1936

issue was a poem, “Sons of the Pioneers,” by

Stanley A. Purrington of Ogden. It included

this stanza that points to the purpose of the

SUP organization and its responsibility to foster

remembrance and gratitude:

4

2019 n

66 n

4


Ah! yours is a sacred duty,

Telling this story old,

Never too well-remembered;

Never too often told.

Tell how they plowed and planted,

Watering the furrows with tears:

Sowing that we might harvest,

Sons of the Pioneers!

The same issue also included an advertisement for

the 1936 “Covered Wagon Days,” a former four-day

celebration incorporating July 24, or Pioneer Day—

Utah’s most important state holiday.

Within the pages of the second issue is a list of

“The Original Pioneers of 1847”(see above). This list

serves as a symbolic statement of the mission of Pioneer

magazine and the Sons of Utah Pioneers: to preserve

the history and legacy of the founding pioneers

of Utah. While the vast majority of those on the list are

men—Church leaders did not want to risk the lives of

women and children while trails to the Utah Territory

were being blazed and settlements in the Valley were

being established—the names of three women and two

children comprise a dramatic and significant conclusion

to the list.

Pioneer 5


VOLUME

NO

1936

As one reads through the list of the fourteen companies

that arrived in 1847, one recognizes names of stalwart individuals

and families who first settled the Salt Lake Valley and

laid the foundation for the settlement of the rest of Utah and

much of the West.

Another feature in the July 1936 issue is an editorial,

“Public Conscience and Selection of Public Officials.” As

relevant today as when it was first published, the essay examines

a prominent theme of early issues of Pioneer: personal

responsibility for the democratic election of strong leaders,

maintaining liberty, and upholding the US Constitution.

In 1937, as Pioneer proclaimed itself “Herald of Utah’s

Centennial Exposition, 1847–1947,” it employed a series of

political essays to kick off the decade-long countdown to the

centennial celebration. Essay titles included

“From Whence Our Liberty under the

Constitution,” “How Close Does Government

Come?” and “Erosion of Our Form of

Government.”

Politics played an important role in

the formation of the state of Utah,

and political responsibility was an important

issue in Utah during the 1890s. When

national leaders called attention to imbalanced

political representation and voting

patterns in the state, the Church-sponsored

People’s Party was dissolved, and members

were advised—or assigned—to join one of

the major national parties. A few decades

later, after most Utahns had been voting

for Democrat candidates since statehood,

general Church leaders gave instructions

that local congregations be divided, with half

designated Republicans and the other half

as Democrats. Some extended families were

split between the two parties.

Because of the sometimes-passionate

partisanship that ensued, Pioneer editors

found it wise to emphasize the strict

political neutrality of the publication and to

Pioneer proclaimed itself the

“Herald of Utah’s Centennial

Exposition, 1847–1947,”

to kick off the decade-long

countdown to the 1947 centennial

celebration.

6

2019 n

66 n

4


In 1937 SUP leadership developed

a “credo,” or what we would now

call an oath or mission statement,

for the organization.

remind readers of the necessary role

of public conscience in the selection

of public officers. Bluntly declaring,

“Sons of Utah Pioneers Not in Politics,”

the above editorial (published

in November 1936) emphasized that

Pioneer or the SUP organization

must not be used as a steppingstone

to political support. “We protest,”

SUP leadership declared, “against

the efforts of any member attempting

to draw the organization into

political matters.”

Each of the six issues of Pioneer

in 1936 were sixteen pages long,

including covers, and featured SUP

announcements, editorials, essays,

pioneer stories, poetry, news from local chapters,

and paid advertising. In 1937 the magazine expanded

to twenty pages; the July issue was fifty. About

half the space in each issue was devoted to advertising.

There were print ads for a variety of businesses

and services, including automobile dealerships,

furniture stores, banks, coal companies, mortuaries,

Pioneer

7


VOLUME

NO

1936–1950

The magazine expanded to

twenty pages with about

half the space in each issue

devoted to advertising.

8

2019 n

66 n

4


physicians, dentists, attorneys,

housecleaning services, and

places to eat. And there were ads

for popular products, such as

Farr’s Ice Cream.

In the early days of the SUP

organization its officers sought to

establish guiding objectives and

appropriate goals for preserving

Utah’s pioneer history—the legacy

of those who sacrificed to bring

the Saints to Zion and establish

a safe haven for their practice of

religion. In 1937 SUP leadership

developed a “credo,” or what we

would now call an oath or mission

statement, for the organization. “I

believe in the Sons of Utah Pioneers,”

it began, and then specified

spiritual, political, familial, and communal reasons

for this belief and support. The credo was featured

prominently in several issues that year.

T

he Spring 1954 issue was the culmination of

the initial trajectory of Pioneer magazine. The

58-page issue included national and chapter news,

but also rich historical articles that portended the

eventual future and focus of the magazine. There

was an article on early “Mormon” journalism, another

on the history of Salt Lake City’s Main Street,

and another—which included photos of the originals—on

the last letters of Joseph Smith (sent to his

wife Emma and to his lawyer, Mr. Browning, from

Carthage Jail). And there were eyewitness reports of

the martyrdom of Joseph and Hyrum written many

years later by Dr. Thomas L. Barnes, prison physician

for Carthage Jail.

Pioneer 9


VOLUME

NO

1950–1960

10

2019 n

66 n

4


From its beginnings through

the 1980s, Pioneer served as the

news vehicle for the SUP, reporting

on both national and chapter

events. It included profiles of individual

members, dedications of

new monuments, reports on treks

and chapter meetings, and lists

of life members. It also contained

additions to the Chapter Eternal

(obituaries) and other memorials.

Indeed, from 1954 through 1992

Pioneer was primarily an SUP

news magazine. Occasional historical

articles were a supplementary

feature. There were, in fact,

many more advertisements than

historical articles. Many of these

ads stir nostalgic memories today.

Do you remember Snelgrove’s?

The magazine

masthead

changed multple

times over the

years.

Pioneer 11


VOLUME

NO

1960–1990

DR. CHARLES GRAVES

SUSAN LOFGREN

As personal computers and the Internet

began changing our lives in the late 1980s,

magazine publishing nationwide also underwent

significant changes. In 1993, under the

direction of SUP president Angus Belliston and

members of the Pioneer magazine committee,

Dr. Charles Graves began changing the appearance,

content, and objectives of the magazine.

The masthead was changed, historical articles

began replacing SUP news, and full-color

printing was introduced in the last issue of

1993. Later, Graves employed Susan Lofgren

as the graphic designer, and her skills in

computer-based layout and design have shaped

the magazine as it exists today. While Lofgren

continues through the present as magazine

designer, she also serves as the magazine’s

editor-in-chief.

As technology continued to develop and

as computers profoundly changed the fields of

genealogical research and record keeping, SUP

leadership recognized the value of preserving

and digitally sharing materials in the SUP

library, including pioneer biographies, family

histories, and chapter records. The President’s

Message appearing in the Winter 1999 issue

focused on these developments.

Subsequently, many persons have taken

steps to accomplish John Anderson’s goal of

making SUP Library materials more acces-

12

2019 n

66 n

4


Designed by the Provo-based

advertising agency Hales Allen, the

November/December 1993

issue of Pioneer was the first color

magazine. The newly designed masthead

was gold-foil stamped and the

cover artwork, “Christmas Through

Eagle Gate,” was commissioned especially

for this issue by renowned Salt

Lake City artist, Al Rounds.

sible to members and others. After serving as national

presidents, Roger Flick and Booth Maycock worked many

hours to expand, catalog, and organize the library’s materials.

But it has only been in the last two years that the

dream to digitize books, journals, memorials, and chapter

records has begun to materialize. The dream is being

made reality through the efforts of our present librarian,

John Smith, and his wife Diane, and with the help of

many volunteers who give generously of their time.

Through the late 1990s and early 2000s advertising

in Pioneer declined in importance. Eventually, as sales

of the magazine increased and generous donations to

the magazine became more frequent, all advertising was

discontinued, and the format of the magazine continued

to evolve. Under the direction of publisher and past national

president Kent Lott, SUP news was transferred to

a new publication, Trail Marker, which is emailed to all

SUP members at the first of each month; it is also accessible

online at the SUP website. The editor of Trail Marker

in recent years is the very capable graphic designer Chad

Stowell. It is essential that the SUP have an online presence

in our digital age, and Chad also manages the SUP

website (at www.sup1847.com)—the go-to source for

Pioneer

13


VOLUME

NO

1990–TODAY

No other magazine

or quarterly journal

devotes each issue to

a single historical

subject related to

Latter-day Saint pioneers

or to the history

of Utah or The Church

of Jesus Christ of

Latter-day Saints.

14 2019 n

66 n

4


KENT LOTT

CHAD STOWELL

SUP calendar information, event details, chapter locations,

national contact information, and chapter and area

leadership lists.

With the initiation of Trail Marker, and as local

chapters also began publishing their own monthly

newsletters, Pioneer replaced its SUP news features with

historical articles. These were supplemented by regular

departments—the SUP President’s Message, Pioneer

Journal, Pioneer Vignette, Monuments and Markers.

During the past several years each issue of Pioneer

has been devoted to a single subject or theme from

pioneer history. There have been biography issues for

Hyrum Smith, Brigham Young, Parley P. Pratt, Erastus

Snow, the Joseph Knight family, and Johnathan Browning.

Place issues have focused on the British Isles and

Liberty Jail and on pioneer settlements in Utah’s Iron,

Davis, and Sevier Counties. (Utah County will be an issue

subject in 2020.) Other issues have provided studies

of Latter-day Saint immigration (“Gathering the Saints

by Sea,” “The History of Utah’s Italian Pioneers,”); still

others have explored historical events (“The Heavens are

Opened,” the Mormon Battalion, the Utah War, and the

coming of the transcontinental railroad to Utah). And

there have been issues on important cultural subjects

(sister missionaries, the Tabernacle Choir, the use of

stained glass in Latter-day Saint buildings, and the

newly rediscovered missionary scroll painted by pioneer

artist C. C. A. Christensen).

No other magazine or quarterly journal devotes

each issue to a single historical subject related to

Latter-day Saint pioneers or to the history of Utah or

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. And

certainly Pioneer is unique in combining scholarly

or expert articles with Susan Lofgren’s masterfully

designed pictorial layouts.

If the articles in this issue—all of them taken

from our archives—pique your interest, please visit

our website at www.sup1847.com, where you can

find and read many past articles and features.

As you explore this issue and step back into the

history of Pioneer magazine, we hope you will feel the

spirit of our pioneers and of those who have worked to

keep our pioneer heritage alive. As President Gordon

B. Hinckley emphasized during a meeting with Bruce

Olson, then director of public affairs for The Church

of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints,

“THE CHURCH MUST NEVER FORGET ITS

PIONEER HERITAGE AND THE SACRIFICES

THAT WERE MADE FOR THE GOSPEL.”

Dr. William W. Tanner is the publisher of Pioneer magazine

and is retired from a private dental practice in Beverly

Hills, California. A former stake president and mission

president, Bill is currently a sealer in the Salt Lake Temple.

He is also an adjunct faculty member of the University of

Utah School of Dentistry. He and his wife Elizabeth are

the parents of four sons and many treasured grandchildren

and great-grandchildren.

15 11

I S S U E 1 7 1

P R E S I D E N T ’ S M E S S A G E

October has been busy. We have

completed three of the five area

trainings. Thanks to the AVP s for

making arrangements, providing

agendas, refreshments, and leading out

in discussing local concerns. Thanks also

to all who have attended. The attendance

has been good even on the opening

weekend of the deer hunt.

The Pioneer Magazine issue featuring

articles on the transcontinental railroad;

part of SUP’s celebration of the 150th

anniversary of the driving of the golden

spike at Promontory Summit, is either in

your hands or in the mail. Please enjoy. We are grateful to Bill Tanner,

the members of the Editorial Board and the authors for this fine issue.

Hopefully, all chapters have chosen new officers including

presidents-elect so that chapter presidents and presidents-elect may

Pioneer

number

TABLE OF CONTENTS

President’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Pioneer Stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

Membership Report. . . . . . . . . . . . .4

National Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

2020 Vision Trek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

Chapter News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

Boulder Dam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

Box Elder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

Centerville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

Cotton Mission. . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

Eagle Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

Jordan River Temple . . . . . . . .10

Lehi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

Maple Mountain. . . . . . . . . . . .11

Morgan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Mt Nebo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Porter Rockwell . . . . . . . . . . . .13

Portneuf. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

Red Rocks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

Sevier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14


VOLUME

NO

16 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer

17


VOLUME

NO

18 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer

19


VOLUME

NO

MAY/JUNE

1983

20 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer

21


VOLUME

NO

NOVEMBER

1993

22 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer 23


VOLUME

NO

NOVEMBER

1993

24

2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer 25


VOLUME

NO

26

2019 n

66 n

4


Kellene Ricks Adams is a former assistant editor of Ensign magazine

and former editor of Pioneer magazine (1999–2001). She is

currently Publications Editor at the Marriott School of Management,

Brigham Young University.

Pioneer

27


VOLUME

NO

28

2019 n

66 n

4


JANUARY/

FEBRUARY

1994

Pioneer 29


VOLUME

NO

30 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer

31


VOLUME

NO

NOVEMBER/

DECEMBER

1994

32 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer 33


VOLUME

NO

34 2019 n

66 n

4


When this article was originally published F. Charles Graves was chairman

of the magazine publication committee of the Sons of Utah Pioneers.

Pioneer

35


VOLUME

NO

SUMMER

1996

36 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer

37


VOLUME

NO

38 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer 39


VOLUME

NO

40 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer

41


VOLUME

NO

WINTER

1996

42 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer 43


VOLUME

NO

44

2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer 45


VOLUME

NO

46 2019 n

66 n

4

W. Randall Dixon is a well-known Latter-day Saint writer and

independent scholar.


Deseret Views

WINTER

1997

Pioneer

47


VOLUME

NO

WINTER

1997

48 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer 49


50


Pioneer 51


VOLUME

NO

52 2019 n

66 n

4


When this article was published, Richard E. Bennett was department

head of Archives and Special Collections at the University of Manitoba.

Currently he is Chair of Church History and Doctrine in the Department

of Church History at Brigham Young University.

Pioneer

53


VOLUME

NO

54

2019 n

66 n

4


AUTUMN

1999

Pioneer 55


56


Pioneer 57


VOLUME

NO

NUMBER 3

2005

58 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer

59


VOLUME

NO

60 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer

61


VOLUME

NO

62 2019 n

66 n

4


NUMBER 1

2008

The Pioneer Trek

Reenactment of 1947

The Pioneer Trek

Reenactment of 1947

by Booth Maycock, SUP President

Throughout the history of the Sons of Utah

Pioneers,

by Booth

treks have

Maycock,

been an important

SUP President

part of

both Throughout the National Office the history and the of the individual Sons of Utah

chapters. Each chapter Pioneers, usually treks sponsors have been several an important one-day part of

treks each year to both historic the sites, National monuments, Office and cultural the individual

events. Treks chapters. sponsored Each by chapter the National usually Organization sponsors several areone-day

usually included

treks each

in the

year

annual

to historic

encampment

sites, monuments,

and feature

and cultural

events. Treks sponsored by the National Organization are

special sites along the way.

usually included in the annual encampment and feature

However, one notable exception was the reenactment

special sites along the way.

of 1947, the centennial of the original pioneer trek from

However, one notable exception was the reenactment

Nauvoo to Salt Lake basin. In 1946, R. H. Wooten, a former

national president, Wendell J. Ashton, and the

of 1947, the centennial of the original pioneer trek from

Nauvoo to Salt Lake basin. In 1946, R. H. Wooten, a former

national

executive board formulated

president,

a

Wendell

plan. Seventy-two

J. Ashton, and the

executive automobiles board formulated were covered a plan. with Seventy-two

framework automobiles and canvas were to covered appear

as covered framework wagons, and replica canvas to ap-

with

wheels, and pear a pair as covered of oxen. wagons, One replica

hundred forty-three wheels, and men, a pair three of oxen. One

women, and hundred two children forty-three were men, three

women, and two children were

2008 Vo l. 55, No.1 PIONEER 19

◆ ◆ 2008 Vo l. 55, No.1 PIONEER

Pioneer

19

63

◆ ◆


VOLUME

NO

selected from the many applicants. These numbers including

the number of wagons corresponded to Brigham

Young’s original group.

Chairman Willard R. Smith was given the formidable

task of designing the covered wagon tops, which

needed to be able to withstand the elements and not require

modification of the cars. All cars should be new

enough to stand the rigors of the long trip.

Other items organized included areas appropriate

for “circling the wagons,” adequate firewood, and appetizing,

inexpensive menus. Game meat including buffalo

was specified in some of the meals.

To select the 72 participants, each chapter was given

a quota based on the number of paid-up members. The

Daughters of Utah Pioneers supplied one sister; Dorothy

Kimball Keddington, the great-granddaughter of Heber

C. Kimball; Brother Darger chose the third; and the two

boys were the outstanding Boy Scouts in the state.

John P. Giles, familiar with the

Mormon Trail, worked out the itinerary.

Brother Giles’s son, Parley P. Giles,

had done extensive research

on pioneer clothing and issued suggestions, including

illustrations showing clothing that should be made for

the trek by participants.

The specific route was carefully planned. Civic leaders

from cities and towns along the way often presented a

ceremony upon the trekkers, arrival at their respective

towns. A theatrical group was organized and a portable

stage transported along with the trek to present dramatizations

of Mormon history.

A special invited guest on the trek was Elder Spencer

W. Kimball and his wife, Camilla (pictured on page 19).

Both won undying devotion of the trekkers by being “one

with us in work and play.” Elder Kimball, as a representative

of the Church on the trek, gave impromptu talks at

many of the communities along the route.

The trek began in Nauvoo July 14, 1947. The old

Nauvoo Temple site was the scene of frantic industry,

where wagon tops were assembled and installed (pictured

upper left).

On the eve of the trek’s departure, a special program

was held on an impromptu stage, made of hay wagons

side by side. Honored guests included Elder and Mrs.

Spencer W. Kimball; Senator T. Mac Downing, of the

Illinois State Legislature, and Mrs. Downing; Mayor and

Mrs. Lowell F. Horton, of Nauvoo; and President George

P. Anton, of the Nauvoo Chamber of Commerce. A

speech, long to be remembered by the audience of two

to three thousand, was given by Senator Downing in

which he contrasted the treatment of the Mormons one

2019 n 66 n ◆ 20

64

4

PIONEER Vol. 55, No.1 2008


hundred years before to the reception

they received today. Comments by

Elder Kimball included the joy and

happiness about the privilege of seeing

the historical spots of Mormonism, especially

his grandfather’s (Heber C.

Kimball) home.

Finally the time of departure

came. With Fox Movietone News

filming, both from the ground and

from an airplane overhead, the soundtrack

announced, “Start your engines.”

Unfortunately, Brother Ashton, driving

car number one, suddenly realized he couldn’t start

his engine because his keys were in a shirt locked in the

trunk. After a few anxious minutes, a husky highway

patrolman grabbed the trunk handle and forced it open

and the trek was able to start.

Most of the trek traveled over paved roads with

police escort minimizing the hazards. Occasionally it was

necessary to go on dirt roads to visit historical points

originally traveled by the pioneers. In these instances, it

was discovered the “modern wagons” didn’t have the

same clearance as the old covered wagons.

Throughout the entire trek, the caravan was greeted

by enthusiastic crowds. With vehicles spaced out, they

occupied more than two miles of the highway.

One of the most memorable events of the trek took

place soon after they crossed into Utah. Two figures,

standing alongside the road, waved the caravan to

a stop. One was dressed in a Scouter’s uniform—

George Albert Smith, President

of the LDS church. The

other was Herbert B. Maw,

governor of the State of Utah, both anxiously awaiting

the arrival of the trek.

The conclusion of the trek was not without drama.

At the last minute it was decided to change the route from

East Canyon to Parley’s and over the ridge to Immigration

Canyon. What the trekkers did not know was that dozens

of boys, dressed as Indians, were waiting in East Canyon

to make a mock attack on the trek.

As the trek neared the end of the 10-day odyssey,

thousands at “This Is the Place Monument” greeted

them. The caravan moved on to Sugar House with the

streets lined with well-wishers. After a brief ceremony

they proceeded down to the Brigham Young monument

in downtown Salt Lake City, where the First Presidency

of the Church, Mayor Earl J. Glade, and thousands of

cheering onlookers met them at the trek’s end.

Pioneer

65


VOLUME

NO

66 2019 n

66 n

4


Pioneer 67


VOLUME

NO

T

he Sons of Utah Pioneers owns several pieces of art housed at the SUP Headquarters Building including a

huge mural downstairs: Ute Rangers by Lynn Fausett. Donated to the S.U.P. by Leon W. “Pete” Harmon. The

plaque reads:

UTE RANGERS

The official Utah State Highway Patrol Posse

and Howard Egan Pony Express Chapter of

the Sons of the Utah Pioneers—

The Ute Rangers were organized in 1944 as

a service and pleasure posse. They believe

in good fellowship and clean sportsmanship.

The membership consists of 75 active

members of Salt Lake County with a Drill

and Parade team of 53 members. They are

men from all walks of life, business men

and tradesmen of all crafts.

They do a precision drill under the leadership

of Ray P. Greenwood, Drill Master.

Horses are matched as to Squads of eight

of a color, such as Palominos, Blacks,

Grays, Roans, Sorrels, and Bays.

To date [1956] they have made

over 200 public appearances

throughout the Western United

States and have been shown

on television and in the movies

throughout the entire nation.

They have conducted their

own Horse Show and Rodeo

the past twelve years. This

event is held in June each year

in Salt Lake County.

They are on call at any time

for any state emergency and

may be placed on active duty with the State Council

of Defense as special Policemen of the State of Utah.

They are active in civic affairs and contribute much

to advertising the State of Utah.

68

2019 n

66 n

4


BRIGHAM YOUNG’S EMPIRE MILL 1864–1883, BY CHARLES PETERSON, 1890


JULY 1937,

PIONEER MAGAZINE

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!