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Dominion Magazine - November 2022

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NOVEMBER 2022

The Latest Trends

in Crypto and NFTs

An AFFIRMATION

of the ARTS

Colette Holt and David Wood

Taste of DOMINION

Breaks Fundraising Records

GOLF

ART

CULINARY

HOME TOUR

AND MORE


Top 1

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T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com

5



NOVEMBER 2022 | VOLUME 9 ISSUE 11

The Graves Group

PUBLISHED By

Compass Creative Texas, LLC

428 English Oaks, Boerne, TX 78006

210-507-5250

The Dominion | 2 henly

WELCOME TO

THE DOMINION MAGAZINE

Dear Dominion magazine reader,

With a cover image like we have this month, I’m not sure about you, but I really wanted to

read more about Colette Holt and her partner David Wood. Colette is a world renowned

affirmative action attorney, and David is a professional drummer, so they obviously lead

pretty exciting lives! It’s a fascinating story of the adventures that brought them together,

their struggles and triumphs, and their future plans told to us from the comfort of their

beautiful Dominion residence. The diversity of the people is part of what makes the

Dominion so unique, but also the vibrancy and uniqueness of the vocations of its residents

always intrigues me, and we’re so proud to bring you this great feature story this month.

And I keep saying this in these opening letters, but it is so great to see the activities and

dinners and social groups getting back into a groove at the Country Club! Smiling faces,

high-fives, and finely dressed people enjoying the amenities is also a wonderful reminder

that our lives are continually returning to normal.

We’re working hard on 2023 articles and content and I’d love to hear more from you, the

readers! Have a neighbor with an interesting story? A friend at the Club that owns a great

local business? Someone nearby that is doing some great work in the community? We want

to hear from you! So much of our content comes from the residents and Club members so

please don’t be shy – simply shoot us an email and let’s start a conversation!

Welcome to November! May you enjoy the (hopefully) cooler temps, the wonderful

amenities of the Dominion, and everything that makes living in our area so wonderful this

time of year!

COMPASS CREATIVE TEXAS, LLC

CEO/PRESIDENT

Benjamin D. Schooley

ben@compasscreativetx.com

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Megan Smart

megan@compasscreativetx.com

SALES & MARKETING

Meredith Sturlin

meredith@compasscreativetx.com

THE DOMINION HOA OFFICE

20 Dominion Drive

San Antonio, Texas 78257

(210) 698-1232 | www.dominionhoa.com

THE DOMINION COUNTRY CLUB

1 Dominion Drive

San Antonio, Texas 78257

(210) 698-3364 | www.the-dominion.com

Sincerely,

wherever you

wanT To be...

BEN SCHOOLEY, PUBLISHER

The Dominion Magazine

The Dominion Magazine is published by Compass

Creative Texas, LLC in Boerne, TX. The Dominion

Magazine and Compass Creative Texas, LLC are not

responsible for any inaccuracies, erroneous information,

or typographical errors contained in this publication

submitted by advertisers. Opinions expressed do not

necessarily reflect the opinions of The Dominion and/

or Compass Creative Texas, LLC. Copyright 2021

Compass Creative Texas, LLC, Boerne, TX

Located on the 11th hole of the golf course,

this stunningly updated 6,482 sq. ft. home is

located in the original estates section of The

Dominion. The property sits on 0.65 acres and

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4.5 baths, third floor bonus room, indoor pool

and much more.

we Can GeT

you There!

Denise Graves

abr | CLhms | Crs | Gri

#4 Luxury reaLTor®

in san antonio

www.thegravesgroup.com

210.260.2176 | #wecangetyouthere

6 NOVEMBER 2022 T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com 7



CONTENTS

06 PUBLISHER LETTER 34 ART AND CULTURE

With a cover image like we have

this month, I’m not sure about

you, but I really wanted to read

more about Colette Holt and her

partner David Wood. Colette is

a world renowned affirmative

action attorney, and David is a

professional drummer, so they

obviously lead pretty exciting

lives!

12 TENNIS

Incredibly the season is upon us.

There are so many reasons to love

this time of year but ours centers

around Elf Louise. I started

supporting “The Elf” about 30

years ago and have loved all that

Elf Louise represents and how this

charity gives back to our great

city.

22 THE LATEST TRENDS

IN CRYPTO AND NFTS

Digital assets - such as

cryptocurrency and NFTs - have

grown significantly over recent

years. They have attracted large

sums of capital and interest

from both retail and institutional

investors.

16 40

24 - TASTE OF DOMINION

Thursday evening’s annual Taste

of the Dominion fundraiser event

for the San Antonio Food Bank at

the Dominion Country Club was an

enormously successful evening,

with more than 600 attendees

and culinary offerings provided

by twenty-six area restaurants

and caterers.

16 - AN AFFIRMATION OF THE ARTS

Colette Holt and David Wood

Having the privilege of working

with the Dominion magazine staff

these past seven or so years has

afforded me the opportunity to

meet, interview, and write about

a wide range of interesting and

eclectic people, couples, and

organizations. Colette Holt and

David Wood are about as interesting

and eclectic a couple as

you’d ever care to meet, and their

story demonstrates not only the

breadth of personal and professional

backgrounds living here in

the Dominion, but also the serendipitous

path that life can sometimes

send us down.

NOVEMBER 3-23. ART CALENDAR.

In the next few months, we are

asking local Real Estate Agents

about the current market.

This month we asked Miguel

Herrera of Miguel Herrera Luxury

Lifestyle Group.

54 - GOLF

24 54

30 - CIGAR BLOG

30

48 HOME TOUR

44

The past year and a half has

been hard on just about

everyone. Some have paid the

ultimate price, others have

lost loved ones, and even

the luckiest among us have

suffered.

36 REAL ESTATE

46 DAAG

Bitsy and Mimi are 5-month-old

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looking for a permanent home

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Early extension is one of the most

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swing. It happens when your

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ball on your downswing.

40 - CULINARY CROSSROADS

Nothing says cozy fall flavor quite

like the unique taste of maple

syrup. Most of us probably think

of weekend breakfast or brunch,

piled high with pancakes and

waffles, or that salty bite of bacon

dipped in the last remnant of

syrup on a sticky plate, but maple

syrup is so much more than a

traditional topping for sweet

breakfast treats.

44- GOOD READS

Colson Whitehead, author of

THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD, has

written another tale of racism

and abuse in THE NICKEL BOYS. He

divides his short novel into three

parts.

8 NOVEMBER 2022 T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com 9



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TENNIS

DEAR Santa...

Annual Elf Louise event at the Dominion Tennis Center.

By Cindy Exton, Tennis Shop Manager

Hello Dominion Homeowners,

Incredibly the season is upon

us. There are so many reasons

to love this time of year but ours

centers around Elf Louise. I started

supporting “The Elf” about 30

years ago and have loved all that

Elf Louise represents and how this

charity gives back to our great city.

Fortunately for me there is another

“Elf” on our staff. I asked Cindy

Exton to write the article this

month. If there is a more generous

and giving woman in the world, I’d

like to meet her! Cindy has been

managing our shop for the past 25

years and loves Elf Louise. Loves it!

“I know some of you are familiar

with the origins of our Elf Louise

event, but just like the story

of Christmas, its history never

gets old, and therefore is worth

repeating.

Once upon a time in 1969 a Trinity

University sophomore by the name

of Louise Locker gave a simple

Christmas miracle to hundreds of

children in San Antonio. It’s now

been 52 years since Louise became

‘Elf Louise.” Here is how it all began.

While watching the Johnny Carson

one late night the genesis of this

unconditional act of kindness

started. Mr. Carson was reading

letters to Santa from kids. That one

moment inspired Louise to go to the

Post office and volunteer to read

letters to Santa from children in the

San Antonio area.

The local Post office was more

than happy to let her sift thru

the thousands of letters they had

received. Louise read many letters.

There was one in particular that

caught her attention.

“Dear Santa,” the letter began. “I

know the only reason you’ve never

given us anything is because we

haven’t written.” Louise continued

to read in disbelief the letter from a

9yr old girl who had never opened a

Christmas present. She asked for a

tree for their house and a Bible for

her mother. She asked for a couple

of toys for her siblings and a little

something for herself.

Louise showed the letter to her

mother, who was as heartbroken as

she was. Money was scarce so Louise

and her mom pulled things from

their own belongings and wrapped

them up. Louise then reached out

to her friends and soon people and

strangers were handing over gifts.

When the manager of a Christmas

Tree lot learned about the Christmas

project, he provided the best tree he

had on his lot.

Then on Dec. 24,1969, Louise

and a friend dressed as Santa

delivered the tree and gifts to

that little girl and her family,

and to 200 other families that

night. Louise told all who were

aware of her efforts that they

knocked on doors, woke up

families, heard children scream

with delight.

“It was a combination of being

in shock and incredulous,” she

says.” Santa knew the names of

the children and the presents

they asked for.”

And so was born the Elf Louise

Christmas Project throughout

San Antonio.

Once again, this year on

Wednesday December 7th, we

will hold our annual Elf Louise

event at the Dominion Tennis

Center. We will invite Tennis

Pros from around San Antonio

to donate their time to put

on a tennis clinic followed by

a round robin. Lunch will be

served at the club. Everyone is

asked to bring an unwrapped

gift that we will take to the “ELF

North Pole.” If you can’t attend

but wish to participate, feel free

to drop off an unwrapped gift

at the tennis shop. Give us a call

at 210-698-2288 if you have any

questions.

12 NOVEMBER 2022



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FEATURE

STORY

An AFFIRMATION

of the ARTS

Colette Holt and David Wood

By Brian Swain

I started my own law firm and I’ve

never looked back,” she says. “That was

1994, and we’ve been at it for the past

twenty-eight years.” - Colette Holt

Having the privilege

of working with the

Dominion magazine

staff these past seven

or so years has afforded me the

opportunity to meet, interview,

and write about a wide range of

interesting and eclectic people,

couples, and organizations. Colette

Holt and David Wood are about as

interesting and eclectic a couple

as you’d ever care to meet, and

their story demonstrates not

only the breadth of personal and

professional backgrounds living

here in the Dominion, but also the

serendipitous path that life can

sometimes send us down. Colette

is an affirmative action attorney

with her own firm and David is

a professional drummer who’s

performed with some of the biggest

names in the music industry, all

of which makes challenging the

decision of just where to begin

their story. So, we’ll start in Chicago

because, well, why not?

Colette is a native-born Chicagoan

and spent her entire upbringing

in the windy city. Her mother

was from South Carolina and her

Nashville-born father was one of

the original legendary Tuskegee

airmen. Following WWII, Colette’s

mom became a teacher and her

father went on to law school.

With a background like that,

Colette’s future was more or less

predetermined.

“I always knew I was going to be

a lawyer,” she says. “I was both

an only child and a relatively late

child (my parents were in their late

thirties when I came along) and my

father started me on rhetoric and

the reading of great books at a very

young age. My education pretty

much became their main project.”

Discovering midway through high

school that she did not, in fact,

need a diploma to apply for college,

Colette decided to give it a go upon

completing eleventh grade. Her

original goal was to attend Barnard,

the female college of Columbia

University, but this ambition was

discouraged by her parents, who

weren’t keen on their only child

going it alone in New York City. So

instead, she “settled” for Yale in

New Haven, Connecticut.

“I was a member of one of the very

first classes of women at Yale,” she

recalls. “I studied philosophy, which

is an excellent background for law

school.”

Following her college graduation,

Colette moved

to Washington,

D.C., to work for

Alabama’s junior

senator, serving

as his legislative

assistant for

eighteen months.

With the loss of

the subsequent

election, she

opted to return

home to attend

the University

of Chicago Law

School, where she

studied with such

notables as future

Minnesota Senator

Amy Klobuchar

and future FBI

Director James

Comey. She lived

at home during

law school with

her mother to

save on expenses.

Following law

school, she earned

a position clerking

for 7th Circuit Appeals Court Judge

Thomas Fairchild for 2½ years, a

position she describes as the best of

her entire career.

Colette went on to take a position

with a large Chicago law firm,

Schiff, Hardin, and Waite, after

which she spent time as an assistant

corporation counsel under the

second Mayor Daley. As a result of

her by-now numerous connections

in Chicago city government, she

was offered a position as Chief

Operating Officer of the Chicago

Park District.

“After that stint with the Park

District, I started my own law firm

and I’ve never looked back,” she

says. “That was 1994, and we’ve

been at it for the past twenty-eight

years.”

Colette Holt & Associates works on

disadvantaged, small and minorityand

woman-owned business, and

affirmative action legal work, taking

on assignments all over the country,

including work here in San Antonio

for SAWS and city government. Her

role is less about actually serving as

legal counsel for clients, and more

about being an expert witness and

consultant.

“Our firm offers a two-for-one

benefit,” she says. “You get a really

experienced attorney who’s also

your technical expert on the subject

matter being discussed and debated

in the courtroom.”

Working out of her home office in

the Dominion provides convenience

and flexibility, particularly given the

significant amount of travel that her

position requires.

16 NOVEMBER 2022

T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com

17



FEATURE

STORY

“I’ve had the luxury of working

from home since our inception

(long before the rest of the country

was doing it because of COVID).

Not having expensive office

infrastructure allows me to offer

much lower billing rates because

we’re not paying for rent, insurance,

cleaning staff, and all of that

overhead.”

In addition to her legal work,

Colette points to politics as her

main lifetime hobby, so much so

that she has even run for public

office. “I was a delegate for Bill

Clinton in 1992. And I worked for

Barrack Obama’s campaign for a

while, who I knew from my Chicago

days. He’d been my state senator

in Illinois, and he had also been

a constitutional law professor at

University of Chicago,” where she

served as a trustee.

She’s been involved in a lot of

campaigns. The first was her

father’s (1964) run for alderman

in Chicago (he lost, no surprise as

he was running against the Daley

machine of the time). She also ran

for a delegate position during Amy

Klobuchar’s 2020 presidential run,

where she campaigned for the

Senator in Iowa. She recalls being

six years old handing out materials

in front of a voting precinct and

having a policeman approach to tell

her she was too close to the polling

location. “And I almost got arrested

for electioneering!”

Midway through our interview,

Colette was called away to take a

phone meeting with Chicago Mayor

Lori Lightfoot (all part of the job), so

David and I shifted gears and spent

some time exploring his altogether

different career path.

David hails from Kingsville, Texas

(a few miles southwest of Corpus).

He recalls his grandmother losing

her position as a high school

teacher over something called

the Sunshine Project, a teaching

initiative that required children

to play uncomfortable social roles

(e.g., minorities, war veterans, etc.)

that some Texas parents weren’t

supportive of. His grandmother

fought back against the decision

and the case went all the way to

the U.S. Supreme Court where she

won and was reinstated for the

final six years required to earn her

retirement.

David’s grandfather was head of the

health department for what was, at

that time, known as A&I University

(future Texas A&M). His parents

were young college students and

he was born in Wisconsin before

moving to Missouri around age five.

David’s life has been an itinerant

one (not just his youth, but his

career too, as we’ll discover shortly),

spending summers with the

grandparents in Texas and winters

on campus with his parents at the

University of Missouri. Later the

family relocated to Ottawa, Canada

in protest of the Vietnam War, with

David starting third grade there.

He would remain in Canada for the

ensuing ten years before entering

Ottawa University, where he spent

a single year before transferring to

Berklee College of Music in Boston,

Massachusetts (the move partially

motivated by the requirement to

pass a French fluency test in order

to graduate).

Jazz has been David’s passion for

a long time, with an uncle on his

mother’s side who played drums.

“I think my biggest influences

were my uncle and Ringo Starr,”

he says. “I really never wanted to

do anything else. When I was a

child, my mom put me in front of

Bernstein’s Young People’s concerts.

I have loads of treasured memories

of music from my youth.”

Of course, having been raised

largely in Canada, there was no

escaping a love of hockey, memories

of which David recalls with great

enthusiasm.

“I remember the Summit Series

like it was yesterday,” he says of the

epic 1972 8-game contest between

Canada and the Soviet Union. “I

was in fifth grade and I was able

to watch game six. Canada ended

up winning the series in the final

seconds of the last game with a

dramatic goal by Paul Henderson.

We had been down by two goals for

most of the game and I remember

Canada going crazy after that

victory!”

David first started drum lessons

in second grade while still living in

Missouri. But he only got serious

about it later in sixth grade, playing

gigs wherever he could find them.

“It didn’t really matter what kind of

music it was—jazz, rock, blues,” he

says. “I just wanted the experience.

I even wore lederhosen to play for a

polka band.”

David graduated from Berklee in

1982 and went on to spend a few

years gigging around the Boston

area before going on the road.

“I played with a bunch of oldies

bands in those days,” her says. “And

I made enough money to buy a bit

of real estate and have a secure

financial life.”

Throughout the ensuing twenty of

so years, David played with some

of the most notable bands and

performers in music, including

Frankie Valli, Ben E. King, and

enough others to have a wall filled

with photos of those days. He was

“It didn’t really matter what kind of

music it was—jazz, rock, blues,” he says. “I

just wanted the experience. I even wore

lederhosen to play for a polka band.”

living on Cape Cod at the time,

having relocated there to escape

Boston’s enormous cost of living.

But the politics of the area were

not to his liking, and he decided

to leave and set out on a few new

adventures, including a complete

hike of the 2,200-mile Appalachian

Trail that runs from Georgia to

Maine, a journey that took him six

months during the summer and

fall of 2017. He’s also run several

marathons and done a number of

fifty-mile charity walks.

“But nothing compares to the

difficulty of the Appalachian Trail,”

he says. “I was never so tired in my

entire life.”

Another pursuit David took up

during all those long hours on the

road was flying. He earned his

pilot license and he now serves as

Colette’s personal pilot, flying her to

and from jobs all over the country

in the couple’s plane. He has also

expanded his musical skill set in the

past couple of years by taking up

piano.

“A friend recommended that I

spend some time with Vivian Spy,

the pianist for the San Antonio

Philharmonic. I feel like my playing

is okay some of the time and

horrific at other times. Still, I’m

definitely getting more serious

about it and I’d like to maybe do

some gigging in the future.”

All of which gets us to the question

of how do an attorney from Chicago

and a traveling drummer from

Boston meet one another and end

up marrying?

“We met through a mutual friend

in California,” Colette says. “I had

moved to Oakland in 2011 for

another relationship, one that

didn’t end up working out. David

was in Berkeley visiting his dad and

the friend recommended that we

meet. I remember our first date

was five hours long and it was at

this Japanese restaurant with really

uncomfortable benches. It took a

18 NOVEMBER 2022

T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com

19



FEATURE

STORY

few days for my back to recover from

those benches, and it didn’t help any

that I had a couple of broken ribs

at the time from an accident in my

building elevator. David felt that our

first date had gone so well he wanted

to simply stay there in Oakland, but

I made him go back east to think it

over before committing to anything

too serious.”

In the end, things worked out well

and the two were married in 2019.

In November of that year the couple

decided there was nothing keeping

them in Oakland and decided to

come back to Texas. They began

looking in Austin, but David’s mother

recommended that they look in San

Antonio as well, which she described

as being a more interesting and

much less expensive option.

“I had been doing work in Austin

since starting my law company in

1994,” Colette says, “and I felt like

if you added twenty degrees and

guns, Austin was basically like Silicon

Valley. Around that time, I still had

a condo in Chicago and we figured

we’d split our time between Texas

and Chicago. We had also decided

during our search that we didn’t

want to live in a gated community; it

felt like the sort of environment that

wanted to keep other people out.

But then our realtor showed us

this house in the Dominion and

we fell in love with it. What we

discovered is that the people

here are, in fact, very warm

and inclusive (more so than

we had ever experienced in

northern California). I’m

still thankful that we were

moved in here before

COVID and the lockdown

that happened in early

2020. If we’d had to do

lockdown in Oakland, it

would have ended up

like The Shining! Our timing was

perfect.”

Given David’s musical career, it was

perhaps inevitable that the couple

would become closely involved

with the musical community here

in San Antonio, including the

symphony and all of the travails it

has undergone over the past few

years.

“At one point, I even considered

the possibility of doing percussion

work with the symphony,” David

says. “I reached out to the

organization’s head of percussion,

but nothing ever came of it.

Nevertheless, we’ve stayed close

with the symphony throughout

its difficulties. It was amazing to

watch the community really come

out to support the musicians. We

began talking with San Antonio

Philharmonic president Brian

Petkovich about how we could help

with the transition that was taking

shape earlier this year following

the bankruptcy of the original

symphony. Turned

out the biggest

near-term

problem

was that

all of the

symphony’s

instruments, printed music and

other assets were going to be sold

off as part of the bankruptcy. In the

end, we bought it all and donated

it back to the new organization.

All those scores with their

notations and history are critical

to the artistic success of the new

Philharmonic and we’re proud to

have been in a position to make

that level of financial commitment

to the group and to the city’s arts

community.”

Summing it up, David thinks back

on his long career of traveling and

performing.

“It’s all led to a great life and to

Colette and I meeting up. We share

an appreciation for the arts and for

culture, and that’s what attracted

us to each other. Thinking back on

my childhood, the idea that young

people in this city might be denied

the sort of opportunity I had to

appreciate music was just tragic. We

felt it was important to do what we

could to support the cultural life of

our city. As a result, somebody may

get to have that same experience

that I had in my childhood. It’s

crucial that the

community

embrace the

arts.”

20 NOVEMBER 2022

T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com

21



The Latest Trends

in Crypto and NFTs

Digital assets - such as

cryptocurrency and NFTs -

have grown significantly over

recent years. They have attracted

large sums of capital and interest

from both retail and institutional

investors.

Non-fungible tokens, or NFTs, are

tokens that represent ownership of

a unique asset - whether physical

or digital. NFTs are secured and

verifiable on blockchains, such as

Ethereum, and each of them have a

different value depending on what

they represent.

Bitcoin ($btc) and Ethereum

($eth) are examples of fungible

tokens because every token is

interchangeable, similar to a

commodity. These cryptocurrencies

are examples of fungible tokens

because each coin has the same

value as any other coin of the same

type at a given moment.

In short, if Bitcoin is the future of

money, and Ethereum is the future

of operating systems, then NFTs

are the future of digital ownership.

Together, they make up the new

decentralized world of Web3.

MARKET SIZE

Roughly 46 million people in the

U.S. own cryptocurrency (about

22% of the adult population),

according to the New York Digital

Investment Group.

In early October, the global

cryptocurrency market

capitalization was $980 billion,

down from $2.2 trillion at the same

time in October 2021, representing

a loss of about $1.2 trillion

according to CoinMarketCap.

22 NOVEMBER 2022

Almost $950 million worth of NFT

trading occurred in September

of 2022 according to DappRadar,

although in January this year it

was as high as $5.36 billion. The

market has cooled, however NFTs

are still selling, and the ecosystem

is expanding rapidly.

ENERGY USAGE

Critics have dismissed crypto

and NFTs over their alleged

impact on the environment,

but their belief is often rooted

in a poor understanding of the

technology. On September

15, Ethereum completed “the

merge” to a Proof-of-Stake (PoS)

consensus mechanism, dropping

its energy usage by around

99.95%. A consensus mechanism

is a standardized way of how

blockchain nodes - the computers

that run the blockchain and

keep records of all transactions

- reliably reach agreement.

Ethereum now uses less energy

than services such as PayPal,

Netflix, and YouTube.

While Ethereum is the main

hub for dapps (decentralized

applications) and NFTs, it’s not the

only blockchain that hosts them.

Polymesh ($polyx), for example,

also uses Proof-of-Stake, and

has been called the Ethereum of

security tokens, security NFTs, and

other regulated assets.

Energy consumption is a complex

subject. Even Proof-of-Work

(PoW) blockchains like Bitcoin

can be environmentally friendly,

depending on the energy sources

they use. PoW is a consensus

mechanism where miners solve

mathematical puzzles to prevent

anybody from gaming the system,

and record transactions on the

blockchain to earn crypto rewards.

Miners that use solar, thermal,

hydro, or nuclear energy can be

more environmentally friendly than

those that use fossil fuels. Crypto

mining is a much greener industry

than critics let on.

FUTURE TRENDS

Society will move toward further

adoption in the coming years.

NFTs will probably achieve mass

adoption first because there are

more use cases to bring new people

in. Ticketmaster, for example,

has minted over 5 million NFT

tickets already, giving fans a digital

ticket stub of sorts that can prove

attendance via the blockchain,

and can even provide fans access

to other gated content, limited

merchandise, future events, etc.

Future NFT growth will come from

NFT gaming and NFT securities as

the space matures. NFTs, as they

are structured today, have limited

capacity for what they can provide

to owners. In the future, security

NFTs will allow new use cases

such as fractionalized real estate

ownership and media rights, where

creators can fund movies, music,

video games, etc. and share the

royalties with their fans.

Regulation is one of the biggest

trends in the industry. The

White House has been urging

Congress for clarity around crypto

regulation. Appropriate regulation

is needed, while allowing thoughtful

innovation for crypto and NFTs to

flourish.

Several proposed bills and

regulatory frameworks have been

drafted, and when they pass, an

influx of institutional demand

will follow. Many of them have

bipartisan support, which is

monumental in today’s political

climate.

The Financial Stability Oversight

Council (FSOC), a collection of

senior U.S. regulators chaired by

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen,

wants Congress to pass multiple

laws to regulate the digital asset

industry. It’s not if, but when, and

many predict it could spark the next

bull market.

On the legislative front, there

has been a significant increase in

crypto-related bill proposals over

the last year, including Senators

Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) and Kirsten

Gillibrand’s (D-NY) Responsible

Financial Innovation Act, and

Senators Debbie Stabenow (D-MI)

and John Boozman’s (R-AR) Digital

Commodities Consumer Protection

Act of 2022.

The U.S. crypto industry will start

to look more like fintech (Financial

Technology) than the grassroots

movement it started as to create an

alternative financial system. If that

becomes the case, the U.S. could

become the world’s leading cryptofriendly

jurisdiction, propping up

the entire global industry with it.

Bored Ape #3989. Bored Ape

Yacht Club is a collection of 10,000

unique bored ape NFTs living on

the Ethereum blockchain and is

the most coveted NFT collection in

the world.

Mike Corradini has

successfully launched

numerous eight figure

businesses, developed

two private companies

that achieved Inc. 500

status, and has helped

over 2,000 entrepreneurs

develop, fund, and grow

their businesses. He

received his B.S. in Business

Administration at the

University of Southern

California, minored in

economics, and graduated

from the Lloyd Greif School

of Entrepreneurship.

Disclaimer: The author

is not an investment or

financial advisor and

nothing in this article is to

be construed as financial

advice. At the time of

writing, the author owned

BTC, ETH, POLYX, a Bored

Ape, and many other

cryptocurrencies and NFTs.

BIO

The global pandemic made me realize that my digital identity is just as

important as my physical one. As a result, I purchased a Bored Ape NFT

earlier this year. Bored Ape Yacht Club is a collection of 10,000 unique

bored ape NFTs living on the Ethereum blockchain and is the most coveted

NFT collection in the world. Bored Apes start in the low six figure range

and can easily reach over $1M, depending on rarity. Ownership has allowed

me to join an elite group of global entrepreneurs and has created instant

online status - akin to driving a lambo around in the physical world.

I’ve been trading crypto since 2017 and am currently accumulating while

markets are down from rising interest rates and global macro headwinds.

This type of market is when you typically make the biggest returns. I’m

also launching a Web3 startup, advise for an NFT project, and host monthly

meetups for Dominion residents on the second Sunday of every month.

You can contact me at mike@productmentor.com if you are interested in

attending.



Taste

of DOMINION

Breaks Fundraising Records

By Brian Swain

Thursday evening’s annual Taste of the

Dominion fundraiser event for the San

Antonio Food Bank at the Dominion

Country Club was an enormously

successful evening, with more

than 600 attendees and culinary offerings

provided by twenty-six area restaurants and

caterers. The event filled both the indoor and

patio areas of the club and included not only

savory offerings like wagyu beef bites, baconwrapped

dates, salmon and crème fraîche on

home-made waffle chips, prosciutto-cup hors

d’oeuvres with goat cheese and fig jam, and

delectable hot chili vinegar dumplings, but

numerous desserts as well, including awesome

butternut squash napoleons provided by the

club’s own kitchen.

“We are proud and honored to continue our

partnership with the San Antonio Food Bank,”

says newly inaugurated Dominion Country

Club General Manager Dave Marguth. “The

organization holds a special place in the hearts

of everyone in the Dominion community and

the restaurants put on a wonderful show for

everyone who attended.”

The event is one of the

Food Bank’s largest

fundraisers of the year.

“Taste of the Dominion

2022 was a record year

for giving back to families

facing hunger,” says Michael

Guerra, Chief Resource

Officer for the Food Bank.

The event is one of the Food Bank’s largest fundraisers

of the year, according to CEO Eric Cooper, head of the

organization charged with feeding more than 100,000

people each week (details of which were described in

last month’s feature article).

“The Dominion is an incredible community,” Cooper

says. “It has felt from the outset like the entire

community took up our fight. What started as a small

snowball has turned into a very large one. Now, we get

to showcase lots of area restaurants while also raising

significant funds for our organization. But even more

important than the funds raised are the relationships

we have developed with the families here.”

Restaurants on-hand included (but were by no means

limited to) Sari Sari Supper Club, Land Race, Moon’s

Daughter, Tardif’s, Bob’s Chop House, Piatti, and Acu

Bistro. Best Food honors went to Land Race (for their

awesome wagyu beef) and Best Display went to Acu

Bistro.

“Taste of the Dominion 2022 was a record year for

giving back to families facing hunger,” says Michael

Guerra, Chief Resource Officer for the Food Bank.

“The proceeds from the event will provide more than

400,000 meals for individuals facing hunger across

our community. We are incredibly grateful to all

the patrons, sponsors, and restaurants who gave so

generously.”

24 NOVEMBER 2022 T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com 25



26 NOVEMBER 2022



28 NOVEMBER 2022 T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com 29



CIGAR BLOG

A New

Cigar

BOOM

by Gary Gootman,

Managing Partner,

Elite Cigar Lounge

The past year and a half has been hard on just about

everyone. Some have paid the ultimate price, others

have lost loved ones, and even the luckiest among

us have suffered. The pandemic put normal life on

hold, but as we write these words in mid-June the outlook is

one of hope. The masks are coming off. People are emerging

from their homes. It’s time to take a deep breath and prepare

to once again live our lives the way we remember.

With so many negatives since March of 2020, it’s pleasantly

surprising to hear some good news—the cigar industry is

booming. Imports of premium, handmade cigars were up in

2020—despite a start of the year that shut down cigar stores

and cigar factories—and the first quarter of 2021 has been

nothing short of remarkable. Cigar sales are soaring at numbers

not seen since the late 1990s, with shipments up 47 percent in

the first quarter of 2021. In the darkest days of this pandemic,

people were looking for sources of pleasure and reward, and

that reward became a cigar. Those of us who already enjoyed

smoking cigars found more opportunities to light up, and new

cigar enthusiasts discovered that a handmade cigar is one of

life’s truly affordable luxuries. Show us something else that

costs $10 and delivers an hour of pleasure.

Any talk of booms brings us back to the last period of exceptional

growth in the cigar market, which began in 1993, right after the

launch of Cigar Aficionado. Thankfully, this boom appears to be

different than the ’90s boom, at least for now. The 1990s cigar

boom caught cigar makers by surprise and led to depleted stocks

of top-tier brands, a void that was filled by newcomers, many of

which made substandard product. If you shopped for cigars in

1995, 1996 or 1997, you might remember those times when you

couldn’t find one of your favorite smokes and your choices were

sometimes un smokeable. We don’t see that today—not yet—and

veteran cigar makers continue to respond to surging orders.

Sure, some small-production rarities are hard to get, but if you

walk into a cigar store today you will likely find a wide range

of choices, with a generally high quality of product, something

reflected in our blind cigar tastings.

As we return to normal, consider the things we’ve been denied.

Invite a group of friends over for a smoke. Meet your pals at one

of our Big Smokes taking place this fall. Or simply go to your

local cigar shop, pick out a great one, take a seat and join in the

conversation. The world is getting back to business. Let’s light up

and celebrate.

We appear to be in a new cigar boom.

30 NOVEMBER 2022 T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com 31



32 NOVEMBER 2022



ART AND

CULTURE

NOV 2 23

Dominion

2022

NOV 3, 2022 | 7:00 P.M.

NOV 5, 2022 | 7:30 P.M.

H-E-B PERFORMANCE HALL

TOBIN CENTER FOR THE

PERFORMING ARTS

Composer & Librettist: Ruggero

Leoncavallo Premiere Date: Teatro Dal

Verme, Milan. May 21, 1892. When a traveling acting troupe arrives to perform in a bustling

town, the secrets and jealousies among them threaten to explode onstage—with deadly

consequences. Performed in Italian with English translations.

NOV 19 | 6:00 PM TO MIDNIGHT

FROM THE TOBIN CENTER TO TRAVIS PARK

The Luminaria Contemporary Arts Festival is a free annual

nighttime celebration of the arts and artists who create

work that allows us to dream of our collective future,

boosts the city’s creative economy, and spotlights the rich

artistic culture that makes San Antonio unique. The outdoor

festival highlights film, music, theater, spoken word, dance,

fine art, sculpture, large structural installations, in-gallery

installations, digital art, performance art, and multi-media

throughout San Antonio’s downtown footprint.

The Luminaria Contemporary Arts Festival will take place from The Tobin Center for the Performing Arts to Travis Park. The

footprint for this year’s festival will be held at The Tobin Center’s Will Naylor Smith River Walk Plaza, the Radius Center, and

Veterans Memorial Park, taking over Jefferson Street from Auditorium Circle to Pecan Street.

NOV 22 | 8:00 P.M. NOV 23| 8:00 P.M.

JUDAS PRIEST

TECH PORT ARENA WITH SPECIAL

GUEST QUEENSRŸCHE

There are few heavy metal bands that have managed to

scale the heights that Judas Priest have during their nearly

50-year career. Their presence and influence remains at

an all-time high as evidenced by 2018's 'Firepower' being

the highest charting album of their career, a 2010 Grammy

Award win for 'Best Metal Performance', plus being a 2006

VH1 Rock Honors recipient and a 2017 Rock and Roll Hall

of Fame nomination. Additionally in 2022, Priest band members Rob Halford, Glenn Tipton, Ian Hill and Scott Travis will be

inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. No doubt, Priest will continue to storm their way across the globe spreading

their special brand of heavy metal throughout!

34 NOVEMBER 2022 T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com 35



REAL ESTATE

CURRENT MARKET Q & A

In the next few months, we are asking local Real Estate Agents about the current market.

This month we asked Miguel Herrera of Miguel Herrera Luxury Lifestyle Group.

Miguel Herrera Luxury Lifestyle Cell/Text Phone: 210-563-3660 Office Phone: 210-563-1772

Email: Miguel@MHLuxuryLifestyle.com

WHAT ARE YOU SEEING

HAPPEN IN KENDALL

COUNTY/BEXAR REAL ESTATE

CURRENTLY?

Clients are getting worried and anxious being

in a shifting market, but the reality is that we

are not in a collapsing market. We are merely

going back to normal and selling properties

within a 1–3-month timeframe which is still

better than pre-pandemic. I still see growth

and we still see a lot of buyers moving into

the area. We are definitely still in a positive

market in both counties.

LUXURY HOMES – ARE THEY

STILL SELLING AT THE SAME

INTENSITY?

The craziness is unfortunately over, so the

above market value offers are gone, however

we have not stopped selling. If the house is

priced correctly, it will get sold fast.

HOW HAVE INVESTMENT

PROPERTIES BEEN

PERFORMING RECENTLY?

There is still a demand for investment

properties, especially in the residential

rentals, which are rising in value and rental

price.

WHAT DO YOU THINK

HAPPENS NEXT FOR THE

MARKET?

We will go steady for about a year until

inflation is over and when interest rates go

down, the market will adjust and we will

continue assisting in the purchasing and

selling of properties.

IS THERE ANYTHING TO SAY

TO SOMEONE CONSIDERING

BUYING/SELLING RIGHT

NOW?

Do not hesitate to move forward. Houses are

still getting sold. Buyers are still buying.

36 NOVEMBER 2022



JASON GLAST GROUP

TRADITIONAL ELEGANCE

6 COTSWOLD LANE

SPECTACULAR GROUNDS

JUST LISTED IN THE DOMINION

6,976 SQ. FT. | 4 BEDROOMS | 5 BATHS

Located in the former Boerne Wine Company building

JASON GLAST

REALTOR ® | Attorney

210.386.1833

jglast@phyllisbrowning.com

JASONGLAST.COM

INTERESTED IN TOURING THIS ESTATE?

CONTACT ME TODAY



CULINARY CROSSROADS

Fall’s Favorite Flavor

Maple

by Elaine Perusquia

Nothing says cozy fall flavor quite like the unique

taste of maple syrup. Most of us probably think

of weekend breakfast or brunch, piled high

with pancakes and waffles, or that salty bite

of bacon dipped in the last remnant of syrup on a

sticky plate, but maple syrup is so much more than

a traditional topping for sweet breakfast treats. It

boasts a complex and unique flavor profile suited

to many different culinary applications. Maple

can be substituted for sugar in recipes, as well as

used in savory dishes. Maple syrup is a cook’s best

friend, especially in the fall, when

warm flavors sound so good

alongside cooler temperatures.

Speaking of cooler

climates, I was fortunate enough

to spend a week in New England

last month, and the colorful show

of fall foliage starring the sugar

maple trees and their cousins had

me in search of some authentic

culinary gold. Let’s stop right

here and clarify that we’re talking

about the real deal: pure maple

syrup, and not “maple flavored” or “artificially

flavored” anything. Nothing named after anyone’s

aunt, if you get my meaning, because those products

are full of high fructose corn syrup and simply lack

the complexity needed to complement food. Most

pure maple syrup bottles don’t even list ingredients,

but simply say pure maple syrup, because they

contain only one ingredient: maple tree sap.

There is a lot more that goes into making

syrup, however, than simply tapping maple trees.

For starters, trees need to be a minimum of about

40 years old, or 10-12 inches in diameter, in order

to tap. Many top producing maples age in at over

200 years old! A typical sugaring season in New

There is a lot more that

goes into making syrup,

however, than simply

tapping maple trees.

England lasts about 4-6 weeks, and begins in late

winter when pressure builds in the trees due to

fluctuating daytime and overnight temperatures.

When the sap starts to run, it’s all hands on deck.

It takes 40 gallons of maple sap to yield one gallon

of syrup, which surely accounts for pure maple

syrup’s higher price tag as opposed to its corn

syrup-laden impersonators. Sugaring season

comes to an end when the trees bud in springtime.

Maple sap is crystal clear and consists mostly

of water with approximately a 2% sugar content. It

is typically put through a reverse osmosis machine

to draw off a percentage of the water before being

placed in boilers. Stainless steel boilers sit atop

fireboxes, where either wood

or oil is used to create intense

heat. The sap is boiled until it

reaches 219 degrees, and is then

ready to draw off. Strict quality

standards must be adhered to in

order to sell at retail, and maple

syrup is closely monitored and

measured using a hydrometer

or refractometer. Achieving a

narrow margin of density and

sugar content is important to

keep the syrup shelf-stable

and prevent crystallization.

The world’s top producer of maple syrup is

Quebec, with 70% of the world’s output. Vermont

is the top US producer, responsible for 50% of the

maple syrup made domestically. Beautiful syrups

can be found all over New England, and even in

our local markets in the south. Different colors and

grades are available, but what distinguishes them

from one another? I wrongly assumed that darker

syrups were simply boiled for longer periods of

time, but the different colors and strengths of

maple syrup actually has to do with when in the

40 NOVEMBER 2022 T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com 41



sugaring season the sap is collected. Light colored

syrups are achieved with the first sap of the season,

whereas darker, richer syrups are made from sap

collected closer to the end of a sugaring season.

Lighter-to-medium amber maple syrups

are what we are accustomed to pouring over our

morning pancakes, and are also delicious simply

served over vanilla ice cream. Darker amber syrups

have a stronger flavor and intensity that works well

in baking, as the maple flavor carries through to

the finished dish. Cooking is all about balance, and

I often use maple syrup in acidic or savory dishes

to heighten a food’s natural flavor. For example, a

teaspoon of maple syrup (a little bit is all you need!)

in a pot of marinara sauce brings out the sweetness

of the tomato and helps soften high levels of

acidity. Maple syrup is the perfect sweetener for

baked beans, smoked meats, BBQ sauces, and

root vegetables. It’s hard to beat maple-glazed

roasted carrots or maple whipped sweet potatoes!

When storing maple syrup, be sure to

refrigerate or freeze syrup once it has been

opened. If left at room temperature, it can mold.

If your maple syrup develops mold, discard it.

Frozen syrup can be thawed and refrozen again

and again, but be sure to thaw completely before

use. When substituting maple syrup for sugar in

baked goods, substitute ¾ to one cup for every

cup of white sugar. For each cup of syrup used,

decrease the liquid in your recipe by two to four

tablespoons. Pure, granulated maple sugar (made

by evaporating maple sap until it crystallizes) can be

substituted one-to-one for white sugar in a recipe.

Even though maple syrup is technically

produced in the spring, fall flavors pair well with

its warm, familiar and unique flavor. Worth every

penny, I hope you’ll try using maple in some of your

favorite recipes, as well as inventing some new uses

for this culinary powerhouse, whether sweet or

savory. Maple syrup is great for so much more than

pancakes. Happy fall, and happy cooking, everyone!

Maple Pecan Oat Muffins

1/3 cup pure maple syrup

1 tablespoon brown sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 egg, beaten

½ cup milk

¼ cup unsalted butter,

melted

1 1/3 cups all purpose flour

¾ cup rolled oats

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

2 ½ teaspoons baking powder

1 cup pecans, toasted and

roughly chopped

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a mixing bowl, combine the flour,

rolled oats, salt, cinnamon, baking powder, and chopped pecans.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the maple syrup, egg, milk,

vanilla, brown sugar, and melted butter. Make a well in the center

of the dry ingredients. Pour the wet ingredients in all at once, and

stir until just combined. The batter will be thick and lumpy. Take

care not to over mix, or the muffins will be tough.

Grease a nonstick muffin pan, and fill each about ¾ full. Sprinkle

with a few rolled oats, and bake for 20 minutes, or until golden

brown. Let the muffins sit for five minutes, then remove to a wire

rack to cool. Serve warm with butter.

Makes 8-10 muffins.

Maple Mustard Glazed Baby Back Ribs

2 racks baby back ribs, rinsed and patted dry

2 tablespoons olive oil

kosher salt, pepper, and garlic powder

½ cup pure maple syrup

1/3 cup grainy mustard

Preheat oven to 225 degrees. Line a large sheet pan with heavy

duty foil. Rub the ribs with olive oil and season with salt, garlic

powder, and lots of coarse black pepper. Wrap each rack of ribs

separately in heavy-duty foil, sealing tightly. Place both racks

on the sheet pan, and roast for 3-3 ½ hours, or until tender.

While the ribs are roasting, prepare the glaze. In a small bowl,

whisk together the maple syrup, mustard, grated garlic, salt,

pepper, cider vinegar, and thyme. Set aside.

Even though maple syrup is technically

produced in the spring, fall flavors

pair well with its warm, familiar and

unique flavor.

2 cloves garlic, grated

pinch salt and pepper

1 tablespoon cider vinegar

2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves, chopped

Unwrap the ribs and transfer them to the foil-lined sheet pan.

Brush with the glaze and set under the broiler, turning and

glazing several times, until the ribs are sticky and browned. Let

rest for ten minutes before slicing. Serve drizzled with any extra

glaze. Serves 4-6

About the author:

Elaine Perusquia is a mother of two,

private chef, and a graduate of The

Culinary Institute of America. A long-time

food enthusiast, she is also a culinary expert

for the Skillr app for iphone. Follow her on

instagram at chefelaine.culinarycrossroads

to see what's cooking between issues.

42 NOVEMBER 2022 T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com 43



GOOD READS

Colson Whitehead,

author of THE

UNDERGROUND

RAILROAD, has written

another tale of racism

and abuse in THE NICKEL

BOYS. He divides his short

novel into three parts.

Part One introduces the

main character, Elwood

Curtis. He is a bright,

hopeful, black teen who is

captivated by the peaceful

doctrines of his hero Dr.

Martin Luther King. Life

in Tallahassee in the 1960s

is not easy for Elwood.

When very young, he

was abandoned by his

parents. His hard-working

grandmother gives him

loving direction and

encouragement. “She was

a slight humming bird of

a woman who conducted

herself in everything with

furious purpose.“ “Elwood

was slight-shouldered,

skinny as a pigeon and

worried about his glasses

which were expensive.”

Bad luck follows Elwood

as he hitchhikes to his

first day of college with

a car thief and ends up

at Nickel, a correctional

facility for boys.

Part Two expands on

life at Nickel. Elwood’s

belief that, “He will be ok

if he keeps doing what he

always did-act right,” proves false. He

ends up on the wrong end of a strap

for trying to stop an incident of bulling.

The horrendous beating at the “White

House” puts him in the school hospital

where he gets to know Turner, who

emerges as the second main character.

“He had a notch in his left ear, like an ally

cat that had been in a scrapes.” Turner

has an eerie sense of self. He plays chess

well, tells the best jokes and manages

to get Elwood assigned to “community

service” with him. They help deliver van

loads of cartons and crates from Nickel’s

kitchen stores. The food and supplies

meant for the black boys are sold to

establishments in town. The effect of the

excruciating beating and the unbearable

racism and injustices have a heavy

impact on Elwood. “Problem was even if

you avoided trouble, trouble might reach

out and snatch you anyway.”

One of the most dramatic scenes in

the novel is the boxing match between

a black boy and a white

boy. The black dorms

found the best fighter to

go against “whatever chum

the white guys put up.” The

championship would be

their sole acquaintance with

justice at Nickel. The combat

served as a kind of mollifying

spell, to tide them through

the daily humiliations.

Another highlight in this

quick-paced story is the

Nickel Christmas celebration.

“The students loved this time

of year, whether it reminded

them of Christmases back

home, miserable as they

were, or it was the first real

holiday of their whole lives.

For one morning they were

like boys from nice houses in

nice neighborhoods where

it was quiet at night and

nightmare-less.”

Part Three of the novel brings

some of the characters to

New York City and adulthood.

The scars of Nickel remain

not only on legs but in souls.

Life is still difficult but

success comes and love is

found. Whitehead provides a

satisfying twist to the end of

his powerful tale.

The lives of these boys,

though fiction, are based on

real incidents and factual

details which Whitehead

weaves together to create

a moving story. THE NICKEL BOYS is

based on Dozier, a reform school that

operated in Marianne, Florida, for 111

years. It’s sordid practices were exposed

by reporter Ben Montgomery from

the TAMPA BAY TIMES and forensic

anthropologist Dr. Erin Kimmerley from

the University of South Florida.

In excavating the school’s unmarked

graves, she discovered 55 children’s

bodies. The 2016 film DEADLY SECRETS;

CHILDREN OF DOZIER can be viewed on

Amazon Prime Video.

44 NOVEMBER 2022 T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com 45



DAAG

FUR-EVER SISTERS

Bitsy and Mimi are 5-month-old bundles of

optimism and energy looking for a permanent

home together.

Bitsy loves to be cuddled and is a pro-level purr-er.

She loves playing with toys of all kinds, including toilet

paper rolls and pretend mice, and, of course, Mimi.

Mimi is affectionate and super sweet. She is blind,

but does not know it, so acts like any kitten, fearlessly

zipping around chasing her toys and wrestling with

Bitsy. She loves to play in a box full of rustling paper

and with toys that make noises.

Mimi roams freely in her foster home, and loves

drinking from the bathroom sink faucet; she gets up

there—and down—all by herself. She comes when her

Follow us on Facebook!

www.facebook.com/DominionAAG

Dominion Animal Advocates Group (DAAG)

is a non-profit 501(c)(3) rescue group

that assists with lost and found pets,

and abandoned pets and feral cats in the

community.

foster mom

taps the floor.

Mimi was born

with tiny, nonfunctioning

eyes because

her mother had

not received

a basic vaccine and became ill while carrying

Mimi. Mimi will quickly learn her way around

her new home, but would prefer a home where

furniture and other items can be left in their

regular places.

Bitsy and Mimi are spayed, vaccinated, and

triple tested negative. Contact daagadoptions@

gmail.com to inquire about this adorable pair.

Dominion Animal Advocates Group (DAAG) is

a non-profit 501(c)(3) rescue group that assists

with lost and found pets, and abandoned pets

and feral cats in the community.

46 NOVEMBER 2022



HOME TOUR

10 MERRIVALE PLACE

Unparalleled craftsmanship! Located on a

3.33+- acre hillside lot this perfectly situated

home relishes the awe inspiring 180+ degree

Texas Hill Country views from every room!

This architecturally significant Dominion

home is one-of-a-kind, and was designed by

renowned architect, Roy Braswell, and built

by master builder, Image Custom Homes. The

finest appointments throughout are fit for the

most discerning buyer. Grandeur open living

space is appointed with vaulted ceiling, floor

to ceiling stone fireplace and opens to dining

room with doors opening to expansive covered

patio. Entertainers dream kitchen with Sub

Zero appliances, custom cabinetry, and large

center island with breakfast bar, is adjoined

by wet bar and separate caterers' kitchen with

extensive storage and secondary dishwasher.

Primary suite offers outdoor access with its

own covered patio and generous ensuite bath

boasting natural stone elements, multiple

vanities, built-ins, two closets, and soaking tub

overlooking serene private yard. 3 secondary

bedrooms are on the first floor, each with

their own ensuite bath and breathtaking views.

Spiral staircase leads down to entertainment

level with game room, bar, full bath, and pool

access. Impressive deep-water Keith Zars

pool offers spa, multiple water features, diving

ledge, and pristine flagstone decking providing

ample poolside living space. Private drive,

motor court, and three car garage provide

ample room for all your toys.

48 NOVEMBER 2022

T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com

49



HOME TOUR

10 MERRIVALE PLACE

7,676 SQUARE FEET

4 bedroom

5.5 bathroom

3 Attached Garage Spaces

50 NOVEMBER 2022 T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com 51



HOME TOUR

52 NOVEMBER 2022 T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com 53



GOLF

What is Early Extension?

by Doug DeSive, PGA, Head Golf Professional at The Dominion Country Club

PICTURE A

PLAYER B

Early extension is one of the most common

problems in the golf swing. It happens when

your pelvis works closer to the golf ball on your

downswing. In other words, you loose your spine

angle in the downswing and start standing up prior to

impact with the ball.

Player in picture A has great posture, note his

backside against the umbrella at impact. In picture

B he has come off the umbrella line which is early

extention. The players backside has come off the

umbrella and now his pelvis is closer to the ball than

it was at address. Problems

associated with early extension

include: Topping the ball, hitting

behind the ball, thin shots,

shanks and balls pushed to the

right (RH player) and pulled to

the left. The cure to getting

rid of the early extension would

start with reaching out to one

of our PGA Professionals at The

Dominion to guide you through

this common error.

Usually early extension is

caused by trying to hit balls too

hard. Your body will give you

the feel that harder is better

which isn’t true. Speed is great

as long as you don’t sacrifice posture which breeds

inconsistency. Here is an image for you to create in

your mind: Note Tigers spine angle in each picture

below.

Tiger Woods

In your practice time try to stay down in your posture

until after impact. Standing up after impact is natural

and is strongly encouraged.

Try to avoid looking like the picture below on the

right side.

54 NOVEMBER 2022 T h eDominion-M a g a z i n e.com 55



THE DOMINION MAGAZINE

428 English Oaks

Boerne, TX 78006

Prsrt Std

U.S. Postage

PAID

Permit #3217

Dallas, TX

EVERY

LUXURY

INCLUDED

10 MERRIVALE PLACE

TexasHomesSA.com/10MerrivalePlace

4 BEDROOMS | 5.5 BATHS

7,676 ± SQFT | 3.33 ± ACRE

LISTED AT $3,295,000

Matthew

Resnick

Exceptional Service With Results Since 2006

TOP 3 LUXURY

REALTOR® CITY-WIDE

210.849.8837 | TEXASHOMESSA.COM

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