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The Softwood Forest Products Buyer - September/October 2022

The latest issue of the Softwood Forest Products Buyer features stories on the NAWLA Portland Regional Meeting, Atlanta Hardwood Corp, Holt & Bugbee and so much more.

The latest issue of the Softwood Forest Products Buyer features stories on the NAWLA Portland Regional Meeting, Atlanta Hardwood Corp, Holt & Bugbee and so much more.

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The

Forest Products

www.softwoodbuyer.com

Vol. 37 No. 5 The Softwood Industry’s Only Newspaper...Now Reaching 36,034 firms (20,000 per issue) September/October 2022

Inland Lumber Producers Celebrate

38th Annual Golf Event

Photos By Terry Miller

UVLA Returns To Seven Feathers For

Annual Event

Photos By Zach Miller

Jeff Bowers, Bowers Forest Products Inc., Beavercreek, OR; Kathy and Bernie Nugent,

Warren Trask Company, Lakeville, MA; and Paul Ericson, Shelton Structures

Inc., Chehalis, WA

Coeur d'Alene, ID – The Inland Lumber Producers recently held their 38th

Annual Golf Tournament here at the Coeur d'Alene Resort.

The two-day event also featured golfing at Hayden Lake Country Club. The

winners of the Horse Shoe golf game held there were Matt Beymer, of Hampton

Lumber Co., located in Portland, OR and Luke Wenner, Pallet Service

Corp., of Maple Grove, MN. •

Paul Owen, Vanport International Inc., Boring, OR; Dave Cochenour, Eric Oien and

Todd Shipp, Alta Forest Products, Chehalis, WA

Additional Photos on page 12

Aaron Fleming, Elk Creek Forest Products LLC, Eugene, OR; Mark Swinth and Mark

Kelly, Elk Creek Forest Products LLC, McMinnville, OR; Steve Snyder, Elk Creek Forest

Products LLC, Oregon City, OR; Terry Rasmussen, Elk Creek Forest Products

LLC, Oklahoma City, OK; Brett Slaughter and Jennifer Moran, Elk Creek Forest Products

LLC, McMinnville, OR; and Dianna Snyder, Elk Creek Forest Products LLC, Oregon

City, OR

Canyonville, OR–The Seven Feathers Casino and Resort, located here, was

the site for the multi-day Umpqua Valley Lumber Association (UVLA) annual

banquet and golf tournament. Attendance was the largest in the history of this

event.

UVLA members form a coalition of long-time timber and lumber operators

located in the southwestern timber country of Oregon.

The UVLA's stated mission is "to work together to support our industry and

share best practices and, of course, the fun that comes from long-time partnerships."

The event included such networking opportunities as the Hellgate jet boat

excursion, a vineyard dinner buffet, as well a golf tournament. UVLA members

and guests were also invited to tour designated sawmills in the area. n

To learn more about this organization, visit www.uvla.net.

Portland Hosts

NAWLA's

Regional Meeting

Additional Photos on page 16

PRSRT STD

U.S. POSTAGE PAID

COLUMBIA MO

PERMIT NO. 353

Change Service Requested

The Softwood Forest Products Buyer

P.O. Box 34908

Memphis, TN 38184-0908

Photos By Zach Miller

Portland, OR–The Multnomah

Athletic Club, situated here, recently

welcomed members of the North

American Wholesale Lumber Association

(NAWLA) for a regional

meeting.

The evening's schedule included

an education session that focused

on "Preparing for the Future."

NAWLA members and guests

Rose Braden, Softwood Export Council,

Portland, OR; and Bill Price, All Star Forest

Products Inc., Jackson, MS

heard insights to the future from two perspectives. Joe Riner, Sales Director –

Forest Products at Union Pacific discussed updates to the UP network and capital

investments in the PNW. To follow, Kevin Otzenberger and Steve Mignardi

from Daimler Truck North America outlined the company’s broad effort to roll

out and support zero-emissions commercial trucks in the field, and provide an

outlook on autonomous driving for commercial applications.

Additional Photos on page 20

Continued on page 40


Brandon Marshburn is a lumber trader with Idaho

Timber, located in Henderson, NC. His division produces

Spruce-Pine-Fir dimension and studs for customers in

North Carolina and area states to the north and west.

Idaho Timber is a Softwood lumber producer operating

sawmills and value-added manufacturing facilities across

the U.S. The company has an annual dayshift production

capacity over 800 million board feet annually of Douglas

Fir, Hem-Fir, Southern Yellow Pine, Spruce-Pine-Fir and

Premium European Spruce in dimension and studs – together

with Ponderosa Pine, Southern Yellow Pine – and

Brandon Marshburn

Cedar boards and pattern stock, plus Cedar Split Rail Fencing.

Continued on page 30

Ryan Satterfield is the Pine sales manager, who oversees

production and sales of the Eastern White Pine for

Cersosimo Lumber Co., Inc., located in Brattleboro, VT.

Cersosimo Lumber Co. is a sawmill that produces 25

million board feet of Eastern White Pine as well as about

20 million board feet of New England hardwood species.

The company carries kiln-dried (KD) Eastern White Pine

lumber in 1 inch through 16/4 in all grades and KD Standard

and Better Cabin timbers. In addition to Cersosimo

Ryan Satterfield lumber products, they have a custom kiln-drying facility

located in Hardwick, MA.

Cersosimo Lumber is a member of Hardwood Manufacturers Association,

National Hardwood Lumber Association, North American Wholesale Lumber

Who’s Who in Softwoods

Continued on page 51

2021 APA Safety And Health Award

Winners Announced

Program Honors Manufacturers’ Dedication to

Workplace Safety and Operational Excellence

APA – The Engineered Wood Association

has announced the winners

of its 2021 Safety and Health Awards.

The APA Safety and Health Awards

Program is the premier safety award

program for the engineered wood

products industry in North America. It

encourages and recognizes operational

excellence with the goal of reducing

injury and illness rates.

Resolute Engineered Wood and West Fraser won Safest Company Awards in

their respective categories, while the coveted Innovation in Safety Award went

to two winners: Tolko Industries Ltd. of Athabasca, Alberta, for the Equipment-

Based Innovation Award, and Tolko Industries Ltd. of Armstrong, British Columbia,

for the Jeff Wagner Process-Based Innovation Award.

“We are proud of our members’ commitment to developing systems and processes

that improve worker safety,” said APA President Mark Tibbetts. “People

are the foundation of our industry, and we support making workplaces as safe as

possible.”

Continued on page 36

Long Term Global Timber

Supply Decline Signals

Opportunity For U.S. Suppliers

By Rose Braden

President, Softwood Export Council

(www.softwood.org)

Those of us whose livelihoods depend on international markets have experienced

a couple of challenging years as most U.S. suppliers focused on supplying

the domestic market and record high U.S. Softwood lumber prices placed U.S.

Softwood lumber out of reach for many international buyers. However, as prices

continue to soften in response to lower domestic demand, exports of U.S. Softwood

lumber have rebounded. From 2020 to 2021, U.S. Softwood lumber export

volume increased 31% and export revenue increased 56%. Total 2021 Softwood

lumber exports exceeded $1 billion. While lower prices have clearly been the

central reason to this rebound, the U.S. is poised to continue to increase its global

Jared Plucknett leads the implementation team at DMSi

Software and was recently promoted to Vice President of

Customer Service. Before being promoted, he worked as

Director of Implementations for 10 years, having been with

the company for 12.

DMSi Software, based in Omaha, NE, sells computer software

to manage lumber and building materials businesses in

real time, with integrated solutions for sales, accounting operations,

and inventory management. The company flagship

software, Agility ERP, helps businesses run more efficiently Jared Plucknett

and profitably.

With a reputation for unparalleled customer service, Plucknett’s implementa-

Continued on page 51

Terry Haddix is the Operations Manager at Patrick

Lumber Company, a role responsible for projects, systems

analysis, documentation, and training. She works closely

with PLC management to develop strategies to meet the

long-term goals of the company and is involved in varying

degrees in almost all aspects of the company.

Terry began her career in the lumber industry in 1990,

as a receptionist at Stimson Lumber’s downtown Portland

sales office. She was later promoted to Trader Assistant,

supporting the entire (albeit small at the time) sales floor. Terry Haddix

Later, after spending nearly 12 years at Oregon Canadian

Forest Products she joined Patrick Lumber Co. in 2011 as a Trader Assistant,

where she served as business manager for three traders as well as being involved

Continued on page 53

ADDRESSING OUR COUNTRY’S

HOUSING CRISIS HUMANELY

By: Jackson Morrill

President & CEO of the American Wood Council

America’s housing stock is failing to keep up with the

needs of the present. According to the National Low Income

Housing Coalition, the U.S. has a shortage of 7 million

Jackson Morrill

affordable and available rental homes for extremely lowincome

renters. New multi-family units are renting at prices cost-prohibitive for

middle- and low-income renters. Nearly two-thirds of renters across the U.S. say

they can’t afford to buy a home, and saving for a down payment is out of reach

when home prices are rising at twice the rate of wage growth. These challenges,

along with a two year-long pandemic, have only intensified America’s housing

problems.

Over the last century, affordable housing projects have largely taken the form of

hulking, cookie-cutter, concrete and steel structures that distance residents from

both each other and the natural world. Many architects, contractors and builders

have begun to challenge these affordable housing norms by pursuing new design

elements that provide for a much healthier living space meant to invoke a sense

of connection to nature. Known as biophilic design, the most in-demand modern

housing today connects the occupants to nature even in the most urban of settings.

In fact, there is an emerging body of science that is finding that natural building

products like wood can have significant mental and physical health benefits for

inhabitants.

Continued on page 54

market share over the long term for a variety of reasons. Many of these reasons

come down to a rising global shortage of legally harvested and sustainably managed

timber – factors where the U.S. excels.

For years mills have debated what to do with the excess supply of lumber in

the U.S. South, where timber growth is twice the rate of removals. As companies

established mills in the south to take advantage of the ample supply, they knew

they needed to develop new international markets to consume the production.

COVID-19 and the related housing and repair and remodeling boom provided

a solution, albeit temporary. Contrary to the gloom-and-doom predictions, the

market surged beyond anyone’s wildest predictions. However, rising interest

rates and inflation have pushed affordability out of reach for many homebuyers

and remodelers and U.S. suppliers now find themselves both competitive in and

finding international markets necessary.

International buyers who have discovered the benefits of U.S. species are

pleased that U.S. product is more readily available and affordable. For example,

exports to Mexico, where manufacturers prefer U.S. heat treated species and

American suppliers enjoy more favorable rail prices compared to ocean freight

rates from South America, U.S. exports increased from $127 million to $272

Continued on page 52

Table of Contents

FEATURES

ILP 38th Annual Golf Event..... 1

UVLA Annual Event................. 1

NAWLA Portland Regional

Meeting.................................. 1

Atlanta Hardwood Corp.......... 4

NELMA, Video Grade Tools.... 5

Holt & Bugbee.......................... 6

WRCLA, Upselling Cedar........ 7

Potlatch Deltic/Stimson

Reception.............................. 8

MLMA Event............................. 9

Zip-O-Log, Logs To Lumber.10

IFG Saw Blade Invitational... 11

DEPARTMENTS

Who's Who in Softwoods....... 2

AWC News................................ 2

SEC News................................. 2

APA News................................. 2

SLB News................................. 3

Washington Scene................ 30

Retail Review......................... 34

Northeast Bus. Trends.......... 42

Inland West Bus. Trends....... 44

Midwest Bus. Trends............... 46

West Coast Bus. Trends......... 48

Southeast Bus.Trends.............49

Ont./Quebec Bus. Trends..... 50

Softwood Stock

Exchange.......................56-59

Trade Talk............................... 60

Softwood Calendar................ 65

Classified Opportunities....... 66

Index of Advertisers.............. 66

A Bi-Monthly newspaper serving

North America’s Softwood Forest Products Buyers

Published by

Softwood Trade Publications, Inc.

P. O. Box 34908

Memphis, Tenn. 38134

Tel. (901) 372-8280 FAX (901) 373-6180

Web Site: www.softwoodbuyer.com

E-Mail Addresses:

Advertising: apryll@millerwoodtradepub.com

Editorial: editor@millerwoodtradepub.com

Subscriptions: circ@millerwoodtradepub.com

Terry Miller - President/Publisher

Zachary Miller - Sales Representative

Paul J. Miller Jr. - Vice President

Apryll Cosby - Advertising Manager

Sue Putnam - Editorial Director

Matthew Fite - Staff Writer

Tina Dial - Graphic Artist

Rachael Stokes - Production/Graphic Artist

Lisa Carpenter - Circulation Manager

Canadian Correspondents: Toronto, Ontario, Vancouver,

B.C.

The Softwood Forest Products Buyer is the product

of a company and its affiliates that have been in the

publishing business for over 94 years.

Other publications edited for specialized markets and

distributed worldwide include:

National Hardwood Magazine • Hardwood Purchasing

Handbook • Import/Export Wood Purchasing News

• North American Forest Products Export Directory

• Imported Wood Purchasing Guide • Green Book’s

Hardwood Marketing Directory • Green Book’s Softwood

Marketing Directory

Subscriptions: U.S. and Canada: $65 (U.S. dollars)

- 1 year; $75 - 2 years; $90 - 3 years; Foreign (airmail)

$140 - 1 year; $235 - 2 years. Canadian and foreign

orders must be paid by check drawn on U.S. bank or by

wire transfer. Fax for more information.

Send address changes to:

Softwood Forest Products Buyer

P.O. Box 34908, Memphis, TN 38184-0908

The Publisher reserves the right to

accept or reject editorial content and

Advertisements at the staff’s discretion.

New Research Highlights How Mass Timber

Schools Benefit Students And Staff

New report explores how mass timber schools could boost well-being, cut

carbon, and remain flexible without breaking the bank.

How can we build schools that are adaptable, while supporting

student well-being and learning? What role can

biophilic design and mass timber play? And how do we cut

carbon, while delivering better schools faster, without breaking

the bank?

Those are the questions the integrated design firm, Mithun,

set out to explore in their report, Mass Timber Schools:

Building for Wellness, in collaboration with a team of experts.

As expertise and experience in mass timber continues to

flourish across the country, an increasing number of designers

are looking at how mass timber and biophilic design

could help optimize learning environments. And according to

the report, there is a growing body of research that associates

biophilic spaces with student health and cognitive benefits.

Combine that with advancements in mass timber technology,

and you have a winning combo that can contribute to build-

ing better schools, faster.

To further investigate the feasibility of mass timber schools,

the team took an iterative approach driven by an optimized

three-ply mass timber structural grid and sectional framework

that balances efficient timber fiber volumes with the need for

agile spaces. The report’s results demonstrate that mass timber

spaces can be cost competitive for schools when compared to

a steel-framed baseline—providing warm, well-daylit interiors

with exposed mass timber columns, beams, ceilings, and walls

that can evoke biophilic responses while significantly reducing

embodied carbon impacts.

Continued on page 36

Page 2 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 3


AHC Seeks Program Partnerships With New Niche

Headquartered just outside Atlanta in Mableton, GA,

Atlanta Hardwood Corporation purchases 65 percent

green lumber and 35 percent kiln-dried lumber. The

company maintains about 16 million board feet of

inventory. Pictured is an aeriel view of AHC’s Clarksville,

TN facility.

Mableton, GA–Atlanta Hardwood Corporation (AHC) is headquartered here,

just outside of Atlanta. Founded in 1952 as Howard Lumber & Kilns by James W.

Howard, Sr., the company has evolved over the years, by introducing industryleading

technology and production techniques to address the needs of the everchanging

manufacturing and construction markets.

With decades of success in the hardwood forest products industry, AHC has

recently entered the Softwood side of the industry, bringing with them a thriving

niche market. The company inventories approximately 16 million board feet.

Three million of which, President Hal Mitchell said, is Softwoods including Yellow

Pine and White Pine. “Historically, we have always processed hardwoods,"

he explained. "Many of our hardwood sawmill partners are now manufacturing

Softwoods which has provided us

an opportunity to kiln-dry Pine

and process it through our moulding

plants into boards or profiled

mouldings to service millwork

distributors in new market sectors.”

He continued, “We saw an

opportunity to develop custom

millwork as an available resource.

When we noticed our sawmill

base was basically being forced

to cut a percentage of Softwoods,

we recognized there was an

opportunity for us to develop

manufacturing procedures to get

the Softwoods processed and

dried correctly. The result of which would provide a new market in the residential

sector. For us it was a real opportunity because few companies can offer these

products on a commercial scale.”

Explaining the process, Mitchell offered, “Starting with green lumber, we

can dry and remanufacture boards into pattern stock from virtually any species

including several Softwoods: White Pine, Southern Yellow Pine, Aromatic Cedar,

and Cypress, along with our traditional hardwood product lines. We are handling

strictly those four species in Softwoods. We can process the upper grades as

well as No. 2 common, and we dry it a little bit differently. Most large Yellow

Pine mills will dry for construction moisture content. By utilizing our hardwood

kilns, we can fully set the sap and produce a finished product that is excellent for

interior use with an 8 to 10 percent moisture content. That is our new niche in the

market, and it's a different approach to the Softwood markets.”

With 175 sawmill partners overall, Mitchell said about 20 of these are Softwood

supplier sawmills. “For us, it was a way to help our sawmills merchandise

their production. They were often new to cutting Yellow and White Pine, so it

was a way for us to help in supply chain management. Most of the Softwood

that we are processing is being machined into paneling products, mouldings, and

trim. They can now merchandise the higher grades to

us for the millwork industry and can continue to sell

their low grades to their treaters or construction-based

manufacturing” he explained.

With AHC’s tripling of their production capacity

with the addition of a new millwork facility in

Clarksville, TN and upgrades at the Cleveland, GA

plant, AHC is actively seeking partnerships for valueadded

markets. Mitchell explained, “We’re making

ourselves available and seeking supply partners that

have boots on the ground and active sales forces in

the wholesale distribution industry that can go out and

market these products. We are looking for long-term

partnerships with stocking distributors that can take

Atlanta Hardwood Corporation's (AHC) White County

Mouldings facility (pictured) in Cleveland, GA is now

fully rebuilt and operational since the 2020 fire from the

green drying yard to the moulding plant.

Grooved Yellow Pine is now offered by AHC in

custom sizes and HT stamped.

ber, including some import species. Mitchell noted the success of AHC’s White

County Moulding facility provided the groundwork that led to the value-added

expansion at Clarksville. “We had a massive fire in October of 2020 at our moulding

plant in Cleveland, GA. We had just begun installation on the new moulding

facility in Clarksville, TN, with a five-year anticipated build out. We were able

to fast track the TN facility while rebuilding our GA plant to have both facilities

become fully operational within a year. We designed the plants to process

both random width and dimensional lumber for both Softwood and hardwoods.

Our moulders are unique in that they are high-speed, 8-head machines. We can

efficiently process the Softwood products and dimensional hardwood products

through our equipment. We also installed WoodEye scanners and Eagle rip and

chop systems so that we can scan for defects, optimize yields, and provide cut-tolength

component parts for large scale production.”

According to Mitchell, “Today our north Georgia facility has a smaller footprint,

but has successfully incorporated a lean manufacturing culture. The equipment

is more automated which allows

us to reduce our labor and increase

volume. It was a win so we duplicated

the process at our plant in Clarksville.

Historically, we produced architectural

mouldings and S4S profiles. With the

new WoodEye scanning defect lines,

we can supply finished component

parts in blank or moulding form.

Whether we are chopping the blanks

to precision length prior to moulding

or after moulding, we have the

capability to do both functions at any

of our reman facilities.

“Our mission,” Mitchell stated, “is

to become a world-class, value-added

manufacturer of lumber and mouldings.

We are developing a LEAN

culture and servant leadership where

our management group supports our

employees to become more actively

engaged, giving them ownership in

Pictured is a state-of-the-art scanning defect line at

AHC.

"Historically, we have

always processed

hardwoods. Many of our

hardwood sawmill partners

are now manufacturing

Softwoods which has

provided us an opportunity

to kiln-dry Pine and

process it through our

moulding plants into boards

or profiled mouldings

to service millwork

distributors in new market

sectors.”

– Hal Mitchell, President,

Atlanta Hardwood Corporation

their daily production. Whether the plant is winning or losing on a particular day,

we want everyone to understand that we are part of a team, working toward the

same goals. Our focus is controlling the process from the green mill all the way

through to the stocking distributor level. Our regional distributors have the sales

teams and logistics tools to service local customers. We supply them with both a

competitive cost and production efficiency savings for an array of value-added

wood products or kiln-dried lumber to service their customer base.”

Repeat business has driven AHC’s long-term success. Mitchell said, “Our

investments are driven by our customers’ requests to help resolve some of their

labor and supply challenges. We’re striving to meet

their needs. We can often optimize the raw material

and provide a natural, lower-cost solution for

them than as compared to what they could produce

in-house. We serve millwork manufacturers, OEMs,

and two-step distributors that sell to retail outlets. We

focus on our customers' needs to supply them with

value-added alternatives to help solve their production

and personnel constraints.”

At White County Mouldings, Mitchell said the

operation leans heavily to high grade lumber from a

secondary manufacturing standpoint. “Everything that

goes through the production plant is typically No. 1

common and better, 4/4 through 8/4 thicknesses,” he

these products to market.”

explained.

This is one of AHC’s 12” joinable, high-speed moulders.

As for the new millwork facility in Clarksville,

Mitchell continued, “Our hardwood domestic species

mix is heavy poplar, red oak, hard and soft maple,

Mitchell said, “We purchased the Clarksville, TN

facility which was previously the Averitt Lumber Company in 2008. Initially, ash, cherry, and walnut. We are direct importers of a variety of exotic and tropical

we ran the plant as a hardwood concentration yard catering to the export market, species, such as red grandis and sapele. Whatever fits our customers’ needs, we

supplying poplar, red and white oak, and ash. Over the years, our vision has can leverage our supply partners to provide consistent program-style business.

evolved toward more value-added markets. Further vertical integration helps us We’re collaborative partners with our vendors and our customers, and rely heavily

control the supply chain and quality from green lumber all the way through to the on feedback from both. Our objective is to help them manage their businesses

finished products.”

more effectively.”

Today, AHC purchases 65 percent green lumber and 35 percent kiln-dried lum- Continued on page 64

NELMA Offers Comprehensive Video Grade Tools For SPFs

And Eastern White Pine

If you’ve ever had a customer ask to see SPFs lumber

with their own eyes before purchasing it, what do you do?

Share a brochure with photos, or maybe pull something up

on your phone? Walk out to the lumberyard and see what

you can find? While these options get the job done, there’s

another way to showcase the visual strength and beauty of

SPFs lumber, courtesy of the Northeastern Lumber Manufacturers

Association (NELMA): the new Video Guide to

Four Grades of SPFs.

Developed by NELMA as a companion piece to the

existing Eastern White Pine grades video, the addition of

this new and different educational tool results in NELMA

being able to offer a full visual catalog of almost all of the

lumber manufactured by the members of the Association.

According to Jeff Easterling, NELMA president, “Our

informational package for retailers and their customers

in now complete! Visual representations of most of the

grades and species of lumber produced by NELMA

members is now available in an easy-to-understand format.

These video species representations are the perfect tools

for selling SPFs and Eastern White

Pine both domestically and internationally.”

The Video Guide to Four Grades

of SPFs is nine minutes long and

spotlights video representations of

SPFs 2x4 lumber. Full explanations

of what customers can expect within

each grade – as opposed to one

or two poorly illustrated examples

– allow the video to offer real-life,

accurate representations within the

major SPFs grades.

How does it work? The video is

presented from a bird’s-eye view

– or really, a lumber grader’s view.

Real pieces of finished lumber

move down a visual conveyor belt,

and, as each board passes slowly

on screen, digital callouts appear to

indicate grading elements important

within each of the boards.

The video includes all defining

characteristics within each grade

in order to share and represent the

entire story of each board. Each

of the grading characteristics are

explained and visually marked to

allow for a complete informational

connection.

Not sure of what you just saw? The

video may be stopped and replayed

as you like, allowing each viewer

to consume the information at the

speed and level with which they are

most comfortable.

How can this video help your

customers?

In many ways. Let’s talk about customer

product knowledge: with the

easy mimicking on video of what

your customers will find in a unit of

lumber, the result is a clear picture

of (literally) the whole package.

The information contained in both

the SPFs and Eastern White Pine

videos ensure that, after viewing,

both you and your customers will

have learned by seeing about each

of the various characteristics that

make up certain grades.

How about reduced callbacks?

While of course we can’t guarantee

this, it’s a strong possibility. If

you’ve ever had someone purchase

lumber from you, only to return

it because it doesn’t look right or

it’s not what they were expecting

– well, these videos allow you to

educate them and then actually

Continued on page 51

Page 4 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 5


Quality Softwood And Hardwood Lumber, Millwork

And Moulding At Holt and Bugbee Company

By Michelle Keller

Upselling Cedar: Don’t Sell

The Product, Sell The Value.

Holt and Bugbee purchases approximately 25M board feet in

Softwoods and hardwoods annually including: Pine, Douglas

Fir, Cypress, Western Red Cedar, Alaskan Yellow Cedar,

poplar, red and white oak, hard and soft maple, walnut, hickory,

alder, ash, basswood, birch, and cherry. Holt and Bugbee also

purchases some imports. Pictured above are (from left): Mike

Pierce, William Collins, Roger Pierce, Ben Pierce, Phil Pierce,

Sean Herlihy, and James Herlihy.

At just one of its four locations, the facility

operates a kiln capacity of 450,000 board feed

running eight kilns, a stacker, grading line, planing

line, two rip saws, three moulders, a wood waste

system, seven lift trucks and four distribution

trucks to produce lumber.

The variety of equipment manufacturers utilized by Holt

and Bugbee include Weinig moulders, Mereen-Johnson

rip saws, Yates American planers, Irvington Moore and

American Wood Dryers and SII Dry Kilns.

Photos By

Alexis Ann Photography

Tewksbury, MA– Holt and Bugbee

Company, headquartered here,

is a distributor of Softwood and

hardwood lumber, flooring, custom

mouldings, and millwork. The company

purchases approximately 25M

board feet annually in Pine, Douglas

Fir, Cypress, Western Red Cedar,

Alaskan Yellow Cedar, poplar, red

and white oak, hard and soft maple,

walnut, sapele, red grandis, hickory,

alder, ash, basswood, birch, cherry,

Euro beech, jatoba, African mahogany,

teak and ipe (kiln-dried, S4S,

Dressed, 4/4 through 12/4).

“We buy species mostly

based on demand, but

we really focus on high

grades with good lengths

and widths in all our

products. If you buy

from us, you’re going to

get the highest quality

product. We have a

reputation for quality

lumber and serving our

customers with attention

to their needs. Our

custom mouldings, wide

and long plank flooring,

and smaller precise

orders are our bread and

butter.”

–Ben Pierce,

Head of Marketing,

Holt and Bugbee Company

With a history of success dating

back to 1825, Holt and Bugbee has

withstood many storms, including

the COVID pandemic. “When the

pandemic began, it was a really

difficult time for everyone. Obviously

because of lockdowns it was

extremely difficult to do business,”

Head of Marketing, Ben Pierce ex-

The ultimate goal for most Softwood retailers

is, of course, to sell their product. But

that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s their main

mission. The Western Red Cedar Lumber

Association (WRCLA) has long supported

their member retailers in what’s commonly

known as value-based selling (also referred

to as value-added selling) — the process of

taking a consultative approach to sales and

conveying the value of a product or service

along the way.

The goal with a value-based selling approach

is to put the needs of the customer

first: they are guided through the sales

process to make an informed decision to

best suit their needs; with the ideal outcome

of having your product be the solution that

best meets those needs. With the

WRCLA, their sales process begins

with an advertising and communications

program that informs

consumers, distributors and retailers

not only about the benefits of

Western Red Cedar, but about the

value the products have as an appearance

product.

The look of Western Red Cedar

is a major reason for choosing it,”

noted Brad Kirkbride, Managing

Director of the WRCLA. “But

when you start to add in the value

the products offer in terms of what

they do for the environment, or the

incredible versatility and range of

finishing options you have, then

you start to build a competitive but

highly positive narrative around

your product in the mind of the

consumer.”

Consistency of messaging has

been an important part of the

communications program, and the

WRCLA works to maintain this

the entire way through the sales

funnel, beginning with the advertising

through to the retail level.

“Highlighting Real Cedar’s role in

carbon capture and as an environmentally

friendly building product

is important,” continued Kirkbride,

“but we’ve also found that consumers

are very responsive to the

sheer range of options they have to

enhance the beauty of the wood and

design the exact finished look they

want. These are two major benefits

that composite substitute products

really can’t match, and add tremendous

value to the product.”

Western Red Cedar’s versatility

in finishing options has shown

to be such an impactful topic that

the WRCLA has also made it the

subject of a recently launched

continuing education unit course

(CEU) with the American Institute

of Architects. “Architects are a very

influential group,” noted Kirkbride,

“and educating them on the benefits

and value of the species is particularly

important in getting that mes-

Architect Webster Wilson clad this home in a

beautiful knotty grade of Western Red Cedar

finished with a semi-solid stain.

Western Red Cedar siding can be finished to complement all styles of

buildings from modern to traditional to rustic.

Additional Photos on page 38

Continued on page 53

Page 6 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 7


PotlatchDeltic/Stimson Lumber Co-Host Annual Reception

Photos By Terry Miller

More Than 600 Gather At MLMA Event

Photos By Paul Miller Jr.

Walt Woliver, Retired, Spokane, WA; and

Ashlee Cribb, Mike Flynn and Joe Angelo, PotlatchDeltic

Corporation, Spokane, WA

(seated from left) Jill Angelo,

PotlatchDeltic Corporation,

Spokane, WA;

Eddie Anzo and Jess

Anzo, Sapphire Lumber

Company, Hamilton, MT;

and (standing from left)

Jennifer Smelko and Matt

Kelly, PotlatchDeltic Corporation

Joe Angelo and Bob Mai, PotlatchDeltic Corporation,

Spokane, WA; Mark Dutton, Viking Forest

Products LLC, Minneapolis, MN; and Bill Nocerino,

PotlatchDeltic Corporation

Deb Hankins, Hankins Lumber Company,

Grenada, MS; and Larry and Paulette

Barrett, Vicksburg Forest Products LLC,

Vicksburg, MS

Mike Morris, SmartMill USA, Lèvis, QC; Eli Hodges, United Lumber

& Remanufacturing LLC, Muscle Shoals, AL; Will Brooks, SmartMill

USA, Birmingham, AL; and Tim DeMorse, United Lumber & Remanufacturing

LLC

Greg Langford, Mason Forest Products Inc.,

Ruston, LA; Chad Smith, USNR, Hot Springs,

AR; and Tracey Mitchell, USNR, Perry, GA

Reid and Elaine Schooler, Leianne and Carter

Stinton, Hampton Lumber, Portland, OR

Gunnar Brinck, Disdero

Lumber Co., Clackamas,

OR; Bob Hoyt,

Humax Lumber Inc.,

Canby, OR; Bob Mai,

PotlatchDeltic Corporation,

Spokane, WA; and

Paul Waldon, Wildwood

Trading Group/Vaagen

Bros. Lumber Inc., Boise,

ID

Jake Kimball and Bo Maiuri, Spokane

Forest Products, Spokane, WA; Sean

Coughlin, Utah Lumber Company, Ogden,

UT; Derek Dryden, PotlatchDeltic

Corporation, Spokane, WA; and Dave

Whitlow, Cook County Lumber Co.,

Chicago, IL

Ty Shumate, Ryan Noble, UFP Industries

Inc., Windsor, CO; Bill Schlottman,

Biewer Sawmill Winona Inc.,

Winona, MS; Lauren Bradley and Kyle

Howe, Biewer Lumber LLC, St. Clair,

MI; and Jeff Tant, Carlson Forest Products

LLC, Panama City Beach, FL

Marcus Trisdale, John Rhea and Chris Cournyer,

MiCROTEC, Corvallis, OR

Curtis Bebek, Owen Lusztig and Mikal Jacquard,

Boscus Canada Inc., Vancouver, BC; and Gabriel

Zeiger, Cook County Lumber Co., Chicago, IL

Coeur d’Alene, ID–Taphouse

Unchained was the local site for

the recent cocktail reception that

PotlatchDeltic and Stimson Lumber

Company co-host annually.

Each year this reception is held in

conjunction with the annual Inland

Lumber Producers golf event.

According to the company’s

website, PotlatchDeltic is a leading

timberland owner and a top 10 manufacturer

of lumber in the United

States. The company has a long

legacy of excellence in timberland

management and wood products

manufacturing with operations in

six states. PotlatchDeltic is committed

to being a responsible corporate

citizen and manages its timberlands

for future generations to come.

PotlatchDeltic, a Real Estate Investment

Trust, owns approximately

1.8 million acres of timberland in

Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Louisiana

and Mississippi and operates

seven manufacturing facilities that

produce lumber and plywood, according

to the company's website.

Learn more at

www.potlatchdeltic.com.

Today, Stimson Lumber Company

stretches across Oregon,

Idaho and Montana. The company

employs more than 650 people;

operates seven mills in Oregon and

Idaho; and owns and sustainably

manages over 500,000 acres of

forest land in the western United

States. Stimson Lumber is proud to

be active partners in the communities

where employees live and do

business, according to the company’s

website. n

Learn more at

www.stimsonlumber.com.

Biloxi, MS–More than 650

members, guests and exhibitors

were in attendance at the recent

2022 Mississippi Lumber

Manufacturers Association

(MLMA) Convention and Trade

Show, held here at Beau Rivage

Resort and Casino.

Approximately 65 exhibitors had

booths set up to display products

and discuss their services.

MLMA reported that there

were 25 sawmill members from

Mississippi represented at the

convention, as well as 185 industryrelated

companies.

MLMA's president's cocktail

reception kicked off the event,

followed by multiple networking

events for attendees over a twoday

period, including a golf game,

fishing tournament and silent

auction.

The 2023 MLMA Convention is

scheduled for June 22-25, also at

Beau Rivage Resort and Casino in

Biloxi. n

Learn more at www.

mlmalumber.com.

Ken Trainor and Belinda Remley, Arxada

LLC, Atlanta, GA

Additional Photos on page 54

Additional Photos on page 22

Page 8 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 9


Zip-O-Log Hosts PWLA Members

By Zach Miller

IFG/Alta Welcome Guests to 8th Saw Blade

Tournament

Photos By Terry Miller

Forrest Clark, Prime Cut Custom Remanufacturing,

Springfield, OR; Levi Kintz, Daniel Gerton, Pelican Bay

Forest Products, Bend, OR; Cory Arius, Prime Forest

Products LLC, Springfield, OR; Terry Haddix, Patrick

Lumber Company, Portland, OR; and KelCee Hallstrom,

Zip-O-Log Mills Inc., Eugene, OR

Nick Lake, Zip-O-Log Mills Inc., Eugene, OR; Francisco

Chavez, Jesus Romero, Marcella Rocha and Jeremiah

Abbas, Prime Cut Custom Remanufacturing, Springfield,

OR

KayCee Hallstrom, Zip-O-Log Mills Inc., Eugene, OR;

Brooke Davison and Shelley Mentzer, Prime Forest

Products LLC, Beaverton, OR; Matt Schmidt, Prime Cut

Custom Remanufacturing, Springfield, OR; and Patrick

Charley and Cedrex Charley, Prime Forest Products LLC

Tyler Rockwell, Wildwood Trading Group, Portland, OR;

Courtney Chesney, Wildwood Trading Group, Tualatin,

OR; Jessica Kennedy, Prime Forest Products LLC,

Springfield, OR; Melissa Bunde, Wildwood Trading

Group, Tualatin, OR; and Nate Lively, Zip-O-Log Mills Inc.,

Eugene, OR

Dan Ettelstein, Northwest Specialty

Timber Inc., Sherwood, OR; Jessica

Stanley, Oregon Wood Specialties,

Portland, OR; Joe Honochick, Zip-

O-Log Mills Inc., Eugene, OR; Connor

Brink, Cameron Chatwood and

Joey Cochineur, Disdero Lumber Co.,

Clackamas, OR; and Mike Foster, AltruWood

Inc., Portland, OR

Eugene, OR–''Recently, the Portland

Wholesale Lumber Association

(PWLA) held a “Logs to Lumber”

meeting for members at Zip-O-Log's

mill here.

PWLA members divided into

separate groups and were guided

through both the sawmill and the

lam plant where they were able to

get insight from their respective

group leaders into the log breakdown

process of lumber and other

products.

Zip-O-Log's group leaders included

Nick Lake, Nate Lively, KayCee

Hallstrom, KelCee Hallstrom, and

Joe Honochick.

Zip-O-Log Mills Inc. has been a

leading provider of quality Douglas

Fir products for more than 75 years.

It is a long length cutting sawmill

with the capacity to produce up

to 52' in length, according to the

company's website. Because their

products are produced for exposed

structure applications, Zip-O-Log

specializes in No. 1 & Better, free

of heart center timbers. Zip-O-Log

also produces boxed heart timbers.

Anti-stain and application of a

clear wax base end seal is applied to

all rough products and they offer anti-stain

treatment on surfaced products

as well (all surfaced timbers are

end sealed). Other available options

to protect products during handling

and shipping are paper wrapping,

bottom boards, and stickers with

lath or kiln stickers on every layer

if the customer requires. Zip-O-Log

ships by rail or truck. n

To learn more about PWLA,

visit www.portlandwholesalelumberassociation.org.

For details about

Zip-O-Log Mills Inc.,

visit www.zipolog.com.

(Standing from left) Ken Koenig, Idaho Forest Group

LLC, Coeur d’Alene, ID; and Roger Fossett, Boise

Cascade Company, Boise, ID; and (seated from left)

Glenn Fischer, Boise Cascade Company, Salt Lake

City, UT; and Erol Deren, Idaho Forest Group LLC

Coeur d'Alene, ID–The Saw

Blade Invitational Golf Scramble,

held by Idaho Forest Group (IFG)

and Alta Forest Products, and held

at the Coeur d'Alene Resort, marked

its 8th year recently.

IFG is a growing familyowned

company, operating seven

sawmills and a finger-joint facility

in North Idaho and, most recently,

Lumberton, MS, that built a new

Southern Yellow Pine mill. The

company is now one of America's

largest lumber producers, with

capacity well over 1 billion board

feet per year and markets around the

globe.

Alta Forest Products,

headquartered in Chehalis, WA,

offers multiple lines of fencing

products, from Western Red

Cedar to pre-stained Whitewood

and Premium Treated products,

according to the company's

website, and is the largest wood

fence manufacturer in the world.

Alta manufactures over 15,000

truckloads of wood fencing each

year in the U.S. with a dedicated

team of more than 500 employees

across the Pacific Northwest. n

Learm more about the host

companies by visiting

www.ifg.com and

www.altafp.com.

Mason Granger, Idaho Forest Group,

Coeur d'Alene, ID; and Dave Cochenour,

Alta Forest Products, Chehalis,

WA

Additional Photos on page 28

Dave Cochenour, Alta Forest Products, Chehalis, WA; Joe Currier, Dakota Fence,

Fargo, ND; Joe La Berge, Collins Pine, Wilsonville, OR; Michael Avery, Universal

Forest Products LLC, Orlando, FL; and Derren Bennett and Ryan Kemp, UFP

Industries Inc., Grand Rapids, MI

(Standing from left) Phil Shumock,

Stella-Jones Corp., Tacoma, WA; Ryan

Tranter, Capital Lumber Company, Boise,

ID; Matt Wittschiebe, Stella-Jones

Corp. and (seated) Mike Kruse, Builders

FirstSource, Boise, ID

Page 10 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 11


ILP GOLF EVENT PHOTOS Continued from page 1

Ron Liebelt, TransPak Inc., Ridgefield, WA; Kellye

Miller, The Softwood Forest Products Buyer, Memphis,

TN; and Keith Seal, Taiga/Exterior Wood Inc.,

Washougal, WA

Cam Stevens, Patrick Lumber Company, Portland,

OR; Larry Schmedding, Empire Lumber Company,

Spokane, WA; and Amy and Jon Montague, General

Building Materials Inc., Denver, CO

Jennifer Smelko, Matthew Kelly and Ashlee Cribb, PotlatchDeltic

Corporation, Spokane, WA; Brett Mildenberger,

Fox Lumber Sales Inc., Hamilton, MT; and Walt

Woliver, PotlatchDeltic Corporation

Garth Williams, Idaho Forest Group LLC, Coeur

d’Alene, ID; Nicole Brunner and Brad Passione, Kenyon

Noble Lumber & Hardware, Bozeman, MT; and

Shawn Cox, OrePac Building Products, Boise, ID

Darrell and Jessica Lee, Fox Lumber Sales

Inc., Hamilton, MT; and Jim Vandegrift, Bennett

Lumber Products Inc., Princeton, ID

Mark Smith and Tanya Jerome, Ziegler Lumber Co.,

Spokane, WA; and Elaine and Reid Schooler, Hampton

Lumber, Portland, OR

Bob Mai, PotlatchDeltic Corporation, Spokane, WA; Addison

Stapleton, Bitterroot Valley Forest Products LLC,

Missoula, MT; Kellye Miller, The Softwood Forest Products

Buyer, Memphis, TN; and Scott Elston, Forest City Trading

Group LLC, Portland, OR

Brett and Michelle Johnson, Dakeryn Industries Ltd.,

North Vancouver, BC; and Jennifer and James Mortimer,

Idaho Forest Group LLC, Coeur d’Alene, ID

Ryan Kemp, UFP Industries Inc., Grand Rapids, MI;

Joe La Berge, Collins Pine, Portland, OR; and Kay and

Kevin Lang, Central Forest Products Inc., Canby, OR

Brad Welvaert, International Wood Products LLC, Post Falls, ID; Tom Lund, Western

Timber Products Inc., Coeur d’Alene, ID; and Jen and Josh Hamilton, Jenna and

Aaron Linerud, International Wood Products LLC, Clackamas, OR

Greg Martin, Wildwood Trading Group/Vaagen Bros. Lumber Inc.,

Colville, WA; Roger Fossett, Boise Cascade Company, Boise, ID;

and Alivia Hewitt and Andy Dunham, Idaho Forest Group LLC, Coeur

d’Alene, ID

James Venters, Alta Forest

Products, Chehalis, WA; Pat

Duchien, Bitterroot Valley Forest

Products LLC, Missoula,

MT; Gib Gibor, Alta Forest

Products; Addison Stapleton

and Quinn Chamberlain, Bitterroot

Valley Forest Products

LLC

Kody Miller, Idaho Forest Group LLC, Coeur d’Alene, ID; Ashlee

Cribb, PotlatchDeltic Corporation, Spokane, WA; and Amy and

Tom Hoffmann, Boise Cascade Company, Boise, ID

Matthew and Krystle Cunningham,

Foxworth-Galbraith

Lumber Company, Plano, TX;

Jim Williams, Seaboard International,

Nashua, NH; Erin

Klosterman, Wildwood Trading

Group, Portland, OR; and John

C. Branstetter, Wildwood Trading

Group/Vaagen Bros. Lumber

Inc., Colville, WA

Dave Stokes, Zach Keiser, Ben Ford and Scott Sunday, Idaho

Pacific Lumber Company Inc., Boise, ID

Additional photos on page 14

Page 12 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022


ILP GOLF EVENT PHOTOS Continued from page 12

Doug Bates, Forest Products Distributors Inc., Rapid City, SD; Laura

Ganatos, Thompson River Lumber Co., Thompson Falls, MT; Ron Manzanares,

Blue Ridge Forest Products, Albuquerque, NM; Christy Duchien,

Bitterroot Valley Forest Products LLC, Missoula, MT; and Dan Claridge,

Thompson River Lumber Co.

Bill DenHoed, Sprenger Midwest Wholesale Lumber, Sioux Falls, SD; Rick

Palmiter, BPWood Ltd., Penticton, BC; Kevin Fykstra, Sprenger Midwest

Wholesale Lumber; Boyd Ballard, Idaho Fence & Deck Supply, Meridian, ID;

and Larry Schmedding, Empire Lumber Company, Spokane, WA

Sawyer and Abigail Bardwell, Chandra and Greg

Martin, Wildwood Trading Group/Vaagen Bros.

Lumber Inc., Colville, WA

(Seated from left) Stefan McGuire and Jason Jacobson, Hampton

Lumber, Portland, OR; and Garth Williams, Idaho Forest

Group LLC, Coeur d’Alene, ID; and (standing from left) Chad

Findlay, West Bay Forest Products Ltd., Langley, BC; and Amy

and Jon Montague, General Building Materials Inc., Denver, CO

Tyson Sands, Disdero Lumber Co., Clackamas, OR;

Paul Ericson and Sandy Oitra, Shelton Structures

Inc., Chehalis, WA; and Gunnar Brinck, Disdero Lumber

Co.

Matt Wittschiebe and Phil Schumock, Stella-Jones

Corp., Tacoma, WA; and Nicole and Joe La Berge, Collins

Pine, Portland, OR

Eric Grandeen, Idaho Pacific Lumber Company Inc., Meridian, ID;

Zach Keiser, Dane Waters, Ben Ford and Scott Sunday, Idaho Pacific

Lumber Company Inc., Boise, ID; and Brad Gabriel, Weyerhaeuser,

Denver, CO

The Horse Race winners were: Matt

Beymer, Hampton Lumber, Portland,

OR; and Luke Wenner, Pallet Service

Corporation, Maple Grove, MN

Mike and Isabella Flynn, PotlatchDeltic Corporation,

Spokane, WA; Terry Miller, The Softwood

Forest Products Buyer, Memphis, TN; Addison

Stapleton, Bitterroot Valley Forest Products LLC,

Missoula, MT; and Kellye Miller, The Softwood

Forest Products Buyer

Rick Palmiter, BPWood Ltd., Penticton,

BC; and Shauna and Dylan Tripp, Tripp

Lumber Company Inc., Missoula, MT

(Seated from left) Laura Ganatos, Thompson River

Lumber Co., Thompson Falls, MT; Ron Manzanares,

Blue Ridge Forest Products, Albuquerque, NM; Terri

Dotson, Thompson River Lumber Co.; and Darrell Lee

and Jessica Fox, Fox Lumber Sales Inc., Hamilton, MT;

(Standing from left) Mike Mannex, Hampton Lumber,

Portland, OR; Chuck Dotson, Thompson River Lumber

Co.; and Gail Mannex, Hampton Lumber

Stay in touch and informed @ softwoodbuyer.com

Page 14 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 15


UVLA ANNUAL EVENT PHOTOS Continued from page 1

Travis Wynegar, Steven Sands, Leslie Southwick, Kris Lewis and Lee Greene, C & D Lumber Co.,

Riddle, OR

Jeff Squires, PC Wholesale, North Highlands, CA; J.T. Taylor,

Herbert Lumber Co., Riddle, OR; and Chris Swanson, Swanson

Group Inc., Roseburg, OR

Blake Keitzman, Murphy Company, Eugene, OR; Lauren Pruett, Taiga

Building Products, Rocklin, CA; and Cory Betts, UFP Industries

Inc., Woodburn, OR

Justin Boyer and Tyler Hieb, Buckeye Pacific LLC, Portland, OR; and Raegan

Stratton and Pat Zan, Taiga Building Products, Rocklin, CA

Brandon Crosier, Western Lumber Company, Medford,

OR; and Tyrone Konecny and Greg Winakur,

Utah Lumber Company, Ogden, UT

Lisa Livingston, Douglas County Forest

Products, Roseburg, OR; and Ken

Timmins, American International Forest

Products, Portland, OR

Andrew Barker, White Cap, Cincinnati, OH; and Greg Johnson

and Steve Swanson, Swanson Group Inc., Roseburg, OR

Jared Davis, Brice Absalon and Chris Rice,

Thomas & Sons Distributors, Springfield, OR

Jeff Wiesner, Garrett Mahigan and Emily Dachand, Viking Forest

Products LLC, Minneapolis, MN; and Rex Klopfer, Ganahl

Lumber Company, Anaheim, CA

Kevin Bruce and Ryan Pearson, Western Lumber Company,

Medford, OR; and Matt and April Campbell, Swanson

Group Inc., Roseburg, OR

Leslie Southwick, C & D Lumber

Co., Riddle, OR; and Rob Endres,

LMC, Wayne, PA

Lance Mobley and Bryan Davidson,

Idaho Pacific Lumber Company Inc.,

Wilsonville, OR

Jake Moriniti and Matt Ferguson,

Wildwood Trading Group, Tualatin,

OR

Mark Swinth and Aaron Fleming, Elk Creek Forest Products

LLC, McMinnville, OR; Rob Endres, LMC, Wayne,

PA; and Terry Rasmussen, Elk Creek Forest Products

LLC

Mark Kelly, Jennifer Moran and Brett

Slaughter, Elk Creek Forest Products LLC,

McMinnville, OR

Additional Photos on page 18

Donna Jones, Patrick Lumber Company, Portland, OR; Tim

Brown, Capital Lumber Company, Woodburn, OR; Steven Sands

and Lauren Whitmore, C & D Lumber Co., Riddle, OR; and Jay

McArthur, Capital Lumber Company

Ryan Pearson, Western Lumber Company, Medford, OR;

Greg Baker, Target Lumber Sales Inc., Fontana, CA; and

James Marston, Western Lumber Company

Page 16 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022


UVLA ANNUAL EVENT PHOTOS Continued from page 16

Chrissy Sorensen and Kaylia Gunn, DR

Johnson Lumber Company, Riddle, OR;

and Angela Stewart, Roseburg Forest

Products, Roseburg, OR

Steve and Dianna Snyder, Elk Creek Forest Products LLC, McMinnville, OR;

Mary Rainey, UFP Industries Inc., Woodburn, OR; Dave Rainey, Hull-Oakes

Lumber Company, Monroe, OR; and Cory Betts, UFP Industries Inc.

Jeff Reed, Whit Bohannan and Jeremy Buckalew,

Builders FirstSource, Medford, OR

Zach Miller, The Softwood Forest

Products Buyer, Memphis, TN;

and Eric Ford, Western Lumber

Company, Medford, OR

Dan Barklow, Brandon Crosier and Bob Crews, Western Lumber Company,

Medford, OR; and J.T. Taylor, Herbert Lumber Co., Riddle, OR

Bonna and Lee Greene, C

& D Lumber Co., Riddle,

OR

Donna Jones, Patrick Lumber Company,

Portland, OR; Aaron Fleming,

Elk Creek Forest Products LLC, Eugene,

OR; and Terri Adair, Boise Cascade

Company, Medford, OR

Nick Johnson, Leslie Southwick and Matt

Johnson, C & D Lumber Co., Riddle, OR

Joe La Berge and Parker Woodley, Collins, Wilsonville,

OR; and Greg Mitchell, TNT Wholesalers,

Newport Beach, CA

Cam Stevens, Patrick Lumber

Company, Portland, OR; and

Randy Malm, Linden Lumber

LLC, Mammoth Lakes, CA

Scott Valenkamph and Sierra Myrick,

American International Forest Products

LLC, Beaverton, OR; and Ryan Sweeney,

Allweather Wood LLC, Washougal,

WA

Danny French, Builders FirstSource, Denver, CO; Jeremy Buckalew, Whit Bohannan and Jeff

Reed, Builders FirstSource, Medford, OR; Terri Adair, Boise Cascade Company, Medford, OR;

and Frank Peterson, Builders FirstSource, Medford, OR

Charley McGovern, Pacific Western Lumber Inc., Lakewood,

WA; Kalayna Crook, Patrick Lumber Company, Portland, OR;

and Parker Woodley and Joe La Berge, Collins, Wilsonville, OR

Matt Johnson and Nick Johnson, C & D Lumber Co., Riddle, OR; Kevin Caughron, WoodPly Forest

Products Inc., Chico, CA; Chuck Danskey and Misty Ross, Billboard Lumber Company, Riddle, OR;

and Tim Hunt, Frank Lumber Co. Inc., Lyons, OR

Joni Hanson, Angela Dundas, Ron Hanson and Bruce Erdel, Pelican

Bay Forest Products, Bend, OR

Page 18 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 19


NAWLA PORTLAND MEETING PHOTOS Continued from page 1

Parker Wildeboer, Majestic Forest Products, Eugene, OR; Ian Kelly, Prime Forest

Products LLC, Portland, OR; Keaton Smith, Nova USA Wood Products LLC,

Forest Grove, OR; and Ryan Holwege, Oregon-Canadian Forest Products Inc.,

North Plains, OR

Jason Adams, Ryder System Inc., Portland, OR; Steve Anderson, Contechem/U-C

Coatings LLC, Portland, OR; James Russell, U-C Coatings LLC, Lebanon, OR; Noelia

Ragland, U-C Coatings LLC, Seattle, WA; and Roger Welling, Ryder Transportation Solutions,

Yorba Linda, CA

Steve Osterman, Nova USA Wood Products LLC,

Wilsonville, OR; and Keaton Smith and Steve Getsiv,

Nova USA Wood Products LLC, Forest Grove, OR

Nick Lake and Joe Honochick, Zip-O-

Log Mills Inc., Eugene, OR

Paul Owen, Vanport International Inc., Boring, OR;

Steve Killgore, Timber Products Company, Springfield,

OR; and Bill Price, All Star Forest Products Inc.,

Jackson, MS

Eliazar Lopez, Vanport International Inc.,

Portland, OR; Chris Knowles, Timber Products

Company, Springfield, OR; and Eric

Chen, Vanport International Inc.

Mason Virnig, Sherwood Lumber

Company, Lake Oswego, OR;

and Terry Haddix, Patrick Lumber

Company, Portland, OR

Katie Isdonas, NAWLA, Chicago, IL;

and Zach Miller, The Softwood Forest

Products Buyer, Memphis, TN

Dacia Foster, Softwood Export Council,

Portland, OR; Chris Knowles, Timber

Products Company, Springfield, OR; and

Scott Parker, NAWLA, Chicago, IL

Chelsea Brown, Patrick Lumber

Company, Portland, OR; and Stefano

“Steve” Mignardi, Daimler

Truck North America, Charlotte,

NC

Cameron Waner, Dora Beebe,

Lee Jimerson, Abby Meek and

Paige Thomas, Collins, Wilsonville,

OR

Aly Kingsley and Grant Phillips, Wildwood Trading Group, Tualatin, OR; Steve

Killgore, Timber Products Company, Springfield, OR; Scott Elston, Forest

City Trading Group LLC, Portland, OR; and Laurie Creech, Allweather Wood

LLC, Washougal, WA

Phil Schumock, Stella-Jones Corp., Tacoma,

WA; Donna Jones, Patrick Lumber

Company, Eugene, OR; and Tim Hunt,

Frank Lumber Co., Lyons, OR

Parker Wildeboer, Majestic Forest

Products Inc., Eugene, OR; Tyson

Sands, Disdero Lumber Co., Clackamas,

OR; Jason Jacobson, Hampton

Lumber, Portland, OR; and Matt Wittschiebe,

Stella-Jones Corporation, Tacoma,

WA

Ian Kelly, Prime Forest Products LLC, Portland,

OR; and Zack Halsey and Mark Gray, Patrick Lumber

Company, Portland, OR

Additional Photos on page 22

Page 20 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022


NAWLA PORTLAND MEETING PHOTOS Continued from page 20

Steve Snyder, Patrick O’Donnell,

Marcos Flores, Mike Taron, Aaron

Fleming and Mark Kelly, Elk Creek

Forest Products LLC, McMinnville,

OR

Pat Burns, Terry Haddix, Natalie Heacock, Danny

Jacobson, Chelsea Brown, Kalayna Crook;

and (back row) Zack Halsey and Mark Gray, Patrick

Lumber Company, Portland, OR

Nick Lake, Zip-O-Log Mills Inc., Eugene,

OR; and Lucas Rodakowski, Prime Forest

Products LLC, Beaverton, OR

Keith Seal and Damien Fallin, Taiga Building Products Ltd., Washougal, WA; and

Jake Moriniti, Wildwood Trading Group, Tualatin, OR

Andy Jones and Aly Kingsley, Wildwood

Trading Group, Tualatin, OR

MLMA EVENT PHOTOS Continued from page 9

Craig Albright, Messersmith Manufacturing

Inc., Bark River, MI; and Barbara Bullock and

Bradley Bullock, Hankins Inc., Ripley, MS

Cody Young, The Teal-Jones Group, Liberty, MS; Jo Anne Battles, The

Teal-Jones Group, Antlers, OK; Neil Tatum, The Teal-Jones Group, Martinsville,

VA; Joe Belknap, The Teal-Jones Group, Spokane, WA; Lisa

McGinness, The Teal-Jones Group, Kinsale, VA; Gary Stewart, The Teal-

Jones Group, Liberty, MS

Dave Sondel, U-C Coatings LLC, Buffalo, NY; Joel

Weaver, Cal-Tex Lumber Inc., Nacogdoches, TX;

and Jason Goodman, U-C Coatings LLC

Scotty Wilson, Barry Black and Pete Johnson, Taylor Machine Works

Inc., Louisville, MS; Larry and Paulette Barrett, Vicksburg Forest

Products LLC, Vicksburg, MS; and Hal Nowell, Taylor Machine Works

Inc.

Greg Langford, Mason Forest Products Inc., Ruston,

LA; and Corey Bounds, Continental Underwriters

Inc., Newton, MS

Additional Photos on page 24

Betsy and Richard Batton, Jack Batte & Sons Inc.,

Forest, MS; Sebastian Cruz, Couture Inc., Piche, QC;

and Tyler Batton, Jack Batte & Sons Inc.

Page 22 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 23


MLMA EVENT PHOTOS Continued from page 22

Chad Smith, USNR, Hot Springs, AR; Tracey Mitchell,

USNR, Perry, GA; and Mark Culpepper, USNR, Hot

Springs, AR

Hernan Dominguez, Hazard Control Technologies

Inc., Fayetteville, GA; and Ken Stroud, Hazard Control

Technologies Inc., Natchez, MS

(Front row, from left) Orjan McCarty, AJ Webb, Bridgett Lowe, Todd

Nodine, and (back row, from left) Robert Foreman, Greg Hodge

and Tracy Daniels, Hood Industries Inc., Hattiesburg, MS

Jeremy Pitts, Nyle Dry Kilns, Brewer, ME; Kellie Hailey,

Shuqualak Lumber Company, Shuqualak, MS; and

Jeremy Howard, Nyle Dry Kilns

Bruce Kicklighter, Carbotech International Inc., Evans,

GA; and Gale Miller, Carbotech International

Inc., Tuscaloosa, AL

Marty Cornett, Pierce Construction and Maintenance Co.

Inc., Morristown, TN; Werner Pierce, Pierce Construction and

Maintenance Co. Inc., Petal, MS; and Stanley Pierce and Jeff

Plante, Southern Industrial Supply, Hattiesburg, MS

Bud Reaves, Starla Reaves and Drew Homan, Tri-State Lumber Company

Inc., Fulton, MS; Jeremy Pitts, Nyle Dry Kilns, Brewer, ME; and

Stephanie Homan, Tri-State Lumber Company Inc.

Ellery Jones, MLMA, Jackson,

MS; and Angie Ridgdon,

Shuqualak Lumber Co.,

Shuqualak, MS

Gerry and Kathleen Brucia, Mid-States Wood Preservers LLC, Simsboro,

LA; and Meg and Jason Ebert, Barge Forest Products Co., Macon,

MS

Rodney Haas, Lumber Remanufacturing Services Inc.,

Belk, AL; Patty Cook, The Westervelt Company Inc.,

Moundville, AL; Cammi Newman, Lumber Remanufacturing

Services Inc.; and David Kowalsky, Great Southern

Wood Preserving, Abbeville, AL

Lisa Hunter, Peggy Thomas and Jessica

Atkins, Shuqualak Lumber Company,

Shuqualak, MS

Jim Olson, LaSalle Lumber Company LLC, Ruston, LA; Michael

Sheppard and Michael Wren, Hixson Lumber Company, Dallas, TX;

Barry Hendler, American Lumber Inc., Bryan, TX; and Rick Stoltz,

Tolko Industries Ltd., Vernon, BC

Angie Rigdon, Rick Rigdon and Robert Hunter Jr., Shuqualak Lumber

Company, Shuqualak, MS

(Seated, from left) Donna Farley, Lassiter Lumber LLC, Silas, AL; Danny Semple, Austell

Forest Products Inc., Gordo, AL; Mike and Wanda Garrett, Hankins Inc., Ripley, MS; and

(standing, from left) Tim Farley, Lassiter Lumber LLC; and Sally Allen, Hunt Forest Products

LLC, Ruston, LA

Additional Photos on page 26

Page 24 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022


MLMA EVENT PHOTOS Continued from page 24

Trint Reese, Taylor Reese, Stephanie and Bo Reese, PalletOne Inc., Hazlehurst, GA;

and Dawn Campbell and Paul Cabrol, Battle Lumber Company Inc., Wadley, GA

Stephanie and Drew Homan, Tri-State Lumber Company,

Fulton, MS; and Gale Miller, Carbotech International

Inc., Tuscaloosa, AL

Noah Barcroft, Birmingham International Forest Products, Birmingham,

AL; Danny Semple, Austell Forest Products Inc., Gordo, AL;

and Meredith and Bert Campbell, M.C. Dixon Lumber Company Inc.,

Eufaula, AL

Jennifer and Jeff Biddy, Great

Southern Wood Preserving,

Dothan, AL

Frank Pilon, Samuel Packaging Systems Group, Montreal,

QC; and Anne-Marie Levesque and Laurent

Poudrier, BID Group, Saint George, SC

Christopher Pederson, KyKenKee Inc., Vance,

AL; Kelly Rud, WestRock Company, Cottonton,

AL; and Ryan Devine, KyKenKee Inc.

John Womack, Sonoco Products Company, Hartselle, AL;

Jason and Meg Ebert, Barge Forest Products Co., Macon,

MS; and Ben Pollack, Sonoco Products Company

Chaz Thomas, Angie Rigdon, Rick Rigdon, Jessica Atkins and

Laura Stone, Shuqualak Lumber Company, Shuqualak, MS

Jason Goodman, U-C Coatings

LLC, Buffalo, NY; and Craig Albright,

Messersmith Manufacturing

Inc., Bark River, MI

Chad Jourdan, UFP Industries Inc., Cypress, TX; Stephanie Smith, George Smith,

Chuck Smith and Jordan Smith, Rex Lumber LLC, Graceville, FL

Sylvia Napper, MLMA Retired Executive Director,

Jackson, MS; Paul Miller Jr., The Softwood

Forest Products Buyer, Memphis, TN; and

Pam Gunter, Attorney for MLMA

Tony Butler and Glynn Williams,

Hunt Forest Products

LLC, Ruston, LA; and

Kelly Rose, First Horizon

Bank, Memphis, TN

Ben Garrison, Garrison Brothers Lumber Co. & Lakeside Lumber Co., Eufaula,

AL; Todd Barker, Patrick Lumber Company, Savannah, GA; Jeff Baumgartner,

Patrick Lumber Company, Portland, OR; and Meredith and Bert Campbell, M.C.

Dixon Lumber Company Inc., Eufaula, AL

Additional Photos on page 28

Page 26 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 27


MLMA EVENT PHOTOS Continued from page 26

Brent and Tracy Steed,

Riverside Forest Products

Inc., Augusta, GA;

and Ben Garrison, Garrison

Brothers Lumber

Co. and Lakeside Lumber

Co., Eufaula, AL

Jeff Baumgartner, Patrick Lumber Company, Portland, OR; Jeremy Pitts and Jeremy

Howard, Nyle Dry Kilns, Brewer, ME; Todd Barker, Patrick Lumber Company, Savannah,

GA; and Bruce Kicklighter, Carbotech International Inc., Evans, GA

Truss Beasley, Christina Beasley and Brandon Cox, Beasley Forest

Products Inc., Hazlehurst, GA; and Derrick Wentworth, Clayton

Supply Birmingham, Birmingham, AL

Keith and Belinda Remley, Ken and Christine Trainor, Arxada LLC, Atlanta, GA;

and Kenneth Keith, Talladega Machinery and Supply Co., Talladega, AL

IFG/ALTA TOURNAMENT PHOTOS Continued from page 11

Ryan Kline, Disdero Lumber Co., Clackamas, OR; Garth

Williams, Idaho Forest Group LLC, Coeur d’Alene, ID;

Chad Findlay, West Bay Forest Products Ltd., Langley,

BC; and Bruce Tays, Olympic Industries Inc., North Vancouver,

BC

Vince Goodman, Solidwood Forest Ltd., Houston, TX; and

Eric Oien, James Venters and Scott Suh, Alta Forest Products,

Chehalis, WA

Steve Snyder, Elk Creek Forest Products LLC, McMinnville,

OR; Tyrone Konecny, Utah Lumber Company,

Ogden, UT; Brett Green, Idaho Forest Group LLC, Coeur

d’Alene, ID; and Ken Timmins, American International

Forest Products LLC, Portland, OR

Kevin Lang, Central Forest Products Inc., Canby,

OR; Monty McClain, Master Halco, San Antonio,

TX; Kay Lang, Central Forest Products Inc.; and

Gib Gibor, Alta Forest Products, Chehalis, WA

James Mortimer, Idaho Forest Group LLC, Coeur

d’Alene, ID; Brad Johnson, Dakeryn Industries Ltd.,

North Vancouver, BC; and Paul Owen and Tim Stovall,

Bright Wood Corporation, Madras, OR

Dan Jensen, Pelican Bay Forest Products, Bend, OR; Jason Faulkner,

Hampton Lumber, Hillsboro, OR; Chuck Beagle, Cedar Products Unlimited,

Missoula, MT; and Mike Carey, Parr Lumber Company, Albany,

OR

(Seated from left) Bryan Riga, Idaho Forest Group

LLC, Coeur d’Alene, ID; Charles Wright, Builders

FirstSource, Denver, CO; and Mark Rau, Buckeye

Pacific LLC, Portland, OR; and (standing) Mason

Anderson, Idaho Forest Group LLC

(Front from left) Doug Griffith and Vince Goodman, Solidwood Forest

Ltd., Houston, TX; Scott Suh, Todd Shipp and Eric Oien, Alta Forest

Products, Chehalis, WA; (Back row) James Venters, Alta Forest Products;

and Robby Griffith, Solidwood Forest Ltd.

Additional Photos on page 55

(Seated from left) Scott Vigil, Builders First-

Source, Denver, CO; and Chris Cramer, Boise

Cascade Company, Boise, ID; and (standing

from left) Andy Dunham, Idaho Forest Group

LLC, Coeur d’Alene, ID; and Kyle Welch, Boise

Cascade Company, Lake Oswego, OR

Page 28 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 29


Washington Scene

Canadian

Lumber Tariffs

Cut By More

Than Half

The National Association

of Home Builders

(NAHB) efforts calling

on the Biden administration to eliminate — or at

the very least reduce — duties on Canadian lumber

shipments into the United States has taken a step in

the right direction, according to the NAHB, with the

Department of Commerce moving to cut tariffs by

more than half and Canada seeking a new legal solution

that would completely eliminate the tariffs.

The Department of Commerce has issued its final

third administrative review to reduce duties on shipments

of Canadian lumber into the United States by

more than half from 17.99 percent to 8.59 percent.

This is even lower than the initial third administrative

review that would have set the tariffs at 11.64

percent.

The new 8.59 percent lumber tariff is expected to

take effect later this month. Although lower tariffs

could help to ease extreme price swings in the lumber

market that have added $14,300 to the price of a typical

new home since the early stages of the pandemic

in the spring of 2020, the fact remains that the Commerce

action does not adequately address the issues

surrounding Canadian lumber — that all parties must

come to the table to negotiate a long-term solution

that puts an end to the tariffs.

That is the message that NAHB continues to send

to the Biden administration. At the same time, NAHB

supports Canada’s efforts to address legal issues surrounding

these unfair tariffs. Canada reacted to the

news out of the Commerce Department by requesting

a dispute settlement through the U.S.-Mexico-Canada

trade agreement (USMCA).

“Canada is disappointed that the United States

continues to impose unwarranted and unfair duties

on Canadian Softwood lumber,” said International

Trade Minister Mary Ng. “While the duty rates will

decrease from the current levels for the majority of

exporters, the only truly fair outcome would be for

the United States to cease applying baseless duties to

Canadian Softwood lumber.

These duties have caused unjustified harm to the

Canadian industry and its workers,” Ng added. “They

also amount to a tax on U.S. consumers, exacerbating

housing unaffordability at a time

of increased supply challenges and

inflationary pressures.”

Ng said that Canada intends to

challenge the final results of the

third administrative reviews, including

through launching a dispute

settlement process under Chapter

10 of the USMCA. •

WHO’S WHO -

Marshburn

Continued from page 2

Value-added services include

custom manufacturing, proprietary

grades, precut and custom PET’d

studs, custom patterns, custom

packaging, highly specialized

mixed loads, just-in-time delivery

and jobsite-direct delivery.

Idaho Timber is a member of the

North American Wholesale Lumber

Association, Idaho Forest Products

Commission, American Wood

Council and the Treated Wood

Council.

Marshburn has worked for Idaho

Timber for three years in sales. He

has been around the industry his

entire life, as his family owned a

construction company and built

custom homes. Since joining Idaho

Timber, he has learned the other

side of the industry and everything

that goes into getting that 2x4 from

the mill to the jobsite.

A graduate of East Duplin High

School and alumnus of Campbell

University in Buies Creek, NC,

Marshburn enjoys golf, fishing and

following the Carolina Tar Heels.

He has been married to his wife,

Kristin, for nine years. Together, the

couple have two daughters, Harper

and Ava. n

For more information, please

visit www.idahotimber.com.

Page 30 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 31


Page 32 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 33


84 Lumber Opens Its First

Store In Michigan

Eighty Four, PA— 84 Lumber, one of the nation’s

largest privately-held building materials suppliers,

recently announced the opening of its newest store in

Commerce Charter Township, MI. This is the company’s

first store in the state of Michigan.

The brand new 42,000 square foot facility includes

an extensive warehouse with a spacious showroom.

The space includes treated lumber, roofing, trim,

windows, doors and more.

84 Lumber is on track to end 2022 with record

sales numbers. To keep up with growth, 84 Lumber

is expanding in new and existing markets around the

country, and it is continuing to hire in all 250 stores

across 30-plus states.

To follow along with more company news,

visit www.84lumber.com.

Retail Review

US LBM Acquires Foxworth-

Galbraith Lumber Company

Buffalo Grove, IL—US LBM, headquartered here,

a leading distributor of specialty building materials

in the United States, announced recently that it has

reached a definitive agreement to acquire Texas-based

Foxworth-Galbraith Lumber Company, a prominent

building products supplier to building professionals

and homeowners in the Southwest.

Upon completion of the acquisition, US LBM will

operate 80 locations in Texas, 13 in Arizona, nine in

New Mexico, five in Colorado and four in Oklahoma.

Founded in 1901 by W.L. Foxworth and H.W.

Galbraith, the company today operates 28 locations

across Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas

under the Foxworth-Galbraith banner and two locations

in Oklahoma under the Forest Lumber brand.

The company’s primary customers are professional

builders, commercial contractors and homeowners,

which Foxworth-Galbraith serves from its building

materials yards, distribution centers, home centers

and manufacturing locations, which are focused primarily

on floor and roof trusses and structural beams.

To learn more, go to www.uslbm.com.

Dixie Lumber Company

Purchased By The Building

Center

Easley, SC—The Building Center, Inc. completed

the purchase of Dixie Lumber Company, Inc., located

here, recently.

The acquisition provides The Building Center, Inc.

with additional access to upstate South Carolina and

the fast-growing Greenville market. Dixie Lumber

Company, Inc. has provided building materials and

hardware to builders, remodelers, and homeowners

for the past 79 years.

Founded in 1977 by Ed Norris,

The Building Center, Inc. is one of

the country’s largest privately held

building material suppliers. The

Building Center, Inc. has multiple

operations throughout the Carolinas:

two truss plants, two custom

millwork operations, and six active

lumberyards. This marks the fifth

acquisition for the company in the

last six years.

To learn more, visit www.

thebuldingcenterinc.com.

Hammond

Expands Into

New Hampshire

With Purchase Of

Brock's

Belgrade, ME—Hammond

Lumber Company (Hammond),

located here, announced recently

that it has acquired Brock's Building

Materials, a third generation,

family-owned company located

in Rochester, NH. Hammond is a

fourth generation, family-owned

building material retailer established

in 1953. With the acquisition,

Hammond now has nearly 900

employees and 22 locations across

Maine and New Hampshire.

Brock's is a third generation, family-owned

and operated business

established in 1961 by Maurice and

Anne Brock. Brock's has served the

seacoast and lakes regions of New

Hampshire and southern Maine

for more than 60 years. Hammond

has offered employment to all of

Brock's employees and owners.

Hammond is the largest lumber

and building materials retailer

throughout Maine and New Hampshire.

To learn more, go to

www.hammondlumber.com.

Continued on page 36

Page 34 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 35


RETAIL REVIEW—Continued from page 34

Koopman Lumber Acquires Boilard

Lumber In Western Massachusetts

Whitinsville, MA – Koopman Lumber, located here, a family-owned and

-operated business since 1939 with 10 locations in eastern Massachusetts, recently

announced it has acquired Boilard Lumber, another family-owned and -operated

retail lumber yard providing quality building supplies since 1936 in Indian

Orchard, MA.

Boilard Lumber adopted the Koopman name recently. All Boilard employees

were welcomed to remain on staff.

Koopman Lumber offers three full-line lumber, hardware, paint, lawn and

garden stores in Whitinsville, Uxbridge and North Grafton; one lumber, hardware,

paint and design center in Sharon; a full-service paint store in Milford; lumber

yards and kitchen design centers in Hudson, Andover and Fairhaven; and distribution

centers in Uxbridge and Sutton. n

To learn more, go to www.koopmanlumber.com.

softwoodbuyer.com

APA — Continued from page 2

Besides the Safest Company and Innovation in Safety awards, other competition

categories include Annual Safety and Health Award, Safety Improvement

Award (2019-2021) and 3-Year Safety Award. The annual award, safety improvement

and three-year average categories are divided into three divisions based on

the type of product manufactured at the mill (plywood; OSB; and glulam, CLT,

I-joist, LVL and SCL).

Sixty-nine APA-member structural wood panel and engineered wood product

facilities in the U.S., Canada and abroad participated in the 2021 program. A total

of 16 facilities representing seven APA member companies earned awards in various

competition categories. Some mills were multiple award winners.

While the program awards are limited to APA members, data is collected from

both member and non-member mills to provide a broad-based industry performance

benchmark. A total of 80 mills reported data for 2021.

The 2021 Safety and Health Awards program was the 14th year of the program

under a revitalized safety effort spearheaded by the APA Safety and Health

Advisory Committee comprised of several APA member company safety professionals.

Under the committee’s guidance, three main goals were established: make

the APA program the premier safety awards program in the industry, encourage

the sharing of best practices to improve the industry’s safety culture and programs

and, most importantly, improve the industry’s overall safety performance. n

The full list of winners and

more information on the APA

Safety and Health Awards

Program can be found on the

Association’s website at www.

apawood.org.

SLB Column —

Continued from page 3

According to the Mithun report

and cited studies, there is growing

evidence that biophilic design can

be correlated with improved learning,

memory, emotion, and social

intelligence. Biophilic design is

when designers bring elements of

the outdoors inside by integrating

natural elements into the building,

such as wood, greenery, natural

light, water features, and views to

nature. Children with access to nature

exhibit lower levels of stress

than those without; children in

day-lit classrooms have test scores

7-18% higher, while children

without daylight saw test scores

drop by 17%.

Similarly, exposure to wood

in indoor environments has been

correlated to positive biophilic

responses. Preliminary research

shows wood surfaces reduce activation

of the sympathetic nervous

system, helping to calm the body

before the onset of stress. Other

studies suggest wood may help

reduce blood pressure and heart

rate, as well as allowing for more

creativity and productivity. •

All claims cited in this

article are from the

Mithun report.

Read Think Wood’s

coverage of the study

and download the

document by going to

thinkwood.com/blog.

Page 36 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 37


Holt & Bugbee — Continued from page 6

Lumber species are purchased based on demand

to produce high grade products with good lengths

and widths.

At all four locations, Holt and Bugbee own their own curtain side

delivery trucks, 17 total in their fleet.

Custom products like wide and long plank flooring,

mouldings and smaller, precise orders are what drive

the company’s reputation of quality Softwood and

hardwood products and attention to clients’ needs.

plained. “We didn’t sit still while it was happening. We took advantage of the time

and used it to audit our operations and make several improvements.”

Pierce said Holt and Bugbee maintained their operations at the height of the

pandemic and also gave to the communities in which it serves. “We did a great job

of staying safe and reducing the spread of COVID-19 at work. Not one employee

was laid off and we managed to get to the other side as a stronger and more

versatile company. The communities that we serve are just as important to us as

our business. We’re thankful that we were in a position where we could donate

$20,000 to local food banks to give back to the people who were hit hardest.”

With four locations, Holt and Bugbee Company has a plant in Tewksbury, MA

on 25 acres with 550,000 board

feet of kiln capacity; nine kilns,

two stackers; two inspection lines;

two planers; an automated grading

line; three rip saws; five moulders;

a resaw, primer, end matcher and

a wood waste boiler. This operation

also has 12 lift trucks and five

delivery trucks.

On 10 acres in Mount Braddock,

PA, Holt and Bugbee operates

450,000 board feet of kiln capacity,

eight kilns, a stacker, grading line,

planing line, two rip saws, three

moulders, a wood waste system and

seven lift trucks and four distribution

trucks.

Pierce added, “Our third plant

located in Boyertown, PA has a

40,000 square-foot storage capacity,

a planer, rip saw, two lift trucks

and four delivery trucks. Located

in Elmwood Park, NJ, we have a

20,000 square-foot storage facility

with two lift trucks and four delivery

trucks.”

Sourcing all of their lumber

from sawmills, Pierce said the

product mix is based mostly on

current trends. “We buy species

mostly based on demand, but we

really focus on high grades with

good lengths and widths in all

our products. If you buy from us,

you’re going to get the highest

quality product. We have a reputation

for quality lumber and serving

our customers with attention to

their needs. Our custom mouldings,

wide and long plank flooring, and

smaller precise orders are our bread

and butter.”

Some of the equipment manufacturers

utilized by Holt and

Bugbee include Weinig moulders,

Mereen-Johnson rip saws, Yates

American planers, Irvington Moore

and American Wood Dryers and

SII Dry Kilns. Average inventory

is 8,000,000 board feet, companywide.

It was the entrepreneurial savvy

of businessman John Cutter that

established Holt and Bugbee in

Continued on page 40

Page 38 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 39


Holt & Bugbee — Continued from page 38

1825. Cutter’s goal was to establish a sawmill for rough cutting mahogany logs in

Charlestown, MA. Armed with nothing more than a strong knowledge of the trade

and a single, but powerful, idea, Cutter struck a bargain where he would supply

an equally industrious sea captain with much-needed block ice. The captain

would deliver the ice to South America and, on Cutter’s behalf, exchange it for

rough mahogany. With the emptying of the seaweed-encased block ice, the ship’s

Kilns located in Tewksbury, MA sit on 25 acres with 550,000 board feet capacity. Among

the kilns in use are some manufactured by SII Dry Kilns.

holds then became available

for transporting the mahogany

logs back to Cutter.

By 1850, Cutter’s son-inlaw,

Stephen Holt, entered

the business, carrying on the

company’s tradition. He was

followed by John Bugbee 10

years later and, with his arrival,

the name and company were

officially established. To better

serve its rapidly growing

customer base, the Holt and

Bugbee Company migrated to

Tewksbury from its original

Charlestown, MA, location. Holt and Bugbee utilizes lift trucks at three of its

four locations. The plants in Boyertown, PA, and

Mount Braddock, PA, became Elmwood Park, NJ, both have multiple lift trucks.

the chosen site for the second

Holt and Bugbee facility in 1994. With this prime location near key sources for

North Appalachian hardwoods, Holt and Bugbee began exploiting the value-added

benefits of easy access to the finest cherry in the world.

Five years later, Boyertown, PA, became home to the company’s third operation,

placing Holt and Bugbee in an ideal location (just 40 miles northwest of

Philadelphia) for serving customers in the mid-Atlantic region, greatly increasing

its market reach.

Five family generations, and

many years later, Holt and Bugbee

is recognized not only in the Northeast

but from coast to coast and

in many parts of the world for the

quality of their products and dedication

to service.

Holt and Bugbee Company

embraces its past and its rich set of

values that contribute to the strong

foundation the company was built

on. Because of its respect for its heritage,

Holt and Bugbee, like many

fine New England firms with solid

roots, continues to thrive in both

name and entrepreneurial spirit.

With 200 employees, key personnel

include President and Owner,

Phil Pierce, Chief Financial Officer

and Owner, William Collins, Vice

President and Owner, Roger Pierce,

Vice President of Sales, Sean Herlihy,

Vice President of Operations,

Eric D’Annolfo, and General Manager

of Boyertown, Peter Burns.

Holt and Bugbee Company is

a member of National Hardwood

Lumber Association; Indiana

Hardwood Lumbermen’s Association;

and Hardwood Manufacturers

Association. n

For more information visit

www.holtandbugbee.com

NAWLA Portland

Regional Meeting —

Continued from page 1

A networking reception concluded

the evening.

Since its founding in 1893,

NAWLA has represented the best

interests of wholesalers, manufacturers,

and service provider companies

from the planting of seedlings,

to the selling of building materials

and wood in all of its many forms. n

To learn more,

visit www.nawla.org.

Page 40 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 41


Northeast Business Trends

By Sue Putnam

Editor

The markets for Softwood lumber are strong or steady

in the Northeast.

The market has stayed very good so far even considering

inflationary pressures,” said a sawmill representative

in Maine. “It seems like our product in our marketplace

is doing very well still and business has been – not what I

would say COVID-like crazy –good, but supply and demand seem to be equal, so

the takeaway is really good from the mill to the end user.”

Looking backwards a few months, he stated, “I’d say our sales are at the same

clip, the same level. We make so much lumber every day and that’s what we sell

every day, and we do that every day. I would say that sales are at a good clip, as

good as it was.”

He sells only Eastern White Pine in all grades and patterns in 4/4 boards and

pattern stock.

He provides Softwood lumber to his company’s own retail stores, wholesale

distribution, big box stores, manufacturers, wholesale brokers and buying groups.

“Our customers are selling well,” he noted. “Business is good but whether it’s the

time of year or true demand coming off a little bit because of inflationary pressure,

everybody’s busy but they feel it’s not quite as busy. They feel like the rest

of this year will be OK, but everybody’s wondering what will come out of these

economic times.”

He said, “Transportation is very expensive. It’s not affecting moving our

product but it’s affecting cost, with inflation to us and our customers. Moving our

product is being done in a timely fashion.”

“Our market has been strong,” stated a Connecticut lumberman. “Order files

are still good, but we’re starting to feel a little bit of a backing off of business.

I think that’s due to the economy. Partly due to interest rates, people are being

a little more cautious about their purchasing lumber. The market’s at the high

pricewise but starting to go in the other direction. People are hedging their bets

a little bit, keeping the inventories lean. Plus, there’s been a little slowdown in

sales. Prices over the past couple of years have risen at exponential rates and I

believe for the first time, we’re starting to see the pricing going down. You’re not

going to buy right now; you’re going to wait and see if the market comes back a

little bit.”

Compared to several months ago, he said, the market is worse.

He sells Doug Fir and Eastern White Pine in all NELMA grades, Sugar Pine

and Ponderosa Pine in all grades, all in 4/4 - 16/4 thicknesses.

Seventy percent of his customers are lumberyards. Thirty percent are secondary

manufacturers. His customers’ sales are still strong, he observed.

“Transportation is always negatively affecting our business, especially fuel

costs,” he remarked. “That’s very detrimental to our bottom line when you see

those kinds of fuel increases.”

In New Hampshire, a sawmill

representative said his market is

“still pretty good” even though it

has been steady. “I’d say it’s about

status quo,” he stated. “It’s been

about the same for the last three or

four weeks. It’s been the same pace,

on the quieter side, for the last year

or so. But it’s still pretty good, too.

So, maybe it’s back to normal. I’d

say it’s comfortable. Some items are

busy and they’re setting the world

on fire, and some are slow. You

have some hot movers and some

slow movers and others in between.

The market is just quieter,” he

remarked. “I’m doing about the

same business and not having to

say ‘no’ all day. The company’s in

the same position but the sense of

normalcy is there.”

He sells 4/4 Eastern White Pine

only in all NELMA grades. His

customers include distribution yards

and brokers mostly. “The distribution

in various parts of the country

seems very strong,” he observed.

“Retail seems very strong, too. The

brokers and end-use manufacturers

are hit-or-miss; some are really

busy while some have slowed down

a bit.”

He said that, for his company,

transportation hasn’t been bad.

“Trucks have been good. Geography

is probably the main reason.

We’re right off Interstate 89, an

hour and a half from Boston, all

interstate.”

A Massachusetts lumber woman

said, “Our market is still steady.

There’s a lot of demand.

“We have a lot of people looking

for just-in-time turnaround,” she

noted. “I have heard some comments

from some of my customers

that they’re starting to catch up on

their order files, too.”

Compared to several months

ago, the market is “about the same,

pretty steady,” she remarked.

She sells Eastern White Pine and

Western Red Cedar in all grades

and patterns. Eastern White Pine in

Common grades is her best seller.

Her customers are industrial

Continued on page 44

Page 42 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 43


NORTHEAST TRENDS— Continued from page 42

manufacturers and independent lumberyards. “The comments we’re getting is that

their sales are up but some companies are starting to catch up on their order files.

“We’re fortunate to have a network of good carriers that make sure we’re covered

for transportation,” she stated. “The biggest struggle is everyone looking for

lumber tomorrow. When it takes three to four weeks to fulfill an order, it’s hard to

do that within a request for a five- to seven-day turnaround. I think people are trying

to get orders filled; they’re still in that mentality that they need to get products

out and they’re not thinking long-term. They find themselves lower on raw material

than they anticipated.” •

@millerwoodtradepub

www.millerwoodtradepub.com

Inland West Business Trends

By Terry Miller

President

Softwood sales in the Inland West region show some

strength, but the outlook is questionable.

A manufacturer of Softwood lumber in Idaho stated,

“We’re seeing changes in the marketplace. It’s still good

for us. We’ve seen the prices decline and we expect

volatility in the future. But we’re also seeing production

difficulties with many mills dropping a second shift due to

not having the staffing to run a second shift. We’ve seen an odd and eerie balance

in the market as housing begins to slow down but we still think there will be opportunities

in the lumber business. There will also be volatility. The ebb and flow

will be as it is when we potentially move into a recession. We feel our company is

well positioned to navigate it and we’re excited for the future.”

Compared to a few months earlier, he said the market is worse.

He sells Spruce, Ponderosa Pine, ESLP, Doug Fir and Hemlock Fir in all grades

from economy to appearance lumber, from 2x3 to 2x12.

His customers include home centers, pro dealers and distribution yards. “I

wouldn’t say they’re struggling but they’re seeing changes,” he noted. “Nobody

wants to admit they’re struggling

just yet. We’re still profitable as an

industry, but changes have occurred.

We don’t know the magnitude of

these changes. For example, the interest

rates and housing affordability

are major issues. We think that there

will be a correction in home values

and that tends to take money out of

the economy. It feels different than

the Great Recession that began in

2007 and 2008, but it is eerily de ja

vu in appearance.

“Truck driver shortages are affecting

everyone and we’re seeing

inflationary pressures,” he stated.

“That’s all negatively affecting our

business.”

An Arizona lumberman said

his market is “quiet. It’s definitely

slowed down. Generally, it’s the

economy causing this. The interest

rates are up and inflation is making

people nervous about committing to

new housing.”

The market is not as good as it

was a few months ago, he stated.

He sells all No. 2 Common White

Fir, Green Doug Fir and White Fir

Select struct. His best seller varies

“but right now the Doug Fir is the

predominant mover,” he remarked.

He sells lumber to distribution

yards and manufacturers such as

modular housing. “They’re all telling

me their sales are 50 percent off

to a little off, but they’re all down

some.

“Transportation is horrible,” he

stated. “Trucks are hard to get and

rail has become a nightmare. Railcars

that normally take two weeks

to get here are taking eight weeks

and they’re still not here. I’m told

it’s just a lack of people. It’s a mess;

I can tell you that.”

In Wyoming, a sawmill representative

stated, “Our markets have

been really slow. Prices have been

deteriorating over the past three or

four weeks. There’s a lot of pressure

from western mills now with excess

stock. It’s been tough.”

The market is not as good as it

was a few months ago, he said.

“Three of our mills produce

Continued on page 46

Page 44 Softwood Forest Products Buyer • July/August 2022


INLAND WEST TRENDS— Continued from page 44

primarily Ponderosa Pine boards and shop,” he noted. “One of our mills is a stud

mill.” His company manufactures ESLP. “Our Ponderosa Pine is primarily boards

and we do some 5/4 and 6/4 shop. Boards are 1-inch thick.”

He sells primarily to distribution yards. “They actually seem a little more optimistic

than we are,” he stated. “They’ve seen business slowing down but they’re

pretty optimistic about how the year’s going to turn out.”

“Transportation has been good,” he commented. “We have a transportation department

that we book probably 50 percent of the trucks with, and that helps.” n

Midwest Business Trends

By Paul Miller Jr.

Vice President

In the Midwest region, strength remains in the Softwood

lumber business, but there is some slowing down.

A sawmill spokesman from Texas stated, “Our market

has still been pretty active, pretty strong. All our production

is moving at current, competitive pricing.”

Relative to a few months earlier, he remarked, “I would say it’s flat. It’s historically

the same. It’s a positive environment for us. All we produce is boards.

We’re the second largest board mill in the South. We’re still moving all our

fiber.”

He sells Southern Yellow Pine boards in No. 2 and No. 3 Common and D and

Better. “Twenty five percent of our production goes to 17 different patterns. It’s

all 1-inch thickness,” he noted.

Eighty percent of his sales are to wholesalers, he noted. “I think their sales to

their customers are still good,” he remarked. “For boards, if you call other board

mills, you should hear similar stories.

“I hear from my customers that finding truckers is difficult,” he said. “There

are fewer truckers on the road. But it’s not affecting our business. Our customers

pick up their loads from us within two to three weeks.”

Another Texas lumberman stated, “We’re fairly strong right now in our sales.

We’re on the custom side so we’re not being hit by any of the track homes slowing

down. Our board footage on order has been steady for the past year.” Therefore,

he said, the market is the same as it’s been for several months.

He sells No. 1 and Better Green Doug Fir; No. 1 and Better kiln-dried Doug

Fir and Appearance Grade Western Red Cedar. “Anything over 24 feet has been

difficult to get,” he noted.

He sells to retail lumberyards. “In Texas,” he said, “they recently had a seasonal

slowdown, but there has been a positive outlook for the future. They don’t

see the market slowing down a whole lot. Track home building is affecting some

of the yards but the custom side seems to be steady.

“Like anyone in the industry, transportation costs have gone up as fuel costs

have increased,” he commented. “But we’ve been able to manage, pricing accordingly

to make sure we’re covering

our costs.”

In Kansas City, a lumber supplier

said there has been “a bit of a

slowdown due to the interest rate

increases. The frantic pace seems

to be subsided for now at least.

Lumber sales are steady, but I’d say

it is off a bit from a few months ago

in demand.”

He offers No. 2 SPF in 2x4 and

2x6, No. 2 Green Doug Fir in 2x6

to 2x12, and kiln-dried Doug Fir in

2x6 to 2x12. His best seller is Green

Doug Fir.

He sells his lumber to pro dealer

yards and box stores. “Everyone’s

business is still really good,” he

observed. “The insanity we went

through in the COVID years has

subsided, but it’s still steady.

There’s still difficulty finding

flatbeds across the country,” he

remarked. “Trucking is still tight;

it’s hard to get drivers in those

trucks. Rail traffic has improved a

little bit.”

A South Dakota lumberman said

his sales are “steady; people are

buying as they have need.” The

market is actually better than it was

six months earlier, he noted.

He offers Cedar in knotty, SPF in

No. 2 Common and Premium and

White Fir in Select struct. His best

seller is Premium SPF in 2x4. Distribution

yards are his customers, he

stated and “most are staying busy.

“Getting railcars is problematic,”

he said. “Trucks are getting expensive

but they’re available.” n

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Page 46 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 47


West Coast Business Trends

By Zach Miller

At the time of this writing things have slowed for West

Coast producers seemingly across the board. Pricing volatility,

which is exacerbating hand to mouth orders, is being

driven by a number of factors including the price of oil

and gas, the recent BC stumpage increase, and the soon to

be duty reduction for most BC suppliers. As we head into

the fall this is what a few West Coast producers are seeing:

Dean Garofano of Delta Cedar Specialties, Delta, BC

said, “The Cedar market trend continues to show very little life, with distributors

mainly purchasing only what they need to fill holes. Prices have subsequently

come down on many Cedar lumber products and prices can vary greatly from

one supplier to another. The 5/4 x 6 decking has seen the steepest decline as the

August 2022 print price is now lower than before the pandemic and less than a

third of its peak price. The lack of demand and lower lumber prices have led to

manufacturers pushing back on Cedar log prices. Smaller log prices that produce

mainly tight knot material came down in July, but the larger sawlogs have

remained stubbornly high with only very modest declines.”

Garofano continued, “Loggers find themselves in a difficult position currently,

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Vol. 37 No. 5 The Softwood Industry’s Only Newspaper...Now Reaching 36,034 firms (20,000 per issue) September/October 2022

Vol. 36 No. 3 The Softwood Industry’s Only Newspaper...Now Reaching 36,034 firms (20,000 per issue) May/June 2022

Inland Lumber Producers Celebrate

NAWLA

38th Annual

Leadership

Golf Event

Summit Offers

Full Agenda Of Education And

Photos By Terry Miller

Networking

01. Jeff Bowers, Bowers Forest Products Inc., Beavercreek, OR; Kathy and Bernie

Nugent, Warren Trask Company, Lakeville, MA; and Paul Ericson, Shelton Structures

Todd Inc., Lindsey, Chehalis, Eastern WA Engineered Wood Products, Bethlehem, PA; Pike Severance,

Coastal Forest Products LLC, Bedford, NH; Joe Hanas, Nordic Structures, Montreal,

QC; David Coeur Destiche, d'Alene, Amerhart ID – The Limited, Inland Lumber Green Bay, Producers WI; and recently Rob Latham, held Tri-State their 38th Forest

Products Inc., Springfield, OH

Annual Golf Tournament here at the Coeur d'Alene Resort.

Fort The Lauderdale, two-day event FL– also The featured 2022 golfing Leadersip at Hayden Summit Lake was Country hosted recently Club. The by

the winners North American of the Horse Wholesale Shoe golf Lumber game held Association there were (NAWLA) Matt Beymer, at the of Fort Hampton

Lumber Marriott Co., Harbor located Beach in Portland, Resort OR & Spa. and Luke The theme Wenner, for Pallet this year's Service event

Lauderdale

was Corp., "Where of Maple Decision Grove, Makers MN. Grow." •

During the three-day event, attendees enjoyed multiple networking sessions

as well as educational presentations. Brian O'Malley, inspirational speaker and

former expedition leader, paramedic firefighter, SWAT team officer and paragliding

pilot was the keynote speaker at this event.

Other education session leaders were: Mark Lanterman, chief technology

officer, Computer Forensic Services; Kent Wheiler, associate professor, School

of Environmental Forest Sciences, University of Washington; and Ann Baker,

UFP Business School, UFP Industries Inc. Also, panel members from Weyerhaeuser,

Boise Cascasde and LP presented "What's the Holdup?: A Supply

Chain Disruption Panel Discussion."

08. Paul Owen, Vanport International Inc., Boring, OR; Dave Cochenour, Eric Oien

and Todd Shipp, Alta Forest Additional Products, Photos Chehalis, on page 12 WA

Continued on page 32

Additional Photos on page 12

PRSRT STD

U.S. POSTAGE

PRSRT STD

PAID

U.S.

COLUMBIA

POSTAGE

MO

PAID

PERMIT

COLUMBIA

NO. 353

MO

PERMIT NO. 353

Photos By Terry Miller

Change Service Requested

Change Service Requested

The Softwood Forest Products Buyer

The

P.O.

Softwood

Box 34908

Forest Products Buyer

P.O.

Memphis,

Box 34908

TN 38184-0908

Memphis, TN 38184-0908

UVLA Returns To Seven Feathers For

Annual

SLMA and

Event

SFPA Spring Meeting

Strongly Attended

Photos By Zach Miller

Photos By Terry Miller

01. Aaron Fleming, Elk Creek Forest Products LLC, Eugene, OR; Mark Swinth and

Mark Kelly, Elk Creek Forest Products LLC, McMinnville, OR; Steve Snyder, Elk Creek

Forest

Terry

Products

Miller, The

LLC,

Softwood

Oregon

Forest

City, OR;

Products

Terry

Buyer,

Rasmussen,

Memphis,

Elk Creek

TN; Mark

Forest

Richardson,

Products

The

LLC,

Westervelt

Oklahoma

Company

City, OK;

Inc.,

Brett

Tuscaloosa,

Slaughter

AL;

and

John

Jennifer

Lindsey,

Moran,

Langdale

Elk Creek

Forest

Forest

Products

Co.,

Products LLC,

Valdosta,

McMinnville,

GA; and

OR;

Rich

and

Mills,

Dianna

Hood

Snyder,

Industries

Elk Creek

Inc.,

Forest

Hattiesburg,

Products

MS

LLC,

Oregon City, OR

New Orleans, LA–The Southeastern Lumber Manufacturers Association

(SLMA) Canyonville, and Southern OR–The Forest Seven Products Feathers Association Casino and Resort, (SFPA) located hosted here, a joint, was twoday

site meeting for the here multi-day recently. Umpqua Valley Lumber Association (UVLA) annual

the

banquet The associations and golf tournament. held their Attendance respective was board the meetings, largest the in addition history of to this providing

attendees with industry updates from various experts and hosting a trade

event.

expo UVLA featuring members more form than a coalition 40 vendors of long-time that supply timber equipment and lumber and services operators to

located the lumber in the industry. southwestern Before timber the official country meeting of Oregon. began, a fundraising dinner to

provide The UVLA's funds stated to update mission the industry is "to work catalog together of high to support resolution our industry Southern and Yellow

share Pine best product practices photos and, was of held course, at the renown fun that Napoleon comes from House. long-time partnerships."

Eric Gee, SFPA Executive Director, provided an overview of SFPA’s recent

programs The event and included activities. such SFPA networking currently opportunities promotes as Southern Hellgate Pine lumber jet boat in nine

excursion, global markets a vineyard with dinner in-market buffet, representatives as well a golf based tournament. in five countries. UVLA members

and After guests two were years also of invited hosting to virtual tour designated events and sawmills meetings, the SFPA area. is npleased to

be offering in-person activities once again, with increased funding for International

To learn

Program

more

promotions,

about this organization,

additional technical

visit www.uvla.net.

resources, the newly rebranded

John Edgar Rhodes Sawmill Safety Excellence Award, Additional and the Photos annual on page Forest 16

Products EXPO, which will be held in Nashville, Tennessee on August 23-25,

2023.

Portland

For more information,

Hosts

please visit www.sfpa.org.

SLMA’s board meeting highlighted on-going efforts of the association regarding

government affairs activities in Washington, DC to promote lumber as

NAWLA's

Regional

a “green” building

Meeting

material that supports rural economies while also combating

potentially troublesome regulations and tax changes. The membership was

also informed Photos By about Zach the Miller association’s growing Young Lumber Professionals

and Fundamentals of Leadership programs, which help develop future industry

leaders, Portland, and OR–The SLMA’s Multnomah Lumber.Works website to provide materials and virtual

Athletic Club, situated here, recently

reality videos to members

that are recruiting

welcomed members of the North

American Wholesale Lumber Association

(NAWLA) for a regional

potential employees

at high schools, trade

meeting.

schools, and job fairs.

The Industry Updates

sessions Export Coun-

in-

The evening's schedule included

01. Rose Braden, Softwood

an education session that focused cil, Portland, OR; and Bill Price, All Star

cluded presentations by

on "Preparing for the Future." Forest Products Inc., Jackson, MS

experts ranging from

NAWLA members and guests

environmental, tax, and

heard insights to the future from two perspectives. Joe Riner, Sales Director –

human resource attorneys

to representatives

Forest Products at Union Pacific discussed updates to the UP network and capital

investments in the PNW. To follow, Kevin Otzenberger and Steve Mignardi

from the treated wood,

from Ricky Daimler Stanley, Truck T.R. Miller North Mill America Co. Inc., outlined Brewton, the AL; company’s and

trucking,

broad effort

and

to

pallet

roll

out Casey and support Miller and zero-emissions Dean Griffey, commercial A.W. Stiles Contractors trucks in the field,

Inc., McMinnville, TN

industries.

and provide

Attendees

an

outlook on autonomous driving for commercial applications.

Additional Photos on page 16

Continued on page 32

Additional Photos on page 20

Continued on page 40

having just received a large stumpage increase on July 1st. In addition to this

increase, the labor and fuel costs have skyrocketed, while at the same time the log

values in all species are decreasing. The overall Q2 log harvest on the Coast was

down about 8 percent from the same period of last year and looking ahead with

the 2-year-old growth deferral underway, many cutting permits will continue to

be elusive. Some loggers, sensing that future supply may be low, are choosing to

hold onto the few logs they do have and waiting for the market to firm or stumpage

fees to decrease rather than selling at the lower levels.

"Sawmills currently are more reluctant to purchase Cedar logs until they see

where the lumber market settles. Often a purchased boom of logs is not cut for

60 to 90 days after securing pricing; therefore, in a declining lumber market it is

a long game of catch up before the economics make sense again." Garofano finished

by saying, “The recent reduction for the all-in duty rate from 17.91 percent

to 8.59 percent should be some refreshingly good news for Cedar which has lost

market share, as well as priced out many consumers. However, there are many

more factors at play that may stand in the way of things turning brighter. The next

several months will be challenging for all as the market works its way toward a

new normal.”

Leslie Southwick of C&D Lumber, Riddle, OR said, “Supply has seemed to

outpace demand in a majority of products and especially Cedar products. While

Cedar timber orders remain strong, we have ample supply of decking products

this season. It has been very difficult to find a trading level that buyers will even

entertain buying at. Pricing continues to be volatile in this market. From week

to week you are never sure what pricing is going to do. The market is soft currently

as we head into September

and could continue to be that way

into late fall if we don’t see some

economic indicators stabilize soon.”

Southwick continued, “Customers

seem to be less than enthusiastic

about the current market. It is

challenging when pricing seems to

constantly be moving. I think buyers

continue to remain cautious and

are not sticking their necks out too

far with having large amounts of

inventory on hand.”

In-regard-to challenges C&D

Scan this QR code

with your camera phone

to sign-up.

Lumber continues to face, Southwick

said, “Labor continues to be

a challenge. We constantly seem

to be hiring at least a few people.

It is fire season now and Oregon/

Northern California have already

been experiencing multiple fires,

which can lead to restrictions in the

woods and log supply issues. Fortunately,

we are not experiencing a

log supply issue at C&D, but we are

always monitoring what is happening

in the woods so we can react if

necessary.”

Aiden Coyles of Gilbert Smith

Forest Products, Barriere, BC

said, “We currently have a healthy

inventory but are building across

all dimensions due to decreased

customer interest. 2x6 continues to

be the problem with large amounts

of low-price knotty Cedar readily

available on the market. Every

customer is maxed on their inventory

and needs to see some movement

before they can commit to

new business. We are seeing little

to no pull through right now across

almost all product lines."

Coyles continued, “High log cost

persists, we are actively trying to

average our inventory down with

lower cost fiber. Transport actually

seems to have regulated although

prices still remain high. We’ve

had some small fires in our area

but nothing of note and the cooler

weather is helping out.” n

Southeast Business Trends

By Matthew Fite

Staff Writer

Ask a lumberman in the South how his market is, and

the answer will vary depending on what type of company

you’re talking to.

A wholesaler in Mississippi stated, “Our business

conditions are still good. Sales are good. I would say it’s

tempered down just a little bit from the best months we’ve

had. Last month, we had fewer sales than the previous month but nothing to be

alarmed about. The Southern Yellow Pine market, the only Softwood we deal

with, is off pricewise from the highs substantially. The overall market is down, not

just pricing but volume. Customers are not buying as much because they’re trying

to take advantage of lower prices. People buy for their immediate needs and then

they wait for the market to fall further.”

Compared to six months ago, he said, the market is “slightly down.”

Southern Yellow Pine is the only Softwood he sells, from 2x4 to large timbers.

He sells his lumber to industrial customers. “Based on our sales to that segment,

they seem to be doing well in their own sales,” he stated.

Transportation isn’t a problem

for his company. “Transportation

is always a struggle,” he said, “but

we’ve got a really good employee

who handles all of our logistics for

flatbeds and vans. We’ve got a wide

network of truckers that we deal

with. The only thing that negatively

affects our business is when freight

rates escalate as they have done for

everybody. We anticipate that and

we incorporate a higher freight rate

into our delivery price to customers

when that’s necessary.”

A representative for a New

Orleans-based lumber company

remarked, “Overall on a global

scale, I’m seeing a contraction

in the Softwood lumber market.

A lot of that is due to economic

challenges that are global. Some

countries have inflation but not to

the degree that the United States

does now, although our economy is

much better. But there is not a lot

of buyer confidence. Our customers

are seeing a reduction in their

orders. Today, the market is weak

and there is very little optimism in

the market. I think we’re several

weeks away from the optimism that

we have hoped for.”

Asked to compare the market at

the time of this interview with several

months ago, he replied, “Our

sales are off more than 50 percent

from several months ago.”

He sells Southern Yellow Pine

and a little Doug Fir and Eastern

White Pine (98 percent Southern

Yellow Pine) in all grades in 4/4,

8/4, some 16/4 and 20/4. He sells to

distribution yards and end users. “A

lot of our customers are struggling

mightily,” he noted. “For example,

sales are softening in Europe. In

India and Pakistan, their orders to

us are very poor. We’re also seeing

a slowdown in payments.

“Domestic transportation is still

quite expensive, but the availability

is better,” he stated. “Rates have

also been increasing for offshore

shipments.”

In Alabama, a provider of lumber

to makers of multifamily dwellings

said, “Over the last four or five

weeks we haven’t seen as many

sales come in as far as new jobs starting. As the market rose, it froze everybody

up. Not as many people were willing to jump in and make purchases as the market

was rising, because I don’t think there was a whole lot of confidence that the market

would continue to move upwards.

“Now, things are better,” he commented, “as a lot of jobs are starting. We don’t

exchange any money till materials hit the job site. This month was the busiest

month of the year so far as far as shipping material.”

He offers No. 2 and No. 3 Common Spruce and No. 2 and No. 3 Common

Southern Yellow Pine. “Southern Yellow Pine is the one I sell the most of,” he

remarked. He sells lumber in 2x4 and 2x6.

He sells his lumber to end users: installers, framers, general contractors and

owner developers. “We’re seeing more opportunities on the horizon,” he stated.

“I’ve been in this line of work for 10 years, and the market has only gotten

stronger for the multifamily dwellings. Starts and permits are up on multifamily.

They’re getting more work so we’re seeing more inquiries.”

Getting railcars, getting them unloaded and shipped on time, has been tough, he

observed. “Trucks have been tough as well,” he noted. “However, getting trucks

seems to be getting better over the last couple of weeks here.” •

Page 48 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 49


Quebec/Ontario Business Trends

By Richard Lipman

Guest Writer

In SPF, a Quebec producer noted, “We were off for

a few weeks and we just came back, to adverse market

conditions. It is a bit easier for smaller mills to navigate.

We sold everything before the shutdown. Like other

mills, we built an order file and now we are facing prices

that are $100 less than before the shutdown. Our market’s

lower prices were driven by the West Coast. The east was in better shape

before the Quebec holiday; there was some optimism left in eastern Canada at

the end of July."

Noted an Ontario wholesaler, “Western Canada chased the market down. Futures

reacted accordingly by being as much as $100 lower. The September contract

was suggesting a $100 drop in addition to the $100 drop we experienced.

But, lumber futures are volatile so the $100 became $60 in one day. There was a

swing of $40 in one day, which is not that unusual."

“Some very noticeable market fluctuations are becoming regular business

now," in the opinion of a Quebec manufacturer. "Back in the day, a swing of $30

in one week was dramatic and that is no longer the case. The crazy conditions of

the last two years were like a roller coaster ride. The 'new normal', if I can say

that, will still be highly volatile compared to what we experienced in the past,

where minimum volatility was about $130-140, and highly volatile years were

$200. Now, in my opinion, we are likely looking at $500 between the highs and

the lows in a given year. Still, that is well below the $1,500, which we were just

living in for the last two years. My expectation for the next year and a half is

$500 spread between the highs and the lows."

Noted a Quebec wholesaler, “I don’t see us going down more than $150 from

where we are now, which will be the low point in this current period. I see the

potential for things to go up from there by $200 to $300 in my estimation. This

should allow for more reasonable profits for companies. For the months ahead,

we will be at the lower end of the pricing, as the housing market needs to adapt

and adjust to the new financing situation. I predict we are going to have a decent

August and then we are going to prepare for a difficult six months."

The commodities currently are selling better right now," according to an Ontario

producer. "The industrial product is already harder to sell, the No. 3 and No.

4, especially on the whites. The U.S. duty is kind of an all or nothing situation.

In some market conditions you cannot pass any of it to anyone, you can’t dictate

anything at all. When the market was strong you could show what the U.S. was

paying, and encourage your Canadian customers to pay more. The duty gives us

access to the U.S. market, but you can’t say we are able to bump up the Canadian

prices because of it."

On the Pine side, an Ontario producer commented, “The summer is slowly

coming to an end and it will be gone before we know it. Being that we are in the

summer doldrums right now, things have quieted down a little bit over the past

month or so. I think it is still going to look ok for the fall, prices are still fairly

firm, so there are no real issues there."

Particularly in the last couple weeks, according to an Ontario wholesaler, “The

market has slowed down noticeably, but it generally does this time of year. There

is still no significant amount of product out there and inventories are very low."

An Ontario producer commented, “There is a shortage in the pattern work,

siding and panelling, as it is in high demand. It is the thicker product and it takes

a long time to dry. When you get in to the 6/4 and 8/4 material, some mills don’t

want to kiln-dry it because of the time it takes and there are sometimes wet

pocket issues to contend with. It is far better as an air-dried product. With this

selling well, those inventories have gone down at the mills, and will need to be

replenished now. I don’t see there being any excess of product out there any time

soon on the White Pine."

A Quebec producer noted, “At this point, I would say that things look good for

the fall. There seems to be some demand there. There is no doubt that the interest

rate increases will likely curtail some of the business. Those on a tighter budget

may well think about holding off on some of their projects for another year until

things settle down, but people with money will still spend, so there will be activity.

I would say everybody is trying to put one foot in front of the other and hope

that things hang on for a while yet."

An Ontario-based wholesaler commented that trucking is always an issue and

it really has been for the last couple of years. Even though rates have come off a

little bit, with fuel prices being what they are, the transporters are charging for it.

Reported a Quebec producer, “The high costs all roll down to the consumer,

who have to first pay the prices of the wood itself. With the cost of the resource

going up so much, the mills are trying to pass the costs on, but then you have the

freight people charging high as well. The mills sometime feel like we get credit

for all the increase in prices."

Quebec/Ontario Trends

A Quebec wholesaler indicated, "The logging has not started up again and that

it usually is late August or early September before they go back in the woods.

There is always a little bit of work that gets done during the summer months, but

if there is any hint of drought, they don’t do any logging at all; they shut it down.

The fire season has been relatively quiet so far. It has not been one of the bad

years so far, even though it has been quite dry in the last month or so. The recent

rain will really help." •

NELMA — Continued from page 5

show them what to expect with their SPFs or EWP purchases.

If you’re selling internationally, both videos are available in French, Chinese, and

Spanish.

Let’s look at a real-world example:

Pretend one of your favorite customers orders a unit of SPFs lumber; not understanding

fully what the various grading terms and quality mean, then order No.

2. Upon opening the unit, they’re suddenly unhappy with “unexpected” knots

– so they call you back and say they aren’t happy. If you had sent them to the

Video Grades of SPFs lumber video, they would already be equipped with the

information needed to understand their purchase. Information that’s been shared

in the past on sheets that often go unread is now being presented in a way that’s

eye-catching and educational. The result? Happier retailers and happier, more

educated customers.

And with multiple translations of the video at your fingertips, end-users across

your selling spectrum can better understand the products manufactured by NEL-

MA members.

But think beyond just your customers to additional audiences: Retailers can refer

to the video to educate their customers, but NELMA members can also direct

customers from around the world to watch it and obtain a better, deeper understanding

of what SPFs grades are and what they look like.

“Our members have asked for this for years, and we’re so thrilled to deliver it

for them,” concluded Easterling. “The Eastern White Pine videos and the SPFs

videos help to complete the knowledge cycle and ensure that customers know

what to expect when their lumber delivery arrives.”

You may find the two free grade species videos on the NELMA YouTube channel.

For more information about selling SPFs or Eastern White Pine, please

visit www.NELMA.org.

WHO’S WHO - Plucknett Continued from page 2

tion and support teams focus on minimizing the disruptions of upgrading to new

software. In short, they aim to make the transition as seamless as possible. Starting

with a new customer site visit, the team creates a roadmap to identify where

and how their software can support and improve a customer’s business processes.

They then create a training plan and start regular check-ins to help keep upgrades

on track. When a business goes live on Agility, team members are on site for a

few days. After that, the support team is always just a phone call away.

DMSi is a member of the North American Wholesale Lumber Association,

National Lumber and Building Material Dealers Association and the National

Hardwood Lumber Association.

A graduate of Ogallala High School, Plucknett went on to graduate from the

University of Nebraska in Omaha, NE, with a double major in Computer Science

and Management of Information Systems.

Plucknett has been married to Annette for the past 16 years and they have one

son and one daughter. In his free time, he enjoys supporting his kids’ activities by

coaching softball and being involved with Boy Scouts. n

Learn more about DMSi Software at www.dmsi.com.

WHO’S WHO - Satterfield Continued from page 2

Association, and Northeastern Lumber Manufacturers Association.

Satterfield has been with Cersosimo over 17 years and has been in his current

position for eight years. Cersosimo was his first introduction into the industry.

Satterfield attended Wayzata High School, located in Plymouth, MN. He

obtained his degree at The University of Oregon in Eugene, OR, majoring in

Environmental Studies and a minor in Geology.

He has two sons and in his spare time, Satterfield enjoys sports, music, and

spending time with his family. n

For more information visit www.cersosimolumber.com.

Page 50 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 51


SEC — Continued from page 2

million over the past year. January-June 2021 vs 2022 export revenue is up 43%

despite lower 2022 prices, and export volume is up 154%. Buyers in Pakistan,

which was a non-existent market for U.S. Softwoods prior to 2017, is now the

leading international market for Eastern White Pine, thanks to market development

efforts by SEC. During COVID, buyers in the country were largely unable

to source supply due to competition from buyers in the U.S., but with travel restrictions

lifted, SEC hosted a group of eight buyers from Pakistan on an inbound

mission in June where they met with suppliers.

As standing timber in much of the U.S. continues to increase, the supply of legally

harvested international timber is declining. A November 2022 ban on timber

sales of old growth forests in B.C. restricted harvests on 1.4 million acres (2.6

million hectares) and analysts project that this could result in the closure of 14-20

mills. Old growth logging, which constitutes one-quarter of B.C.’s annual timber

harvest is declining as availability of these forests is declining and becoming

more inaccessible. Prior to the Ukraine invasion, Russia exported 28 million cubic

meters of lumber annually, much of which is now subject to international conflict

timber bans. While half of Russia’s lumber exports are sold to China, China’s

flagging real estate market is likely to hamper those sales.

The U.S. also benefits from the global drive

toward legally harvested and sustainably

managed timber. Global furniture retailers are

increasingly demanding chain of custody certification

to ensure that the products they carry

are produced from legally harvested timber – a

move that is negatively affecting tropical timber

in favor of SFI certified U.S. timber. Finally,

South American producers such as Brazil are

facing massive annual losses which is pushing

log costs to a point where they are now higher

than in the U.S. Brazil’s National Institute for

Space Research estimated that between August

2020 and July 2021 3.3 million acres of

forestland was lost – a 22% increase from the

previous year. It marks the greatest area lost

to deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon since

2006 when a total area of 3.5 million acres was

cleared. These issues place the U.S. in a key position to improve its competitiveness

in international markets.

The last two years have been both a challenging time for U.S. producers and

a boon. While logistics will likely remain with us for a while, recent changes

in the domestic economy underscore the importance of remaining diversified

in our domestic and international markets. Thanks to sound forest management

laws and practices, while timber supply in other areas of the world is declining,

the U.S. has a long-term supply of timber – and our sustainable forest management

practices only bolster our marketability. The trade groups that promote

U.S. Softwoods internationally remained committed to promoting U.S, Softwood

lumber throughout the COVID travel bans and domestic market boom, and we are

now seeing customers return to international trade shows in greater numbers than

prior to COVID. These customers visit our booths looking for certified products,

suppliers who can provide a long-term supply, and alternatives to Russian Larch.

Others specifically seek out the U.S. booth looking for specific U.S. species such

as Eastern White Pine.

With COVID in the background, export is ready to flourish. It’s a lot of work,

but with so many factors working in our favor, it surely will be worth it. At a

minimum, tapping into this ocean of outside demand will allow U.S. lumber companies

to diversify their risk – and rewards, between domestic and international

business while finding new markets for our ample domestic timber supply. n

Source: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service, GATS Database

WRCLA— Continued from page 7

sage seeded.” The course focuses mainly on WRC siding, including soffits and

trim, as it plays such a major role in the design and style of a home or building as

well as protecting it from the elements. The course also points out that although

the siding category has had a myriad of competitive man-made substitute products

that have appeared and disappeared over the decades, WRC siding has been a

popular constant for hundreds of years.

“We know that professionals and homeowners alike are genuinely surprised

when they learn that they literally have hundreds of options when it comes to

specifying finishes for siding and trim,” said Kirkbride. “Add in the different

textures, profiles and grades and you can create whatever design you want.” The

CEU covers the first and most simple non-maintenance option of leaving WRC

siding unfinished so it naturally turns gray over time. This option also has the advantage

of having the most benign environmental impact of all alternative product

choices for similar building applications, according to a recent third-party Life

Cycle Assessment of natural Western Red Cedar siding and decking.

As the majority of Western Red Cedar users will prefer a finish that preserves

the wood’s natural color and appearance, the range of natural finishes such as

transparent and semi-transparent stains is also explained. One technique that

is gaining in popularity is the use of bleaching and weathering products. These

are essentially water-repellent finishes containing pigments and other additives.

Bleaching stains accelerate the weathered, gray look faster and more evenly than

if the wood was left to naturally weather. After bleaching, the Western Red Cedar

can be left in its natural state or given a coat of clear sealer.

Included in the variety of finishing options available are opaque finishes; used

with finger-joint products or in cases where the color and natural grain of the

wood are not required, and the waxes and coatings used in interior applications.

The importance of using WRC products to mitigate climate change and the versatility

they offer are but two of the benefits that contribute to upselling Western

Red Cedar’s true value to the customer. The emerging area of biophilic design,

in which studies are showing that incorporating natural products like wood in

interior and exterior design have positive health benefits and help reduce stressrelated

illnesses, also resonates strongly with consumers and further differentiates

WRC from composite competitors.

By adhering to a consistent message and focusing on the value of their products,

the WRCLA is avoiding bombarding potential customers with meaningless

messages and instead are working to stand out from their competitors and create

long-term, happy customers by providing more value than anyone else. n

WHO’S WHO - Haddix Continued from page 2

in inside sales, special projects, and various informal leadership roles. In the summer

of 2021, she was promoted to Operations and revels in the variety of her new

position.

Asked to describe one of her favorite things about working at PLC, Haddix

said “Our customer service is second to none. Our goal is to help clients solve

problems and we work hard – as a team – to get the job done.”

Patrick Lumber Co. is a member of the North American Wholesale Lumber

Association, Portland Wholesale Lumber Association, National Wood Flooring

Association, National Hardwood Lumber Association, and Hoo-Hoo International.

Terry is active in several of these organizations – she is currently the Vice

President of the PWLA, and a member of the NAWLA Education Committee, as

well as a past President and current Supreme 9 in HHI.

Haddix graduated high school in Eatonville, WA and attended the ubiquitous

“School of Hard (lumber) Knocks.” She and her husband of 21 years, Bryan,

have a son and a daughter. Together, the couple are on the leadership team of an

organization that provides summer camp experiences to kids in the foster system.

Terry is also in the Rose Festival Clown Corps, where she has led groups of local

tradeswomen as they represent Rosie the Riveter in Rose Festival parades. She

is a proud dragon boater, and enjoys cake and cookie decorating. During the

pandemic, Terry discovered a new love for puzzles, and has recently decided to

go back to school to earn a degree in management.

Located in Portland, OR, Patrick Lumber Co. is a global wholesaler and

remanufacturer that sells its lumber products internationally. The company offers

rough lumber, boards, patterns and timbers including high end, appearance-grade

Douglas Fir, Western Red Cedar, Hemlock, SYP, and AYC. •

For more information, Terry can be contacted at terryh@patlbr.com or

(503) 805-9899.

LIKE US ON

@MillerWoodTradePublications

www.millerwoodtradepub.com

Page 52 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 53


PotlatchDeltic/Stimson— Continued from page 8

AWC — Continued from page 2

AWC

Bill Hetland, Buckeye Pacific LLC, Portland,

OR; Pam Grooters, Detroit Forest Products

Inc., Detroit, MI; and Steve Traetz, Detroit Forest

Products Inc., Grand Rapids, MI

Todd Glomski, Viking Forest

Products LLC, Minneapolis,

MN; Dave Hutson,

Universal Forest Products

LLC, Windsor, CO; Mike Ebert,

Eagle Forest Products,

Eagle, ID; and Jim Williams,

Seaboard International Forest

Products, Nashua, NH

Kevin Bruce, Western Lumber Company, Medford, OR; Dan Mandeville, Parr

Lumber Company, Woodinville, WA; John C. Branstetter, Wildwood Trading

Group/Vaagen Bros. Lumber Inc., Colville, WA; Nic Wilson, Big Sky Lumber

Sales LLC, Hamilton, MT; and Cary Holaday, Eagle Forest Products, Eagle, ID

Kevin Mantay, Kelsey Kline and

Ryan Kline, Disdero Lumber Co.,

Clackamas, OR; and Rick Palmiter,

BPWood Ltd., Penticton, BC

Wood has been used as a building material for millennia, but the health

benefits of wood use are only recently being studied and understood. Recent

research from the not-for-profit FPInnovations has shown that people feel more

relaxed when living around natural materials such as wood. Another recent

study published in International Journal of Architectural Research found that

building with wood products promote stress reduction and reduced depressive

episodes.

The effects of our living spaces don’t stop with our mental health: they also

expand to our physical health. Researchers at John Hopkins University and

many other institutions have concluded for decades that environmental stresses

take a serious toll on heart health. A comprehensive study out of the University

of British Columbia indicates that the biophilic benefits of being near wood

products lower blood pressure and heart rate, while also increasing activation of

the parasympathetic nervous system to achieve greater learning outcomes.

Imagine if we could provide housing solutions that offer not simply a roof

over one’s head, but also the dignity of a healthful space. Housing as a social

determinant of health and well-being is brought to light in a plethora of research.

Access to affordable housing is a cornerstone to improving quality of life, remediating

inequality, addressing social problems and reducing unemployment. Key

federal initiatives addressing affordable housing – such as tax credits to build or

rehabilitate affordable housing, American Rescue Plan funds for investments in

housing, and HUD’s Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program

– primarily address barriers in supply only. What is not being addressed are approaches

that combine access with quality.

It is time we start to look differently at how we build affordable housing in

this country. It is possible now, thanks to the advent of tall mass timber and

other wood building techniques, to address our housing shortage in an entirely

new way that incorporates biophilic design as a means of improving overall

quality of life for those who need it most. Innovations in wood construction are

making affordable housing options more plentiful and cost-efficient. Wood products

offer significant advantages in terms of material and construction costs—

while meeting all code requirements for safety and performance. Most American

communities have a large pool of skilled contractors with wood-framing experience,

which keeps labor costs competitive, reducing the overhead for affordable

construction projects. Wood also has incredible sustainability benefits, from

renewability to water quality to reducing our climate footprint.

We clearly need more low- and middle-income housing in this country, but

moving forward let’s do it right with design principles rooted in dignity, improv-

ing human mental and physical health and sustainability. Combined with other

elements such as natural lighting, running water fixtures, and natural air flows,

the use of wood as both a structural and aesthetic fixture can be a crucial part of

any biophilic design process that science is telling us can achieve important human

mental and physical health benefits. For our most vulnerable populations,

we as a society have the opportunity to provide housing in a new way, where the

actual building itself is a more holistic part of the solution. That’s exciting to

think about. n

IFG/Alta Tournament — Continued from page 28

Jason Pattis, Idaho Forest

Group LLC, Coeur d’Alene,

ID; Damien Fallin, Taiga

Building Products, Washougal,

WA; Ron Liebelt,

TransPak Inc., Vancouver,

WA; and Terry Miller, The

Softwood Forest Products

Buyer, Memphis, TN

Max Heller, Pelican Bay

Forest Products, Bend,

OR; Brad Gabriel, Weyerhaeuser,

Denver, CO;

Jerrett Long, Idaho Forest

Group LLC, Coeur

d’Alene, ID; and Kyle

McWhirter, American International

Forest Products

LLC, Portland, OR

Rod Larios, Spokane

Forest Products, Canby,

OR; Steve Culbertson,

Atlantic Forest Products

LLC, Georgetown,

TX; Wade Wheeler, Idaho

Forest Group LLC,

Coeur d’Alene, ID; and

Mark Smith, Ziegler

Lumber Co., Spokane,

WA

Read our current and

past issues online at

softwoodbuyer.com

Troy Lundquist, Silvaris

Corporation, Bellevue,

WA; Marissa Kernodle,

Silvaris Corporation,

Coeur d’Alene, ID; Pat

Collins, T J Forest Inc.,

Nampa, ID; and Pat Way,

Idaho Forest Group LLC,

Coeur d’Alene, ID

Page 54 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 55


Softwood Forest Products’ Stock Exchange

Softwood Forest Products’ Stock Exchange

SANDY NECK

LUMBER

Idaho Timber of Florida - Lake City, FL

SPF Dimension, 2x2 Banding Groove

2x4 - 2x12 – up to 24’, All Grades

2x4 & 2x6 92 5/8” to 10’, Stud Grade/#2

PET 92 5/8 & 104 5/8 Util. Studs/#2

7x9-8’ #1 and #2 Used - Treated RR Ties

1x2-8' Utility Furring Strips

Contact: Rusty, Glen, Kirk or Doug

(800) 523-4768 (386) 755-5555

Sagebrush Sales - Albuquerque, NM

2x4 – 2x12 SPF, HF & PP, All Grades

Studs, SPF, HF All Trims

2x2 8’ - 16’ Furring Strips

Boards & Whitewoods 1x4 – 1x12, All Grades

SYP Plywood, hardboard & fiber cement siding

Fire retardant lumber and plywood

Glulams/Engineered Joists/LVL

OSB All Thickness, Railroad Ties

Contact: Bret, Victor, Eddie or Phil

(800) 444-7990 (505) 877-7331

Idaho Timber of Texas - Fort Worth, TX

SPF/HF Dimension, 2x4 - 2x12 8-20’ #2/#3/Ut/Ec

SYP Dimension, 2x4 - 2x8 8-16’ #1/#2/#3/#4

2x4 & 2x6 SPF/HF/DF Trims to 140-5/8, Studs #2

2x2 8-16’ #3 Furring Strips

Contact: Dave, Brad or Noland

(800) 542-2781 (817) 293-1001

IDAHO TIMBER

Meridian, Idaho

(800) 654-8110 (208) 377-3000

www.idahotimber.com

Check us out

online

millerwoodtradepub.com

SOUTHERN

YELLOW PINE

2x4'—2x12'

6x6'

up to 16' long

*we also manufacture

Cypress

(912) 375-5174

beasleygroup.com

sales@beasleygroup.com

Contact: Brandon Cox and

Truss Beasley

WORLD-CLASS EASTERN WHITE PINE FROM MAINE

Manufacturing 4/4, S4S, S1S2E, Rough and Pattern in 2”-12”

MANUFACTURING NeLMA GRADES INCLUDING:

• C Select

• DBTR Select

• Premium

Contact our sales team today:

Manufacturers of Eastern White Pine.

1x12 BAND TEX

1x8 STD Pattern Stock

4/4 and 5/4 EWP C SEL

6/4x8 Log Cabin Siding

1/2x6 1/2x8 Prem Bevel Siding

DiPrizio Pine Sales

Route 153 & King’s Hwy.

Middleton, N.H. 03887

603-473-2210 603-473-2314

• Industrial

• D Select • D Select/Finish • Standard • Shop

FROM FOREST TO TRUCK IN 14 DAYS

OF OUR PINE IS DELIVERED

WITHIN A TWO DAY DRIVE

OF OUR SAWMILLS

Hancock Lumber operates 3 state-of-the-art sawmills in

Maine and specializes in producing to your specific needs.

Matt Duprey: (207) 627-6113

Jack Bowen: (207) 627-6115

www.HancockLumber.com/Sawmills

APA Western Softwood

Plywood

Manufactured for Use in Structural

Applications

Sheathing: CDX, CDX Structural 1, CCX, CC

Plugged & Touch Sanded

Underlayment: C X-band, Tongue & Groove

All Panels Available in Variety of Sizes &

Thicknesses

Available lengths: 8 ft thru 10 ft

Available widths: 4 ft thru 5 ft

Available Thicknesses: ¼ in. thru 1 ½ in.

Full Sanded softwood Plywood Available

Grades: AC, BC, and Marine

Produced to Customer Specifications to

Meet Specific Applications.

Sales: Kevin Smith

Toll-free: 800-547-9520

QUALITY PEOPLE CREATING

QUALITY WOOD PRODUCTS

AMERICAN CYPRESS

Dimension Lumber

4/4 through 8/4

Green & Kiln Dried | Up to 16’

S2S & Pattern Work Available

Timbers

3x3 through 16x16

Green | Up to 26’

Surfacing Available

POPLAR

4/4 Dimension Lumber

FAS, 1C, 2AB, Stained – Stock Width & Random

Green & Kiln Dried | Up to 16’

S2S & Pattern Work Available

ATLANTIC WHITE CEDAR

Dimension Lumber

4/4 through 8/4

Green & Kiln Dried | Up to 16’

S2S & Pattern Work Available

Timbers

3x3 through 6x6

Green | Up to 16’

Surfacing Available

WWW.GATESMILLING.COM

(252) 357-0116

EASTERN WHITE PINE

WESTERN RED CEDAR

Experience | Trusted | Service

1-888-726-3963

SNTraders.com

ROBBINS LUMBER, Inc.

est. 1881

Searsmont, Maine U.S.A.

Stock Listing

All items subject to prior Sale

T/L 1x5 Premium grade dressed to suit

T/L 1x6 Standard grade dressed to suit

T/L 1x8x8 Standard grade S4S or run to pattern

T/L 1x8x10 Standard grade WP4WP4

T/L 1x8x10 Standard grade dressed to suit

T/L 1x12 Premium grade dressed to suit

T/L 1x10 & 1x12 Pattern outs

29,222 pieces 3/4” x 1-7/16” x 48”

Tropical Hardwood stickers

P.O. Box 9

Searsmont, ME 04973

Tel.: 207.342.5221

Fax: 207.342.5201

Web: www.rlco.com

AVAILABLE

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Timber, LLC, Fort Worth, TX

Leading North American

lumber suppliers know the best

sales leads are found in Miller

Wood Trade Publications’

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Page 56 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 57


Softwood Forest Products’ Stock Exchange

Softwood Forest Products’ Stock Exchange

SHINGLES

- 18 inch perfections

- Grades #1 #2 #3 #4

- Western Red Cedar

- Alaskan Yellow Cedar

HAND SPLIT RESAWN SHAKES

- 18 and 24 inch lengths

- #1 and premium grade

- Thickness from ½ to 2 inches

- TAPERSAWN SHAKES

- 18 and 24 inch lengths

- Premium #2 and #3 grades

- 5/8 and 7/8 inch thickness

- Western Red Cedar

- Alaskan Yellow Cedar

SIDEWALL SHINGLES

- 18 and 24 inch lengths

- Re-butted and Re-jointed ( R&R )

- Natural sanded or grooved face

- Western Red Cedar

- Alaskan Yellow Cedar

Yellow Cedar Timbers - Clears & Decking

Appearance grade timbers and dimension

Fine grain industrials, clears, shops

and flitches

Export Clears

P R O D U C T S R

Teal Cedar Shake & Shingle

CLASSIC BUTT DECORATOR SHINGLES

- 18 inch length

- 3.5 and 5 inch widths

- 10 stock patterns

- Custom pre-stain available

TEAL SIDEWALL PRE-FINISH

- Prime Gray or White

- Custom colors our specialty

- Oil stain in semi-trans semi-solid and solid

- Acrylic latex in 2 and 3 coat application

- Up to 25 year finish warranty available

TEAL TONEWOOD

- Cedar and Spruce Guitar Tops

- Custom cut soundboards for

stringed instruments

BARK MULCH

- Landscape Mulch

- Container loads

SHINGLE HAY

- Nursery grade

- Hay Bale packaging

- Truck loads

Teal Cedar Lumber

Finished products

Panel and Pattern, siding, decking

and Fascia/Trim

Remanufacture blanks – mill run and

TK Specialties

read every issue online

The

Teal-Jones Group

A Family Of Fine Forest www.tealjones.com

Products

High quality Southern Yellow Pine dimension lumber.

Now available at four locations.

• Antlers, OK 150 MMFBM

2x4, 2x6 / 4x4, 6x6, 4x6 / 1x4, 1.25x6

8’ - 16’

Prime, #1, #2, #3, Decking

2’-4’ Trim Blocks

• Liberty, MS 30 MMFBM

8x8, 10x10, 12x12

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6’ - 20’

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• Martinsville, VA 150 MMFBM

2x4, 2x6, 2x8, 2x10 / 3.5x6, 3.5x8

8’ - 16’

Prime, #1, #2, #3, Pallet Cants

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• Kinsale, VA 70 MMFBM

2x4, 2x6 / 4x4, 6x6, 4x6 / 3x8, 4x8 / 1x4, 1.25x6

8’ - 16’

Prime, #1, #2, #3, Decking, Rgh Green

2’-4’ Trim Blocks

Westside Enquiries: OK-sypsales@tealjones.com

Eastside Enquiries: VA-sypsales@tealjones.com

Teal-Jones Group

www.tealjones.com

TEL: 604-587-8700

Hemlock and D. Fir Lumber

Dimension Lumber KD and Green

MSR, Premium Appearance, #2&btr, #3

Douglas Fir and Hemlock Timbers 4x4 up to 16x16

Appearance, #2&btr Structural

www.softwoodbuyer.com

TM

TM

Think quality, think Delta

DELTA PREMIER APPEARANCE

TIMBERS and ROUGH DIMENSION

3x6 thru 12x12 timbers

2x4 thru 2x12 ¼ off rough dimension

DELTA SUPREME GREEN S1S2E

FASCIA and S4S DECKING

5/4x4 thru 5/4x12 - 2x4 thru 2x12

S1S2E fascia

5/4x4, 5/4x6 2x4, 2x6 S4S decking

DELTA SUPERIOR KILN DRIED S1S2E

FASCIA and DECKING

1x4 thru 1x12 – 5/4x4 thru 5/4x12 – 2x4 thru

2x12 S1S2E fascia

5/4x4, 5/4x6, 2x4, 2x6 S4S decking

DELTA SELECT GREEN S1S2E

NO HOLE BOARDS

1x4 thru 1x8

www.deltacedar.com

Sales at 604-589-9006

Delivering Quality Timbers to

Our Dealers Nationwide

Home for all your timber needs

Douglas Fir - Sizes to 20”x20” - Lengths to 40’

Kiln Dried Douglas Fir - Sizes to 12”x12” -

Lengths to 24’

Cedar - Sizes to 16”x16” - Lengths to 32’

Mixed Hardwoods - Sizes to 12”x12” - Lengths to 20’

Larger sizes available on special order

Products and Services include:

• Corbels, Brackets, Rafter Tails

• Exclusive and Hand Hewn Surfacing

• Custom Siding Patterns

• Surfacing (all sides up to 20”x20”)

• Material Run to Pattern

(We Can Make Knives to Your Specs)

• Trailer Flooring

• Saw Texture

• Precision End Trimming

• Reman Customer Material to Spec

We offer a full line of Reman Services –

Special Items or Truck Loads

Wholesale Only, we sell exclusively through

our dealer network.

Locations in Dallas and Bertram, Texas

214-358-2314

RichardsonTimbers.com

REDWOOD

Uppers available in 1-inch, 2-inch and 4-inch

dimensions in lengths from 6-20 feet

Timbers available in 6-inch and larger dimensions,

up to 12”x24”, and lengths up to 24 feet

DOUGLAS-FIR

Joists and planks available in 4-inch

dimensions in lengths up to 24 feet

Posts and beams available in 6-inch and

larger dimensions, up to 12”x24”, and lengths

up to 24 feet

To order, please call (707) 764-4450

GetRedwood.com

Softwood Forest Products

Stock Listing Service

Available Exclusively to

SIX TIME ADVERTISERS

in

The Softwood Forest

Products Buyer

Page 58 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 59


TRADE TALK

TRADE TALK

Jefferies Announces Strategic

Transactions Including Agreement To

Sell Idaho Timber

Ted Ellis

Meridian, ID—Jefferies Financial Group Inc. (“Jefferies”) has agreed to sell

Idaho Timber, headquartered here, in two transactions at a combined sale price

of $239 million, resulting in an estimated pre-tax gain of $140 million. These

transactions were expected to close in August.

“Finally, we note that Ted Ellis, Idaho Timber’s CEO, has been a great partner

to Jefferies since 2005,” said Rich Handler, CEO of Jefferies, and Brian Friedman,

President of Jefferies. “During that seventeen-year period, Idaho Timber has

consistently contributed to Jefferies’ bottom line, and in the past two years Idaho

Timber has generated off-the-charts record performance. However, as Jefferies

becomes even more intently focused on our financial services businesses, we

have decided that it is the right time to sell our lumber-manufacturing business.

We thank Ted and all of his valued partners at Idaho Timber for all they have accomplished.

Ted is a remarkable human with incredible competency, decency and

compassion.”

Jefferies LLC acted as financial advisor to Jefferies Financial Group Inc. in connection

with the merger, the Vitesse Energy spin-off and the sale of Idaho Timber.

To learn more, go to www.jefferies.com.

At Timber Products, Mark Avery

Promoted To CEO,

Steve Killgore To Board; TP Logistics

Sees Changes

Springfield, OR—The Timber Products board and

the Gonyea family recently announced that Mark

Avery, currently serving as Chief Operating Officer to

Timber Products, will be promoted to Chief Executive

Officer (CEO). Steve Killgore, current CEO, will move

to the company’s board of directors. This move will

ensure continuity in leadership, the company stated.

“We are pleased that Mark has accepted this promotion;

he is an outstanding leader and we look forward

to the new era,” said Steve Killgore.

Avery joined Timber Products in 2018 as Chief

Operating Officer. He has over 25 years of experience

Mark Avery

in the industry, the last 10 in senior leadership roles.

His background includes leading large-scale capital projects and overseeing and

completing several significant acquisitions. Avery has been particularly successful

in establishing rapport and executing business plans with both sales and operations

staff, according to Timber Products.

Killgore has been CEO since 2018. Under Killgore’s leadership and direction,

the company has achieved many successes, and is well positioned for the future,

the company states. In his new role, he will continue to work on the development

of corporate governance, a seamless CEO transition, and Timber Products’ longterm

strategy. Killgore is uniquely equipped to perform in this role, as his prior

experience includes senior management and executive leadership, as well as being

a business owner, the company said.

Also, TP Logistics of Central Point, OR recently announced that its privately

owned truck fleet recently surpassed 200 trucks. This is a significant milestone

in the company’s plan to expand its fleet to 500 trucks, according to a company

spokesperson. The expansion of the fleet is a key element of growth plans to expand

the company’s footprint into the Eastern United States. “Our team couldn’t

be prouder of surpassing the 200-truck mark and look forward to the continued

growth of our fleet,” said Chris Goodman, National Business Manager for TP

Logistics.

Additionally, Sheri Tarr recently joined TP Trucking as the Western Sales Manager.

She will be based in Arizona. “Sheri will help drive the diversification of our

customer base as we grow to 500 trucks in our fleet,” said Tom Gennarelli, VP of

TP Logistics.

Tarr has worked in trucking for over 25 years, and has spent the majority of her

time with Swift Flatbed (14 years). She has also worked for 3 Peaks Logistics,

Smith Way Motor Express/Western Express and Roehl Transport. In these roles,

her responsibilities included office development, building fleets and sales/operations

management. She has a passion for Flatbed trucking, and very much enjoys

developing business and working with great teams.

Learn more at www.timberproducts.com.

Teal Jones Group Begins

Construction On $110 Million

Louisiana Sawmill

Surrey, BC—Gov. John Bel Edwards recently announced the start of construction

on a $110 million lumber production facility that will support the creation

of nearly 500 new jobs in northwest Louisiana. Teal Jones Group, with its head

office in Surrey, BC, disclosed in December that it was considering Bossier Parish

as the site of a new Southern Yellow Pine lumber plant. The company made

its final investment decision official at a groundbreaking ceremony that was also

attended by Louisiana Economic Development (“LED”) Secretary Don Pierson,

Teal Jones CEO Tom Jones, company President Dick Jones and other regional and

local officials.

“Louisiana’s wealth of timber resources has made it

a prime destination for lumber and sawmill business

operations for many years,” Gov. Edwards said. “We’re

gratified that Teal Jones has chosen to become a part of

that long tradition. This project will stimulate economic

activity, create good jobs in Louisiana’s Northwest

Region and contribute to the revitalization of our state’s

rural communities. It is a powerful reaffirmation of the

important role our state’s agribusiness sector plays in the

growth and diversification of Louisiana’s economy.”

Tom Jones Site preparation of the 235-acre greenfield facility in

Plain Dealing is underway and

expected to be complete by Q3 2023. Site work includes

creating access to nearby railway infrastructure and

timberlands, which the company cited as key factors in

its decision to build its first plant in Louisiana. The company

also has U.S. operations in Virginia, Oklahoma,

and Mississippi.

The project is expected to create 125 new direct jobs,

with average annual salaries of $47,000 plus benefits.

Louisiana Economic Development estimates the project

will also support at least 369 indirect jobs, for a total

Dick Jones

of 494 prospective new jobs in Louisiana’s Northwest

Region. The company estimates up to 120 construction

jobs at peak construction.

To learn more, go to www.tealjones.com.

TRADE TALK–

Continued on page 62

Page 60 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 61


TRADE TALK

TRADE TALK

Western Forest Products

Names Hofer President

And CEO And Invests In

Its BC Operations

Vancouver, BC—Western Forest Products Inc.,

with its head office here, recently announced that it

has appointed Steven Hofer as its new President and

Steven Hofer CEO and a member of the Company’s Board of Directors

(“Board”), effective September 7, 2022. Hofer

succeeds Don Demens, who will remain at Western in an advisory capacity until

March 31, 2023 to ensure a seamless transition. Demens will step down from the

Board effective September 7, 2022.

Hofer joins Western from BID Group, a global leader in wood processing

technologies and solutions. At BID Group, Hofer was responsible for creating

and leading its key strategic initiatives, including BID’s digital technology strategy

to drive revenue growth and market, product and geographic diversification.

Hofer started his career in the BC Coastal forest products sector and has deep

and expansive industry experience.

“Steven brings a wealth of industry knowledge and has the vision, leadership

skills and commitment to sustainability to guide Western’s execution of its

strategic plan and drive disciplined, long-term shareholder value,” said Michael

Waites, chair of the board. “Steven embodies Western’s core values, and his holistic

approach to the business equips him to continue working with our partners

to strengthen our business.”

Additionally, Western Forest Products Inc. recently announced capital investments

totaling approximately $29 million towards its B.C. operations. The

investments are part of the Company’s ongoing commitment to support valueadded

manufacturing on the B.C. Coast and grow its value-added wood products

business, all while continuing to improve Western’s long-term competitiveness.

These capital investments represent an increase of $13 million over and above

the $16 million of capital investments discussed in the Company’s first quarter

2022 Management’s Discussion and Analysis.

To learn more, visit www.westernforest.com.

NewLife Forest Products Gets A New

Name: Restoration Forest

Mesa, AZ—NewLife Forest Products, headquartered

here, has changed its name to Restoration Forest.

“Restoration Forest is a name that best describes

the essence of the company,” said Ted Dergousoff,

CEO. “The company’s roots are firmly entrenched

in forest thinning and biomass removal. It is through

forest thinning that the company is able to convert

the smaller and aged trees to high valued, customer

centric lumber products. The forest restoration work

reduces the available fuel load in the forests, and a

low fuel load significantly shrinks the risk of massive

forest fires.”

Restoration Forest is the largest vertically integrated

forest products business in the Southwest region

Ted Dergousoff

with next-generation manufacturing facilities currently producing value-added

wood products. Restoration Forest works closely with an ecosystem of local industry

partners including mechanical thinning crews and smaller forest products

manufacturing facilities.

To learn more, go to www.nlfpaz.com.

Biewer Sawmill Sales Department

Reorganizes

St. Clair, MI–Biewer Lumber LLC, headquartered here, recently announced

changes to the sawmill sales department. These changes will better support the

company’s growing sawmill business, according to a company press release.

Newly promoted to the position of sawmill sales manager, Mike Burley will

take the lead on day-to-day business, as well as direct the team. Burley will

report to Bill Schlottman, director of sawmill sales. With over eight years with

Biewer, Burley has done an outstanding job supporting the needs of Biewer’s

customers, the press release stated.

Schlottman, a 20-year industry veteran, will focus on production and maximizing

the efficiencies of Biewer’s seven sawmills. These facilities are located in

Michigan, Wisconsin and Mississippi.

“As Biewer’s overall production nears 1 billion board feet in annual production,

this new structure will better position Biewer for continued growth while

providing the same excellent customer service our customers have come to

expect,” stated Tim Biewer, owner and president of Biewer Lumber.

Biewer Lumber is a fourth-generation, family-owned group of companies that

are committed to the environment and best forest practices. Biewer’s family of

companies currently includes five sawmills, three treating and distribution facilities

and a full-service logistics company.

For more information, visit www.biewerlumber.com/winona.

Macy Is New In Sales, Logistics For

Bowers

Beavercreek, OR – Bowers Forest Products, located here, recently announced

the new hire of Noah Macy, sales and logistics coordinator.

BFP offers specialty wood products for all 50

states. They carry standard and elevated tile battens

for roofing, construction, and survey lath, stakes,

hubs, pallet material, truss blocks, nursery blocks,

post caps, lattice, fence toppers, garden trellis, deck

balusters, posts, and furring strips in Cedar and

Whitewood. Their unique services include custom

re-manufacturing including kiln-drying, planing,

moulding, trim, ripping, and resawing.

Macy books and schedules shipments and assists

with order entry, pre-invoicing, and customer service.

He joined BFP in August 2021 and this is his

first role in the industry.

Macy is currently pursuing his associate’s degree

Noah Macy

and enjoys playing basketball, collecting records, and going camping with his

wife, Anne, and their daughter.

Established in 1999 by Jeff and Cheryll Bowers, Bowers Forest Products fulfilled

a need in lumber remanufacturing. Over the past 20 years, Bowers Forest

Products has grown to about 75 employees, distributing wood products across

the United States.

For more information, visit www.woodwayproducts.com.

BID To Acquire Smith Sawmill

Services

Saint-Georges, QC—BID Group recently announced it has entered into an

agreement to acquire Smith Sawmill Service. The transaction brings together

two customer-focused organizations and further expands BID’s industry-leading

operational life cycle product and service offerings to include the essential recurring

saw and tooling capabilities required to support modern wood processing

operations.

Smith Sawmill Service is one of the largest suppliers and service providers

of saws, cutting tools, filing room equipment, and critical consumable products

to the wood processing industry. Smith serves the North American market with

both proprietary cutting technologies and industry-leading brands. With locations

in Texas, Louisiana and North Carolina, Smith is a recognized service leader,

equipped to meet the growing customer demand for personalized saw and knife

repair and reconditioning solutions, according to a company press release.

“I am incredibly pleased with the opportunity to unite with an industry leader

like BID,” said Paul Smith, president and CEO of Smith Sawmill Service. “I

would like to thank our team for their dedication and hard work to build a thriving

business. We are confident this partnership will provide our employees, suppliers,

and loyal customers with greater opportunities and benefits.”

The transaction is expected to close in Q3 2022 and is subject to customary

closing conditions.

About BID Group

Since 1924, the privately-owned BID Group has been providing industryleading

solutions for its highly valued customers. As one of the largest integrated

suppliers to the wood processing industry, and the North American leader in

the field, BID Group is a one-stop source for guaranteed, comprehensive, and

TRADE TALK–

Continued on page 65

Page 62 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 63


AHC— Continued from page 4

Pine paneling is shown ready for shipment

from AHC's facility.

On the logistics side, Mitchell said, "We have repositioned and added some

additional trucks at our Clarksville, TN and Cleveland, GA facilities. We’ve

always shipped volume lumber and now our fleet has been expanded to ship

value-added products. AHC has been able to maintain our lumber supply channels

while increasing our volume mix

in value-added products.” With 16

company-owned trucks, AHC Logistics

is the right arm of the AHC operation.

Mitchell explained, “Since we operate

our own fleet, we can mix products on a

single truck to include units of rough or

surfaced and ripped lumber in domestic

or imports, ripped blanks, all the way

down to moulding and millwork products,

like S4S and paneling, and consolidate

shipments to send to a stocking

distributor. This allows our customers

to control purchasing for better management

of their inventory and turns.

“We run our own fleet within a

1,000-mile radius of our manufacturing

plants in the southeast and we ship to other locations through either use of a

common carrier, containers, or box van – whatever works best for the customer.

We have loading facilities at all our plants that can handle anything from flat beds

to hot shot trailers and LTLs, all the way through the box van and van loading to

containers.” Typical turnaround time for delivery of dimension

products is two to three weeks. AHC takes extensive

measures to protect its products, including curtain-side

trailers, cardboard covers, stretch wrapping, airbags, and

runners or skids.

Special requests are common for AHC, which Mitchell

said they are prepared to accommodate. “All of our

facilities have multiple 12-inch moulders to meet customer

demands. Our automated scanning equipment has 12-inch

chop lines in place to help facilitate the S4S and specialty

programs with 1/16-inch length tolerances. We have defect

saws that are capable of chopping 6x12s or 8x8s for more

industrial-type applications through the system. We also do

all tooling in-house from CAD drawings to knife making.”

Serving the furniture and cabinet industries for years,

AHC is now also doing business on the industrial side.

Prime 1x6 Southern Yellow Pine paneling

production at AHC

Mitchell added, “We still have a diverse product

offering in dimensional components, from small

component parts to large industrial sizes. We

manufacture hobby board programs that are from ¼

inch by 1-½ inch, all the way up to a large 2-inch by

11-¼ inch S4S program.”

Celebrating its 70th anniversary this year, AHC

began as a lumber brokerage business. The elder

Mr. Howard, father of the current chief executive

officer, Jim Howard, grew his business by selling

to furniture manufacturers in eastern Tennessee and

western North Carolina. In the mid-1950s, the company

was moved to Atlanta and began processing

Appalachian hardwoods in leased kilns. By 1960, a

plant was built in Mableton, GA. In 1966, a second

plant in Huntersville, NC was opened to service the

furniture industry in the Carolinas.

Under the leadership of the younger Howard, the

company has grown to include three drying yards

operating as AHC Hardwood Group. Also operating

under the AHC brand are the AHC White County

Mouldings plant in north Georgia, AHC Import

Lumber, importing African and South American

hardwoods, AHC Export Lumber, which sells Appalachian

hardwoods around the world, and AHC

Logistics, the trucking division of the company.

As a multi-generational company with a long-term

vested interest in sustainable

forestry, AHC Hardwood

Group is committed to renewable

wood resources and

responsible forest stewardship.

AHC is a member of the

North American Wholesale

Lumberman’s Association, National Hardwood Lumber

Association, the Hardwood Manufacturers Association,

the Southern Cypress Manufacturers Association, the

Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen's Association, and the

Kentucky Forest Industries Association. n

For more information,

visit www.hardwoodweb.com.

One Success Story After Another

We have been very pleased with the phone calls and inquiries we have received as a

result of our advertising in The Softwood Forest Products Buyer. As a remanufacturer

producing ornamental timbers and specialty products with an extensive milling facility,

we were amazed by the phone calls we received from our customers regarding the

feature story you did accompanied by photographs. Our company has a small sales staff

and ʻThe Softwood Buyerʼ provides Richardson Lumber and Manufacturing the ability

to target our customers and potential customers. We definitely see the VALUE!

Jamie Hursh

Richardson Timbers

Dallas, TX

Currently utilizing: Six 1/2 Horizontal, four color ads in The Softwood Buyer and one Full-Page, four color ad in the Special NAWLA Edition.

Richardson Timbers is a remanufacturer providing profiling and mill capabilities on large timbers

and lumber. They supply Fir timbers as large as 20’x20’x40’, Cedar 16’x16’x32’ and Oak 12’x12’x20’.

They keep a large inventory of timbers on their four-acre yard that is completely paved. Their milling

facility consists of rip saws, gang rip saws, resaws, Weinig moulder, surfacers, band saws and an

extensive file room. Tel: (214) 358-2314 - richardsontimbers.com

THE SOFTWOOD FOREST PRODUCTS BUYER

P.O. Box 34908 • Memphis, TN 38184-0908 • Toll Free: 800-844-1280 • FAX (901) 373-6180

Web site: www.millerwoodtradepub.com • E-mail address: apryll@millerwoodtradepub.com

www.softwoodbuyer.com

Much of the Softwood at

AHC is being machined into

paneling products, such as

this 1x6 White Pine T&G

Beaded Paneling.

AHC President Hal Mitchell

TRADE TALK—Continued

September

from page 63

innovative solutions. The ability to provide complete, smart connected, turnkey

manufacturing facilities that includes engineering, project management, equipment,

software, installation, startup, and after-sales parts and services is the BID

Group companies' strategic value to its customers. The company has offices in

15 locations situated to serve the predominant wood processing regions of North

America.

Learn more about BID at www.bidgroup.ca.

JoeScan Develops Next-Gen Scanners

JoeScan president Joey Nelson dials-in a new

JS-50 scanner.

Softwood Calendar

Global Buyers Mission, Whistler, BC. www.bcwood.com. Sept.

8-10.

Lumbermen's Association of Texas, 136th Annual Convention &

Expo, Omni Frisco Hotel, Frisco, TX. www.lat.org. Sept. 12-14.

NAWLA, Regional Meeting, Omni Frisco Hotel, Frisco, TX.

www.nawla.org. Sept. 12.

Northeastern Lumber Manufacturers Association, 89th Annual

Meeting, Wentworth By-The-Sea, New Castle, NH. www.nelma.

org. Sept. 21-23.

NAWLA, Regional Meeting, Wentworth By-The-Sea, New

Castle, NH. www.nawla.org. Sept. 22.

Timber Processing & Energy Expo, Portland Expo Center,

Portland, OR. www.timberprocessingandenergyexpo.com. Sept.

28-30.

October

LMC Expo, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA.

www.lmc.net. Oct. 12-14.

November

Vancouver, WA—The

sawmill scanning experts

at JoeScan, headquartered

here, will soon bring the

proven simplicity of their

JS-50 scan head to more

parts of the sawmill,

according to a company

spokesperson.

“Mills love how our

latest JS-50 WX model

performs on their edgers

and trimmers,” said JoeScan

President Joey Nelson.

“It’s a robust, reliable

platform that is very easy

to use. So, we’ve been

working hard to develop

next-gen scanners for more machine centers.”

JoeScan will debut several new scanners at the Timber Processing and Energy

Expo trade show in Portland, OR on September 28, 29 and 30.

The company invites attendees to stop by their booth or visit www.joescan.com

to learn more. For additional information, contact JoeScan Senior Business

Development Manager Blake DeFrance at 360-993-0069 extension 7008, or

e-mail him at Blake.DeFrance@joescan.com.

NAWLA Traders Market, Phoenix Convention Center, Phoenix,

AZ. www.nawla.org. Nov. 9-11.

Blane

Page 64 Softwood Forest Products Buyer • July/August 2022

Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022 Page 65


OUR CLASSIFIED ADVERISING WORKS

800-844-1280

HELP WANTED

Come join a growing environmentally sustainable,

vertically integrated Ponderosa Pine Lumber Company

and be a part of rehabilitation of the Ponderosa Pine

Forests of Arizona while reducing the fire danger

through the removal of combustible forest floor debris.

Hiring all positions for Forestry, Sawmill, Planer Mill and

Engineered Wood Plant Bellemont Arizona.

We have open positions at Millwright, Electricians,

Molder, Fingerjoint, Dry kiln Operators. Lumber Graders.

Heavy Duty Diesel Mechanic and Forestry Operators

Do not miss this unique opportunity to take on a

dynamic, challenging and rewarding role with a growing

Arizona forest industry organization. Apply today!

Compensation (DOE)

Please send resumes to

Kandace.Johnson@nlfpaz.com

USED MACHINERY FOR SALE

• USNR 4TA30 Top Arbor Three Shifting Saw Edger

• Infeed Landing Deck

• USNR – Lunden Cam Unscrambler S/N 41419

• Even Ending Rolls

• Queuing Hooks (2) ahead of Scanner

• Queuing Hooks (2) after Scanner

• Edger Infeed Model 600 Maximizer S/N 2951-A

• USNR 4TA30 Edger with 200 HP Arbor Drive Motor

• Outfeed Belt with Shifting Edging Shears

• Specs – Hardwood 1” to 4” Thick x 4” to 24”

Wide x 6’ to 16’ Long

• Saw Kerf .160” x Saw Plate .120”

• Two Hydraulic Units

• Water Mizer Oil Mist Guide System

• Set of Babbitt Guide Tools

CONTACT: Jenness Robbins

CELL: (207) 745-2223

EMAIL: jenness57@gmail.com

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

AHC Hardwood Group........................... 68

Air Systems Mfg. of Lenoir, Inc..................

Alta Forest Products.............................. 11

Arxada.................................................... 62

Automation & Electronics USA LLC....... 35

BC Wood Spec./Global Buyers Miss..........

Beasley Forest Products........................ 21

Biewer Lumber....................................... 25

Biolube.......................................................

Bitterroot Valley Forest Products............ 53

Blair Logistics......................................... 61

Blue Book Services....................................

Boise Cascade BMD LLC...................... 36

Boise Cascade EWP LLC..........................

Bowers Forest Products......................... 52

Brunette Machinery....................................

Cersosimo Lumber Co. Inc.................... 42

Collins........................................................

Continental Underwriters, Inc.....................

DMSi...................................................... 29

Delta Cedar.............................................. 5

Diorio Forest Products, Inc........................

DiPrizio Pine Sales................................ 38

Disdero Lumber Co................................ 10

Durgin & Crowell Lumber Co................. 44

Elk Creek Forest Products..................... 55

Empire Lumber Co.....................................

Gates Milling............................................ 6

Hancock Lumber Co.............................. 13

Humboldt Sawmill............................... 31

Huscroft, J.H., Ltd.................................. 57

Idaho Forest Group................................ 47

Idaho Timber............................................ 7

Keller Lumber Co................................... 65

King City Forwarding USA, Inc.............. 27

Legna Software...................................... 60

Mars Hill, Inc..............................................

Messersmith Manufacturing.......................

MiCROTEC................................................

Neiman Enterprises............................... 37

Nordic Structures................................... 41

No. Amer. Forest Foundation (NAFF)........

No. Amer. Whls. Lbr. Assoc.

(NAWLA).....................................32 & 33

No. Eastern Lbr. Mfg. Assoc. (NELMA)... 54

Nyle Dry Kilns........................................ 17

Pacific Western Wood Works Ltd........... 49

Patrick Lumber Company...................... 34

Paw Taw John Services, Inc.................. 39

PPG Industrial Coatings.............................

Prime Forest Products........................... 51

Quebec Wood Export Bureau/Montreal

Wood Convention.....................................

Restoration Forest Products.................. 43

Richardson Timbers............................... 59

Robbins Lumber Inc............................... 19

SII Dry Kilns...............................................

San Group..................................................

Sandy Neck Traders.............................. 65

Selkirk Cedar.............................................

Shelton Lam & Deck.............................. 10

Siskiyou Forest Products....................... 63

Skana Forest Products.......................... 50

Softwood Lumber Board (SLB)..................

Southern Forest Products Assoc. (SFPA).. 67

Smith, Gilbert Forest Products...................

Stiles, A.W., Contractors Inc.................. 30

TS Manufacturing................................... 23

Teal-Jones Group................................... 15

Thompson River Lumber...........................

Timber Products Co................................. 9

U-C Coatings......................................... 40

U.S. Lumber............................................. 8

Vaagen Bros. Lumber.............................. 3

Valutec Wood Dryers............................. 45

West Bay Forest Products Ltd...................

Western Forest Products Inc......................

Western Red Cedar Lumber Association

(WRCLA).................................................

Woodgrain Lumber & Composites......... 46

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

2000 OPTIMIL 6FT TWIN BANDMILL

Never used. Bandsaw with covers. $150,000.

USNR 4TA30 TOP ARBOR THREE SHIFTING SAW EDGER

200 hp drive motor, includes unscrambler, control cab, infeed

and outfeed. $95,000.

Please call Jenness for more information at 207-745-2223

or Jeff at 207-342-5221.

CLASSIFIED OPPORTUNITIES

Classified Rates: Display $60.00 per column inch, fractions of an

inch will be charged as a full inch.

All classified Ads must be received by the 15th of the preceding

month. Example: Ads for the January/February 2021 issue must be

in by December 15th, 2020.

Also, please specify the number of times Ad is to run. All Ads to be

inserted on prepaid basis only.

Classified advertising accepted only for: Position Available,

Position Wanted, Business Opportunities, Machinery For Sale,

Machinery Wanted, Wanted To Buy, Service Offered.

800-844-1280


S4S & Architectural Mouldings

Cabinet & Furniture Components

Siding & Exterior Trim

Shiplap & Nickle-gap Paneling

1,000+ Finished Profiles

The Latest Technology.

Expanded Capacity.

No Supply Chain Issues.

Your Partner in Meeting Record-breaking Market Demand.

Atlanta, GA

Cleveland, GA

Crystal Spring, PA

Clarksville, TN

www.hardwoodweb.com

800.476.5393

Page 68 Softwood Forest Products BuyerSeptember/October 2022

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