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Netjets EU Volume 19 2022

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ROME REBORN

Italy’s capital blends

the old and new

A CUT ABOVE

Hailing the latest

generation of tailors

SCIENCE OF REST

Why recovery is key

to all-round health

CUSTOM CARS

Dany Bahar’s one-ofa-kind

creations

ORGANIC GROWTH

A famed French vineyard

is taking a different path


TAKING OFF

IN THIS EDITION OF NETJETS, THE MAGAZINE, our editors have put together an issue

of the tailored, the elegant and the beautiful. The amazing story of true automotive

customisation from entrepreneur and NetJets Owner Dany Bahar, who discovered

the need for his latest venture in an intriguing twist of fate. Then we turn to the next

generation of tailoring talent, creating detailed designs for clients tired of work-from-home

ultracasual apparel. And we travel to Rome to experience the boom in exceptional new

hotels and restaurants in the Eternal City – each catering to unparalleled service, something we

pride ourselves on here at NetJets.

As we enjoy the warm welcome of a new season, we hope you are experiencing the very best

the world has to offer – whether adventures close to home or trips across the globe.

Only NetJets!

Adam Johnson

Chairman and CEO

C O N T R I B U T O R S

CHRISTIAN BARKER

The Australian-born,

Singapore-based

fashion scribe takes

a look at the new

cutters on the block

for The Future of

Tailoring (page

72). From Sydney

to New York, he

discovers changes

are afoot in the very

traditional world of

suitmaking.

NOCERA & FERRI

Italian photographer

duo – Luca Nocera

and Lara Ferri –

have worked out

of London since

2012, but had

the ocean as their

inspiration for Sea

Bounty (page 60),

showcasing the

stunning beauty

of pearls in artistic

settings.

DELIA DEMMA

In Rome’s Riches

(page 64), the

Italian writer visits

her country’s capital

to explore the latest

developments

in the worlds of

hospitality and

gastronomy that

are complementing

the city’s abundant

architectural and

historical treasures.

GUY WOODWARD

The wine expert

travels to a

venerable vineyard

in Bordeaux,

where a major

development is

underway thanks

to the visionary

leadership of Saskia

de Rothschild,

as Lafite Looks

Forward (page 86)

to an organic future.

CHRIS HALL

Where once watches

were a simple case

of black and white,

colour is now in

vogue, and one hue

in particular stands

out. As our Londonbased

horology

specialist explains in

Feeling Blue (page

76), manufacturers

are embracing all

things azure.

This symbol throughout the magazine denotes the nearest airport served by NetJets to the

story’s subject, with approximate distances in miles and kilometres where applicable.

8 NetJets


ALPINE EAGLE

With its pure and sophisticated lines, Alpine Eagle offers a contemporary reinterpretation

of one of our iconic creations. Its 41 mm case houses an automatic, chronometer-certified

movement, the Chopard 01.01-C. Forged in Lucent Steel A223, an exclusive ultra-resistant metal

resulting from four years of research and development, this exceptional timepiece, proudly

developed and handcrafted by our artisans, showcases the full range of watchmaking skills

cultivated within our Manufacture.


CONTENTS

10 NetJets


TIME TO RELAX

Six Senses, Ibiza,

page 46.

80 64 64 36

IN THE NEWS

A desert cultural oasis,

the finest spirits, urban

ebikes and more

pages 14-26

NETJETS UPDATE

The latest events, staff

in profi le, plus the latest

companywide news

pages 28-35

MADE TO MEASURE

With Ares, Dany Bahar is

making customisation the

king in the automative world

pages 36-39

WIDE OPEN SPACES

Golfing revolutionaries

are making their mark in

the wilds of Nebraska

pages 40-44

SLEEP ON IT

The secret to healthier

living may be as simple

as taking a break

pages 46-56

PRECIOUS PEARLS

The ocean’s most beautiful

bounty sparkles in the

right settings

pages 60-63

ETERNALLY YOURS

Rome’s glorious past and

inventive present combine

for a unique city experience

pages 64-71

SUITED UP

A new generation of tailors

is redefi ning men’s fashion

in the post-pandemic world

pages 72-74

DINING OUT

The most intriguing and

inventive restaurant

openings around the world

pages 80-85

GROWING ORGANICALLY

An old name but a new

approach, Château Lafite-

Rothschild is reborn

pages 86-89

SWISS TIME

Inside Fondation Beyeler

on the 25th anniversary of

the premier art collection

pages 90-97

THE LAST WORD

CEO of restaurant noma

Peter Kreiner on how

he spends his spare time

page 98

JOHN ATHIMARITIS, FRANCESCA MOSCHENI, ISTOCK, © ARES

STORY OF THE BLUES

Once a rarity, marine-hued

watches are an increasingly

timely presence

pages 76-79

11


NETJETS, THE MAGAZINE

FRONT COVER

La Fontana dei Quattro

Fiumi at Pizza Navona,

Rome

(See page 64).

Image by Mauro Sciambi

AUTUMN 2022 // VOLUME 19

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Thomas Midulla

EDITOR

Farhad Heydari

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Anne Plamann

PHOTO DIRECTOR

Martin Kreuzer

ART DIRECTOR

Anja Eichinger

MANAGING EDITOR

John McNamara

SENIOR EDITOR

Brian Noone

STAFF WRITER

Claudia Whiteus

CHIEF SUB-EDITOR

Vicki Reeve

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Albert Keller

SEPARATION

Jennifer Wiesner

WRITERS, CONTRIBUTORS,

PHOTOGRAPHERS AND

ILLUSTRATORS

Christian Barker, Delia Demma,

Chris Hall, Jörn Kaspuhl, Bill

Knott, Jen Murphy, Nocera &

Ferri, Larry Olmsted, Julian

Rentzsch, Josh Sims, Elisa

Vallata, Guy Woodward

Published by JI Experience

GmbH Hanns-Seidel-Platz 5

81737 Munich, Germany

GROUP PUBLISHER

Christian Schwalbach

Michael Klotz (Associate)

ADVERTISING SALES

Katherine Galligan

katherine@metropolist.co.uk

Vishal Raguvanshi

vishal@metropolist.co.uk

NetJets, The Magazine is the offi cial

title for Owners of NetJets in Europe.

NetJets, The Magazine is published

quarterly by JI Experience GmbH on

behalf of NetJets Management Ltd.

NetJets Management Ltd

5 Young Street

London, W8 5EH England,

United Kingdom

netjets.com

+44 (0)20 7361 9600

Copyright © 2022

by JI Experience GmbH. All rights

reserved. Reproduction in whole or

in part without the express written

permission of the publisher is strictly

prohibited. The publisher, NetJets

Inc., and its subsidiaries or affi liated

companies assume no responsibility

for errors and omissions and are

not responsible for unsolicited

manuscripts, photographs, or artwork.

Views expressed are not necessarily

those of the publisher or NetJets Inc.

Information is correct at time of

going to press.

12 NetJets


RM UP-01 FERRARI

Ultra-flat manual winding calibre

1.75 millimetres thin

45-hour power reserve (±10%)

Baseplate and bridges in grade 5 titanium

Patented ultra-flat escapement

Function selector

Limited edition of 150 pieces

A Racing Machine

On The Wrist


THE SMART GUIDE

An update on the world of culture heads our

collection of the latest, the best and the brightest

TODD HEISLER / THE NEW YORK TIMES / REDUX / LAIF

A CITY LIKE NO OTHER

Part of a growing trend, the latest artistic creation of extraordinary scale has opened

in the American West, after 50 years in the making // By Brian Noone

© MICHAEL HEIZER; COURTESY TRIPLE AUGHT FOUNDATION; PHOTO BY JOE ROME

THE SAME SELFISH, INEVITABLE

question arises for visitors to

the pyramids of Egypt, the

Great Wall of China and every

other monumental relic of

the ancient world: in a few

thousand years, what will

be left of our contemporary

civilisation? Michael Heizer’s

extraordinary project in the

austere desert of Nevada,

which took the artist 50

years to complete, is a good

candidate to be one of the

survivors.

When the project began

back in the early 1970s,

Heizer was one of the foremost

artists in a movement that

14 NetJets


ELIZABETH HARROD & STEVEN MCRAE, SOLOIST & PRINCIPAL, THE ROYAL BALLET

savoirbeds.com

Clear space around logotype = 1.5*X


THE SMART GUIDE

SCENES FROM CITY

Every corner of the astonishing

work (below and previous page)

by Michael Heizer (above)

presents a new perspective

is now known as Land Art,

along with Nancy Holt, Robert

Smithson, Richard Long and,

perhaps most famously, Christo

and Jeanne-Claude. The works

of all these artists involve the

earth itself as a part of the

piece, whether it is excavating

and reshaping the soil or

framing the landscape in a

novel way.

The pieces are often jawdropping

in scale – and the

newly opened work by Heizer

in the American desert, City,

is no exception, stretching

1.6km by 0.8km, an expanse

that is best appreciated from

an airplane but is intended to

be experienced on the ground.

TODD HEISLER / THE NEW YORK TIMES / REDUX / LAIF

As such, it unfolds slowly as

you pace through the imposing

site, continually surprised by its

angular concrete constructions

and mammoth earthforms that

evoke both ancient ceremonies

and modern metropolises.

Both the historic and the

contemporary resonances are

intentional here, just as

they are at other Land Art

masterpieces: The shadow

of conceptual art, which also

developed in the 1960s, looms

large over the movement

and the resulting conceptual

sophistication adds depth

to the visceral experience

of the works. Questions of

mortality, of Sisyphean futility

and, naturally, of legacy all

intermix – and you can’t fail

to appreciate, here in the

middle of the high desert of

Basin and Range National

Monument, why this massive

creation might outlive most

of our contemporary feats of

architecture.

The American West has long

been a popular home for these

creations of otherworldly scale,

from Robert Smithson’s iconic

Spiral Jetty (1970) near the

Great Salt Lake in Utah to light

artist James Turrell’s Roden

Crater in Arizona, which he

began in the 1970s and is still

ongoing, though the 3kmwide

crater is only sometimes

accessible to the public (and,

in 2019, to Kanye West, who

filmed an IMAX-format music

video there). But America is

not the only setting where a

sense of our infinitesimality is

apt, and such works have been

proliferating in recent years in

places like Patagonia and the

Australian Outback.

Most recently, a new site

has been announced for

a series of huge projects:

AlUla in Saudi Arabia, where

the new Valley of the Arts

will be home to five new

permanent installations in the

next two years, including a

work by Heizer and another

by Turrell. Will it become

the world’s largest sculpture

park, a supersized version of

the soul-stirring Château La

Coste in Provence? Or will

it be something closer to a

sculpture graveyard, as a few

of the trendy art parks are

sadly becoming?

Impossible to say now – but

one thing is clear: largescale

outdoor art is here to

stay, and Heizer’s City will

almost certainly outlast us all.

tripleaughtfoundation.org

COMPLEX ONE, CITY; © MICHAEL HEIZER; COURTESY TRIPLE AUGHT FOUNDATION; PHOTO BY MARY CONVERSE

CEDAR CITY AIRPORT TO GREAT BASIN NATIONAL RESERVE: 142miles/229km

16 NetJets


MADDOX CLIENTS INVESTING IN YAYOI KUSAMA REALISED

AN AVERAGE PROFIT OF 26% IN 2021

MADDOXGALLERY.COM

DOWNLOAD OUR ART INVESTMENT GUIDE


THE SMART GUIDE

A GRAND COLLECTION

Tantalising elixirs, the latest city rides,

art in New Mexico and more.

1

2 3

4

6

5

1 COURVOISIER MIZUNARA Two giants of the spirits industry join forces for a unique cognac, as Grande Champagne eaux-de-vie aged originally in French oak barrels

is then moved to House of Suntory’s award-winning casks made of Japanese Mizunara wood for a second maturation. courvoisier.com // 2 GORDON & MACPHAIL 1949

FROM MILTON DISTILLERY An exceptionally rare whisky, this was the last cask laid down in the distillery – now known as Strathisla – in the 1940s. Small copper stills

with a distinctive shape helped to give the spirit its rich, fruity and full-bodied character. gordonandmacphail.com // 3 BERRY BROTHERS & RUDD NORDIC CASK

COLLECTION Featuring five casks from pioneering Nordic distilleries, the second release from the renowned London wine and spirits merchant’s range features single malts

from Denmark, Sweden and Finland (including Teerenpeli, pictured), plus a rare Nordic blend. bbr.com // 4 THE MACALLAN HORIZON As enchanting as the latest whisky

from the Moray-based distillery is, the focal point of this release is its remarkable packaging. A collaboration with Bentley Motors, the visionary design of the casing focuses

on the horizontal, producing a most distinctive look. themacallan.com 5 GLENFIDDICH TIME RE:IMAGINED Three single malts capture a single moment in time and are

encased in elaborate designs. The 50-year-old (pictured) stands for Simultaneous Time, the 40-year-old for Cumulative Time, and the 30-year-old for Suspended Time.

glenfiddich.com 6 FETTERCAIRN 18 YEARS OLD SINGLE MALT The innovative distillery’s first whisky finished in locally sourced Scottish oak casks, having been refined in

American white oak ones, represents a major development in master whisky maker Gregg Glass’s approach. fettercairnwhisky.com

CITY STYLE

2 3

1

The inexorable rise of ebikes continues apace with perhaps the greatest strides taking place in the

production of those improving transit around urban areas. The Brompton Electric P Line (1, brompton.

com) is a prime example. The lightest bike yet from the London brand, among its many charms, its

portability, with an innovative dual-locking seat post, means you can steer the folded bike by the

saddle. Further east, Taiwanese brand Tern (2, ternbicycles.com) has produced the NBD, with its

long-step-thru frame and low centre of gravity making it an ideal getaround. And across the Atlantic,

Texas’s Denago (3, denago.com) has created the Commute 1, widely regarded as one of the best

ebikes around for navigating the busy city streets in style and ease.

ADDED POWER

Sportscar giant Porsche is increasing its interest in the ebike world, making motors, batteries and software

architecture at its Munich factory, and acquiring a stake in Croatian ebike brand Greyp. porsche.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY THE COMPANIES

18 NetJets


MORE THAN A

SINCE 1873.

View.

Bürgenstock Hotels & Resort

6363 Obbürgen – Switzerland | T +41 (0)41 612 60 00

info@burgenstockresort.com | burgenstockresort.com


THE SMART GUIDE

A SOUND

INVESTMENT

Danish audio specialist

Bang & Olufsen has long

been at the forefront of

technological advances in

the high-end speaker sector

but has also always paid

attention to interior design,

ensuring its products are

as easy on the eye as they

are pleasing on the ear. So

it proves with the latest

natural aluminium Beosound

Balance, which combines

a Scandinavian aesthetic

with hidden interfaces which

allow a control of volume

that ensures the perfect level

for every occasion. bangolufsen.com

PETER VITALE

SIGHTS TO BEHOLD

Santa Fe has established itself as a major player in the art world, but how best to enjoy the city’s

bountiful culture scene when such US hubs as New York and LA offer so much more in the hospitality

sector? A simple solution is provided by one of world’s leading hotel brands, Four Seasons Resort

Rancho Encantado Santa Fe, which has launched an art concierge programme. As well as enjoying

the intimate surrounds of the 65-casita boutique hotel, guests will be offered an array of curated

experiences around the 250-plus galleries in the Santa Fe area, including meet-and-greet with artists,

private shows, and after-hours tours at some of the city’s top establishments. Perhaps the highlight is

a four-hour Canyon Road Concierge Tour, helmed by local expert Mike McKosky. fourseasons.com

SANTA FE AIRPORT: 20miles/32km

© BANG & OLUFSEN

BEST OF THREE

“A vehicle that’s all about leisure and

pleasure,” says Steve Morris, executive

chairman of Morgan, the British

manufacturer of the new Super 3. The threewheeler

is a throwback to a more carefree

era, though the engineering is of the highest

contemporary quality, with a Dragon inline

engine, monocoque body and a five-speed

manual gearbox. Pitched to appeal to

curious motorcyclists and sports car lovers

wanting something a bit more “fun”, the

retro look is a sign of things to come, with

other manufacturers such as Liberty Motors,

Vanderhall, and Polaris in the US also playing

their part in the rebirth of the three-wheeler.

morgan-motor.com

NICK DIMBLEBY

20 NetJets


WHEN THEY ASK WHERE YOU’RE FROM.

THE WORLD

Each day aboard The World, you awaken in the most remarkable home you will ever own.

As one of the few international adventurers who live this incomparable lifestyle, you explore

each continent and sail every sea surrounded by unrivaled anticipatory luxury service on

the planet’s largest private residential yacht.

Learn more about ownership opportunities. aboardtheworld.com | +44 20 7572 1231


THE SMART GUIDE

A BEAUTIFUL

FRIENDSHIP

A collaboration between the venerable

London luggage maker and the renowned

Paris-based fashion house, the Globe-

Trotter x Casablanca collection of suitcases

is truly the meeting of two worlds. The range

– which includes large check-in and carryon

trolley cases alongside smaller bags such

as the miniature, London square, vanity

and attaché sizes – embodies the Globe-

Trotter aesthetic, which remains true to the

principles laid out at its founding in 1897,

yet takes inspiration from the very latest

autumn/winter designs from Casablanca,

“Le Monde Diplomatique”,

a homage to the world of jet-set travel.

globe-trotter.com

KEEPING A WARM FRONT

SPINNING TOP

Long-time leader in the field

of home entertainment,

Audio-Technica has upped

the ante for lovers of vinyl

with its latest release, the

AT-LPW50BTRW. The newest

edition of the brand’s belt-drive

wooded turntables gives the

listener all the benefits of their

old-fashioned records connected,

via Bluetooth, to the very latest

speakers or headphones. The

rosewood-finish veneer adds

more than a dash of class to a

beautifully manufactured piece of

equipment. audio-technica.com

As well as producing some of the world’s finest golf clubs, Scottsdale, Arizona-based PXG

creates distinctive and bold golfing fashions. Its fall/winter collection, inspired in part by its

desert headquarters, comes in three sections – The Essentials, The Edit and Coming in Hot

– each imbued with a sense of tradition and American style, and all equally wearable on the

course and off it. pxg.com

LIGHT FANTASTIC

Two British icons have come together for a limitededition

bike that features both a sense of nostalgia

and the latest engineering and materials. Folding-bike

specialist Hummingbird has garnered a reputation

for its lightweight creations and its latest frame made

of flax-plant fibres weighs in at just 15 pounds. It

is also a homage to the motorsports manufacturer

British Racing Motors (BRM), with the bikes painted

in the brand’s colours, to mark the 60th anniversary

of its Formula One World Championship win.

hummingbirdbike.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY THE COMPANIES

22 NetJets


THE SMART GUIDE

What’s in the Bag?

It’s an oft-asked question posed to professionals by everyone from members of

the golfing media to equipment junkies. And thanks to the popularity of social

media, the hashtag #WITB has become a siren call for diehard enthusiasts to

track what their favourite pro is debuting, utilising, modifying or replacing. It is

in that spirit that we are lifting the veil to reveal the tools of the trade for some

of our favourite NetJets Brand Ambassadors, starting with this debut feature

that showcases the eclectic weapons used by none other than Jason Day.

WOODS

DRIVER:

Ping G410 LST Diamond

(10.5 degrees)

Custom Tpt 15 Lo shaft

3 WOOD: Taylormade SIM Max

80g Kuro Kage X flex shaft

IRONS

3 & 4 IRON: Taylormade P770

KBS C-Taper shaft

5-PW: Taylormade P7MC

KBS C-Taper shaft

WEDGES

52-DEGREE,

56-DEGREE: Titleist Vokey SM9

S400 shaft

60-degree:

PUTTER

Titleist Vokey 22 Proto

S400 shaft

Scotty Cameron F-5.5

© NETJETS

24 NetJets


LEGACY OF LIFESTYLE

For 50 years, Quinta do Lago has established its reputation as one of the most desirable locations

for prime real estate and a world-leader in luxury lifestyle. In its semi-centennial year, there is no

better time than now to invest in this world-class destination.

Surrounded by three immaculate golf courses, including the €7 million upgraded South Course,

world-class sports and fitness hub, The Campus, and sublime gastronomic experiences, in Quinta do Lago,

a luxurious lifestyle of wellness is enjoyed beside a protected coastal nature reserve and the

breath-taking shores of Portugal’s Algarve.

With its sustained investment securing the future for generations to come, Quinta do Lago’s

stunning properties and coveted plots are now available for discerning buyers looking to make

a truly life-changing investment in a timeless destination.

T. +351 289 392 754

E. realestate@quintadolago.com

wwww.quintadolago.com


SMART GUIDE

Future Space

Domus III, the new hangar space at Farnborough Airport, has

been sustainably designed to enhance the hub’s already impressive

facilities and fit in with its award-winning architecture

COURTESY FARNBOROUGH AIRPORT (2)

BREAKING NEW GROUND

Domus III, now under construction

will provide state-of-the-art hangar

space at Farnborough

ALREADY ONE OF THE most important hubs for

premier air travel in Europe, Farnborough Airport

is getting a significant upgrade with a new £55m,

16,000sq m state-of-the-art hangar facility, named

Domus III. It is a development designed for the

next generation of business aircraft, cementing

Farnborough’s elevated position. As well as greatly

increasing the airport’s hangar space, Domus III

will feature translucent automated doors, which

will stretch the entire length of the building,

optimising natural light inside the hangar and

reducing lighting usage. The doors’ design will

help improve aircraft manoeuvrability, as well as

mitigating unnecessary emissions from aircraft

handling activities. farnboroughairport.com

26 NetJets


PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO

Set in a quiet and gated residence with 24H security,

gardens, swimming-pool, fitness room and snack bar steps

to the famous Monte-Carlo Tennis Club, stunning East

facing apartment refurbished to the highest standards

and offering a contemporary and modern design

combined with breathtaking panoramic views of the

Mediterranean Sea and the Principality of Monaco.

This luxurious 4 bedroom apartment is located on a

high floor and offers 230 sqm living space + 46 sqm

balconies. Sold with an independant storage room

and 2 parking spaces.

Ref: BQMC-AL317V

More information and price on request.

20 avenue de la Costa - Principality of Monaco

Tel: +33 6 80 86 47 09 contact@berry-quinti.com

www.bq-internationalrealty.com


NOTES FROM NETJETS

Latest events, onboard updates,

companywide news and profiles

RETURN TO SPLENDOUR

PASCAL FEIG (2)

SAFE SPACE

Custom-made furniture and a

pink motif marked this year’s

NetJets Lounge at Art Basel

For our 21st year of sponsorship, NetJets

saw the return of the exclusive lounge

located within the Collectors Lounge at

Art Basel. Partnering with Moco Museum

and Argentinian artist Ezequiel Pini of Six

N Five, the lounge was transformed into

a tranquil space for our Owners to take

respite from the show. We displayed some

of the non-fungible token [NFT] collection,

Dreamscapes, on screens, while Six N

Five created an immersive environment

combining contemporary art and interior

design with custom-made furniture.

Through this design, Pini used the space

to demonstrate the phases of the Sun and

the Moon, which tied nicely with travel

and the views from the windows of our

aircraft. He actually also introduced some

aircraft windows into the design as a nod

to NetJets. The pink colour of the lounge

depicts the light at sunrise and sunset but

is also Moco Museum’s brand colour.

28 NetJets


A HASSLE FREE MAYFAIR

PIED-A-TERRE

AT A FRACTION OF THE COST

OF WHOLE OWNERSHIP

Buying a second home for occasional use – with initial outlay, tax implications and

commitment of managing a property outright – rarely seems justified.

47 Park Street offers a selection of luxuriously furnished, spacious apartments in Mayfair

for the amount of time you personally require in London each year - at a fraction

of the cost of whole ownership.

Residential benefits include:

• Fully Integrated Property Management

• 24-hour Concierge, Maid and Room Service

• Valet Storage Facility and a wide range of usage options

• No Stamp Duty

• Individual and Corporate fractional interests from £108,300

We know our members by name and cater to their tastes and preferences,

ensuring that every visit feels like coming home.

LIMITED AVAILABILITY*

Open daily 9am – 5pm

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7950 5528 Email: moreinfo@47parkstreet.com

www.47parkstreet.com

*The term limited availability refers to the number of fractional residence club memberships available.

Data protection: Your personal information and details will be stored by Marriott Vacation Club International, part of a global group of affiliated companies (“Affiliates”), and your personal

information may be shared among the Affiliates and transferred outside of your country of residence. Personal information that is transferred outside of the European Economic Area is done

under data transfer agreements that contain standard data protection clauses adopted by the European Commission that provide safeguards for such transfers. For more information about

the use of your personal information, or to exercise your rights of opposition, access, rectification and deletion please review our Global Privacy Statement found at marriottvacationclub.com/

privacy/ or contact our Privacy Office at privacy@mvwc.com. IQL-20-001. THIS ADVERTISING MATERIAL IS BEING USED FOR THE PURPOSE OF SOLICITING THE SALE OF FRACTIONAL

RESIDENCE CLUB MEMBERSHIP. Subject to applicable terms and conditions. This is neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation to buy to residents in jurisdictions in which registration requirements

have not been fulfilled or where marketing or sale of fractional residence club membership is prohibited and your eligibility and the membership clubs available for purchase will depend upon

the jurisdiction of your residency. Prices are subject to change. Key information is available upon request by contacting 47 Park Street Grand Residences by Marriott, Mayfair, London, W1K 7EB,

United Kingdom or email apartment@47parkstreet.com. Marriott Vacation Club International and the programs and products provided under the Grand Residences by Marriott brand are not

owned, developed, or sold by Marriott International, Inc. Marriott Vacation Club International uses the Marriott marks under license from Marriott International, Inc. and its affiliates.

©2022 Marriott Vacation Club International. All Rights Reserved.


NOTES FROM NETJETS

INSIDE TRACK

SONIA ALVES MENDES

Chief Financial Officer

YOUR NORMAL DAY CONSISTS OF … usually reading

the main highlights in the news to start followed by an

Operations meeting where several stakeholders discuss

the activity expected for the day, eventual challenges

and actions taken/to be taken. The rest of the day

also consists of several meetings with different areas/

departments, mainly with the fi nance and analytics

teams, to follow up on ongoing projects, monitoring

and forecasting the fi nancial and cash performance

of the group, as well as to take action on day-to-day

challenges and requests among other topics (such as

fl eet decisions, pricing).

JULIAN RENTZSCH

NETJETS BY THE NUMBERS

GLOBAL

STATISTICS

ACCESS TO

5,000+ AIRPORTS IN

200+ COUNTRIES AND TERRITORIES

(That’s more than the top four airlines combined)

260M+ SM FLOWN ANNUALLY

Enough to circle the Earth 10,400+ times or

take 540+ trips to the Moon and back

800+ AIRCRAFT WORLDWIDE 1

The world’s second-largest fleet and

greater than our three largest competitors’

fleets combined

175+ NEW AIRCRAFT PURCHASES

Nearly 80 jets will be delivered in

2022 alone as part of a multibillion-dollar,

multiyear fleet investment

THE BEST THING ABOUT YOUR JOB IS … being part

of an amazing team and company while having the

opportunity to make the difference in the strategic and

management decisions of the business, contributing to

NetJets’ growth and success.

THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE YOU FACE IN

YOUR ROLE IS … pretty much aligned with the

challenges that are being felt across the entire aviation

industry. These are certainly unprecedented and

uncertain times, where companies and the respective

management are required to be agile and resilient. In the

past two years we have been dealing with the COVID-19

pandemic, the ins and outs of travel restrictions …

when things were expected to become controlled and

getting back to “normal” we were surprised with a war

in Europe that has been imposing more constraints and

challenges to the economy and the business. Currently,

the biggest challenge derives from the economic and

geopolitical landscape that is affecting all businesses –

high infl ation rates, fuel, gas and energy price increases,

forex fl uctuation, supply chain constraints, all of these

contributing to an increase of the overall cost structure.

LESS THAN FIVE YEARS

Age of almost half of our aircraft,

which is significantly younger than

that of our competitors’

APPROXIMATELY $83M

Annual investment in personalised,

industry-leading Crewmember training

630+ NEW HIRES

2021 recruiting efforts, including

300+ new pilots

1

Total number of aircraft includes aircraft under management by NetJets and

Executive Jet Management

30 NetJets

NetJets 30


View film

Computer generated imagery is indicative only and subject to change.

LIVE IN LONDON’S ORIGINAL POWER STATION

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• Signature waterside restaurant,

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• State-of-art wellness centre

with pool and spa

• Residents’ Club Lounge

• Secure underground parking

Call to register your interest

020 7352 8852

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sales@powerhousechelsea.com

COMING SOON

A subsidiary company of

Joint selling agents


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NOTES FROM NETJETS

KEEPING ON TRACK

The final week of May saw the most highly anticipated event

in the Formula One calendar return to the Circuit de Monaco

DRIVE TIME

Owners enjoyed a grand return to

the Monaco Grand Prix with views

overlooking Tabac corner

After two years with no spectators because of the pandemic, the Monaco Grand

Prix saw excited guests crowding into the bustling principality. As usual, we

provided our Owners with the best seats in the house – the NetJets roof terrace

overlooking the 12th corner, Tabac – and the finest in hospitality, with catering

paired with an exquisite wine list provided by WineSource, our global wine

supplier. In total, we welcomed 238 guests across the weekend and flew 51

legs, equivalent to 96.7 flight hours – or four straight days in the air.

FREDERICK DUCHESNE (3)

34 NetJets


JULIAN RENTZSCH

CREWMEMBERS IN PROFILE

LIZA ZIPFEL

Cabin Crew Falcon 2000EX/Global 6000

MY FIRST EXPOSURE TO FLYING WAS …

at the age of fi ve. We were leaving Africa –

Mozambique, where I was born – to come to

Europe. That was on a 747 – for somebody

who was living on the farm that was quite grand.

THE BEST PART OF FLYING IS … the people

who I meet, the different cultures, and that there

are no two days that are the same. There is no

routine in our job. So I really, really like that.

Even if we sometimes try to make plans, they

always go the other way, but I love it.

I love the surprise factor in having different days

every day.

BEFORE JOINING THE NETJETS TEAM,

I WAS … a photographer back in

Germany. I love Germany – it’s very big part of

me. Before being a photographer, I also worked

in the hospitality industry.

THE ONE DAY AT NETJETS I WON’T FORGET

WAS … not just one, but plenty, being in the

company so many years [23]. Recently, one

lady Owner said to me at the end of the fl ight,

“Liza, you have been a wonderful host,” and

that for me was like the ultimate goal. So, that

always makes my day.

ONE THING OWNERS PROBABLY WOULDN’T

GUESS ABOUT ME IS … when I joined I

worked in the NetJets offi ce for about a decade.

When I started we had about eight aircraft

and 40 Owners – it’s been amazing to witness

our growth and to be part of it.

ON MY DAYS OFF I … like to spend time with

my loved ones. I like to be at our beach house.

I also restore furniture. I really love furniture, so

I give pieces a new lease of life. My latest hobby

is stand-up paddling.

WITHIN THE NEXT 10 YEARS, I WOULD

LIKE TO … serve our Owners the best I can,

basically. In the famous phrase, to enhance

the lives of our Owners one exceptional travel

experience at a time. My goal is really to

continue to do what I love.

MY BEST ADVICE FOR STAYING SANE

ACROSS TIME ZONES IS … I’ll go out exploring,

meet new people. I’m very curious and love this.

I’m a people person, so I love to get to know

other cultures and explore what the locals do.

To me, this kind of feeds my soul and then I rest

whenever I can, even if it is during the day.

NetJets

35


OWNER’S PROFILE

36 NetJets


From Red Bull to Ferrari to Lotus, Dany Bahar has been a force for

change in the automotive world, and yet his coachbuilding company,

Ares, may be his most ambitious undertaking // By Josh Sims

ONE

OF A KIND

YOU CAN IMAGINE the look on his face. A Saudi prince is the proud

owner of a $2.5million Bugatti. He’s enjoying lunch in Monaco.

And then guess what pulls up outside the restaurant? A virtually

identical $2.5milllion Bugatti. Fortunately, Dany Bahar was there to

provide a solution.

“He looks at me and just tosses the car keys across the table

and tells me to do whatever I need to do to make his car unique,”

recalls Bahar. In doing so, he became Bahar’s first customer. And

a rather good one, as he has since put a “double-digit number” of

cars a year through the entrepreneur’s services.

“If he hadn’t seen that other Bugatti maybe it would never have

occurred to him just how much he actually wanted something

unique – that what is, in most cases, the pure, theoretical idea that

someone else just might be able to buy the same vehicle as him [is

enough of an incentive to pursue that individuality],” Bahar adds.

What Bahar does, through his Modena, Italy-based company

Ares, which he co-founded with business consultant Waleed Al

Ghafari just eight years ago, is take a vehicle and remodel it as

a true one-off. Clients come with their seemingly run-of-the-mill

Ferrari, Bentley or Rolls-Royce – automobiles that, in the more

everyday world, would already be considered extremely special –

and often with specific ideas as to how to make it utterly special.

That might amount to a reworked interior scheme or it might

involve something much more fundamental: turning a saloon into

a coupe, for example, converting a fixed roof into a convertible one,

or changing the entire profile of the vehicle.

“Actually, I’m not really a car guy myself, not a petrolhead,” says

Bahar, who nonetheless spent a couple years at Ferrari as its senior

vice president for commercial and brand before leaving – something

hardly anyone at Ferrari ever does – to become CEO of Lotus.

Perhaps he is, at heart, more of a brand-builder: he made his name

in the business world with considerably smaller wheels, helping

to make inline skating the global phenomenon, if a fleeting one,

that it became, before moving on to Red Bull, where, as its chief

operating officer for four years, he was instrumental in launching its

Formula One racing team.

“What I learned [from both experiences] was how important

emotional content is to any product, how powerful that can be,”

enthuses Bahar, who’s more an ice-hockey player than an inline

skater, and who, one imagines, has enough get-up-and-go in his

veins to bypass energy drinks. But perhaps both brands attuned

him to the needs of younger people – and what the “Me Generation”

wants, more and more, is something that’s all about them.

Indeed, the falling age profile of the very wealthy isn’t something

all manufacturers of luxury products have yet grasped, he contends.

It was Bahar who battled with Ferrari’s dominant engineering

culture to get the company to launch vehicles that worked with

the lifestyle needs of the young and wealthy, not just to provide

excellence in mechanics.

“Ferrari was becoming an old man’s car, an attribute that

[younger consumers] wouldn’t want to be associated with. I

think I was able to change that a lot while I was there, and

start to do some really cool things,” says Bahar, a Turkish-born

Swiss, now based in Dubai. “But I also met so much resistance

to that idea. I remember having this 1.5-hour-long meeting with

the CEO, who’s a dear friend, and at the end he said ‘Dany,

I didn’t understand anything you said, but it sounded good.’”

He continues: “To give a stupid example, it was as simple as

putting in cup-holders. Ferrari saw no engineering reason to

have them. But even a Ferrari needs a cupholder. The Ferrari

California was the first ever Ferrari for which the initial briefing

came from the commercial department, which had an eye to

fulfilling the needs of the customer [not finding a customer to

meet whatever the company built].”

And there are more and more of these customers, a new

demographic for whom lifestyle concerns are paramount, and,

increasingly, customisation is king. That, Bahar concedes, is not

an original idea per se. “Modding” is now well-established within

the watch world, and luxury car makers, Ferrari included, have

long run programmes that allow buyers to select, say, a particular

paintwork finish or seating leather. Many high-end car makers

also have decades-long relationships with famed coachbuilders

like Pininfarina or Zagato, each bringing their vision to exceptional

versions of production vehicles.

What’s new, arguably, is elevating it to the Ares level: the

customer ends up with their Bugatti looking like no other, complete

with all road-worthiness certifications and registrations. And

that’s possible because Ares will do what the bigger names of

the luxury automotive world could do – on paper – but can’t or

won’t do in actuality because the necessary disruption to their

production processes is just too costly and too complex. These

massive companies will, Bahar reckons, only ever be able to offer

CHANGING MINDS

Dany Bahar’s Ares is setting new

standards for customised vehicles

NetJets

37


OWNER’S PROFILE

customisation-lite. In other words, Ares is filling a “market

niche” – no, Bahar pauses to correct himself, make that

“ultra, ultra niche”.

“In principle, no manufacturer really likes another

company messing with its cars,” Bahar laughs, though

the likes of Bentley and Volvo have already approached

Ares to take on some special projects they’re too big to

fulfil. Besides, he suggests, like it or not, for some of

their customers, this is the future.

“Even back at Ferrari and Lotus I felt that, while the

product is important, it’s individualisation that’s even

more important, and that it’s only a matter of time

before the possibilities of individualisation will come

to every kind of luxury item on sale today,” reckons

Bahar. “You can see that the customisation business has

made huge progress over just the last few years, that

the personalisation you got a century ago from having

a bespoke suit made just for you will be seen in many

other products, too. It’s all about having a product your

neighbour doesn’t have.”

Critics might worry that this is a reductive view of

what’s driving customers – one-upmanship, swagger,

boastfulness – but Bahar suggests it’s precisely the

reassurance that you have what nobody else has that is

the motivating force for, maybe, half of his clients. And

it’s all the more pertinent given that, as he suggests,

the likes of a Ferrari doesn’t have the cachet it once did.

After all, these days it’s within the pocket of a top lawyer

or doctor.

“You may, if you’re fortunate enough to have the

money to do so, select your paint colour, or whatever,

at the likes of Rolls-Royce, but there’s nothing to stop

someone else selecting the same paint colour. And,

fair enough, that’s going to annoy you if you’ve spent a

million on a car and 5,000 people turn out to have the

same,” says Bahar. “The fact is that the more people

there are who can buy a $2.5million Bugatti, the more

it’s a precondition that it has to be unique.”

Remarkably, he has found that the wealthier an

Ares’ client is, the less interest he – and it’s usually a

he – has in the mechanics of his vehicle, even though,

thanks to massive consolidation within the car industry,

many parts are common to vehicles up and down the

price spectrum. That’s not just because some of Bahar’s

clients already have hundreds of cars in a very big garage

somewhere. It’s because what provides them with the

additional value is the look and the feel of their car. “It’s

very particular. You might even call these people nerds,”

Bahar laughs.

That can lead to some very particular results, too.

If you’re selling a client on the carte blanche they will

have to produce a car just as they want it, there’s no

scope to quibble with their taste. You have to respect that

taste is – thankfully – not universal, not cross-cultural.

Bahar also recalls the frustrations his design department

experienced with a new project that could barely get

started for the client making one minute change after

another – and that was just to the steering wheel. Why

all the fuss about such an insignificant part of the car,

they wondered?

“I called the client and he said, ‘Look Dany, it might

not have occurred to you but when you’re driving a

car all you’re doing really is holding this one piece in

your hands. That makes the steering wheel the most

important part of the car, the part that has to be the

most beautiful. I can’t see the car from the outside when

I’m sitting in it. So I’ll spend all the time I need until the

steering wheel is perfect,’” Bahar recalls. “And I thought,

‘Yeah, he’s right.’ It’s all a question of what’s important to

you. Each detail typically has a story behind it. It’s that

emotional element again. I think understanding that is

why people come to us, because really we have no track

record to speak of yet. I think that’s why people come

back to us over and over again, too.”

Yet providing a service that can pay that level of

attention to detail doesn’t necessarily make for a longterm

growth business, especially given the realities of

contemporary geopolitics, even if the very, very topend

may be largely insulated from most events. Bahar

stresses that Ares’ customisation service is, almost by

definition, limited in its growth: “You could produce

a thousand [specialist] cars per year and you’d be a

tiny, tiny company [in the automotive world] – and

we’re producing 50,” he says. But he also believes the

company has some way to go to reach what he calls “the

exclusivity limit”. He puts this at between 300 and 500

cars per annum, just few enough that what Ares does

will remain super-exclusive.

All the same, much as Pininfarina, after decades

focusing on design for third parties, has recently returned

to manufacturing its own cars, so Ares has now pressed

ahead with the launch of its own range of vehicles,

including its impressive S1 Project supercar. The first

production run of 77 was successfully pre-sold and will

be delivered this year. It has its own SUV in the pipeline

for 2023, and it’s also, somewhat incongruously,

planning an electric compact city car, bicycle and

scooter. Manufacturing is, Bahar agrees, a very different

proposition from customisation, but he’d rather Ares

stood on multiple pillars than become dependent on

one. Ares, he says, is moving away from being a service

provider and towards being a brand in its own right.

Certainly, he’s already thinking like a manufacturer. Has

any buyer of the S1 tried to put their new car through

Ares’ bespoke process?

“No,” says Bahar, “and, answering like all the big

manufacturers would, I hope it never comes to that.”

And at least this time it’s on his terms. Bahar might

well have been put off car manufacturing for life,

following his experience at Lotus. Brought in to rescue an

ailing brand, he went at it full throttle, upping its glamour

quotient by signing up Kate Moss, launching five new

models in one year (something the car industry just

doesn’t do) and then being fired by new owners in a hail

of accusations of financial impropriety, legal battles and,

finally, a settlement out of court.

“It’s all a question of what’s important

to you. Each detail has a story behind it”

38 NetJets


MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Inside and out, Ares

transforms already

superlative cars such

as a Bentley

ALL IMAGES COURTESY ARES DESIGN

“Each and every experience gives you an opportunity

to learn, and from Lotus I learned a lot about loyalty,

teamwork, the corporate world, and how you should get

absolutely everything in writing,” Bahar laughs. “But, you

know, it’s fine. I’m a pragmatic person and accept that

every life has its ups and downs. I won’t make the same

mistakes again. That said, whoever knows me, whoever

works with me, knows that I like to achieve goals in less

time than might be expected. There’s no rush really. It’s

just what drives me. I mean, why take things slower if

you can do them faster?”

That’s an apt question for the world of Ares, with

its 0-60 in three seconds culture and its exasperated

princes. At Ferrari, Bahar recalls, it was standard – as it

remains for most automotive manufacturing – for a new

car to move from drawing board to production in around

four or five years. “But we’re not at Ferrari here, we’re not

at Aston Martin,” he exclaims. “Here, there’s no reason

why we can’t do that in a year, a year-and-a-half. And

we’ve shown now that this is possible if you have good

processes and project management.”

In the long run, might Ares’ more important

contribution be to bring an overhaul of approaches to

luxury car production rather than for car customisation?

After all, Bahar claims that Ares is already the world’s

largest coachbuilding company, both by turnover

and number of projects. Within the next five years he

expects it to be manufacturing around 400 of its own

cars every year. It’s an ambitious goal, but Bahar has

experience with doubters. When bankers and private

equity managers told him that it would be impossible

to achieve his proposed business plan within Ares’ first

five years, he decided to do it, and go beyond it, in four

years. And he did.

“It’s just the satisfaction of saying, ‘There, in your

face!’” he says with a knowing smile. aresdesign.com

NetJets

39


TEEING OFF

GOLF

ON THE

BEN VIGIL

40 NetJets


GREAT

PLAINS

The new must-play course from hotshot

American golf design firm King-Collins

is a true stunner spread across a vast

parcel of former farmland in Nebraska

// By Larry Olmsted

IT HAS ONLY BEEN a little over three years since Golf Magazine

named little-known architect Rob Collins “The Next Big Thing” in

golf course design, but it is looking like its crystal ball was spot on.

The young star in the making partnered with construction manager

Tad King to create King-Collins Golf Course Design & Construction,

a boutique fi rm that handles every step from site evaluation to

design to building the course. Most uniquely, they became the fi rst

notable designers ever to hit it out of the ballpark and make their

reputation with a nine-hole course, Tennessee’s Sweetens Cove.

Despite its small size, the course has gained cult-like status, drawn

favourable comparisons to the Alister MacKenzie-Bobby Jones

masterpiece Augusta National, and landed on Golfweek’s Top 100

list as the 21st Best Public Course in the US – the only nine-holer

on that vaunted ranking.

Since Sweetens Cove, King and Collins have been swamped

with requests for their work and have projects under way in Texas,

New York, Mississippi and more in Tennessee, but the next big

thing – in a very literal sense – is in one of golf’s less heralded

destinations, Nebraska. Here, in the extreme northeast corner of the

state – the closest “big city” is not even in Nebraska, it’s Sioux City,

Iowa, about 24km away – is a big chunk of agricultural land that

has been farmed by the Andersen family for four generations. The

Andersens are of Danish descent and proud of it, and own a local

nine-hole routing called Old Dane, but wanted to do a lot more in

NetJets

41


TEEING OFF

GREEN SCENE

The seventh hole

at Landmand

ROB COLLINS

terms of golf, so they hired King-Collins and gave

it the run of 226 hectares that have laid fallow for

two decades. The result is the Landmand (Danish

for farmer) course, a 7,200-yard, par-73 stunner,

which opened for play on September 3 – one of

the highest-profile openings in the world this year.

If Sweetens Cove shocked with its small

stature, the opposite is the case at Landmand,

where everything is much larger than life. The

course site is about four times the average for

18 holes, with a whopping 34 hectares of turf

between tees and the gigantic green complexes.

That would suggest ample landing areas, and, to

a degree, that is true, but players will have to

navigate a maelstrom of bunkers, totalling almost

1.6ha in all. The greens are among the largest

most golfers will have ever seen, amounting to

over two and a half hectares unto themselves.

The largest is the signature 17th, a tribute to

MacKenzie’s infamous, legendary and now

vanished Sitwell Park green, an enormous and

extravagantly contoured green he built at an

otherwise pedestrian course in England, with a

drop so steep it is often described as a waterfall.

The long extinct green has become a mantra of

sorts in the currently hot retro-golf architecture

circles, led by the likes of Tom Doak, Gil Hanse,

and Kyle Franz, among others. Collins’ Sitwell

take here in Nebraska farm country covers more

than 2,800 square metres for just one pin. In

comparison, the famed enormous double green

at St Andrews Old Course, for the fifth and 13th

holes, is over 3,400 square metres. There are four

greens at Landmand in excess of 2,300 square

metres – more than four times the size of the

average putting surface on the major professional

tours (around 550). Collins is clearly influenced

by the early architecture of the British Isles, with

fairways meant to lay firm and fast in the hot, dry

Nebraska summers and additional homages to

the classic punchbowl and redan greens.

So Landmand requires length off the tee

and gives room to play, but both fairway and

greenside bunker shots will be a vital part of any

visitor’s round, and two-putts may be rare, while

four- and five-putts won’t surprise. What will

surprise is the beauty and magnificence of the

land itself, which was cleared of trees decades

ago for farming, yet is hardly the flat cornfields

The greens are among the largest most

golfers will have ever seen, totalling over two

and a half hectares unto themselves

42 NetJets


CONNOISSEURS CAN SPEND

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Equal Housing Opportunity.


BEN VIGIL

TEEING OFF

CHALLENGING SPACE

The eighth hole amid

the sparse Nebraska

landscape

Nebraska is famous for, but rather a series of

valleys bisected by prominent ridges, offering

constantly impressive 360-degree panoramic

views but also creating a natural optical illusion

that makes it hard to judge distance. Collins was

dead-set on a walkable course, and designed it

initially by walking, channelling the old-school

Old Tom Morris method employed at Scotland’s

legendary Prestwick 170 years ago when Morris

would wander about the dunes selecting the

best green sites, then find a way to connect

and play to them. As a wonderful result of this

methodology and the very generous parcel, with

no constraints for homesites or such, there are

par threes, fours and fives of every conceivable

length, and the holes play in every possible

direction. In addition, there are some dramatic

elevation changes, as Collins let the natural

flow of the landscape and its towering ridges

dictate the routing, which, for example, led to

a driveable par-four (seven) in a short valley

between ridges followed by a climb to a short

par-three up on top of the next hill.

As Collins has written, “Prior to the Sweetens

opening, we knew we had something special

on our hands. Right now, I multiply the feeling I

had early on in my gut about Sweetens by about

1,000 and that’s how I feel about Landmand.

We cannot wait for everyone to get out there and

experience it firsthand. The pictures don’t do it

justice. You just have to go and see it for your

own self.” landmandgc.com

SIOUX GATEWAY AIRPORT: 18miles/29km

44 NetJets


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go.nandj.com/netjets


LIVING WELL

46 NetJets


REST,

RECOVER,

RECHARGE

The missing link to your fitness programme

may just be taking it easy // By Jennifer Murphy

FOR DECADES, “No Pain, No Gain” and “Sore Today, Strong

Tomorrow” were the mantras preached by fitness instructors

and written on gym walls. We were always going hard, be it in

the gym or on the job. The events of the past two years have

caused us to take a collective pause. Suddenly, the slower pace

and work-from-home lifestyle allowed us time to embrace good

habits we’d typically skimp on – an indulgent hour-long yin

yoga class, a nutritious breakfast, 10 minutes of foam rolling

after a workout, a full eight hours of nightly rest. We never

realised we’d been running on fumes.

As the world reopened, we emerged with a new appreciation

for rest. Gyms and hotels have taken note, introducing everything

from dedicated recovery rooms equipped with self-massage tools

and compression gear, to sleep coaches and in-room meditations

to induce calm and tranquility. We still care about getting in our

steps, but we turn to the latest technology and fi tness trackers to

also help us monitor our sleep and maximise recovery.

Top athletes, such as NFL legend Tom Brady, ski champ

Mikaela Shiffrin and tennis great Rafael Nadal, have long known

the secret to maintaining longevity while continuing to improve

performance is a balancing act. The big days of intense workouts

are carefully paired with naps, massages, active recovery days

and smart nutrition programmes. Studies have shown rest days

are essential for the body to maintain homeostasis, or a state

of balance. An intense bout of physiological stress followed by

recovery allows the body to adapt and restore balance. Skip

the rest and keep pushing, and the body’s balance gets out of

whack, increasing risk of injury and illness.

Rest doesn’t have to mean lounging on the couch. Active

recovery can be as simple as scaling back intensity or doing

something active outdoors versus pumping iron at the gym. And

massages, once seen as an indulgence, are now viewed as selfcare.

If you’ve been giving it your all and aren’t seeing gains, it may

be time to step back and re-evaluate your routine. Here are some

easy ways to incorporate a bit more rest and recovery into your dayto-day

so you can look good but also feel good day in and day out.

JÖRN KASPUHL

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LIVING WELL

Five Yin Yoga Poses for

Every Weekend Warrior

Yin yoga is jokingly called sleepytime

yoga as you often remain lying

on your mat the entire class and

hold poses for three to fi ve minutes

to access deeper layers of fascia –

the connective tissue that acts as

shrink-wrap around your muscles

and bones. Studies have shown that

fascia requires sustained stretching

before it starts to change elasticity.

Those longer holds in restorative Yin

postures have been shown to be one

of the most effective ways for fascia

to stretch and lengthen. And like

any style of yoga, breathing is at the

heart of the practice. As you breathe

into each pose, you’ll increase blood

fl ow and circulation, while also

activating your parasympathetic

nervous system to melt away stress.

Here are fi ve Yin poses to integrate

into your home routine.

SUPPORTED BRIDGE POSE

BENEFIT:

Relieves lower back pain and

opens the chest to counteract

slumped desk posture.

RECLINED SPINAL TWIST

BENEFIT:

Helps decompress the lower back,

stretches the glutes and opens

tight shoulders.

RECLINED SUPPORTED

BUTTERFLY

BENEFIT:

This hip opener stretches

the groin and adductors while

releasing tension in the

lower back.

RUNNER’S LUNGE

BENEFIT:

Targets tight hip flexors, the psoas

muscle and the lower back.

PUPPY POSE

BENEFIT:

Provides a deep stretch

through the shoulders, chest,

and upper arms.

ISTOCK

Spa Navigator

Top spas draw on the knowledge and ancient healing practices from cultures around the world as well as the latest

science and technology to deliver a menu of distinctive therapies guaranteed to relax and restore both mind and body.

LOMI LOMI ABHYANGA THAI MAORI SHIATSU

WHAT IS IT

This indigenous Hawaiian

healing art involves long,

rhythmic forearm strokes

that can deliver light to

deep pressure to improve

circulations and realign

the body.

Rooted in Ayurveda, a

traditional system of

medicine from India, this

massage is performed with

warm, dosha-specific oil.

Instead of a table, you lie

on the ground, clothed, as

a therapist uses their feet,

elbows, knees and hands

to compress and stretch

the body.

Utilises a “patu”, a wooden

weapon of war, and beech

spheres to apply varying

pressure to every muscle of

the body.

A century-old Japanese

massage technique that

deftly uses finger pressure

to knead, press, soothe, tap

and stretch muscles as well

as stimulate the flow of “Qi”

or vital energy, throughout

the body.

WHERE TO TRY IT

The newly renovated Four

Seasons Resort Hualalai

on the Big Island of Hawaii.

fourseasons.com

Ananda, a five-star holistic

spa resort in the Himalayas

in India. anandaspa.com

Thai massage is a specialty

at COMO Shambhala Spa at

COMO Point Yamu in Phuket,

Thailand. comohotels.com

Newly opened Monteverdi

Spa in Tuscany.

monteverdituscany.com

The revamped Four Seasons

Hotel Westlake Village

in southern California.

fourseasons.com

48 NetJets


JULIAN RENTZSCH

How To Know

When You Need A Break

If you’re putting in too much time at the gym, you could be doing more

harm than good. Overtraining can undo your fitness gains and make

you more susceptible to injury and illness. Samantha Campbell, owner

of Deep Relief // Peak Performance Athletic Training Center in Haiku,

Hawaii, on the island of Maui, trains some of the world’s top athletes

including big-wave surfer Ian Walsh, snowboarder Travis Rice and

kitesurfer Jesse Richman. Here she shares insights on everything from

the importance of a rest day to how to get back to baseline.

Is there a way to measure how hard

you’re taxing your body during training

or are you really just going on how you

feel? These days gadgets like your Apple

Watch give you a readiness score. This

metric is based on heart-rate variability

(HRV), or the variance of time between

the beats of your heart. Low HRV may

indicate your body has activated your

parasympathetic nervous system, or

fi ght-or-fl ight mode, to respond to stress.

Sometimes you could write off that low

number due to having a few drinks the

night before. What’s more useful is to

look at trends over time by using HRV as

an objective number and correlating it to

subjective states like mood.

How might overtraining affect mood?

Mood swings can often be one of the fi rst

signs that something is out of whack.

Exercise is usually a mood booster,

but overtraining can lead to feelings of

grumpiness and even depression.

Are there other signs to look for?

Depending on the person, you could

notice changes in appetite and sleep

patterns. If you aren’t usually a napper

and are suddenly taking two-hour

naps in the middle of the day or if you’re

an early bird now sleeping in, those could

all be signs you might need a break.

Training puts physical stress on the

body but can outside stressors play

a factor in overtraining? Professional

athletes get to rest as part of their

job. Normal people, say training for a

triathlon or CrossFit competition, may

still work a 70-hour week. You have

to consider the total amount of stress

affecting your body, including nonathletic

stressors like work, a new baby,

or being off your sleep schedule.

How does overtraining affect

performance? If you’re unable to

perform well, even when you’re set up

to perform well, it’s a sign you need

a change. If you’re a runner and your

top speeds are going down even when

you’re rested or you’re a paddler and

you aren’t hitting your intervals in the

water, it may be because you’re doing

too much in the gym.

If you have overdone it, how do you get

back to baseline? Majorly scale back so

you go back to baseline for a week. That

doesn’t mean don’t exercise. Change

what you’re doing. If you normally do

a hilly run, do an active recovery walk.

You’re still moving and getting outside. Do

your sport, be it surfi ng or cycling, at the

most relaxing level and integrate recovery

activities like ice baths and massages.

After one week, if you feel refreshed,

slowly increase the intensity of activity.

Any tips for avoiding overtraining?

At least every two weeks take one full day

off. And for every two to three weeks of

intense training, add a week where you

bring down the volume so you can absorb

your efforts. And if you’re coming off an

illness or have been suffering from “long

Covid” symptoms, go slow.

Nutrition

Hacks

Nutrition is the often-overlooked

piece of the performance and

recovery puzzle. But with so

many options, it can be hard

to know what to eat and drink – and

when. Kate Zeratsky, a registered

dietitian and nutritionist with

the Mayo Clinic in Rochester,

Minnesota, offers insights to help

you make a game plan.

SPORTS DRINKS

PROS

Sports drinks rehydrate the body and

replace lost electrolytes while providing

sodium to drive thirst that makes the body

want to continue to hydrate. The added

carbohydrates refuel and replace glucose

(glycogen in muscles and liver) for the

next activity.

CONS

For those who do not exercise regularly,

you could be adding additional calories

through sugar and excess sodium to your

diet. The latter negatively impacts blood

pressure and kidney health. For those

wanting less processed foods, the fluid and

electrolytes of sports drinks can be achieved

in a combination of water and food.

RECOVERY BEER

PROS

Beer can boost the body with carbohydrates,

and brewer’s yeast is a good source of

thiamine, or B1, an important vitamin in

energy production. Just watch the alcohol

levels and maybe opt for a session ale rather

than a high-strength IPA. Or better yet, look

for non-alcoholic options from craft brands

like Athletic Brewing Company.

CONS

Consuming alcohol is counterproductive

to rehydrating and depending on

formulation, may not meet recovery protein

recommendations. If you want to crack

open a celebratory brew, have one, with

a water.

CHOCOLATE MILK

PROS

The children’s drink provides hydration,

carbohydrates, protein for muscle repair,

and electrolytes, as well as nutrition in

the form of sodium, calcium, magnesium,

phosphorus, and vitamins D and A. Dairy

products are a good source of leucine, an

amino acid thought to be a key in muscle

growth, as well as iodine, a trace element

needed for thyroid hormone production

that plays a role in energy production and

protein synthesis.

CONS

Added sugar from powdered or syrup-based

chocolate provides extra calories.

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LIVING WELL

HIT THE RECOVERY ROOM

Stretching zones have long been relegated to a cramped back corner of the gym, perhaps with a yoga mat or two.

No longer. Gyms and spas at hotels such as The Hythe Vail, a Luxury Collection Resort in Colorado, and Six Senses

Istanbul, are devoting dedicated rooms to recovery. Yes, you’ll find yoga mats, but so much more. Equipped with

everything from vibrating foam rollers to compression leg sleeves, they offer the DIY cure for all sorts of muscle aches

and pains. Create your own home recovery room with these essential tools.

From top:

TRS SUPERNOVA

It took 18 months of research and work with professional athletes to perfect

the design of this massage ball. The groove pattern provides serious deep

tissue therapy while the small size – just 80mm diameter – can reach tricky

trigger points. It’s the ultimate antidote for tight shoulders and hip flexors.

roguefitness.com

GAIAM VIBRATING FOOT ROLLER

Our feet are our foundation and one of our most overlooked body parts.

Acupuncture spikes on this pulsing foot roller help increase blood flow

and reduce inflammation to help avoid common injuries, such as plantar

fasciitis, achilles tendinitis and shin splints. gaiam.com

NORMATEC 3

The perfect remedy after a long flight or tough workout, Normatec’s patented

pulse technology helps to increase circulation, restore muscles and reduce

swelling. Leg attachments (pictured) can be expanded to full body and can

pack down into a carry-on. You can choose from seven levels of compression

and ZoneBoost technology allows you to target specific areas with more

pressure. hyperice.com

MARC PRO PLUS

This electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) device is used by elite athletes to speed

up recovery and improve performance. The pain control mode helps instantly to

alleviate soreness caused by exercise strain. Free, unlimited access to one-on-one

coaching calls help weekend warriors optimise results. marcpro.com

THERAGUN PRO

Easy to take on the road, this handheld massage device comes with six

different attachments to deliver the exact relief you need, be it gentle

percussion near sensitive areas or flushing motions to increase blood flow. A

rotating arm and ergonomic multigrip make it easy to access otherwise hardto-reach

spots. therabody.com

TRIGGERPOINT GRID 1.0 FOAM ROLLER

The next best thing to a sports massage, this foam roller has a grid-like

surface that targets specific muscles to get stubborn knots and kinks to

release. Studies have shown regular foam rolling, even just a few minutes

a day, can improve mobility and circulation and prevent muscle tightness.

tptherapy.com

BODYSPACE BODY ROLLER (not pictured)

It takes about a dozen lymphatic massage treatments to cleanse your lymph

system. This cutting-edge tool integrates infrared technology into a body roller

so you can flush toxins daily, resulting in firmer skin tone and reduced muscle

inflammation. A built-in computer allows for precise control. bodyspace.ca

SUPERFOOD

EXTREME ATHLETES’ SECRET TO ALL-DAY ENERGY

Products from wild-harvested supplement maker HANAH have become ubiquitous in the social media feeds of pro athletes like

big-mountain skier Angel Collinson and snowboard icon Jeremy Jones. HANAH founder Joel Einhorn spent over three years

working with an Ayurvedic practitioner in India to develop the 30-herb recipe for the company’s signature product, HANAH ONE.

Jimmy Chin credits a daily dose of HANAH ONE for keeping up his stamina throughout the intense fi lming schedule of Oscarwinning

movie Free Solo as well as lapping Tram runs when he’s home in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. The paste-like superfood has a

pungent smell and Vegemite-like taste, but mixed into coffee or spread on toast, it’s easy to integrate into a breakfast routine.

And travel-friendly ONE Go-Packs are the ultimate weapon for avoiding fatigue on the road. hanahlife.com

COURTESY THE COMPANIES

50 NetJets


We know sleep is important, but what

happens to the body while we slumber?

Sleep is vital for repairing and providing

rest to the brain and the body. But several

changes occur during sleep that help

regulate the body’s immune function,

control blood pressure and heart rate,

regulate production of several hormones

including growth hormones and those that

control hunger and satiety, impact the

areas in the brain that control emotions

and logical thinking, and help consolidate

short-term and long-term memory. Hence,

sleep deprivation could contribute to

susceptibility to infections, weight gain,

mood disorders, pessimism, depression,

anxiety, emotional dysregulation and

worse short-term and long-term memory.

The Sleep Effect

Dr. Rohit Budhiraja, the medical

director in the Sleep and Circadian Disorders

Clinic at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in

Boston, weighs in on why seven to eight hours

of quality sleep can be a gamechanger in

how you feel and perform.

Can you explain the different qualities

of sleep? Sleep is usually divided into

dream sleep (REM sleep) and nondream

sleep (NREM sleep). NREM

sleep is further divided into light sleep

(N1), intermediate sleep (N2), and

deep sleep (N3). Both REM and NREM

serve important functions. REM is

important for learning new skills and

memory consolidation and may help

regulate emotions.

What are some things that might lead to

a poor sleep? Environmental factors like

noise, light, high temperature (usually

cold temperature helps improve the

quality of sleep) and blue light exposure

at night (phone and computer screens

are very rich in blue wavelength). Eating

close to bedtime can worsen sleep

quality, and while alcohol can induce

sleep it can also suppress deeper stages

of sleep. Anxiety, stress and depression

can signifi cantly impact the ability to fall

and stay asleep. And medical factors like

arthritis, acid refl ux and sinus issues can

all effect sleep quality and continuity.

Are there habits you can embrace to help

improve sleep? Relaxation, exercise and

meditation can help slow down the brain

and facilitate deeper stages of sleep.

Avoid alcohol and meals close to bedtime

and try not to have caffeine within 8 to

10 hours of bedtime. For optimal sleep,

exposure to screens, like phones and

computers, should be cut off two hours

before going to bed, but even powering

down 30 minutes prior makes a difference.

Are there benefits of napping and if so

what and how long is a good nap?

Naps can improve mood and memory in

some people. If napping, it is usually a

good idea to keep it less than 20 to 30

minutes since longer naps can worsen the

sleep on subsequent nights by decreasing

the pressure of sleep.

Does sleep quality become more important

if we are training for a physical activity?

Good sleep is vital if you are training.

Several studies have demonstrated

improved athletic performance with sleep

extension. Good sleep has been shown to

decrease exhaustion, improve refl exes and

accuracy, and also help control emotions

and enhance logical thinking, all of which

can be very helpful during sports and

physical training.

MEALS TO HELP YOUR BODY RECOVER

As convenient as power bars and protein shakes are, nothing beats a well-balanced meal, says Kate

Zeratsky, of the Mayo Clinic. “Wholesome foods provide macronutrients, which include carbs, proteins

and fats, micronutrients, and naturally occurring phytonutrients, antioxidant-rich compounds in

plants.” Here are easy combos to prepare at home or order on the road.

JULIAN RENTZSCH (ILLUSTRATION), ISTOCK (FOOD)

GREEK YOGURT

AND FRUIT

Yogurt is a good source of

calcium and phosphorous,

both important for strong

bones, and Greek yogurt

has a higher protein content

than other styles. Fresh fruit

provides fibre, energy in the

form of carbs, plus vitamin C

as well as other polyphenols

that may reduce markers of

inflammation after exercise.

SALMON AND

SWEET POTATO

A fatty fish, such as salmon,

provides a solid dose of

protein, healthy, omega 3

fatty acids, and vitamin

D. The addition of skin-on

sweet potato adds healthy

carbs, vitamin A, fibre, and

magnesium, which has

been shown to play a role

in muscle performance and

strength.

TUNA SANDWICH

Tuna is a fatty fish (see

benefits left) and is also a

good source of selenium,

an antioxidant mineral

that has been shown to

boost the activity of DNA

repair enzymes. Eat it on

wholegrain bread for a

dose of fibre and add a

slice of cheese for extra

protein, sodium, calcium

and riboflavin, a B vitamin

involved in many key

metabolic processes

including energy production.

GRANOLA AND MILK

This is a good choice if you

don’t have a big appetite

after exercise, says

Zeratsky. Low-sugar granola

comprised of mostly nuts

and seeds is a good source

of vitamin E, magnesium and

zinc, an antioxidant mineral

with over 1,000 functions in

the body, many involving the

growth and repair of tissue.

Granola made with oats

delivers added carbohydrates

and fibre and the addition

of dried fruit provides a

concentrated source of

calories and carbs. Milk adds

protein and vitamin D.

VEGETABLE PASTA

PRIMAVERA

Pasta is a good source of

carbs while tomato sauce is

packed with vitamin C and

lycopene, an antioxidant

that plays a role in reducing

inflammation and oxidation.

Add in onions, an excellent

source of quercetin, an

antioxidant that is believed

to play a role in reducing

inflammation, mushrooms, a

good source of vitamin D and

selenium, and spinach or

other magnesium-rich leafy

greens packed with folate,

which plays a key role in the

production of new cells.

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51


LIVING WELL

OURA RING GENERATION 3

A discreet fitness tracker that doubles as bling, the Oura Ring

measures your body’s signals from your finger (next to your arteries)

for the utmost accuracy. Sleep, activity and readiness scores based

on your body’s baselines are used to share personal insights, such

as how much time you spend in a relaxed state each day, as well

as guidance on your optimum bedtime and when you should start

winding down at night to ensure a solid sleep. ouraring.com

NUMBERS GAME

These fitness trackers measure everything

from sleep quality to muscle-oxygen levels to help

improve recovery and performance

SUUNTO 7

Finnish company Suunto marries the best features

of its sports watches with smart technology in a

single device that delivers 70-plus sport modes

from cycling to skiing, free offline outdoor maps

with navigations, and a wrist-heart rate sensor

for activity tracking. An impressive battery life

supports 24 hours of active smartwatch use and

you can follow your steps, sleep quality, calories

and other fitness data from the Suunto app and

connect with partners such as Strava. suunto.com

MOXY MUSCLE OXYGEN MONITOR

Muscle-oxygen saturation indicates the balance between oxygen delivery

and consumption in muscles. By attaching this matchbox-sized sensor

to a specific body part – say, forearms for a climber or quads for a

cyclist – athletes can see whether their muscle oxygen is stable, rising,

or dropping. The latter signifies a buildup of lactate and can let athletes

know when to dial back intensity and gauge how long they have before

they hit the wall. moxymonitor.com

POLAR VANTAGE V2

Polar is the gold standard

when it comes to heart-rate

monitors. Its new sports

watch is packed with even

more smart features to

help fine tune training and

recovery. Training Load Pro

technology alerts users

when they’re overtraining

and recovery tests provide

feedback on when your body

has recovered from a workout.

And when stress levels spike,

a Serene feature can restore

calm by helping you sync your

breath to your heart rate.

polar.com

APPLE WATCH ULTRA

Apple takes its watch

to the next level with

a titanium case, dualfrequency

GPS and every

health feature you could

need from an ECG app

that can record your

heartbeat and rhythm, to

heart health notifications

that can alert you to

irregular heart rhythms.

It can also track the type

of sleep (REM, core and

deep) you’re getting and

provide readings on blood

oxygen. apple.com

BIOSTRAP EVO RECOVER SET

This personal health monitor uses a

combination of raw waveform analysis

and cloud-based algorithms to provide

a physiological snapshot of your sleep

quality, recovery, and nocturnal biometrics

including heart rate, heart-rate variability,

oxygen saturation and respiratory rate. Each

day you’ll receive a sleep and recovery

score as well as insights into how to make

lifestyle changes that will improve those

numbers. biostrap.com

WHOOP 4.0

The fitness tracking manufacturer’s sleekest, smartest product

yet collects metrics including skin temperature, blood oxygen

and heart rate. Available with more than 70,000 customisations,

from knit bands to precious metal-plated clasps, it can be a

fashionable accessory, or the sensor can be removed and hidden

in a pocket of the new WHOOP Body line of technical apparel.

whoop.com

COURTESY THE COMPANIES

52 NetJets


Deep Relaxation

Five unique therapies that promise

supreme tranquility

SOUND BATH AT ETÉREO,

AUBERGE RESORTS COLLECTION,

RIVIERA MAYA, MEXICO

Performed ocean-side, a therapist lulls you into a

meditative state by creating vibrations with crystal

singing bowls that sync with the sounds of the

Atlantic’s rhythmic waves. The sea’s negative ions,

which increase the flow of oxygen to the brain,

enhance the benefits. aubergeresorts.com

CANCUN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT: 24miles/39km

SENSORY DEPRIVATION AT TAYLOR

RIVER LODGE, AN ELEVEN EXPERIENCE

PROPERTY IN ALMONT, COLORADO

During Eleven Life wellness retreats, the saltwater

pool in the Bathhouse is used for sensory deprivation

experiences. Guests don arm-bands, a cap that covers

their ears, and an eye mask to block the light and float

into a state of deep relaxation. elevenexperience.com

GUNNISON-CRESTED BUTTE AIRPORT: 22miles/35km

BHUTANESE BATH AT CERVO RESORT,

ZERMATT, SWITZERLAND

The resort’s new Mountain Ashram Spa has an

authentic Bhutanese hot stone bath. The deep wooden

tub is filled with steamy water spiked with medicinal

herbs and the heat releases minerals from the stones.

A long soak can help relieve joint pain, reduce blood

pressure and revive weary muscles. cervo.swiss

SION AIRPORT: 51miles/82km

VIBRA HEALING CHAKRA

BALANCING THERAPY AT

MONTAGE BIG SKY, MONTANA

Our chakras – seven vital energy centers that run

up and down the body – can become blocked,

manifesting physical ailments and even emotional

distress. This balancing session uses meditation

techniques and vibrations from eight singing bowls to

unblock and rebalance the body’s energy pathways.

montagehotels.com

BOZEMAN YELLOWSTONE AIRPORT: 51miles/82km

LED/INFRARED DETOX POD

AT AMAN NEW YORK

The dazzling spa at the recently opened Aman New

York features a state-of-the-art, cocoon-like pod

that detoxes the body while also providing relief for

both chronic and acute pain. The lower panel acts as

an LED therapy bed, while the upper panel delivers

infrared rays for deep tissue penetration. aman.com

TETERBORO AIRPORT: 15miles/24km

Track Your Way to

Optimal Health

Will Ahmed, founder and CEO of WHOOP,

a manufacturer of fitness trackers, shares why the time

you spend in the gym doesn’t make you stronger, the dangers

of training when your body’s stressed, and how data can

help inform healthier habits for a better night’s sleep.

Does recovery really matter if you’re not an athlete or training for an

athletic endeavour? While WHOOP’s members include top athletes like

NFL player Patrick Mahomes and golfer Rory McIlroy, the majority simply

aspire to live healthier and more productive lives. Feeling good starts with

paying more attention to recovery and sleep. You can only manage what

you measure. If you want to put yourself in the best position to take on

the day, you need to recognise what’s going on inside your body.

Why are sleep and recovery crucial for optimising performance? Sleep is

essential to maintaining good health and the foundation for our analytics

at WHOOP (see WHOOP 4.0, facing page). Our goal is to help members

understand when their bodies are ready for strain and when their bodies

should prioritise recovery. The time you spend training or exercising

doesn’t make you stronger – that’s when you break down the body. You

make gains during rest and recovery. Sleep repairs your muscles, restores

your cognitive function and improves vital systems like immunity. Your

body can only take on so much stress each day. If you aren’t properly

focusing on recovery, you’re putting yourself at risk of injury or illness.

When you were the captain of the Harvard University squash team

you struggled with overtraining. What were some signs that you

were doing too much? I would regularly train for three hours a day. I

wanted to be the best and believed that meant consistently pushing

myself to the limit. I was overtraining, misinterpreting fi tness peaks

and underestimating the importance of recovery and sleep. I was

also balancing the rigours of being a student. That experience ignited

my interest in how technology could help unlock peak performance.

WHOOP really became the fi rst wearable that would tell you not to train

on days when your body was run down.

What personal revelations have you had from WHOOP, and how has that

data informed your habits? I use the WHOOP Journal that lets members

track how their choices impact their physiological data. For me, practising

transcendental meditation has a very positive effect on my heart-rate

variability. Wearing blue-light blocking glasses every evening makes

my sleep much more effi cient. I’ve also found that supplements like

magnesium and melatonin enhance the quality of my sleep.

JULIAN RENTZSCH

NetJets

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LIVING WELL

SWEET DREAMS

GUARANTEED

Sleep coaches and AI-powered mattresses are among the ways hotels

are ensuring their guests get a heavenly night’s rest. And the trendiest

spa retreats around the globe help guests adopt better sleep hygiene

THE CADOGAN, A BELMOND HOTEL, LONDON

A sleep concierge accessed via the Belmond app offers guests sleep enhancements

including a choice of pillows, a weighted blanket, aromatherapy mists, a bedtime

tea service and a meditative recording from London-based hypnotherapist and

sleep expert Malminder Gill. For a more personalised experience, the concierge

can arrange a private one-on-one session with Gill. belmond.com

LONDON CITY AIRPORT: 9miles/14km

SIX SENSES IBIZA

A resident sleep doctor curates three-, five- and seven-night programmes designed

to analyse and improve your current sleep patterns and habits. Guests receive

a sleep tracker and review data during one-on-one consultations. Workshops

on meditation, breathwork and yoga nidra techniques are complemented by

cryotherapy sessions, massages and diet and exercise advice. sixsenses.com

IBIZA AIRPORT: 22miles/35km

PARK HYATT NEW YORK

Park Hyatt teamed up with tech-enabled restorative mattress maker Bryte

to create a One Bedroom Sleep Suite. The bed features a menu of relaxation

experiences such as being rocked to sleep and dynamically adjusts to relieve

pressure points. Throughout the 84sq m space, guests will find sleep-enhancing

amenities including a Vitruvi Essential Diffuser, sleeping masks and a collection

of sleep-related books. hyatt.com

TETERBORO AIRPORT: 15miles/24km

PUENTE ROMANO, MARBELLA

The resort’s four-bedroom Villa La Pereza features the cutting-edge, sciencebacked

resting system from Spanish company HOGO. The technology defends

the body from electromagnetic pollution and optimises the villa for a good night’s

sleep. Guests who book a stay also receive a consultation with a professional

HOGO sleep coach. puenteromano.com

MALAGA AIRPORT: 34miles/55km

HACIENDA ALTAGRACIA, COSTA RICA

This is one of the first hotels from Auberge Resorts Collection to roll out the

brand’s new Better Sleep programme, created in partnership with cult New York

City spa the Well. Rooms feature amenities such as journals and yoga blocks

that encourage mind-calming practices. And a guided sleep meditation is set to

binaural beats, which are known for promoting REM sleep. aubergeresorts.com

HOTEL ALTAGRACIA AIRPORT: 0.6miles/1km

CANYON RANCH TUCSON, ARIZONA

In addition to physician-reviewed, overnight sleep screenings, Canyon Ranch

hosts annual five-day sleep immersion retreats that educate attendees about

foods that support rest, the best yoga poses to do before bed, and tips for

breaking bad sleep habits. The week includes overnight sleep screenings and

one-on-one consultations. canyonranch.com

TUCSON AIRPORT: 19miles/31km

MARION KAUFER

54 NetJets


PRIVATE

ISLAND LIVING

at it’s finest.

VIRGIN GORDA

BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS

OILNUTBAY.COM


LIVING WELL

KAMALAYA, KOH SAMUI, THAILAND

Seven- and nine-day sleep-enhancement programmes are specifically

designed for people suffering from insomnia. Each guest is assigned a

naturopath, Chinese medicine practitioner and life-enhancement mentor to

work with them one-on-one throughout their stay. Bioresonance therapy is

used to help reset the nervous system, and guests learn how to maintain

that state of calm through meditation techniques and nutrition hacks, like

adding herbal and nutraceutical supplements to their diet. kamalaya.com

KOH SAMUI AIRPORT: 14miles/23km

MIRAVAL, TUCSON, ARIZONA

Complimentary Rituals for Better Rest workshops delve into nighttime

rituals from ancient Greece and Egypt and offer advice on how to create

a home sleep sanctuary. For more personalised advice, book a session

with Miraval’s certified sleep science coach and take home an action

plan to improve your zzzs. miravalarizona.com

TUCSON AIRPORT: 15miles/24km

REST EASY

Clockwise from top left: The Cadogan, A

Belmond Hotel, London; Six Senses Ibiza; Park

Hyatt New York; Puente Romano, Marbella;

Miraval, Tucson; Kamalaya, Koh Samui; Canyon

Ranch Tucson; Hacienda AltaGracia, Costa Rica

Previous page: Miraval, Tucson

ROWS FROM TOP AND LEFT: HELEN CATHCART, ASSAF PINCHUK,

DONNA DOTAN, © PUENTE ROMANO, © HACIENDA ALTA GRACIA,

© CANYON RANCH, © KAMALAYA, KEN HAYDEN

56 NetJets


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CELEBRATING ITS 60TH ANNIVERSARY this year,

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beyond. The jewels in Sotogrande’s crown, the

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PERFECT PEARLS

SEA

BOUNTY

The jewels of the ocean turn this season’s gems into works of art

Photography by Nocera & Ferri // Production by Elisa Vallata

60 NetJets


Clockwise from top left:

TASAKI

White gold Atelier Cascade

earrings set with Akoya pearls,

South Sea pearls and diamonds

YOKO LONDON

White gold necklace set with

South Sea pearls and diamonds,

from the High Jewellery

collection; white gold ring set

with one South Sea pearl and

diamonds, from the Mayfair

collection; white gold bracelet

set with Akoya pearls and

diamonds, from the Raindrop

collection

MIKIMOTO

White gold ring set with

one South Sea cultured

pearl and diamonds

BUCHERER FINE JEWELLERY

White gold Peacock ring set

with diamonds

Facing page,

clockwise from the top:

GRAFF

White gold necklace

set with diamonds

TASAKI

White gold Atelier Surge ear

clip set with Akoya pearls

and diamonds

DAVID MORRIS

White gold Pearl Deco bangle set

with Akoya pearls and diamonds

YOKO LONDON

White gold ring set with one

South Sea pearl and diamonds,

from the Mayfair collection

NetJets

61


PERFECT PEARLS

Clockwise from top left:

CHOPARD

White gold necklace set

with cultured pearls and

diamonds, from the Haute

Joaillerie collection

MOUSSAIEFF

White gold high jewellery

bracelet set with natural

pearls and diamonds

GRAFF

White gold earring set

with diamonds

62 NetJets


Clockwise from the top:

MIKIMOTO

White gold Les Pétales Place

Vendôme necklace set with

South Sea cultured pearls

and diamonds

YOKO LONDON

White gold earrings set with

Akoya peals and diamonds,

from the Raindrop collection

RETOUCHING BY LAURA CAMMARATA

DIOR JOAILLERIE

White gold Archi Dior

Diorama bracelet set

with diamonds

BOODLES

Platinum Baroque pearl

pendant set with diamonds

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63


ON LOCATION

ROME’S

MATT COOPER / GALLERY STOCK

64 NetJets


RICHES

The Italian capital is back in style, as global hotel brands flock

to open new standout properties and the restaurant and shopping

scenes are as hot as they’ve ever been // By Delia Demma

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Rome’s architectural beauty

still shines, but the city has

so much more to offer

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© W ROME

ON LOCATION

66 NetJets


WHERE TO STAY

With the flood of luxury hotels over the past two

years, the charm of the Eternal City has never

been more piquant – and there’s still more to

come, with Six Senses, Bulgari and Nobu all

planning big projects for 2023.

The best new hotels in Rome have all taken a

familiar course: merging the grandeur of Roman

aristocratic palaces with a contemporary interior

design. But each has done it with particular style

and verve, sometimes even playfully, and that

energy is radiating across the city. Take the highly

anticipated W Rome (marriott.com), which marks

the Italian debut of the always irreverent brand

and here occupies two 19th-century buildings,

located a stone’s throw from Piazza di Spagna.

In the 147 rooms and 15 suites, bright hues

and bold patterns combine with architectural

styles that date back to ancient Rome, a dizzying

mix that is heightened by designer furnishings

and ultra-modern technological accessories.

Unexpected paths lead to hidden corners, such

as the Parlapiano space, a garden inspired by the

architectural style of Borromini, or the Giardino

Clandestino, an outdoor courtyard very popular

with locals and creatives, who come here for a

drink and live music.

Conviviality is also the mantra of The Hoxton

(thehoxton.com), the first outpost in Italy of

the burgeoning English brand. Calling itself

an open-house hotel, it’s a stylish destination

attracting both travellers and locals in the always

chic Parioli neighbourhood. The lobby is alive all

day long, while the Cugino bar is very popular

for breakfast and light bites, the social tables

bring gig workers from across the globe, and at

Beverly restaurant you can taste a Californian

cuisine with farm-to-table ethos. The 192 rooms

pay homage to iconic Italian design of the 1950s

with eclectic vintage furnishings and carefully

selected works of art.

Present also meets past in the Shedir Collection

(shedircollection.com) of boutique hotels, an

JONATHAN SAVOIE / GALLERY STOCK

MODERN TOUCH

The MAXXI – Museum of Arts

of the XXI century

Facing page: the terrace of

a WOW suite at W Hotel

Italian brand born just before the pandemic and

now getting its due. After the Vilòn hotel, a small

gem of 18 rooms whose atmosphere is reminiscent

of an elegant Roman house, the Maalot hotel,

set near the Trevi Fountain, has enriched the

portfolio. Occupying the former home of the famed

opera composer Gaetano Donizetti, it boasts 30

rooms and suites, a bar and a restaurant with

contemporary British design. The latest addition –

perhaps even more exciting – is Umiltà 36, where

the elegance of the interiors harkens back in all the

best ways to La Dolce Vita.

There is another group that has just expanded

its collection of urban escapes as well. Following

The First Arte and The First Dolce hotels – the

former focused on impressive works of art and the

latter on haute patisserie – The Pavilions Hotels

& Resorts (pavilionshotels.com) has just opened

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67


MATT COOPER / GALLERY STOCK

ON LOCATION

The First Musica, where music suffuses every

corner, at least in spirit. The strikingly modern

concrete façade with floor-to-ceiling windows

pays homage to Richard Meier’s iconic Museo

dell’Ara Pacis, situated on the opposite bank of

the Tiber. Inside, Loro Piana fabrics and Calacatta

marble conjure a calm, warmly luxurious

ambience that echoes the promise of the brand to

cover all five senses in every property.

WHERE TO EAT

The hotel openings have led the transformation

of the Roman culinary offering thanks to the

arrival of numerous starred chefs. Perhaps the

most awaited was Ciccio Sultano of the two-

Michelin-starred Duomo Restaurant in Ragusa

Ibla, who has succeeded in merging Sicilian

cuisine and Roman culture in the kitchen of

Giano Restaurant (gianorestaurant.com) at W

Hotel. The sweet part of the meal is entrusted

OLD AND NEW

The history of the Pantheon,

above, contrasts with the

new hotels in the city, such

as The Hoxton, the Maalot,

and Umiltà 36, facing page,

clockwise from top left

to the pastry chef Fabrizio Fiorani, who has also

opened his first boutique Zucchero x Fabrizio

Fiorani inside the hotel. Try his “Happy pills”, a

burst of pure happiness with five chocolate pilllike

bites: dark, white with vanilla, raspberry,

pistachio and caramel. For those who want to

combine fine dining with a breathtaking view of

the Roman skyline, there is Cielo at the Hotel de

La Ville by Rocco Forte (roccofortehotels.com),

which has a good claim to being the best rooftop

bar in the city. Here, master of Italian cuisine

Fulvio Pierangelini offers his intriguing and

unconventional dishes from lunch to a smart

casual dinner.

Speaking of panoramic restaurants, La

Pergola (romecavalieri.com) by three-starred

chef Heinz Beck is an institution in the city,

as is La Terrazza Restaurant on the top floor

of the Hotel Eden by Dorchester Collection

(dorchestercollection.com) where presidents

The hotel openings have transformed

the Roman culinary offering thanks

to the arrival of numerous starred chefs

68 NetJets


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: © THE HOXTON ROME, STEFANO SCATÀ, © SHEDIR COLLECTION

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ON LOCATION

and heads of state often meet. The view from

the Acquaroof Terrazza Molinari of The First

Roma Arte hotel is also astonishing: Here chef

Daniele Lippi offers a more informal version

of his creative cuisine served at Acquolina

(acquolinaristorante.it), the gourmet restaurant

located on the ground floor, where the art on

the plate obviates any need for additional views.

WHERE TO SHOP

Retail therapy has long been centred on Via

dei Condotti, but for something original and

handmade, the place to go is Via di Monserrato.

Along this secluded street, behind the Campo

de Fiori district, you can find the highest

concentration of creativity in the city. Take the

jewellery at Delfina Delettrez (delfinadelettrez.

com), where the eponymous daughter of the

goldsmith Bernard Delettrez and Silvia Venturini

Fendi creates handmade treasures inspired by

Surrealism and the art of Giorgio de Chirico. At

No 18 there is another jewellery store beloved

by VIPs, including Queen Rania of Jordan: Fabio

Salini (fabiosalini.it) who, after working for

Cartier and Bulgari, founded his own firm. He

experiments with new materials, such as carbon

fibre, as well as combining gold, diamonds and

sapphires with wood, leather and silk. Two

more unmissable stops on Via di Monserrato

are Chez Dédé (chezdede.com), which purveys

a sophisticated mix of objets d’art, accessories

and clothing, and the Archivio di Monserrato

(soledadtwombly.com), a jewel box of a boutique

founded by Soledad Twombly, daughter-in-law of

the American painter Cy. Argentinian by origin,

she has created her wunderkammer in Rome by

collecting ancient fabrics, mainly from Anatolia

and Uzbekistan, as well as kimonos and objects

inspired by her travels. For original fashions with

comfortable and elegant lines, head to La Jolie

Fille (lajoliefille.it) by Michele Capalbo, a wellknown

Italian fashion designer who has worked

with Roberto Cavalli and Chiara Boni. He makes

deft use of silk, velvet and lace in his handmade

dresses, which often boast deep necklines and

touches of transparency. The last stop has to be

Lab Solue (labsolueperfume.com), an olfactory

laboratory where you can create your personal

perfume or home fragrance with the crack

on-site team.

WHAT TO SEE

Rome is an open-air museum. Each corner reveals

its millennia of history to anyone who cares to

look. But to discover the secret soul of the city,

ISTOCK

A NEW DAWN

Sunrise over the

Roman Forum

ROME CIAMPINO

AIRPORT TO CITY CENTRE:

8miles/13km

the inaccessible aristocratic buildings, where you

can see not only recent trends but seldom-seen

archaeological finds, it’s worth seeking out the

right guide. Try the journey among myths, legends

and superstition offered by Hotel de la Ville or the

guided tour to the places where Caravaggio spent

his eventful life curated by Hotel Eden. And you

don’t need to be staying to enjoy the bounty of

the historians: Eden also arranges private visits to

the MAXXI museum storeroom, where otherwise

unseeable artworks are kept, and jaunts in a

classic Italian Fiat 124 Spider convertible to

explore the beautiful Roman countryside.

70 NetJets


JULIAN RENTZSCH

TABLE TALK

Fabio Ciervo, executive chef of

La Terrazza, at Hotel Eden

DESCRIBE YOUR COOKING STYLE IN A FEW KEYWORDS …

Innovative, healthy, tasty and artistic.

FOOD MEMORIES ARE VERY IMPORTANT. WHICH DISH REPRESENTS YOU MOST?

Bringing back my memories in my cuisine is essential for me. The crunchy mullet with its broth and seaweed

tartare is one of the dishes that represents me best. In it you can find uniqueness, concentration of taste

and the enhancement of ingredients in different textures.

WHICH OF YOUR DISHES BEST CAPTURES THE ESSENCE OF THE ROMAN CULINARY TRADITION?

The “cacio e pepe” pasta is one of the most representative dishes of Roman cuisine. My personal

interpretation is spaghetti with cacio cheese and black pepper from Madagascar scented with rosebuds.

HOW DO YOU FACE THE CHALLENGE FOR AN INCREASINGLY SUSTAINABLE CUISINE?

I am attentive not to waste, I use water only when needed, I ask our supplier to reuse the same cases to

deliver fruits and vegetables. I could continue with a long list.

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71


JACI BERKOPEC

SUITED UP

72 NetJets


THE FUTURE

OF TAILORING

Bespoke is back in a big way, and a new generation of sartorial

talent has taken the reins at major houses across the globe, giving us

a peek at the cuts of tomorrow // By Christian Barker

DURING THE PANDEMIC, the demand for bespoke tailoring plummeted.

That’s hardly a surprise. Who needed a needed a new lounge suit,

dinner jacket or morning dress when in-person business meetings,

trips to the office, social events, and formal occasions were out of

the question – and for some, even leaving home was forbidden?

According to the renowned New York men’s outfitter Alan

Flusser – who has dressed all manner of Wall Street tycoons –

during the lockdowns, his clients were hiding out at their holiday

houses in the Hamptons. “They’re telling me they haven’t put

a pair of trousers on for months; they’ve been living in T-shirts

and tracksuit pants,” Flusser said when we spoke in 2020.

His response was to down tools and offer protégé Jonathan

Sigmon the chance to take over the business. Flusser wasn’t the

only old hand to call it quits. There’s been a great deal of batonpassing

going on in the sartorial scene of late, with numerous

leading tailors retiring and a new generation rising to take their place.

One such ascendant figure is Paolo Martorano (paolostyle.com),

who got his start working for Flusser, before honing his skills at

Paul Stuart and subsequently running the bespoke department

at Alfred Dunhill USA. Five years ago, he hung out his own

shingle, setting up a bijou by-appointment atelier on West 57th

Street in Manhattan. Things were going fantastically well before

the pandemic hit. “By March 2020, we’d done about 80% of

2019’s revenue. Business was just exploding,” Martorano says.

Then came the dip. Fortunately, as life has returned to normal,

demand for sartorial finery has bounced back – bigger and better

than ever, in fact. “Since the second half of 2021, the occasiondressing

business skyrocketed. Everyone wants to go out, everyone

wants to be dressed up,” Martorano says. “Weddings are almost all

black-tie now and we’re making a ton of tuxedos.”

As companies have begun returning to the office, “People

are coming to me for suits and they’re buying the most elegant

suits I’ve ever sold in my career,” Martorano says. “They’re

going for pinstripes; they’re going for double-breasted; they’re

going for peak lapels; they’re going for dressy jackets and

trousers with braces. They’re choosing cloths like cashmere.

They want luxury.” And they want it from an under-theradar

purveyor with pedigree whom Martorano personifies.

Across the pond in London, Dominic Sebag-Montefiore, cutter

and creative director at Edward Sexton (edwardsexton.co.uk), is

also observing customers taking real joy in dressing to the nines.

“Bespoke tailoring is blooming into something beautiful and

special,” he says. No longer is traditional men’s wear viewed as

a dour corporate uniform, reluctantly donned for the workday.

“Today, the suit is free to be an icon of masculine elegance,” he

explains, “or something subversive.”

Sebag-Montefiore’s mentor, the eponymous Sexton, knows a

thing or two about subversion, having earned legendary status as

the cutter for Savile Row insurrectionist Tommy Nutter, tailor to

1960s London’s swingingest characters. Today, Sexton’s house

honours Nutter’s legacy, remaining dedicated to making “clothes

that are striking, bold and timeless that are true to our rebellious

roots – dressing The Beatles, Stones, Warhol, Hockney, and so

on,” Sebag-Montefiore explains. “We approach what we do boldly

and unapologetically,” he says. “We have more freedom to be

creative in what we make than we have had in over 40 years.”

And yet, for all this talk of breaking with tradition, Sebag-

Montefiore says he’s acutely conscious of the need to adhere to

the old-school values of exquisite construction and craftsmanship

upon which Sexton built his name. “Legacies are hard earned and

easily lost,” Sebag-Montefiore believes. “A reputation is dependent

© KEVIN SEAH

BACK AND BESPOKE

Paolo Martorano,facing page, is a

major player on the New York sartorial

scene; Kevin Seah, above, leads the

way in Singapore’s tailoring circles

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SECTION SUITED HEAD UP

COURTESY EDWARD SEXTON

on maintaining the standards that won it. A

legacy is kept by pursuing higher standards.”

The reputation of Australia’s oldest bespoke

tailors, JH Cutler (jhcutler.com), stretches all the

way back to 1884. When John Cutler assumed

the role of cutter at the family business in the

1970s, he became the fourth generation of his

bloodline to run the company. Over the years,

John expertly catered to the sartorial needs of

a host of Australian prime ministers, business

leaders, top professionals and internationally

renowned entertainers. Unfortunately, none of

John’s four children chose to follow him into the

trade, so when he began pondering retirement,

he was forced to look beyond his gene pool for

a successor. Employed by John in 2009, Sam

Hazelton has been training to take the reins at

JH Cutler for the past 13 years. Now, with John

retiring to Tasmania, he’s poised to fulfill that

destiny.

“It’s an amazing opportunity,” says Hazelton.

“I’m truly honoured and I’m still getting used to

the idea. I’ve always known that the business

had incredible potential, and I’d like to really

explore that over the next few years.” He says

plans are afoot to refresh and slightly modernise

the brand, and to ensure the standards Cutler

and his forefathers established are kept.

“It’s difficult finding or training people these

days. Sadly, there’s no government-supported

tailoring apprenticeship programme in this

country. But I’ve just hired a fantastic new tailor.

It’s important to recruit young talent to learn

alongside the older guys we currently have, who

are in their sixties and seventies, so that their skills

are passed on,” Hazelton says. “We need to ensure

ETERNAL STYLE

“Post-pandemic, the conscious consumer wants to invest in something that they can wear

numerous times in numerous ways, dressing it up, dressing it down, rather than spending

£2,000 on a dress they’ll wear once to a party, or buying disposable fast fashion that will

quickly find its way into a landfill. People’s mindsets around fashion have changed. They

want longevity, durability and versatility.” So says Daisy Knatchbull, founder of THE DECK

(thedecklondon.com), the first tailoring shop on Savile Row exclusively for women, by

women. Established in 2019, the firm swiftly found a loyal fanbase among female consumers

seeking to “buy less but better” investing in perennial garments that can be mended when

necessary and altered as the body evolves. Trend-proof apparel of sufficient quality to

survive a lifetime – or more. “Our tailoring is made to last,” Knatchbull explains. “We do free

repairs for life: we construct garments in such a way that they can be adjusted for the rest of

your life, and beyond. They truly can be passed down to the next generation.”

NEXT GENERATION

Dominic Sebag-

Montefiore is

carrying on Edward

Sexton’s subversive

traditions

we can continue to keep producing tailoring of the

same or better quality 10 or 20 years from now.”

The most famous Florentine tailoring house,

Liverano & Liverano (liverano.com) is working

toward this same goal by actively educating a new

generation of talent. The house has established

a school where students are tutored by maestro

Antonio Liverano, who first picked up a needle

as a small boy in the 1930s. Select graduates

join the team as Liverano Fellows, a cohort that

currently includes men and women from Italy,

Japan and Korea.

“Coming from different backgrounds, we

share one common goal, which is to craft the

most beautiful and comfortable tailoring for

our clients,” says Korean Seungjin “Jin” An.

“We work in a collaborative setting, and we

learn from each other’s culture while upholding

what is a very Italian tradition and craft.”

Italian Leonardo Simoncini, who works

as a tailor in the atelier and a teacher in the

Liverano school, says carrying on the traditions

of the maestro is a dream come true. “As

a native of Florence, I am super proud to

represent the best in Italian and Florentine

tailoring and the ‘Made in Italy’ label,” he says.

Of his cosmopolitan team-mates, Simoncini

says, “Every one of us is passionate about our

craft. We have never forgotten and we never

take for granted the position that we occupy.

Whether we are in the atelier here in Florence

or visiting our clients halfway around the world,

we are ambassadors of the Liverano approach.”

One of the countries Simoncini and Jin

frequently visit to service Liverano’s customers is

Singapore. In this equatorial nation, for the past

13 years, sartorial culture has been championed

and fostered by one individual above all others:

Kevin Seah (kevinseah.com). In addition to

classic suits, tuxedos and blazers, Seah traffics

in forward-thinking bespoke attire tailored to

Singapore’s steamy climate.

“Bespoke isn’t just about what a banker or

lawyer might traditionally wear to the office,”

Seah explains. “I encourage my clients to

reconsider their preconceptions of bespoke.

Why not commission a unique tropical shirt in

beautiful Indian block-print cotton? Or some

bespoke shorts or chinos? Individuality and selfexpression,

creating a wardrobe that reflects your

lifestyle and tastes. That’s the future of tailoring.”

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Elevate your bucket list


ON THE PULSE

FEELING BLUE

The coolest of hues took some time to make its

way into the world of watchmaking,

but now it’s here to stay // By Chris Hall

76

NetJets


SINCE THE LATE 1960s, and defi nitely by the onset

of the 1970s, there have always been some blue

watches – the dressier kind of Omega Seamasters,

a few Rolexes, Heuer Monacos. And the latter

decade also saw a fair bit of wild and colourful

experimentation, especially as watchmakers

looked to compete with new-fangled digital

timepieces. But, by and large, the watches you’d

actually fi nd at a top jeweller or see advertised in

a magazine came in two colours: black and white.

To say it continued that way for the next 40 years

would be a serious oversimplifi cation – watches

associated with the sea certainly adopted blue as

a dial colour earlier than others, and such is the

multitudinous nature of the watch world that you

can fi nd an exception to any rule. But it is true that

come the late 2000s and early 2010s, something

was afoot. Blue was suddenly everywhere, to the

extent that before long, it was accepted as almost

a third default colour, something to be expected

every time a new model or range launched,

rather than something special that would follow

in due course. We see now that it was just the

fi rst trickle in what would become a chromatic

deluge, as manufacturing technology and fashion

tastes converged to allow watchmakers to offer

more or less any watch in more or less any

colour. First, a sea of green watches emerged,

followed by a veritable rainbow of pink, purple,

orange and more. At the same time, a whole new

generation of blue watches has launched – and

in comparison to the wilder hues on offer, it’s

starting to look like the perfect middle ground.

Allow us to present the best of 2022’s blue

watches: not necessarily as revolutionary as they

might have been a generation ago, but a very

welcome additional choice. As you might expect,

many brands still make the natural association

between seafaring and watches in some form

or other. The Baume & Mercier Riviera 10616

(baume-et-mercier.com), while possessed of the

necessary water resistance and sturdy steel case

to dip beneath the waves, is billed as a watch for

gazing down at the water from your Sunseeker,

and, appropriately enough, the semi-transparent

blue sapphire dial makes the automatic

movement beneath look like something halfglimpsed

in the shallows. Montblanc’s 1858 Iced

Sea Automatic Date (montblanc.com) is another

watch making metaphorical with its dial – this

time using an array of complicated techniques

to give the impression of gazing into the ancient

heart of a glacier. Back on the open waves, and

paying reference to the brand’s 176 years of

maritime clockmaking is Ulysse Nardin’s latest

Marine Torpilleur Moonphase (ulysse-nardin.

com), a watch that could well be said to embody

the safer side of blue dials (not for nothing is

navy blue supposed to be the easiest colour

for men to wear when it comes to their wider

wardrobes). But at the same brand you’ll also

AZURE LIKE IT

Above from left: Audemars Piguet

Royal Oak 50th Anniversary 37mm;

Montblanc 1858 Iced Sea Automatic

Date; Baume & Mercier Riviera 10616

Facing page, clockwise from top left:

Chopard Alpine Eagle Flying Tourbillon;

Patek Philippe 5470P-001; Ressence Type

8; Hublot Big Bang Integrated Sky Blue

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ON THE PULSE

BLUE HEAVEN

Above from left: H. Moser & Cie

Endeavour Perpetual Calendar;

Czapek Antarctique; Oris Big Crown

Pointer Date

Facing page, clockwise from top:

A. Lange & Söhne Odysseus;

Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur

Moonphase; Cartier Santos

fi nd the Freak X Aventurine, an altogether bolder

way to work a deep blue into the collection.

Indeed, there is often a practical consideration

to the choice of colour on offer. Whether it’s

the rich starry blue of aventurine glass or the

complexity of creating exactly the right colourfast,

wear-resistant pigment, or perfecting the

dozens of artisanal steps that can go into a highend,

enamel-fi red dial, the fi nal colour of a watch

is determined by what’s possible as much as by

what its creator may have been able to imagine.

Ceramic watches are notable for opening up a

whole new world of possibilities: the whole watch

can adopt a new shade, from bezel to buckle, but

each new colour requires a fresh chemical recipe

for the raw ceramic powder, which will change

colour when moulded and fi red into shape.

Hublot’s Big Bang Integrated Sky Blue (hublot.

com) is a case in point – such a delicate hue has

taken its engineers a while to master. The end

result is a watch that won’t be mistaken for any

other. Also experimenting with spreading colour

beyond the dial is Cartier (cartier.com), which

having breathed new life into the Santos a few

years ago, is now expanding it far beyond its

1980s roots (which seemed daring enough back

then) with a blue coating to the bezel and bracelet.

The all-blue look – thanks to its expansive dial

and carefully paired leather strap – was also on

display at Ressence (ressencewatches.com),

which debuted its new Type 8 (the simplest

and most stripped-back of its creations to date)

in just one colour. And if clever, independently

owned watch brands with a minimalist streak

are your thing, there’s also H. Moser & Cie

(h-moser.com), whose nifty perpetual calendar

complication was given a dazzling blue dial

for the Endeavour Perpetual Calendar that

launched in February alongside a provocative

sister model whose dial came inscribed

with chalkboard-style instructions for use.

At the other end of the spectrum, in terms

of solemnity if not visually, there is perhaps no

better indication of blue’s arrival than its use by

the very biggest watchmaking maisons for their

top releases. Patek Philippe (patek.com) chose

to debut an incredible, multi-patented new

chronograph, reference 5470P-001, in what is,

by its dignifi ed standards, a very racy blue and

red colour scheme, with a casual fabric strap to

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE WATCHMAKERS

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Ceramic watches are notable for opening up

a whole new world of possibilities

match. Meanwhile, its companion at the very top

of the tree, Audemars Piguet (audemarspiguet.

com), wisely kept the classic blue dial for its

stainless steel 39mm Jumbo 50th anniversary

reissue of the Royal Oak but – according to

collectors watching the 50th anniversary

collection as it launched – the piece that set

tongues wagging was the smaller, more unisex,

37mm in ice blue. More than any other blue, this

particular shade stood out in 2022: it was hard

to miss at A. Lange & Söhne (alange-soehne.

com), , on the new Odysseus, and equally catching on Czapek’s Antarctique (czapek.com).

Some would surely argue that the combination

of a frosty pale blue is a perfect match for the

brushed and polished titanium of the Odysseus,

or the steel of the Antarctique, but I think the

truth is these sleek, integrated-bracelet designs

work well with almost any blue (or almost any

colour at all, come to that). Certainly Chopard’s

Alpine Eagle (chopard.com), which is hewn

from the same strata as the Royal Oak, Nautilus

et al, is no worse for having a brighter, bolder

blue dial on its new Flying Tourbillon reference.

The dial pattern is crafted to resemble the

fl ecked iris of an eagle’s eye, and here has been

redrawn to emanate from the beating tourbillon

at six o’clock. Not to take away from the handfi

nished watchmaking on show, but sometimes

it’s all about having a dial the owner wants to

stare at for far longer than it takes to tell the time.

You could say the same – at a very different

price point, with very different techniques on

offer – of a watch as unassuming as Oris’s Big

Crown Pointer Date (oris.ch). Pictures only begin

to hint at how glossy, how rich and how all-round

smart is the navy blue dial. Alongside the more

illustrious horology we’ve just rattled through,

eye-

it might recede into the background, but when

all is said and done it’s a perfect embodiment of

our opening point: a blue watch that works as a

mainstream choice, with infi nitely more character

and life than if it were sombre black. Indeed,

when it comes to watchmaking, there has really

never been a better time to have the blues.

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79


THE GOURMET

TABLES

A global guide to the best new restaurants,

many of which have a Gallic twist // By Bill Knott

80 NetJets


KNOW TO

© KOLOMAN; OPPOSITE PAGE: FRANCESCA MOSCHENI

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81


THE GOURMET

TASTING FINE

Below, from left to right: soufflé for

two at Koloman, New York; the bar at

Batea, Barcelona; Adriana Cavita at

her eponymous London restaurant;

Japanese-French fusion at Magma in

Paris; Alejandro Saravia of Melbourne’s

Victoria by Farmer’s Daughters; a

private room at Mr T’s in LA

P80-82, from left: Pancia di vacca

from Horto in Milan; peach and

raspberry Charlotte from the dessert

menu at Koloman

IT MAY HAVE BEEN usurped in gourmets’ affections over the

past couple of decades by molecular gastronomy and Scandi

minimalism, but French cuisine is fighting back. Perhaps, postpandemic,

we all crave burgundy banquettes, crisp white napkins,

sparkling chandeliers and the contented bistro buzz that only Gallic

savoir-faire can provide.

Nowhere is that truer than New York. Daniel Boulud, New York’s

favourite French son, has gone back to his Lyonnais roots to open

Le Gratin (legratinnyc.com), a pitch-perfect bistro de luxe with

dishes that would bring a tear to his maman’s eye: cervelle de

canut (soft cheese with herbs), quenelles of pike with mushrooms

and gruyère, pâté en croûte gourmand, and spit-roast chicken with

gratin dauphinois.

Not to be outdone, Fouquet’s, the hallowed Champs-Élysées

brasserie, now has a New York outpost, in the heart of Tribeca.

The menu at the Art Deco-ish Brasserie Fouquet’s New York

(hotelsbarriere.com) is the brainchild of marquee chef Pierre

Gagnaire, who adds his customary élan to a classically Gallic menu

of escargots, sole meunière and steak tartare.

Up in NoMad land, Austrian chef Markus Glocker is fusing a

Viennese café vibe with a (mostly) French menu. Taking over the Ace

Hotel space vacated by The Breslin, Koloman (kolomanrestaurant.

com) offers cheese soufflé with confit mushrooms, and salmon

en croûte with beetroot beurre rouge, but there’s also a schnitzel,

naturally, and sachertorte to follow.

Back in Paris’s 16th arrondissement, Le Petit Rétro (petitretro.

fr) is hardly new – this glorious Art Nouveau bistro has been in

business since 1904 – but the owner is: the renowned Guy Savoy,

who has installed wunderkind chef Irwin Durand (Le Chiberta) at

FROM LEFT: NICK JOHNSON, VILMA EK, ARIANA RUTH

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Perhaps, post-pandemic, we all crave

burgundy banquettes, crisp white napkins,

and sparkling chandeliers

FROM LEFT: ALEXANDRE ZHU, TRISTAN JUD, INNIS CASEY

the stove. Expect marrowbone tartine, veal sweetbreads with grain

mustard, classic desserts and a great wine list.

Over in the 11th arrondissement, by Oberkampf, the love

affair between France and Japan continues at the small and

stylish Magma (+33 01 4805 5690). Yamaguchi-born chef

Ryuya Ono’s menu changes suivant son humeur, but his sublime

technique is a constant, cooking classic French combos – gurnard

with bouillabaisse sauce, rabbit pithivier with smoked eel – with

precision and aplomb.

Across the Channel, chef Alex Dilling, who earned his spurs at

The Connaught and The Greenhouse, now has his name above

the door at the Hotel Café Royal (hotelcaferoyal.com). His refined

brand of haute cuisine marries French technique with luxury

ingredients and a generous dash of originality: aged kaluga caviar

with oysters and long pepper, for instance, or pâté de campagne

with black truffle and jamón ibérico.

It is London’s hottest ticket right now, but rivalling it will be The

Audley (theaudleypublichouse.com), international gallerist Hauser

& Wirth’s makeover of a towering old Mayfair pub. Hauser & Wirth

– known as Artfarm, for hospitality purposes – have plenty of form

(Roth Bar & Grill in Somerset; The Fife Arms in Braemar; Manuela

in LA) and promise a classic ground-floor pub with bar snacks, and

the first-floor Mount St Restaurant, with ex-Gordon Ramsay chef

Jamie Shears rattling the pans.

Londoners love a little spice, and Cavita (cavitarestaurant.

com), the newly opened, much-lauded Mexican joint in

Marylebone, is happy to oblige. The chef/proprietor is the hugely

talented Adriana Cavita; the space is a high-ceilinged subtropical

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83


MATTIA PARODI

THE GOURMET

oasis; and the food is earthy and seductive. Try the smoked beef

shin quesabirria – a hybrid of a taco and a quesadilla – served

with veal bone consommé.

Elsewhere in Europe, Barcelona continues to cement its gastrotourist

reputation with Batea (bateabarcelona.com), the handsome

new seafood restaurant from local boy Carles Ramon and Galician

Manu Núñez, the two chefs behind the acclaimed Besta. Their

sometimes audacious menus delight in uniting their two corners

of Spain (and the Atlantic with the Mediterranean): spicy mussel

croquetas, maybe, or cockles with a salted fish broth dashi, or

sautéed baby cuttlefish with bouillabaisse mash and dry-aged

steak. Go with an open mind and an empty stomach.

In fashion-conscious Milan, nowhere is more in vogue than Horto

(hortorestaurant.com), the sleek and stylish restaurant atop The

Medelan, the new business and retail complex in Piazza Cordusio.

The brains in the kitchen belong to Norbert Niederkofler, the three-

Michelin-starred chef from St Hubertus, who has transferred his

ultra-local philosophy from the Dolomites to Milan. All his produce

comes from within an hour’s drive of the city: The menu changes

constantly, but expect freshwater trout and sturgeon, locally farmed

caviar, and imaginative twists on northern Italian classics such as

Piemontese plin (agnolotti) gilded with saffron and scattered with

borage flowers from the terrace garden.

Meanwhile, Bangkok’s post-pandemic recovery continues

apace, and the city’s cosmopolitan tastes are exemplified by Terra

(bangkok-terra.com), the smart new Spanish restaurant from

Barcelona-born chef Sandro Aguilera. Located just off Petchburi

Road, Aguilera’s menu takes the very best of Spanish produce and

turns it into a feast both for the palate and for the eyes. Ajo blanco

is reinvented with coconut, clams and a basil granita; cuttlefish is

served as a tartare with charred lettuce; while Galician octopus has

bomba rice, roasted white asparagus and alioli for company.

For an underappreciated cuisine much closer to home, head to

North (north-restaurant.com), in Phrom Phong, a leafy sanctuary in

the middle of Bangkok. Chiang Rai-raised chef Panupong Songsang’s

menu, as the restaurant’s name suggests, is a homage to northern

Thai cuisine – the ancient kingdom of Lan Na – and his cleverly

crafted menu takes diners on a journey through river and jungle, far

away from the coconut palms and the ocean that inform many Thai

menus. Expect butterflied and grilled king river prawns with khao soi

noodles and a spicy broth, Chiang Rai-style deep-fried catfish salad

(larb), and tea-smoked duck breast with galangal chili sauce.

A TASTE OF THINGS TO COME

Above: Refined dining at Horto, Milan

Facing page, from top: Markus Glocker

and Katya Scharnagl of Koloman,

New York; côte de boeuf from Le Gratin,

also in the Big Apple -

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FROM TOP: NICK JOHNSON, BILL MILNE

Jeow (jeow.net.au), in Melbourne, has much in common with

North: the food here is Laotian, from the other side of the Mekong

– jeow is the Lao word for a sauce, paste or dip – and funky,

jungle flavours are to the fore in dishes like or lam, a brothy stew

made with beef short ribs, spiced with the Szechuan pepper-like

sakhaan and fragrant with herbs. Chef and co-owner Thi Le is

also fermenting her own Laotian fish sauce, a cloudy condiment

called “padek” that adds its distinctively pungent flavour to many

Laotian dishes.

Also in Melbourne, Victoria by Farmer’s Daughters

(victoriarestaurant.com.au) has galvanised the Fed Square

culinary scene with an ambitious 250-cover restaurant, a 20-cover

wine library, and an all-weather terrace overlooking the Yarra

River. Leading the kitchen is chef Alejandro Saravia, and his menu

celebrates the produce of Victoria, from Snake Valley smoked eel

pâté with pancetta, and Koo Wee Rup asparagus with walnut

cream to Western Plains pork loin with roast onion and dark beer,

and free-range lamb cutlets with mountain pepper mustard. The

wine list is described as a “bible”, and they’re not kidding.

There’s no kangaroo on Saravia’s menu, but it has somehow

hopped over to Singapore: specifically, to Kaarla (kaarla-oumi.sg),

the new restaurant from Australian-born chef John-Paul Fiechtner.

His spotlight shines on Australian coastal cuisine: as well as

kangaroo, salted and given extra bounce with liquorice root and

bush tomato, you might find Australian oysters with oyster leaf and

fig leaf vinegar, Abrolhos Island scallops with edible flowers and

trout roe, and wagyu from Robbins Island, pepped up with pickles

and preserves from Fiechtner’s garden. The kitchen’s impressive

wood-fired grill gives a welcome lick of smoke to many of the

dishes, and the wine list is also striking.

Finally, heading back to the States, and two new restaurants

– the first in Los Angeles, the second in Chicago – that confirm

the Gallic trend, although Mr T’s (mrtrestaurants.com) original

restaurant is in Paris’s trendy Upper Marais district, where chef

Tsuyoshi Miyazaki (the eponymous Mr T) and business partner

Guillaume Guedj play fast and loose with the bistro concept, to

the delight of a hipster crowd that feasts happily on lamb kebabs

scented with burning thyme, truffled mac’n’cheese, and vegan

“merguez” made from carrots and served with salsify fries, all to a

thumping R&B backbeat. Expect no different on Hollywood’s North

Sycamore Avenue.

Obélix (obelixchicago.com), in Chicago’s River North district,

is cut from more traditional cloth: Daniel Boulud (or his mother)

could have written the menu. Gratinated onion soup features a

rich beef stock, Swiss cheese and croûtons, salade lyonnaise

tosses duck confit and duck egg in with the frisée and the

vinaigrette, and coquilles Saint-Jacques are bathed in a grapestudded

sauce Véronique. The sancerre is perfectly chilled, the

plateau de fruits de mer is a work of art, the jelly in the pâté en

croûte has the perfect wobble, and the room is as buzzy as a

beehive. As co-owners and brothers Oliver and Nicolas Poilevey

would probably say: if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

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85


TASTING NOTES

One of Bordeaux’s leading vineyards is converting its

terroir to biodynamic farming – a change led by the

formidable Saskia de Rothschild // By Guy Woodward

LAFITE

LOOKS

FORWARD

WITHIN THE WINE world, Bordeaux is not a place where things

tend to happen quickly. Take the region’s hallowed 1855

classification, which ranks the top châteaux of the Médoc from

first to fifth growths. The ranking has seen just one change in

its 167-year history – the stately Mouton Rothschild being

promoted from a second to first growth after its owner, Baron

Philippe de Rothschild, successfully petitioned agriculture

minister and future president Jacques Chirac in 1973.

Other than that, such is the sanctity of their terroir that

changes of ownership, winemakers and even the expansion

and addition of vineyards, have not threatened the status of

this vinous elite. As a result, Mouton’s close relation, Château

Lafite Rothschild, which belongs to another branch of the

aristocratic family, has, since 1855, retained its status as one

of only four, latterly five, Premiers Grands Crus Classés – and

with it, its reputation as a bastion of Bordeaux, and one of

most vaunted, coveted (and expensive) wines in the world.

Lafite, too, is not given to radical change. Under the long-time

stewardship of the debonair if somewhat detached Baron Éric de

Rothschild – cousin to Baron Philippe – it continued on its serene

trajectory, Baron Éric’s only nod to fashion the velvet smoking

slippers he was fond of wearing to the grand black-tie dinners

that are commonplace in Bordeaux’s wine fraternity. Yet having

celebrated its 150th year in the ownership of the same family in

2018, the property has undergone something of a transformation.

Two things happened in 2018, in addition to the anniversary

celebrations. Firstly, Saskia de Rothschild (the sixth generation,

and neither the oldest child, nor male, and therefore destined

not to inherit her father’s title) took over the management of

the estate, and its various sister properties, as the first female

chairwoman of Domaines Barons de Rothschild (Lafite).

“When the family decided it was time for Baron Éric to hand over to

his daughter, it was a big, big change,” says Jean-Sebastien Philippe,

international director of DBR Lafite. “We moved from a man who

was a legend in the wine world, who had been managing the estate

since 1974, to his young daughter, who was only born in 1987.

“It was a big move, and when Saskia came on board, she wanted

to make quite a lot of changes across everything we do. Not that what

we were doing was wrong, but it was time to embrace modernity.”

The second change – and the most significant immediate

impact she made – was to convert all the Lafite vineyards (and

those of its sister estates) to organic viticulture, a relatively

radical move in Bordeaux. And having gone so far, why not go

further? Over the last four years, the estate has been following

– “in a scientific, empirical way,” says Philippe – biodynamic

viticulture. One third of the property is now biodynamic, after a

long-term study in collaboration with the University of Bordeaux,

to gauge the effect of biodynamic farming on the vineyards.

As Philippe acknowledges, it was “a very strong statement”

for a first growth to commit itself to a type of vineyard husbandry

that is more common in the more rustic wine regions of Burgundy,

the Loire or even that hipster’s favourite the Jura. A handful of

Bordeaux’s classified estates – notably Châteaux Palmer and Pontet-

Canet – have followed the same path, but very few of the scale and

status of Lafite (whose vineyard holdings total a 110ha, compared

to small single-figure hectarage at most Burgundy domaines).

FIRST AMONG EQUALS

Château Lafite Rothschild, home of

one of the Premiers Grands Crus

Classés of Bordeaux

FRANÇOIS POINCET

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FRANÇOIS POINCET

TASTING NOTES

“We’re trying to find a new way of interacting

with consumers” – Jean-Sebastien Philippe, international director, DBR Lafite

88 NetJets


DRIVING FORCE

Jean-Sebastien Philippe is one of

the innovative team bringing a new

dynamism to the hallowed cellars of

Château Lafite Rothschild

But then Saskia de Rothschild is not scared of a challenge. A

graduate of HEC Paris and Columbia University, she carved out a

successful career as an investigative journalist for The New York

Times International Edition in the US, Africa and Europe, where her

assignments included a month spent interviewing inmates at the

notorious La MACA prison at Abidjan, in Côte d’Ivoire; following the first

female US Marines on Afghanistan’s front line; and being embedded

with sheep farmers taking on the mining industry in Greenland.

This is not a woman afraid to get her hands dirty. “It was a great

time, covering elections and other events in the area,” she said of

her time in West Africa. When it became clear that she was favoured

over her two brothers and other contenders from the six branches

of the family who are shareholders in Lafite, she returned to France

to study viticulture and winemaking, and committed herself to the

land where, as a young girl, she had picked grapes and tasted

blends with her father. “I knew the place. I loved the place. And

I felt I could protect it for years to come,” she said at the time.

The conversion of the vineyard to organic and, ultimately,

biodynamic farming is a wholesale undertaking. “It’s not a case

of being organic for the sake of being organic, but going further

via agroecology and agroforestry,” says Philippe. So while

many Bordeaux estates are bolting on vineyards through the

somewhat controversial purchasing of land from neighbouring

(but not necessarily classified) estates, Lafite has been pulling

out hectares of vineyards and replanting them with trees. “The

trees were cut in the 1970s and ’80s so it was time to replant

them to reproduce corridors of vegetation and wildlife,” says

Philippe. The 200 hectares of marsh fields at Lafite that sit

alongside the vineyards are now home to herds of wild cows.

“There is a lot of thinking and beliefs about biodynamism,

but we wanted hard facts,” says Philippe. “We already have

five years of data, and we need to do five more years’ study

to go deep into understanding what biodynamics bring to

the vineyard, good or bad. The electro-connectivity of soil,

minerality of soil, genetic studies of soil, rootstock, leaves, etc.”

The move is, he says, “very much linked to Saskia’s belief,” but is

“something that we are embracing and that everyone is following, right

across the château.” The transition, adds Philippe, has required “full

commitment” from all involved. “We can’t force our viticulturalists to

do something, so it needed us to fully explain and convince workers

who have been here for generations that this is the way forward.”

It is still too early to say how the move will impact the style of the

wine in the bottle, but analysis by plot, grape variety and terroir via

blind tastings has shown “neither a drop nor a rise in quality”, says

Philippe. So, given that the process is significantly more expensive

and labour-intensive, leading to a drop in yields due to a less

interventionist approach, but requiring more manpower to prepare

and spread biodynamic concoctions in the vineyard, why bother?

“Well, fortunately, we can afford it,” says Philippe. “But

first and foremost, it’s about the health of the vineyard and

the people working there for us. And then we cannot ignore

the fact that there is a strong tendency these days – and this

affects everything that we do – for people to be more conscious

of the behaviour and approach of brands they consume.”

There is also, says Philippe, the social impact. “We do a lot of

things at Lafite that go beyond viticulture – so how can we create an

ecosystem where we can help people who are in difficult situations

to re-find a purpose in life and reintegrate themselves into society?”

The answer has been through a programme that sees refugees

from parts of Africa and the Middle East recruited to be retrained

and integrated into the Lafite vineyard team. “We welcome around

10-20 every year, and try to provide them with a new job and

a path for the future,” says Philippe. The property also has a

foundation aimed at “being socially respectful in our local networks,

in Pauillac [the commune where Lafite is based] and Bordeaux, by

redistributing some of the wealth we accrue to the right causes.”

It’s all part of a mission, as Philippe says, to establish a more

emotional connection with consumers. “My first impression

when I came to Lafite was that we have a fantastic distribution

network via the négociant system, but conversely, it was

creating a distance from consumers. So we’re trying to find

a new way of interacting with consumers, and moving away

from big wine dinners where all the trade comes together and

tells you how good their wine is, which can be quite boring.”

Last year, Saskia de Rothschild added the title of CEO to

her responsibilities, after the resignation of former incumbent

Jean-Guillaume Prats, whose team now reports directly to de

Rothschild. It completed her assumption of total control of

the estate, where, in another break from tradition, she now

lives with her family, including her two young daughters.

De Rothschild’s father used to split his time between

Pauillac and Paris; indeed, Saskia is the first member of

the family to live at the estate since it was bought by Baron

James de Rothschild in 1868. “She decided to live at the

château and be here every day, to show her commitment,”

says Philippe. That commitment, it seems, is total. lafite.com

© CHÂTEAU LAFITE ROTHSCHILD

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INSIDE VIEW

A TRUE CLASSIC

90 NetJets


Celebrating 25 years, the Fondation Beyeler

in Switzerland hosts one of the finest collections of art

in the world, from the Impressionists to today

ROBERT BAYER, BASEL

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© 2017, SUCCESSION PICASSO/PROLITTERIS, ZÜRICH; PHOTO: ROBERT BAYER, BASEL

INSIDE VIEW

ABOVE

Pablo Picasso’s Femme

(Époque des ‘Demoiselles

d’Avignon’), 1907

P90-91

The Hungry Lion Throws

Itself on the Antelope,1905,

by Henri Rousseau

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© 2017 SUCCESSION H. MATISSE/PROLITTERIS, ZÜRICH; PHOTO: PETER SCHIBLI, BASEL

ABOVE

Nu Bleu La Grenouille,

1952-58, by Henri Matisse

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INSIDE VIEW

AN ANNIVERSARY

TO REMEMBER

Creating great art can be a painstaking process and so too can designing and building

a suitable place to display it. This is certainly true of one of the most remarkable

repositories of art in Europe, the Fondation Beyeler, in Riehen, near Basel, which

celebrates its 25th anniversary this year. Its journey to becoming one of the most

visited art museums in Switzerland was somewhat longer in the making, though.

The foundation was established in 1982, by husband-and-wife team Ernst Beyeler

(1921-2010) and Hilda Kunz (1922-2008), with the express purpose of showing

their remarkable collection. The renowned Italian architect Renzo Piano was engaged

to design a space fitting for the body of work that incorporates some of the finest

creations from the 19th and 20th century’s biggest names, including Claude Monet,

Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein

and Francis Bacon. Yet it was only available to be viewed in travelling shows until

eventually, after a groundbreaking in 1994 and yet more delays, the museum was

opened in 1997. The building in the foothills of the Black Forest, constructed with glass

and volcanic rock, was worth the wait, and now hosts, alongside the legendary names,

a selection of tribal work from Africa, Oceania and Alaska. Fittingly for an institution

started by one of the co-founders of Art Basel, Fondation Beyeler knows how to put on

a show for its anniversary. Already this year, there has been a major retrospective of

Georgia O’Keeffe’s work, followed by a summer exhibition dedicated to Piet Mondrian.

To round out the year, the Anniversary Exhibition (until 8 January, 2023) is the largest

presentation of its collection to date, including nearly 400 works by leading artists from

1800 to the present day. fondationbeyeler.ch

FACING PAGE

The Renzo Piano-designed

Fondation Beyeler in Riehen,

near Basel, Switzerland

94 NetJets


MARK NIEDERMANN

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ROBERT BAYER, BASEL

INSIDE VIEW

ABOVE

Paul Klee’s Wald-Hexen

(Forest Witches), 1938

96 NetJets


ROBERT BAYER, BASEL

ABOVE

Head of a life-sized

Malagan figure from

Papua New Guinea

BASEL AIRPORT: 7miles/11km

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JULIAN RENTZSCH

THE LAST WORD

PETER

KREINER

The CEO of iconic Copenhagen restaurant noma

on how he spends his rare, spare time

TRAVEL

Sun worshipper or thrill-seeker? I love a bustling city, but also

time in the sun to wind down. So for an ideal holiday, a great

city location with a rooftop terrace or similar is the best, and the

entire family is happy – both my wife and two children.

ACCOMMODATION

Grandes dames, luxe design, or eminently private? I have been

fortunate and stayed at some of the most unique and great

hotels in the world. For me, the decisive thing is if the place has

character and personality. When I say character, I mean great,

daring and impressive design. You know the place where you go

in, and just feel as if you have entered a completely new world.

And the personality is the human touch – the hospitality, the

small details. I love it when it all comes together.

FOOD

Top names or hidden gems? I can’t help it. I have to try the big

names – both for professional reasons, but also because I really

enjoy it when people are doing their best to deliver an experience.

That said, I have had a lot of amazing food experiences at very

surprising and unexpected places.

ARCHITECTURE

Classical or modern? Most cities’ character and architectural

identity are the result of classical buildings and monuments. But

I love how modern architecture can transform and build a bridge

between the old and the new.

ARTS

Still life or live performance? I love to go to concerts and will

go to as many as I can. One of my all-time favourite bands –

particularly live – is Depeche Mode. I have been to their shows so

many times and they keep delivering.

TRANSPORT

Fast lane or cruise control? I honestly think we are in a great

place when it comes to cars. The transformation to electric

vehicles allows for new and exciting designs, and I think that the

Audi e-tron GT is living proof of that. My friend Marc Lichte has

created a design masterpiece – and it drives like a dream!

FUTURE PLANS

Stay on the same track or planning new adventures? My track is

to create the new, so that’s me.

98 NetJets


when others see a

HOUSE

we see a

WORK

of

ART

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of property specialists are trusted advisors in the art

of connecting buyers and sellers of fine homes.

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Call Eleni Papadopoulou on +30 210 3643112 ext. 1213

The Eye of a Master, Mykonos

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and stunning sea and sunset views.

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