16.09.2022 Views

Pittsfield Community Guidebook

Pittsfield Community Guidebook

Pittsfield Community Guidebook

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS

Create successful ePaper yourself

Turn your PDF publications into a flip-book with our unique Google optimized e-Paper software.

PITTSFIELD • 2022-2023

Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 1


CRUST

The Art of Pizza

Handcrafted Dough Homemade Sauces

The Finest Toppings

Vegan Friendly, Gluten & Dairy Free Options

A Truly Unique Pizza Experience

Come Taste The Delicious Difference!

505 East Street • Pittsfield • 413.464.7977

@crustpz.com

MARY COURTNEY DARREN LEE THOMAS HAMEL

Serving the Berkshires for more than 25 years

Committed to providing the highest quality legal services

possible through attentive, creative and aggressive

application of the law to our clients’ practical needs.

• Litigation

• Business

• Personal Injury

• Divorce

• Family Law

• Employment Law

• Social Security

• Guardianship/Conservatorship

• Estate Planning - Probate - Tax Proceedings

• Real Estate

• Banking

• Creditors’ Rights & Bankruptcy

31 Wendell Ave | Pittsfield, MA 01201 | 413.443.4445

We offer discounts every-day for Veterans & Active-Duty Personnel

2 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 3


Welcome

to Pittsfield

As mayor of the city of Pittsfield, I am

thrilled to extend warm greetings and a

hearty welcome.

Pittsfield, the capital seat of Berkshire

County, is the proud home to 44,000 residents.

Our thriving arts and culture community

features an array of museums, performance

centers, theatres, galleries and

exhibits that attest to the vibrant history

and creativity in our city.

Additionally, our downtown has an amazing

movie theater that offers an unrivaled

viewing experience. On North Street is also

where you’ll find an array of eateries and

restaurants that reflect rich and diverse

backgrounds.

While we’re a city with a distinctive urban

flair, we also have spectacular and easily

accessible natural resources, ranging from

the Pittsfield State Forest to Bousquet

Mountain, that allow for a host of outdoor

recreation enjoyment.

I encourage you to explore and learn more

about our city. For more information,

please visit cityofpittsfield.org.

Again, welcome!

Mayor Linda M. Tyer

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FEDERAL ......................................................... 7

SENATORS ...................................................... 7

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES .................... 8

STATE ............................................................... 8

CITY GOVERNMENT .............................. 10-11

ELECTED OFFICIALS ................................... 12

PITTSFIELD SCHOOL COMMITTEE ........... 12

BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS ............. 14-15

SCHOOLS ...................................................... 16

ACTIVITIES AND ATTRACTIONS ............... 16

TENNIS COURTS .......................................... 18

RECREATION ................................................ 18

PUBLIC GOLF COURSES .............................. 18

STATE PARKS ................................................ 18

ORGANIZATIONS ........................................ 19

FIRE COMPANIES......................................... 20

A publication of

Capital Region Independent Media

11 Augusta Court, Clifton Park, NY 12065 • (518) 859-6353

PRESIDENT: Mark Vinciguerra • PUBLISHER: Warren Dews Jr

EDITORIAL: Melanie Lekocevic

ADVERTISING: Urij Tabuntschikow • DESIGN: Jackie Reese

ON THE COVER:

Clockwise, Berkshire Eagle, Berkshire Black Economic

Council, Berkshire Museum, Barrington Stage Company

and Berkshire Theatre Group.

ST.JOHN’S LODGE #10

COMMITTED TO HELPING OUR

COMMUNITY BECOME

A BETTER PLACE

TO LIVE, WORK AND PLAY

Pittsfield • Dalton • Gt. Barrington

Member FDIC & DIF Equal Housing Lender pittsfieldcoop.com

Your Local Waste & Recycling Service Provider

Preserving Our Environment by Giving Resources New Life

800-CASELLA • casella.com • Always Hiring Great People: Text CASELLA to 97211

We believe in making a difference through people!

Upcoming Community Events:

Facebook.com/St.Johns10.Mass

4 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 5


FEDERAL

FBI

Western Massachusetts Office

1441 Main Street

Springfield, MA 01103

413-736-0301

Medicare

800-633-4227

Social Security

800-772-1213

IRS

800-829-1040

SENATORS

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren

413-788-2690

1550 Main Street

Suite 406

Springfield, MA 01103

www.warren.senate.gov

U.S. Sen. Edward Markey

413-785-4610

1550 Main Street

Fourth Floor

Springfield, MA 01103

www.markey.senate.gov

ART.

MUSIC.

FAMILY

FUN.

YOU CAN HELP BUILD A STRONGER COMMUNITY

With your support, Berkshire United Way works

toward ensuring:

• Young children are ready to enter kindergarten

• Youth are able to graduate and build college

or career readiness skills

• Families have sufficient income and supports

to provide economic stability

North Adams, Mass. | Tickets & information at massmoca.org

(413) 442-6948 | www.berkshireunitedway.org

GIVE. VOLUNTEER. ADVOCATE.

6 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 7


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

U.S. Rep. Richard Neal

78 Center Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

Tel: 413-442-0946

Fax 413-443-2792

Washington D.C. Office:

372 Cannon House Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20515

Tel: 202-225-5601

Fax: 202-225-8112

Represents – 1st Congressional District

“By now it’s apparent that one misses out

on Barrington Stage Company musicals

at one’s peril…they are simply the best.”

—Ed Siegel, WBUR

STATE

GOVERNOR

Charlie Baker (R)

Office of Constituent Services

Massachusetts State House

24 Beacon Street

Office of the Governor

Room 280

Boston, MA 02133

617-725-4005

Springfield Office:

413-784-1200

ATTORNEY GENERAL

Maura Healey (D)

Attorney General’s Office – Western Massachusetts

Real, Reputable,

1441 Trusted. Main Street Your News

12th Floor

Media.

Springfield, MA 01103

THIS PUBLICATION

SUPPORTS REAL

NEWS.

Tel: 413-784-1240

Fax: 413-523-7765

STATE SENATE

Sen. Adam Hinds (D)

Massachusetts State House

24 Beacon Street

Room 109-E

Boston, MA 02133

Tel: 617-722-1625

Fax: 617-722-1523

District Office:

413-344-4561

adam.hinds@masenate.gov

REPRESENTATIVE

Rep. Tricia Farley-Bouvier (D)

Third District

State House

24 Beacon Street

Room 156

Boston, MA 02133

617-722-2240

District Office:

413-442-4300

Tricia.Farley-Bouvier@mahouse.gov

Taxation & Finance

800-225-5829

Child Abuse Reporting

800-342-3720

Commonwealth Museum

220 Morrissey Boulevard

Boston, MA 02125

Tel: 617-727-9268

Fax: 617-825-3613

commonwealthmuseum@sec.state.ma.us

Free admission

BEST THEATRE OF THE DECADE

5 years in a row!

17 BERKSHIRE

THEATRE

AWARDS 2021

REPORTERS, EDITORS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS

CREATE REAL NEWS. JOURNALISM YOU CAN TRUST.

#SupportRealNews

Pictured: Alan H. Green, Alysha Umphress, Jacob Tischler,

Allison Blackwell and Britney Coleman in Who Could Ask

for Anything More? The Songs of George Gershwin, 2021.

Photo by Daniel Rader.

413.236.8888

BARRINGTONSTAGECO.ORG

8 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 9


CITY GOVERNMENT

CITY GOVERNMENT

Accounting Office

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01202

413-499-9436

Pittsfield Municipal Airport

832 Tamarack Road

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-448-9790

Office of Arts and Culture

28 Renne Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9348

Assessor’s Office

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-395-0102

Berkshire Athenaeum

Public Library

One Wendell Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9480

BUIILDING INSPECTORS:

Building Commissioner: Jeffrey

Clemons

jclemons@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9440

Local Building Inspector: Albert

Leu

aleu@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9440

Local Building Inspector: William

Spinney

wspinney@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9440

Local Building Inspector: Ray

Ronan

rronan@cityofpitssfield.org

413-499-9440

Senior Inspector of Wires: Michael

Burton

10 Fenn Street

Pittsfield, NY 01201

mburton@cityofpittsfield.orgt

413-499-9443

Plumbing and Gas Inspector: Tim

Martin

10 Fenn Street

Pittsfield, NY 01201

tmartin@cityofpittsfield.org

413-448-9799

Sealer of Weights & Measures: Sally

Carnevale

scarnevale@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9302

Building and Grounds Maintenance:

81 Hawthorne Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9476

City Clerk

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9361

City Solicitor

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9352

Department of Community Development

70 Allen Street

Room 205

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9368

Conservation Commission

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9359

rvanderkar@cityofpittsfield.org

Council on Aging

330 North Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9346

Emergency Management

74 Columbus Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-448-9764

Engineering Division

10 Fenn Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9327

Finance and Administration – Treasurer’s

Department

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9466

Pittsfield Fire Department

74 Columbus Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-448-9764

Health Department

100 North Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9411

Human Resources Department

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9340

Information Technology

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9404

Licensing Board

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9363

MAYOR’S OFFICE

Mayor Linda Tyer

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9321

Parking, Buildings and Grounds

Maintenance Department

413-499-9497

Parks & Recreation

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9371

PITTSFIELD POLICE

DEPARTMENT

Chief of Police Michael Wynn

39 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

Tel: 413-448-9700

Chief’s Office: 413-448-9717

Records Bureau: 413-448-9711

PITTSFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Administration Building

269 First Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9500

contactus@pittsfield.net

Department of Public Services

10 Fenn Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9330

dpw@cityofpittsfield.org

Department of Public Utilities

10 Fenn Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9330

Purchasing Department

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9470

Registrar of Voters and Elections

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9461

Retired Senior Volunteer Program

(RSVP)

16 Bartlett Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9345

Tax Collector

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9431

Veterans Services Department

330 North Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9433

Wastewater Treatment Plant Division

901 Holmes Road

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9304

Water Division

413-499-9339

10 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 11


ELECTED OFFICIALS

MAYOR

Linda Tyer

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

ltyer@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9321

CITY CLERK

Michele Benjamin

70 Allen Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

mbenjamin@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9361

MEMBERS AT-LARGE:

President Peter Marchetti

63 Valentine Road

Pittsfield, MA 01201

pmarchetti@cityofpittsfield.org

413-212-2163

VICE PRESIDENT

Peter White

239 Jason Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

pwhite@cityofpittsfield.org

413-464-9044

Earl Persip III

190 Karen Drive

Pittsfield, MA 01201

epersip@cityofpittsfield.org

413-281-4909

Karen Kalinowsky

63 Shaker Lane

Pittsfield, MA 01201

kkalinowsky@cityofpittsfield.org

413-329-0397

MEMBERS BY WARD:

WARD 1:

Kenneth Warren Jr.

399 Cheshire Road

Pittsfield, MA 01201

kwarren@cityofpittsfield.org

413-418-0830

WARD 2:

Charles Kronick

93 Winsdor Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

ckronick@cityofpittsfield.org

413-884-3570

WARD 3:

Kevin Sherman

22 Kathy Way

Pittsfield, MA 01201

ksherman@cityofpittsfield.org

413-822-9511

WARD 4:

James Conant

78 Lucia Drive

Pittsfield, MA 01201

jconent@cityofpittsfield.org

413-212-4974

WARD 5:

Patrick Kavey

66 Spadina Parkway

Pittsfield, MA 01201

pkavey@cityofpittsfield.org

413-841-2770

WARD 6:

Dina Guiel Lampiasi

8 Trova Terrace

Pittsfield, MA 01201

Email: dlampiasi@cityofpittsfield.org

413-433-8654

WARD 7:

Anthony Maffuccio

256 Robbins Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

amaffuccio@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-4633

PITTSFIELD SCHOOL COMMITTEE

Mark Brazeau

33 Melrose Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

mbrazeau@pittsfield.net

413-770-1652

Dr. William Cameron

1016 West Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

wcameron@pittsfield.net

413-443-9776

Daniel Elias

201 Mohegan Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

delias@pittsfield.net

413-442-7521

Sara Hathaway

17 Walnut Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

shathaway@pittsfield.net

413-442-6204

Alison McGee

979 North Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

amcgee@pittsfield.net

518-727-3549

Dr. Vicky Smith

1218 West Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

vsmith@pittsfield.net

413-629-8400

12 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 13


BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Michael Taylor, Human Resources

Director

mtaylor@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9340

AGRICULTURE COMMISSION

Jim McGrath, Open Space/Natural

Resources Manager

jmcgrath@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9344

AIRPORT COMMISSION

Daniel Shearer, Airport Manager

dshearer@cityofpittsfield.org

413-448-9790

ANIMAL CONTROL

COMMISSION

Renee Dodds, Clerk

luludogdaycare@gmail.com

BERKSHIRE ATHENAEUM

TRUSTEES

Alex Reczkowski, Library Director

alex@pittsfieldlibrary.org

413-499-9480

BERKSHIRE COUNTY REGIONAL

HOUSING AUTHORITY

Brad Gordon

bradg@bcrha.com

413-443-8137

BOARD OF ASSESSORS

Paula King, Chief Assessor Chairperson

413-395-0102

BOARD OF HEALTH:

Andy Cambi, Director

acambi@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9411

BOARD OF REGISTRARS

Michele Benjamin, City Clerk

mbenjamin@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9361

CABLE TELEVISION COMMIS-

SION

Office of the Mayor

cvanbramer@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9321

CAPITAL OUTLAY COMMITTEE

Office of the Mayor

cvanbramer@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9321

CHARTER REVIEW STUDY COM-

MITTEE

Catherine VanBramer, Clerk

cvanbramer@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9361

COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES

Michael Taylor, Human Resources

Director

mtaylor@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9340

COMMISSION ON TOURISM

Jennifer Glockner, Director of Cultural

Development

jglockner@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9348

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

BOARD

C.J. Hoss, City Planner

choss@pissfieldch.com

413-499-9366

Ted Kozlowski, Clerk

tkozlowski@cityofpittsfied.org

413-499-9451

CONSERVATION COMMISSION

Rob Van Der Kar, Conservation

Agent

rvanderkar@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9359

COUNCIL ON AGING

James Clark, Director

jclark@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9346

CULTURAL COUNCIL

Jennifer Glockner, Director of Cultural

Development

jglockner@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9348

GREEN COMMISSION

Jim McGrath, Parks, Open Space,

Natural Resources Manager

jmcgrath@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9344

HARBORMASTER

Jim McGrath, The future Parks, of our Open country Space, depends

Natural on the Resources ability of Manager journalists to

jmcgrath@cityofpittsfield.org

provide the public with

413-499-9344

investigative journalism.

HISTORICAL COMMISSION

C.J. Hoss, City Planner

choss@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9366 investigative journalism:

HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION

Donate to the International

Christine

Consortium

Codella, Clerk

of Investigative

hrc@pittsfieldch.com

Journalists today

HUMAN SERVICES ADVISORY

COUNCIL https://donate.icij.org/

Justine Dodds, Program Director

jdodds@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9358

LICENSING BOARD

www.newsmediaalliance.org

Sabrina Gogan, Clerk

sgogan@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9363

MOBILE HOME PARK RENT

CONTROL BOARD

Justine Dodds, Housing Specialist

jdodds@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9367

ORDINANCE REVIEW

COMMITTEE

Catherine VanBramer, Clerk

cvanbramer@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9361

PARK COMMISSION

parks@cityofpittsfield.org

Help show your support for quality,

413-499-9368

PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARD

Michael Taylor, Human Resources

Director

mtaylor@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9340

PITTSFIELD ECONOMIC DEVEL-

OPMENT AUTHORITY BOARD

Michael Coakley

mcoakley@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9726

PITTSFIELD Real, Reputable, HOUSING AU-

THORITY Trusted. Your News

Connie, Media. Executive Director

contact@pittsfieldhousing.org

413-443-5936

PITTSFIELD RETIREMENT

BOARD

Karen Lancto, Director

klancto@cityofpittsfield.org

THIS PUBLICATION

413-499-9468 SUPPORTS REAL

NEWS.

POLICE ADVISORY AND RE-

VIEW BOARD

Ellen Maxon, Chair

pittsfieldparb@cityofpittsfield.org

413-448-9717

RESOURCE RECOVERY COM-

MITTEE

Ricardo Morales, Commissioner of

Public Services

rmorales@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9330

RSVP ADVISORY BOARD

Jeffrey Roucoulet, Director

jroucoulet@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9345

SCHOOL BUILDING NEEDS

COMMISSION

Superintendent

rblake@pittsfield.net

413-499-9512

SHADE TREE COMMISSION

THE PUBLIC NEEDS THE TRUTH;

NOT SOCIAL MEDIA HEADLINES & FAKE NEWS.

“Journalism keeps you planted in the earth.”

#SupportRealNews

Ricardo Morales, Commissioner of

Public Services

rmorales@pittsfieldch.com

413-499-9330

SISTER CITIES COMMISSION

Office of the Mayor

cvanbramer@pittsfieldch.com

413-499-9321

TAXICAB COMMISSION

Sabrina Gogan, Clerk

sgogan@cityofpittsfield.org

413-499-9363

TRAFFIC COMMISSION

Patricia Hogan, Clerk

patsavon@nycap.rr.com

413-443-3787

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS

Nate Joyner, Permitting Coordinator

njoyner@cityofpittsfield.org

413-448-9673

- Ray Bradbury

#SupportRealNews

14 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 15


SCHOOLS

PITTSFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Administration Building

269 First Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9512

MISS HALL’S SCHOOL

492 Holmes Road

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-443-6401

BERKSHIRE COMMUNITY

COLLEGE

1350 West Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-236-1000

BERKSHIRE MUSIC SCHOOL

30 Wendell Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-442-1411

ACTIVITIES AND ATTRACTIONS

ALBANY BERKSHIRE BALLET

51 North Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-445-5382

ballet@albanyberkshire.org

ARROWHEAD, HOME OF HER-

MAN MELVILLE

780 Holmes Road

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-442-1793

amelville@berkshirehistory.org

BERKSHIRE ARTISANS

28 Renne Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9348

BERKSHIRE ATHENAEUM

1 Wendell Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-9486

BERKSHIRE LYRIC THEATRE

P.O. Box 347

Pittsfield, MA 01202

413-499-0258

berkshirelyric@gmail.com

BERKSHIRE MUSEUM

Route 7

Downtown Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-443-7171

info@berkshiremuseum.org

BARRINGTON STAGE COMPANY

297 North Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-442-9955

info@barringtonstageco.org

BERKSHIRE OPERA COMPANY

297 North Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-442-9955

info@berkshireoperafestival.org

THE COLONIAL THEATRE

111 South Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-448-8084

info@berkshiretheatre.org

HANCOCK SHAKER VILLAGE

Route 20 and 41

P.O. Box 927

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-443-0188

info@hancockshakervillage.org

SAMUEL HARRISON HOUSE

82 Third Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-445-5414

boardoftrustees@samuelharrison.org

SOUTH MOUNTAIN CONCERTS

Routes 7 and 20

P.O. Box 23

Pittsfield, MA 01202

413-442-2106

TOWN PLAYERS

Performing at Berkshire

Community College

Robert M. Boland Theater

1350 West Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-443-9279

Mailing Address :

P.O. Box 765

Pittsfield, MA 01202

Bringing you unique dishes

with traditional flavors of the Mediterranean

to Adams, MA. Come in and try our

succulent dishes. You’ll be happy you did.

47 PARK STREET, ADAMS, MA | 413-776-7121 | FIREHOUSECAFE.NET

16 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 17


TENNIS COURTS (FIRST COME, FIRST SERVE)

ORGANIZATIONS

HERBERG MIDDLE SCHOOL

501 Pomeroy Avenua

Pittsfield, MA 01201

LAKEWOOD PARK

Newell Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

RECREATION

BOUSQUET SKI AREA/PLAY BOUSQUET

101 Dan Fox Drive

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-442-8316

info@bousquetmountain.com

PUBLIC GOLF COURSES

GENERAL ELECTRIC ATHLETIC CLUB

Crane Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-443-5746

PITTSFIELD HIGH SCHOOL

300 East Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

PONTERRIL TENNIS COURTS

East Acres Road

Pittsfield, MA 01201

ONOTA BOAT LIVERY

463 Pecks Road

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-442-1724

onotaboatlivery@gmail.com

TACONIC HIGH SCHOOL

96 Valentine Road

Pittsfield, MA 01201

PONTOOSUC LAKE COUNTRY CLUB

Ridge Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-445-4217

AMERICAN LEGION

41 Wendell Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-443-9853

BERKSHIRE BLACK ECONOMIC

COUNCIL

contact@berkshirebec.org

www.berkshirebec.org

BERKSHIRE COMMUNITY AC-

TION

1531 East Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-445-4503

BERKSHIRE COUNTY ARC

395 South Street, #6803

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-499-4241

bcarc@bcarc.org

BERKSHIRE INTERFAITH ORGA-

NIZING

175 Wendell Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

310-910-5350

office@biorganizing.org

BERKSHIRE MEDICAL CENTER

725 North Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-447-2000

BERKSHIRE UNITED WAY

200 South Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-442-6948

info@berkshireunitedway.org

BIG BROTHERS AND BIG SIS-

TERS

292 North Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-443-9471

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF THE

BERKSHIRES

16 Melville Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-448-8258

info@bgcberkshires.org

CENTRAL BERKSHIRE HABITAT

FOR HUMANITY

314 Columbus Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-442-3181

info@berkshirehabitat.org

JEWISH FEDERATION OF THE

BERKSHIRES

196 South Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-442-4360

federation@jerishberkshires.org

MASSACHUSETTS AUDUBON

SOCIETY

Canoe Meadows Wildlife Sanctuary

Holmes Road

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-637-0320

westsanctuaries@massaudubon.org

NAACP – BERKSHIRE COUNTY

BRANCH

P.O. Box 605

Pittsfield, MA 01202-0605

naacpberkshirecounty@gmail.com

R.O.P.E.

Rites of Passage + Empowerment

www.ropeberkshires.org

ropeworld1995@gmail.com

UCP OF WESTERN MASSACHU-

SETTS

208 West Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-442-1562

YES INITIATIVE

Youth, Education and Sport Initiative

Inc.

437 North Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-770-6604

info@yesforchange.org

18 DEGREES

Family Services for Western Massachusetts

480 West Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-448-8281

info@18degreesma.org

STATE PARKS

PITTSFIELD STATE FOREST

Cascade Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-442-8992

THE PUBLIC NEEDS THE

TRUTH; NOT SOCIAL MEDIA

HEADLINES & FAKE NEWS.

#SupportRealNews

18 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 19


FIRE COMPANIES

Berkshire Black Economic Council

Planting the seeds for our future

FIRE DEPARTMENT

HEADQUARTERS: EN-

GINE 3

74 Columbus Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-448-9753

ENGINE 1

331 West Housatonic Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-448-9751

ENGINE 5

54 Pecks Road

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-448-9755

ENGINE 6

8 Holmes Road

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-448-9756

ENGINE 2

9 Somerset Avenue

Pittsfield, MA 01201

413-448-9752

GOALS

use your

• Locate, recruit, and retain other Black

entrepreneurs and businesses

VOICE.

Protect freedom of speech.

freespeech.center

Alanna Saunders and Michael Starr in Irving Berlin’s White Christmas, 2021.

Photo by Emma K. Rothenberg-Ware.

www.BerkshireTheatreGroup.org

(413) 997-4444

• Increase the number of Berkshire Black

businesses that are certified as minority owned

businesses

• Help Black-owned businesses gain access to

business coaching, professional development,

grants, and capital

• Promote economic justice by advocating

public policy and increasing supplier diversity

Email: contact@berkshirebec.org

Visit: berkshirebec.org

20 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 21


The Berkshire

Eagle:

Revitalizing

a community’s

‘town square’

Frederic Rutberg

EAGLE, from page 22

Banner in 1961, the Brattleboro

Reformer in 1969, and

the Manchester Journal in the

early 1980s, according to the

company’s website.

The company remained in the

Miller family until 1995.

During that time, The Berkshire

Eagle evolved into a

highly respected community

newspaper, and many of its

reporters moved on to distinguished

careers with publications

including The New York

Times, The Washington Post,

The Wall Street Journal and

others.

Among those distinguished

reporters was Daniel Pearl,

who went on to report for The

Wall Street Journal and was

kidnapped and killed in 2002

while conducting an investigation

in Pakistan during the

war in Afghanistan.

The Berkshire Eagle and other

newspapers acquired by the

“The Berkshire Eagle was extraordinary. That sort

of dried up when the Miller family sold the paper in

1995 and in the 20 years between when they sold

the paper and we bought it, it shrunk from its previous

greatness, and so I got the idea that we could restore

some of the former glory of the paper because

it is important for the community to have someone

telling the stories of what is happening here.”

— current co-owner Fredric D. Rutberg

Miller family over the years

were purchased by a Denver-based

media company in

1995 and lost some of its luster,

current co-owner Fredric

D. Rutberg said.

“It got a lot smaller. They cut

a number of reporters, some

vendors were cut, the size of

the paper was reduced and

they relied on wire service

reporting as opposed to local

reporting,” Rutberg said. “The

paper was a shell of what it

once was.”

Rutberg is a lawyer who was

appointed to the district court

in Massachusetts in 1994 and

served for 21 years. Judges are

mandated in the state to retire

at age 70, so as Rutberg approached

that milestone, he

began considering his future

options. The Berkshire Eagle

caught his eye after Rutberg

attended a lecture in Nantucket

where the speaker spoke of

the importance of journalism.

“He said, kind of off-handedly,

‘Democracy requires citizenship

and citizenship requires

a town square,’” Rutberg said.

Plans are underway for our new branch at the

corner of South and Reed Streets in Pittsfield.

CONSTRUCTION BEGINNING

SPRING OF 2022!

MEMBER FDIC/MEMBER DIF

That off-hand statement put

the wheels in motion.

Rutberg said The Berkshire Eagle

had once been regarded as

“one of the great newspapers

of the world,” and he wanted

to restore that former luster.

“In their class, along with a

world newspaper — at the

time The New York Times was

a national paper — The Berkshire

Eagle was a local newspaper,

and it set the standard

for local newspapers,” Rutberg

said, pointing to the worldclass

journalists The Berkshire

Eagle had turned out over the

years.

But things changed after the

Miller family sold the company,

he said.

“The Berkshire Eagle was extraordinary.

That sort of dried

up when the Miller family sold

the paper in 1995 and in the

20 years between when they

sold the paper and we bought

See EAGLE, page 24

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

Experience Matters.

Trusted Brands.

Local Business, Local Focus since 1928.

carrhardware.com

By Melanie Lekocevic

Capital Region Independent Media

PITTSFIELD — The Berkshire Eagle can trace its lineage as far

back as 1789, and today has been revitalized with the goal of

returning to its roots as a “town square” for the community it

serves.

The Western Star, a weekly newspaper founded in 1789 in Stockbridge,

Massachusetts, changed its name and ownership several

times, and eventually transformed into the weekly Berkshire

Eagle in 1852, according to the company’s website. The paper

was purchased by Kelton B. Miller, along with several partners,

in 1891, and in 1892 became a daily newspaper, The Berkshire

Evening Eagle.

Miller bought the paper from his partners and over the years

acquired several other publications, including the Bennington

See EAGLE, page 23

WWW.LEEBANK.COM LEE | STOCKBRIDGE | GREAT BARRINGTON | PITTSFIELD | LENOX 413-243-0117

22 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 23


WHERE’D

YOU GET

YOUR

KICKS?

For the Love of Diamonds

RICKS KICKS

1575 WEST

HOUSATONIC STREET,

UNIT #1, PITTSFIELD, MA

413.347.2957

WE HAVE MOVED TO

558 EAST STREET IN PITTSFIELD

413.447.9023 | RJSTOHR.COM

PLENTY OF FREE & HASSLE FREE PARKING IN OUR PRIVATE LOT

The building where the Berkshire Eagle is located.

EAGLE, from page 23

it, it shrunk from its previous greatness,

and so I got the idea that we could restore

some of the former glory of the paper because

it is important for the community

to have someone telling the stories of

what is happening here,” Rutberg said.

Rutberg purchased The Berkshire Eagle

and its accompanying newspapers along

with three partners in 2016 — Stanford

Lipsey, Hans Morris and Robert G. Wilmers.

“Our goal was to create the finest group

of newspapers in America,” Rutberg said.

“That was our initial goal and that remains

our goal.”

Lipsey died in November 2016 and Wilmers

died the following year, in December

2017, according to the company’s website.

The board of directors of New England

Newspapers Inc. currently consists

of Rutberg, Morris and John Mulliken,

who represents the Wilmers family, along

with Martin C. Langeveld, who was associated

with both of the newspaper’s former

owners.

Having a viable and contributing newspaper

is vital to a growing community,

Rutberg said.

“It’s really important for economic development

for the stories to be told about

the interesting and creative things going

on in our world, not just ‘cops and court,’”

he said.

Covering crime stories had become a

mainstay of the newspaper, dominating

its front page, during the years between

the sale of the company by the Miller

family and when Rutberg and his partners

purchased the publications.

After the four partners took over, they

made significant investments in the operation

of The Berkshire Eagle.

“We invested in reporters,” Rutberg said.

“We now have 30 or 32 reporters, including

editors.”

With a much bigger staff, The Berkshire

Eagle was able to expand its coverage on

several fronts, perhaps most notably its

reporting on the arts and cultural scene

FILE PHOTO

that is so endemic to the Berkshires.

“The thing we did that was most significant

was we set out to be the finest community

newspaper in America,” Rutberg

said. “We had to have a world-class arts

and culture section because A, it’s necessary,

but B, because the arts are so important

to the Berkshire community and

the economy. The board challenged the

editorial staff to do that, and they came

up with the Berkshire Landscapes section

that we added back in May of 2017. It’s

quite extraordinary — it has shrunk because

of COVID and things closed down,

but it was originally a 12-page section,

all color, and it is quite spectacular for a

newspaper of our size.”

In serving as the Berkshires’ “town square,”

Rutberg makes a point to take into consideration

the needs and wants of the

community the newspaper serves.

“I always tell people — if you see something

in the paper that you like, please

tell all your friends,” he said. “And if you

see something that you don’t like, please

tell me.”

Call Casey Albert Today 413.652.4265

BeeNiceTravel@gmail.com

www.evotravelagent.com/beenicetravel

Bee Nice

Travel

Dream Vacations

At Discounted Prices!

FLIGHTS • HOTELS • CRUISES • WEDDING DESTINATIONS & MORE!

Florida Registration #35395 • CST# 2001330-10 • Hawaii # TAR-6612 • Washington # 603352551

24 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 25


CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The Berkshire Museum was closed for several months during the COVID-19 shutdown, and used the time to get work done on a long-term renovation project.

Local

businesses that

are thriving in

pandemic’s wake

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Wally, the beloved stegosaurus that stands guard outside the Berkshire Museum, got a makeover while the museum was closed for the COVID-19 shutdown.

By Melanie Lekocevic

Capital Region Independent Media

PITTSFIELD — There’s nary a

person, place or business that

has not been impacted by the

COVID-19 pandemic in one

way or another.

From the mind-boggling

death toll to months’ long

shutdowns and the virus

variants, vaccination controversies

and face masks that

continue to linger two-and-a

half years after the start of the

pandemic in March 2020, it’s

difficult to overstate the impact

of the crisis on the global

community.

For Pittsfield businesses, the

impact of the pandemic has

varied, from those that were

shut down for months and

found rebounding difficult,

to essential businesses that

thrived in the early days and

now find new challenges facing

them.

“People were really respectful and really grateful

that we provided a safe place for them to visit.

We were very attentive to all the safety protocols

and really followed the CDC (Centers for Disease

Control and Prevention) guidelines, the commonwealth

guidelines, our local city guidelines — we

never went outside of that because obviously

health and safety is of utmost importance to us.”

— Hilary Ferrone, chief engagement officer for the museum

BERKSHIRE MUSEUM

For some businesses and cultural

institutions, the early

days of the shutdown meant

exactly that — their doors

were closed completely. The

Berkshire Museum was closed

for nearly half of 2020. And

when their doors did reopen,

it looked very different from

their pre-COVID days.

“We shut down in March 2020

and we reopened in August

of that year with limited admissions

so you had to make

reservations,” Hilary Ferrone,

chief engagement officer for

the museum, said. “There were

very clear paths walking one

way through the museum, we

were really attentive to distancing,

and each pod (of people)

that was allowed to come

in was just a group of six and

it had to be a family group, so

we wouldn’t have six strangers

in the same pod.”

While things differed from the

museum’s typical operations,

it worked, Ferrone said.

“People were really respectful

and really grateful that

we provided a safe place for

them to visit,” Ferrone said.

“We were very attentive to all

the safety protocols and really

followed the CDC (Centers for

Disease Control and Prevention)

guidelines, the commonwealth

guidelines, our local

city guidelines — we never

went outside of that because

obviously health and safety is

of utmost importance to us.”

The Berkshire Museum, located

at 39 South St. in Pittsfield,

is a unique museum offering

eclectic collections, from history

and art to science and

technology. The museum even

includes an aquarium with

live sea creatures and a touch

See BUSINESSES, page 28

26 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 27


BUSINESSES, from page 28

were so concerned about

people staying employed and

keeping their jobs,” Ferrone

said.

But the impact of the museum

and other cultural institutions

goes beyond dollars and

cents, and the pandemic has

helped shine a light on that,

she said.

“I think we are all in a place of

seeing what really matters to

our community and I think cultural

institutions play a really

important role,” Ferrone said.

“We had a donor tell us recently

that the Berkshire Museum

is the glue of the community,

and I think there could be no

better compliment than that.”

CARR HARDWARE

For some businesses deemed

“essential,” the COVID-19 pandemic

proved to be a boon,

but even then, there were

challenges.

See BUSINESSES, page 30

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Carr Hardware, deemed an “essential business” by the commonwealth, has been at the frontline of the pandemic from the start.

Carr Hardware has been serving customers throughout the COVID-19 outbreak.

BUSINESSES, from page 27

tank, and exhibits geared to

both children and adults.

“It is really, really fun — it is

multi-disciplinary and also interdisciplinary,

showing how

everything informs other aspects

of the world,” she said.

“We have about 40,000 pieces

in our collection, ranging

from shells and birds to art

and sculpture, from all sorts of

cultures and places all around

the world.”

The museum, at nearly 120

years old, also has one very

distinctive and much beloved

feature — a large replica of a

stegosaurus named Wally that

has long stood guard outside

the museum’s entrance.

Wally got a makeover during

“We were considered an essential business,

so we were quite busy. We sold a lot of PPE

(personal protective equipment) and a lot

of home improvement.”

— Bart Raser, owner of Carr Hardware

the COVID shutdown.

“Wally is back,” Ferrone said.

“He was restored during

COVID at Louis Paul Jonas Studios,

where he was created.

He is all freshly resurfaced and

repositioned in front of the

museum. That was one of the

things that we did during the

downtime of COVID, when the

museum was closed.”

When most businesses were

shut down in March 2020, the

Berkshire Museum was in the

middle of a renovation plan

and used the shutdown time

and the months that followed

to get some work done.

“We were in the midst of these

long-term renovation plans,

so we were able to get a lot of

construction done during that

period,” Ferrone said. “Finally,

in August 2021, we reopened

the museum fully. Our second

floor has been renovated so

we had new gallery space, and

since then we have been open

seven days a week, just like

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

pre-COVID times.”

Museums may not have been

considered an “essential business”

during the COVID shutdown,

but they are big drivers

for local economies and can

spur growth and create jobs,

Ferrone said.

“When we look at who visits

our museum, yes, our primary

support is from people

who live locally, but we bring

in people from Albany, from

central Massachusetts, from

southern Vermont. That’s really

important, but we also employ

28 people at the museum,

and during our construction

project we worked with local

firms and kept them busy,

even during COVID when we

See BUSINESSES, page 29

BUSTED PHONE??

We do repairs & virus removal on

mobile devices and PC’s

• Accessories

• iPhone-Android

• Computer Repair

PhoneBros

Home Of The Phone Pros

• Service-Repair

• New & Used

WE HAVE LOW PRICED PHONE PLANS!

1575 West Housatonic Street, Unit #1

Mon - Fri: 11am - 8pm • Sat: 11am - 6pm

28 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 29


Crust Pizza uses the finest ingredients it can find for its handcrafted pizzas.

BUSINESSES, from page 29

Carr Hardware has eight locations in

western Massachusetts and northern

Connecticut, and its flagship store is in

Pittsfield at 547 North St. The store has

been in business since 1928 and was purchased

by the Raser family in 1962, owner

Bart Raser said.

“It’s a full-line hardware and rental operation,

so we sell hardware, electrical,

plumbing, tools, paint, all the things you

would imagine,” Raser said. “We are also

in the equipment and party and event

rental business. Another big piece is our

industrial-commercial business, called

Carr Supply. That sells large institutional,

government and large contractor supplies.”

Because hardware stores were considered

an essential business by the commonwealth

during the COVID-19 shutdown,

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Carr Hardware remained open from day

one. And business was booming.

“We were considered an essential business,

so we were quite busy,” Raser said.

“We sold a lot of PPE (personal protective

equipment) and a lot of home improvement.”

With most people staying home far more

than they typically would, the early days

See BUSINESSES, page 31

BUSINESSES, from page 30

of the pandemic were a busy

time for Carr Hardware.

“People were doing a lot of

painting, gardening, all kinds

of home repair,” Raser said.

“People wanted to be outside,

so we saw a lot of outdoor living

improvement — we sold

a lot of outdoor fire pits, outdoor

furniture, hammocks,

mosquito magnets, things

that would extend the outdoor

season.”

As an essential business, the

store was never shut down

and adapted from the start of

the outbreak to safely serve its

customers, he said.

“We were customer-facing

from start to finish,” Raser

noted. “We revolutionized

our platform in terms of flexibility

— we allowed phonein,

email, texting to order for

curbside pickup. We brought

in sanitizers so we could spray

our stores in the morning and

throughout the day to keep

everybody safe.”

Carr Hardware and its employees

took great care to follow

health department best practices

to prevent the spread

of the virus as the stores remained

open for business.

“We were hyperaggressive

about it — we partnered with

a local liquor manufacturer

who was making hand sanitizer

so we could distribute

it throughout our footprint

when nobody else could get

it,” Raser said. “We partnered

with a group of seamstresses

who made masks for us in the

beginning of the pandemic

when they weren’t available.”

While business was booming

throughout the virus outbreak,

there were challenges

in hiring and maintaining an

adequate workforce to serve

all those customers as it became

difficult to attract workers

willing to interact with the

public.

“The aftermath of personnel

has been the biggest negative

takeaway that we have had

from the pandemic,” Raser

said. “Demand was brisk, but

our ability to execute at retail

was challenged because folks

who were customer-facing

became uncomfortable. We

had a lot of people who had

been with us for many, many

years make the decision to retire

because maybe they were

a little bit older and they were

afraid. We were on the frontlines

throughout the pandemic.

And now, with the global

staffing crisis, it has been hard

to find workers. That has been

the biggest impact for us —

finding workers.”

But like other Pittsfield businesses,

Raser has found strong

support from the community.

“The community has been

incredibly supportive,” Raser

said. “There has been a

big push back to shopping

local and brick-and-mortar

throughout this. The large majority

of our stores are located

in downtowns so we are big

believers in downtown and

community, and they have

supported us throughout the

pandemic.”

CRUST PIZZA

James Cervone, owner of

Crust Pizza, got his business

off the ground a few months

into the start of the pandemic

but rethought his business

model to accommodate state

and local health guidelines

and has thrived.

“We started right in the middle

of the pandemic,” Cervone

said. “We opened Aug. 31,

2020. We are located right in

the center of Pittsfield at 505

East St.”

Cervone relocated the business

to its current location

in January of 2020. When the

pandemic began in March of

that year, no one knew how intense

it would be or how long

the virus would remain.

“COVID was supposed to go

away over the summer, but no

one really knew what was go-

See BUSINESSES, page 32

HAPPINESS TOOLBOX FOR BERKSHIRE YOUTH

We focus on the unity in Community

Happiness Toolbox (ages 4- 14) This program promotes cultural and

multilingual literacy for children of all backgrounds. Fun, exploratory

curriculum includes embracing diverse cultures, learning foreign

languages, developing and identifying community and personal values,

connecting to self and environment.

For more information or to joing the Real Talk

please call 413.394.4305 or visit our website:

WWW.MULTICULTURALBRIDGE.ORG

MARK T. BRENNAN

Attorney At Law

54 North Street

Pittsfield, MA 01201

Pittsfield 413.499.1022

Amherst 413.253.3111

Fax 413.499.1023

Email: mark@brennanlawoffices.com

30 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 31


BUSINESSES, from page 32

because we thought it was the

smart thing to do.”

The business installed a special

fan to circulate the air,

with an infrared light that kills

germs in an effort to keep the

virus at bay.

“And we were always very

aggressive with washing our

hands and making sure masks

covered our workers’ faces,”

Cervone added.

With changing commonwealth

mandates, Crust Pizza

became flexible in how it

served its customers.

“Takeout became a very big

part of our business,” Cervone

said. “We have a very large

seating capacity — we can

seat 50 people — and we went

to 100% takeout, which was a

real challenge.”

Under Crust’s original business

plan, Cervone envisioned

40% of the business would

be takeout service, with 60%

dine-in. But COVID changed

that.

“Right off the bat, we were

maybe 30% dine-in and 70%

takeout, and then for a period

of time, we were 100% takeout

when indoor dining was

shut down,” Cervone said. “It

was a challenge.”

Continuing challenges include

the supply chain, making obtaining

some ingredients difficult,

as well as inflation that is

causing higher prices.

Throughout the pandemic,

though, the community has

been behind the business every

step of the way, Cervone

said.

“The city of Pittsfield, when

something new comes to

town, you’ll get support. People

will come out and give it

a try. They might even give it

two tries,” he said. “It’s a tremendous

business environment.

The support is really

fabulous.”

Where New Beginnings

Come To Light

Working with families and individuals to

realize their opportunities and goals.

Volunteers Welcome.

18DEGREESMA.ORG

480 WEST ST • PITTSFIELD, MA • 413.448.8281

59 INTERSTATE DR • W.SPRINGFIELD MA • 413.584.5690

Crust Pizza opened its doors at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, and adjusted its business model to thrive in a challenging environment.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

BUSINESSES, from page 31

“The community has been extremely supportive.

I have said it a thousand times — doing business

in Pittsfield is fantastic because the community

really does support good local businesses.”

— James Cervone, owner of Crust Pizza

ing to happen,” Cervone said.

“We thought it wasn’t going to

be a big deal. By the time we

started renovating the space,

it looked like it was going to

be more intense, but we were

committed at that point. We

didn’t plan on opening a pizza

café during a pandemic, it was

just the way it worked out.”

Through the trials of the next

two years, Cervone said having

the strong support of the

community has made all the

difference.

“The community has been extremely

supportive,” he said. “I

have said it a thousand times

— doing business in Pittsfield

is fantastic because the community

really does support

good local businesses.”

Crust Pizza serves high-quality

handmade pizzas using the

finest ingredients they can

find.

“We make everything ourselves

— our dough uses

Italian flours. We make it the

traditional way — we age it

for four days, and most of our

sauces are organic,” he said.

“We think we are delivering a

very high-quality pizza.”

The eatery produces handcrafted

pizza, with gluten-free,

dairy-free and vegan options,

along with traditional-style

selections.

“I started out with an idea to

create this pizza using the best

ingredients we could find,

regardless of price,” Cervone

said. “We found out that just

because something is more

expensive doesn’t mean it’s

better, but certain things that

we get that are the most expensive

are things like organic

tomatoes from California

for our sauce, and we source

all our cheese from a place in

Wisconsin. We get our pepperoni

from a butcher in Ohio,

and we get our mushrooms

locally from a farm in North

Adams. We could get those

items much, much cheaper,

but the quality and the flavor

are not there, and we would

become just like every other

pizza place.”

Opening a few months into

the pandemic, Crust Pizza

adjusted its business model

to reflect health department

requirements and best practices.

“When we first opened, we

had the mandate in place and

there was social distancing

for dining 6 feet apart,” he

said. “When we opened, like

most places, we had an initial

boost of customers. Then the

city shut down indoor dining

again. My wife and I were

always ahead of that — we

shut down indoor dining two

weeks before the city did just

See BUSINESSES, page 33

CUSTOM EMBROIDERY &

SCREEN-PRINTING

Family owned with 25 years of experience

supplying companies with branded apparel and

promotional products. Embroidering anything

from hats to polo shirts or from bags to jackets!

Call Today To Submit Your Order

237 FIRST STREET • PITTSFIELD, MA 01201

(413) 447-9452 • ELEGANTSTITCHESINC.COM

32 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 33


Pittsfield:

The birthplace of

post-pandemic theater

Tyler Hanes and the ensemble in Barrington Stage Company’s “West Side Story.”

COURTESY OF DANIEL RADER

COURTESY OF DANIEL RADER

Sarah Crane, Magdalena Rodriguez, Skyler Volpe, Tamrin Goldberg and Jerusha Cavazos in “West Side Story,” performed at Barrington Stage Company.

By Melanie Lekocevic

Capital Region Independent Media

PITTSFIELD — When the nation —

and world — shut down due to the

COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020,

the creative economy was devastated

as the lights dimmed on Broadway,

and everywhere else, for the first time

in recent memory.

As the lockdown continued, productions

were canceled, performers and

stage crews lost their jobs, and the

creative spirit went dormant.

But two Pittsfield groups were determined

to revive the soul of live theater

that is so vital to the Berkshires.

In fact, they were the first two theater

groups in the country to return to live

performances, and it brought their

audiences to tears.

Barrington Stage Company and Berkshire

Theatre Group blazed a new trail

in the wake of the coronavirus out-

See THEATER, page 36

COURTESY OF DANIEL RADER

Danny Bevins, Sean Ewing and Julio Catano-Yee in “West Side Story” at Barrington Stage Company.

34 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 35


THEATER, from page 35

break, paving the way for others to follow.

BARRINGTON STAGE

COMPANY

In a typical year, the Barrington Stage Company

puts on eight live productions on its

two stages in the summer, and in the fall

stages a show aimed at getting youth interested

in live theater. In February, the group

does a “10x10 New Play Festival,” featuring

ten 10-minute plays.

“We have a 520-seat Main Stage and a 136-

seat Stage 2,” said founder and Artistic Director

Julianne Boyd. “The Main Stage is for bigger

shows like musicals, maybe Pulitzer Prize

and Tony Award winning shows, shows that

people already know and want to see. At our

Stage 2, we do more new plays, things that

are perhaps more experimental. We have

been able to find an audience for both.”

“We basically do May through October, and

then the month of February,” she added.

But all that stopped when the COVID pandemic

hit in 2020.

Like everything else in the country, Barrington

Stage Company shut down in March

2020, but by summer they were ready to venture

back into live theater, with strict health

and safety precautions in place, Boyd said.

And they were the first to do so in the nation,

she said.

“We were the very first,” Boyd said. “We started

with ‘Harry Clarke’, a one-person show,

outside under a tent, and then Berkshire Theatre

Group opened the next night.”

Barrington Stage Company wanted to keep

it simple for its first post-lockdown production

and staged a one-person show with

minimal crew to ensure social distancing and

other COVID protocols were possible.

“We were very careful — we didn’t want

dressers or actors backstage, we wanted it to

be a very simple show and we did it outdoors

under a tent,” she said.

The group worked in conjunction with Berkshire

Theatre Group, which opened its first

post-shutdown production — a musical —

the very next day, Boyd said.

“We worked very closely with them so we

would have the same seating protocol and

all, so if people went to one, they would be

very comfortable going to the other,” Boyd

said. “We had seating pods of two or three

seats, and then other seats would be 6-feet

apart.”

See THEATER, page 38

COURTESY OF DANIEL RADER

Allison Blackwell and Alan H. Green perform in Barrington Stage Company’s “Who Could Ask for Anything More? The

Songs of George Gershwin.”

COURTESY OF DANIEL RADER

Alan H. Green, Alysha Umphress, Jacob Tischler, Allison Blackwell and Britney Coleman in Barrington Stage Company’s

“Who Could Ask for Anything More? The Songs of George Gershwin” in 2021.

The cast of Berkshire Theatre Group’s “The Wizard of Oz” performing in 2021.

COURTESY OF JACEY RAE RUSSELL

Corinna May in Berkshire Theatre Group’s “Shirley Valentine.”

The exterior of the Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield.

COURTESY OF JACEY RAE RUSSELL

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

36 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 37


THEATER, from page 36

COURTESY OF EMMA K. ROTHENBERG-WARE

Claire Saunders and Alanna Saunders in Berkshire Theatre Group’s “White Christmas,” in 2021.

They followed “Harry Clarke” with a Rodgers

and Hammerstein musical revue, and then in

the summer of 2021, staged a full season of

productions, with the same safety protocols

in place. For indoor performances at the Main

Stage, a meticulous cleaning and staging system

kept everyone safe and healthy.

“Last summer we did a whole season,” she said.

“We did shows under a tent, and at our Main

Stage theater we had two seats in between

seating pods and had all the safety protocols

in place, including HEPA filters, we redid

our air filtration system, every night after the

show we purged all the air out of the theater

and brought in fresh air, and we used much

more fresh air in our air conditioning. Most

air conditioning systems are generally 10% to

20% fresh air and the rest is recirculated air. We

used 50/50.”

At the end of each performance, electrostatic

cleaners were used to clean every surface in

See THEATER, page 39

COURTESY OF JACEY RAE RUSSELL

Sasha Hutchings, Najah Hetsberger, Felicia Curry and Darlesia Cearoy perform in “Nina Simone: Four Women” at the Berkshire Theatre Group in 2021.

COURTESY OF EMMA K. ROTHENBERG-WARE

Berkshire Theatre Group’s “Godspell” was the first musical performed live on stage in the country after the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown in 2020.

THEATER, from page 38

the theater, including the lobby, bathrooms and seats.

“We will continue doing all this until we are told there is no more

COVID,” Boyd said.

BERKSHIRE THEATRE GROUP

The day after Barrington Stage Company put on the first live theater

production in the country after the shutdown, Berkshire Theatre Group

staged the first musical.

The group has four theater spaces in two different locations in Berkshire

County, Kate Maguire, artistic director and CEO of Berkshire Theatre

Group, said.

“One campus is in Stockbridge. We have two theaters there in two

buildings — the Playhouse, which is going to celebrate its 100th anniversary,

which is one of the oldest theaters in the country, and the

Unicorn Theatre, which is a small theater attached to the barn where

we build scenery. So there is nine acres in Stockbridge with two theaters

— a 300-seat space and a 120-seat space.”

The second campus is in Pittsfield, Maguire said.

“We have the Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield, and there is space there that

is a little over 700 seats, a beautiful, renovated theater, very traditional,

very similar to Broadway houses,” she said. “And then there is another

space that we call The Garage that is very transformable, and we can

seat 25 to 100 people and we do comedy, musicians and storytelling

in that space.”

The Stockbridge campus is in production mostly over the summer

months, and the Pittsfield campus stages shows year-round.

Like everywhere else, COVID shut them down in March 2020.

“We stopped production on everything that we were working on and

like the rest of the world, we went into lockdown,” Maguire said.

But they were itching to get back to the live theater they love so much.

“I really felt like we would be able to present something in one of

our spaces — we have nine acres in Stockbridge, so I figured surely

we would be able to do something outdoors, and we also have lots

See THEATER, page 40

The exterior of the Barrington Stage Company theater.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

38 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 39


COURTESY OF EMMA K. ROTHENBERG-WARE

Harriet Harris in the Berkshire Theatre Group’s 2021 performance of “The Importance of Being Earnest” in 2021.

THEATER, from page 39

of space in Pittsfield as well, and

surely we can do something outdoors

there as well. It wound up

we had one production done in

the summertime on the campus

in Pittsfield in what was traditionally

our parking lot, surrounded

by buildings, so we were able to

surround the space, with plenty

of air space above.”

Their first production of 2020 was

the musical, “Godspell,” which ran

for about a month, extending

beyond its original timetable “because

it was so successful,” Maguire

said.

“We could only have 50 people

in the audience because of state

regulations, but we were the only

theater in the country that was

sanctioned by the Actors Equity

Association to present a musical,”

Maguire said.

Berkshire Theatre Group continued

live productions in the winter

— outdoors.

“In December of that year we

presented a piece called ‘Holiday

Memories’ by Truman Capote,

which is based on his short stories

about a lovely woman and her experiences

around Thanksgiving

and Christmas, and we presented

those outdoors on the grounds

in Stockbridge, literally in 13- to

20-degree weather,” Maguire said.

“Again, the show was sold out.

Those brave people turned out

and it was a beautiful production.”

Again, health and safety protocols

were stringent, particularly

in light of the fact that vaccines

were not yet available.

“It was all treacherous because

we were performing in the middle

of COVID — we were testing

the actors three times a week,”

she said. “They were also isolated.

We had created all these bubbles

— the production staff were in

their own bubble, the actors were

in another bubble.”

CREATIVE SPIRIT

Both theater groups were intent

on returning live theater to their

audiences. And the audiences

couldn’t get enough of it.

“In my mind, I get paid to do a

job and I wanted to do it,” Maguire

said. “I have been working in

theater for a long time and I just

imagined that it was possible.

And indeed, I have never seen

audiences so moved — at the

start of every single performance,

I would see the audience, their

heads would drop and I would

see the tears streaming over their

masks because they were hearing

music and hearing this story that

was so inspiring. After all these

years of doing theater, it was truly

amazing and cathartic.”

Boyd saw the same emotional response

in her audiences.

“There is a shared humanity in

theater. You sit in the audience

with a group of people and you

are sharing the same experience

with what is on the stage. I was so

aware that people were just hunkered

down in their houses, they

couldn’t go out, there was such

a frustration level,” she said. “And

I thought, wouldn’t it be great if

we could offer people, with the

right safety protocols, the ability

to go and see a show. And people

would come to the theater and

start crying — they would say

they can’t believe they are here,

they can’t believe there are stage

lights. We had more donations

given to us that summer than we

have ever had.”

Both theater groups worked with

local and state health officials to

ensure the health and safety protections

were adequate and in

place.

“None of it was done haphazardly,”

Boyd said. “Every single thing

was checked out.”

Bringing back live theater in the

wake of a global health emergency

infused the community with

new spirit and showed the vitality

of the creative economy in the

Berkshires.

“The creative economy contributes

literally millions of dollars to

the Pittsfield economy,” Maguire

said. “Everyone that comes to our

theater then goes out to eat or

they go shopping. The Berkshires

is a cultural destination — where

else can you go in the country

and find Jacob’s Pillow, Berkshire

Theatre Group, Tanglewood, Barrington

Stage Company — it is a

mecca, a cultural resort. We ARE

the economy in Berkshire County.”

Building Strong

Communities for

175 Years

Lori Kiely

Regional President

Berkshire County

Louann Harvey

Relationship Mortgage

Loan Officer

Becky Sorrentino

MyBanker

Joseph DelSoldato

MyBanker

Kimberly Clancy

Branch Officer

West Street, Pittsfield

Jay Bailly

Business Banking

Officer

Matt Emprimo

Commercial Banking

Team Leader

Jay Ogle

Branch Officer

Pittsfield Road, Lenox

Member FDIC Rev. 10/21

40 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 41


Buy • Sell • Invest

With Confidence

Group aims to

Find Your Dream Home

HarmonyEdwards.kw.com

413.344.3440

Facebook.com/harmonyedwards.KW/

Linkedin.com/in/harmony-edwards-043b0116a

Instagram.com/harmony.buys.houses/

Also lets Welcome to the Team

Warren C. Dews Jr.

Warren has 30 years of experience in Sales, Marketing & Networking.

Call him today to look into your forever home

413-212-0130

Wdewsjr@gmail.com

License# 9569617

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Black entrepreneurs shared ideas and gained exposure for their businesses at a September 2021 networking event that drew the mayors of both Pittsfield and North Adams.

By Melanie Lekocevic

Capital Region Independent Media

PITTSFIELD — The vibrant and growing sector

of Black-owned businesses in the Berkshires

has an advocate dedicated to pushing for its

success.

The Berkshire Black Economic Council was

formed in 2021 to support and foster Black

entrepreneurs and help them build their business

and visibility in the community.

“The Berkshire Black Economic Council is an

opportunity for Berkshire County residents

who are African-American to obtain and get

support that is needed in the business world,”

said Shirley Ann Session Edgerton, a member

of the council’s steering committee.

Advocacy is particularly critical at this time, as

businesses are rebounding from the impacts

advance, support

Black entrepreneurs

of the COVID-19 pandemic that started in

March 2020.

“If you review statistics around who receives

funds and grants in response to the impact

of COVID, the numbers are really low for Black

businesses,” Edgerton said. “By organizing a

Black Economic Council, it provides a united

front, it ensures that Black businesses have information

— they have an organization that is

committed to advocacy on their behalf. And

it’s a good opportunity in terms of learning

from each other.”

Obtaining grant assistance, including recent

infusions of money into the economy such

as federally supported Paycheck Protection

Program loans, or PPP — many of which don’t

have to be paid back — issued by the U.S.

Small Business Administration, has been challenging

for some minority-owned businesses,

Edgerton said.

“I think some of it is lack of awareness — I was

surprised talking to people who didn’t know

that you didn’t have to take out loans, but there

are other ways of getting funds, like grants,” Edgerton

said. “Whether loans or grants, a lot of

it is lack of information and for some people,

because they have small organizations, they

don’t have the capacity to write grants or have

the expertise in terms of applying for loans so

that often puts them in a position that they often

don’t have the resources to make it work.”

The Berkshire Black Economic Council offers

businesses guidance in applying for financial

assistance.

“We guide them and if more intense help is

needed, there are some who have expertise

See GROUP, page 44

42 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 43


and knowledge,” Edgerton said.

“We also have knowledgeable

organizations in the community

that can support them.”

In addition to providing support

to current entrepreneurs, the organization

also helps connect

established business owners with

aspiring future entrepreneurs.

“We connect them to give back to

the community as well, to be a resource

and provide opportunities

where they can share their talents

and skills with others who want

to be entrepreneurs who have an

interest and want to learn more

about business,” Edgerton said.

“It’s also an opportunity for them

to be representatives in the community

in teaching younger folks.”

Steering committee member A.J.

Enchill said the council focuses

on African-American businesses

with the aim of broadening their

opportunities. He, too, cited challenges

in obtaining grant funds

and support businesses were eligible

for in the wake of the pandemic.

“A large part of what we are trying

to do is establish and meet

the needs of Black businesses,”

Enchill said. “For example, during

COVID-19 we learned that of our

entrepreneurs, over 68% of them

did not receive any COVID-19 relief

at all.”

The Berkshire Black Economic

Council looks to educate its members

and the broader community,

as well as helping them to overcome

long ingrained obstacles.

“While there is excitement and

energy towards serving the Black

community and advocating for

the BIPOC (Black, indigenous and

people of color) community at

large, it still isn’t making its way

to the Black entrepreneurs and

the question for us is, how do we

solve that and how do we address

those barriers of entry?” Enchill

said.

Barriers can include something as

simple as a Black business owner

who runs their business on their

personal bank and does not have

a business account, creating a

roadblock to obtaining an SBA

grant or loan.

Another barrier could be the size

and scope of the business with regard

to obtaining SBA assistance.

“If you are asking for $500,000

in sales and 10 employees, then

that is not going to be criteria that

some entrepreneurs are going

to be able to meet,” Enchill said.

“Those are the issues that we are

trying to address and we are trying

to break down those barriers

through networking between

Black businesses and the greater

Berkshire business community at

large.”

In September, the council tried to

bridge some of those relationship

gaps with a networking event designed

to connect Black business

GROUP, from page 43 GROUP, from page 44

“The Berkshire Black Economic Council is an

opportunity for Berkshire County residents

who are African-American to obtain and get

support that is needed in the business world.”

— Shirley Ann Session Edgerton,

a member of the council’s steering committee

A networking event in September 2021 connected Black entrepreneurs with each other and with the broader Berkshire community.

See GROUP, page 45

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

owners with the broader local

community.

“This past September we were

able to host a networking event

and we were successful in getting

tables for the entrepreneurs so

they could get set up and really

market themselves and tell their

stories to the Berkshire business

community,” Enchill said. “The

beauty of that event was that A,

it was the first time we were able

to get almost 20 Black businesses

under one roof and B, they were

able to be celebrated and introduced

to the wider Berkshire business

community.”

That networking event drew the

mayors of both Pittsfield and

North Adams, along with public

officials and businesses such as

the Boston Symphony Orchestra,

Williams College, Tanglewood

and others, he said.

“Being able to shake a hand and

be face to face, it’s really a great

way to introduce people to one

another and break what has more

or less been economic segregation

in the region,” Enchill said.

The event provided an opportunity

for Black-owned businesses to forge relationships

with white-led organizations, Enchill

said.

“That is what has been so exciting about putting

this organization together — what is has

been able to quickly amplify because right

now, there is still a lot of distrust between the

Black business community and the public sector,”

Enchill said. “Since the murder of George

Floyd, there has been energy and excitement

towards diversity, equity, inclusion and anti-racism,

but you can only imagine that as a

Black entrepreneur, you are somewhat skeptical

as to where this is all coming from and I

think folks are still not getting the resources

they need, but meanwhile there is this talk of

getting funds and resources in the communities

that have been historically underserved.”

George Floyd was an African-American man

from Minnesota who was killed at the hands

of police and whose death sparked a nationwide

push in support of the Black Lives Matter

cause.

In addition to providing support and networking

assistance to help African-American entrepreneurs

grow their business, the council

is also aiming to provide information about

becoming a certified Minority Business Enterprise,

or MBE.

“One of our hopes is to have MBE certification

education,” Enchill said. “By working with

the Greater New England chapter of Supplier

Diversity, we are hoping to be able to teach

Black businesses about the benefits of having

MBE certification. Just because you are a Black

business doesn’t mean you are certified as a

minority business and as a minority business,

there are different supplier diversity programs

that can be beneficial to the entrepreneur.”

Enchill pointed to a supplier diversity program

that a national pharmaceutical retailer has that

encourages minority-owned beauty suppliers,

such as hair and makeup companies, to get

their products on the store’s shelves.

“That is a missed opportunity if someone

doesn’t have the MBE certification,” Enchill said.

“If they are able to have their products on the

shelves, they will be able to get their product

out there and increase visibility, but also for

revenue.”

The types of businesses that have joined the

council are diverse, everything from fitness

trainers to landscapers, realtors, beauty supply,

sports retail and more.

Enchill hopes the council will help business

owners build relationships with others in the

Berkshire economy.

“Right now, what businesses need is access to

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The Berkshire Black Economic Council provides networking opportunities, grant application assistance and support

for Black-owned businesses in the area.

patronage, but they also need access to listeners

— folks who really want to work alongside

of Black businesses, to think creatively about

their solutions and solutions that would be

beneficial to them in terms of grants and technical

assistance,” Enchill said. “I think the typical

models that we have are great, whether it’s

marketing and advertising dollars, whether

it’s website development, but I think there are

ways we can be creative and think outside the

box and find other solutions to socioeconomic

barriers.”

The council has also set up a subdivision, a

Black Arts Council, that will look to build the

creative economy, tapping into the economic

potential of African-American performers, artists

and customers.

“We are hiring ambassadors who are locally

trusted residents from the community,” Enchill

said. “They will go out to the Berkshire

nonprofits and cultural institutions, and also

youth-based organizations, to start interviewing

Black residents and visitors on their experiences

and what they would wish the Berkshires

would have to make them feel more

included in the economy, especially the arts

and cultural sector.”

Arts ambassadors are asking interviewees

about the types of performances and exhibits

they would be interested in attending, safety

measures they would like to see implemented,

and how to create a general sense of belonging.

“We are really doing a temperature check and

working through these ambassadors who

know where Black residents are,” Enchill said.

“We would like to increase our numbers of survey

respondents and in doing so, begin to inform

the curriculum for the Berkshire culturals

on how to be a better Berkshire nonprofit to

reach a broader community. Ultimately, they

will be able to increase their patronage and

have a more diverse workforce.”

Expanding and supporting Black involvement

in the Berkshires’ creative economy will help

the broader cultural and business community

as the arts can contribute to economic development

by bringing people to the area who

stay in hotels, purchase gasoline, eat in local

restaurants, shop and more.

And when the general economy benefits from

the work of both the economic council and the

arts council, everyone benefits, Edgerton said.

“The council benefits all — it’s a plus for the

community as well as the membership of

Black businesses as well as white corporations,”

she said. “I think it is definitely a positive and

can have a major impact on our county.”

Disclosure: Warren Dews Jr., publisher and

vice president of Capital Region Independent

Media, is a member of the Berkshire Black Economic

Council’s steering committee.

44 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 45


Wedding Packages

Starting at $1500

Now Booking 2022 & 2023 Weddings!!

Winter Dates Available In The Historic Carriage

Barn Set in the picturesque Vermont countryside,

Park-McCullough is regarded among the most

romantic places to tie the knot.

Schedule Your Champagne Tour Today!

Contact, Jeanne Mintrone at Jeanne@

ParkMcCullough.org or 802.379.6342

1 Park Street North Bennington, VT

46 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook Pittsfield Community Guidebook • 47


Official Hospital Partner of Tanglewood

An

Orchestra

of

Medical

Specialties

Here

for You

LEARN MORE AT

WWW.BERKSHIREHEALTHSYSTEMS.ORG

48 • Pittsfield Community Guidebook

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!